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BUSINESS MONTHLY G R E ATE R LANS ING

JUNE 2014

hr Experts Focus on Flexible Work Environment In this issue •

REO TOWN POISED FOR REVITALIZATION

SMALL BUSINESS LENDING ON THE REBOUND

5 WAYS TO BOOST PRODUCTIVITY

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Front Row Left to Right: Nazneen Syed JD, LL.M, Barbara Bialko JD, Bill Jaconette, Nancy Johnson MBA, Al Yambor, Peggy Klopf, Pat Hopp Back Row Left to Right: Colleen Foster, Dianne Thurston, Steve Peters JD, CTFA, Sherrie Armstrong, Jim Schmelter MBA, Carolee Buckey, Karla Ter Haar CTFA, Ryan Munson, Jennifer Bolle │ Not pictured: Larry Crockett CFA, MBA

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©2014 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Bank deposit products and services provided by PNC Bank, National Association, Member FDIC.


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JUNE 2014

G R E AT E R

L A N S I N G

BUSINESS MONTHLY

BUSINESS MONTHLY GRE ATER LANSING

JUNE 2014

News Auto Expert Says Innovation Key to Lansing’s Continued Success................................... 6 Small Business Lending on the Rebound......................................................................................... 8 REO Town Poised for Revitalization............................................................................................... 10

Features Business Helps Break Down Job Hunting Barriers for Disabled..................................... 14 hr Experts Focus on Flexible Work Environment In this issue •

REO TOWN POISED FOR REVITALIZATION

SMALL BUSINESS LENDING ON THE REBOUND

5 WAYS TO BOOST PRODUCTIVITY

Cover illustration by Brooke Erwin

Business Needs, Regulation & Generations Shape Today’s Human Resources........ 16 Common Ground Music Festival Makes Big Impact on Local Economy........................20

Departments Commentary.................................................................................................................................................. 4

The Greater Lansing Business Monthly (Volume 27, Issue 5) The Greater Lansing Business Monthly is published monthly by M3 Group at 614 Seymour Street, Lansing, MI  48933. Periodicals postage paid at Lansing, Michigan USPO. USPS number 020w807. Subscriptions: Subscriptions are available at $22 per year for postage and handling or $38 for two years. Call (517) 203—0123 or visit www.lansingbusinessnew. com to subscribe.

Opinion ....................................................................................................................................................... 22 Man on the Street ................................................................................................................................... 24 Collectibles .................................................................................................................................................26 Workforce Development ..................................................................................................................... 28 Real Estate................................................................................................................................................... 30 GLBM List ................................................................................................................................................... 32

Postmaster: Send address changes to The Greater Lansing Business Monthly, 614 Seymour Ave., Lansing, MI 48933. Send additional subscription requests and address changes to The Greater Lansing Business Monthly, Inc., 614 Seymour Street, Lansing, MI 48933. Copyright © 2014 The Greater Lansing Business Monthly, Inc. All rights reserved.

Accounting .................................................................................................................................................. 34

Editorial Office: 614 Seymour Street, Lansing, MI 48933 www.lansingbusinessmonthly.com

Business Calender .................................................................................................................................42

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Social Responsibility................................................................................................................................ 36 Regional Rotation..................................................................................................................................... 38 Financial Advisor ...................................................................................................................................... 40

Notable News ...........................................................................................................................................44


Protecting What’s Important At Auto-Owners Insurance, we’ve been protecting what matters most to you since 1916. For all of your life, home, car and business insurance needs, call or visit Shinberg Insurance today.

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C O M M E N TA R Y

G R E AT E R

L A N S I N G

BUSINESS MONTHLY Publisher: Tiffany Dowling tiffany@m3group.biz Editor: Emily Caswell emily@m3group.biz Sales Manager: Jennifer Hodges jhodges@m3group.biz Media Specialist: Jill Bailey Account Managers: Katie Brown Manny Garcia

People Are Your Best Product

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here’s no doubt that relationships make the world go round. They give us a sense of connectivity and an overall feeling of purpose.

I often get asked what the toughest part of my job is, and I always reply that the best and most challenging parts of my work are dealing with my organization’s team members or my human resources role. I would imagine that most of you could relate. Everyday I get up and go to the office excited to surround myself with dedicated people who have a common goal and creative plan to make big things happen for our organization and our clients’ companies. It just wouldn’t be the same or as fun without them.

Production Director: Kelly Ritter Art Director: Brooke Erwin Graphic Artist: Mike France Web Manager: Skylar Kohagen Event Calendar Manager: Jaime Hardesty

GLBM Editorial Board: April Clobes - Executive Vice President, MSU Federal Credit Union Trish Foster - Senior Managing Director & COO, CBRE|Martin Lisa Parker - Director of Alumni Career and Business Services, Michigan State University Alumni Association Deb Muchmore - Vice President of Public Affairs, Marketing Resource Group Tom Ruis - Vice President, Fifth Third Bank Doug Klein - Executive Director, Mason Area Chamber of Commerce Mark Hooper - Partner, Andrews Hopper Pavlik Diontrae Hayes - Legislative Director for State Senator Coleman Young, II

When I started my company almost 12 years ago, I wanted to create an environment of ultimate flexibility. After all, I was assembling a group of creative folks who know themselves and can make the judgment call on when they can produce the best creative product. Therefore, I would tell them to set their own hours. I gave the team video games and snacks to show how our environment could be a place of comfort, fun and productivity. We also had a lot of business-paid team-building activities and I never instituted a time-off policy. If you need a day off, take it. This philosophy earned our company the 2009 Alfred P. Sloan Award in Business Excellence Workplace Flexibility. Through the years, as I navigated the flexible business environment and my team grew larger, I learned a few things about the people I worked with. First, I know now that sometimes humans need parameters and feel better when they know exactly what they can and can’t do. Second, I know that some people will take advantage of a situation for as long as they can and will try to ruin a relaxed atmosphere for everyone. And, lastly, no matter what you do for some employees, it will never be enough or appreciated. I used to take this personally. But, now I know that it isn’t personal. It’s individual and generational. And thankfully, there are enough great employees out there that really balance the scales. Today, my office environment has a nice blend of flexibility and guidelines that help our group run smoothly. Following all the human resource rules and regulations, while providing a creative place to do great work, is not as easy as it sounds, but it’s a critical part of running an organization. As a small business owner, it’s important to get a consultant to help when needed, use resources from your professional associations and pay attention to the trends regarding our employees of the future. Any way you look at it, people are the most important asset in any organization and deserve the attention necessary to keep things moving forward. Be dynamic in all you do,

Tiffany Dowling | Publisher 4

G R E AT E R L A N S I N G B U S I N E S S M O N T H LY

JUNE 2014


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NEWS

Auto Expert Says Innovation Key to Lansing’s Continued Success BY MICKEY HIRTEN

Detroit may be the auto capital of the world, but successes in Lansing spring from a different set of values and culture, said David E. Cole, Chairman Emeritus of the Center for Automotive Research in Lansing, who recently addressed business leaders. He cited the educational values that spill over from MSU, the quality of the state employees and the work ethic Lansing shares with Southwest Michigan, as factors that make Lansing special.

“IN MICHIGAN, THE SOUTHWEST IS VERY DIFFERENT FROM THE SOUTHEAST. IT’S ENTREPRENEURIAL WITH A HIGH LEVEL OF WORK ETHIC.” -DAVID E. COLE

“It gets down to the workforce. In its central location, it (Lansing) is really closer to the west part of the state,” Cole said. “In Michigan, the Southwest is very different from the Southeast. It’s entrepreneurial with a high level of work ethic. “There’s a better climate here between 6

labor and management,” he said. That is a relationship that Cole attributed to more rural values and an embracing of hard work. It contributed to General Motors’ decision to invest in the Lansing region, and allowed businesses, politicians, unions and educators to promote the region’s attributes and ultimately preserve its auto manufacturing heritage. “What this community did was absolutely amazing,” Cole said. “It was a very big deal, one of the most remarkable stories I have ever seen in this industry.” And when it comes to cars, Cole has seen plenty. He is a nationally-recognized automotive expert, a former director of the Office for David E. Cole speaking at the Michigan Business the Study of Automotive Network’s Strategic Business Luncheon Transportation at the University of Michigan, where he is an engineering professor. He has for all of the industry will depend on specialized in strategic issues related to how it deals with many challenges on restructuring the North American auto many fronts. industry, globalization, technology and human resource requirements. He identified choke points that can still derail the auto industry’s recovery from Speaking at the Michigan Business the Great Recession: staffing, tooling, Network’s Strategic Business Luncheon suppliers, equipment, natural events at the Eagle Eye Golf Club in April, he and materials. But it’s staffing — the was optimistic about the current state human element — that may be most of the auto industry and of Lansing’s critical. standing, especially with the crossover vehicles built at GM’s Delta and Grand “There are thousands of new jobs,” River plants. Cole said, “But only for the educated.” To ensure what he terms “America’s Tomorrow,” Cole suggested scaling “They are high value, functional up education programs that focus on vehicles and well executed,” said Cole. creating a message of importance, But continued success in Lansing and

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PH OTO P ROV I D E D

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t may not seem obvious, but Lansing’s standing as a strong and sustainable auto manufacturing center owes much to Michigan State University, state government and its location away from Detroit.


NEWS

Cole recounted the traits of the old auto industry: bureaucracy, slow, structured, jobs for life, paper, legalistic and more. And he compared them with the traits needed for the new business model: lean and agile, cooperation, flexible, teams, coaches, trust and enabled. “Innovative people and companies win,” he said. “It takes a team and leadership is critical.” This, in fact, is what GM rediscovered in Lansing. And the impact can’t be overstated.

“INNOVATIVE PEOPLE

Mickey Hirten is an award winning writer and editor. He has been executive editor of the Lansing State Journal, the Burlington Free Press in Vermont, and was the financial editor and a columnist for the Baltimore Evening Sun. He is the current president of the Michigan Press Association. His wife, Maureen Hirten, is director of the Capital Area District Library.

© 2013 ManpowerGroup. All rights reserved.

opportunity and need. “It’s all about people. Relationships are important . . . Everyone is important.”

AND COMPANIES WIN. IT TAKES A TEAM AND LEADERSHIP IS CRITICAL.” — DAVID E. COLE

It is why GM built the 3.4-millionsquare-foot Lansing Delta Township plant, where it employs 3,543 workers at its production and stamping operations. It is the automaker’s newest North American plant and produces the popular Chevrolet Traverse, GMC Acadia and Buick Enclave. It is why it retained its 204-million-square-foot Lansing Grand River facility, with 1,541workers who produce the acclaimed Cadillac CTS (2014 Motor Trend Car of the Year) and ATS (2013 North American Car of the Year) models. Both plants, the workers and the communities that support them fit the template Cole envisions for auto industry success. Lansing, he said, is the model.

Look be yond T he m a c hini s T.

See opportunity. Manpower delves deeply into each assignment, getting to know your company and its business objectives. Because, ultimately, your success is our success. See what’s humanly possible at manpower.com ®

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NEWS

Small Business Lending on the Rebound BY MICKEY HIRTEN

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s Michigan’s economy rebounds from the Great Recession, so does small business lending.

The rules have changed: loan standards are tighter and the vetting process, that is, the paper work, is more taxing. But money is available in many ways and from many sources. “There is a myth that banks are not lending now,” said Paula Cunningham, president of Capitol National Bank, headquartered in Lansing. Her bank and others in the region are aggressively courting small businesses, helping them fashion loan applications and shape their operations to qualify for the capital they need to sustain their operations and to grow.

“IT’S ABOUT ECONOMIC GARDENING, GROWING SMALLER BUSINESSES.” -JANE SHERZER, VICE PRESIDENT COMMERCIAL LENDING AT HORIZON BANK IN EAST LANSING

While the actions of large business often command attention — the planned General Motors stamping plant at the Grand River Assembly site or Jackson National Life’s planned expansion in Alaiedon Township — it is the solid growth of smaller business that ultimately supports the economy. “These are the drivers in Michigan. It’s about economic gardening, growing 8

smaller businesses,” said Jane Sherzer, vice president commercial lending at Horizon Bank in East Lansing. They also represent the broadest commercial customer base. When bankers think about small businesses, they often target what are called stage 1 and stage 2 companies that operate with fewer than 100 employees. These companies are inherently entrepreneurial and successful financing often relies on the credit worthiness of the owner.

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Credit histories, collateral, cash flow and business plans are factors that banks weigh when making loan decisions. But the process isn’t linear. Relationships are important, as is the U.S. Small Business Administration and its affiliated organizations. They work with banks and businesses to nurture growth with advice, counseling, training and loan guarantees. Lansing Community College sponsors a Small Business Development Center (SBDC) which states its mission as contributing “to economic development by assisting in the creation of new small business and the retention and expansion of existing small businesses.” “The reason the program exists ultimately is jobs. If businesses grow, they will hire people,” said program director Tom Donaldson, explaining LCC’s mission. The SBDC provides businesses help with management, human resources, finances, public relations and other assistance. Virtually all area banks tap into the SBA

G R E AT E R L A N S I N G B U S I N E S S M O N T H LY

JUNE 2014

SBA LOANS 2012—2014

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loan guarantee program to help customers improve their chances for financing. Huntington Bank, which is expanding in the Lansing region, is Michigan’s largest SBA lender. It made 951 SBA loans between 2012 and February 2014. Second was JP Morgan Chase Bank with 218 loans and third was Fifth Third Bank with 15 loans. “Banks work with the SBA to guarantee a portion of a loan — 50 to 80 percent insured by the federal government,” said Donaldson. He explained that this support enables banks to make loans to businesses that might not qualify for more stringent lending standards, turning a near miss into a hit. “We use this program if a customer can’t get a conventional loan; if there’s not enough collateral or cash flow,” said Joan Schroeder, vice president and senior SBA & USDA product specialist at Huntington


Bank. She said that her bank might do 10 conventional loans for every SBA loan; its goal is finding the “right structure.” Based on current market conditions, Schroeder and other lenders said the interest rate on small business loans ranges between one and six percentage points above the prime rate, 3.25 percent at the beginning of May. At Horizon, Sherzer tell her clients to estimate a loan interest rate of 5.5 to 6 percent for cash flow projections. Another key to a successful loan application is credit scoring. Donaldson placed the acceptable rate in the mid600s, but the bankers who actually make the loans may be pickier. What kind of score? “Eight hundred looks good,” Cunningham said, acknowledging that this is a gold standard. More realistic, she said, are scores in the 710 to 720 range. Raw numbers, however, while important don’t always prevail. Bankers stress the importance of relationships and the value of local decision making. Businesses may suffer setbacks that affect their numbers — a one-time medical emergency, for example. But if the fundamentals are solid and bankers and businesses work together, loans and other services are available.

Meet with certified business coaches in the following programs and formats Mickey Hirten is an award winning writer and editor. He has been executive editor of the Lansing State Journal, the Burlington Free Press in Vermont, and was the financial editor and a columnist for the Baltimore Evening Sun. He is the current president of the Michigan Press Association. His wife, Maureen Hirten, is director of the Capital Area District Library.

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NEWS

REO Town Poised for Revit BY MICKEY HIRTEN | PH OTO S B Y MA R K WA R N ER

E

verything needed for a trendy neighborhood is ready to happen in REO Town. There is easy access from I-496, Red Cedar and Grand River waterfront and trails, inexpensive real estate, large businesses, small businesses and, most importantly, momentum. “REO Town is the next big thing. It’s starting to get critical mass,” Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero said of the neighborhood just south of downtown. “It’s perfectly poised. You see all sorts of signs for redevelopment.” He points to interior and exterior reconstruction, the South Washington Street boulevard and the people, newcomers and veterans. Bernero, like others in REO Town and outside, believe that the promise of 10

renewal, so long in the making, finally has the staying power to replicate the success of Old Town. They hope it doesn’t take as long. Optimism about the neighborhood stems from two significant developments. First, Construction of Lansing Board of Water and Light’s $182 million natural gas co-generation plant and headquarters, which brought about 200 new jobs to the community. The project included renovation of the Grand Trunk Western Railroad depot, long in disrepair. The second factor propelling the area is the demolition of the Deluxe Inn at the southeast corner of South Washington and Malcolm X Street. “What happens with the vacant property that once housed the Deluxe Inn will help shape the area,” said Eric Rosekranz,

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senior vice president of CBRE/ Martin. This property is the gateway to REO Town. Bob Johnson, Lansing’s Director of Planning & Economic Development, is more blunt: “We’ve taken that negative element out of the equation.” A mixed use project with market rate housing and retail business has been discussed for the site. Rosekranz’s firm is active in the REO Town real estate market and currently has an offer pending on 1105 S. Washington. It was listed at $105,000, said CBRE/Martin broker Shawn O’Brien, who expects the sale to close near that price. The company also is listing a four building bundle of properties at 1101 and 1103 South Washington and Elm Street for $300,000. These are attractive store fronts in the


NEWS

italization heart of the commercial district. The Elm Street properties are residential. Johnson cites the renovations happening up and down South Washington as a measure of the area’s economic emergence. And changes are happening quickly. “It is difficult to state the true vacancy based on readiness. Some structures may require substantial renovations; others can be done in three-to-six months.” He said class-B office space is leasing in a range between $13 to $15 per square foot; retail space is available in the $7-to-$10 range with tenants paying utilities, tax, insurance and other costs. The prices are modest, especially for businesses seeking an urban clientele. The vibe is very early Old Town, the template for what business and city officials hope will happen.

“REO Town has a lot of the same characteristics that Old Town has, but they aren’t as entrenched. There are unique businesses, but not as many,” Rosekranz said.

where there are changes happening.” Thirteen years ago, when the company outgrew its offices at Ionia and Pine Streets, it relocated a mile south, passing on a trendier and safer move to Old Town.

One of the companies that defines REO Town’s emergence — and its potential — is Great Lakes Capital Fund (GLCF), presided over by Mark McDaniel, its president and CEO. The fund describes itself as a “full-service community development finance institution serving the Midwest.” It employs over 50 professionals who help manage the organization’s work in Michigan and in other states.

“We said let’s look at other areas. We looked at the east side, on Michigan Avenue and drove through South Washington. I didn’t know it was called REO Town or what used to be a vibrant commercial district,” McDaniel said. But it felt right. The Fund moved into the old Krentel building, 1000 S. Washington and moved again, to larger quarters at 1118 S. Washington last spring. The Lansing Economic Area Partnership (LEAP), relocated to GLCF’s former offices in November 2013.

“Our mission is community development. It’s important where our address is,” McDaniel said. “We need to be in an area

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NEWS

Invested in and working to build REO Town gives McDaniel an intimate perspective on the area. He’s bullish on its prospects and sees these developments shaping the short term future: •

A new restaurant: “We thought there might be one on the first floor of our building, but with the renovation of Ramon’s there is a plan there for some sort of dining establishment.” He said the market is right for more food service.

The Riverview Church relocating in the former Cadillac Club: “It wasn’t my first choice. Still, it’s a way to get the building back on track.”

Retail: “There are vacant store fronts across the street from us. When you get restaurants, then some smaller retailers will come. There are a lot of people coming in and working here.”

The gas station: “The final big piece is the old gas station on the corner. That is just a prime piece of or property for something to happen.” He said it would make a great little restaurant or cafe.

The Lansing Board Of Water and Light Headquarters

Paul Schmitd, owner of UnoDeuce Multimedia on South Washington, typifies the small scale sustainable growth that is happening in REO Town. In May, he added a full-time position to his video production firm and needs room to grow. “I want space that’s a little bit better, so

G R E AT E R L A N S I N G B U S I N E S S M O N T H LY

As REO Town transforms, some established businesses fear the consequence of gentrification. Belinda Thurston has operated Just B Yoga on Island Avenue for the past three-and-ahalf years, wants growth and development, but worries about the consequences and how it changes the neighborhood. “I want to see more investing into creating community as opposed to gutting and making everything new.”

Mickey Hirten is an award winning writer and editor. He has been executive editor of the Lansing State Journal, the Burlington Free Press in Vermont, and was the financial editor and a columnist for the Baltimore Evening Sun. He is the current president of the Michigan Press Association. His wife, Maureen Hirten, is director of the Capital Area District Library.

Reo Town Pub and The Vintage Cafe and Catering 12

I’m talking with developers.” UnoDeuce has been in REO Town for two-and-a-half years. “It’s a really interesting area. I like where it’s heading.”

JUNE 2014


NEWS

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F E AT U R E

Business Helps Break Down Job Hunting Barriers for Disabled BY ANN COOL

If you have a disability, job hunting can be an even bigger challenge. “A SIMPLE, ‘NORMAL’ VIDEO RESUME WOULD NOT DO MUCH FOR THEM. HOWEVER, WHEN WE ARE ABLE TO SHOW THESE INDIVIDUALS PERFORMING TASKS, AND TALK TO PEOPLE WHO HAVE WORKED WITH THEM, WE CAN START TO GET PAST POTENTIAL CONCERNS HELD BY THE EMPLOYER.” —JUSTIN CAINE Good Fruit Video, a Lansing video production company, may have an answer. Partnering with the Eaton Intermediate School District, they’re creating video resumes for persons with disabilities as alternatives to the traditional written ones. “Individuals with disabilities tend to face an uphill battle to get employed,” said Justin Caine, Client Relations Lead for Good Fruit Video. “What my company started doing is looking at how video resumes could be used to help break down barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities.” 14

These videos are anything but standard. They are dynamic. The three they’ve completed take a short amount of time — just over 2 minutes — to watch, but they relay a powerful message. By watching the candidate successfully complete tasks required for the job he is seeking, the employer can see firsthand the candidate’s strengths and skill set. The potential employer can also hear the candidate list his professional goals in his own words. Finally, the video also records testimonials from individuals who have firsthand knowledge of the job seeker. “These individuals, (have worked with the candidate) either professionally or through a training scenario and can speak to their abilities,” Caine said.

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nyone who’s been job hunting knows that getting over the first hurdle — preparing a resume that stands out against the rest — can be a difficult task.

Caine’s company helps land jobs for job seekers, like Burdo, with video resumes, like the one above.

To date, the videos have helped two of the three job seekers find jobs. Good Fruit Video hopes to produce more video resumes in the future and “study their overall effectiveness with a larger group.” They’re seeking partnerships with Michigan State University, Lansing Community College and other career centers to help them lower the cost from the current $1,200 they charge.

“Video adds a whole other dimension to a resume,” Caine said. “It helps to overcome a stigma that comes along with a person who is differently abled … You see, many

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individuals with disabilities have a hard time with speech and communication,” Caine continued, “therefore, a simple, ‘normal’ video resume would not do much for them. However, when we are able to show these individuals performing tasks, and talk to people who have worked with them, we can start to get past potential concerns held by the employer.” Good Fruit Video production was founded in 2009 when Caine and business partner Kraig Westfall merged their two production


companies. Since then, they’ve worked together to produce high quality webbased videos that tell the stories of local organizations, events and programs. The video production company has received awards and recognitions from the Lansing Regional Chamber of Commerce and the City of East Lansing. Caine was named 2012’s Socially Responsible Entrepreneur of the year by this magazine. Committing our staff to the success of your business.

For more information on Good Fruit Video, visit www.GoodFruitVideo.com.

DISTINCTIVE SERVICE. www.dartdevelopment.com

Ann Cool, MPS, is a freelance writer who lives in Mason with her husband Bob. 3120 Sovereign Dr., Suite 4B, Lansing, MI 48911 • 888.DART.001

What’s so special about the number 17? St. Patrick’s Day is March 17th

It takes 17 muscles to produce a smile

There are 17 weeks in the regular NFL season

Denny McLain’s jersey number was 17

There are 17 Principals at Maner Costerisan Our low 1:4.5 ratio of principals to staff means that you’ll have involvement from our executive team starting at day one. We encourage communication with our principals and know that they add a wealth of knowledge and expertise to every engagement. Being accessible and involved is our priority. At Maner Costerisan, the numbers speak for themselves.

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COVER

Business Needs, Regulation & Generations

Shape Today’s Human Resources BY ANN KAMMERER | I L L UST R AT I O N S B Y B ROO K E ER W IN

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ust a decade or two ago, the term “personnel” applied to workplace functions that largely involved defining policies and procedures for employee behaviors, benefits and pay. Today, the term “personnel” has been replaced by “human resources” and relates to strategic activities that can affect the development of an organization and its people. “The expectation is that HR goes well beyond protecting the organization through rules and guidelines,” says Dr. Tonya Fountain, president elect of the Greater Lansing Chapter of the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM). “We’re called on to serve the needs of employees, as well as to ensure the work environment is diverse, based on tolerance and mutual respect, and one in which employees can develop and grow on a personal and professional level.” A combination of forces continues to shape human resource practices in the 16

21st century. The Greater Lansing Business Monthly asked several HR professionals to tell us about trends they perceive. Here are some of the themes they shared:

1. BE A STRATEGIC BUSINESS PARTNER. 2. RECRUIT AND RETAIN TALENT. 3. DEVELOP LEADERS FROM WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION. 4. UNDERSTAND, WORK WITHIN AND STAY CURRENT WITH EMPLOYMENT LAW AND LEGISLATION. 5. PRACTICE WORKPLACE FLEXIBILITY.

“In years past, human resources was definitely a more technical position,”

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says Tina Sutterlin, immediate past president of the Greater Lansing SHMR. “Today, HR has evolved to where we work more on a macro rather than a strictly micro level.” BE STRATEGIC Professionals agree: HR needs to be a part of the “big picture” and included in the planning and direction of an organization. As more HR administration functions are automated or outsourced, HR personnel are freed up to partner with leadership. For example, HR might be asked to investigate root causes of problems, assess employee fit for particular positions, evaluate staffing levels or address training needs. It’s important that we become strategic partners with our leaders,” says Sutterlin. “By making sure we’re part of the business plan, we can help move the business forward.”


COVER

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COVER

RECRUIT AND RETAIN TALENT While a company’s web page might be filled with job postings, some companies have trouble filling positions — even when unemployment is high. The challenge is finding people with the right skills. And as competition intensifies for qualified employees, retaining talent becomes a challenge as well. Building an engaging corporate culture that encourages employee participation, feedback and flexibility provides one

“WE MAKE IT SO THAT EVERYONE FEELS LIKE THEY ARE AN INSIDER RATHER THAN AN OUTSIDER ... SOMEONE WHO FEELS INCLUDED WILL WANT TO HELP. SOMEONE WHO DOESN’T MIGHT FEEL ALIENATED AND FRUSTRATED.” — SCOTT DERTHICK workable strategy and retention.

for

recruitment

“Generational differences are becoming a bigger and bigger focus that employers will have to address,” says Scott Derthick, known as “ ’THE’ HR Guy” at Peckham, Inc. “The things that add up to job satisfaction for Millennials are very different than what a Baby Boomer or Gen Xer wants to stay happy and engaged at work.” DEVELOP FROM WITHIN A great motivator and morale booster for any employee is the opportunity to develop and grow with an organization. But developing leaders from current 18

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staff doesn’t necessarily mean creating a workforce of managers; it may simply mean fostering a leadership mindset among employees at all levels. Employees who are self-directed, good communicators, problem-solvers and know how to manage conflict, contribute to productivity and help improve the bottom line. “We make it so that everyone feels like they are an insider rather than an outsider,” says Derthick. “Someone who feels included will want to help. Someone who doesn’t might feel alienated and frustrated.” STAY CURRENT WITH LEGISLATION Professionals in HR need to continually stay up-to-date on key legislation that affects the workplace. The Affordable Care Act demands that employers examine their benefits plans and define what constitutes full and part-time employment. The Americans With Disabilities Act requires employers to provide for the needs of employees who are considered disabled under law. The National Labor Relations Board demands that employers be mindful of company policies regarding discipline and employee behavior — particularly as it relates to social media. “Tech and social media are huge challenges facing HR,” says Fountain. “HR needs to carefully think about how they are using what they might see on Instagram, Vine and Facebook as a basis for evaluation during the recruitment or promotion process. The danger comes if that information is used in a discriminatory manner.” BE FLEXIBLE Many factors affect the lives of all employees-from Millennials to Gen Xers to Baby Boomers. Companies that recognize the challenges people face and provide flexible scheduling or work-fromhome options help create workplaces that increase loyalty and productivity. Recognizing work habits and attitudes of different generations of employees also goes a long way toward building respect, collaboration and teamwork.


FOCUSED ON YOUR AUDIENCE “Everyone’s life is more complex now,” says Sutterlin. “And when people come to work, they bring their life with them. Our work involves helping people be successful at work — whether it’s helping them develop skills or balance their workload. It’s all about helping to manage those needs.” Companies and organizations of all sizes are invited to consider joining the local chapter of the Society of Human Resource Management as a way to keep up-to-date on current HR practices and trends. Visit www.shrm.org for details. Ann Kammerer is a freelance writer living in East Lansing. She has written extensively about business people, educators, artists and every day people doing good things in greater Lansing for a couple decades.

COVER

MUSIC

NEWS

SPORTS

DRAMA Our viewers and listeners are Your community is tuned to WKAR

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F E AT U R E

Common Ground Music Festival Makes Big Impact on Local Economy BY ANN COOL

T

he city of Lansing knows how to throw a party. And for the 15th year in a row, they’re throwing the largest outdoor summer music festival in the region that attracts tens of thousands of people from near and far.

On July 8 to 13, Common Ground Music Festival will be held once again in the heart of the city — at Lansing’s scenic Adado Riverfront Park. Since 2000, when it was first established, Common Ground organizers estimate that 1 million guests have attended the festival, making an economic impact of more than $50 million to mid-Michigan, according to the Common Ground website. This year promises to continue to attract tourists and residents who’ll take in the festival’s

It takes more than ticket sales to make the festival a success.

John Brown

Common Ground relies on its corporate sponsors as well. This year, festival partners include Miller Lite, Auto Value Parts Stores, Dan Henry Distributing Co., AT&T, Pepsi and Jackson National Life.

We caught up with corporate sponsor Jackson National Life and asked them about their support for the festival. Q: WHY DOES JAC K SON SPON SOR EV EN T S I N T H E COMMU NITY ?

A: Events like Common Ground are part of what makes greater Lansing a wonderful place to live. Our Jackson offices employ nearly 2,500 people here in mid-Michigan. We believe it’s important to help ensure greater Lansing remains a vibrant and active region for our associates. We want our colleagues to live, grow and flourish in Lansing and we believe part of our role as a large employer here is to support large community events that benefit the area, like Common Ground. Q: HOW DOES SPON SOR SH I P OF C OM M O N GRO U N D IMPACT JACKS ON ’S B U SI N ESS?

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PH OTO CO U RTE S Y OF CAW L M

A: Common Ground brings the entire region together to have fun, celebrate our communities and just enjoy a week of great music. At Jackson, we want our associates to truly enjoy their community and we know if we can support exciting events like Common Ground, we can retain and recruit top people to live and work here. Q : H O W D O E S I T B E N E F I T J N L OT H E R W I S E ?

A: Along with attending the many great performances, many of our associates choose to volunteer at Common Ground. Our company puts great emphasis on the value of giving back to the community, particularly through volunteerism. Common Ground offers a fun, family-friendly event many of our associates look forward to each year. Q : H O W D O YO U S E E CO M M O N GRO U N D BE NE FI TI NG T H E CO M M U N I T Y ?

A: Events that bring positive attention to Lansing benefit the entire community. We all know mid-Michigan is a great place to live. We have great schools, parks, museums, arts and entertainment, Michigan State University, the State Capitol and much more to offer. Common Ground is another great example of a benefit to living in Lansing. It brings big name talent to the area, boosts tourism and encourages many people to venture into and enjoy the area. It’s a big draw and fun for all ages. Anytime the community works together, it benefits everyone.


F E AT U R E

T H E CU RRE N T A N N O U N CE D L IN E U P IS : T U E S DAY, J U LY 8 :

Brand New, Circa Survive, The Hold Steady, Say Anything, The Front Bottoms, Kevin Devine and the Goddamn Band, Braid, So So Glos, You Blew It, Dinosaur Pile-Up and Seahaven WED N E S DAY, J U LY 9 :

311, Violent Femmes, The Wailers, Flobots, OPM, The4ontheFloor, Ben Kenney, Radical Something, The Weeks and Squirrel Shaped Fish T H UR S DAY, J U LY 1 0 :

Justin Moore, David Nail, Gord Bamford, Jacob Powell, more TBA F R I DAY, J U LY 1 1 :

Big Sean, Juicy J, more TBA SAT U R DAY, J U LY 1 2 :

Fitz and The Tantrums, Dr Dog, Dale Earnhardt Jr Jr, The Orwells, X Ambassadors, Royal Teeth, Chappo, more TBA live music and large array of food and beverages provided by local vendors.

SU N DAY, J U LY 1 3 :

Earth, Wind and Fire, more TBA

The festival features music performed by nationally recognized artists in every music genre including contemporary and classic rock, alternative, country, hip hop, and R & B, punk, and reggae, among others. Festival organizers have announced this year’s lineup, including performances on multiple stages each night. (See info box) Tickets are now festival website.

on

sale

on

the

For more information on this year’s Common Ground Music Festival, visit www.commongroundfest.com.

Ann Cool, MPS, is a freelance writer who lives in Mason with her husband Bob.

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Ideas are due the Friday before each event Submit your idea at

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OPINION

Employee Privacy in The Ever-Changing, TechDriven Workplace: A Warning to Employers BY S COTT EL DRIDG E

hether and to what extent employees enjoy “privacy” in the workplace — although not novel legal issues — are becoming more difficult questions for employers as technology advances.

W

Perhaps the most significant change in recent years is the rise of “mobile.” The law had only just started addressing workplace technology issues related to hiring, disciplining and discharging. Now, however, with most employees carrying the internet in their pocket 24/7 and the proliferation of “Bring Your Own Device” (“BYOD”) practices, issues related to technology in the workplace have been supercharged.

PERHAPS THE MOST SIGNIFICAT CHANGE IN RECENT YEARS IS THE RISE OF “MOBILE.”

The state and federal constitutions, of course, still protect 21st century public employees who engage in protected speech and against unlawful searches where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy, including in the virtual world. But to what extent online posts and e-communications are protected by the constitution remain a challenge for employers. Is a Facebook post (or simply “Liking” one) protected speech? Does an employee have a reasonable expectation of privacy outside of work if she posts everything about her private life online? Employers, employees and courts continue to struggle to find answers. One U.S. Supreme Court justice recently expressed 22

concern over the current state of the law regarding privacy in the workplace as being “ill-suited to the digital age, in which people reveal a great deal of information about themselves to third parties in the course of carrying out mundane tasks.” Indeed, technology advances rapidly, but the law is continuously playing catch-up. Private employers don’t have it any easier. Questions proliferate over whether employers’ monitoring or accessing employees’ personal email, social media sites or personal devices amounts to an unlawful invasion of privacy, even if there is a legitimate business reason. Some courts and government agencies are ruling in employees’ favor where overly-broad employer policies or practices curtailing employees’ social media activity might also chill their rights to engage in certain protected activities under the law, such as discussing wages and working conditions with co-workers. Other courts are examining the application to new technologies of the federal Electronic Communications Privacy and the Stored Communications Acts, which prohibit the “interception” of electronic communications using a “device” without the authorization of one of the parties to the communication, and intentionally accessing stored electronic communications (e.g., email or closed online chats) without authorization, respectively. Nor can employers ignore the ubiquitous nature of mobile devices in today’s society. Many are adopting BYOD policies to increase productivity, customer response times, and work processes, and to stay competitive in the 21st century. Though employers still issue mobile

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devices to employees, the BYOD trend is becoming the norm. Permitting employees to access employer databases and information systems using their own devices requires a delicate balance to protect both proprietary business information and an employee’s right to privacy when her device also transmits and stores personal information. The tension between employee privacy and an employer’s desire to maintain an efficient, congenial and confidential workplace will continue as technology advances. Will your workplace policies keep pace?


OPINION

Scott Eldridge focuses his practice on employment litigation defense and compliance matters involving discrimination, harassment, and whistleblower claims, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA), the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Uniformed Services Employment and Re-Employment Rights Act (USERRA), the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act (GINA), and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). He represents universities/colleges, municipalities, nonprofit organizations, government contractors, and commercial enterprises. 1400 Abbot Rd., Suite #200 East Lansing, MI 48823 517.352.3617 www.tomieraines.com

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MAN ON THE STREET

M AN on the STR E ET What level of privacy should employees expect in the workplace? COMPIL ED BY K YL E D OWL I N G

“A reasonable amount of privacy, people shouldn’t be doing bad things that they want to hide from the company..”

Rebecca Harris

“More than you get from most companies, but personally, my life is an open book, so I don’t mind.”

Patrick Ondrus

“An employee should have lots of privacy in the workplace because it’s like a second home to people. People go to work every day so they should have privacy like at home.”

Mike Hamur

“People should expect some privacy but it is at work. People should be using company time and resources correctly.”

Dee Smith

“Employees should get a very high amount of privacy. As long as it doesn’t have to do with work at all, the company should stay away from people’s private lives.”

Shelley Weisberg

“Companies should stay out of people’s personal lives. And companies should let you check your personal email without looking at it.”

Tom Wendt

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Unleash Your Potential NEWS

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Now accepting new students!

CONTACT US TODAY! 877.438.1596 or graduatecollege@sienaheights.edu www.sienaheights.edu/graduate w w w

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COLLECTIBLES

What About Buying Collectibles In Auction? BY PATRICK A. HEL L E R

Editor’s note: This is part two of a two-part column. Part one appeared in the April issue.

I

n my first segment, I reviewed the prospects of finding potential bargains in collectibles in local auctions of estates and households, specialized auctions held by general auction companies and government auctions. Let me repeat the two most important rules for bidding in auctions. First, know what you are trying to buy. You have the responsibility for learning the identity and condition of items and also a feel for the wholesale and retail markets for them. Second, read and understand the terms of sale. Do you have any return options should the item, for instance, turn out to be fake, have hidden undisclosed damage, or is misidentified? Also, pay attention to the payment and settlement requirements — and comply with them. Let me now continue with a discussion of the prospects of finding bargains in online auctions and in major auctioneers that specialize in collectibles. Among online auctioneers, eBay is the best known. In my own company’s experience, it is not worth paying someone to use their expertise reviewing online auctions to pick off bargains. Too many of what seem to be bargains are actually reproductions, reprints, or repaired, altered or counterfeit merchandise. Many online sellers properly disclose such information, but there are also many who do not. Again I have to emphasize that you know your merchandise before bidding and also study any guarantees offered by the seller and the auction company. Online auction companies and major sellers have a strong incentive to take care of their customers, so a good track 26

record or feedback rating will tend to identify quality sellers. This puts the individuals, who may only want to make an occasional sale, at a significant disadvantage. A number of bidders steer away from such sellers or will only bid a lower amount to cover against the risk of an unethical on incompetent vendor. By the way, there are authentication services for many kinds of collectibles. Be aware that not all “authentication services” are the real deal. There are several coin marketing companies who have packaged the coins they sell in protective holders of a supposed independent grading company. In reality, the alleged grading company is part of this marketing company. In such instances, the numismatic market does not respect the grades stated by such “authentication services.” The same problems exist in other areas of collectibles. Again, it comes

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down to being familiar with the items and the market in which you are bidding. For someone who searches online auctions for collectibles as a recreation, there can be occasional bargains found. Here’s one strategy to help find some of them. If the seller has a misspelling in the title of the item, it will be difficult for potential buyers to find it. So, for instance, someone looking for a Tiffany lamp would not find it if the seller spelled the brand as Tifany. However, a search for “Tif” would find such a lot, which otherwise might not get much bidding attention. Major auctioneers of collectibles have significant experience at listing lots so as to obtain the maximum selling prices. Typically, such auctions have a number of dealers in attendance, or who have previously examined the lots and placed bids without attending. These are your


competitors, who may be bidding for their own inventory or on behalf of the ultimate buyers. So, what are the odds that you can pick off a genuine bargain? Almost nil. However, such auctions are where you will find the trophy items for buyers who just have to have something. These auctions are also excellent venues to help gauge the market value of matching or similar items. While you may not purchase any bargains in such auctions (which is a rare occurrence), you can gain a lot of useful market information at little cost.

F I R S T, K N O W W H AT YO U A R E T R Y I N G TO B U Y. YO U H AV E THE RESPONSBILITY FOR LEARNING THE IDENTITY AND CONDITION OF ITEMS AND ALSO A FEEL FOR THE W H O L E S A L E A N D R E TA I L MARKETS FOR THEM.

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W O R K F O RC E D E V E LO P M E N T

Education Isn’t Optional BY EDYTHE HATTER -W I L L I A MS

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e need to face the truth. Our children aren’t reading at the appropriate grade level, and test scores aren’t improving. Last year’s MEAP scores showed that one in every three third graders in Michigan couldn’t read proficiently. In addition, 65 percent of eighth graders in Michigan were not proficient in mathematics. These numbers prove that the importance of education needs to be stressed now more than ever, beginning with early childhood education. Education isn’t just about high scores on tests and courses. It’s about learning the knowledge, skills and habits that will prepare students for the future. If our children aren’t adequately prepared, they won’t be able to obtain a job in the long run to support themselves and their families. The National Science Foundation reported the science and engineering workforce grew from 182,000 to about 5.4 million people between 1950 and 2009, almost 15 times faster than the United States population and nearly four times faster than the total U.S. workforce. Georgetown’s Center on Education and the Workforce  predicts the total number of STEM jobs will grow 26 percent between 2010 and 2020, while a Change the Equation study found even in the sluggish years between 2009 and 2012, there were nearly two STEM-focused job postings for every unemployed STEM professional. During those same years, unemployment in STEM stood at just over 4 percent, well below the 9.3 percent unemployment rate for non-STEM workers. The next generation needs to be set up for prosperity. Unfortunately, that’s not what’s happening. The Annie E. Casey Foundation reported 28

that by 2020, the U.S. is expected to face a shortage of one and a half million workers with college degrees and will have a surplus of six million individuals without a high school diploma who are unemployed. Our economy may currently be improving, but it won’t recover without an educated workforce, particularly one well versed in the STEM disciplines. According to the Wall Street Journal, the number of engineering degrees awarded in the U.S. has dropped 20 percent since its high point in 1985. China, for example, graduates 400,000 engineers a year, compared to 70,000 in the U.S. A recent article published by Fortune revealed the U.S. is producing 43 engineers per 100,000 inhabitants — well below Finland, Sweden and France, who lead the EU in percentage of engineering grads per capita.

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College graduates overall make 84 percent more over a lifetime than those with only high school diplomas, but further analysis of 171 majors shows that STEM majors can earn even higher wages. For example, petroleum engineering grads make about $120,000 a year, compared with $29,000 annually for psychology majors. Math and computer science majors earn $98,000 each year, while early childhood education majors get paid about $36,000. According to the Commerce Department, people in STEM fields can expect to earn 26 percent more money on average and be less likely to experience job loss. The STEM degree holders also tend to enjoy higher earnings overall, regardless of whether they work in STEM or non-STEM occupations. And it’s not just the schools, teachers, administrators and students who hold


W O R K F O RC E D E V E LO P M E N T

the responsibility to promise a high-quality education for our students. Parents and businesses need to be involved, too. Parents need to understand how crucial an education is and be engaged in their children’s learning. If you’re enthusiastic about learning, it’s more likely your children will replicate that motivation. Support at home can encourage students to develop a desire for success in the classroom and in their future careers.

support their educational endeavors in whatever ways you can. Greater Lansing needs to work together to strengthen education for our children’s futures and our own.

Edythe Hatter-Williams is the chief executive officer of Capital Area Michigan Works!, a talent investment network that partners with businesses to develop recruiting and retention strategies

E DUCATION ISN’T JUST ABOUT HIGH SCORES ON TESTS AND COURSES. IT’S ABOUT LEARNING THE KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND HABITS THAT WILL PREPARE STUDENTS FOR THE FUTURE.

Businesses can help by supporting an educated future, for both their employees and their employees’ children. A community that creates partnerships within itself is more likely to raise student performance and narrow the education gaps. Education needs business to help it understand what kids need to know, and to provide students with access to job shadows, work experiences, internships and anything that lets them get into a workplace and see what they can be. Whether you’re a parent, student, teacher, administrator or business, you can make a difference. Get your child involved in engaging and meaningful learning outside of school at places like the Information Technology Empowerment Center and Impression 5 Science Center. Model the behavior you want to see in the next generation by continuing to learn yourself. Talk about the importance of lifelong education with your employees and encourage and w w w

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R E A L E S TAT E

Creating and Maintaining a Culture of Excellence BY TRICIA FOS TER

W

hen talent, hard work, acumen, integrity and accountability come together in the business world, that idyllic combination is what we call “Excellence.”

Creating a culture of excellence in the workplace doesn’t happen by accident. It requires commitment by leadership, the right talent and patience. Developing a master plan to strive for excellence is the first step in molding a company culture. The second step is perseverance! Leadership must stick with the plan and allow it to evolve as the business grows, changes and matures. Further, the plan must allow for feedback so continuous improvement is embraced from the top down.

F E E D B AC K

PLAN

“EXCELLENCE” IS NOT A COMPANY GOAL TO BE ATTAINED ONCE AND THEN TAKEN

PERSEVERANCE

FOR GRANTED; IT’S AN ATTITUDE THAT MUST CAREFULLY AND CONTINUOUSLY BE NURTURED SO THAT IT CAN THRIVE.

The number one asset of any company is the people. Our employees are the face of our company, and how these ambassadors of our brand are perceived within the business community is as important as how they portray the company they work for. The confidence your clients and customers have in your people instills longevity in relationships, which in turn provides stability for your business and allows it the ability to grow. Therefore, investing in the right talent at all levels is an essential element in your overall culture. It takes time to build and develop the team, and hiring well is a tedious yet incredibly important step in the path to excellence. “Excellence” is not a company goal to be attained once and then taken for granted; it’s an attitude that must carefully and continuously be nurtured so that it can thrive. In my experience, regardless of the level of education or the impressiveness of a candidate’s resume, it is most important to hire talent with the following attributes: the ability to juggle projects and assignments; intelligence; common sense; honesty; and above all, a strong work ethic. These traits determine that elusive yet highly sought after characteristic called “aptitude” — the ability and capability to problem solve by effectively assessing, 30

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evaluating and implementing solutions, versus waiting to be told the solution by leadership. With employees in place, channeling individual abilities into a team that functions well together requires that each and every person associated with the company embraces the vision, mission and core values of the organization. For example, at CBRE we operate collectively by our RISE values — Respect, Integrity, Service and Excellence. It is a global value statement that is understood by everyone and embraced company-wide. Our values are a standard to which we hold ourselves and each other. Even with the right team in place, creating a culture of excellence is a goal that is never complete. Excellence is anything but stagnant. Companies must make an ongoing commitment to adapt the plan, the team and the approach in order to maintain the standard.

Tricia Foster, CPM®, ACoM® is Senior Managing Director and Chief Operating Officer at CBRE|Martin.


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GLBM LIST

Associations in Lansing Name of Association

Number of Members

Address

Michigan Education Association

150,000

1216 Kendale Blvd. P.O. Box 2573

Michigan Association of Realtors

23,000(+)

720 N. Washington Ave

Small Business Association of Michigan

23,000(+)

120 N. Washington Square

Michigan Restaurant Association

4,500(+) foodservice establishments

225 W. Washtenaw

Home Builders Association of Michigan

4,429 members

6427 Centurion Drive Ste. 150 B

Michigan Manufacturers Association

3,000 members

620 S. Capitol Ave.

Michigan Bankers Association

2,300 branches

507 S. Grand Ave

Michigan Association of School Administrators

2,000 members

1001 Centennial Way, Ste. 300

Greater Lansing Association of Realtors

1,800 members

4039 Legacy Parkway

Michigan High School Athletic Association

1,500(+) members

1661 Ramblewood Drive

Michigan Association of Health Plans

1,300(+)

327 Seymour Ave.

Michigan Recreation & Park Association

Represents 1,300(+) recreation professionals, agencies and industry vendors.

2465 Woodlake Circle, Ste. 180

Michigan Townships Association

Represents 1,240 townships

512 Westshire Drive

Association for Children’s Mental Health

1,200(+) members

6017 W. St. Joseph Hwy, Ste. 200

Michigan Association of School Boards

Comprised of 600(+) boards of education, representing nearly all public school districts in the state.

1001 Centennial Way, Ste. 400

Michigan Government Finance Officers Association

600(+) members representing nearly 500 communities

4020 Copper View, Ste. 130

Home Builders Assocation of Greater Lansing

331 members

2937 Atrium Drive Ste.

Michigan Press Association

320(+) members

827 N. Washington Ave.

Health Care Association of Michigan

Represents nearly 300 nursing facilities

7413 Westshire Drive

Community Economic Development Association of Michigan

216 members statewide

1118 S. Washington Ave.

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GLBM LIST

Each month, The Greater Lansing Business Monthly compiles a list relevant to the publication’s theme. The lists are not comprehensive, but rather, a snapshot look at what is publicly available on various industries and organizations. The following is a list of area associations ranked by the number of members in each.

City

Zip

Phone

Web address

East Lansing

48826

800.292.1934

www.mea.org

Lansing

48906

800.454.7842

www.mirealtors.com

Lansing

48933

800.362.5461

www.sbam.org

Lansing

48933

517.482.5244

www.michiganrestaurant.org

Lansing

48917

517.322.0224

http://www.buildingmichigan.org

Lansing

48933

517.372.5900

www.mimfg.org

Lansing

48933

517.485.3600

www.mibankers.com

Lansing

48917

517.327.5910

www.gomasa.org

Lansing

48911

517.323.4090

www.lansing-realestate.com

East Lansing

48823

517.332.5046

www.mhsaa.com

Lansing

48933

517.371.3181

www.mahp.org

Okemos

48864

517.485.9888

www.mrpaonline.org

Lansing

48917

517.321.6467

www.michigantownships.org

Lansing

48917

517.372.4016

www.acmh-mi.org

Lansing

48917

517.327.5900

www.masb.org

Traverse City

49684

231.947.0882

www.migfoa.org

Okemos

48864

Lansing

48906

517.372.2424

www.michiganpress.org

Lansing

48917

517.627.1561

www.hcam.org

Lansing

48910

517.485.3588

cedam.info

517.323.3254

www.hbalansing.com

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ACCOUNTING

Five Ways to Boost Productivity: Practical Solutions for Business Managers BY KRIS TINE L ATCH AW

A

re you having trouble motivating the troops? Keeping the workplace energy level high — while continuing to churn out the merchandise or provide valuable services — remains a constant struggle for many employers. Of course, it starts at the top because business managers generally set the tone for the workplace. Look inward at yourself first before looking outward. Here are five helpful hints for increasing everyday productivity:

1

TRIM THE “ FAT ” F ROM T H E SC H EDU L E.

2 3 34

Business advisors often recommend making a “todo” list each day. But this can be a counterproductive experience, not to mention depressing, if the list is too long. Cut it down to a more manageable size-maybe even in half. This way, you will not be as frustrated by a lack of progress. Instead, you should have a little extra breathing room for additional projects, plus you might learn more from any setbacks you encounter. STRE SS QUA L I T Y OV ER QUA N T I T Y.

It would seem axiomatic that improving productivity would be about producing more, not less. But the truth of the matter is that increasing output, while a reasonable objective, might actually lead to mistakes, thereby costing you more time in the long run. Also, do not become overly enamored with multitasking. Switching frequently from one project to another can slow you down. It is usually better to focus on one task at hand. SCHEDULE H A R D WOR K F OR “ PR I M E T I ME .”

If you are honest with yourself, you may find you are more productive at certain times of the day or week than others. For instance, are you a morning person or are you more creative if you are burning the midnight oil? Are you better off starting fresh on Monday or wrapping up on Friday, or maybe you hit your stride in the middle of the week? Regardless of the answers, take on challenges when you are at your best, and leave the administrative duties for those times when your energy starts to lag.

G R E AT E R L A N S I N G B U S I N E S S M O N T H LY

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4 5

AVO I D D I S RU P T I O N S A N D N U I S A NC E S.

This goes back to the importance of being able to focus. Unless you are someone who feeds off noise or chatter in the background, you may increase productivity by turning off mobile devices, ignoring social media and possibly even logging out of your e-mail accounts. And, when it is called for, you might post a “do not disturb” sign on your door. Do whatever it takes to get the job done. TA K E A DVA N TAGE O F N E W T E C H NO LO GY.

The days of jotting down reminders to yourself are long gone for the tech-savvy person. Alternatively, you can rely on a wide variety of software programs designed to increase your productivity. This includes digital calendars, task management apps and other timesaving devices. With these new tools at your disposal, it should be easy to keep better track of projects, meet deadlines and become more efficient overall.

These five steps should help you to be more productive. Once you implement them, the approach is likely to filter down to other workers. Develop the good habits you expect your workers to exhibit.

Kris joined Maner Costerisan in 2011 as the Director of Administration, overseeing the day-to-day internal operations of the firm. Specifically, she manages and directs the firm’s administrative, facilities, financial and personnel functions. An integral part of the Maner Costerisan team, Kris also assists with managing internal information systems and marketing initiatives.


Federally insured by the NCUA

A Reliable Connection Wherever You Are

Manage your business account 24/7 with online banking, MSUFCU’s mobile app, or by using your phone with MoneyLine. • Transfer funds between accounts • Make loan payments • Review transaction history • Check account balances Make sure your money is where it needs to be, even if you’re not. And, if your company needs to borrow money, MSUFCU has a variety of lending options that will fit your needs. Contact MSUFCU today.

Branch Locations East Lansing • 3777 West Rd. MSU Union, 49 Abbot Rd., Rm. #108 523 E. Grand River Ave. 4825 E. Mt. Hope Rd. Lansing • 104 S. Washington Sq. 200 E. Jolly Rd. 653 Migaldi Ln. Sparrow Professional Bldg., Ste. 300 Haslett • 16861 Marsh Rd. Okemos • 1775 Central Park Dr. Charlotte • 180 High St. Auburn Hills • 3265 Five Points Dr.

www.msufcu.org/business 517-333-2365 • 800-678-4968

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SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

How Local Businesses and Owners Can Give Back to the Community BY J UL IE PINGS TON

L

A 2013 research study by Core Communications and Echo Research reported that 91 percent of global consumers are likely to switch brands to one that supports a good cause, given similar price and quality. “Companies have a job to do,” Alison DaSilva of Core Communications says. “This research reveals an increasingly social, savvy consumer who is looking for proof of progress. Varying degrees of perceived individual and corporate impact underscore the overwhelming need for companies to consistently communicate both corporate and consumer CSR return.” For example, Jackson National Life employs a Corporate Responsibility team to ensure that the company stays focused on the social and economic well-being of the communities in which they are an employer. They also encourage employees to participate in projects and initiatives that strengthen those communities. You will see JNL employees volunteering at many local events in their bright red t-shirts in which they log over 9,000 volunteer hours a year annually.

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PH OTO P ROV I D E D

ast month, the local business community in downtown Lansing took to the streets for the Capital City Clean Sweep. The initiative was supported by businesses with their financial support and in-kind services, as well as by businesses that sent their staff members to spend an afternoon cleaning up the downtown streetscape. While the cleanup had no direct benefit to the bottom line for the sponsoring businesses, the event was critical to the future success of the local business community. Now, more than ever, businesses are placing a high emphasis on corporate social responsibility (CSR), giving back and taking care of the community.

Jeff Crippen and Ed Culberson present a $15,000 check to Loaves and Fishes.

Another rising trend is for local communities to provide CSR opportunities to the attendees of meetings and conventions to incorporate a community give back program as a component of their event. The Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau sees more and more meeting professionals looking for ways to connect to their host destination. To address the requests, the GLCVB has created a local resource guide to connect meeting and event planners to opportunities within the community. Meeting attendees have been silently hosting blood drives, book drives, cleanups and beautification programs within our community. Fortunately, there are a multitude of ways for local businesses in the greater Lansing region to be able to give back and get involved within the community. From Big

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Brothers Big Sisters to Adopt a River, and rebuilding a play structure at Patriarche Park to distributing matching grants and sponsorships, the choices are endless. Local service clubs, such as local Rotary clubs, provide business owners an opportunity to engage with the local business community in service-minded activities. Being a Rotarian means becoming part of a group of business leaders dedicated to making service a part of their lives. The Lansing Rotary Club is approaching its 100th year of being dedicated to a higher standard by following the Rotary philosophy of “Service Above Self.” Rotary Clubs can also be found in East Lansing, Haslett/Okemos, Delta Waverly, Williamston, Grand Ledge, South Lansing/ Holt, Lansing/DeWitt, Sunrise and Mason.


GLBM_JanuaryAd.pdf 1 12/12/2013 12:27:32 PM

ARCHITECTURE • ENGINEERING • PLANNING Corporate social responsibility initiatives may have started as more of a generalized marketing activity, but current initiatives should be considered a strategy that a business develops to create longterm success. As a member of the local business community, you can give your time, your talent and/or your resources to being more socially responsible in local endeavors. In the end, the bottom line is that your business will benefit and the local community will thrive. C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

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Julie Pingston, CMP, CTA is the Senior Vice President of the Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau and the President Elect of the Rotary Club of Lansing Foundation.

P 517.371.1200 info@c2ae.com C2AE.COM

Sparrow Health Classic Exceptional Golf to Support

Extraordinary

Care

Wednesday, June 18, 12:30 shotgun start at Hawk Hollow & Eagle Eye Golf Courses The Sparrow Health Classic offers an unforgettable day of golf. All proceeds benefit the health and care of our community. Join us.

» Serious golfers will love the challenges offered by some of the toughest holes in the region.

» Recreational golfers will enjoy the scramble format, the beautifully manicured greens and the fun gifts for every golfer.

» Not a golfer? Sign up for the 18-hole real-grass putting course at Little Hawk, then join the golfers for dinner following play. No matter how you choose to participate, you’re helping us continue to provide the best, most advanced healthcare services available to the men, women and children who come to Sparrow for care each day. Generously presented by

For more information, visit SparrowFoundation.org. Questions? Call 517.364.5677.

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R E G I O N A L R O TAT I O N

Leslie Businesses Find Inexpensive Ways to Expand Their Market BY BRUCE CROCK E T T

O

ur small town has everything … everything except a lot of people! Located on Interstate 127 between Lansing and Jackson, Leslie is the perfect place to be, but small businesses often struggle to make their sales projections. Most local businesses do well, especially the chain stores, restaurants, hardware and health care professionals. It is the niche business with a store front in downtown Leslie that faces a big challenge in raising up a large customer base.

BY STAYING CONNECTED AND REACHING OUT TO NEW PEOPLE IN DIFFERENT PLACES, THESE BUSINESSES HAVE, IN SOME CASES, DOUBLED THEIR BUSINESS ... USING THE INTERNET TO GROW BUSINESS IS CERTAINLY NOT A NEW IDEA, BUT SEEING IT AS THE KEY TO SUCCESS FOR THE MOM & POP SURE IS. Gaylene Johnson, owner and operator of Kidz Clothes & More, connects to her customers via Facebook. In addition to the store’s Facebook page, Johnson recently added an online store page to enable Facebook users to see products and place orders (facebook.com/ KidzClothesMoreOnlineStore). In the first two weeks, she sold 20 percent of the 38

postings to customers all over the United States. To purchase an item, viewers comment the word “sold” beneath an item’s picture. Then they send a private message with their contact information. Johnson sends them an invoice, receives payment by mail and then ships the item. Another downtown Leslie storefront is Friends Resale shop featuring quality, low-priced furniture, wall décor and dinner ware. Owner Doug Riley says that 50 percent of their sales are from items posted on Craigslist. Their ever-changing window displays help bring in the other half of their customers. Leslie’s newest downtown business, The Pirate’s Den, a resale shop also cultivates customers through Craigslist. Specializing in collectibles and unique household items, the Den uses Craigslist to sell items as well as to hunt for treasures online. They also offer a search and procure service for clients looking for specific items. Percentage of sales is evenly split between online and in-store purchases.

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By staying connected and reaching out to new people in different places, these businesses have, in some cases, doubled their business. Most of our local businesses use Facebook to attract repeat customers. Using the Internet to grow business is certainly not a new idea, but seeing it as the key to success for the mom and pop shop sure is. The Leslie Area Chamber of Commerce partners with CADL, the Capital Area District Library, to encourage and equip businesses for eCommerce.

Bruce Crockett is a pastpresident of the Leslie Area Chamber of Commerce. Formerly a software engineer, Crockett now pastors the Grand River Community Church, a Free Methodist ministry in Leslie, Mich.


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FINANCIAL ADVISOR

Summer Fun 4 strategies today’s small business owner can employ to take that vacation they deserve BY CURT NURENBERG

L

et’s face it, running a business can be stressful. How stressful? A survey conducted by Small Business Owner Report found that for small business owners the stress of running a company can dwarf that of managing personal finances, maintaining a healthy marriage or even raising children.

Sometimes, relatively minor issues can prove to be quite aggravating. For example, who gets called if the refrigerator in the break room goes on the fritz? What happens if a delivery truck backs into a parked car? 3.

One way to manage that stress is with a vacation, long-recognized as an effective stress reliever. And there’s no better time to step away from the office than during a beautiful Michigan summer.

Small business owners sometimes reinvest in the business at their own personal cost, paying everyone from suppliers to employees before ensuring they themselves are being appropriately remunerated. Sometimes, there’s no alternative. But saving up to take even just one or two small vacations during the year may be a simple matter of creating a new bank account and setting aside a modest sum of money (through, say, an automatic transfer) every week or two.

(This might be the part of the article where you say, “But I can’t take a vacation! There’s work to do!” Relax, there’s even a tip here for those business owners compelled to work as frequently as possible.) Without further ado, here are four strategies today’s small business owner can employ to take that vacation they deserve. 1.

PR IOR ITIZE A WOR K—L I F E B A L A N C E

First and foremost, it’s important to recognize that vacations are good for business because they’re good for you. Bloomberg Businessweek reported in 2007 that vacation deprivation contributed to more mistakes, anger and resentment at coworkers, and former NASA scientists found that vacationers experienced an 82 percent increase in job performance post-trip.

PAY YO U R S E L F

4.

W O R K … I F YO U M U S T

A vacation should be about fun. In fact, the good times begin even before the vacation does: a study published in the journal Applied Research in Quality of Life showed that merely planning a vacation results in an increase in happiness. But if the idea of stepping away for a few days increases your anxiety levels a bit instead, it’s okay to cheat a little. •

Being a small business owner sometimes means that boundaries between work and personal life can deteriorate as unforeseen business needs arise. But just as you wouldn’t drive your car non-stop until it breaks down, don’t push yourself so hard that illness or exhaustion forces you to take some down time. 2.

SHARE THE STAG E

Regardless of the industry, it’s possible for small business owners to work as “chief cook and bottle washer.” In other words, they do everything — from relatively menial tasks to the most vital leadership duties — to fill whatever gaps might open up. This gives owners an allencompassing view of the company, but can also paint them into a corner. After all, if no one else knows the nooks and crannies of the business quite like the owner, it can make it more challenging for the owner to walk away for any more than a day or two. The solution? Share the stage. Consistently seek opportunities to cross-train employees on the tasks required to run the show. This isn’t limited to the mission-critical stuff, either. 40

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• •

Set aside 30 or 60 minutes (but no more) each day to respond to email and/or calls. Arrange for a work-related meeting with a prospect, client or vendor located in or near your vacation destination. Thanks to tools such as Apple’s FaceTime and Microsoft’s Skype, distance is no barrier to faceto-face chats — just make sure you’ve packed more than your Hawaiian shirts.

Many small business owners are powered by a passion for what they do. But they must be careful not to overlook the need to recharge periodically, and a well-timed vacation can be just the chance they need.

Curt Nurenberg is principal-in-charge of Rehmann’s Lansing office and works specifically with clients in the dental industry. He can be reached at curt.nurenberg@rehmann.com.


Borrow local. It’s important to me to establish relationships with people in our community. Chris and Jane feel the same way. We support each other as well as other local businesses. It’s a great partnership. —Mark Robinson, President DeLau Fire Services

From left: Jane Sherzer, Vice President Commercial Loan Officer, Horizon Bank; Mark Robinson, President, DeLau Fire Services; Christopher Nugent, Market President, Horizon Bank

Still! Customers just like DeLau Fire Services are now part of the Horizon Bank family. And, while the name has changed, the personal service from bankers you know and trust has not. For more than 140 years, Horizon Bank has been dedicated to the prosperity of communities with financially sound, local decision-making by experienced leaders who are rooted in their communities—like Chris Nugent and Jane Sherzer. Now, it’s our privilege to have the opportunity to serve your community! Stop by your new Horizon Bank to continue to experience the difference that local service really makes in your financial life. We look forward to serving you.

Borrow local. Bank local. Still.

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BUSINESS CALENDAR

June 2014 BUSINESS EVENTS

John W. Mashni, attorney with Foster, Swift, Collins & Smith. Seating for this event is limited, so please RSVP early, no later than June 9. This informative evening will be held at Greenstone FSU, located at 3515 West Road. Networking will begin at 6 p.m. followed by the annual member meeting at 6:30 p.m. The presentation will begin at 6:45 p.m. This is a free session. Email Elisabeth.mowen@greenstonefcs.com or visit www.glpa-michigan.org.

6/17

BUSINESS EDUCATION SERIES: MARKETING 101, LANSING. Join presenters Chad Simon from LSJ

News and Susan Angel from WLNS as they guide you through Marketing 101. You will learn how to create a plan, set objectives, set a budget and more. This session will be held at the Lansing Regional Chamber, located at 500 E. Michigan Ave. Suite 200, from 8 to 10 a.m. Register for How to Communicate in a Social Media World on June 19 and this session and receive a discount in price. Call (517) 853-6463, email trichardson@lansingchamber. org or visit www.lansingchamber.org.

Gloria Loongo and Denise Rassel at the Greater Lansing Business Monthly Connections and Coffee Event.

6/3

DOWNTOWN BUSINESS HUDDLE, LANSING. Join

downtown business owners and their associates on the first Tuesday of every month at the Downtown Business Huddle. Discuss current issues happening in our community, downtown updates and special topics, along with networking in a round table atmosphere. The event, organized by the Business Development committee, will be held at Michigan Brewing Company, located at 402 S. Washington Square, from 8 to 9 a.m. Call (517) 977-1349 or visit www.downtownlansing.org.

6/11

F IRST ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING & EDUCATION PROGRAM, EAST LANSING. Join Great

Lakes Paralegal Association for their annual member meeting, networking, and a social media and marketing presentation by

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JUNE 2014

6/19

GREATER MONTHLY

LANSING BUSINESS RIBBON CUTTING ,

LANSING. Join Greater Lansing Business Monthly for an

open house and ribbon cutting. The GLBM team will celebrate one year of publishing the Greater Lansing Business Monthly. This event will be held at 614 Seymour Ave. from 5 to 7 p.m. The ribbon cutting will take place promptly at 5:30 p.m. Call (517) 203-3333 or email virginia@m3group.biz.

6/19

SBAM’S ANNUAL MEETING & LUNCHEON, LANSING. Join The Small Business Association of

Michigan for their Annual Meeting & Networking Luncheon. This event provides SBAM members the opportunity to network with other small business owners and supporters to not only celebrate successes, but also to discuss important issues affecting small businesses in Michigan. This event will be held at the Lansing Center from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tickets $65/person or $450/ table of 8. Visit www.michiganbusinessnetwork.com.


BUSINESS CALENDAR

6/25-26

7/22

TEAM LEADER SEMINAR, LANSING.

Greater Lansing Business Monthly and presenting sponsor MSU Federal Credit Union for Connections and Coffee. Spend your morning networking, enjoying a light breakfast, and listening to a short presentation. This free event will be held at the University Club of MSU from 8 to 9 a.m. Call (517) 2033333 or email virginia@m3group.biz.

SkillPath Seminars will host a comprehensive two-day course on how to excel and become a highly effective team leader. Managers, supervisors and team leaders will all benefit from this two-day workshop. Learn the characteristics of a successful team, how to build a team that will get results, how to create a motivating team climate, the changing role of a team leader, how to deal with performance problems and team conflicts and much more. This course is being held at the Comfort Inn Lansing, located at 525 N. Canal Road, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days. Call (800) 873-7545 or visit www.skillpath.com.

7/8

CONNECTIONS AND COFFEE, LANSING. Join the

7/31

JULY MEMBER MIXER, LANSING. Join the Lansing

Chamber for their July Mixer at Midtown Brewing Company, located at 402 S. Washington. Enjoy their new patio, food and craft beer. Call (517) 853-6463, email trichardson@ lansingchamber.org or visit www.lansingchamber.org.

OSHA COMPLIANCE 2014, LANSING. Would you

pass an OSHA inspection tomorrow? This one day intensive session will help anyone who is in charge of overseeing the safety and training of their organization’s employees so that you can pass with flying colors. Learn all of the ins and outs of OSHA and how to stay compliant. This session will take place at Best Western Plus, located at 6820 S. Cedar St. The cost for this course is $179/person or $169/person for groups of five or more. Check in is at 8:30 a.m. and the session runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit www.pryor.com.

Ownership. Pride. Responsibility.

Your job. Done right. Seamless, secure project facilitation. From pre-press/graphic design and printing, to bindery and mailing — your project is in-house and under control. We’re professionals — and it shows in everything we do.

BRDPrinting.com

tel 517.372.0268

|

fax 517.372.4922

|

912 West St. Joseph, Lansing, MI 48915

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N O TA B L E N E W S

FAMILY-OWNED COMPANY CONVERTS TO NAPA BRAND One of the largest distributors of automotive parts and equipment in Michigan will now service its customers under the NAPA Auto Parts brand. The Parts Place — NAPA, with eight locations

MSUFCU ANNOUNCES NEW BRANCH MANAGER AND ASSISTANT BRANCH MANAGER OF MASON BRANCH Patrick McPharlin, President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of MSU Federal Credit Union, is pleased to announce the promotions of Allison Horn to Branch Manager, and Anthony Brown to Assistant Branch Manager at MSUFCU’s new Mason Branch (to open in October 2014). The new branch will allow these individuals and their

throughout the greater Lansing area, recently made the switch from Carquest to NAPA. Though the eight locations will appear different, the service administered to customers will not change. Customers will  receive  the same great service and expertise they’ve grown to rely on for the past 50 plus years, according to long-standing company president Dick Seehase.

staff to provide superior service to MSUFCU members in the Mason area. Allison Horn has been with MSUFCU since December of 2010, and was previously a Call Center Manager before being promoted to the Mason Branch Manager. She received a Horn bachelor of arts (BA) degree in organizational communication from Michigan State University.

Anthony Brown has worked for MSUFCU since February 2013, previously serving as an E-Services Specialist. Prior to his position at MSUFCU, he served as the Director of Brown Sales at the Holiday Inn Express and Suites in East Lansing. Brown is pursuing a bachelor of arts (BA) degree in organization administration and is a volunteer for Junior Achievement of Mid-Michigan. AWARD-WINNING MARKETING EXEC JOINS PACE Andrea Ness has joined Lansing-based Pace Marketing and Communications Inc. as director of account services. Ness

In her new position, Ness leads Pace’s client services and content management teams to ensure the best results for clients. She is responsible for client relationships and making sure that all client needs are met.

You work hard to sweat. We can make sure that’s the only time you do. Have your air conditioner tuned-up before summer heats up.

For more information, visit www. ThisIsPace.com.

517.482.5501 www.hagerfox.com

44

Prior to joining Pace, Ness was director of graphic and new media services at Martin Waymire, a Lansing public relations and communications firm. Ness graduated from Michigan State University with a BA in advertising.

Because you really DO deserve to be comfortable

G R E AT E R L A N S I N G B U S I N E S S M O N T H LY

JUNE 2014


GRAVITY WORKS TEAM EXPANDS WITH TWO NEW HIRES Gravity works, a Lansing-based design and development company, has added two new hires to their team. Seth Allison, mobile development specialist, and Jeff Pompliano, project manager, join the Gravity Works office in Old Town, Lansing.

the City of Eaton Rapids and distributed to residential and commercial ratepayers in the community. The project is also expected to generate enough power to meet onethird of the community’s renewable energy requirements under the State’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) regulations. More can be found at www.helios-power.com.

BOB HOFFMAN NAMED 2014 LANSING COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTINGUISHED ALUMNUS The Lansing Community College Alumni Association has selected Bob Hoffman as the recipient of the Distinguished Alumni of the Year Award for 2014. Hoffman is founder of the nationally recognized

Jeff Pompliano is a graduate of Michigan State University with degrees in telecommunication and information studies and media. As project manager, he will bring together all the components of projects and customer service: design, development and stakeholders. Seth Allison is primarily an iOS developer, but is determined to learn as much about programming as he can, especially mobile development. Seth has a degree in computer science from Northern Michigan University. Read more about the Gravity Works Design + Development team of experts at www. gravityworksdesign.com/about/our-team. HELIOS SOLAR AND RENUSOL AMERICA ANNOUNCE COMPLETION OF MICHIGAN’S FIRST BROWNFIELD-TO-SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT Helios Solar and Renusol America recently announced that a 100-year-old community waste landfill in Eaton Rapids has been redeveloped as Michigan’s first brownfield location to generate renewable energy. Closed and ‘capped’ 20 years ago and unused since then, the landfill is now the site of a 535.5kW solar system with 2100 PV panels. Helios Solar, the project engineer and installer, and Renusol America, a solar mounting system manufacturer, joined forces in engineering the system to maintain the integrity of the sealed landfill and maximize power output. Eaton Rapids Solar LLC will own and operate the facility, which is expected to generate 658 MWh of solar generated electricity annually for the City of Eaton Rapids Electrical Utility. The lower cost power will be purchased by w w w

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N O TA B L E N E W S

grassroots movement ePIFanyNow and serves as the Public Relations Manager at Wharton Center for Performing Arts. Hoffman was recently featured as a national community contributor on the CBS Evening News for his work with ePIFanyNow. As the founder of this nonprofit Hoffman organization, Hoffman has engaged people throughout the nation to Pass It Forward and touch peoples’ lives through acts of kindness — no matter how small, simple or insignificant. After graduating from Lansing Community College in 1991 and completing his undergraduate experience at Michigan State University in 1993, Hoffman quickly ascended to the position of morning anchor with Lansing’s WLNS News Center Six. For seven years, he brought the local, national and world news to the residents of our community. As a trusted, awardwinning journalist, Hoffman’s work has been recognized by the Michigan Associated Press and the National Radio and Television News Directors Foundation. Hoffman is

a graduate of Webberville Community High School.

JEFFREY ZUNK WINS USG’S TOP SALES AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE

Hoffman’s broadcasting background, media connections and unique ability to tell a story led to his current position at Wharton Center of Performing Arts. As Michigan’s largest performing arts venue, Hoffman has become the face of Wharton.

Jeffery Zunk, a Contractor Specialty Representative for USG Corp. based in Portland, Mich., has been named to USG’s President’s Club, an elite group of top sales people Zunk who have demonstrated outstanding performance, relationship building and a commitment to excellence.

As an active community volunteer, he has been acknowledged with numerous awards, including: •

The Community Service Award from the Lansing Regional Chamber of Commerce Official Celebrity Award from the Junior League of Lansing Eleanor Banes Award from the Capital Area United Way

Zunk is among 33 sales professionals named to the USG President’s Club, a coveted status earned by only 8 percent of USG’s sales team. Some of those honored this year have been with USG Corp. for more than two decades; others have been with the company less than two years.

The Distinguished Alumni Award was established to honor outstanding alumni who have achieved a high level of professional accomplishment and have made significant personal contributions through their involvement in community service.

Zunk comes from a long line of USG workers; he’s the third generation in his family to work for the company. His care for his role as a specialty representative shines through in his work performance.

• •

CLOBES TO SUCCEED MCPHARLIN AS MSUFCU CEO MSU Federal Credit Union announces the retirement of Patrick McPharlin, President and Chief Executive Officer from the Credit Union after 41 years of dedicated service and leadership. April Clobes, MSUFCU’s Executive Vice President/Chief Operating Officer, will be his successor beginning in March 2015. McPharlin joined the Credit Union in 1973 and has served as President/CEO for the past 14 years. During his leadership, MSUFCU has grown from $546 million to over $2.6 billion in assets, and from close to 97,000 members to over 183,000 members nationwide. His dedication to McPharlin serving the members and the community has led the Credit Union to a stellar record of growth and success.  

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Clobes

State University Federal Credit Union April Clobes Michigan has been with the Credit 3777 West Road, East Lansing, MI 48823 Union for 18 years and has led many areas 517.333.2254 Fax 517.333.2227 www.msufcu.org aclobes@msufcu.org within the Credit Union through various executive positions. Her vision and April Clobes joined Michigan State University Federal Credit commitment Union to (MSUFCU) the Credit Union in 2006. After holdinghas a number of executive she was named Executive Vice President and Chief allowed herpositions, to excel within the Operating Officer in 2011. MSUFCU has an asset size of over organization $2.5 and achieve her worldwide, currentand 550 employees. billion, 181,000 members Credit Union was recently recognized as one of West position of The Executive Vice President/ Michigan’s 101 Best and Brightest Companies to Work For by the Michigan Business and Professional Association (MBPA) Chief Operating Officer.

and named one of the Top 100 Workplaces in Michigan by the Detroit Free Press. MSUFCU is the largest university-based credit April M. Clobes in the a world and has a national reputation for excellence. “April is an exemplary leaderunion with great passion for helping our members, employees and community to be Ms. Clobes is extremely active in the Michigan State University (MSU) and Greater Lansing communities. financially successful and achieve their goals and dreams.She serves on a variety of councils, committees, and boards of directors for She has been integrally involved in virtually all aspects of Region Community community organizations including Capital Symphony Orchestra, Credit Union operations and Foundation, has the Lansing full support of theWharton Center Board, MSU College of Music National Leadership board of directors,” stated Dr.Advisory John R. Brick, MSUFCU’s Council, College of Communication Arts and Sciences Alumni Board, WKAR Development Council, Chairman of the board. “We are confident she will takeMSU theAlumni Association National Board, and the McLaren Greater Lansing Foundation Credit Union to the next level.”Board. In early 2013, she was named a Top Woman to Watch by the Credit Union Times. The Top Woman to Watch honor is awarded to women who are reshaping the credit union industry and recognizes true leaders throughout the country. Ms. Clobes holds a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in Marketing from Michigan State University, Master of Arts (MA) degree in Advertising and Public Relations from Michigan State University, and Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree from Western Michigan University.


BUSINESS CALENDAR

A ceremony honoring the President’s Club winners took place in mid April at the Peninsula Hotel in Chicago. CLARK CONSTRUCTION COMPANY EXECUTIVE SELECTED AS FERRIS FOUNDATION BOARD MEMBER Robert LaLonde, vice president of Clark Construction Company, has been selected as a board member of the Ferris Foundation. Ken Lawless, executive vice president of Clark Construction Company, previously served as a Ferris State University board member.

Lansing since 1987. The organization’s mission is to eliminate substandard housing in the community — improving local neighborhoods — and to help disadvantaged families achieve their dream of safe, decent and affordable home ownership. This Habitat for Humanity affiliate has invested more than $5 million in our local housing market.

NEW NONPROFIT FOR SMALL BUSINESSES LAUNCHED A new 501(c)(4) nonprofit called Small Business for Michigan was launched recently in Lansing. Small Business for Michigan supports public policies and programs aimed at

Established in 1991, the foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit with the purpose of advancing the mission and goals of Ferris State University by generating and managing private support. LaLonde is an alumnus of Ferris State University and graduated with a degree in construction management. Before being promoted to vice president, he worked as LaLonde senior project manager for Clark Construction Company and has 15 years of experience in commercial construction. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY LANSING ANNOUNCES NEW LEADERSHIP Habitat for Humanity Lansing has announced that Vicki Hamilton-Allen has been selected to serve as the organization’s executive director, effective June 2. Hamilton-Allen, who succeeds Denise Paquette, has extensive administrative, fundraising and communications experience. She was most recently employed as a Major Gifts Officer for the American Red Cross. She also held an executive position with the British government and worked with multiple companies that comprised the U.K.’s National New Home Construction Industry. Habitat for Humanity Lansing has built or rehabilitated over 100 homes of Greater w w w

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improving Michigan’s small business economy, business climate and employment opportunities. It promotes, encourages and advocates citizen participation in political and civic events, governmental events and associated activities. More information about Small Business for Michigan is available at smallbusinessformichigan.org. YMCA OF LANSING ANNOUNCES CHANGES TO BOARD OF DIRECTORS The YMCA of Metropolitan Lansing is pleased to announce Kelli A. Ellsworth-Etchison, Vice President of Community and Business Development for LAFCU, Etchison has been elected to a twoyear term to serve as chairperson of the Y’s 32-member board of directors. Ellsworth-Etchison, who has served on the Y board of directors for six years, replaces outgoing board chairperson Catherine Jacobs, attorney for Loomis Law Firm, who served in the role from 2012-2014. Longstanding Y board members James Schmelter from PNC Bank and Denise Schroeder from Alterus Retirement Solutions also assume their new roles of first vice chair and second vice chair, respectively. As board chair, in addition to providing direct leadership of the board, EllsworthEtchison will also chair the Y’s Executive Committee, which provides support and direction to the Lansing Y CEO, Jeff Scheibel. DBI EARNS HAWORTH’S BEST IN CLASS DISTINCTION FOR THIRD CONSECUTIVE YEAR Haworth, Inc has designated DBI as a 2014 Best In Class dealership based on exceptional performance in sales and customer satisfaction, operational excellence as well as enterprise development. DBI has earned Best In Class distinction each year of the 48

three years of the program’s existence, joining an elite group of 22 dealers. Haworth works with a network of more than 250 North American dealerships — independent businesses — that provide sales and support to customers by assisting architects, designers and facility managers in the complex process of selecting, specifying, planning and purchasing furniture and workspace interiors. ATTORNEY PAULA J. MANDERFIELD ELECTED TO BLUE CARE NETWORK OF MICHIGAN BOARD OF DIRECTORS Fraser Trebilcock Attorney and retired Ingham County Circuit Court Judge, Paula J. Manderfield has been elected to the Blue Care Network of Michigan Manderfield Board of Directors for a term starting in January 2014. The BCN Board of Directors is composed of members, private citizens and representatives from various businesses, labor organizations, hospitals and health care providers and is the largest HMO in Michigan. Manderfield had previously served on this Board for 16 years. Manderfield is a former Ingham County Circuit Court and Lansing District Court Judge and is a Registered Nurse. She has served on a variety of boards including the Michigan Judges Association Executive Board, State Bar of Michigan Judicial Council, Women Lawyers Association of Mid-Michigan (past President) Elder Law of Michigan, Ronald McDonald House, YMCA Metro and American Heart Association Board (past President). She previously held a seat on the BCN board for 16 years, serving on the Health Care Quality and Service Improvement committees. Former Judge Manderfield currently practices law and is a certified facilitative mediator at Fraser Trebilcock Law Firm in Lansing. Manderfield graduated from Thomas M. Cooley Law School and received her B.S. in nursing from Michigan State University and

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also graduated from Michigan Technological University in Nursing. She has maintained her Registered Nurse license and is an adjunct faculty member at MSU College of Nursing where she was awarded the distinguished Alumni Award in September 2012. Manderfield currently serves on the State Bar of Michigan Criminal Law Council and is a member of the State Bar of Michigan Alternative Dispute Resolution Section and the Negligence Law Section. EATON RAPIDS CALLS FOR PHOTOS FROM COMMUNITY MEMBERS Where is your favorite place to eat? What’s the most scenic view in town? Why do you love Eaton Rapids? The Eaton Rapids Marketing Alliance is asking Eaton Rapids residents to answer these questions and more in the form of a social media photo post along with the hashtag #JoinIn to help change the face of the city. Share why you feel the city is a great place to visit or live and your original photos could be chosen for upcoming Eaton Rapids promotions, and the top three photos will win a prize. For contest details, visit www.cityofeatonrapids. com/JoinIn. MERIDIAN COMPANY OFFERS NEW SCHOLARSHIP Meridian Company, a leading plumbing, heating, cooling and remodeling company based in East Lansing, Mich. is offering a new annual scholarship to high school graduating seniors from the Capital Area Career Center (CACC) in Mason. Over the past 20 years, Meridian Company has employed more than 12 interns and six fulltime employees through their partnership with the CACC. Eligible students should be high school seniors who have demonstrated excellent performance in the construction technology program and have plans to further their education. The first recipient, Nathan Hilbrecht of Waverly High School in Lansing, was presented with the award by Jim Phillipich, owner of Meridian Company at a ceremony on Friday, May 16, 2014. Hilbrecht plans to attend Ferris State University where he’ll receive his HVACR certification.


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Glbm June 2014 - Experts Focus on Flexible Work Environment