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Waterloo Region's Diverse and Evolving Economy


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1-888-333-6337 | chamber@cowangroup.ca | www www.cowangroup.ca .cowangroup.ca


advocate MAY | JUNE 2016 WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

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COVER STORY

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:

Locally Rooted, Internationally Competitive and Globally Renowned

Art Sinclair

Tony LaMantia

EDITOR:

Heather Hutchings

FEATURE

Our Broken Review Processes

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

M&T Printing Group

Perrin Beatty

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PHOTOGRAPHY:

FEATURE

Mobility Clinic Moves to New University Gates Location FEATURE

Going Global: Tips for Canadian Businesses Amy Reier

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Adamski Photography ADVERTISING AND SALES:

David MacLellan – dmaclellan@greaterkwchamber.com Don Critelli – dcritelli@greaterkwchamber.com Karen Cross – kcross@greaterkwchamber.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

FEATURE

My Coverage has Ended Under My Employer's Group Benefit Plan. What are My Options? Colin Bowman

Perrin Beatty, Colin Bowman, Joan Fisk, Sabrina Fitzgerald, Tom Fitz-Gerald, Ian McLean, Tony LaMantia, Amy Reier, Art Sinclair CONTRIBUTORS:

Teri Egerdeen and Julie Tedesco ADVERTISING AND COPY DEADLINES: July 15, 2016 for September-October 2016 September 16, 2016 for November-December 2016

departments 4

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

Supporting Local Business to Grow in the Community

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Sabrina Fitzgerald

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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Region of Waterloo Businesses Require Government Support for Success

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Ian McLean

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ADVOCACY

Alberta, Ontario and Canadian Hockey Teams Missing the Playoffs Art Sinclair

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PERSPECTIVE ON HEALTH CARE

Advancing Health through Technology Joan Fisk

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AWARDS

2016 Business Excellence Awards Winners

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AWARDS

2016 Business Excellence Awards Guests NETWORKING

Spring Networking NEW MEMBERS

February 1, 2016 to March 31, 2016 HI-LIGHTING MEMBERS

Health & Wellness

SUBSCRIPTION AND BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES:

Darlene Jones djones@greaterkwchamber.com SUBMISSION POLICY:

Proposals and articles are accepted via mail or email c/o Editor - Advocate. Please do not send originals. All contributors articles must be accompanied by a head shot in a jpg file and a 40 word author’s bio. PUBLICATIONS PERMIT:

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FOR PERMISSIONS AND REPRINT REQUESTS

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EVENTS

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ADVOCATE - PUBLICATIONS OFFICE 80 QUEEN STREETE NORTH, PO BOX 2367 KITCHENER, ONTARIO N2H 6L4 519.576.5000 The Advocate is a bi-monthly membership benefit publication of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. Advertising content and the views expressed herein are those of the contributors and do not constitute endorsement by the Chamber. The Advocate follows the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards (1990), copies are available through the Publisher. The Chamber cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions that may occur and has the right to edit material submitted. The Chamber will not accept advertising with competitor comparison claims and has the right to refuse advertising that is deemed to be false, misleading, or inappropriate.

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message from the chair

Supporting Local Business to Grow in the Community BY SABRINA FITZGERALD

Waterloo Region is one of the fastest growing and prosperous areas in Ontario. It has over 500,000 residents and plans to continue to grow by over 200,000 residents in the next 20 years. The Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce is here to support local businesses and help them grow in the community. Here in Waterloo Region, we are fortunate to have quick access to Toronto, the border and shipping ports. When Toronto Mayor John Tory was in the Region in March, he spoke about being a part of the Regional Innovation Cluster and the Toronto-Waterloo Region Innovation Corridor. The room at the Chamber luncheon was filled with energy and enthusiasm from all forms of Chamber connections – elected officials, sponsors, members and future members. Businesses of all shapes and sizes were there to hear that between Waterloo Region and Toronto, there are over 200,000 tech workers, over 15,000 tech companies, and 5,200 start-ups which by the way is the 2nd highest density in the world. Together we speak over 150 languages and have over 423,000 students in 16 post-secondary institutions.

Environment and Sustainability - WalterFedy Health and Wellness – Libro Credit Union Hospitality and Tourism – Grand River Raceway Innovation – Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics Michael R. Follett Community Leader – Mary D’Alton Non-Profit/Charitable - The Food Bank of Waterloo Region Volunteer of the Year – Laura Hewitson Young Entrepreneur of the Year – Lina Shamoun It was an awesome evening filled with great networking and reflection of all the great employers we have in this Region. Together, we are supporting local businesses for growth in the community. As always, I encourage you to reach out to your board members, and provide feedback on any items you feel are important to you as a Chamber member. We are here to serve you! We look forward to seeing you soon at one of the many upcoming Chamber events!

Hosting these types of Point of View luncheons is only one way the Chamber helps to support local businesses in our community. Mayor Tory was a great speaker, and we have many more lined up over the course of the spring and summer. Hosting the Energy & Environment Forum featuring George Croft and Russell Tabata of Brick Brewing Company and the Manufacturing Summit are just a few more examples of how the Chamber assists businesses in the community. In February we hosted over 900 people at our Business Excellence Awards Gala. We celebrated winners in 12 categories which included the business of the year awards for 1-10 employees, 11-50 employees and over 50 employees. Winners were Gem Spa, S.G. Cunningham Limited, and Home Hardware Stores Limited respectively. In the employee engagement category, the University of Waterloo won this award. Other categories and winners included:

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sabrina Fitzgerald CHAIR, BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Sabrina is a CPA, CA and tax partner at PwC LLP. She has a passion for working with businesses and owners in the region, to efficiently plan their tax affairs. She is also an avid volunteer in the community.


message from the president

Region of Waterloo Businesses Require Government Support for Success BY IAN MCLEAN The short and long-term success of Waterloo Region businesses, across all sectors, is highly dependent on supportive policies from the federal and provincial levels of government. In a highly unusual but not unprecedented scenario, both the 2016 Ontario and federal budgets were tabled before the end of March. Usually one fiscal plan, if not both, are tabled in April. However this year the provincial budget was delivered before Ottawa. The traditional practice is for provinces to wait for the federal budget, examine what they will be allocated, and respond accordingly. The Ontario Budget from February 25 contains some positive measures for Waterloo Region, yet it leaves a number of issues unaddressed for our region and provincial business sector. An additional funding of $345 million was provided for provincial hospitals. This was urgently required in Waterloo Region as Grand River Hospital had previously announced layoffs in response to mounting fiscal pressures. As restructuring continues across the primary care delivery system, fiscal stability at hospitals and in particular emergency rooms is an imperative. This announcement is the first hospital funding enhancement in five years against significant population growth in areas like Waterloo Region and the Greater Toronto Area. The Ontario Retirement Pension Plan (ORPP) remains a major issue of concern for small businesses across the province. A week before the Budget, Finance Minister Charles Sousa announced that employers who were originally scheduled to commence contributions into the plan in January 2017 are now pushed back to January 2018. While this delay is good news for those businesses, it also initiates serious concerns over the provincial government’s ability to implement this massive pension system under the time frames that have been developed. On the federal front, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce termed federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s fiscal plan delivered on March 22 as a “budget spread too thin.” The document provides minor initiatives over a wide range of portfolios but is missing a major incentive for national economic development and growth. There are investments in skills development however the cancellation of small business tax reductions could negatively impact future hiring decisions for many employers here in Waterloo Region and across Canada.

A high level of concern has also been expressed from the business sector, and other stakeholder groups, regarding the deficit in the budget and the time it will take to return to a balanced position. Placing money on our collective credit card in the short term can be acceptable if a plan is in place on repayment. Prime Minister Trudeau and Minister Morneau should maintain their promise to balance the budget during this term of Parliament. On a positive note for the local economy, the federal budget commits up to $2 billion over three years for infrastructure renewal at Canadian universities and colleges through the new Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund. This program is similar to the Knowledge Infrastructure Program (KIP) introduced in 2009 which provided significant funding for Conestoga College and our two local universities. The Greater KW Chamber, recognizes the importance of local post – secondary institutions to the Waterloo Region economy and the strong relationship between them and local businesses, particularly for developing the skills to meet employer demands. We have continued to be a strong advocate for sustained funding for campus infrastructure. We provided numerous submissions to both the Ontario and federal governments seeking their support. Through KIP funding Conestoga College has significantly increased their capacity, among other portfolios, in health care and building trades, two areas that are chronically challenged for skilled employees. Our Chamber will continue to work with our local federal and provincial members to ensure that government programs invest in business growth for Waterloo Region, while recognizing the folly of unchecked budget deficits.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ian McLean Ian is President and CEO of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce

advocate MAY | JUNE 2016

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THANK YOU TO OUR DEDICATED SPONSORS FOR HELPING THE CHAMBER CONTINUE ITS GOAL OF ELIMINATING THE DOCTOR SHORTAGE IN WATERLOO REGION PLATINUM

GOLD

Ontario Provincial District Council

SILVER

C H A R T E R E D P R O F E S S I O N A L AC C O U N TA N T S C E R T I F I E D G E N E R A L A C C O U N TA N T S

BRONZE

COMMUNITY

INDIVIDUAL CONTRIBUTORS

Linda Dancey

Al Hayes

Karen Mason

SMALL BUSINESS

Tim Jackson Ian McLean


advocacy

Alberta, Ontario and Canadian Hockey Teams Missing the Playoffs BY ART SINCLAIR Many years ago, American Ben Franklin decided the only two certainties in life are death and taxes. In Canada we pay taxes to three levels of governments and that is a certainty. Former Ontario Premier Mike Harris from North Bay – Ben Franklin was born in Philadelphia – often said there are three levels of government and one taxpayer. The only other certainty in life is despite constant coaching and player changes, the Toronto Maple Leafs will play terrible hockey. For fans of Canadian- based NHL teams, one of the seven is usually talented enough to make the post-season. Not in 2016. Generally, apart from the Leafs less than competent performances, there are very few certainties in professional sports. As we have seen over the past two years, economic conditions across Canada do not mirror Toronto professional hockey. Conditions have gone 180 degrees in opposite directions – over a relatively short time frame - and depending on where you live this development is either overwhelmingly positive or negative. A Financial Post article from July of 2014 noted that Alberta was dominating an increasingly unbalanced Canadian economy. The most significant observation at that time was that the prairie province west of Saskatchewan would soon pass Quebec and become the second largest provincial economy in 2017. Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz used the term “two track economy” to describe the predicament where energy exports were exceptional and non-energy (manufacturing) were conversely disappointing. Former Prime Minister Stephen Harper, born in Ontario but representing a Calgary riding, predicted two years ago that Canada could witness $650 billion in new resource projects over the next decade, such as the $6.5 billion Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline. Byrne Luft of Manpower Canada based in Toronto, stated that “when you live in Alberta you have a sense of security and of choice.” The province was essentially at zero unemployment. A year and a half later, a February 2016 Globe and Mail article by Michael Babad spelled the prevailing reality in its title – Ontario’s new prosperity vs. Alberta’s Anguish. Ontario, as noted, is entering into a new period of prosperity originating in large part to a low loonie that is improving the competitiveness of its previously floundering provincial exports.

The March 2016 Provincial Economic Outlook from RBC Economics indicates that dropping oil prices have lead to a further growth downgrade for Alberta, with a provincial recession persisting and impacting non-energy sectors. Oil consuming provinces like Ontario will be the beneficiaries of lower priced exports, cheaper energy costs, and a stronger US economy. In terms of unemployment, RBC indicated that upward pressure on Alberta is likely to persist after the rate surged in 2015. In January 2016, the provincial unemployment level surpassed the national average for the first time since 1989. No more security and choice. A recent article in Canadian Business magazine argued a government bailout for the Alberta oil sector is not required – yet. Saskatchewan Premier Bard Wall is quoted that if current conditions in the oil industry were evident in any other domestic economic sector, there would be a race for a major government package. An extensive analysis is provided in the article comparing the job losses in Ontario manufacturing one decade ago to current conditions in the western oil sector. The two declines have similar sources, primarily the world prices for crude oil. However, despite Premier Wall’s claims to the contrary, there was no race to bailout southwestern Ontario when oil prices rose between 2004 and 2007. Why should there be a race in Edmonton during 2016? And, across Canada this spring, there will be no competition for final playoff positions. The entire country joins Toronto in a race for the golf course.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Art Sinclair Art is Vice President Policy and Advocacy for the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

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perspective on health care

Advancing Health through Technology BY JOAN FISK Health care has changed a lot in the five years I have been Board Chair of the Waterloo Wellington Local Health Integration Network (LHIN). It’s always been a fluid industry, filled with complexities, but the pace of change has escalated rapidly in recent years. With an average life expectancy of 81.8 years, Waterloo Wellington residents are living longer. And while we’re living longer, the factors that impact our health are making care more and more complex. For example, the health of 81 per cent of Ontarians over the age of 65 is increasingly threatened by incidences of chronic illnesses like diabetes, chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. More than half of these people have two or more chronic illnesses. Care for these chronic illnesses and others requires support from many different parts of the health care system. This makes it difficult for patients and care providers to navigate the care they need. Our health system should be tailored to meet the needs of our residents. Patients should be able to move through all sectors and levels of our health system easily. This means that when a patient goes to the emergency department at a local hospital for care, their family doctor knows about that visit, the type of care that was provided in hospital and has all the information they need to support that person when they leave the hospital to go home. Seamlessly. This need for an integrated system is why LHINs were created. In addition to planning, funding and accountability, as local professionals, we work in partnership with health service providers to better support the needs of residents and those who care for them. One of the ways we’re achieving this is through enabling technologies solutions. Enabling technologies are information and clinical

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technologies that are used to improve health care. Here in Waterloo Wellington, it means we’re working to develop unique and malleable technology solutions that will speak to existing platforms, support care providers and improve patient care by reducing errors, better connecting care providers with each other and patients, improving communications and allowing patients to play a more significant role in their own health. What will this look like? How will this change health care? Some of this work has already been happening. But to give you an idea of what connected care will look like, I’d like to tell you about a patient named Lillian. Lillian is 77 years-old and lives alone. Her daughter lives more than an hour away and tries to visit as often as she can to help her mother. Lillian has chronic heart failure and a painful hip. Thankfully her family doctor uses electronic medical records (EMR) to

support her care. Less than 10 years ago only 25% of primary care providers in Waterloo Wellington used electronic medical records. Today, Waterloo Wellington has the highest rate of EMR adoption in the province at 87%. The EMR allows her family doctor to track her care closely. It also provides him with the most up-to-date information, coupled with reminders that suggest the preventative care methods that Lillian may need to live as healthy as possible with her chronic heart failure, like vaccinations. Since EMRs were introduced, Waterloo Wellington has seen an 80% increase in patients with chronic heart failure who have received vaccinations for pneumonia. Lillian’s doctor decides that she might need to see an orthopedic surgeon to address her hip pain. One of the initiatives we are working on is e-consult. In the future, Lillian’s doctor will be able to use e-consult to send information and questions to an orthopedic surgeon to be sure. E-consult allows family doctors to


perspective on health care

connect to specialists before they refer patients for further care. It has helped to reduce the number of unnecessary referrals to specialists by 40% and reduce wait times for others in areas that use this technology. The surgeon could respond within a few hours indicating that Lillian needs a full hip replacement.

These are just some of the ways that enabling technology initiatives help to bridge the gaps that exist between health sectors, better support both care providers and their patients, and build on a strong foundation of exceptional care that we see every day in each of our local health providers.

Referrals will soon be managed through one system that will allow her doctor to locate area orthopedic surgeons, view their wait times and share information to support the care of the patient together, all securely on-line. This will allow Lillian and her doctor to choose the surgeon and location that works best for her and she is booked for surgery.

Our health care system will continue to evolve, and in many ways, through the use of technology, Waterloo Wellington is leading the way. We currently have the highest rate of adoption for electronic medical records and technology solutions that connect primary care to acute, or hospital care. This success should come as no surprise in a community as advanced and connected technologically as ours. We will continue to build on these successes.

Her surgery at the hospital is made easier through a technology solution that makes hospital information available to family doctors and other primary care providers. In the fall of 2015, all Waterloo Wellington hospitals had adopted this technology; Hospital Report Manager (HRM). When a patient receives care in hospital, all of their care information is automatically updated to their family doctor’s electronic health record through HRM within hours, which means Lillian’s family doctor is able to follow her progress in hospital in real-time. And he has the information he needs to continue supporting her care when she leaves the hospital to go home. When Lillian leaves the hospital to begin her recovery at home, she experiences complications from her chronic heart failure. With her daughter so far away, it’s often difficult for Lillian to get to medical appointments on her own. Her goal is to live independently in her own home and so a plan is developed and shared electronically with everyone who is involved with her care. In the future, her doctor will be able to check in on her regularly at home and help her develop health goals, track her progress and better manage her chronic heart failure through telehomecare and remote monitoring equipment. All of this support available through enabling technologies will help Lillian to fully recover from her hip replacement and manage her chronic heart failure all while maintaining her goal of living in her own home.

Five years ago, I couldn’t have imagined how far we would come in transforming health care in Ontario. And as we keep moving forward, we will continue to work closely with our health service providers and our community to better integrate our health system for the benefit of residents. We always welcome feedback and ideas, so please feel free to get in touch with me to share yours.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Joan Fisk Joan is the Board Chair, Waterloo Wellington LHIN

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awards

2016 Business Excellence Awards Winners

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1 SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR AWARD (1-10 EMPLOYEES) WHITNEY DALUZ, OWNER OF GEM SPA ACCEPTS THE AWARD FROM JOHN DEANS, SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, S. G. CUNNINGHAM. 2 BUSINESS OF THE YEAR AWARD (11-50 EMPLOYEES) JOHN DEANS, SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, & GEORGIA CUNNINGHAM-BOLGER, PRESIDENT AND CEO, OF S.G. CUNNINGHAM ACCEPT THE AWARD FROM GORD ROBSON, SWO OFFICE MANAGING PARTNER AT MILLER THOMSON LLP. 3 BUSINESS OF THE YEAR AWARD (OVER 50 EMPLOYEES) STEW GINGERICH, VICE PRESIDENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES AT HOME HARDWARE ACCEPTS THE AWARD FROM ROCCO FONDACARO, ACTING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, COOPERATIVE EDUCATION & CAREER ACTION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO. 4 EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT AWARD MARILYN THOMSON, ASSOCIATE PROVOST, HUMAN RESOURCES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO ACCEPTING THE AWARD FROM DR. JOHN TIBBITS, PRESIDENT OF CONESTOGA COLLEGE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND ADVANCED LEARNING. 5 ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY AWARD ELENA WIERSMA, ARCHITECT AND CHAIR OF WALTERFEDY’S SUSTAINABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE ACCEPTING THE AWARD FROM MURRAY COSTELLO, DISTRICT MANAGER FOR WATERLOO/BRANTFORD UNION GAS LIMITED 6 HEALTH & WELLNESS IN THE WORKPLACE AWARD MARTIN KIHLE, REGIONAL MANAGER OF LIBRO CREDIT UNION ACCEPTING THE AWARD FROM MALCOLM MAXWELL, PRESIDENT & CEO OF GRAND RIVER HOSPITAL.

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7 HOSPITALITY/TOURISM AWARD KELLY SPENCER, MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER OF GRAND RIVER RACEWAY ACCEPTING THE AWARD FROM MINTO SCHNEIDER, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF THE WATERLOO REGIONAL TOURISM MARKETING CORPORATION. 8 INNOVATION AWARD DEBBIE ADARE, STEWARDSHIP MANAGER AT THE PERIMETER INSTITUTE FOR THEORETICAL PHYSICS ACCEPTING THE AWARD FROM ROBERT BOWERMAN, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, ENTERPRISE SOFTWARE, ARCHITECTURE & DEVELOPMENT, BLACKBERRY. 9 MICHAEL R. FOLLETT COMMUNITY LEADER OF THE YEAR AWARD MARY D’ALTON RECEIVES THE MICHAEL R. FOLLETT COMMUNITY LEADER OF THE YEAR AWARD FROM DAVE BENNETT, SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, GROUP BENEFITS AT EQUITABLE LIFE OF CANADA. 10 NON PROFIT/CHARITABLE AWARD WENDI CAMPBELL, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE FOOD BANK OF WATERLOO REGION ACCEPTING THE AWARD FROM PAUL EICHINGER, VICE PRESIDENT OF MTE CONSULTANTS INC. 11 VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR AWARD LAURA HEWITSON FROM MANULIFE ACCEPTS THE AWARD FROM DR. MICHEÁL J. KELLY, DEAN, LAZARIDIS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & ECONOMICS. 12 YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR AWARD LINA SHAMOUN, OWNER AND DIRECTOR OF ARTLINE SALON ACCEPTS THE AWARD FROM ERIN SARGEANT GREENWOOD, INTERIM VICE PRESIDENT, ADVANCEMENT, AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO.


awards

2016 Business Excellence Awards Guests

Photography by Adamski Photography

advocate MAY | JUNE 2016

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networking

Spring Networking

CHAMBER STAFF WELCOMING GUESTS AT THE HOME HARDWARE BA5 AT SHERWOOD SYSTEMS

GUESTS CHECKING OUT THE BOOTHS AT THE E & E FORUM

GUESTS AT THE LIBRO CHAMBER YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORKING EVENT AT DEER RIDGE

KARL KIEFER, DOUG CRAIG, JOHN TORY AND KEN SEILING

JANE MITCHELL, KAREN REDMAN, HELEN JOWETT AND ELIZABETH CLARKE

HOME HARDWARE BUSINESS AFTER 5 NETWORKING EVENT

GUESTS NETWORKING AMONGST THE GUITARS AT SHERWOOD SYSTEMS

GUESTS NETWORKING AT THE 29TH ANNUAL ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT FORUM

POINT OF VIEW LUNCHEON WITH MAYOR OF TORONTO JOHN TORY

Photography by Adamski Photography

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networking

IAN MCLEAN, WALTER MCLEAN, AND JOHN TORY GEORGE CROFT, IAN MCLEAN AND RUSSELL TABATA

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GLENN THORPE, MARK KULA AND CAMERON HAUCK AT LIBRO CHAMBER YOUNG PROFESSIONALS EVENT

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WATERLOO NORTH HYDRO’S JUSTIN ALI AND JEFF QUINT

BRITTANY STACEY AND JILL KOLB AT THE POINT OF VIEW WITH MAYOR OF TORONTO JOHN TORY

MAYOR OF KITCHENER BERRY VRBANOVIC, MAYOR OF TORONTO JOHN TORY AND CHIEF OF POLICE BRYAN LARKIN

WAYNE BRABAZON AND TOVA DAVIDSON

ALISON BOURKE & JODI PICKLES FROM OXFORD LEARNING

MAYOR JOHN TORY AND CHAMBER PRESIDENT & CEO IAN MCLEAN Photography by Adamski Photography

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new members

February 1, 2016 to March 31, 2016 Berzins Creative

Frey's Plumbing Works

Michael Irwin, Freedom 55 Financial

Graphic Designers Linda Shilling, Owner Email: linda@berzinscreative.com www.berzinscreative.com Phone: (519) 501-0416

Plumbing Contractors Barb Frey, Manager/Owner 1600 King St N, Unit 22 Waterloo, ON N0B 2N0 Email: barb@freysplumbing.com www.freysplumbing.com Phone: (519) 664-1649

Highland Place by Revera

Financial Services Michael Irwin, Financial Security Advisor 50 Sportsworld Crossing Rd, Unit 280, Kitchener, ON N2P 0A4 Email: michael.irwin@f55f.com Phone: (226) 338-9496 Fax: (519) 650-8114

Senior Citizen Services Christopher Jung, Executive Director 20 Fieldgate Street Kitchener, ON N2M 5K3 christopher.jung@reveraliving.com www.reveraliving.com Phone: (519) 741-0221 Fax: (519) 741-1356

Event Planning Danny Lautenschlager, President 335 Wellington St N, Kitchener, ON N2H 5L1 Email: danny@prosportstours.ca www.prosportstours.ca Phone: (519) 575-5288

Bock North America Ltd. Manufacturers Michael Eckardt, Managing Director 18 Cherry Blossom Cambridge, ON N3H 4R7 meckardt@bocknorthamerica.com www.bocknorthamerica.com Phone: (519) 653-3334

Bracelet of Hope Charitable & Community Organizations Candice Coghlan, Director of Business Development 111 Farquhar Street Guelph, ON N1H 3N4 Email: ccoghlan@braceletofhope.ca www.braceletofhope.ca Phone: (226) 790-3824 Fax: (855) 491-5808

Brian Smith Consulting Business Consultants Brian Smith, Principal 350 Northlake Drive Waterloo, ON N2V 1W7 Email: smithba2014@yahoo.ca Phone: (519) 497-8047

Bulwark Legal Services Paralegals Curtis Rutt, Owner/Director 19 Weber St E Kitchener, ON N2H 1C2 Email: info@bulwarklegal.ca www.bulwarklegal.ca Phone: (226) 647-9200

Christian Seeman Manufacturers Chris Seemann, Senior Director Email: seemannchris@web.de

Corporita Consulting Business Consultants Hanan Awaad, President 112 Benton St, Suite 602 Kitchener, ON N2G 3H6 Email: president@corporita.ca www.corporita.ca Phone: (519) 208-7244

Donna's Hair Design Hair Salons Anne Hastings, Owner 375 University Ave E, Waterloo, ON N2K 3M7 Email: ahastings007@rogers.com www.donnashairdesign.com Phone: (519) 885-3220

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Homer Watson House & Gallery Art Galleries, Dealers & Consultants Kate Macpherson, Director of Marketing & Fundraising 1754 Old Mill Rd, Kitchener, ON N2P 1H7 development@homerwatson.on.ca www.homerwatson.on.ca Phone: (519) 748-4377 Fax: (519) 748-6808

IM@Events Marketing Consultants Jane Barkley, Founder Email: jane@imatevents.com www.imatevents.com Phone: (519) 505-3854

JHM Electric Electrical Contractors Jordan Hale, Owner/Certified Electrician 33 Meadow Woods Cr Kitchener, ON N2N 1T3 Email: info@jhmelectric.com www.jhmelectric.com Phone: (519) 573-9889

KingsGuard Security Inc. Security Guard & Patrol Services Rajdeep Malhi/President/Owner 105 Young Dr, Brampton, ON L6Y 0P1 Email: info@kingsguard.ca www.kingsguard.ca Phone: (905) 251-4759

K-W CardioPulmonary Services Health Care Service & Supplies Kim Jozkow, Manager 206 - 430 The Boardwalk Waterloo, ON N2T 0C1 Email: kwcps@golden.net www.kwcps.com Phone: (519) 741-5252 Fax: (519) 741-5772

Expense Reduction Analysts (ERA)

Mark Straub Consulting

Business Consultants Kevin Quinn, Principal 243 Winder Heights Place, Waterloo, ON N2T 1P1 Email: kquinn@expensereduction.com www.expensereduction.com Phone: (226) 748-4000

Consultants Mark Straub, President 513 Mayflower St Waterloo, ON N2K 3Y7 Email: markstraub@live.ca www.markstraub.ca Phone: (416) 708-9288

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

Pro Sports Tours

Razzle Dazzle Home and Design Group Home Staging Juliana Tosello, Lead Stylist Email: juliana@somethingbyjules.com www.somethingbyjules.com Phone: (519) 573-9365 Fax: (519) 213-0077

Realty Executives Complete Properties Inc. Real Estate Brokers & Agents Sharilou Zister-Schagena, Owner 421 Greenbrook Dr, Unit 8 Kitchener, ON N2M 4K1 completepropertiesrealty@gmail.com www.completeproperties.ca Phone: (226) 686-0400 Fax: (519) 214-0223

Recruiting In Motion Employment Agencies Patricia Walton, Staffing Consultant 22 King St S, Suite 300 Waterloo, ON N2J 1N8 patricia@recruitinginmotion.com www.recruitinginmotion.com Phone: (519) 279-0190

Red Meat Games Entertainment - Family Keith Makse, CEO 7 Duke St W, Suite 306 Kitchener, ON N2H 6N7 Email: keith@redmeatgames.ca www.redmeatgames.ca Phone: (519) 868-4263

Rooymans Mercantile Sales Management Fred Rooymans, President 51 Breithaupt St, Suite 100Kitchener, ON N2H 5G5 Email: sales@rooymansmercantile.com Phone: (519) 590-1525 Fax: (519) 804-9236

Stevenson & Hunt Insurance Brokers, part of Arthur J. Gallagher Canada Limited Insurance Agents & Brokers Jeff Kienapple, VP Commercial Insurance 20 Erb St W, Suite 100 Waterloo, ON N2L 1T2 Email: jeff.kienapple@sthunt.com www.sthunt.com Phone: (519) 772-0972 Fax: (519) 772-0977

Strategic Alliance Financial Group Inc Insurance Garry Levy, President & CEO 3 Director Crt, Suite 201, Vaughan, ON L4L 4S5 Email: glevy@safg.ca www.safg.ca Phone: (416) 438-9494 Fax: (905) 264-6061

Tepperman's Retail Andrew Tepperman, President 1415 Huron Rd, Kitchener, ON N2R 1R4 Email: atepperman@teppermans.com www.teppermans.com Phone: (519) 969-9700

Tesna Group Import & Export Services Maria Almudevar, Partner 906 Fung Place, Kitchener, ON N2A 4M3 Email: maria@tesnagroup.com www.tesnagroup.com Phone: (519) 743-5282 Fax: (519) 743-4540

The Hair Lair Hair Salons Jenn Kuntz, Owner 88 Sixth Ave Kitchener, ON N2C 1R1 Email: jomarra@thehairlair.com www.thehairlair.com Phone: (519) 895-2984

The Sugar Cube Hair Removal Jolene McKnight, Owner 42 Bridgeport Rd E, Unit 5 Waterloo, ON N2J 2X1 Email: service@thesugercube.ca www.thesugarcube.ca Phone: (519) 584-5768

VOR Physiotherapy Physiotherapists Gaetanne Aggerholm, Physiotherapist/Office Manager 303 - 55 Erb St E Waterloo, ON N2J 4K8 Email: vor.physio@gmail.com www.vorphysio.com Phone: (519) 208-0150 Fax: (226) 647-1905


CUSHMAN & WAKEFIELD.

BUILT TO LEAD. Cushman & WakeďŹ eld is a leader in the global real estate marketplace, putting the client at the center of everything we do. With over 43,000 employees in over 60 countries. 4.3 billion square feet of space under management. $191 billion in transactions. $5 billion in revenues. Built to help clients reach their full potential.

Michael H. Polzl President Broker of Record Cushman & WakeďŹ eld Waterloo Region Ltd. 4295 King Street East, Suite 101 Kitchener, ON N2P 0C6 +1 519 585 2200 Ext. 224 michael.polzl@cushwakewr.com

cushwakewr.com


cover story

Locally Rooted, Internationally Competitive and Globally Renowned BY TONY LAMANTIA The Waterloo Region Economic Development Corporation (WREDC) is four months into its inaugural year and setting a constructive, collaborative tone with our key partners and stakeholders as we ramp up operations while keeping a keen eye on core business. In addition to supporting new companies landing in the Region and working on a number of anchor company expansions in 2016, we are beginning to expand our pipeline with several new qualified investment opportunities. The steady flow of traffic from international businesses, government delegations (including a visit by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau) and key investment intermediaries has provided ample opportunity to promote Waterloo Region’s compelling value proposition and create targeted business cases to keep us top of mind in decision-making.

WREDC has also been very active in several great community events. Together, this early “big action” in Waterloo is contributing to our pursuit of many of the goals set out in the Region’s Economic Development Strategy—the foundational document that laid out WREDC’s aspirational goals and objectives. There is much work ahead. While it’s important to keep our eye on executing our key priorities, we’ll be doing that while building WREDC’s talent and organizational capacity in the months ahead. When delivered by Malone Given Parsons Ltd. in December of 2014, the Waterloo Region Economic Development Strategy laid out several common themes that emerged in various contexts throughout the study, including collaboration, innovation, entrepreneurship, diversity and local and international

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cover story

perspectives. These revelations led to our new Vision Statement of being locally rooted, internationally competitive and globally renowned. Alongside our Vision Statement, the Strategy provides four strategic goals for our organization to follow. The first is to be the premier location for innovation and entrepreneurship. The second goal is to be the most competitive location for new and expanding companies and institutions. Third, we want to be a resilient, engaged and dynamic economic ecosystem. Finally, and most important, we want to be a community of choice for talented people. Achieving these ambitious goals was contemplated to be done through a series of 22 strategic objectives and 43 specific actions for WREDC to take charge of. Very early in 2016, WREDC’s new CEO and Board of Directors recognized that it would be fundamentally important to prioritize these objectives and actions into measurable, targeted operational planks that WREDC would be accountable for. In this spirit, four priorities were specifically identified. First and foremost, the core business demands that WREDC forge a track record of clear Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and local company expansion/scale-up wins. Second, WREDC must focus on building a best-in-class “go to” Concierge Service for investment attraction and retention within this Region. To achieve this, WREDC is working closely with the Economic Development resources in the Region so that there is an integrated “no wrong door” approach to client account management and pursuit of investment opportunities. Third, we will work with partners to create an inventory of investment-ready or “shovel-ready” sites within the area – the Strategy and WREDC’s Board both recognize that it is important to have one source for all Regional data, especially when it comes to signature brownfield and Greenfield sites. This is critically important to investment decision-makers and intermediaries who are relentlessly looking to de-risk their timelines and execution. Finally, and very much derived from the call to action in the original strategy work, WREDC will turn its attention to developing a unifying narrative and an integrated marketing plan for the Region. WREDC will create a clear brand for Waterloo Region – one that will succinctly tell our story, convey our promise and better position us in the cluttered global landscape for investment attraction.

WREDC has had no trouble in generating genuine interest from international companies investigating the Canadian business landscape, but we won’t be taking our eyes off local businesses that are already in our backyard and need to scale. Our Strategy has clearly indicated that helping local businesses to grow and expand in Waterloo Region is critical. We really have to stay engaged locally, working with our municipal partners, the Economic Development Offices of the cities and townships, to learn as much as we can about our local businesses and their strategic interests and challenges to support their retention, global mandate growth and local expansion. In this spirit, there is much to promote. The Region is replete with globally competitive companies and research capacity in technology, business and financial services, advanced manufacturing and, in case anyone missed it, a globally significant start-up ecosystem. Waterloo Region bookends one of the most vibrant innovation corridors in the world—the Toronto-Waterloo Innovation Corridor—and making a business case underlined by the market opportunity, competitive cost-structure and winning talent is central to that promotional imperative. So too is the Region’s barnraising, “get it done” collaborative culture, diversity and entrepreneurial spirit. Waterloo Region is inventing the future. Let’s get to work!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tony LaMantia Tony is President & CEO of the Waterloo Region Economic Development Corporation. He was appointed in November 2015.

advocate MAY | JUNE 2016

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85 Willis Willis Way Way at Waterloo Waterloo Town Town Square Square is on its way. way. This This 85,000 85,000 squar squaree foot off office ice building is being built with ground ground floor rretail etail space fronting fronting onto W Willis illis W Way ay and C Caroline aroline S Street treet in W Waterloo. aterloo. Be Be at the centre of attention and move to the best location in the city. For For more information about leasing easing your future off office f ice oor retail space, contact: CUSHMAN & WAKEFIELD W AK EFIELD WATERLOO W A TERL OO REGION RE GION BROKERAGE BROK ERA GE 4 4295 295 K KING ING ST E E,, UNIT 1101 01 K KITCHENER, IT CHENER , ON N N2P 2P 0 0C6 C6 511 9 ) 5 8 5 2 2 0 0 | W W W W.C PHONE: +1 (5 . C U S H WA W A K E W R ..C COM

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hi-lighting members

Health & Wellness A Body in Motion Rehabilitation

A Body In Motion

70 Victoria St N, Suite E Kitchener (519) 579-3746 www.abodyinmotion.ca

A Body In Motion is focused on individualized, hands-on treatment by a registered physiotherapist, each and every time you visit our clinic. We provide caring, skillful treatment to clients of all ages, treating a wide variety of conditions including orthopaedic, pelvic health and pediatric.

Arthur Murray Dance Studio

Arthur Murray Dance Studio

abodyinmotion@theboardwalkmedical.com

104 King St South, 2nd Floor Waterloo (519) 880 0800 info@arthurmurraywaterloo.com www.arthurmurraywaterloo.com

Why Ballroom Dancing? Dancing reduces stress, increases energy, improves flexibility, strength, balance and endurance, boots cardiovascular health, increases mental capacity by exercising our cognitive processes, dynamic and rapid fire decision making creates new neural paths while having fun. See you on the dance floor.

St. John Ambulance 250 Gage Avenue, Kitchener (519) 579-6285 Maggie.Sieber@on.sja.ca www.sja.ca

St. John Ambulance

The Westhill Retirement Residence

The Westhill Retirement Residence

St. John Ambulance, Canada’s leading authority in First Aid, train thousands annually in first aid, health and safety courses. As a charitable organization proceeds from our training support programs such as Medical First Response, Therapy Dog and Home Caregiver Support.

25 Westhill Drive, Waterloo (519) 725-0525 info@westhill.sifton.com westhill.sifton.com

The Westhill is a Retirement Residence located in the heart of Waterloo. From simple pleasures like enjoying a variety of menu choices, to living well, with a recreational events calendar designed to enhance your mind, body and spirit; we have a passion for healthy aging and wellness.

Meal In A Jar Inc.

Meal In A Jar Inc.

18 Eby Street South Kitchener 519-498-6325 orders@mealinajar.com www.mealinajar.com

The Sugar Cube 42 Bridgeport Road East, Waterloo (519) 584-5768 service@thesugarcube.ca www.thesugarcube.ca

Serving professionals across Waterloo Region - Want your employer to stock the fridge? Are your colleagues interested in having their lunches made fresh and delivered to their desks? Give us a call and we’ll make it happen 519-498-6325.

®

The Sugar Cube The Sugar Cube is Waterloo Region’s best full-service hair removal studio. Since opening in 2010, our sugaristas have made countless clients silky smooth using the most gentle and effective hair removal method; sugar! Sugaring is 100% natural and acts as both an exfoliant and hair remover. We take great pride in ensuring your experience is not only thorough and hygienic, but individually tailored to your specific needs too.

Flowt K- W

Flowt K-W

550 Parkside Dr, Unit B3 Waterloo (519) 577-2022 mark@goflowt.com www.goflowt.com

Break through to a whole new level of wellness. Discover a mind-body experience unique to sensory deprivation tanks. Learn firsthand the multiple benefits from resetting both your brain and body. Book your float on our website or Facebook page.

advocate MAY | JUNE 2016

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events

Mark Your Calendar May 6, 2016

May 18, 2016

Leadercast

Point of View with Local Hospital Presidents

8:00am-4:30pm at CIGI Tickets: $100 Steve Wozniak, Nick Saban, Dr. Henry Cloud and Andy Stanley – just to name a few of the world-class speakers that will be a part of this leadership development event broadcast live from Atlanta to hundreds of venues around the world. It’s a day of exceptional motivation, inspiration, education, and not to mention great networking. * Lawyers & HR Professionals can receive substantive credits or recertification points- see website for more details.

11:30am-1:30pm at Delta Waterloo Member: $40 • General Admission: $50 Waterloo Region’s hospitals are emerging as provincial and national leaders in sharing responsibilities for the delivery of cost effective and efficient services for a growing economic and population base. Patrick Gaskin (Cambridge Memorial Hospital), Malcolm Maxwell (Grand River Hospital), and Don Shilton (St. Mary’s General Hospital) will provide their visions for the future of local primary care.

Lunch Sponsor:

Gold Sponsors:

Coffee Break Sponsors: Small Business Sponsors:

Title Sponsor:

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May 26, 2016 MNP LLP Networking Breakfast Series presents Kurtis McBride, Miovision

®

May 10, 2016 Manufacturing Summit 10:00am-4:00pm at Bingemans Tickets: $75 A conference for manufacturing leaders and supply chain partners aimed at exploring the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead for Ontario’s manufacturing sector. The event will feature speaker Joerg Stieberg from Ontario Drive and Gear and Michael Kuntz from Kuntz Electroplating, as well as informative breakout sessions and a diverse number of exhibitors.

7:15-9:00am at Holiday Inn Kitchener-Waterloo Member: $28 • General Admission: $35 Miovision has been recognized as one of Canada’s 50 fastest growing tech companies for the third year in a row. Kurtis McBride, CEO and Co-founder, will share how the company has grown to include 650 customers in 50 countries within 10 years and his insights on their strategic vision and continued growth. Title Sponsor: Media Sponsor:

Title Sponsor: Community Sponsor: Gold Sponsors:

Insurance is the last thing business owners think of when times are good. But, when there’s a claim it’s their first call. You should have the best coverage possible. Get an expert opinion on your commercial insurance needs.

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events

June 7, 2016

June 16, 2016

Manulife Chamber Academy –The Power of Inbound Marketing

Libro Chamber Young Professionals Networking Event

8:00-9:30am at Kitchener Public Library Member: $20 • General Admission: $25 With a major focus put on attracting new clients, it is easy to forget about our existing ustomers. In 2016, content is king; learn how effective inbound marketing strategies can keep your existing clients coming back, and bring their friends along too.

5:30-7:30pm at Chicopee Ski & Summer Resort Member: $5 • General Admission: $10 You are invited to join us to develop key relationships, build your business network and connect with other young professionals and business leaders at this casual networking event. Title Sponsor: Event Sponsor:

Title Sponsor:

Media Sponsor:

June 14, 2016 Home Hardware Business After 5

June 22, 2016

5:00-7:00pm at The Foodbank of Waterloo Region Member: Complimentary • General Admission: $10 Does networking intimidate you or do you thrive on meeting new people? Come out to this casual bi-monthly event with friendly faces and easy conversation that provides an opportunity for B2B networking.

Heffner Women’s Leadership presents a Sangria Social 5:00-7:00pm at Victoria Park Pavillion Member: $30 • General Admission: $40 Come and connect at a casual event with sangria and lightly facilitated networking! Title Sponsor:

Title Sponsor: Event Sponsors: Media Sponsor: Design Sponsor:

G

Print Sponsor: I

N

&

PRINT

Community Sponsor: Get Noticed. Get Found.

August 15, 2016 Annual Golf Scramble 10:00am-8:00pm at Galt Country Club Member: $215 • Foursome: $850 A fun-filled day on the course with plenty of networking, activities on every hole, BBQ lunch, dinner and prizes! Tournament Sponsor:

advocate MAY | JUNE 2016

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RBC Dominion Securities Inc.

Looking for a new career in a rewarding industry? Join our winning team RBC Dominion Securities in Waterloo is seeking motivated individuals for a fulfilling career in the wealth management industry. If you’re looking for the support you need to build a successful wealth management career, RBC Dominion Securities offers several advantages:

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With an independent focus that encourages and rewards initiative, industry-leading investment and wealth

management support, and the backing of Canada’s largest financial group, RBC Dominion Securities is the leading choice for investment professionals who want to build a successful wealth management practice.

Please contact Mark Hodson, Vice President and Branch Manager at 519-747-7790 or mark.hodson@rbc.com. RBC Dominion Securities Inc.* and Royal Bank of Canada are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. *Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund. RBC Dominion Securities Inc. is a member company of RBC Wealth Management, a business segment of Royal Bank of Canada. ®Registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. ©2016 RBC Dominion Securities Inc. All rights reserved. 16_90561_003

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feature

Our Broken Review Processes BY PERRIN BEATTY As published in the National Post, February 2, 2016 It’s been a bad few months for Canadian pipeline proposals. U.S. President Barack Obama closed the door on Keystone XL; the B.C. government announced it couldn’t support the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in its current form; and Montrealarea mayors have called Energy East too risky. Among politicians, stopping pipeline development has become a way to look green without having to make unpopular choices at home. President Obama named climate change as one of his reasons for rejecting Keystone XL. Yet if he wanted to remove the equivalent of all the greenhouse gases generated by the oilsands from the atmosphere, he would only have to shut down three large coal-fired power plants right in his own backyard. The belief that the cost of denying these pipelines will largely fall on folks in faraway places is undoubtedly part of the political calculus for many politicians. But for Canadians, it is a dangerously false assumption. The pipeline debates are throwing up red flags about Canada’s ability to get large projects done. Canadians demand a rigorous approval system, strong environmental regulation, stringent safety controls and proper consultation with communities and indigenous peoples. Regulators and stakeholders have an absolute right to ask questions about a project’s potential impacts and to receive detailed answers from the companies looking to build these pipelines. However, good governance of infrastructure projects also means having a process in place that is efficient and predictable. Decisions must be made within a reasonable timeframe, or else opportunities will pass us by. Good governance does not mean adding additional hurdles at the last minute, like the federal government applying an additional climate test to the Trans Mountain pipeline after the National Energy Board's review process is almost complete. Good governance means that governments must be actively involved in dealing with issues that are outside the power of any one business — issues like marine safety and reconciliation with indigenous peoples. The result of decision-making processes should reflect what evidence has proved to be in the national interest over the long run and not what is politically expedient at the moment. Let’s not

make the mistake of confusing a fair process with one that is uncontroversial. It is increasingly clear that our decision-making process is broken. Anyone who thinks that it is only about the oil and gas sector is mistaken. Wind and solar farms, electrical generation and transmission, rail infrastructure, port expansions, public transit: all of these developments face passionate opposition from some segment of the population. In the face of governments’ inability to make controversial decisions, global business will simply decide that Canada is not worth the trouble. I’ve already been hearing these murmurs from my contacts in Canada’s diplomatic community and my members in large international companies. When global businesses sit down and decide where to invest, the uncertainty and overly politicized nature of Canada’s environmental regulatory processes is a strike against us. The world needs energy and other natural resources, and does not much care whether they come from Canada or somewhere else. The pipeline debate is about more than just the oil and gas sector in more ways than one. Allowing the merits of an individual project to take second place to the symbolic value of opposing them is hurting Canada’s competitiveness in the global economy, and that hurts all Canadians.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Perrin Beatty The Honourable Perrin Beatty is the President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Canada’s largest and most representative national business association. Mr. Beatty grew up in Fergus, Ontario. In 1972 he was elected to the House of Commons and in 1979 he was appointed to the first of seven ministerial portfolios. He went on to be President and CEO of the CBC and later, President and CEO of Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters. He joined the Canadian Chamber of Commerce in 2007. advocate MAY | JUNE 2016

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HOW THE PROGR A M WORKS! • Yoour employees can use your login codes to obtain the discounted ticket pricing 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (including evenings, weekends, and holidays!). • There is no cost or time commitment to administer the program. • Employees are required to pay at the time of logging on – which means NO KEEPING TRACK, NO COUNTING TICKETS! HOW TO SIGN UP To register for the Bingemans E-Consignment Ticket Program or to ďŹ nd out more, please contact: consignment@bingemans.com or call 519-744-1231 ext. 2230

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feature

Mobility Clinic Moves to New University Gates Location The award winning Centre for Family Medicine Family Health Team Mobility Clinic has moved to its new University Gates location. This is under the umbrella of the Schlegel-University of Waterloo Research Institute for Aging (RIA). The Schlegel family, together with U of W and Conestoga College have established the RIA with the mission to improve the quality of life for older adults through partnerships in research, education and practice. Dr. Jamie Milligan is the director of the Mobility Clinic and is excited about this new site. The treatment room is larger permitting easier negotiation by a wheelchair user. The professionals have unrestricted access to the patient from either side of the examination table. The ceiling lift and wheelchair scale continue to be available, making the office fully accessible. The team is comprised of a family physician, occupational therapist, nurses, receptionists and a chiropractor. All work to realize the team’s mission “to deliver quality primary care, education, and research for persons with spinal cord injury and those who support them”. Continued funding from the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation and the Centre for Family Medicine allows this clinic to be possible. The Mobility Clinic remains open to all regional spinal cord injury patients through the KW4 Health Link and is accepting referrals. The Mobility Clinic enhances the care provided by the patient’s primary care provider, such as a family physician or nurse practitioner. The Mobility Clinic collaborates with Spinal Cord Injury Ontario and has Melanie, the Waterloo-Wellington Regional Service Coordinator, onsite at the clinic as required. This is of great benefit regarding navigation of community resources. One such example would be to direct patients to the A.R. Kaufman YMCA’s Neurofit program for monitored exercise. Research efforts continue at the Mobility Clinic with the ongoing development of a patient toolkit. This toolkit is completed by the patient prior to their consult. It guides the patient through a process of evaluating all the key health issues for someone with a spinal cord injury. For example, this includes bowel and bladder concerns, sexuality and mental health issues.

MOBILITY CLINIC TEAM (L TO R): MARY LOU – RECEPTIONIST, KRISTINE – NURSE, DR. JAMES MILLIGAN - DIRECTOR, MELANIE - SPINAL CORD INJURY ONTARIO REGIONAL SERVICE COORDINATOR, SARAH OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST, AND DR. CRAIG BAUMAN - PROJECT MANAGER & CHIROPRACTOR.

Another project was the e-consult service the Mobility Clinic was testing. This allowed a primary care provider to ask a spinal cord injury specialist a question about patient care. The hope was such a service might prevent a specialist referral or an emergency department visit. Specialist access is challenging and this program facilitated getting timely advice to the primary care provider through a secure portal. It is Dr. Milligan’s vision that this clinic becomes a model for similar spinal cord injury clinics across the province and such steps are being taken. The Mobility Clinic team is driven by this dream where health care is accessible for all. The Centre for Family Medicine Mobility Clinic is interested in seeing spinal cord injury patients and is currently taking referrals. Please contact the clinic at mobility.clinic@family-medicine.ca. or at 519-904-0656 for more information on the program.

advocate MAY | JUNE 2016

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sponsor profile

Staying Ahead of the Curve BY TOM FITZ-GERALD

You would be hard pressed to find an industry that has undergone such tremendous change as what has occurred in the media sector. We have witnessed disruptive technologies that have seen television evolve from a black and white screen to colour picture to digital and HD signals. The development of high-speed internet along with an explosion of new devices – most notably gaming, smart phones, tablets, and computers – has provided consumers the opportunity to watch and listen to their favourite stations anytime from virtually anywhere. Bell Media has been a member of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce for more than sixty years and operates a number of media outlets within our communities including CTV Kitchener, KOOL FM 105.3 (CFCA), and KFUN 99.5 (CKKW). In addition, each of these stations operates their own websites, which generate millions of views per month.

CTV Kitchener reaches nearly 1,000,000 viewers weekly and continues to be the most-watched station in the market For CTV Kitchener, it all began on March 1, 1954 when the station first went to air as a CBC affiliate under the call letters CKCO. At the time, it was only the third privately owned television station in Canada and was operated by Central Ontario Television. The original ownership group was a joint venture comprised of Arthur Pollock, President of Electrohome, as well as Famous Players Theatres. The original location of the station was where it still stands today 864 King St. West. CTV Kitchener produced a slew of local popular shows from this location over the years, including: Romper Room, Province Wide, Canadian Bandstand, Bowling for Dollars, Big

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Photo by Richard Bain Top Talent, and Oopsy the Clown. With the development of colour television in the ‘60s, the practice of having news anchors don red jackets was introduced in 1967, a practice that continued until 1989. CTV Kitchener has also had a number of their local news anchors go on to play a larger role on the national news scene. Most notably, Lisa LaFlamme who is the Chief News Anchor and Senior Editor of CTV NATIONAL NEWS WITH LISA LAFLAMME, and CANADA AM’s Jeff Hutcheson. With regard to local radio properties, both stations were launched by Arthur Pollock, with CFCA coming into existence in 1949, and CKKW originally starting as an AM station in 1959. Over the years, both stations have seen various changes in format, frequency, and ownership. Currently, KOOL FM plays Today’s Best Variety while KFUN is the region’s home for Classic Hits. With great music and familiar, local voices, the stations have become longtime listener favourites. Fast forward to today - the media environment is a fast-paced, ever-changing landscape. Facebook and Twitter have been on the scene for more than a decade and streaming services such as Netflix, Apple TV, CraveTV, and Shomi have exploded. In the face of ever increasing competition and choice, it has meant broadcasters have had to adapt and stay ahead of the curve.


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Contrary to popular belief, traditional broadcasters are not dying. The most recent Numeris data shows that television reaches 97.5% of Persons 2+ weekly with the average person spending almost 27 hours per week viewing television. With regard to radio, we see much the same with radio reaching more than 88% of Canadians weekly with the average person listening to almost 18 hours per week of radio programming.

With great music and familiar, local voices, the stations have become longtime listener favourites. Based upon the most recent Numeris results for television, CTV Kitchener has nine of the top-20 shows in the market. The schedule includes BIG BANG THEORY, GREY’S ANATOMY, THE AMAZING RACE, and CRIMINAL MINDS, to name a few. However the top show - the #1 show in the entire market - is none other than the locally produced CTV EVENING NEWS at 6:00 p.m.! With a well-rounded schedule of drama and entertainment programming, coupled with award-winning news, it is no surprise that CTV Kitchener reaches nearly 1,000,000 viewers weekly and continues to be the most-watched station in the market.

... the media environment is a fast-paced, ever-changing landscape As an organization, Bell Media is a proud member of the Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce and has a strong history of working closely with the Chamber to ensure the region stays economically vibrant. To that end, we have recently partnered with the Chamber to bring forth a new initiative called “Made Right Here”, a weekly CTV EVENING NEWS and online feature highlighting local businesses and their successes within the region. We take great pride in our commitment to the communities we serve. Our local media properties and have received numerous recognition awards for community activities such as The Pledge, Stuff-ABus, and the Tree of Angels Toy drive.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tom Fitz-Gerald For our advertisers, we offer a one stop shopping approach and offer fully integrated marketing solutions utilizing radio, television and digital. We work with businesses to develop the right advertising and marketing solutions that best suit their needs.

Tom Fitz-Gerald is the General Sales Manager for Bell Media Kitchener and is responsible for the television, radio and digital properties with respect to revenue.

advocate MAY | JUNE 2016

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feature

Going Global: Tips for Canadian Businesses BY AMY REIER Canadian companies need to take into consideration many intersecting laws and legal developments when conducting international business. Here are some brief legal and practical tips for going global. 1. Business Law Foundations. Before going global, seek the advice of legal counsel at the inception of your company to deal with start-up issues, investors, corporate structure and potential tax implications. All relationships are unique - there is no such thing as a standard form agreement and do not use an internet precedent you think will suffice. This method can lead to costly mistakes. Get it done right the first time. 2. Going Global. Know your product, your target market and create an effective business plan. Conduct due diligence on the companies you expect to do business with as well as on the country’s political and cultural environment. Attend trade and industry conferences to meet potential clients, investors and business partners. Take advantage of Canadian Government funding, its agencies within a host country and other resources including country profiles and risk assessments. Locally, all of the Chambers of Commerce, and the Waterloo Region Economic Development Corporation (WREDC) (formerly Canada’s Technology Triangle) can help internationally and they are a fantastic resource for local companies. 3. Language and Culture. All key materials must be translated properly as a failure to do so can create significant and unwanted complications in legal negotiations and/or in your marketing strategy. Take time to build business relationships and do not rush into a business venture. It also is important to accept, respect and embrace cultural differences, such as traditional greetings. Learn to say “four drinks please” in the host language, to order one for yourself and the others at your table. 4. Intellectual Property. IP strategies should be addressed at the outset and be included as part of the business plan. In the Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA) and the Trans -Pacific Partnership (TPP), Canada provided various IP extensions, increased Canada’s investment potential and brought ours and foreign IP systems more in line with international standards. Be strategic about international IP registrations as enforcement strategies can be costly and challenging, particularly in some countries. 5. Employment/Immigration. It is important to follow other countries’ national and local laws as well as applicable United Nations (UN) Conventions dealing with labour, employment and human rights standards. Depending on the county, these laws range from stringent to non-existent. When operating in

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the latter, a good rule of thumb is to follow international or Canadian standards. 6. Trade and Investment Laws. Understand the applicable import/export laws and goods classification. High-tech companies also should be mindful that their products may be classified as dual-use technologies which may deal with trade sanctions, export controls and controlled goods. Foreign direct investment laws have expanded significantly through trade agreements and it is important to understand a specific country’s rules when going global. 7. Compliance. Foreign corruption, competition, data privacy and security should be on your compliance radar. It is extremely important to have compliance programs in place at all levels including affiliate companies, agents or business partners in other countries. A failure to follow compliance strategies can result in high monetary penalties, the potential demise of your company and its reputation and even jail. 8. Negotiating the Deal/International Business Transactions. Culture, language and the role of lawyers are important issues to address when negotiating clauses dealing with IP, disputes, choice of law, scope of services, and tax implications in the structuring of the deal. Canadian businesses in the Waterloo Region have a long and successful history with international trade. To continue this growth, address your business and legal strategies early and often to achieve long-term global success,

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Amy Reier Amy Reier, previously of Miller Thomson LLP, practices in the areas of high-tech start-ups, competition law, marketing and advertising, regulatory compliance, international business transactions and disputes. Her clients range from familyrun businesses, high-tech start-ups to international corporations in various industries. She has a long-term commitment to Waterloo Region and is thrilled to provide legal advice to our innovative business community, doing business locally and globally.


advocate MAY | JUNE 2016

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My Coverage has Ended Under My Employer’s Group Benefit Plan. What are My Options? BY COLIN BOWMAN When it comes to benefits, employees value coverage through their employer to cover medical and dental costs, along with insurance to protect against death and disability. That’s why as part of its member rewards, the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce offers the Chamber Choice Benefits Plan as part of the One Source Advantage program. As medical and dental costs continue to increase and the incidence of disability rises, these benefits are becoming more valuable. So what happens when an employee retires or terminates their employment and is left without benefit coverage? Well, the good news is that there are several individual products available in the market that can replace the group coverage, including an option to convert your Chamber Choice Benefits Plan to individual coverage under Coverage2Go. Life Insurance All group benefit plans must offer a life conversion option to an individual policy to a maximum amount of $200,000. The conversion option protects individuals from losing coverage in the event that they have a medical condition that makes them uninsurable. Employees have 31 days from the date their coverage ends to exercise the conversion option. No medical information is required and the cost will be based on the employee’s age, gender and smoker status. This can be an expensive option because the insurer is assuming that the person converting the insurance is at a higher risk for a life claim. The conversion option should be compared to individual plans in the traditional life insurance marketplace. Employees need to act fast as the conversion option must be taken within 31 days of the termination date of the group coverage. If an employee dies within 31 days of the termination of the group coverage, the insurer must pay the life claim equal to the amount of coverage the employee had on the termination date to a maximum of $200,000, as the insurer has to assume that the employee was going to exercise the conversion option within the 31-day window. Long Term Disability (LTD) Individual disability policies are expensive compared to group plans, and medical underwriting is always required. Individual disability plans are not available to every occupation, so it may not always be possible to continue to insure this risk when the group coverage ends. If an employee leaves one job, expects to get disability coverage under another group plan within the next year or two, and is under the age of 60, the risk of becoming disabled

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can be insured during this short term period with a product called Transition LTD. A medical questionnaire must be completed in order to qualify for coverage, but the underwriting is more liberal than an individual policy and the approval time is quick. Health and Dental Most insurers offer various individual products, and they come in two basic forms: 1.

Plans that require approval with medical evidence of good health

2.

Plans that are designed specifically for employees leaving a group plan that offer coverage without medical evidence such as Equitable Life’s Coverage2Go plan for members of the Chamber Choice Benefits Plan

The coverage available under individual plans is typically less generous than group plans and generally have low maximums on drug and dental coverage. Since the premium can be high, a decision has to be made on whether to self-insure this coverage or pay a premium for limited coverage. There are conversion plans available for health and dental benefits that don’t require the completion of a medical questionnaire. Employees have 60 days from the termination of their group plan to apply for coverage. These plans can be more expensive and the coverage is more restrictive than plans that require evidence of good health. If healthy, consider applying for a plan that requires medical evidence first, as the premium will be lower and more comprehensive coverage is generally available. There are many options available through the various insurance companies, so it is important to spend some time comparing the coverage available and the associated premium with each insurer. Most insurers have online quoting tools that provide on-the-spot pricing for the various plans.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Colin Bowman Colin is a Marketing and Service Consultant at Cowan Insurance Group. His primary role includes the sales and administration of the Chamber Choice Benefits Plan.


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advocate MAY | JUNE 2016

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member notables

MEMBER NOTABLES Conestoga College Signs Memorandum of Understanding with Beijing Polytechnic On March 17, 2016, officials from Beijing Polytechnic, one China’s leading vocational colleges, visited Conestoga College’s Cambridge and Doon campuses for the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the two institutions that will create new opportunities for students and contribute to Conestoga’s growing international profile. The MOU provides a framework for collaboration that will allow Beijing Polytechnic students to gain international experience and complete their degree studies at Conestoga. Currently, more than 1,600 students from a total of 76 countries are enrolled in the local college programs. The focus on internationalism also includes a growing number of international exchange and study abroad programs and faculty exchange opportunities to enhance the learning experience and prepare graduates for success in the global economy.

WalterFedy listed on Canada’s Top Small &Medium Employers Local engineering, architectural and construction management firm WalterFedy was recently designated as one of Canada’s Top Small and Medium employers (2016) by Mediacorp Canada. The company was recognized for highly progressive policies and practices including flexible work hours and compressed weeks, three weeks paid vacation for new employees, and allowing long-serving staff to apply for an unpaid leave of absence of up to six months. To be eligible as a small or medium employer in this competition, an organization must have less than 500 employees. Winners are evaluated as offering Canada’s most forwardthinking human resource policies and the best workplaces.

Advanced Road Craft Approved as Private Career College Advanced Road Craft, a Kitchener-based training organization for new and experienced drivers, was recently approved as a Private Career College under the Private Career Colleges Act 2005 for AZ truck driver instruction to prepare students for Ontario Ministry of Transportation tests and a career as a professional driver. They also provide fleet training, G1 classes and advanced motorcycle courses. Advanced Road Craft was created based on advanced driving and riding techniques taught in the United Kingdom by police and the Institute of Advanced Motorists.

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member notables

MEMBER NOTABLES Gowlings Merges with Wragge Lawrence Graham In February of 2016, Canada’s second largest independent law firm, Gowlings, formally merged with UK-based Wragge Lawrence Graham & Co to form Gowling WLG, the first international law firm to be co-led by a Canadian firm. The combined organization will have over 1,400 legal professionals across ten countries, including 18 cities in Canada, the United Kingdom, Continental Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Gowling WLG has maintained a presence in Waterloo Region since 1986 when Gowling & Henderson merged with Simmers, Harper, Jenkins based in Kitchener and Cambridge.

Cowan Insurance Group reaches Gold Standard status as one of Canada’s Best Managed Companies in 2015. Cowan Insurance Group has been selected over hundreds of applicants as one of Canada’s Best Managed Companies for four consecutive years, having first achieved the designation in 2012. They have demonstrated their commitment to this program through continuous growth, profitability, and investment in technology, process and people. Established in 1993, Canada’s Best Managed Companies is one of the country’s leading business awards programs recognizing Canadian-owned and managed companies that have implemented world-class business practices and created value through innovation. The program is sponsored by Deloitte, CIBC, National Post, Smith School of Business and MacKay CEO Forums.

Ginger Whitney Achieves Top Designations in Commercial Real Estate Ginger Whitney, Vice President at Whitney & Company Realty Limited, recently completed her CCIM and SIOR designations. She is the only broker in Waterloo Region to hold both. CCIM is a professional designation earned by candidates which signifies that the individual is versed in the commercial and investment real estate industry. The SIOR designation represents the highest level of knowledge, production and ethics in the commercial real estate industry. Whitney & Company Realty is a full service commercial real estate company located in Waterloo and practicing across the mid-western Ontario market.

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Helping Us Make Our Vision Possible A special Thank You to each of these Chamber Sponsors.

CHAMBER CHAIR’S CIRCLE

CHAMBER PATRON

12@12 Chamber

TITLE SPONSOR

CHAMBER TRUSTEE

MEDIA PARTNERS 34

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