College 101 - Winter/Spring 2023

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A GUIDE TO OHIO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES WINTER/SPRING 2023 Published in cooperation with Ohio’s Collegiate Purple Star Designation Helps Military Members and Their Families
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COLLEGE 101 • WINTER-SPRING 2023 3 The right education can boost your lifetime earning power by hundreds of thousands of d llars. Start now with a college education you can afford. $ tri-c.edu/startnow TOP RIGHT: COURTESY OF MIAMI UNIVERSITY; BOTTOM LEFT: COURTESY OF EDISON STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE; ALL OTHERS: ISTOCK CONTENTS CAMPUS NOTES 04 CAREER PATHS Your education journey may not be a straight line, and that’s OK 06 SAVING FOR SCHOOL Answers to commonly asked questions about 529 plans 12 STUDENT SUPPORT A new program helps military families and veterans 14 IN-DEMAND FIELD How schools are addressing the need for cybersecurity pros FEATURE 08 CAMPUS UPGRADES New offerings and features that are improving student life OH! DIRECTORY 15 COLLEGE GUIDE 12 8 14 6 For advertising information: 614-324-2594 Copyright 2023 by Great Lakes Publishing. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any means without permission of Great Lakes Publishing. All rights reserved. Great Lakes Publishing and the Ohio Department of Higher Education are not responsible for errors or omissions. All information is subject to change.

CHOOSE YOUR PATH

The journey after high school begins with a single step forward and a flexible plan that allows you to explore, experience and learn about what comes next.

The decision as to “what’s next” after high school can feel like a complicated map of roadways without directions. Planning for postsecondary education is a daunting process for many students and families, and every journey is different.

“There are lots of paths to choose,” emphasizes Dr. Cheryl Rice, vice chancellor, high-

er education workforce alignment at the Ohio Department of Higher Education. “I always say, the next step is what matters. It’s important to have a next step to keep you on a journey of learning, and it’s OK if it turns left or right. Just have that next step.”

Students routinely have a lot of questions. How will I pay for my education? Is a four-year

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college, community college, career/technical program or hands-on certificate right for me? The key is to begin the process as early as possible but also realize that it is never too late to plan for education beyond high school. Be sure to ask plenty of questions along the way.

“I remember as a first-generation college student, I didn’t want to appear like I didn’t know what was going on,” says Becky Harr, director of College Credit Plus, the state’s dual-enrollment program that lets students in grades 7 through 12 earn college and high school credits at the same time. “I tell my students, I went to college not knowing what the word ‘registrar’ meant. There is a lingo and language in higher education that was not familiar to me at all.”

TAKE ONE STEP AT A TIME

“A four-year education is not for everyone,” says Rice, adding that students should first consider their interests and strengths. What in-demand jobs are available in the market, and how might that impact your decision about education? For example, if technology is your

TEST THE WATERS … FOR FREE

From health-care courses to general education classes like advanced English and math, College Credit Plus lets students explore subjects while earning college credits in high school — for free. Participating community colleges and universities across Ohio offer these courses. Because some high school teachers are also adjunct professors, students can often pursue these credits at their high school.

“We often answer questions like, ‘Do these courses transfer?’ because parents want to know if it will save a student money, and typically the answer is, ‘yes.’ ” Harr explains. “If it’s an Ohio public institution that is participating, because we have such a large transfer network, most courses will transfer.”

High schools also offer Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate tests that can translate to college credits. Both types of courses require obtaining a certain score on exams. College Credit Plus is different because students are taking college courses and earning credits.

When you are choosing an educational-training pathway, it just means, what are you going to do next?

strong suit, knowing that cybersecurity is a hot field with thousands of job openings in Ohio alone could help you narrow your educational focus.

Also, consider what you want to achieve in a postsecondary program.

“Do you want a technical career where you can go to work, or do you want to go off to college to explore options?” Rice asks, adding that community colleges offer a way to test the waters and about 75% of students attending them live at home. “That way they can save for next steps, and if you are undecided on your pathway, it’s a great place to explore because you could start in a business track and end up in information technology, science or health care.”

Technical programs and hands-on certificates can help you get into the workforce more quickly.

“The four-year option can always come later,” Rice adds. “When you are choosing an educational-training pathway, it just means, what are you going to do next?”

Students in grades 7 to 12 can take College Credit Plus courses while also fulfilling high school graduation requirements. Some students have completed an associate degree and can move on to pursuing a four-year education after high school or go directly into the workforce.

“Take advantage of opportunities,” Harr says. “Whether it’s a tech credit or College Credit Plus — anything that is an articulated credit gives you a head start on your postsecondary education.”

ACCESS MONEY FOR COLLEGE

Every student should complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (referred to as the FAFSA), which unlocks federal, state and institutional grants and scholarships. Because funds are distributed on a first come, first served basis, the sooner you complete it, the better. Organizations like the Ohio Association of State and Financial Aid Ad-

ministrators and the Ohio Department of Higher Education offer no-cost FAFSA workshops for students and parents. The application and guidance can be found at studentaid.gov. (The application opens Oct. 1, 2022, and closes June 30, 2024, for the 2023-2024 school year.)

“Even for students who are unclear about whether they will pursue a fouryear degree or technical program, they should still complete the FAFSA,” says Tamika Braswell, director of financial aid at the Ohio Department of Higher Education.

Also seek out scholarship and grant opportunities through local organizations and community groups. Stay organized by keeping a list of scholarships and deadlines.

“If the student or parent is in a club, see if there are scholarships available. A parent’s job might offer tuition assistance for their dependents,” Braswell advises. “Look at those options early on.”

PUT YOURSELF OUT THERE

Harr says during her own college search, she initially thought she wanted to go to a large university in an urban center. She had her sights set on The Ohio State University and envisioned what she thought the experience would be like.

“I had the scores and GPA to be accepted, yet when I visited campus, I realized that a large campus was not the place for me,” she says. “Had I not been able to visit OSU’s campus as a high school junior, I do not know if I would have made an informed decision.”

Harr ended up staying closer to home, earning her degree at Shawnee State University.

“It’s so important that a student ‘see themselves’ on that college campus,” she says. “Many of my former students were able to make informed decisions because they stepped on various campuses for tours and presentations.”

Talk to guidance counselors about campus visits and attend college and career fairs. Even if a college fair is geared toward juniors and seniors, Harr says freshmen and sophomores shouldn’t be bashful about taking 10 minutes from their lunch period to talk to representatives from the schools.

“Take advantage of career advisers and counselors,” Harr adds. “Don’t be afraid to ask questions.”

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SMART SAVING

Ohio’s 529 plan is a tax-free way to set aside money for expenses related to education beyond high school. Here are answers to some commonly asked questions.

The average student-loan repayment costs nearly $400 a month — a hefty bill to face after earning a degree.

“Picture yourself in that position where you have worked hard to get a degree or credential, and for the foreseeable future, you have that much to pay back,” says Tim Gorrell, executive director of the Ohio Tuition Trust Authority that administers the state’s 529 plan. “And it’s often at the expense of retirement savings or maybe buying a home and starting a family. Those things fall by the wayside because of student-loan debt.”

With Ohio’s 529 plan, families can save for whatever comes after high school by growing tax-free savings that are also tax free when you spend them. You can start the plan once a child is born, but it’s never too late. Plus, the plan can be used to fund a variety of postsecondary options, including trade schools, certificate programs, apprenticeships and more. Here, Gorrell answers some common questions about Ohio’s 529 plan.

WHAT IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A LOT OF MONEY TO SAVE IN A 529 PLAN?

A lot of people are paralyzed by the enormity of saving for education after high school, but the key is to start. A minimum contribution is $25, and if you save that every month for 18 years, you’ll have some return. Even starting small and increasing your contribution as other debts are paid off or if your economic situation improves can make a big difference. As you see your investment grow, you might adjust your goals.

HOW CAN A 529 PLAN BE USED TO PAY FOR EDUCATIONAL EXPENSES AFTER SCHOOL?

Some families say, “I can’t predict what my child will use the funds for or what type of school they will go to.” But you can assume there will be something and it will cost, even if there are other funding sources like scholarships or gifts. Your

529 plan can be used for room and board, computers, books — any expense related to a program. A 529 can be used in combination with other financial resources. Plus, a new aspect of the program is that a 529 plan can be used to pay for apprenticeships and student loans.

WHO CAN CONTRIBUTE TO A 529?

Anyone can contribute. It doesn’t have to be parents, grandparents, aunts or uncles. We have a very easy-to-use gift-giving platform. We hear so often that kids don’t need more “things,” so maybe on a birthday or special occasion or holiday, a gift is a contribution to a 529 plan.

HOW DOES A PERSON WHO GIVES A GIFT TO A 529 PLAN BENEFIT?

Ohio residents who contribute to a 529 plan can qualify for up to $4,000 per year per account to take off of their taxable income. So, if you have two 529 accounts and max out the tax benefit, you could take an $8,000 tax deduction. It’s not a maximum contribution, just a cap for the benefit and it has unlimited carryover. So, if you go over the $4,000 contribution, you can carry that over to the next year, and this benefit is for any person who contributes to the account, not just a parent or grandparent.

To learn more about Ohio’s 529 plan, visit collegeadvantage.com.

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OHIO UNIVERSITY/ PHOTO BY BEN SIEGEL
Students work in the GRID Lab makerspace at Ohio University in Athens.

U P G R A D E S

CAMPUS

From new living spaces and improved athletic facilities to expanded food options and innovation labs, Ohio colleges are attracting students with outsidethe-classroom offerings.

Students mainly choose a college or university based on their academic field of study and the quality of the programs offered, but schools are transforming the experience of what living and spending time on campus means. Improvements in housing and state-of-the-art amenities like makerspaces and new athletic centers are selling points as well. Four Ohio universities share how these offerings are improving the student experience.

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Muskingum University’s Bullock Health and Wellness Complex opened a few weeks after the start of the 2022-23 academic year. This impressive 119,000-square-foot building offers an indoor field house for students, staff and faculty, but that’s just the beginning. Muskingum University president Susan Hasseler says that it fills a campus need, but more than that, it also serves the surrounding New Concord community.

“The complex came out of a visioning process,” she says. “We really needed an indoor field house, which was something everyone else in our athletic conference had. Our stadium was fully concrete ... and had reached the end of its useful life. And finally, our health science programs were just booming.”

Officials addressed all these needs with the Bullock Health and Wellness Complex, which is situated between academic and residential buildings on campus.

“We believe that academics are education, and athletics are too. Student life is part of education as well,” Hasseler says. “[This facility] pulls all three together.”

The complex’s main entrance lobby and concourse contains concessions and restrooms for spectators attending sporting events, as well as access to the upper levels and the outdoor concourse. The complex’s second floor houses a 200-meter regulation indoor track that rings a 60-yard turf playing field used by Muskingum’s varsity and club teams as well as by local high schools.

“We are providing a unique indoor track and field competition space for regional high school athletes as well as serving outdoor track and field and other community groups in our stadium,” Hasseler says.

The second floor also has fitness equipment and a diagnostic training hub. The latter is used not only by student athletes but also by regional healthcare professionals and students pursuing degrees in sports medicine and athletic-related fields.

“We are right now working with area health-care providers to provide diagnostic and clinical services to our community,” says Hasseler. “[Through] our growing academic fields of exercise science, nursing, occupational therapy, health and fitness programs, we connect our students with area health and wellness providers. ... There was a particular need for clinical space to bring all these

health students together and to serve our region with facilities and staff.”

The complex’s mezzanine offers an innovative amalgam of dual-use spaces. Just as the diagnostic and clinical services on the second floor double as classrooms for hands-on experiences, the mezzanine also has more than one use. The press box is a sports-communication lab. The stadium's hospitality suite is a classroom.

During athletic events, some spaces that overlook the outdoor field are used as media rooms and coaches’ boxes.

“This building was designed for every student, faculty and staff member on campus,” says Hasseler. “There is something in the building for everyone. ... I believe this facility contributes to this very positive spirit that we have on our campus this year.”

Front Street Residence Hall opened in the fall of 2018 as Baldwin Wallace University’s newest student living space. The mixed-use, four-story building in downtown Berea is a creative example of incorporating students into the town.

“We had an old dorm next to our Conservatory of Music,” explains William Reniff, chief financial officer at Baldwin Wallace University, who also oversees buildings and grounds for the school. “That dorm filled up because those music students practically live at the Conservatory of Music and wanted to be near it.”

Northeast Ohio-based DiGeronimo Companies approached the university about acquiring land adjacent to campus to build a mixed-use facility that would include both rooms where students could live and first-floor retail.

“We are not for profit,” Reniff says. “This mixed use meant the first-floor retail would keep it on the property-tax roll — still providing taxes to residents — with three floors of dorms above it.”

Baldwin Wallace University owns the dorms and leases space on the first floor for an open-concept Starbucks that connects directly to the college bookstore. Previously, Baldwin Wallace University’s only bookstore was on campus inside the student union. Now, shoppers on Front Street can pop in any time and grab a sweatshirt or ballcap to show pride for their local university. Other first-floor businesses include Dave’s Cosmic Subs and a U.S. Bank branch.

As far as the student living spaces, there are 17 doubles and 10 singles per floor (80 rooms and 131 beds in total), and Reniff says the dorm fills up quickly during the annual housing lottery.

Just as there is value in welcoming Berea residents into the university’s combination Starbucks and bookstore, there is also value in having students living in downtown Berea.

“Living on Front Street gets students engaged with the citizens of Berea,” says Reniff. “Businesses and neighborhoods seeing students who are well behaved and contributing to the community, that encourages people to say, ‘BW has nice students.’ ”

Miami University in Oxford hired Aramark Corp. to begin providing its campus dining services at the start of the 2022-23 school year — the first time the institution has outsourced food preparation and service since its founding in

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ABOVE: COURTESY OF MUSKINGUM UNIVERSITY; LEFT, DORM: COURTESY OF BALDWIN WALLACE UNIVERSITY; LOBSTER ROLL: CHRISTIAN G. WALLACE; COLAB: OHIO UNIVERSITY/PHOTO BY BEN SIEGEL

1809. The move benefits students by offering more meal options and a wider variety in how they receive them. It was brought on in part by the staffing challenges facing the food-service sector.

“To be able to have sufficient staff and the kinds of knowledge and skills and talent [necessary], it’s hard to recruit that, especially in such a rural location,” says David Creamer, Miami University’s senior vice president for finance and business services. “We had to ask whether we were able to sustain things going forward as we always had.”

Miami University students and faculty come from all over the world, and Aramark’s expertise offers more variety in meal choices.

“How do you make sure you’re offering the types of food that reflect their taste as well as what they’d like to experience from home? We can do that better with a national operator,” Creamer says.

Options range from food-court fare like hand-tossed pizzas and vegetarian-friendly grain bowls, to more traditional offerings such as salad bars and pasta stations. Students can also use the Grubhub app to order ahead from on-campus restaurants and pick up their food when it’s ready

“Aramark is [also] assisting us in creating a ghost kitchen,” Creamer says, referring to a restaurant that has no dining room, offering only delivery or takeout. “Students, faculty and staff don’t always have time to sit and wait on their food or eat in a traditional dining hall, so we’re offering them options and choices to better meet the flexibility they’re looking for from their dining program.”

Seven makerspaces at Ohio University in Athens offer students opportunities to imagine, innovate and create. These types of labs house a variety of tools and materials — from 3D printers to welding equipment and woodworking tools to sewing implements.

Students in Ohio University’s Russ College of Engineering and Technology have two makerspace options. The Stocker Center, which is staffed by a lab technician, provides the chance to weld, use lathes and work with milling machines. The Academic & Research Center gives Russ College students access to a two-story hangar and industrial crane. Students may work on large and heavy

projects in this space, as well as collaborate as a team for classes or competitions.

That cooperative spirit is an important part of the makerspace experience, says Paul Benedict, director of the Center for Entrepreneurship at Ohio University. Benedict runs the CoLab, which serves as a cross-disciplinary, central hub that welcomes students from all backgrounds and unites them in innovation and entrepreneurship.

“Our space is used in the curriculum, but also co-curricularly,” he says. “We’ve also got students coming in who may have no experience and students who are entrepreneurs, which is perfectly fine with us. My firm belief is that learning happens when you’re trying, messing up and fixing in a nonthreatening, safe way.”

Ohio University’s CREATE_space in Seigfred Hall houses equipment for audio, video, lighting and other artistic endeavors. Seigfred Hall is also home to artistic tools like a wood shop and a letterpress printing facility for students in the College of Fine Arts to work on projects related to their disciplines.

John Bowditch directs the Game Research and Immersive Design (GRID) Lab. It specializes in computer animation, motion-picture capture and other elements of virtual, digital and augmented-reality games and simulations. He sees the lab both as a way for students to learn more about a topic that already interests them or a way to try something new.

“Some universities make students get up to a certain level before they can experiment with things,” he says. “But I have found that inviting people in on the first day … it’s worked out well for us. It was something I wanted as a student and our current students appreciate it.”

Bowditch aims to connect students with creative tech work happening in the region, adding that industries have funded projects done in Ohio University makerspace labs.

“Our students come from all over the world,” he adds, “and our hope is they’ll join a company in Ohio or do startup work here.”

Benedict, who spent most of his career in startups or as an entrepreneur, agrees.

“In my experience, the magic happens when you have a collision of creative, scientific, engineering and business,” he says. “If any element is missing it can get pretty dull pretty fast. But if you can get all working, pretty amazing things can come out of it.”

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(Clockwise from opposite page top) Muskingum University’s Bullock Health and Wellness Complex; interior of a room at Baldwin Wallace University’s Front Street Residence Hall; lobster roll at Miami University; Ohio University’s CoLab

SUPPORTING THEIR SERVICE

Active-duty military members, veterans and their families at times face challenges in education that are specific to the sacrifices that come with serving our country. Some schools have a designated employee or office to help these students find resources or access military benefits.

In 2017, the Ohio Department of Education codified that help into a group of requirements and resources, and then offered K-12 schools the chance to apply for a Purple Star designation. The Purple Star indicates that a school demonstrates an ongoing and organized commitment to U.S. military members and veterans and their families. In 2022, colleges and universities became eligible to apply for Collegiate Purple Star status

“There are dozens of national rankings

out there for how military friendly your institution is,” explains Jared Shank, senior director of military and apprenticeship initiatives and special projects for the Ohio Department of Higher Education. “The majority of the rankings are not very helpful, because there’s not a lot of oversight of what they actually are and what the rankings entail.”

The Ohio Department of Higher Education co-created the Collegiate Purple Star designation with the Ohio Veterans Education Council, which drew up guidelines for what a military-family-friendly school should offer. (The color purple, a combination of red and blue, reflects the apolitical nature of the designation.)

As Shank explains it, the Purple Star program has several focal points.

“First and most important, there’s a point of contact in a physical office. That’s a huge help,” he says. “For the veteran or active-duty student, military spouse or dependent, that’s the office that handles their military benefits on campus, [such as G.I. Bill earnings] and can explain what the institution is doing for military-connected students.”

Second, Shank explains, veterans receive priority registration on campus, and the point of contact can help procure military transcripts for credit transfer. A veteran who has received Army training in electrical engineering can transfer that experience into credits. Someone who has served as a medic in the military has earned an EMT certificate.

“And third,” Shank continues, “at Collegiate Purple Star schools, service mem-

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Ohio’s Collegiate Purple Star Designation recognizes colleges that have resources in place to aid military members, veterans and their families.
COURTESY OF EDISON STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Javier Rivera (right) talks with Edison State Community College executive advisor Doreen Larson

bers and their families know they will have access to many benefits, such as a career-services person who is trained to translate military service into civilian language for jobs and internships.”

Purple Star schools also have a designated office or room that often turns into a place for college students to meet and socialize with fellow veterans or military family members, complete with coffee, snacks and often printers or computers for student use.

Edison State Community College in Piqua is one of 33 schools to receive the inaugural Collegiate Purple Star designation in Ohio. Joe Ratermann, the college’s career pathways advisor and veteran services specialist, says the school jumped at the chance.

“Edison State Community College, like many other Ohio schools, already had many of these programs in place,” he says. “What the Purple Star did, however, was give educational institutions the opportunity to memorialize many of the things they were doing already, and clearly and concisely develop policies to ensure the continuation of the delivery of those services.”

Javier Rivera is a student at Edison State Community College who is studying cybersecurity on his way to an associate degree in applied business and eventually a bachelor’s degree in applied business for cybersecurity. Rivera served in the United States Marine Corps for five years. Having spent one year at Edison State before the Collegiate Purple

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Star designation was available, Rivera says he has noticed a difference since the school received the designation.

“A few of the services have been amplified and highlighted,” he says. “More students seem more comfortable approaching and seeking, knowing about services they didn’t know before — stuff they never considered would have been an option. We can go to the office and see what’s available and know that Joe is a point of contact if we have a question.”

Ratermann, who himself is a veteran who served eight years in the Marines and 14 in the Army, is proud of his work with Edison State Community College’s veterans and their families as part of the Purple Star program.

“We wanted to be a part of this,” he says, “because we believe that after veterans have provided service and sacrifice to their country, it’s our opportunity to reciprocate and provide outstanding service and opportunity for those who defend our nation and their families.”

To learn more about the program, visit highered.ohio.gov and enter “Collegiate Purple Star” into the search box.

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"We believe that after veterans have provided service and sacrifice to their country, it’s our opportunity to reciprocate and provide outstanding service and opportunity for those who defend our nation and their families.”
— Joe Ratermann Edison State Community College

A SECURE FUTURE

act to create an issue for their employer. Then, there is the keyboarding side, which includes programming, networking, securing and problem solving.

“A lot of cybersecurity jobs have nothing to do with hands on a keyboard,” Michael says.

The Ohio Cyber Range Institute partners with the National Security Agency and the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency, participating in national programs, competitions and workshops. The school is also involved with the National Security Agency and National Science Foundation grant program GenCyber that offers free camps across the country.

Students in high school can begin exploring cybersecurity and earn college credit through the College Credit Plus program or if their school is connected to the University of Cincinnati School of Information Technology Early IT program.

“That is where they can earn the first year of the bachelor in cybersecurity for free at their high school,” Michael says.

There’s a significant skills gap hindering employers’ ability to grow, and it’s also creating a national security issue. There are currently 769,000 cybersecurity job openings in the United States and more than 18,000 opportunities in Ohio alone, according to CyberSeek (cyberseek.org), a project of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

“The internet was built for sharing, not for security,” says Rebekah Michael, co-director and executive staff director for the Ohio Cyber Range Institute at the University of Cincinnati. The institute is a collaborative network that supports cybersecurity programs across Ohio.

Many high school students don’t realize cybersecurity is a job option, but it is a multidisciplinary field that involves social engineering, psychology, networking, programming, policy and law.

“Once students find out how flexible a career in cybersecurity is, they realize they can blossom and choose their path,” Michael says.

The University of Cincinnati initially offered cybersecurity as part of an in-

formation technology program that includes data tech, software, networking and gaming/simulation. Today, the school offers a Bachelor of Science degree in information technology, a Master of Science degree in information technology with a cybersecurity focus and a Ph.D. in information technology with a cybersecurity focus.

Courses include covering the defensive side of cybersecurity. Students learn how computer systems work and how communication pathways are exploited.

“We cover adversarial thinking, and students also take courses in our School of Public and International Affairs, so they learn about law and get that cross-pollination and different skill sets,” says Ryan Moore, lead educator for the Ohio Cyber Range Institute.

“One of the classes students love the most is the ethical hacking course — it’s exciting [for them] to see how computers can be manipulated,” Moore adds.

As for the psychology side, cybersecurity involves identifying social patterns like how a disgruntled employee might

The school also offers a free, two-week high school summer camp that includes cybersecurity, along with programming and networking. With so many openings in the field, Michael and Moore say students pursuing an IT degree often go back to school for the cybersecurity training when they could start it and enter the workforce sooner.

“We need to get the word out to middle and high school students,” Michael says.

LEARN MORE

Students with questions about careers in cybersecurity can find out more here:

cyberseek.org GenCyber gen-cyber.com Ohio Cyber Range Institute ohiocyberrangeinstitute.org University of Cincinnati Cybersecurity and IT programs cech.uh.edu/schools/it.html

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The nation faces a demand for cybersecurity professionals, and students can begin exploring the range of career options available before they leave high school.
BY KRISTEN HAMPSHIRE
CyberSeek
OH! DIRECTORY CONTACT GUIDE TO OHIO COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES *Supporters of College 101 are highlighted. THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES

Air Force Institute of Technology

Wright-Patterson AFB • afit.edu

937-255-6565

The University of Akron Akron • uakron.edu

330-972-7111

admissions@uakron.edu

Lakewood Campus lakewood.uakron.edu

216-221-1141 • jlb9@uakron.edu

Medina County University Center uakron.edu/mcuc

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Wayne College

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330-683-2010 or 800-221-8308 wayneadmissions@uakron.edu

Bowling Green State University

Bowling Green • bgsu.edu

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Firelands College

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Central State University Wilberforce • centralstate.edu

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University of Cincinnati Cincinnati • uc.edu

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Blue Ash College

ucblueash.edu

513-558-9495 or 513-558-9998 admissions@ucblueash.edu

Clermont College

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866-446-2822 or 513-556-5400 clermont.admissions@uc.edu

Cleveland State University

Cleveland • csuohio.edu

888-278-6446 or 216-687-5411 admissions@csuohio.edu

Kent State University

Kent • kent.edu

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Ashtabula Campus kent.edu/ashtabula

440-964-3322 or 440-964-4217 ashtabula_admissions@kent.edu

East Liverpool Campus

kent.edu/columbiana

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Geauga Campus

Burton • kent.edu/geauga

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Stark Campus

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Trumbull Campus

Warren • kent.edu/trumbull

330-847-0571 or 330-675-8860 trumbullinfo@kent.edu

Tuscarawas Campus New Philadelphia • kent.edu/tusc

330-339-3391 • infotusc@kent.edu

Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine

Independence • kent.edu/cpm

800-238-7903 or 216-231-3300 podiatry@kent.edu

Miami University

Oxford • miamioh.edu

513-529-1809 or 513-529-2531 admission@miamioh.edu

Hamilton Campus miamioh.edu/regionals

513-785-3000 or 513-785-3111 muradmission@miamioh.edu

Middletown Campus

muradmission@miamioh.edu

513-727-3200 or 513-727-3216 muregionalsadmission@miamioh.edu

Voice of America Learning Center West Chester • miamioh.edu/ regionals

513-895-8862 • voalc@miamioh.edu

Northeast Ohio Medical University

Rootstown • neomed.edu

800-686-2511 or 330-325-6270 admission@neomed.edu

The Ohio State University

Columbus • osu.edu

614-292-6446 or 614-292-3980 askabuckeye@osu.edu

Agricultural Technical Institute

Wooster • ati.osu.edu

330-287-1331 or 330-287-1327 ati@osu.edu

Lima Campus lima.osu.edu

567-242-7272 or 567-242-7500 lima-askabuckeye@osu.edu

Mansfield Campus mansfield.osu.edu

419-755-4317 or 419-755-4300 mansfield-askabuckeye@osu.edu

Marion Campus askmarion@osu.edu

740-389-6786 or 614-292-9133 or 740-725-6242

Newark Campus newark.osu.edu

740-366-9934 or 740-366-9333 newark-askabuckeye@osu.edu

Ohio University

Athens • ohio.edu

740-593-1000 or 740-593-4100 admissions@ohio.edu

Chillicothe Campus ohio.edu/chillicothe

740-774-7200 or 740-774-7241 admissions@ohio.edu

Eastern Campus

St. Clairsville • ohio.edu/eastern 740-695-1720 or 740-699-2536 admissions@ohio.edu

Lancaster Campus ohio.edu/lancaster

740-654-6711 • lancaster@ohio.edu

Southern Campus

Ironton • ohio.edu/southern 740-533-4600 admissions@ohio.edu

Zanesville Campus

ohio.edu/zanesville

740-453-0762 or 740-588-1439 ouzservices@ohio.edu

Shawnee State University

Portsmouth • shawnee.edu

740-351-3205 or 740-351-4778 to_ssu@shawnee.edu

University of Toledo

Toledo • utoledo.edu

800-586-5336 or 419-530-8888 enroll@utoledo.edu

Wright State University

Dayton • wright.edu

800-247-1770 or 937-775-5700 admissions@wright.edu

Lake Campus

Celina • lake.wright.edu

800-237-1477 or 419-586-0300 admissions@wright.edu

Youngstown State University

Youngstown • ysu.edu

877-468-6978 or 330-941-3000 enroll@ysu.edu

COMMUNITY COLLEGES

Belmont College

St. Clairsville • belmontcollege.edu

740-695-9500 or 740-695-8516

Harrison County Center

Cadiz • 740-695-9500

Monroe County Center

Woodsfield • 740-695-9500

Swiss Hills Career Center Woodsfield • 740-695-9500

Central Ohio Technical College

Newark • cotc.edu

740-366-9722

cotcadmissions@mail.cotc.edu

Coshocton Campus

740-622-1408

Knox Campus Mount Vernon • 740-392-2526

Pataskala Campus

740-755-7090

Cincinnati State Technical and Community College

Cincinnati • cincinnatistate.edu

513-569-1500 or 877-569-0115 or 513-861-7700

adm@cincinnatistate.edu

Middletown Campus

513-299-8339

Workforce Development Center

Evendale • 513-569-1643

askwdc@cincinnatistate.edu

Evendale • 513-569-4970

Clark State College

Springfield • clarkstate.edu

937-328-6028

admissions@clarkstate.edu

Beavercreek Campus

937-429-8819

greenecenter@clarkstate.edu

Bellefontaine Campus

16 COLLEGE 101 • WINTER-SPRING 2023

937-599-7602

bellefontaine@clarkstate.edu

Xenia Campus

937-431-7171

xenia@clarkstate.edu

Columbus State Community College

Columbus • cscc.edu

800-621-6407 or 614-287-5353

information@cscc.edu

Delaware Campus

740-203-8345

delaware@cscc.edu

Cuyahoga Community College

Cleveland • tri-c.edu

800-954-8742 or 216-987-6000

Advanced Technology Training Center

Cleveland • 216-987-6000

Brunswick University Center

866-933-5182 or 216-987-3997

Corporate College East

Warrensville Heights 216-987-2800

Corporate College West

Westlake • 216-987-5900

Eastern Campus Highland Hills • 216-987-6000

Hospitality Management Center

Cleveland • 866-933-5181

Manufacturing Technology Center

Cleveland • 216-987-3075

Metropolitan Campus Cleveland • 216-987-6000

Public Safety Training Center

Parma Heights

Basic Police: 216-987-3076

Emergency Medical Services Training: 216-987-4449

Fire Training: 216-987-5076

Fire Advanced: 216-987-5429

Law Enforcement Advanced: 216-987-3033

Private Security: 216-987-3037

privatesecurity@tri-c.edu

Transportation Innovation Center

Euclid • 216-987-3226

Western Campus

Parma • 216-987-6000

Westshore Campus

Westlake • 216-987-3885

Eastern Gateway Community College

Steubenville • egcc.edu

800-682-6553 or 740-264-5591

info@egcc.edu

Youngstown Campus

330-480-0726

Edison State Community College

Piqua • edisonohio.edu

937-778-8600

admission@edisonohio.edu

Darke County Campus

Greenville • 937-548-5546 or 937-778-7890

Troy Campus Troy • 937-381-1525

Hocking College

Nelsonville • hocking.edu

877-462-5464 or 740-753-7050

admissions@hocking.edu

Perry Campus

New Lexington • 740-342-3337 or 866-427-3779

admissions@hocking.edu

Lakeland Community College

Kirtland • lakelandcc.edu

440-525-7000 or 440-525-7100 admissions@lakelandcc.edu

Lorain County Community College

Elyria • lorainccc.edu

800-995-5222 or 440-365-5222 info@lorainccc.edu

Community Learning Center at Lorain High School

440-233-2302

Lorain Learning Center at City Center

440-366-4500 or 800-995-5222 ext. 4500

University Partnership Ridgeville Campus

440-366-4800

Wellington Center

800-995-5222 ext. 1776 or 440-647-1776 wellington@lorainccc.edu

Marion Technical College

Marion • mtc.edu

740-389-4636 • enroll@mtc.edu

North Central State College

Mansfield • ncstatecollege.edu

888-755-4899 or 419-755-4800 admissions@ncstatecollege.edu

Northwest State Community College

Archbold • northweststate.edu

855-267-5511 or 419-267-5511 admissions@northweststate.edu

Advanced Manufacturing Training Center

Toledo • trainwithcts.com

419-267-1332

Vantage Career Center Van Wert • trainwithcts.com

419-238-5411

Owens Community College

owens.edu • 567-661-6000

Findlay Campus

567-661-7777

Toledo Campus

Perrysburg • 567-661-7000

Center for Emergency Preparedness Walbridge • 567-661-7600

Rhodes State College

Lima • rhodesstate.edu

419-995-8320 or 419-995-8000 enroll@rhodesstate.edu

Rio Grande Community College

Rio Grande • rio.edu

800-282-7201 or 740-245-7208 admissions@rio.edu

Sinclair Community College Dayton • sinclair.edu

800-315-3000 or 937-512-3675 info@sinclair.edu or admissions@sinclair.edu

Centerville Campus

937-512-2363

Englewood Campus

937-836-8750

Huber Heights Campus

937-233-5550

Mason Campus

513-339-1212 mason@sinclair.edu

Wright-Patterson AFB Center mfec@sinclair.edu

Southern State Community College Hillsboro • sscc.edu

937-393-3431 or 800-628-7722 ext. 2607 info@sscc.edu

Brown County Campus Mt. Orab • 937-393-3431 amcclellan@sscc.edu

Fayette Campus Washington Court House 937-393-3431

jwise@sscc.edu

Stark State College

North Canton • starkstate.edu

330-494-6170

admissions@starkstate.edu

Akron Campus 330-494-6170 ext. 4670 akron@starkstate.edu

Downtown Canton Satellite Center 330-494-6170 ext. 4138 cputman@starkstate.edu

Terra State Community College

Fremont • terra.edu

866-288-3772 or 419-334-8400 admissions@terra.edu

Washington State Community College

Marietta • wscc.edu

740-374-8716 or 740-568-1900 ext. 1410 admissions@wscc.edu

Zane State College

Zanesville • zanestate.edu

740-588-5000 • hello@zanestate.edu

INDEPENDENT

COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES

NOT-FOR-PROFIT, PRIVATE

Allegheny Wesleyan College Salem • awc.edu

330-337-6403 receptionist@awc.edu

Antioch University Graduate School of Leadership and Change Yellow Springs • antioch.edu

937-769-1800 or 937-769-1340 admissions.glsc@antioch.edu

Antioch University Midwest Yellow Springs • midwest.antioch.edu

877-800-9446 or 937-769-1340 admissions.aum@antioch.edu

Art Academy of Cincinnati Cincinnati • artacademy.edu

800-323-5692 or 513-562-6262 admissions@artacademy.edu

Ashland University

Ashland • ashland.edu

800-882-1548 or 419-289-4142 enrollme@ashland.edu (undergrad), grad-admissions@ashland.edu

The Athenaeum of Ohio Cincinnati • athenaeum.edu

513-231-2223 or 513-231-6116 admissions@mtsm.org

Aultman College

Canton • aultmancollege.edu

330-363-6347 recruiter@aultmancollege.edu

COLLEGE 101 • WINTER-SPRING 2023 17

Baldwin Wallace University

Berea • bw.edu

440-826-2900 or 440-826-2222 info@bw.edu or admission@bw.edu

Bluffton University

Bluffton • bluffton.edu

800-488-3257 or 419-358-3000 or 419-358-3257 admissions@bluffton.edu

Capital University

Columbus • capital.edu

614-236-6101 admission@capital.edu

Trinity Lutheran Seminary capital.edu/trinity

614-236-6856 tlsadmissions@capital.edu

Case Western Reserve University

Cleveland • case.edu

216-368-2000 or 216-368-4450 admission@case.edu

Cedarville University

Cedarville • cedarville.edu

800-233-2784 or 937-766-7700 admissions@cedarville.edu

Chatfield College chatfield.edu

St. Martin Campus

513-875-3344

Cincinnati Campus

513-921-9856

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Cincinnati • thechristcollege.edu

513-585-2401

admissions@thechristcollege.edu

Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science

Cincinnati • ccms.edu

888-377-8433 or 513-761-2020 admissions@ccms.edu

Cleveland Institute of Art Cleveland • cia.edu

800-223-4700 or 216-421-7418 admissions@cia.edu

Cleveland Institute of Music Cleveland • cim.edu

216-791-5000 or 216-795-3107 admission@cim.edu

The College of Wooster Wooster • wooster.edu

330-263-2322 or 330-263-2000 admissions@wooster.edu

Columbus College of Art & Design Columbus • ccad.edu

614-224-9101 or 614-222-3261 admissions@ccad.edu

Defiance College

Defiance • defiance.edu

800-520-4632 or 419-783-2359 admissions@defiance.edu

Denison University

Granville • denison.edu

740-587-0810 or 740-587-6276 admission@denison.edu

Firelands School of Nursing

Sandusky • firelands.com

419-557-7110 schoolofnursing@firelands.com

Franciscan University of Steubenville

Steubenville • franciscan.edu

800-783-6220 or 740-283-3771 admissions@franciscan.edu

Franklin University

Columbus • franklin.edu

877-341-6300 or 614-797-4700 admissions@franklin.edu

God’s Bible School and College

Cincinnati • gbs.edu

513-721-7944 • info@gbs.edu

Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science

Cincinnati • gscollege.edu

513-862-2631 admissions@email.gscollege.edu

Heidelberg University

Tiffin • heidelberg.edu

800-434-3352 or 419-448-2330 admission@heidelberg.edu

Hiram College

Hiram • hiram.edu

330-569-3211 or 800-362-5280 admission@hiram.edu

John Carroll University University Heights • jcu.edu

888-335-6800 or 216-397-4294 admission@jcu.edu

Kenyon College

Gambier • kenyon.edu

800-848-2468 or 740-427-5776 admissions@kenyon.edu

Kettering College

Kettering • kc.edu

937-395-8601 or 937-395-8628 admissions@kc.edu

Lake Erie College

Painesville • lec.edu

440-375-7050 • admission@lec.edu

Lakewood University

Cleveland Heights lakewood.edu

800-517-0857 • info@lakewood.edu

Lourdes University

Sylvania • lourdes.edu

800-878-3210 or 419-885-5291 luadmits@lourdes.edu

Malone University Canton • malone.edu

800-521-1146 or 330-471-8145 admissions@malone.edu

Marietta College

Marietta • marietta.edu

800-331-7896 or 740-376-4600 admit@marietta.edu

Mercy College of Ohio

Toledo • mercycollege.edu

888-806-3729 or 419-251-1313 admissions@mercycollege.edu

Youngstown Campus

330-480-5374

Methodist Theological School in Ohio Delaware • mtso.edu

800-333-6876 or 740-363-1146 admissions@mtso.edu

Mount Carmel College of Nursing

Columbus • mccn.edu

614-234-5800 or 614-234-4266 admissions@mccn.edu

Lancaster Campus

740-689-6675

Mount St. Joseph University

Cincinnati • msj.edu

800-654-9314 or 513-244-4531 admission@msj.edu

Mount Vernon Nazarene University

Mount Vernon • mvnu.edu

740-397-9000 or 740-392-6868 admissions@mvnu.edu

Muskingum University

New Concord • muskingum.edu

740-826-8137 or 740-826-8211 admission@muskingum.edu

Notre Dame College

South Euclid • notredamecollege.edu

877-632-6446 or 216-381-1680 admissions@ndc.edu

Nyskc University

Seville • nyskcedu.org

330-975-4302 admissions@nyskcedu.org

Oberlin College

Oberlin • oberlin.edu

800-622-6243 or 440-775-8413 college.admissions@oberlin.edu or conservatory.admissions@oberlin.edu

Ohio Christian University Circleville • ohiochristian.edu

844-726-7937 or 877-762-8669 enroll@ohiochristian.edu

Ohio Dominican University

Columbus • ohiodominican.edu

800-955-6446 or 614-251-4500 admission@ohiodominican.edu

Ohio Northern University

Ada • onu.edu

888-408-4668 or 419-772-2000 admissions-ug@onu.edu

Ohio Wesleyan University

Delaware • owu.edu

800-922-8953 or 740-368-3020 owuadmit@owu.edu

Otterbein University

Westerville • otterbein.edu

614-890-3000 or 614-823-1500 uotterb@otterbein.edu

Payne Theological Seminary

Wilberforce • payneseminary.edu 937-971-2867 admissions@payneseminary.edu

Pontifical College Josephinum

Columbus • pcj.edu

614-985-2241 or 614-885-5585 acrawford@pcj.edu

Rabbinical College of Telshe Wickliffe

440-943-5300

info@telsheyeshiva.edu

Remington College

Cleveland • remingtoncollege.edu

800-208-1950

18 COLLEGE 101 • WINTER-SPRING 2023

Rosedale Bible College

Irwin • rosedale.edu

740-857-1311 or 740-265-3881 info@rosedale.edu or admissions@rosedale.edu

University of Rio Grande Rio Grande • rio.edu

800-282-7201 admissions@rio.edu

Saint Mary Seminary & Graduate School of Theology

Wickliffe • stmarysem.edu

440-943-7600 or 419-448-3423 registrar@stmarysem.edu

Tiffin University

Tiffin • tiffin.edu

800-968-6446 or 440-943-7667 admiss@tiffin.edu

Transcontinental University Dublin • tc-university.org

614-812-7166 info@tc-university.org

Tri-State Bible College South Point • tsbc.edu

740-377-2520 • info@tsbc.edu

Tri-State Bible College North Akron • 330-906-2479

Union Institute & University Cincinnati • myunion.edu

800-861-6400 or 513-861-6400 admissions@myunion.edu

United Theological Seminary

Dayton • united.edu

800-322-5817 or 937-529-2201 admissions@united.edu

University of Dayton Dayton • udayton.edu

800-837-7433 or 937-229-1000 admission@udayton.edu

University of Findlay

Findlay • findlay.edu

800-472-9502 or 419-434-4732 admissions@findlay.edu

University of Mount Union Alliance • mountunion.edu

800-992-6682 or 330-823-2590 admission@mountunion.edu

University of Northwestern Ohio Lima • unoh.edu

419-998-3120 info@unoh.edu

Ursuline College

Pepper Pike • ursuline.edu

888-877-8546 or 440-449-4200 info@ursuline.edu

Valor Christian College Columbus • valorcollege.edu

800-940-9422 or 855-219-6538 admissions@valorcollege.edu

Walsh University North Canton • walsh.edu

800-362-9846 or 330-490-7090 admissions@walsh.edu

Western Governors University Columbus • wgu.edu

866-903-0108 or 866-225-5948

Wilberforce University

Wilberforce • wilberforce.edu

937-376-2911 or 937-708-5500 admission@wilberforce.edu

Wilmington College

Wilmington • wilmington.edu

800-341-9318 or 937-382-6661 admission@wilmington.edu

Blue Ash 513-793-1337 blueash@wilmington.edu

Cincinnati State 513-569-1806

wccincy@wilmington.edu

Winebrenner Theological Seminary Findlay • winebrenner.edu

419-434-4200 wts@winebrenner.edu

Wittenberg University

Springfield • wittenberg.edu

800-677-7558 or 937-327-6314 admission@wittenberg.edu

Xavier University

Cincinnati • xavier.edu 513-745-3000

xuadmit@xavier.edu

COLLEGE 101 • WINTER-SPRING 2023 19
A GUIDE TO OHIO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES WINTER/SPRING 2023 Published in cooperation with Ohio’s Collegiate Purple Star Designation Helps Military Members and Their Families BEYOND THE CLASSROOM How Campus Upgrades Are Reshaping the College Experience for Students A digital edition of ohiomagazine.com/college101 is available online at

FOR-PROFIT, PRIVATE, BASED IN OHIO

American Institute of Alternative Medicine

Columbus • aiam.edu

614-825-6255 info@aiam.edu

Davis College

Toledo • daviscollege.edu

419-473-2700 or 800-477-7021 learn@daviscollege.edu

ETI Technical College

Niles • eticollege.edu

330-652-9919

info@eticollege.edu

Felbry College

Columbus • felbrycollege.edu

614-781-1085

admissions@felbrycollege.edu

Fortis College

fortis.edu • 855-436-7847

Centerville Campus

937-433-3410

Cincinnati Campus

513-771-2795

Columbus Campus

855-243-0380

Cuyahoga Falls Campus

330-923-9959

Hondros College

Westerville • hondros.com

888-466-3767 or 855-906-8773

ColumbusAdmissions@hondros.edu

Fairborn Campus

855-906-8773

DaytonAdmissions@hondros.edu

Independence Campus

855-906-8773

ClevelandAdmissions@hondros.edu

Maumee Campus

855-906-8773

ToledoAdmissions@hondros.edu

West Chester Campus

806-966-8773

CincinnatiAdmissions@hondros.edu

International College of Broadcasting

Dayton • icb.edu

855-896-3733

admissions@icb.edu

The Modern College of Design

Kettering • themodern.edu

937-294-0592

admissions@themodern.edu

The North Coast College

Lakewood • thencc.edu

216-221-8584

admissions@thencc.edu

Ohio Business College

Sheffield Village

ohiobusinesscollege.edu

888-514-3126 or 888-875-0780

HVAC Learning Center

Lorain • 888-514-3126

Sandusky Campus

419-627-8345

Truck Driving Academy

Dayton • 937-226-1683

Ohio Technical College

Cleveland • ohiotech.edu

800-322-7000

jbrenner@ohiotech.edu

Ross College — Ohio Campuses

rosseducation.edu

Canton Campus

330-494-1214

Cincinnati Campus

513-851-8500

Dayton Campus

937-235-0510

Elyria Campus

440-328-8878

Mansfield Campus

419-747-2206

Niles Campus

330-505-1436

Sylvania Campus

419-882-3203

FOR-PROFIT, PRIVATE, BASED OUTSIDE OF OHIO

American College of Education

ace.edu

800-280-0307 or 317-829-9400

info@ace.edu

American National University An.edu

833-388-1100

20 COLLEGE 101 • WINTER-SPRING 2023
TO DRIVE? BUZZED DRIVING IS DRUNK DRIVING
AM I OKAY

Bryant & Stratton College — Ohio Campuses

bryantstratton.edu

Cleveland Campus

216-771-1700

clecontactcampus@bryantstratton.edu

Akron Campus

330-598-2500

akron@bryantstratton.edu

Parma Campus

216-265-3151

parmainfo@bryantstratton.edu

Solon Campus

440-510-1112 solcontactcampus@bryantstratton.edu

Chamberlain University

Columbus • chamberlain.edu

614-252-8890

info@chamberlain.edu

Cleveland Campus chamberlain.edu

216-361-6005 info@chamberlain.edu

Daymar College

daymarcollege.edu

Columbus Campus

800-621-0042 or 614-643-6680 info@hussiancollege.edu

DeVry University

866-338-7934 • devry.edu

Cincinnati Campus

513-583-5000

Columbus Campus

614-253-7291

Galen College of Nursing

galencollege.edu

Cincinnati Campus

513-475-3636 admissions@galencollege.edu

Valley College

valley.edu

Cleveland Campus

216-453-8201

Fairlawn Satellite Campus

330-997-8900

Walden University

waldenu.edu

844-814-0652

OUT-OF-STATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

The following institutions have campuses in Ohio and/or have been issued a certificate of authorization to operate in Ohio.

Bard College

Cleveland • bhsec.bard.edu

216-838-9700

cleveland@bhsec.bard.edu

Central Michigan University –Wright Patterson AFB Center

Wright-Patterson • cmich.edu

989-774-3076

cmuadmissions@cmich.edu

Concordia University Chicago

cuchicago.edu

708-771-8300

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Erau.edu

Worldwide Campus

800-522-6787

Worldwide@erau.edu

Fielding Graduate University

fielding.edu

800-340-1099 or 805-898-4026 admissions@fielding.edu

Grace College and Seminary Akron • grace.edu

3866-974-7223 admissions@grace.edu

Hebrew Union College Cincinnati • huc.edu

513-221-1875

cincinnati@huc.edu

Herzing University Akron • herzing.edu

800-596-0724 or 330-593-3034

Indiana University East Dayton • iue.edu

765-626-3119 or 765-973-8208 applynow@iue.edu

Indiana Wesleyan University indwes.edu • 866-498-4968 iwuenroll@indewes.edu admissions@iwes.edu

Cincinnati Education Center

West Chester

513-881-3600 or 800-621-8667 ext. 3600

Cleveland Education Center

Independence

216-525-6160 or 800-621-8667 ext. 6160

Columbus Education Center

Hilliard

614-529-7550 or 800-621-8667 ext. 7550

Dayton Education Center

937-298-4430 or 800-621-8997 ext. 4430

Lindsey Wilson College lindsey.edu • 800-264-0138 info@lindsey.edu

Cincinnati Community Campus

502-380-7073 fallm@lindsey.edu

Hillsboro Community Campus

937-403-1949 knauffj@lindsey.edu

Loyola University Institute of Ministry loyno.edu

504-865-3240 admit@loyno.edu

Mansfield University mansfield.edu

800-577-6826 or 570-662-4000 admissions@mansfield.edu

Moody Bible Institute moody.edu

800-967-4624 or 312-329-4400 admissions@moody.edu

Nazarene Theological Seminary nts.edu

800-831-3011 or 816-268-5400 info@nts.edu

Northern Baptist Seminary –Greater Cincinnati Center Fairfield • seminary.edu

630-620-2180 admissions@seminary.edu

Nova Southeastern University nova.edu

800-541-6682 admissions@nova.edu

Park University

park.edu • 816-741-2000

Defense Supply Center Columbus Whitehall • 614-237-4229 dscc@park.edu

Wright-Patterson AFB Campus 937-259-1289 • wrpt@park.edu

Southeastern University Columbus • seu.edu

800-500-8760 or 863-667-5000 admission@seu.edu or dbpafford@seu.edu

Spring Arbor University arbor.edu

800-968-0011

Trinity Evangelical Divinity School of Trinity International University tiu.edu/divinity

847-945-8800 or 847-317-4032

Christ Community Chapel Hudson • 330-650-9533 kimberly.adamov@ccchapel.com

Xenos Christian Fellowship Columbus 614-823-6510 ext. 1226 williamsonk@dwellcc.org

Wheeling University wheeling.edu

800-624-6992 or 304-243-2000 admiss@wju.edu

OHIO TECHNICAL CENTERS

Ohio Technical Centers provide postsecondary career and technical education.

Alliance Career Center Alliance • accrtw.org

330-829-2267

Apollo Career Center Lima • apollocareercenter.com 866-998-2824

Ashland County-West Holmes Career Center

Ashland • acwhcc.org

800-686-3313 or 419-289-3313

Ashtabula County Technical and Career Center Jefferson • atech.edu

440-576-6015

Auburn Career Center Concord Township • auburncc.org 440-357-7542

Buckeye Career Center New Philadelphia • buckeyecareercenter.org

800-227-1665 or 330-339-2288

COLLEGE 101 • WINTER-SPRING 2023 21

Buckeye Hills Career Center

Rio Grande • buckeyehills.net

740-245-5334

Butler Technology & Career Development Schools

Hamilton • butlertech.org

513-868-6300 (high school), 513-8681911 (central office), 513-645-8200 (adult education)

Canton City Schools –Adult Career & Technical Education

Canton • ccsdistrict.org

330-438-2556

Choffin Career & Technical Center

Choffin • choffinctc.com

330-744-8700

Collins Career Technical Center

Chesapeake • collins-cc.edu

740-867-6641

Columbiana County Career & Technical Center

Lisbon • ccctc.k12.oh.us

330-424-9561, 330-424-9562 (adult education)

Columbus City Schools Department of Adult & Community Education

Columbus • ccsoh.us/ace

614-365-6000

C-TEC

Newark • c-tec.edu

740-364-2333 or 740-364-2832

Cuyahoga Valley Career Center

Brecksville • cvccworks.edu

440-526-5200

Delaware Area Career Center

Delaware • delawareareacc.org

740-548-0708

Eastland-Fairfield Career & Technical Schools

Groveport • eastland-fairfield.com

614-836-4530

EHOVE Career Center

Milan • ehove.net

419-499-4663

Four County Career Center

Archbold • fourcounty.net

800-589-3334 or 419-267-3331

Grant Career Center

Bethel • grantcareer.com

513-734-6222

Great Oaks Career Campuses

Cincinnati • greatoaks.com

513-771-8840

Diamond Oaks Campus

Cincinnati

513-574-1300

Laurel Oaks Campus

Wilmington

800-752-5480 or 937-382-1411

Live Oaks Campus

Milford • 513-575-1900

Scarlet Oaks Campus

Cincinnati • 513-771-8810

Greene County Career Center

Xenia • greeneccc.com

937-372-6941

Hannah E. Mullins School of Practical Nursing Salem • hemspn.edu

330-332-8940 info@hemspn.edu

Knox County Career Center Mount Vernon • knoxcc.org

740-397-5820

Lorain County JVS Oberlin • lcjvs.com

440-986-6601

info@lcjvs.com

Madison Adult Career Center Mansfield mlsd.net/adultcareercenter_home.aspx 419-589-6363

Mahoning County Career & Technical Center Canfield • mahoningctc.com

330-729-4100

Maplewood Career Center Ravenna • mwood.cc

330-296-2892 ext. 551010 info@mwood.cc or Medina County Career Center Medina • mcjvs.edu

330-725-8461 info@mcjvs.edu

Miami Valley Career Technology Center

Englewood • mvctc.com

800-716-7161 or 937-854-6297

Mid-East Career & Technology Centers

Zanesville • mid-east.k12.oh.us

800-551-1548 or 740-455-3111

Millstream Career Center Findlay

fcs.org/millstream-career-center

419-427-5488

Penta Career Center

Perrysburg • pentacareercenter.org

419-661-6555

Pickaway-Ross Career & Technology Center

Chillicothe • pickawayross.com

740-642-1288

Circleville Campus

740-642-1277

Ross County Aspire/GED

Chillicothe • 740-779-2035

Pike County Career Technology Center

Piketon • pikectc.org

740-289-2282 or 740-289-4172

Pioneer Career & Technology Center

Shelby • pctc.k12.oh.us/adult-education

877-818-7282 or 419-347-7744

Polaris Career Center

Middleburg Heights • polaris.edu

440-891-7600 • dmiller@polaris.edu

Portage Lakes Career Center

Uniontown • plcc.edu

330-896-8200 • krobinson@plcc.edu

Scioto County Career Technical Center

Lucasville • sciototech.org

740-259-5526

Southern Hills Career & Technical Center Georgetown • shctc.us

937-378-6131

Toledo Public Schools – Career Tech

Toledo

tps.org/find-your-school/career-tech 419-671-0001

Tolles Career & Technical Center

Plain City • tollestech.com

614-873-4666 ext. 4248

Tri-County Career Center

Nelsonville

tricountyadultcareercenter.org

800-637-6508 or 740-753-3511 info@tricountyhightech.com

Tri-Rivers Career Center Marion • tririvers.com

740-389-4681

Trumbull Career & Technical Center Warren • tctchome.com

330-847-0503

Upper Valley Career Center

Piqua • uppervalleycc.org

937-778-1980

Vanguard-Sentinel Career & Technology Centers vscc.k12.oh.us • 419-332-2626 admincenter@vsctc.org

Adult Education

Fremont • 419-334-6901

adultweb@vsctc.org

Sentinel – SCTC

Tiffin • 419-448-1212 sentinel@vsctc.org

Vanguard Tech Center Fremont • 419-332-2626 vanguard@vsctc.org

Vantage Career Center

Van Wert • vantagecareercenter.com

419-238-5411

Warren County Career Center

Lebanon • mywccc.org

513-932-8145

Washington County Career Center

Marietta • thecareercenter.net

740-373-6283

Wayne County Schools Career Center

Smithville • wayne-jvs.k12.oh.us

330-669-7070

aeinfo@wscc.org

Willoughby-Eastlake City Schools –Career and Technical Education

Willoughby weschools.org/careerandtechnical 440-283-4300

Visit

Sandusky Career Center

Sandusky • scs-k12.net/ sanduskycareercenter

419-984-1100

22 COLLEGE 101 • WINTER-SPRING 2023
highered.ohio.gov/about/ohioscampuses for an interactive map that shows all Ohio public institution main campuses, regional campuses and community college locations, as well as Ohio Technical Centers and many independent campuses.
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