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PERSONAL TRAINERS:

ONE OF THE NEWEST FACETS OF THE FITNESS INDUSTRY Wendy Stoll & other trainers give insight on their businesses IN THIS ISSUE •

BEHIND THE SCENES WITH OSTEOPATHIC DR. BRUCE WOLF

10 BUSINESSES THAT OPENED IN 2016 TO WATCH THIS YEAR


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BUSINESS MONTHLY

DECEMBER 2016 ON THE COVER 10 Businesses that Opened in 2016..........................................17 Behind the Scenes: Dr. Bruce Wolf ...........................................20 Personal Trainers ................................................................................24

NEWS Tesla Vs. the State of Michigan.....................................................6 Silver Bells in the City .......................................................................8 Marriott-Starwood Merger Redefines the Hotel Industry........................................................10 Envie Expected to Bring Business, Jobs & Great Food to Downtown Lansing..............................................12 Recap of the 2016 Presidential Election.................................14 GREATER LAN SIN G

DECEMBER 2016

FEATURE Commentary.................................................................................................................................................. 4 Health Food is More than a Fad........................................................................................................ 16 Winter Season Activities....................................................................................................................... 18 Visual Breakdown..................................................................................................................................... 28 Greater Lansing at a Glance ............................................................................................................... 30 Man on the Street ................................................................................................................................... 32 Economy ...................................................................................................................................................... 34

PERSONAL TRAINERS:

ONE OF THE NEWEST FACETS OF THE FITNESS INDUSTRY Wendy Stoll & other trainers give insight on their businesses IN THIS ISSUE •

BEHIND THE SCENES WITH OSTEOPATHIC DR. BRUCE WOLF

10 BUSINESSES THAT OPENED IN 2016 TO WATCH THIS YEAR

Cover photography by Erika Hodges

Business Calendar.................................................................................................................................... 36 Notable News ............................................................................................................................................ 38

CORRECTION In last month’s issue of Greater Lansing Business Monthly we featured a Behind the Scenes Q & A with the Executive Director at Impression 5 Science Center, Erik Larson. We would like to apologize to Mr. Larson for misspelling his first name in the article, as well as to anyone else who this mistake may have affected or confused.

Greater Lansing Business Monthly | Volume 29, Issue 12

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Greater Lansing Business Monthly is published monthly by M3 Group at 614 Seymour Street, Lansing, MI 48933. Periodicals postage paid at Lansing, Michigan USPO. USPS number 020w807.

Subscriptions: Subscriptions are available at $22 per year for postage and handling or $38 for two years. Call (517) 203-0123 or visit lansingbusinessnews.com to subscribe. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Greater Lansing Business Monthly, 614 Seymour Ave., Lansing, MI 48933. Send additional subscription requests and address changes to The Greater Lansing Business Monthly, Inc., 614 Seymour Street, Lansing, MI 48933. Copyright © 2016 The Greater Lansing Business Monthly, Inc. All rights reserved. Editorial Office: 614 Seymour Street, Lansing, MI 48933 lansingbusinessnews.com 2

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COMMENTARY

G R E AT E R

L A N S I N G

BUSINESS MONTHLY

Publisher: Tiffany Dowling tiffany@m3group.biz Sales Manager: Jennifer Hodges jhodges@m3group.biz Media Manager: Jill Bailey Account Managers: Austin Ashley Megan Fleming Manny Garcia Production Director: Kelly Mazurkiewicz Art Director: Mark Warner Communications Director: Ami Iceman-Haueter Graphic Designers: Kerry Hidlay Nikki Nicolaou Photographer: Erika Hodges Editor: Megan Martin Web Manager: Skylar Kohagen Event Calendar Manager: Jaime Hardesty

GLBM Editorial Board: April Clobes — President and CEO, MSU Federal Credit Union

WISHING YOU A HAPPY, HEALTHY HOLIDAY SEASON T

his time of year, we are generally thinking about eggnog, holiday parties and Christmas cookies. We’re spending our discretionary income on gifts, galas and guests. But, those in the fitness industry are in full planning mode to entice you to work off those extra calories – if not now – then right after the first of the year. You’ve probably noticed that the fitness industry is growing and doesn’t show signs of stopping. According to statistica.com, this sector generates nearly $30 billion in revenue in the U.S. by more than 30,000 fitness centers or exercise facilities with over 55 million members. I think the fitness industry is pretty amazing. It doesn’t matter what type of workout you’re looking for – it’s available. You can pretend you’re in the military with a boot camp, use the machines by yourself with headphones or a personal trainer, dance your way through Zumba or get your frustrations resolved with Crossbox. To stay competitive, organizations like the YMCA have even launched a giant rock wall for rock climbing at their Westside location. According to many expert predictions, the next few years’ trends will include: • • • • •

Growth to the fitness center physical facility Competition will heat up among providers and location will be pivotal Specialization of services providing niche services Equipment innovations are less critical with a focus on highly trained staff Entertainment systems will be necessary especially for millennials

These trends have paved the way for many business owners to thrive in the marketplace and revive brands to make their services perfect for multiple demographics. If you’re planning to begin a workout regimen this holiday season or in early January, do your research. Figure out what you like best and make that happen. If you don’t, chances are you won’t stick with it. Today, you can hire a personal trainer to come over to your house first thing in the morning. Seriously, now that’s convenient.

Trish Foster — Senior Managing Director & COO, CBRE|Martin

Whatever you’re interested in, there’s a fitness option tailor made for you. Finding the perfect one can be a wonderful gift to yourself. And, as a bonus, it helps the Lansing area business community and the economy.

Lisa Parker — Director of Alumni Career and Business Services, Michigan State University Alumni Association

I hope you have a healthy and happy New Year.

Deb Muchmore — Partner, Kandler Reed Khoury & Muchmore Tom Ruis — Vice President, Fifth Third Bank Doug Klein — Executive Director, Mason Area Chamber of Commerce Mark Hooper — Partner, Andrews Hopper Pavlik

Tiffany Dowling | Publisher

Diontrae Hayes — Supervisor Charter Township of Lansing

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TESLA VS. THE STATE OF MICHIGAN Why the state is banning Tesla sales and where Tesla stands BY OMAR SOFRADZIJA

Michigan’s auto dealers think their system works — the system where they compete amongst each other to sell and service cars. Auto industry newcomer Tesla Motors believes it’s better to sell its innovative electric cars in an innovative way: directly to the public, cutting out dealers altogether.

“The issue is not, are dealers all bad? Of course not. The question is, why should the law mandate a particular method of distributing a product?” said Daniel Crane, a University of Michigan law professor and antitrust expert who has closely followed the case. “Unless there’s a compelling reason, let the consumer decide.”

“Giving auto dealers a monopoly on car sales benefits them, but harms consumers. This is recognized by the Federal Trade Commission as well as a broad coalition of consumer advocates, economists, free-market supporters, law professors and the public generally,” Tesla said in a prepared statement.

While the state Legislature and regulators side with dealers — banning all direct manufacturerto-consumer sales in 2014 and blocking Tesla’s efforts to set up shop here since a lawsuit, filed by Palo Alto, Calif. based Tesla, against the state in September means that the courts will ultimately decide how Michiganders car shop.

However, Crane added that courts have, at times, shown “reticence to strike down economic legislation just because it’s silly.”

Terry Burns, executive vice president of the East Lansing-based Michigan Automobile Dealers Association, argues consumers actually benefit from having various dealers to choose from for any make.

“Michigan is one of four states banning direct sales, which are allowed in 23 states and the District of Columbia,” Tesla said. Michigan, like the other three states that are banning direct sales; Texas, Connecticut and Utah, may have a tough time defending its position. 6

In its suit, Tesla alleges the state’s “highly protectionist” prohibition is “effectively giving franchised dealers a state-sponsored monopoly on car sales within Michigan” by banning manufacturers from directly selling or servicing the cars they make. As a result, the nearest Tesla sales and service center for Lansing customers is suburban Cleveland, Ohio, according to Tesla’s website.

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“We don’t think there’s any harm in doing it the way it’s done today,” Burns said. “Customers are provided for. It ensures customers have competition, that they have places to go to buy a car, work on their car.” In its suit, Tesla argues that “it could not succeed by selling and servicing its vehicles through a traditional network of third-party dealers,”


NEWS

because, “Tesla is new to the industry, and because all-electric vehicles are new to most customers, Tesla’s sales model has focused on educating consumers about its products and technology …” Burns said many of his constituents can and want to take on that challenge. “It would be very easy to sell (Tesla) through traditional dealer markets. Dealers do a phenomenal job with that,” Burns said. “Every other electric vehicle, every other hybrid, all over America are sold by dealers.” “There are many, many dealers in the state that would love to be a Tesla dealer,” Burns said. Tesla doubts dealer interest is sincere. As one leading legislator told Tesla, “The local auto dealers do not want you here. The local manufacturers do not want you here. So you’re not going to be here.” Several local dealers and General Motors did not reply to requests for comment.

Beyond legalities, Crane said Tesla’s position lines up with expectations of today’s shoppers. “They’re used to shopping on the Internet,” he said. “Consumers today are sophisticated enough to have choices in how they buy cars,” in the same way they can go to an Apple store, other online retailers or independent stores to buy Apple products.

“I don’t see a lot of incentive for them to do anything [ahead of a court ruling],” Edmonds said. “It would be seen as giving in prematurely.” Edmonds believes Tesla will eventually prevail, comparing Tesla’s suit to an earlier lawsuit against the state under former Gov. Jennifer Granholm. That case saw courts overturn state restrictions on wine sales from out-of-state wineries.

While Tesla in its statement said, “solving this legislatively always has been and continues to be Tesla’s preferred option,” observers doubt an out-of-court compromise is likely.

“It was designed to protect and further the interest of in-state wineries,” Edmonds said of the overturned law. “The parallels between that (the Tesla suit) and the Granholm case, at least in my opinion, are very strong.”

“It’s been very politically difficult for Tesla to work the Legislature in Lansing,” Crane said. “It’s dead-end at the moment, politically.”

Burns isn’t so sure. “You never know what’s going to come out of a lawsuit,” he said.

Western Michigan University professor of finance and commercial law Thomas Edmonds added, “This is a political environment. It may be better for the Legislature to have it imposed on them, [rather than agreeing to a compromise].”

Omar Sofradzija is an adjunct journalism instructor at Michigan State University. Prior to that, he was a reporter at the Las Vegas (Nev.) Review-Journal, where he covered Southern Nevada transportation issues and authored the newspaper’s “Road Warrior” column.

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SILVER BELLS IN THE CITY What it means for businesses, economy & community BY SARAH SPOHN

For many local Lansing businesses, the holiday scene is the most wonderful and the busiest time of the year. The official swing into the season begins with Downtown Lansing’s Silver Bells in the City. The event has become a family tradition for some thousands of local residents and Michiganders from all across the state who venture to Lansing’s Capital City to witness the state’s tree lit up in all its glory. Silver Bells includes 130 downtown buildings lit up with more than 15,000 feet of wiring and 85,000 lamps on rooftops along the city skyline. 8

52 lit wreaths are hung with care, 200 banners delightfully grace lamp posts, topped with 200 red bows and 3,320 feet of fresh cedar garland. It’s an event that continues to light up streets; while stirring up support for local businesses as well.

Bells certainly contributes to our local economy. The iconic event draws tens of thousands of visitors to the area each year, with many of them supporting downtown businesses.”

Tracy Padot, vice president of marketing and communications at the Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau spoke about the impact the annual event has on the area.

Although 4.8 million visitors is impressive, perhaps what’s more noteworthy is that a single one-day event can bring in such a large crowd. That event is a celebration and the unofficial kick-off to the holiday season – Silver Bells in the City.

“Greater Lansing welcomes over 4.8 million visitors annually, that generates $602 million dollars in economic impact,” Padot said. “Silver

“Over the years, Silver Bells in the City has drawn anywhere from 80,000 to 150,000 people to the Capital City,” said Mindy Biladeau, executive

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director at Downtown Lansing Inc. “Plus, over 25,000 households tuning in at home to watch the festivities live on FOX 47 and WKAR.” Aside from the joy it brings to the community, it also brings quite a bit of money and customers to the area. The annual event features a host of activities spread across participating businesses and locations including the electric light parade, the Silver Bells Village holiday shopping market and other various smaller events.

“Silver Bells in the City continues to be a gathering of community from across the state, that brings people together,” Biladeau said. “It continues to span new generations, where installing a sense of community pride allows it to remains an event of high quality.” Major sponsors including the Lansing Board of water and Light, the City of Lansing, IBEW Local 665 and the National Electrical Contractors Association, Granger, Lake Trust Credit Union,

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and an additional 70 supporting sponsors and partners enable the annual event to continue its tradition. Sarah Spohn received her degree in Journalism from Lansing Community College. She’s a concert junkie; living and breathing in both the local and national music scene. She is proud to call Lansing her home, finding a new reason every day to be smitten with the mitten.

The Silver Bells Village helps support local and Michigan-made products, offering shoppers locally made goods for loved ones. The Central Business District within downtown Lansing contains over 1,000 businesses in a 64-block area, many of which participate and hold local events, sales and special hours to accommodate for Silver Bells shoppers. The Peanut Shop has been a staple in downtown Lansing’s since 1937 at its location on Washington Square. During the Silver Bells event, the shop’s sales skyrocket, according to Mindy Biladeau. “Downtown Lansing’s Peanut Shop sells a half-ton of assorted nuts and pops more than 50 lbs. of popcorn during the four hours of Silver Bells,” she said. Other local businesses like the Lansing Art Gallery, Biggby Coffee, Kewpee’s Sandwich Shoppe, and the Lansing City Market offer onenight-only specials or activities during the event. “The benefits to regional hotels, local shops and restaurants are significant,” Biladeau said. “For some local businesses, it is the busiest four hours of the year. It’s a good way to start off the holiday season.” Whether festival attendees just make a quick stop into a business for a cup of hot chocolate, or stay a while and browse the store; all the shops appreciate the extra foot traffic during the four-hour block. The event began with humble beginnings and has grown to become the largest of its kind in the greater Lansing area. Created in 1984, Silver Bells in the City began as an idea by the Arts Council of Greater Lansing. It began with 2,500 luminaries framing Washington Square Mall and a singalong with the Mayor. In 1995, the Santa Parade was added, as well as ice sculptures, carriage rides and businesses staying open. In 1997, the first Silver Bells Electric Light Parade trotted down the main streets, and in 2001, fireworks were added. Although many of the portions of Silver Bells are free, the benefits the area experiences are vital to the local economy and community.

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MARRIOTT-STARWOOD MERGER REDEFINES THE HOTEL INDUSTRY

Industry insiders cautiously embrace a journey into the unknown BY ADAM LANSDELL

In September, Marriott International officially became the world’s largest hotel chain. How? Simple, they acquired one of their biggest competitors – Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide, Inc. for some $13 billion. Starwood is best known as the parent company of a variety of hotel brands around the world, including big name luxury destinations like Westin and Sheraton. The acquisition of the brand was long in the works, yet the merger came as a sudden surprise to customers, many of whom were loyal to either brand. With some 30 additional brands falling under the Marriott umbrella, there is a world of change to be had for both consumers, industry competitors and the market as a whole. Ultimately this acquisition has created a micromonopoly on luxury hotel brands and is having a significant impact on the way other brands are able to compete for market share. With smaller rivals, seemingly unable to compete with the dual strength of the new pair, there is plenty of room to assume that opponents may follow suit, creating additional mergers in a last-ditch effort to maintain relevancy. Before Marriott’s acquisition, rival brand Hyatt Hotel Corp. was a forerunner in negotiations to close a merger deal. After a nearly three-week bidding war, Marriott came out on top. With this acquisition, Marriott is poised to control nearly 15 percent of all lodging rooms available in the U.S. While 15 percent may not sound like much, it’s a huge personate of the brands’ value when considering that most Marriott locations are four to five star rated establishments, thus proving that they have the largest profit share moving forward. According to hotel database STR, 10

Marriott nearly doubles the Hilton Worldwide’s 773,000 rooms and the 766,000 that are part of the Intercontinental Hotels Group (Holiday Inn, Crowne Plaza). With the drastic increase in rooms available, some may wonder if this will impact price points for the brand. It’s common for many to assume that this increase in availability may reflect lower prices on accommodations across the brand. However, as Patrick Baum, general manager of Residence Inn by Marriott of Holland explained, this may not be the case. “Maybe [price points will change] at a Marriottowned property, but, as a whole, we can’t look at the entire company and say the price will change everywhere,” said Baum. “Here in Holland, the price point is going to depend on the market and how many hotels are coming or going here. It is very much at a local level. Even down to the individual property, every hotel needs to get their fair share and that will mean changing strategy in order to do so.” As the merger comes to light, CEO of Marriott International Arne Sorenson is proactively addressing concerns of the loyal customers of each brand, claiming that they need not worry. Initially, the merger struck fear into the hearts of longtime loyalty members whom were concerned that their investment in the respective programs would disappear. This sentiment rang especially true for Starwood loyalists who assumed all would be lost. However, no major changes have gone into effect, as the brand is looking to utilize the best components of each program to create a mega rewards system in the future.

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“[Marriott] has many possibilities ahead of us because Marriott and Starwood both have great loyalty programs,” stated Sorenson in an open letter. “We intend to draw upon the very best of both Marriott Rewards and Starwood Preferred Guest® to provide even more value to our members … In the meantime, we’re actively exploring ways to build bridges between the two programs to further enhance your experience.” While posts from guests on the hotel’s social media feeds suggested panic, Amy Peck, Michigan State University (MSU) account manager for Anthony Travel, claimed she hadn’t heard concern from her clients. Peck handles bookings and accommodation arrangements for the MSU athletic department and often works with Marriott. “I honestly haven’t had anyone ask about the merger just yet. I’m sure most have been notified via their Marriott rewards account and our coaches are pretty travel savvy,” said Peck. “We book Marriott almost daily and haven’t noticed any issues. Starwood properties are not something we book much of at this time.” However, others within the industry are approaching the merger with apprehension. Craig Corey, owner of Craig Corey Vacations, a Lansing-based travel agency that specializes in luxury accommodations, doesn’t know if Marriott can handle the acquisition. “[The merger] won’t affect how we do business, but will largely effect the quality of product and services we are able to provide,” said Corey. “Starwood is better known for its upscale brands,


NEWS

and it’s worrisome to think that Marriott may not be able to properly manage them properly.”

the other hand, Marriott’s dedication to absolute consistency is a feature others look for.

appears to be beneficial for some brand loyalists to Marriott, there may be broader implications.

Corey explained that his hesitance comes in retrospect of past mergers that have progressed “miserably.” One such acquisition was that of Macy’s, who acquired high-end retailers through its purchase of May Department Stores Company for $11 billion in 2005.

“Our staff here at MSU are very loyal to Marriott and may try a Starwood property if a Marriott property is not available,” said Peck. “Marriott brands are consistent across the board and that’s why our coaches like them almost exclusively. Perhaps they will try Starwood now.”

“Look what’s happened – Many of [May Department Stores] brands were shut down, or lost quality. Macy’s marginalized these stores,” explained Corey. “What worries me is that Marriott will turn some of these unique brands into cookie cutter experiences like their own.”

Patrick Baum, a longtime employee of Marriott, agrees that consistency is an essential component of the brand and is what keeps his guests with busy schedules satisfied.

“Customers don’t realize it yet, but the change will become more evident, slowly but surely,” said Corey. “Customers are going to be clouded by Marriott’s messaging, when they begin to offer former Starwood customers additional points or added benefits for being a member. It’s going to be up to travel experts to really look at those things and be more responsible when looking at their true value.”

While Corey believes that only time will tell, he remains optimistic that Marriott might take this as an opportunity to fine tune its own locations into premium destinations like those within Starwood, instead of restricting them to fit the Marriott facade.

“Marriott customers are very loyal. Many of our customers are traveling for business and like to keep a routine,” said Baum. “They are staying in the same hotels on a weekly basis and collecting the points while trying to keep some sort of consistency. We want our rewards members to return because they know what to expect and we are able to deliver at every property.”

For a luxury based booking agency like Craig Corey’s, the uniqueness and character of the brands are important for his clients looking to get away and indulge in a refreshing experience. On

While Marriott officials were quick to address customers’ concerns regarding loyalty systems, quality retention and more – this change hasn’t been sitting well with everyone, because as it

Only time can tell how this will alter the industry. The majority of the changes are yet to be seen, but it may very well hold the most change for the way that subsidiary businesses within the industry conduct business in the years to come. A mix of optimism, hesitation and the great unknown loom around the merger. Adam Lansdell is an Alumni of Grand Valley State University, and currently a Communication Specialist with M3 Group of Lansing. With a passion for all things creative it comes as no surprise that he’s also a musician, movie buff and graphic designer. Adam spends his down time biking, and spending too much of his personal income on concert tickets or vinyl records.

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ENVIE EXPECTED TO BRING BUSINESS, JOBS & GREAT FOOD TO DOWNTOWN LANSING BY MEGAN MARTIN

It’s no secret that until recent years, Lansing’s local food scene has been sorely lacking. Farm to table, freshly produced and locally sourced foods are the biggest trends in the restaurant industry and Lansing is finally catching up. The greater Lansing region has been hungry for something more than just chain restaurants for a while, and – as indicated by the rise in local foodie joints popping up across town – local entrepreneurs have answered the call, creating restaurants like Capital Prime, Capital Vine, Black Cat Bistro, The Cosmos, Meat, The Creole, Saddleback BBQ, Red Haven and more. This rise in locally-owned restaurants in Lansing isn’t just good for people’s stomachs, it’s also good for the local economy; creating jobs, generating foot traffic in city corridors and giving creative professionals an outlet to be successful. Downtown Lansing is looking forward to welcoming yet another addition to the foodie bandwagon – Envie, a unique take on French cuisine, owned by James Cheskaty and Lance Davis. Envie, French for “to desire food,” will be a casual, upscale dining destination serving modern food with a French twist. In terms of interior décor, think clean, white, cozy booths and a full service bar serving wine by the glass, in addition to unique and classic cocktails. “Envie will be a wonderful addition to the downtown dining scene on Washington Square,” said Mindy Biladeau, executive director at Downtown Lansing Inc. “Offering French12

inspired cuisine in a casual, up-scale environment should appeal to both the workplace and residential markets.” While members in the community are excited about new eats, what many don’t realize is that restaurants like Envie are not just providing good food – they’re stimulating the economy. In a study performed by the American Independent Business Alliance (AMIBA) in 2015, researchers found and outlined what is called the multiplier effect; essentially, when more money is spent locally, it multiplies. This results in a higher rate of recirculate among local businesses and more local revenue. A noticeable benefit, opposed this influx of local spending being of benefit of national companies or franchises. Because most local businesses know this, most try to source products, which they sell or use, from other local businesses; fostering personal relationships between retailers and a stronger retention of local capital. The result? Buying local equals more local wealth. The study takes a look at the local economic return for local independent businesses, versus chains. As the graph shows, the local recirculation of revenue in chain retailers is only 13.6 percent, whereas local recirculation of revenue for independent businesses sits at 48 percent; going toward profit and labor, procurement for internal use, procurement for resale and charitable giving. Aside from the financial aspect of local restaurants and businesses, the social aspect is huge as well; local businesses that aren’t chains

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give their communities a unique character, and no one can put a price tag on that. Cheskaty and Davis, who both have a long history working in the restaurant industry, plan to source as much local produce and product as possible. The duo’s extensive background includes establishments like Gilbert & Blake’s, Supu Sugoi, a pop-up restaurant series in Metro Lansing, Disney World, and more. “We’ve worked together for years,” Davis said. The business partners met when they worked together at Gilbert and Blake’s. However, the vision for Envie came when the two realized the need for a unique dining opportunity in downtown Lansing. Envie will serve as a true dine-in experience, but will also have a graband-go service, which caters particularly to the lunch crowd. The restaurant will bring approximately 20 jobs to downtown Lansing, and Cheskaty and Davis are hopeful that Envie will be an attractive destination for evening visitors to the downtown area as well. “I want to create a place where I would want to eat,” said Cheskaty. “We’re excited to do it here in Lansing.” Megan Martin is the Editor of Capital Area Women’s Lifestyle Magazine and Greater Lansing Business Monthly. She is a foodie who loves art, tea, the great outdoors and spending time with her family, her Fiancé and her miniature dachshund, Oakley.


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RECAP OF THE 2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION BY ALICIA PILMORE

On Nov. 8, 2016, millions of Americans flocked to their polling places to cast their votes for presidential candidates. This year, the United States’ presidential hopefuls were Hillary Clinton, the first female to ever be nominated by a major political party and business mogul Donald Trump, a political outsider who inspired a movement within the Republican Party unlike any in recent history. The results of the election began rolling in after the first polls closed at 7 p.m. EST. Trump gained an early lead with wins in Kentucky and Indiana. Clinton countered with wins in Vermont, Virginia, New Jersey, Washington D.C., Maine and Maryland by 8 p.m. EST, bringing the electoral vote count to 41-37, with Trump winning Oklahoma, West Virginia and Mississippi. However, Clinton’s lead didn’t last long – races in the majority of states were incredibly close, some wins coming down to a few thousand votes; and as more states reported their results, Trump’s lead widened over Clinton. Although she was able to hold on to wins in many states that historically have voted Democrat, unpredicted losses in Florida, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin ultimately gave Trump enough electoral votes to win the presidency and become the 45th president of the United States. The final electoral count ended with 290 votes for Trump and 228 for Clinton. When it became clear that Trump would become the next president of the United States, he addressed his followers in a victory speech shortly after 3 a.m. “As I’ve said from the beginning, ours was not a campaign, but rather an incredible and great movement made up of millions of hard-working 14

men and women who love their country and want a better, brighter future for themselves and for their families,” said Trump during his victory speech. “Working together, we will begin the urgent task of rebuilding our nation and renewing the American Dream.” Clinton did not comment on the results of the election the night of, but offered a concession speech the following morning. Clinton urged her supporters to give Trump a chance to lead the United States, saying that it was time to come together to move the country forward. “We have seen that our nation is more deeply divided than we thought,” she said. “But I still believe in America and I always will. And if you do, then we must accept this result and look to the future. Donald Trump is going to be our president. We owe him an open mind and a chance to lead.” In the days following the election, it became apparent that demographics played a huge role in Trump’s victory. According to NPR’s analysis of the election, approximately 70 percent of the people who voted were white, and of that 70 percent, the majority were working-class men. This boost of support from white working-class males enabled Trump to win the presidency over Clinton. Additionally, the Pew Research Center reported that on average that Clinton’s supporters were females and minorities between the ages of 18 and 44, while the majority of Trump supporters were white males age 45 and older. Exit polls also showed that 53 percent of white women, a group that many media outlets and campaign strategists were sure Clinton would win, ultimately voted for Trump. This surprise resulted in the loss of a crucial number of votes for Clinton.

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In addition to demographics, one of the key elements that affected this year’s election results was the number of eligible voters who cast their ballot on Election Day. According to exit polls, approximately 57 percent of eligible voters in the United States did not vote in this year’s election. This number is down from 58.6 percent in 2012 and 61.6 percent in 2008, when President Barack Obama was running for office. This can largely be attributed to a feeling of voter apathy, which has been present throughout this campaign season. Many voters expressed this by choosing not to vote for either candidate; in Michigan alone, it was reported that more than 110,000 voters did not vote for either candidate, but cast votes for other officials on the ticket. Because of these factors and many others, Trump will take the oath of office in Washington D.C. on Jan. 20, 2017. In the months to come, the United States will learn what kind of president Trump will be. Many are hoping to see him boost the economy, lower taxes, tighten restrictions on immigration and take on foreign powers, in a way that the presidents who came before him did not. Others fear outbreaks of hate and discrimination as a result of his campaign. If nothing else, Trump’s journey to the presidency has stirred what some media outlets have called a “silent majority” and has changed the way that many will view politics in future elections. Ultimately, it will take some time to see what the effects of this year’s election will have on the United States, as well as the rest of the world. Alicia Pilmore is a freelance writer and graduate student at Michigan State University. She loves writing, wine tasting and spoiling her cat, Pishi.


CAREERS

DIVERSITY LANSING INITIATIVE Aids local businesses in embracing change BY EDYTHE HATTER-WILLIAMS

Organizations and communities must seek to globalize and diversify. Fostering diversity and inclusion is essential to prosperity, as it breeds innovation and empowers creativity. In fact, according to a 2011 “Forbes” study, 85 percent of participants agreed or strongly agreed that diversity is crucial to fostering innovation in the workplace.

they belong is how businesses will attract and retain top talent. And cultivating a culture in an organization that leverages diversity and the unique talents of your workforce doesn’t happen overnight. It takes time and dedication to ensure your business has a diverse foundation and fosters an environment that will attract a diverse group of individuals.

Diverse cities, like Lansing, often have a deep appreciation for the arts to foster creativity, faith communities, multicultural events that celebrate our differences and renowned colleges and universities that attract the best and brightest minds.

To help guide your organization to continue on the path to diversity, leaders throughout Greater Lansing created Lansing’s Diversity Toolbox, a comprehensive and complimentary toolkit with human resources and operational resources on inclusion, talent acquisition and talent retention. Visit purelansing.com/ diversitylansing to learn more about the organization and to access the toolbox.

The business environment and community needs to be diverse, too, in order to thrive. To encourage diversity in the business world, the Lansing Economic Area Partnership (LEAP) launched the Diversity Lansing initiative to increase conversations about how diversity helps our region be a place where people can thrive, succeed, prosper and explore, and I sit on the advisory committee as a senior advisory committee member. According to LEAP, Diversity Lansing’s mission is, “to encourage and leverage partnerships that celebrate and embrace the core values of a diverse, welcoming and affirming region, which will strengthen our economy, help businesses attract and retain world-class talent and create opportunities for all the residents of Clinton, Eaton and Ingham counties. Recognizing and engaging others in the rich tapestry of diversity and cultural experiences that exist will enhance our positioning to compete for talent globally.”

Over the last year, the Executive Leadership Diversity Workgroup presented a four-part series to provide the community with the necessary tools, resources and best practices to embrace a diverse and inclusive culture at an organization, as well as teach how to adapt to changing demographics and how to attract top talent who feel welcomed and valued. The series also focused on the importance of strengthening and leveraging diverse partnerships for new ideas, strategies and ways of thinking. While the Lansing community is on its way to increasing diversity, we can and need to do better for the future of our region. In order to propel the mid-Michigan community forward, it’s vital for every organization to implement and embrace diversity practices. And in today’s day and age, it is much more than a multicultural issue. Embracing individuals from different backgrounds, cultures, generations, ideas and thinking will be one of the most important drivers of success for your organization and our region. Employers want the best talent, which means they need to have a working environment that’s inclusive to everyone. Creating an environment where each and every employee feels like

We are fortunate to have LEAP in our region spearheading this initiative, as well as the various community partners that are involved, but it’s something every single greater Lansing business needs to be a part of. For more information about Capital Area Michigan Works! American Job Centers and the services we provide to both businesses and career seekers, visit camw.org. Edythe Hatter-Williams is the CEO of Capital Area Michigan Works!, a proud partner of the American Job Center network. Capital Area Michigan Works! is a talent investment network that partners with businesses to develop recruiting and retention strategies and partners with job seekers to enhance education and career opportunities. On the Web at camw.org.

“STRENGTH LIES IN DIFFERENCES, NOT SIMILARITIES.” – STEPHEN R. COVEY L

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HEALTH FOOD IS MORE THAN A FAD: It’s a movement in the food industry BY MICKEY HIRTEN

When Whole Foods Market opened with much fanfare in Meridian Township last May, it was already late to a local grocery market fully vested in natural and organic products. Smaller niche stores like Foods for Living, Better Health Stores and large national and regional retailers like Target and Meijer, have followed — and sometimes led — consumers who recognize healthy eating as a key to health and fitness. Organic foods alone are a $43 billion a year industry with sales growing at five percent per year according to the Organic Trade Association. It’s one slice of the wellness market that also includes vitamins, minerals and supplements, products whose sales topped $36 billion in 2016, according to Statista, a research data provider. Entering the Lansing healthy eating market just ahead of Whole Foods, was the regional grocer, Fresh Thyme. Its 28,000 sq. ft. store, which opened in April 2015 at the location once occupied by Goodrich’s Shop-Rite, straddles the line between a fullservice grocer and healthy living products. Store Director Robert Lajcaj said Fresh Thyme recognizes that it competes in a crowded and competitive market and must focus on customer service and its sprawling produce department to succeed. The company operates on the theory that fresh fruits and vegetables are the foundation of healthy eating. To its customers, Fresh Thyme proclaims, “We’re so passionate about produce that we’ve made it the nucleus of the store.” Lajcaj said 50 percent of his store’s produce is organic, and when possible, grown by Michigan farmers. He added that because Fresh Thyme now has 48 stores in its Midwest market it has the scale to be the first buyer for locally grown items. Away from the hand-stacked tables of fruits and vegetables are aisles filled with organic and natural products. There are more than 25,000 skews for 16

vitamins, mineral and supplements, a bewildering selection for the uninitiated. “Not everybody knows to eat clean and healthy,” Lajcaj acknowledged, which to Fresh Thyme is an opportunity. The market hires staff with expertise to help customers find the best products for their health and fitness needs. It reflects the store’s customer service initiative. Also in the MSU orb is Foods for Living. The 28,000 sq. ft. Meridian Township store sells a full line of natural and organic foods as well as nutritional and body care products. The store is locally owned – employee owned, in fact – explained General Manager Kirk Marrison, which gives it the flexibility to move quickly and find unique healthy products for its customers. “If someone comes to us with a new chocolate bar that they have made at the Allen Market Place kitchens and it’s something really great, we’ll buy it from them,” Marrison said. “It doesn’t have to go through corporate headquarters.” Still, he acknowledges that public awareness of healthy eating has lured big food retailers into the market. Niche Foods for Living has been filling since it opened. So lucrative is the market that these larger retailers have developed proprietary organic food brands in addition to stocking national labels, produce and health supplies, broadening their product lines to attract nutritionally conscious shoppers. Kroger sells a full line of whey supplements, fish oils and special products like cold milled flax seeds. Its produce department has a large display promoting organics: carrots, peppers, assorted herbs, red chard and more. In the grocery aisles it stocks organic dried fruits, products cooked in avocado oil and flavored with Himalayan pink salt. Target wants the same customers with its displays of protein powders and plant-based

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smoothie mixes, shelves of natural cereals and organic blue corn Tostitos. Shoppers at Walmart can buy soft-gel capsules of coconut or flaxseed oils. They can choose from hundreds of brand name organic products — snack chips, pancake syrup, gluten-free dark chocolate chewy granola bars or organic tomato soup. What was once marginal has become mainstream. Foods for Living and the East Lansing Food Coop are competing with Whole Foods Market, just across Grand River Avenue. In Bath Township, Monticello Markets & Butcher Block face fights for customers with the region’s mega food retailer, Meijer. “We have major competition just 500 feet down the road,” said Margie Potter, who with her husband Doug, owns Monticello. “We are just a tiny store. We need to set ourselves apart.” It does this by emphasizing fresh and healthy products, many from its roster of 100 small Michigan suppliers. Reflecting the desire for fresh ingredients, the market recently trimmed its frozen food space from 32 feet to just 12 feet. “Nobody is coming to our store for frozen meats loaded with preservatives,” said Potter. Shoppers at Monticello are willing to pay more for products that fit their nutritional and health needs. “As long as it's high-quality and we don’t lie to them, customers are willing pay a fair price,” she said. “We could ask for more, but we don’t. Mickey Hirten is an award winning writer and editor. He has been executive editor of the Lansing State Journal, the Burlington Free Press in Vermont, and was the financial editor and a columnist for the Baltimore Evening Sun. He is the current president of the Michigan Press Association. His wife, Maureen Hirten, is director of the Capital Area District Library.


FEATURE

BUSINESSES TO WATCH: LANSING BY MEGHAN KAILY

Lansing businesses are populating and flourishing, sprouting everywhere from historic REO Town to artistic Old Town Lansing. In 2016, 796 new businesses were established in Lansing proper; all of which have contributed to fostering a budding economy, a slew of new visitors and a greater sense of community. HERE ARE JUST 10 BUSINESSES YOU SHOULD GET TO KNOW: THE ARTISAN COMPANY SALON The Artisan Company Salon is a family-owned salon and spa in the heart of historic REO town. This rustic industrial hub of beauty was founded in May 2016 and has dedicated itself to creating a new and unique salon experience where your imagination can run wild. Choose from a plethora of beauty and salon services at 117 W. South St., Lansing, MI 48910. METRO RETRO Metro Retro is a fashion and collectibles store in Lansing’s ever-eclectic Old Town. The store opened its doors in May 2016 offering everything from clothing to homeware to miscellaneous treasures. Rummage through this boutique while soaking in their funky vintage vibe at 1132 S. Washington Ave., Lansing, MI 48910. REO TOWN RECORDING REO Town Recording is a recording studio that aims to provide bands and artists with a space to create music and recordings without burdening them with a big-corporation-like bill. A rapper and an engineer joined forces to make artists into stars with their equipment, skills and affordability. Evan, the rapper and co-founder, is even reaching out to local businesses to contract a commercial so that this audio haven can foster not just music, but creative services. Find Evan and Alec, the engineer and co-founder, at 1132 S. Washington Ave., Lansing, MI 48910 and bust out a tune. CAPITAL VINE Capital Vine is Lansing’s chic and modern wine bar, bistro and lounge as of winter 2016. Experience a luxurious micro-dining experience

that includes gourmet small-plate pairings to an exceptional selection of wines. Come breathe in the rich aromas wafting throughout this cozy and exquisite spot, located at 2320 Showtime Drive, Lansing, MI 48912. THE OZONE BREWHOUSE The Ozone Brewhouse is a father and son business between Dan and Kyle Malone founded in the spring of 2016. The duo has created hundreds of selfdesigned and inspired beers. They call their brews “liquid art” and with flavor mixes like cherry vanilla amber ale and chocolate pepper porter and sage ale, it’s not hard to see why. Come grab a beer at this artistic micro-brewery in Old Town, located at 305 Beaver St., Lansing, MI 48906. AERBOTS AerBots is a startup by Mario Swaidan, a recent graduate at Michigan State University’s neuroscience program. This entrepreneur created an educational drone to be used by educators and students that also taps into the growing market of automatic aerial vehicles. AerBots are customizable and buildable drone kits where customers can create their own personal flying machines. The company’s mission is to allow people to discover and explore electronics and aeronautics, especially in this technology-reliant time. Visit Swaidan at 313 S. Washington Square, Lansing, MI 48933 to learn more and maybe even test out a drone. SUNRIPE PRODUCE Sunripe Produce is Lansing’s newest produce market, offering a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables. Their focus is to provide fresh local produce, all grown in Michigan. Stock up your fridge with all your favorite fresh foods at 3322 N. East St.,

Lansing, MI 48906 when this market opens just in time for the holidays. MIMI’S SWEET SHOP Mimi’s Sweet Shop is a coffee, ice cream and candy shop, offering quality and Michiganmade ice cream, chocolates, coffee, donuts, tea, hot cocoa and soft drinks. Mimi’s hometown and cozy atmosphere is the perfect place for students to meet up with friends or study for exams and professionals to grab a coffee and grind out some work. Satisfy those sweet tooth cravings at 2425 Showtime Drive, Lansing, MI 48912, in the Eastwood Towne Center behind NCG. BLOOM COFFEE ROASTERS Bloom Coffee Roasters is a specialty, boutique coffee company living amongst the charm of Old Town. The company believes drinking coffee should be one of the most pleasurable experiences of a person’s day and they do so by paying great attention to detail. They’re dedicated to making sure every sip of their premium roasted and home-brewed creations satisfies the core of every person who walks through their doors. They understand the art and beauty of a simple cup of coffee. Indulge at this cozy caffeine haven at 1236 Turner St. #B., Lansing, MI 48906 where coffee lovers can get their beans, know their cup and their roaster. COMEDY COVEN Comedy Coven is a company consisting of a group of Lansingbased women comedians. They’ll hit your funny bone with their original sketches and stand-up comedy acts. Their monthly showcases take place every third Tuesday of the month at The Robin Theatre in Lansing’s REO Town. Don’t miss the next show at 2311 Vine St., Lansing MI, 48912. L

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WINTER SEASON ACTIVITIES Attracting park visitors in Ingham County BY AMANDA DENOMME

Visiting a park during the winter season may seem untraditional to some, but in a state where the winter season makes up a majority of their weather, parks must be able to react quickly when it comes to keeping park visitor statistics up. Luckily, Ingham County Parks don’t not find the winter season to be an obstacle and continues to operate 364 days a year without missing a beat. Owning over

1,200 acres of parkland, some of Ingham County Parks’ include Burchfield Park, Lake Lansing Parks North and South, and Hawk Island Park. Hawk Island remains the newest park owned by Ingham County Parks and notably, since opening in 2002, the park has reached more than five million visitors. Annually, the parks receive more than 1.25 million visitors.

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ATTRACTING CONSUMERS TO THE PARK DURING WINTER WHILE CREATING JOBS Ingham County Parks provides a great mixture of winter activities targeted towards families and also single park visitors, in order to remain marketable throughout the winter season. Some of these activities include a sledding hill, crosscountry ski rentals and trails at the Burchfield Park in Holt; and Hawk Island Park has a snowtubing hill with a lift system for park visitors to use. Since the sledding hill has been very popular for park visitors, this winter the park plans to add a “magic carpet” to the hill in order to replace the lift system, and as a result, provide additional safety measures, and transport people to the top of the hill more quickly. In addition to the sledding hill, Hawk Island’s one and a half mile loop trail around the lake is cleared of snow and ice for winter walkers and runners. “We truly have visitors of every age and from various communities in Ingham County. Certain activities may appeal to a younger group of people or young families such as the snow hill, but I would not rule anyone out,” said Karen Fraser, financial and marketing coordinator at Ingham County Parks. “Since our parks are in three different areas of Ingham County, (Haslett, Lansing and Holt) we are fortunate to be able to serve a large geographic area.” Ingham County reaches their audiences through a variety of marketing and advertising avenues. One tactic includes sending out flyers and newsletters to schools. Besides targeting families through schools, Ingham County Parks uses social media, electronic mailings and radio advertising to attract individuals to the park. “In addition to our many forms of advertising, rack cards for both Burchfield and Hawk


FEATURE

Island are distributed to local libraries and other agencies,” stated Fraser. “Last winter, rack cards for Hawk Island were even in some of the State of Michigan’s rest areas.” Each year, Ingham County Parks hires 100 seasonal workers. Some employees work in the summer months while other employees work in the winter season. Most of the parks’ seasonal workers are high school or collegeaged students completing internships. Besides students, there are also a few retirees who make up the seasonal staff. In addition, each park has full-time park professionals who maintain and operate the parks. Ingham County Parks’ main office is located in Mason and holds 12 full-time professional staff. According to Fraser, in Michigan, parks across the state generate over $1.8 billion of revenue and account for over 15,000 jobs. KEEPING UP WINTER REVENUES Many may wonder if a park can be successful in today’s economy, especially in a state that experiences long term cold and snowy weather during the winter season. According

to Fraser, she finds winter at the park can offer an opportunity for different kinds of activities, which is very attractive to many park visitors. “We are fortunate to live in a part of the country that has four seasons and some people love winter just as much as summer,” said Fraser. “The parks do have fewer visitors in winter months, but we expect that and plan for it, in regard to budgeting.” Fraser noted that The Ingham County Parks generate a larger share of earned revenues from May through September, and beyond earnings, the parks are funded through an appropriation from the County. When it comes to winter revenue at Ingham County Parks, the amount varies a great deal due to factors such as weather and the amount of snow that is on the ground or can be made. “Winter activities in Michigan account for a very positive revenue flow depending upon what a certain community has to offer in terms of outdoor winter fun,” said Fraser. “At Ingham County Parks the winter season runs December through March and collective revenue is near $100,000.”

In addition to collecting revenues from park visitors, the main office is a U.S. Passport Acceptance Agency. During the winter months, employees collect revenues from processing U.S. passport applications. Even though the park does experience fewer visitors in the winter months, revenues show consumers still enjoy visiting. One may ask if the reason behind the successful amount of winter park visitors is due to the love for winter activities or just because of state pride. “For me, I love going to the parks in the winter because it is simply beautiful, and I think that attracts park visitors too,” said Fraser. “I do admit to bundling up and I do like a cup of hot cocoa when I come inside.” To learn more about Ingham County Parks, please visit pk.ingham.org. Amanda has been a freelance writer for the past 5 years, covering arts and entertainment in West Michigan and Lansing. Describing herself as a shoe & fashion enthusiast, Amanda loves attending Broadway shows, dancing, and keeping up with the latest reality T.V.

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the country and affects all of us. The more that we can control our own well-being, the better off everyone is going to be. We tend to partner with our patients to promote their health. We want them to be an integrated part of their care, to help make decisions. If a person is actively engaged, they are more apt to follow the advice and direction that they need to get better. TO SOME DEGREE, MICHIGAN, WITH ITS STRONG OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE CULTURE, SEEMS AN OUTLIER IN THE NATIONAL MEDICAL SCENE. IS THAT GOOD OR BAD? Overall, we are doing extremely well. One in four medical students is now in an osteopathic college. The profession here in the United States is using D.O.’s or osteopathic physicians to identify us as a fully licensed physician. We can see patients, treat them, prescribe medicines, perform surgery and all of the other practice privileges that the state grants us. The reason we are using osteopathic physicians is because outside of the United States, the term osteopath has a different connotation and a different license perspective. IT’S SORT OF A BRANDING ISSUE, ISN’T IT?

BY MICKEY HIRTEN | COURTESY PHOTO

DR. BRUCE WOLF President of Michigan Osteopathic Association Dr. Bruce Wolf, DO, FAOCR, 50, is president of Michigan Osteopathic Association (MOA) and has been a member of the Michigan State University Department of Human Medicine faculty since 2000. MOA has nearly 5,300 members and represents more than 70 percent of all licensed osteopathic physicians in Michigan. TELL US ABOUT THE PRACTICE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE IN MICHIGAN. Overall, we are doing well. As doctors of osteopathic medicine (D.O.’s), in the U.S, we are trained the same as MDs. We do it through medical school and curriculum, but the philosophy and approach is a little bit different. We tend to incorporate the overall, total health of a person. By incorporating the entire muscular and skeletal system, it allows opportunities to help maintain physical health as well as 20

incorporate mental health. For example, if part of my neck might be having an issue I may need treatment of my upper back first, because it will loosen up that part of the neck. We treat one area first because it helps another area. THIS HOLISTIC APPROACH SEEMS TO REFLECT THE WAY THE HEALTH CARE SYSTEM IS MOVING. People are looking more to themselves on what they can do to be healthy. It’s a hot issue across

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The American Osteopathic Association has recognized some of that and it has taken some steps to increase the awareness of osteopathic physicians across the country. We have very good collaboration with our allopathic (MDs) counterparts and with our patients across the state. A lot of the time, patients just go to the doctor and they are treated. They don’t necessarily know which degree they have. However, if they are getting some additional care with manipulation then that is coming from a D.O. WHAT ARE SOME WAYS OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIANS MIGHT APPROACH HEALTH AND WELLNESS ISSUES DIFFERENTLY FROM ALLOPATHIC PHYSICIANS? Right now is a great example. In some areas we are in, like the flu season. It’s when you may develop a respiratory problem and you get congested, you’re coughing, your chest hurts, it’s hard to breathe. This time of year, all of that stuff kicks in. One of the nice things about osteopathic medicine is that one of the approaches we can use is a technique to help further the movement of the rib cage. What it does is loosen those tight muscles and it helps move air better by letting the patient’s lungs expand. You are moving more air and hopefully getting rid of the germs, letting


BEHIND THE SCENES

your body to get back the more neutral state. Can we treat them with medicines when appropriate? Absolutely. But instead of fully relying on a medication, there are manipulative techniques that can help. Headaches, sinus trouble; same thing. There are techniques to help loosen up sinus drainage. There are manipulative techniques to help with headaches. ALL OF THIS WOULD SEEM PARTICULARLY APPROPRIATE FOR SPORTS INJURIES. Correct. There are a number of professional, college and high school teams that use osteopathic physicians as their medical staff. They help integrate the function of the muscular skeletal system in staying healthy. There are ways to help treat injuries without having to undergo surgery. They help maintain mobility and flexibility range of motion. AS THE PRESIDENT OF THE MICHIGAN OSTEOPATHIC ASSOCIATION, WHAT ARE THE IMPORTANT ISSUES FACING YOUR MEMBERS?

options to stay relevant and deliver tangible benefits to our members. We are not fully there yet; it’s a work in progress. DOES THE REQUIREMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION GIVE YOU LEVERAGE IN RECRUITING MEMBERS? It is one of the member benefits. Absolutely. We can provide high quality programs that reach out to a lot of members and it is usually at a reasonable price for them to get the education that they need to for their practice. The state licensure, I believe, is 50 credits per year for a three year total of 150 hours. The state of Michigan has some of the strictest continuing education medical requirements. Each specialty mandates your participation. As a radiologist, I need 30 hours of lecture type training per threeyear cycle. We are one of the few professions that continues continual medical education. The legal profession does not require it, nor does accounting. As physicians, I don’t think there are any of us who aren’t interested in furthering

our education. The day that we stop learning, in my opinion, is the day that we stop practicing. AND FINALLY, CAN YOU TALK ABOUT THE ROLE OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY IN OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE? Having the College of Osteopathic Medicine at Michigan State directly benefits the people of Michigan. For primary care, it’s in the top 10 in the U.S. News and World Reports ranking. The entering class between all three campuses accepts over 300 students per year to train osteopathic physicians. Many end up staying in the state to practice after they complete their residency training and fellowships. In fact, within the last several years, Michigan State has expanded. It now has a branch campus in Detroit and a branch campus in Macomb County. This conversation with Dr. Bruce Wolf has been edited for space and clarity.

It’s not necessarily MD or DO issues. But, affecting all of us right now is the opioid public health crisis. We are working hard with our allopathic partners, our judicial partners and our legislative partners to try and address this. The cost is huge both in manpower hours, dollars, lost productivity for employers and to society. So that is one issue. Another, is maintaining access to care for patients. If we don’t have patients, it’s hard for us to practice. The changing insurance environment is imposing challenges for physicians across the state. If a patient has a high deductible insurance plan and they have to be hospitalized or go to a doctor for a procedure, they may have to make the decision of paying for medicine or buying food this week. In some instances, the “olden times” were simpler. The person went to the doctor and paid him with some chickens. There can be an argument for that. MANY ASSOCIATIONS HAVE TROUBLE ATTRACTING YOUNGER MEMBERS. WHAT ABOUT MOA? We have a large number who are members of our association. But like any other memberdriven organizations in this environment, there is competition. We are trying to maintain our relevancy, so we are exploring a number of L

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RESTAURA ADVANTAGE CBRE|Martin, your ideal partner for restaurant representation services. Golden Corral signs long-term lease for the former Fire Mountain Grill site on Elmwood across from the Lansing Mall. Shawn H. O’Brien, CCIM, Senior Vice President/Brokerage Services represented the owner while also working with Golden Corral on site selection. Amidst interest from various restaurant concepts, the new lease was signed in less than 60 days. Golden Corral anticipates opening early 2017. The owner of the Whiskey Barrel Saloon turned to Todd M. Kosta, Senior Associate/Retail Advisor and Shawn H. O’Brien, CCIM, Senior Vice President/Brokerage Services to sell the iconic country nightclub and music venue on Clippert in Lansing. The opportunity was marketed to a targeted group of restaurant owner-operators resulting in multiple offers. Within months, the building and its assets were sold to Green Dot Stables of Detroit known for unique gourmet sliders. Green Dot Stables anticipates opening second quarter 2017. Your restaurant advantage, CBRE|Martin skillfully strategizes these specialized transactions fusing asset positioning, disposition tactics and market exposure together achieving measurable results. Other 2016 notable restaurant transactions: Brannigan Brothers, R-Club, Hungry Howies, Panda Express and multiple Biggby locations across Michigan.

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PERSONAL A lucrative up-and-coming addition to the fitness industry BY MICKEY HIRTEN

When it comes to health and wellness, personal trainers are, well, quite flexible. They aid clients with weight loss, medical rehabilitation, cardio, body-building and, of course, fitness training in health clubs, schools, gyms, private studios and homes. Personal training is a growing niche in the sprawling fitness industry. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics and other industry sources, the greater Lansing area alone hosts hundreds of personal and athletic trainers. They are part of a $10 billion per year business that is growing by 2.5 percent annually, according to a report on personal trainers by the research firm IBISWorld (CQ). It’s a trend that is unlikely to abate. IBIS forecasts that “Rising disposable income over the next five years will enable a greater share of consumers to spend their money on higher-priced personal training sessions.” Reportedly stoking this growth is the continued expansion of American waistlines. “Its crazy busy,” said Wendy Stoll, an independent personal trainer based in Lansing. “For me, in the last three years, business has exploded. I consistently work eight to 10 hour days and usually see one or two clients on Saturdays.” She attributes some of the growth

24

to people dealing with medical issues, using trainers to recover from illnesses or addressing physical limitations. In a survey by IDEA Health and Fitness Association, an industry trade group, Stoll’s view is supported by other trainers, who cited exercise programs for conditions like diabetes or coronary heart disease as a service in demand by a growing segment of clients. As it is elsewhere, the personal training industry in the Lansing area is decentralized and largely unregulated. Trainers are certified by organizations like the American Council on Exercise (ACE), The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). There are dozens of groups offering certifications of varying quality, according to area personal trainers. The programs deal with assessments, development of client programs, nutrition, behavior, business development and more. What separates one certification from another is lost on most clients. What does shed light on qualifications is the academic credentials of trainers. At the Michigan Athletic Club (MAC), an arm of Sparrow Hospital personal trainers cite their degrees in kinesiology, exercise physiology, physical education, exercise science or even biology, along with association certifications; this is similar for trainers at other athletic clubs like Court One or the YMCA of Metropolitan Lansing. At the YMCA’s Westside complex, personal training is overseen by Laura Alexa who teaches “fit and fabulous,” “muscle FIT,” spinning and coordinates the Jumpstart program. With 15 years of experience

G R E AT E R L A N S I N G B U S I N E S S M O N T H LY

DECEMBER 2016

and working in health and fitness before the surge, she approaches her profession from the client’s perspective. “I consider personal training an art. I look at someone’s body and assess where they are. I look at their posture, where they are tight and where things are off,” said Alexa. “There is a lot more to it than just taking someone and training them.” While the Westside YMCA offers a full range of personal training options, it is particularly focused on serving senior citizens. “There is a huge demand by those over age 55. People are living longer and they want to feel good. It’s been a real change.” Alexa said. “They are particularly interested in balance and flexibility programs that are proactive. Some of this happens in small classes or in individual sessions. One of the YMCA’s more popular programs involves water exercises, forms of training that take place in the pool.” “It’s great for people just coming from surgery or who want one of our arthritis aerobic programs. It’s also great for people who are overweight and need to start somewhere,” Alexa said. Her increasing roster of clients includes people recovering from an illness or struggling with physical limitations, often referred to her by doctors or nutritionists. With the right programs and the right technique, she helps people improve their mobility and reduce pain triggers.


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Personal trainers acknowledge that their business is “personal” and that relationships are vital to their success and to advancing their clients’ interests. Programs are customized to clients’ goals, finances and commitment level. And, the role of a personal trainer is expanding beyond gyms and workouts. IDEA, after surveying 2,800 fitness professionals, identified many of the trends shaping the personal fitness industry. IDEA reported an increase in the number of trainers offering life coaching services. It also found that personal trainers were providing more nutrition assessments and nutritional coaching. And that as a compliment to more traditional fitness programs, they are incorporating mind-body activities like yoga, tai chi and Pilates. Stoll said her clients often want a “big picture” approach to wellness. “It’s important to be

empathetic, to find out what the underlying needs really are. For a lot of clients, you have to become a counselor, more like a therapist.”

Altogether, the industry in its many forms, like exercise DVD’s and downloadable workout programs, supports many pricing models.

In addition to workouts, Stoll provides healthy eating programs for people who want to lose weight. She cautioned that matching solutions to people’s needs requires a solid relationship, adding that, for as long as she can remember, people have felt comfortable confiding in her.

The cost of hands-on personal training varies widely, but for the most part it isn’t cheap. Stoll charges $40 an hour at her Lansing studio. At the YMCA, Alexa charges $25 for a half hour and $50 for a full hour session. For classes, the price drops sharply: $20 to $25 for a six to eight-week session. And some classes are free.

It’s a comfortable fit with Stoll’s specialty, which she said is fitness for middle-aged and older women, some of whom over age 25 have morphed from clients to friends. Inevitably, some of these clients who have moved out of the area continue their sessions via Skype, another trend shaping the industry. That training can be staged digitally, is both an opportunity and threat to personal trainers. YouTube is loaded with fitness programs that can be tailored to an individual’s needs and ambition.

At health clubs likes the MAC, personal training sessions cost between $65 and $75 per one hour session. Half hour training programs cost less and the industry recognizes the trend of small group sessions, quick time sessions, which cost less for clients, but can be lucrative for instructors. “People want to get in and get out,” said Alexa. “They just don’t have time, which is why 30-minute-hit programs or boot camps are popular now.”

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COVER

AN INSIDE LOOK AT PERSONAL TRAINING BY MICKEY HIRTEN

After years of enthusiastic starts and ragged stops, I finally acknowledged that improved fitness will require more help than hope. The answer? A personal trainer. I contacted Kirk Henske, fitness coordinator and a personal trainer at Court One Athletic Clubs in Okemos, Mich. I explained that I wanted to improve my core (doesn’t everyone?), that I was fairly athletic – I play singles tennis four or five times a week and softball in the summer – but that was it for exercise and conditioning. His response was that he had to see what he’d be working with and set up a time for a short session and a physical evaluation. “How we train someone depends on their medical history, injuries and other limits,” said Henske. He is looking for strengths and weaknesses, which doesn’t take long - at least not with me. Henske’s session started with planks – 30 seconds of elbows on a mat with the body rigid. It’s a test of overall core strength, not all that challenging. I did OK.

Next, he wanted to see lunges, which are nicely formed genuflections. One knee down, back straight, and alternate knee down. He then added a four pound medicine ball, for a core rotation as a knee hits the ground. Again, I was just OK with this . . . barely. What Henske was looking for was balance, leg strength and stability.

exercise and Henske didn’t disagree. It was then on to squats, which are what the name implies, but done properly with a straight back, feet apart, sitting down into an imaginary chair.

Overall Henske graded my performance as below average and said that a program with three halfTwo exercises in and I hour sessions each week KIRK HENSKE hadn’t embarrassed myself would start me along the yet, but it was even more road to a more muscular Fitness coordinator & personal obvious that my core core, better leg strength trainer at Court One Athletic Clubs needed work. and improved agility. He recommended sessions Where things started coming off the rails was that would include planks, superman extension the balance test. Standing on one foot, eyes arm and leg lifts, squat presses and modified closed, I lasted just four or five seconds. A pullups and pushups. All I can say is, having a stronger core would have helped me correct personal trainer, even for an evaluation, isn’t my wobbles. I graded myself a “D” on this quite as much fun as tennis.

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VISUAL BREAKDOWN

FITNESS

PROGRAMS

Not for those on a tight budget

$55,344 median income of a personal trainer in the U.S. There are more than

153,000

80%

who joined a gym in Jan. 2012

QUIT WITHIN FIVE MONTHS

health club facilities worldwide

20%

of that total is made up by gyms in the U.S.

Americans spend between

$40 - $50 BILLION annually on weight loss

Many studies suggest that between

60-90%

of that is wasted on ineffective dieting where the weight comes back within

MEMBERS WHO VISIT THE GYM MOST OFTEN EARN AN AVERAGE INCOME OF

1-2 years

$75,000 28

G R E AT E R L A N S I N G B U S I N E S S M O N T H LY

DECEMBER 2016


VISUAL BREAKDOWN

A study of 1,600 participants found people earning less than

$25,000

The top four treadmills on the market range from

while those earning

with the average costing around

a year went to the gym for an hour a week

$990 to $3,500

$2,000

GREATER SALARIES went to the gym an average of three hours per week

Top options for home dumbbells range from

$10 TO $400

Another piece of popular cardio equipment is an

per set

ELLIPTICAL TRAINER

A total-body training machine averages

$1,500

which averages

$1,381 Lower end models average

$175

THE FITNESS INDUSTRY IS EXPANDING Wearable fitness tech sales went up

While in-home streaming fitness classes cost on average of

165%

50-70%

Brands like Garmin, Fitbit and Apple are the most dominate of the market with wrist wear fitness trackers

than a gym membership, the trend is on the rise in 2016

between 2014 & 2015.

MORE

Between 2009 – 2015

300,000

the fitness industry increased in value from $67 billion to nearly

$83 BILLION

personal training jobs projected in the U.S. by 2020

Compiled by Adam Lansdell | Graphics by Nikki Nicolaou Sources: www.creditdonkey.com; www.businessinsider.com; www.quora.com; www.mensfitness.com; www.livestrong.com L

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LANSING AT A GLANCE

GREATER LANSING AT A GLANCE Each month, Greater Lansing Business Monthly compiles statistics showing the growth of the greater Lansing area month to month. This information is not comprehensive, but rather, a snapshot of the area’s growth throughout the year. The following is a look at the advances some of Lansing’s biggest businesses have made in the past two months.

MICHIGAN RETAILERS ASSN. INDEX

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS: LABOR FORCE DATA

A monthly gauge of key retail activity in the state; values above 50 generally indicate an increase in activity.

The regular report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics tracking the region's job performance.

Sept. ‘16

Aug. ‘16

July‘16

June ‘16

Sept. '15

56.9

50.8

45.7

53.9

51.1

56

66.5

57.2

59.5

55.4

Prices

52.6

49.5

50.6

52

Marketing/Promotion

50.1

59.9

55.3

48

50.7

53.4

Sales Inventory

Hiring Plans

Sept. ‘16

Aug. ‘16

July‘16

June ‘16

Sept. '15

Civilian Labor Force (1)

(P) 245.8

240.6

241.7

242.2

240.9

53.5

Employment (1)

(P) 237.6

231.5

231

232.5

232.6

61.6

57.9

Unemployment (1)

(P) 8.2

9.1

10.7

9.7

8333

54.7

45.8

Unemployment Rate (2)

(P) 3.3

3.8

4.4

4

3.5

Values above 50 generally indicate an increase in activity

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS: WAGE & SALARY

KEY STOCKS — MONTH-END CLOSE

The regular report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics tracking the region's job performance.

A report on price changes for key local stocks and others that reflect the health of the region's economy.

Sept. ‘16

Aug. ‘16

July‘16

June ‘16

Sept. '15

(P) 233.3

224.8

224.7

226.6

228.1

12-month % change

(P) 2.3

2.7

3

2.1

1.6

Mining, Logging & Construction (3)

(P) 7.7

7.8

7.7

7.6

7.2

Total Nonfarm (3)

12-month % change

(P) 6.9

5.4

4.1

2.7

-1.4

Manufacturing (3)

(P) 20.9

20.9

21

21.2

20.1

12-month % change

(P) 4.0

3.5

8.2

7.6

5.8

Trade, Transportation & Utilities (3)

(P) 35.6

35.6

35.2

35.8

35.4

12-month % change

(P) 0.6

3.2

2.3

2.3

2.6

Information (3)

(P) 3.0

3.1

3.1

3.1

3

12-month % change

(P) 0.0

3.3

0

3.3

7.1

Financial Activities (3)

(P) 15.9

16.1

16

16

15.6

12-month % change

(P) 1.9

1.9

1.9

1.9

2

Professional & Business Services (3)

(P) 22.6

22.8

22.4

22.7

22.4

12-month % change

(P) 0.9

3.6

3.2

2.3

2.3

Education & Health Services (3)

(P) 31.4

30.9

30.8

30.5

30.3

12-month % change

(P) 3.6

3

3

0

-1

Leisure & Hospitality (3)

(P) 19.7

19.2

20.1

19.8

19.4

12-month % change

(P) 1.5

-1.5

4.1

0.5

0.5

Other Services (3)

(P) 10.1

10.2

10.2

10.3

10.1

12-month % change

(P) 0.0

0

0

0

-1.9

Government

(P) 66.4

58.2

58.2

59.6

64.6

12-month % change

(P) 2.8

3.6

1.9

1.9

1.7

Sept. ‘16

Aug. ‘16

July ‘16

Oct . '15

Spartan Motors

8.55

9.58

9.86

8.49

4.13

General Motors

31.6

31.77

31.92

31.54

34.91

Emergent BioSolutions

26.72

31.53

26.65

31.53

30.36

Neogen

52.69

55.94

59.06

55.15

54.05

Gannett (Lansing State Journal)

7.77

11.64

11.93

12.76

15.82

Gray Broadcasting (WILX)

8.9

10.36

11.23

9.90

15.89

Media General (WLNS)

16.85

18.43

17.67

17.59

14.86

Bank of America

16.5

15.65

16.14

14.49

16.78

UPS

107.76

109.36

109.22

108.10

103.02

Home Depot

122.01

128.68

134.12

138.24

123.64

Kroger*

30.98

29.68

31.99

34.19

37.8

Macy's Inc.

36.49

37.05

36.18

35.83

50.98

Wal-Mart Stores

70.02

72.12

71.44

72.97

57.24

*Adjusted for stock split

CONSUMERS ENERGY SERVICE STARTS An indicator of the Greater Lansing region’s business and housing growth.

BUSINESS Oct. ‘16 Clinton

(1) Number of persons, in thousands, not seasonally adjusted. (2) In percent, not seasonally adjusted. (3) Number of jobs, in thousands, not seasonally adjusted. See About the data. (P) Preliminary

30

Oct. ‘16

G R E AT E R L A N S I N G B U S I N E S S M O N T H LY

4,029

Sept. ‘16

Aug. ‘16

4,029

4,056

Oct . '15

YOY Change

4,024

0.12%

Eaton

5,106

5,097

5,104

5,093

0.26%

Ingham

11,487

11,483

11,428

11,322

1.46%

TOTAL

20,622

20,609

20,588

20,439

0.90%

RESIDENTIAL Oct. ‘16

Sept. ‘16

Aug. ‘16

Oct . '15

YOY Change

Clinton

29,456

29,419

29,346

29,019

1.51%

Eaton

41,518

41,503

41,494

41,243

0.67%

Ingham

98,035

97,758

97,670

96,867

1.21%

TOTAL

169,009

168,680

168,510

167,129

1.12%

GRAND TOTAL

189,631

189,289

189,098

187,568

1.10%

DECEMBER 2016


LANSING AT A GLANCE

REGIONAL SINGLE FAMILY HOMES SALES Source: Homefinders.com, available in the Lansing State Journal

Sept. ‘16

1 month change

Sept. ‘15

1 year change

Ingham County, MI Number of Sales Average Purchase Price Average Price per Square Foot

448

73.64%

378

18.52%

$158,163

3.85%

$140,063

12.92%

$95.00

0.0%

$92

3.26%

In November: There were 2,571 units for sale in the county as of Nov. 10, 2016. Single-family homes have a mean list price of $181,608. The current mean list price for a condo in Ingham County is $155,228.

Clinton County, MI Number of Sales Average Purchase Price Average Price per Square Foot

50

-60.0%

101

-50.5%

$155,255

-8.41%

$147,404

5.33%

$98

-9.26%

$92

6.52%

In November: There were 801 units for sale in the county as of Nov. 10, 2016. Single-family homes have a mean list price of $177,080. The current mean list price for a condo in Clinton County is $294,667.

Eaton County, MI Number of Sales Average Purchase Price Average Price per Square Foot

133

18.75%

141

-5.67%

$143,030

0.55%

$142,574

0.32%

$104

9.47%

$89

16.85%

In November: There were 1,155 units for sale in the county as of Nov. 10, 2016. Single-family homes have a mean list price of $169,234. The current mean list price for a condo in Eaton County is $133,404.

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MAN ON THE STREET

MAN ON THE STREET WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE LANSING AREA FITNESS CENTER OR GYM, AND WHY? “My favorite gym is Planet Fitness, specifically the Holt and Okemos locations. As a Black Card member, I have access to any Planet Fitness nationwide, unlimited massage minutes and the unlimited opportunities to bring a guest for free. The variety of weights, machines and training equipment is perfect for both beginners and people with extensive gym experience. Each location is well-maintained and exceptionally clean, which makes me feel comfortable while working out. I am pleased with my membership and highly recommend Planet Fitness for anyone looking for a positive environment to get in shape!” -JENNIFER POLIN

“I really like the Michigan Athletic Club (The MAC). It’s sort of pricey but they’ve got a lot of sweet classes that are basically free. The freedom to mix it up has convinced me to try out some things I probably wouldn’t have before, like yoga and the WOW (Working Out with Weights) classes. Pairing those with a new supplement schedule lets me get my stretch on and my flex on.” -ROBERT PARMESAN

“I really like the gym at my apartment complex, Hunters Ridge. It’s conveniently close to home and there’s no membership fee. It’s pretty hard to beat a free gym that’s right next door. They’ve got just about everything I need so I don’t feel like I’m missing out on anything that a true gym would provide.” -MICHAEL BOLOGNA

“I like Planet Fitness. They’ve got multiple locations across the city that I can go to with my premium membership. It’s really affordable for me and my boyfriend because I’m able to bring a guest to the gym with me every time I go. It’s already pretty cheap to begin with but that makes it all the better. They have a lot of machines too. Sometimes they get backed up with lines but for the price and convenience of location it’s still worth my patience.” -SHALLIN WICKER

Compiled by Adam Lansdell 32

G R E AT E R L A N S I N G B U S I N E S S M O N T H LY

DECEMBER 2016


SPONSORED

GREATER LANSING POPULATION GROWTH: A local company’s perspective (and hope) BY NATHANIEL EYDE

Optimism percolates in greater Lansing in 2016. It feels like strong coffee for an MSA that has been asleep for more than 20 years. Citizens and business owners are seeing tangible signs of growth and progress. One needs only drive the streets to see both shovels in the ground and cranes in the air. We at The Eyde Company have looked to do our part with our Knapp’s Centre, Capitol Books building and upcoming Oliver Towers redevelopments. Landmark Projects such as these are a welcome change for a city whose population has been largely stagnant since 1990. Comparable cities such as Columbus, Indianapolis and Austin, to name a few, have added hundreds of thousands of residents (in Austin’s case doubling over that period). They have become home to fortune 500 startups and established themselves as cultural hubs

because of their ability to mix the urban and the rural, and sophistication with the sensible. Lansing, meanwhile, despite having these same drivers, found itself mired in the statewide struggles of the auto industry and other factors both political and geographical that sucked talent and businesses out of the state. It seems to us at The Eyde Company, that the tides have finally turned. Auto production has been added almost annually. The growth of the already healthy insurance industry has made Lansing a regional destination for that business. Michigan State University has bet big and won big on high technology, a move whose ramifications won’t even be felt for the next few years, but then for generations hence. A development company, such as ours, watches this with excitement and great anticipation. In

our profession, we ask ourselves, “how do we respond to this growth?” More importantly, we ask, how can we best be of service to the region in fostering it or even increasing it?   We feel that a responsible developer of property is a mix of a number of elements. Among those are craftsman, artist, visionary, and even perhaps more importantly handyman and customer service tech. It’s a number of jobs to juggle but it’s a mission that we are committed to--and a fun one when one contemplates all of what greater Lansing is and soon could become. Nathaniel Eyde is a family member of the Eyde Company and has been an active participant in company projects since 2010.

E Y D E C O M PA N Y 517-351-2480

eyde.com Jolly Road Okemos Road

2445 Jolly Road

View all of our available properties at eyde.com or call us at 517-351-2480.

2445 Jolly Road Medical use building consisting of a central hub with five octagon shaped pods surrounding it. Existing Imaging Center.

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MACRO & MICRO ECONOMICS BY MORDECHAI E. KREININ, UNIVERSITY DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR (EMERITUS), MSU

It is customary to divide the main body of economic analysis into two components: macroeconomics and microeconomics. In a nutshell, macroeconomics deals with the aggregate (country wide) level of the economy - aggregate output (real GDP) and income - total employment, level of unemployment or the average price level of all goods and services. Microeconomics is concerned with the behavior of single consumers, the individual producer or firm, the individual industry or the sectoral composition of the national output. This column and the next one will explore the transition from macro to micro. MACROECONOMICS REVISITED In its first eight months, August 2015 through

34

March 2016, this column dealt with fiscal and monetary policy. Together, they are known as macroeconomic policy measures because they are designed to affect the entire economy. That does not mean that all sectors of the economy are equally affected because not all sectors are equally sensitive to these policies. For example, the housing sector is ultra-sensitive to interest rate variations, so it would be first affected by monetary policy. But the policies themselves are aimed at the aggregate economy: stimulating it in times of recession and slowing it down in times of inflation.

which, in the U.S., is the Federal Reserve System; and fiscal policy is conducted by the congress. Similar arrangements exist in other countries. In the euro-zone of the European continent, the European Central Bank (ECB) conduct monetary policy for the entire 19-country zone, while each country’s parliament conducts fiscal policy for its own country. Similarly in the U.K., (which in 2016 exited the EU) it is the Bank of England and the British parliament respectively. In Japan, it is the Bank of Japan and the Japanese parliament, respectively.

For the purpose of recollection, monetary policy is concerned with the quantity of money and interest rates. It is conducted by the central bank

There are 30 advanced industrial countries, including the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, South Korea and Israel, which form an

G R E AT E R L A N S I N G B U S I N E S S M O N T H LY

DECEMBER 2016


ECONOMY

organization known as the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), headquartered in Paris and sometimes dubbed, “the rich man club.” In the fall of 2016, the U.S. economy is doing well in terms of aggregate output and employment, while Europe and Japan suffer from high unemployment and very low inflation. Interest rates hover around zero in all these countries because of expansionary monetary policy conducted in 2008 to combat the last “great recession.” The question is sometimes raised; what if another recession occurs (as some observers expect)? How can it be combatted given 2016 circumstances? Here are some ways: 1. Near zero interest rates, even for long term loans, which means: • Nearly exhausted monetary policy tools • Ability to borrow very cheaply even for the long run 2. Crying needs for infrastructural construction, such as roads, airports, hospitals etc., especially in the U.S. Under these conditions, all that remains is fiscal policy. The federal government can borrow (float long term bonds) at very low interest rate, thereby locking this debt for, say, 30 years at low

rates. That money can be distributed to the states for infrastructure spending. In the U.S. it may amount to, say, $500 billion, and similarly in other countries. That can jar the global economy out of current or future doldrums. In the U.S. it would increase the national debt from 18 to 18.5 trillion dollars, but this would remain reasonable as a percent of GDP. Varying conditions exist in other countries, but such fiscal spending is more urgently needed than concern over the debt. MICROECONOMICS: THE CONSUMER By contrast, microeconomics concerns itself with the economics of the individual consumer, business or industry. But that definition requires elaboration. The individual consumer selects a bundle of goods and services to consume, subject to a budget constraint, so as to maximize his/her satisfaction (which economists call “utility”). Why does it follow that the consumer would purchase a bundle of goods and services? If a refrigerator yields more satisfaction than a washing machine, why not proceed to buy only refrigerators? Because while the first refrigerator yields more satisfaction than the first washing machine, it does not follow that the second refrigerator would yield more satisfaction than the first washing machine. Indeed, the more unit

of a product a consumer has, the less the added satisfaction from an extra unit. Suppose we could measure satisfaction in units called “utils,” and take a product called a car. The first car may yield 1000 utils, but the second car (once the consumer owns one car) might yield only 600 utils, for a total of 1600 utils, while the third car may yield no additional satisfaction, as it may only cause accidents in the driveway. The numbers are not important, only the principle is a matter of common sense: The more units one has of a product, the less the additional satisfaction derived from an extra unit. Total satisfaction might still rise as the number of units rises, but at a declining rate. This principle applies to all products, and it explains why the average would must buy a bundle of goods and services to maximize his/her satisfaction. Mordechai Kreinin is a University Distinguished Professor of Economics, emeritus at Michigan State University and past President of the International Trade and Finance Association. He is the author of about 200 articles and books about economics, including the widely used text, International Economics. He can be reached at kreinin@msu.edu or by cell phone at (517) 488-4837.

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CENTRAL LOCATION BOOSTS ATTENDANCE

VOTED 2014 BEST CVB IN MICHIGAN*

www.lansing.org CMP, CTA

517.377.1405 atoy@lansing.org CMP, CTA

517.377.1414 mchotchkiss@lansing.org CTA

517.377.1434 amoon@lansing.org *Source: Michigan chapter of Meeting Professionals International

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BUSINESS CALENDAR

DECEMBER 2016 .DECEMBER

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DOWNTOWN BUSINESS HUDDLE, LANSING Meet with downtown business managers to get the inside scoop on what’s happening downtown. Talk business and network with other business professionals. Meetings take place at Midtown Brewing Company at 402 S. Washington Square at 8 a.m.

DECEMBER 6 IMMIGRATION CHANGES: NEW REGULATIONS & ENFORCEMENT, LANSING As a new president takes office, several new regulations regarding immigration are expected to be implemented. In addition, I-9 enforcement through the U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement continues to be a demanding matter for employers. This 60-minute webinar dives into the latest issues

for employing foreign employees and what practices and procedures you should have in place to prepare for the changes. Cost is $75 for chamber members and $95 for nonmembers. Register and find more information at michamber.com.

DECEMBER 7 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CAREER WOMEN MONTHLY MEETING, LANSING The NACW is a non-profit organization devoted to the enhancement of women’s personal and professional development. Their mission is to create an enriching environment for career women to share, grow and build professional and personal relationships that able them to reach their full potential. Lunch meetings are the 2nd Wednesday of each month from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Urban Beat Event Center. Reserve your luncheon spot as a guest or member by visiting nacwonline.org/chapters/Lansing.aspx.

DECEMBER 7 UTILIZING ASSESSMENT TOOLS, LANSING Sometimes, some of the best interviewees turn out to be the lowest performing employees. When interviews can only get you so far, this webinar steps in to help. Learn the best available techniques to assess the skills and fit of candidates and ensure you select the best possible person for the job. This 60 minute webinar is $75 for members and $95 for non-members. Stop by michamber.com for registration.

DECEMBER 8 ATHENA AWARDS LUNCHEON, EAST LANSING The Athena Award was created by former Lansing Chamber President Martha Mertz in 1982 and has since spread across the globe. Today the Athena Award celebrates the potential of all women as leaders of the community and recognizes those

Closely Held Business Niche

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There are 7 rows in the periodic table. The common ladybird has 7 spots.

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2425 E. Grand River Ave., Ste. 1 Lansing, MI 48912-3291 T: 517 323 7500 • F: 517 323 6346 www.manercpa.com • www.manersolutions.com

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Maner Costerisan has been supporting closely held businesses in the community for over a century! With our dedicated, knowledgeable team, we can make sure you have the tools and direction you need to let your business reach a new level of financial success. We will personalize those services that best meet your needs, and pride ourselves on making all of our clients feel like family. For more information about our closely held niche services, contact Dennis Theis at 517.886.9537 or dtheis@manercpa.com.

DECEMBER 2016


BUSINESS CALENDAR

who support them. Award winners are individuals who excel in professional accomplishments, give back to the community and open pathways for other women to follow. This luncheon is held at the Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. To RSVP for this event, stop by lansingchamber.org.

DECEMBER 9 JUNIOR LEAGUE OF LANSING PROSPECTIVE MEMBER EVENT, GRAND LEDGE The Junior League of Lansing invites you to this social event to learn why Junior League is for you! Talk with current members and learn how you can make a difference in your community. This event is held at Sanctuary Spirits in Grand Ledge and is from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Visit jillansing.org for more information.

DECEMBER 13 SUPERVISOR & MANAGER TRAINING COURSE, LANSING Properly and consistently train current, newly promoted and newly hired supervisors and managers with this proven training program.

This program provides supervisors and managers with the core skills needed to be better and more effective employees. Learn about the true role of a supervisor, acquire coaching skills, develop techniques to help navigate difficult employee conversations and note marked improvement in productivity, morale and retention of staff. This training course is $270 for members of the Michigan Chamber of Commerce and $295 for nonmembers. Visit michamber.com for more information and registration details.

DECEMBER 15 HR STICKY SITUATIONS 2: HOW WOULD YOU RESPOND?, LANSING Back after popular demand, round two of this full-day interactive workshop will present new, time-sensitive and common HR situations that you will analyze in a small group setting. Learn if your solution would be compliant with applicable state and federal laws as well as your own workplace policies. This seminar is $270 for members and $295 for non-members. Visit michamber.com for information and registration details.

DECEMBER 13-14

DECEMBER 15

HUMAN RESOURCES AND THE LAW, EAST LANSING Human Resources and the Law is an informative conference organized by the National Seminars Training program. Learn how to correctly explain benefit coverage to employees, handle employee questions about pregnancy leave and benefits and dive into often overlooked regulations from the Age Discrimination in Employment Act. This conference will be held at the Kellogg Center in East Lansing. Please visit eventful.com for tickets and more information.

WILLIAMSTON AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE LUNCHEON, WILLIAMSTON Mingle and network at the always jolly holiday luncheon as the Williamston Choir or Jazz Band provides ambient holiday music. The luncheon will be held at Brookshire Inn & Golf Club. Cost is $12 for members and $15 for non-members. Those joining the luncheon can pay at the door. Contact the Williamston Area Chamber of Commerce for more information by calling (517) 655-1549.

Reasons why employers choose Colonial Life „ End-to-end service Need enrollment assistance? Want to reduce administrative burden? We can help every step of the way. „ Money-saving strategies We’re constantly thinking about ways to save you money. Sound familiar? „ Personalized benefits counseling We meet 1-to-1 to help everybody get the benefits that are best for them. Which is also best for you.

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TECHSMITH NAMES DAVID NORRIS AS NEW CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER TechSmith Corp., the go-to company for visual communication, announced on Nov. 11 the hiring of David Norris as its new Chief Technology Officer (CTO). In this role, Norris will lead TechSmith’s strategic technical vision, overseeing emerging product efforts and guiding the company’s overall technology development. Norris brings more than 40 years of technology experience to TechSmith. Most recently, he served as an executive for three different companies and managed software development, business intelligence and analysis, operations, and project management. Prior, Norris held various leadership positions at Microsoft for 24 years. While at Microsoft, he achieved many accomplishments, including developing tools that facilitated Windows and Office, helping with the development of 3D technology within the company, creating the Pocket Excel application and working on the first Xbox.

He also served on Microsoft’s Engineering Excellence team and taught courseware to developers in China. He began his career working on software for the Air Force Weapons Lab and the Space Shuttle in Cape Canaveral. “David’s wealth of experience, knowledge and talent is invaluable,” said Wendy Hamilton, CEO, TechSmith. “Having someone of David’s caliber on our team will further enable TechSmith to provide the most effective products to help our customers successfully create, share and collaborate.” Norris earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the U.S. Air Force Academy and a master’s degree in industrial and organizational psychology from Capella University.

Mid-Michigan/TMN Commercial he will be managing the financial operations of the firm and aiding in the development of synergies between the firm’s brokerage and property management divisions with an eye towards expansion/growth in both areas. Before coming to NAI Mid-Michigan/TMN Commercial, he worked at Control System Integrators as President and Chief Operating Officer where he helped guide their growth in the areas of controls/automation engineering, manufacturing and technical staffing in the Midwest. Tim Miller received his BBA in accounting from Grand Valley State University, and has served as President, CFO and VP of Sales in the engineering and technical staffing fields.

NEW CAREGIVER AWARD ESTABLISHED AT LANSING HOSPITALS NAI WELCOMES TIM MILLER Tim Miller, a CPA with 27 years of corporate and financial leadership experience has joined NAI Mid-Michigan/TMN Commercial. At NAI

In honor of October being Hispanic Heritage Month, the Lansing Latino Health Alliance collaborated with Sparrow Hospital and McLaren Greater Lansing Hospital to establish a new award to recognize outstanding

Why NAI? Commitment & Performance for the client.

NAI Mid-Michigan/TMN Commercial’s focus on the client predicates our commitment to perform our commercial real estate services with the passion, dedication and expertise to realize maximum potential for our clients. We uniquely combine an agile platform with experienced real estate teams, backed by the institutional strength of one of the world’s leading property investment companies. Jeff Shapiro

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2149 Jolly Road, Suite 200 • Okemos, MI 48864 • 517.487.9222 • www.naimidmichigan.com

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The building will house a drive-thru Pharmacy, Laboratory, Endoscopy, Diagnostic Imaging including CT, ultrasound, mammography, MRI and more, and three Sparrow Medical Group practices. The project is part of Sparrow’s more than $285 million in construction and information technology projects over a fiveyear period and comes during a major wave of openings, including the recent Gathering Place at Sparrow and next year’s Sparrow Plaza and Herbert-Herman Cancer Center.

Caregivers and to promote healthcare opportunities for Latinos. The Outstanding Latino / Hispanic Caregiver Award will be offered annually at each hospital for those who provide exemplary service and significantly contribute to the life of a patient. A Caregiver may be nominated by a patient, a patient’s family, co-workers, hospital staff, visitors, and volunteers. Nomination forms are available in each hospital or on Sparrow.org at Latino/Hispanic Caregiver Award. The Lansing Latino Health Alliance was founded as an advocacy organization in 2003 with the mission of raising the health status of Latinos in the greater Lansing area. Since 2003 the Alliance has informed the community and policymakers of health discrepancies and health needs of Latinos, has advocated for change and improvement, and has testified at legislative hearings on these issues. The Alliance has collaborated regularly with both hospitals on various projects. Both hospitals consider a Caregiver to consist of everyone who participates in the care of a patient, including physicians, nurses, assistants, therapists, food service personnel, housekeeping personnel, technicians from all departments directly involved with patient care.

SPARROW OPENING SPARROW HEALTH CENTER LANSING ON GRAND RIVER, WEST OF U.S. 127 Sparrow is celebrating another step in transforming care for the people of mid-Michigan - the new Sparrow Health Center Lansing. Sparrow held a dedication and open house on Tuesday, Nov. 15 for the 72-sq. ft. building.

AIRPORT INDUSTRY VETERAN EXCITED TO TAKE CAPITAL REGION INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT HELM The Capital Region Airport Authority (CRAA) is proud to announce that Wayne G. Sieloff, a longtime leader with the Wayne County Airport Authority, is joining the Lansing airport as our new chief executive officer. Sieloff, who will take the helm at LAN on Dec. 5, succeeds Robert F. Selig, who retired in August after 14 years of leading CRAA, which operates Capital Region International Airport.

Sieloff comes highly qualified to Lansing. Since 2012, he has served as vice president for the Wayne County Airport Authority, which operates the Detroit Metro and Willow Run WAYNE G. SIELOFF airports. In that position, he was part of the senior leadership team that identifies and develops strategic plans, business plans, annual operational goals and capital initiatives for the two airport campuses. Sieloff holds architecture degrees from Lawrence Technological University, and he worked in the private sector architectural industry until 1997, when he joined Wayne County as a project architect. He held increasingly responsible positions for Wayne County and its airport authority before joining Lansing. At LAN, he plans to initially work on building and strengthening relationships in the Greater

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(517) 482‐2400

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Lansing community and determining how the airport can best serve the region. When he’s not working, Sieloff spends time with his family — he and his wife, Lori, have three children ages 11 through 17 — or serving the community. He has held several appointed and elected positions, including mayor of the Detroit-area community of Trenton and president of the Trenton Public Schools Board of Education. Please join us in giving a warm greater Lansing welcome to Sieloff, and as always, thanks for supporting LAN!

ORIGAMI RECOGNIZED BY INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION FOR WORK HELPING BRAIN INJURY SURVIVORS On Nov. 11, Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center proudly announced that it has been recognized by the International Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) for its work helping local families recover from brain injuries. Origami earned a three year re-accreditation from CARF for programs including Origami’s residential, outpatient, and community based programs as well as vocational services offered to brain injury survivors. Origami received an exemplary status, a status granted for exceptional service, for its recent expansion and renovation. “This achievement is an indication of Origami’s dedication and commitment to improving the quality of the lives of (brain injury survivors),” said Brian Boon, Ph.D., the President and CEO of CARF, while announcing the recognition. “Services, personnel, and documentation clearly indicate an established pattern of practice excellence (at Origami).”

Origami is a nonprofit organization located on a 35 acre wooded campus in Mason, just outside of Lansing. The facility offers a continuum of care for individuals who have sustained a brain injury, from residential to community-based and outpatient programs with the resources available to return people to productive and active lives. “Origami is proud to be recognized by an organization like CARF but even more proud that so many local families entrust us to help care for and rehabilitate their loved ones after a brain injury,” said Tammy Hannah, OTRL, CBIS, executive director at Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center. Brain injuries can be mild to severe and often corresponds with a temporary loss of consciousness and impacts to brain function such as memory loss. The injury may also affect a person’s physical functioning, thinking skills, and behavior. These effects can manifest themselves in other difficulties as well, like anxiety, depression, dizziness, headaches, inability to start or finish tasks or trouble sleeping, all of which can bring about challenges with relationships both in the home and on the job. Individuals with loved ones who were involved in an accident or hit their head and show the signs of a brain injury are advised to seek medical attention immediately. Origami operates in partnership with the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine and Peckham, Inc. With the support of these partners, Origami is able to generate excellent clinical outcomes with cost effective management and remains on the cutting edge of brain injury rehabilitation.

Meridian Township’s 175th Anniversary Kick Off Celebration Saturday, December 31, 2016 Studio! C | 1999 Central Park Dr Okemos, MI 48864 Celebration activities start at 4 p.m. on December 31. Enjoy a special viewing of the Historical Meridian Documentary, fireworks, hot chocolate and the celebration’s signature drink the ‘Meridian Mule’ in a complimentary 175th anniversary mug! The first 75 guests will receive a commemorative Meridian Township time capsule! The documentary is a donation of $7.50, all ticket sales go toward the Friends of Historic Meridian. Documentary showings at 5:15 and 7:30 p.m. For more info visit www.meridiancelebrates175.com/calendar-of-events

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MEMBERS ON THE MOVE Loomis, Ewert, Parsley Davis & Gotting P.C. has been named a Tier 1 firm in Lansing for various practices by U.S. News – Best Lawyers® “Best Law Firms” in 2017.

MASON PROMISE SCHOLARSHIP SUPPORTED BY AREA SERVICE GROUPS* In 2006, the Mason Promise Scholarship program was created to provide selected Mason students the opportunity to receive a two-year


NOTABLE NEWS

investment in our local young people and the future of Mason.”

scholarship to attend Lansing Community College. A new group of students has been added each year since the program started.

NAI ANNOUNCES THE SALE OF NEW PROPERTIES

This 29,000 sq. ft. office/warehouse property is the former office of CASS Polymers INC. The new owner has yet to decide what the future use of the property will be. Jim Salkiewicz represented both the Buyer and Seller in this transaction.

NAI Mid-Michigan/TMN Commercial is pleased to announce the sale of 815 W. Shepherd Street, Charlotte, MI.

NAI Mid-Michigan/TMN Commercial is also pleased to announce the sale of 1514 E. Michigan Avenue, Lansing MI. This 2,900 sq.

Local community members, organizations, businesses, and service clubs guide the program. Recently the Mason Area Service clubs have renewed their commitment to the Mason Promise Scholarship. They include the Mason Lions Club, Mason Kiwanis Club, Mason Optimist Club, Mason Rotary Club, and the Mason Kiwanis Golden K Club.

10254 W. Grand River Hwy Grand Ledge, MI 48837 (517) 627-4600 tlhart.com

Students are chosen in 5th grade and then upon graduation from Mason High School they are eligible to utilize their scholarship. Selection criteria include academic capability, motivation, behavior, parental support, and economic need. The scholarship’s Pathway Program provides mentoring over the six years between selection and graduation from Mason Public Schools. There are currently a number of Mason Promise Scholars already taking classes at LCC. Some examples of their program choices include Computer Networking & Cyber Security, Education, Kinesiology, and Automotive Technology. The first of the Mason Promise students will graduate from LCC this spring. The Mason Promise Scholarship is also continuing its community fundraising. This year’s goal is to raise an additional $50,000. The Mason Promise Scholarship is financed through private donations and grants from individuals and organizations. If the community can raise $50,000 by the end of the year, the Dart Foundation has pledged an additional $25,000 contribution. Contributions may be sent to the Mason Promise Scholarship Fund at the Capital Region Community Foundation, 330 Marshall Street, Suite 300, Lansing, MI 48912, (517) 272-2870. To donate online, call for assistance. “We sincerely thank everyone for all the community support over the past years and encourage additional contributions to ensure that we can continue to support these students and uphold our promise to advance their education,” says Liz Luttrell-Wilson, co-chair of the Mason Promise board. “Please consider this

TRANSFORM YOUR SPACE If you are a homeowner, own or manage a commercial building, or are an industrial user, our team at T. L. Hart, Inc. is well-equipped to meet your painting needs. L

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ft. medical/office building will be converted to general office space. Nick Vlahakis represented the Seller in this transaction. The third property NAI Mid-Michigan/TMN Commercial is pleased to announce, is the leasing of 3681 Okemos Road, Okemos MI. The 3,000 sq. ft. suite is the new location of Senior Helpers. Jeff Shapiro represented the building Owner and Tenant in this transaction.

JOAN JACKSON JOHNSON NAMED 2016 ATHENA AWARD RECIPIENT Joan Jackson Johnson, director of the human relations and community services department for the City of Lansing, will be honored by the Lansing Regional Chamber of Commerce as the 2016 ATHENA Award recipient. Jackson

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Johnson will be honored at the annual ATHENA Award Luncheon on Thursday, December 8. The luncheon will take place from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. at the Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center in East Lansing. “Her altruism to humanity is beyond measure and something that can’t be communicated in a format that has been so eloquently articulated through action,” said Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero. “Dr. Johnson’s accomplishments and generous demeanor have served her and the community well. She is truly one in a million and is worthy of this recognition.” Joan Jackson Johnson used her education background and training to impact the community With a PhD in Psychology and the owner of a local business, Joan could have chosen the path of clinical therapy that focused on the more affluent portion of the community. Instead, she has dedicated the past 35 years as a visible advocate trying to bridge the disparity gap. Prior to becoming an employee with the City of Lansing in 2008, Dr. Johnson served as a psychologist within her own practice, the East Lansing Center for the Family, which was established in 1990. Additionally, she served on numerous boards that focused solely on improving the quality of life for women, men, children and families. Dr. Johnson is an extremely charitable person who is widely known for hosting an annual fundraiser that generates funds for several shelters and ministries. She has been a vigorous advocate for the homeless and underprivileged. Started in Lansing in 1982 by Martha Mertz, the ATHENA Award is presented annually in over 500 communities internationally, recognizing individuals for professional excellence, for providing valuable service to the community and for actively assisting all women in their attainment of professional excellence and leadership skills. By honoring exceptional leaders, the ATHENA Award seeks to inspire others to achieve excellence.

INGHAM COUNTY BAR FOUNDATION PROVIDES GRANT TO LOCAL VETERANS TREATMENT COURT Some much-needed assistance for our local veterans will continue to be possible, thanks to a


NOTABLE NEWS

generous donation given on Nov. 10. The Ingham County Bar Foundation (ICBF) presented a $5,000 grant to Friends of the Ingham County Veterans Treatment Court (ICVTC). From covering utility bills and bus passes, to travel expenses for funerals and beds for kids, grant money has allowed the ICVTC to provide a wide range of items needed by veterans and their families, while they are going through the treatment court process. “It’s important for a veteran’s court to reach out and have community support,” said Honorable David Jordan, retired. “Because things come up in the course of any court participant’s journey that are outside of the box – financial emergencies of various sorts. This lets our veterans know that we respect them and we want to support them.” The ICVTC was the second of its kind in the entire country, when it was established in 2010 to work with veterans from all branches of the military who find themselves involved in the criminal justice system. Instead of a traditional court process, eligible veteran-defendants are diverted to a specialized criminal court that provides a veteran mentoring program and resources for things like substance abuse, mental illness, and physical health issues. “It’s the greatest feeling in the world to see someone squared away,” said Hon. Jordan. “We are grateful for people involved in every aspect of this court.” The ICBF was established in 2002 for Michigan lawyers and other interested citizens to be able to make charitable contributions that provide meaningful benefits for the community. This year’s grant matches the largest amount the treatment court has received from the ICBF since the court was established in March of 2010.

GROWTH OF DFC DRIVES SHAREHOLDER RETURN Dart Financial Corporation (DFC); headquartered in Mason, Michigan, parent

company for The Dart Bank announced a $.20 per share dividend to shareholders for third quarter of 2016. The Board of Directors of DFC noted that this represents the highest level of regular dividends $0.78 per share year-to-date paid to shareholders since 2007. Dividend payout was the direct result of the continued strength of Dart’s key performance indicators. The company reported Dart Bank’s net interest margin and non-interest income both components of company revenue increased 11.6% over year-end 2015. Additionally, fee income is up 23.5% and net interest income rose 2.2%. These positive performance levels are a direct result of a 27.2% increase in net loans. Specifically, net loans grew to $244,149,000 from $191,878,000 from the same period in 2015. Assets increased to $351,293,000 from $306,238,000 since year-end 2015. Deposits increased to $260,639,000 from $237,372,000 during the same period. Earnings remained strong at $1,965,000 even with the

buildout of a new headquarters/bank facility, a new branch office and inclusion of new systems and staffing. Peter Kubacki, president and CEO in commenting on the loan growth year-to-date, as being the direct result of our lending staff communicating the advantages of banking with a local independent bank. Loan growth results was seen in each lending category from commercial, consumer and mortgage lending. Mr. Kubacki, noted that the new headquarters and bank office in Mason has been completed with staff fully moved into this contemporary technology driven banking facility. Kubacki also emphasized that “the continued profitability of Dart Financial Corporation is the result of an exceptional banking staff supporting the financial needs of our customers. Our customer focus is best summarized in our tag line ‘For What Matters Most.’” Meaning “our commitment is to exceed the financial and service expectations

Lucky You. The Business Fiber Network is now in Michigan.

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of our many customers by providing the latest in technology driven banking systems coupled with personal service.”

CBRE|Martin Senior Associate and Office Advisor, Thomas Jamieson, represented the seller, Rooney Enterprises LLC, in the transaction.

CBRE|MARTIN NEGOTIATES SALE OF OFFICE BUILDING TO DESIGN FIRM IN LANSING

“CBRE|Martin has assisted us now in both purchasing a new office building as well as in selling our old one. They have done an excellent job in both capacities and have been a pleasure to work with throughout the process,” said Todd Rooney of Rooney Enterprises.

CBRE|Martin is pleased to announce the sale of the 2264 SF office building at 908 E. Mount Hope in Lansing, to new owner, Addis Enterprises. Todd and Tianna Rooney of Rooney Enterprises LLC, listed the property for sale after relocating their business, Perspectives Therapy Services, to a new location earlier this year. Addis Enterprises, a design firm that assists business and organizations with online branding, purchased the building because they have outgrown their current location and need additional space. “After looking at leasing office space, we determined that it would be better for us to buy. We were happy to find the 908 E Mount Hope building and look forward to moving in before the first of the year,” said John Addis of Addis Enterprises.

Perspectives Therapy Services is operating out of their new location at 1701 Lake Lansing Rd. in Lansing, Mich.

CMS APPROVES MICHIGAN PLAN TO ABATE LEAD FROM FLINT AND OTHER IMPACTED AREAS IN THE STATE WITH FEDERAL SUPPORT The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approved a Michigan State Plan Amendment (SPA) on Nov. 14 that uses federal and state funding to expand lead abatement activities in the impacted areas of Flint and

On January 16, 2016, President Obama declared an emergency in Flint, Michigan, and ordered federal aid efforts in response to the elevated levels of lead in the city’s water system. HHS has been leading these federal efforts.

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This effort, approved through an existing authority in law called a CHIP “Health Services Initiative” (HSI), will allow Michigan to use approximately $24 million per year, for five years from the effective date or until all homes included in the scope of this SPA have been abated for lead, to coordinate and target lead abatement services to eligible homes in the impacted area to ameliorate all lead risks. Abatement activities are only permissible with these federal and state funds if the services are delivered to eligible homes where Medicaid or CHIP-eligible children or Medicaid or CHIP-eligible pregnant women reside. While the state will prioritize the impacted area of Flint, the state will also identify other high-risk individuals and targeted communities within Michigan for approved abatement activities. “This approval is an unprecedented step for the state and federal government in helping Flint families protect their children from the risks associated with lead,” said Dr. Nicole Lurie, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), who is leading federal response efforts in Flint. “Removing lead in homes, including from pipes in homes, can greatly decrease the risk of future lead exposure and improve children’s health.”

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other areas in Michigan. This targeted and time-limited effort will complement other federal, state and local efforts to abate lead hazards from the homes and improve the health of Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) eligible residents.

DECEMBER 2016

In March, CMS approved a section 1115 demonstration that extended Medicaid coverage and services to children under age 21 years and to pregnant women with incomes up to and including 400 percent of the federal poverty level who were served by the Flint water system. At the time, CMS said the agency would work with the state on an alternative plan to help target resources for lead abatement activities.


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