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NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016


Plan for success in 2017

Cowan’s C owan’s One Sourc Source e Advantage™ P Program rogram f the for th Greater G t Kitchene Kit Kitchener h er W Waterloo aterloo t l Cha Ch Chamber amber b off Comm C Commerce erce With 2016 coming to an end, now is the time to evaluate the long-term needs of your business—and one way to DFFRPSOLVKWKDWLVWRSXW\RXUHPSOR\HHV¿UVW DFFRPSOLVKWKDWLVWRSXW\RXUHPSOR\HHV¿UVW With One Source Advantage, Cowan can develop a mpactful, cost-ef ffective pr customized, impactful, cost-effective fective program focused on the future well-being of both you and your employees.

And that’s not all. We also offer the following services: 



&RQWDFWXVWR¿QGRXWKRZ&RZDQFDQKHOSZLWK &RQWDFWXVWR¿QGRXWKRZ&RZDQFDQKHOSZLWK • Key man coverage • Succession planning • Employee Assistance Programs • Group RRSPs One Source Advantage—another Advantage—another great Chamber membership reward.

Cowan Insuranc Cowan Insurance e Group 1-888-333-6337 | chamber@cowangroup.ca www www.cowangroup.ca .cowangroup.ca


advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016 WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

features 16 24

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:

COVER STORY

On the Right Track

Art Sinclair

Stephanie Bigelow

EDITOR:

Heather Hutchings

FEATURE

The Evolution of the Region of Waterloo as a World-Class Cosmopolitan Community (2018 to 2041) Paul F. Puopolo

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DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

M&T Printing Group PHOTOGRAPHY:

Adamski Photography

FEATURE

ADVERTISING AND SALES:

The Future of Air Travel in Southern Ontario

David MacLellan – dmaclellan@greaterkwchamber.com Don Critelli – dcritelli@greaterkwchamber.com Karen Cross – kcross@greaterkwchamber.com

Chris Wood

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

Stephanie Bigelow, Andrew Bousfield, Rosa Lupo, Ian McLean, Jenna Petker, Paul F. Puopolo, Art Sinclair, Chris Wood PHOTOGRAPHY: Adamski Photography CONTRIBUTORS:

Teri Egerdeen and Julie Tedesco COVER PHOTOGRAPHY:

Richard Bain

departments 4 5

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

The Ever-Evolving Face of Waterloo Region

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Rosa Lupo

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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Planning for Population and Economic Growth Ian McLean

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ADVERTISING AND COPY DEADLINES:

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ADVOCACY

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Governing Rural and Urban Municipalities under Regional Government

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Art Sinclair

NETWORKING

Fall Networking HI-LIGHTING MEMBERS

Business Services EVENTS

Mark Your Calendar MEMBER NOTABLES

Chamber Members Achieving Success SPONSORSHIP

Chamber Sponsors

November 18, 2016 for January-February 2017 January 20, 2017 for March-April 2017 March 17, 2017 for May-June 2017 July 14, 2017 for September-October 2017 September 15, 2017 for November-December 2017 SUBSCRIPTION AND BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES:

Darlene Jones djones@greaterkwchamber.com SUBMISSION POLICY:

Proposals and articles are accepted via mail or email c/o Editor - Advocate. Please do not send originals. All contributors articles must be accompanied by a head shot in a jpg file and a 40 word author’s bio. PUBLICATIONS PERMIT:

#40026716

FOR PERMISSIONS AND REPRINT REQUESTS

Heather Hutchings - hhutchings@greaterkwchamber.com

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PERSPECTIVE ON HEALTH CARE

Still a Pressing Need for Family Physicians

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PUBLICATION OF:

Jenna Petker

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NEW MEMBERS

August 1, 2016 to September 30, 2016

POSTMASTER ADDRESS CHANGES C/O

ADVOCATE - PUBLICATIONS OFFICE 80 QUEEN STREETE NORTH, PO BOX 2367 KITCHENER, ONTARIO N2H 6L4 519.576.5000

The Advocate is a bi-monthly membership benefit publication of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. Advertising content and the views expressed herein are those of the contributors and do not constitute endorsement by the Chamber. The Advocate follows the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards (1990), copies are available through the Publisher. The Chamber cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions that may occur and has the right to edit material submitted. The Chamber will not accept advertising with competitor comparison claims and has the right to refuse advertising that is deemed to be false, misleading, or inappropriate.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016

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message from the chair

The Ever-Evolving Face of Waterloo Region BY ROSA LUPO

I am honoured to have been elected as Chair of The Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce for the 2016-2017 fiscal year. I have enjoyed getting to know all of the other wonderful community leaders who have volunteered their time over the past 6 years that I have served on the Board. I volunteered as a member of the Women’s Leadership Committee for 4 years. So it was fitting that my first official welcome as Chair was at the Inspiring Women’s Event in September which was attended by over 600 women business leaders. The energy in the room was electric and the speakers were fabulous. The focus of the day was “it’s about the journey.” This issue is highlighting the journey the Region of Waterloo has taken and its ever-evolving changes. I have been a lawyer at Gowling WLG (Canada) LLP since 1999 and my family and I decided to move to the Waterloo Region shortly thereafter. Over that time, the Region of Waterloo has undergone significant changes. One need only to travel along the length of King Street from St. Jacobs through to the 401 to see the transformation. Where there were once single detached houses and small individual businesses, there are now multi-use, high-rise condominium developments, LRT construction and bustling commercial activity.

“Woonerf” is a term that has its’ origins in the Netherlands. It means a “living street.” It’s a collection of tactics aimed at making streets more multi-purpose, bike and pedestrian friendly. In Canada, these have become known as “Complete Streets.” In the true entrepreneurial spirit by which Waterloo Region has put itself on the global map, cities within Waterloo Region were among the first in Ontario to adopt complete street policies. This year, The Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber is celebrating its 130th anniversary. At the inception of the Chamber, the Waterloo Region was a community of farms with buggy trails filled with horse-drawn carriages and the occasional local store. Over this time, streets were laid, home development intensified and the expressway was built. The current phase will see the completion of the LRT, high-density residential developments and complete streets. I can’t wait to see what the next phase will look like but I know that whatever comes, the Chamber will be there to support the needs of its members in the community. I look forward to playing a role over the next year as Chair in this support. If you have any ideas, comments or suggestions, I would be happy to hear from you at rosa.lupo@gowlingwlg.com.

The construction of the LRT, although disruptive in the short term, will continue to drive the intensification of development. New high-density residential developments, including spaces to shop, work and play, are popping up and more are planned along the LRT route. Residents in these developments espouse the virtues of losing the car and instead stroll out to a chic restaurant followed by a little shopping in a boutique, all within the same building they call home. The transportation HUB in downtown Kitchener will connect the local LRT with train transportation to Toronto and London and local bus lines. The interconnectivity of these three different means of transportation will generate a bustling commercial core where people from various walks of life will connect, meet and move. In addition to public transportation, the Region has adopted other alternative transportation designated bike lanes, bike sharing programs, car sharing programs and pedestrian friendly walkways are sprouting up across the Region and have become part of our transportation landscape.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Rosa Lupo CHAIR, BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Rosa Lupo is a partner at the global law firm of Gowling WLG (Canada) LLP who practices in the area of corporate commercial law. She is enthusiastic about helping businesses and owners grow, expand and thrive.


message from the president

Planning for Population and Economic Growth BY IAN MCLEAN Over the past twenty years municipalities across Ontario have all been required to address many issues and challenges. Some have been connected to transfers from the senior levels of government while others are related to rapidly changing demographics. In rural and northern areas, the primary challenge is providing services to a generally declining population and economic base. Provincial funding formulas are a constant concern, particularly during the municipal budgeting process. In recent years some rural townships have increased property taxes in the double digit range, a serious matter for both residential and business classes. In Waterloo Region, our challenges are on the opposite side of the equation. The Region is growing in terms of both our economic and population base. The overall local governance strategy is best defined as pursuing efficient, sustainable and cost-effective measures for growth management. At the end of 2015, our region’s population was estimated at 575,000, which translates to a 1.58 percent annual increase since 2000. Most residents and businesses are aware of the provincial government projection, formulated in 2006, that our population will reach 730,000 by 2031. A revised plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, released by the provincial government this past May, now estimates the population of Waterloo Region will reach 742,000 by 2031, 789,000 by 2036, and 835,000 by 2041. The local employment projections reflect the population growth and vice-versa. By 2031, approximately 366,000 people will be employed in the Region of Waterloo, an estimate that exceeds the City of Hamilton and Region of Durham. The Region of Waterloo will lead all centres outside the Greater TorontoHamilton Area within the Greater Golden Horseshoe in both population and jobs. A series of regional annual economic outlooks compiled by the Ontario Chamber of Commerce and the Credit Unions of Ontario also indicate that Waterloo Region’s economy is solid. The 2016 forecast for the region indicated rising employment levels and a strong housing market. Statistics from the Kitchener Waterloo Association of Realtors (KWAR) confirm that projection, as local residential sales in September 2016 were 30 percent higher than last year. Overall, for the first nine months of 2016, local home sales have increased by 18 percent and this is the first year the total has exceeded 5,000 units through three quarters.

The major infrastructure project to manage the region’s population and economic growth is the LRT. While there was some opposition to the plan when a final decision was made by regional council in 2011 and resurfaced again in the 2014 municipal election campaign, there is no chance for any reversals as the tracks are now headed for the final stages of completion. The immediate challenge apart from meeting the final deadlines is securing the trains to operate on the tracks. Chronic problems at the Thunder Bay Bombardier facility may prove larger than any local weather related construction challenges. The second transit project we have identified as critical for economic growth, two-way, all-day GO train passenger service between Kitchener and Union Station through Guelph and Brampton, is proceeding however probably not at the rate anticipated by many local stakeholders. The competition for infrastructure funding to municipalities from the federal and provincial levels of government is extraordinarily intense, therefore the recent provincial commitment is recognition of the excellent community efforts to convince Queen’s Park of the immense economic benefits for all Ontario and Canada originating from the Innovation Corridor. Our Chamber will continue our collaborative efforts with other Chambers and Boards of Trade along the CN North Mainline, as well as major employers in Waterloo Region and across the GTA, to ensure optimal economic returns on the new corridor. In summary, Waterloo Region is still well-positioned for meeting global economic and local population challenges. Planning has to be done well in advance of the growth and in that respect we are ahead of many neighbouring municipalities.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ian McLean Ian is President and CEO of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016

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advocacy

Governing Rural and Urban Municipalities under Regional Government BY ART SINCLAIR As the Region of Waterloo continues on a growth crusade that will reach a population of close to three quarters of a million people by 2031, a large component of the planning discussion is centred on the cities. The dominant urban issue is of course the LRT, however subsidiary matters include growth in the downtown core areas against the suburbs, GO trains, and urban boundaries. The final component is hopefully resolved for the immediate future after millions of dollars of legal fees were spent by all parties to settle Ontario Municipal Board appeals of the Region Official Plan. Challenges for the four rural townships will be significant as well. This does not infer incompetence on the part of government, business, or any other sector, it only reflects the reality that population and economic growth initiates problems. The counter is the predicament of no economic growth, which is present in many municipalities across Ontario and not desirable. A chromic planning issue for the rural areas of Waterloo Region is aggregate extraction. As we have witnessed over the past decade, a proposal to establish a new pit or quarry elicits strong and often highly negative community responses. However, if the urban areas of Waterloo Region continue to expand, aggregates are necessary for the heavy volume of construction activities. Hauling product into the Region from other areas of Ontario is not viable from an economic or environmental perspective. The local aggregate industry cannot be shut down. Over the past months another contentious issue has arisen for the Region around who will pay for transit. In Hamilton as we have seen many times the answer is relatively simple – the provincial government should pay for everything. In the Region of Waterloo where we are generally more practical and as a result can start and finish projects on time, the latest option presented to Council for financing future transit is through development charges. A recent bill passed by the Legislative Assembly of Ontario now provides municipalities with that authority. The local business sector has expressed concerns with this approach and opposition is equally intense from the four township councils who have all passed resolutions asking that their municipalities not pay for transit they are not receiving and subsequently derive no benefit.

The current controversy over transit and development fees is notable since generally, over the past forty plus years, the urban and rural municipalities of Waterloo Region have worked exceptionally well. This cooperation may in large part be due to the composition of the municipality remaining unchanged since 1974, unlike most areas of Ontario where municipal restructuring and amalgamations have caused many transitional challenges. Our escape from municipal amalgamation has also been mirrored with the school boards. During the late 1990s the Waterloo Region and Waterloo Catholic District boards remained intact. There were no mergers with Guelph, Wellington, Perth or Brant. School board mergers carry inherently high political risks. The Thames Valley District School Board, an amalgamation of the former London, Elgin, Middlesex and Oxford boards, has struggled with student accommodation reviews in both their urban and rural constituencies. A former colleague of mine from Queen’s Park always said the two most dangerous political situations for an MPP are school closings and landfill sitings. There are many former MPPs who attempted to blame school closings on school boards, which resulted in their change in status from “current” to “former” member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. The province funds the boards and if there is no money available to keep a rural high school open, someone will be held accountable. The Region of Waterloo will have many challenges and issues for urban and rural municipalities over the next two decades. However, we cannot forget that since these problems are related to growth management, there are many other communities across Ontario that would trade their problems for ours. In a split second.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Art Sinclair Art is Vice President Policy and Advocacy for the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016

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perspective on health care

Still a Pressing Need for Family Physicians BY JENNA PETKER Health care is a significant issue for all of us and having access to health care professionals is critical to the well being of families living in our region. Unfortunately, many families, locally and across the province, do not have the benefit of being under the care of a family practitioner. This is why the Chamber’s physician recruitment program is such an important community health care initiative, not only for our residents’ well being but for the health and prosperity of our business community looking to attract the best and the brightest talent. With the generous investment and support of our corporate and municipal partners, the Chamber Health Care Resources Council is able to oversee a number of programs throughout the year to attract new family physicians to serve the health care needs of the community. Since this critical initiative was launched in 1998, the Chamber, working with community interests, has successfully attracted over 190 family practitioners. This year alone, we have had eight physicians who have made community practice commitments here in Kitchener-Waterloo. We could not have achieved such great results without your commitment.

the patients. This can cause some challenges. The majority of newer doctors are interested in practicing in a group setting, with other established doctors for mentorship, whereas many retiring physicians practice within their own, individual space. New to our health care initiatives is assisting the local hospitals in their efforts to recruit and retain emergency doctors. As emergency doctors do not have a roster of patients, it is less complicated and more simple for them to move anywhere in the country and practice. It is crucial that we are able to retain these doctors and ensure that Kitchener-Waterloo is a desired place to live and work. New to this year’s Annual Recruitment Weekend, we have opened it up to 5 emergency residents and their partners to showcase Kitchener- Waterloo and what it has to offer, in hopes that they someday call it home. Our successes and efforts would not be possible if it wasn’t for our generous corporate, municipal and personal sponsors and supporters of this program. The Chamber Health Care Resources Council sincerely thanks our partners for their generous and continued support as we strive to eliminate the physician shortage in Kitchener-Waterloo.

Aside from our Annual Physician Recruitment Weekend, our corporate and municipal partners’ generous annual investment also helps the Chamber to recruit physicians throughout the year. We have been working with new family medicine physicians who just graduated this summer as well as established family practitioners from across the province. Personal community visits have been arranged for these practitioners – meeting with local family physicians and a number of other practice opportunities within Kitchener-Waterloo. Our need for family physicians is still a pressing need for our community. We have been working with a number of physicians nearing retirement and are in the process of looking for prospective physicians to take over their practice. We encourage these physicians to start searching for a replacement well in advance and provide them with the necessary resources to ensure for a smooth transition. Many of the newer graduate physicians are looking for more of a work/life balance and are often starting their practice small (8001500 patient roster) and gradually increasing it over time. With many retiring doctors having a patient roster size of 2000+, we are in need of 2-2.5 doctors per retiring physician to account for all of

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jenna Petker Jenna is Physician Recruitment Lead for the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.


perspective on health care

• BU S I N E S S E XC E L L E N C E AWA R D S •

BEA BE A gala gala.ca .ca

PRESENTED BY:

In celebration of the Chamber’s 130th Anniversary, we are hosting the event at a new venue! The evening will feature an elegant standing dinner reception, followed by the awards presentation, a dessert reception and after advocate party. NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016 9


new members

August 1, 2016 to September 30, 2016 Access Storage Storage - Self Service Riley Broadbent, Site Manager 2444 Shirley Dr Kitchener, ON N2B 3X8 Email: 2444shirley@accessstorage.ca accessstorage.ca Phone: (519) 579-5333

CMS Commercial Moving Services Inc. Moving & Storage Geoff Pearson, President 62 McBrine Pl, Unit 6, Kitchener, ON N2R 1H3 Email: info@commercialmovingservices.ca commercialmovingservices.ca Phone: (519) 749-3387

Amma Yoga Yoga Instruction Thea Mistry, Owner 72 St Leger St, Unit 1 Kitchener, ON N2H 6R4 Email: thea@ammayoga.ca ammayoga.ca Phone: (519) 588 8432

Connection Incorporated Digital Marketing Agency Chris Johnstone, CEO 490 York Rd, #203 Guelph, ON N1E 6V1 Email: info@connectionincorporated.com connectionincorporated.com Phone: (855) 432-3990

Astrodog Media Media Production Matt Hortobagyi, Executive Producer 100 Ahrens St W, Unit 104 Kitchener, ON N2H 4C3 Email: info@astrodogmedia.com astrodogmedia.com Phone: (416) 520-6611

Costco Wholesale - Waterloo Department Stores Ken Shantz, Warehouse Manager 930 Erb St W, Waterloo, ON N2J 3Z4 Email: w01248mgr@costco.com costco.ca Phone: (226) 215-1105 Fax: (226) 215-1116

Brock Solutions Engineers - Control Systems Daria Magar, Marketing Manager 86 & 88 Ardelt Ave Kitchener, ON N2C 2C9 Email: info@brocksolutions.com www.brocksolutions.com Phone: (519) 571-1522 CAA Insurance - Zareena Subhanally Insurance Agents & Brokers Zareena Subhanally, Licensed Agent 655 Fairway Rd S, Unit 1E Kitchener, ON N2C 1X4 Email: zs2@caasco.ca caasco.com Phone: (519) 893-8133 Fax: (519) 741-1841 CafĂŠ Joy and Chocolate Revelations Restaurants Ryan Jacobs, VP, Operations & Owner 235 King St E, Suite 170 Kitchener, ON N2G 4N5 Email: ryan@cafejoy.ca cafejoy.ca Phone: (519) 500-6569

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Descendants Beer & Beverage Co Ltd Restaurants Lee Brooks, Co-Owner 319 Victoria St N, Kitchener, ON N2H 5E1 Email: info@descendantsbeer.com descendantsbeer.com Phone: (226) 241-3700 Design Matrix Inc. Interior Design Services Nadia Kuhni, President 2424 Main St London, ON N6P 1R2 Email: nadia@designmatrixinc.com designmatrixinc.com Phone: (519) 652-3549 Fax: (519) 652-5016

Deverall, Calma & Associates Financial Services Inc. Financial Planning Consultants Sharon Maheu, Marketing & Communications Manager 209 Frederick St, Suite 2A Kitchener, ON N2H 2M7 Email: dca@dcafinancial.ca http://bit.ly/2dtij09 Phone: (519) 741-1259 Fax: (519) 741-1592 EmpowerIT Information Technology Joseph Grimaldi, Co-Founder 402 Harmony Rd, Unit 2, Ayr, ON N0B 1E0 Email: joseph@empowerit.ca empowerit.ca Phone: (519) 577-2972 Erin Parsons - Royal LePage Real Estate Erin Parsons, Sales Rep 370 Highland Rd W, Unit 15C Kitchener, ON N2M 5J9 Email: erinparsons@royallepage.ca sellwitherinparsons.com Phone: (519) 721-4606 Fax: (519) 745-8460 Executive Solutions Worldwide Corp. Consultants Antoine Duong, Technical Sale Representative 450 Midwood Cr Waterloo, ON N2L 5N5 Email: info@execsols.com execsols.com Phone: (226) 339-8291 Flashpoint Photobooth Photo Booths Keith Clark, President 50 Ottawa St S, Unit 154, Kitchener, ON N2G 3S7 Email: keith@flashpointpro.com flashpointphotobooth.com Phone: (519) 745-2558


new members

August 1, 2016 to September 30, 2016 (continued on page 14) FlowSpec Engineering Ltd Engineers - Consulting Andy Bauman, Business Manager 31 McBrine Dr, Unit 1 Kitchener, ON N2R 1J1 Email: info@flowspec.ca flowspec.ca Phone: (519) 744-9336

Keyush Consulting Business Systems Ivo Finotti, Senior Account Executive 2550 Argentia Rd, Unit 213 Mississauga, ON L5N 5R1 Email: ivo@keyush.com keyush.com Phone: (905) 487-1602

Food4Kids Waterloo Wellington Charity Kelly-Sue Oberle-Labus, Executive Director 177 Esson St Waterloo, ON N2L 2A2 Email: info@food4kids.ca food4kids.ca Phone: (519) 576-3443

Kimbop Caterers Jinah Allen, Owner/Chef 265 Lawrence Ave, Unit N4 Kitchener, ON N2M 5R1 Email: jinahkimallen@gmail.com www.facebook.com/freshkimbop Phone: (226) 808-0474

Garretson Resolution Group Legal Services Stephanie Mulcahey, Director, Communications 410 Albert St, Waterloo, ON N2L 3V3 Email: smulcahey@garretsongroup.com garretsongroup.com Phone: (513) 375-0326 Highview Residences Retirement Communities & Homes Joy Birch, Chief Operating Officer 20 Reichart Dr Kitchener, ON N2P Email: joy@highviewres.com highviewres.com Phone: (519) 200-3734 Fax: (519) 675-9781 Karen Lewis Consulting Information Technology Management Karen Lewis, Content Strategist 1941 Ottawa St S, Unit 1C, Kitchener, ON N2E 0C2 Email: karenlewis506@gmail.com Phone: (519) 502-8394 Keolis Grand River LP Transportation Nancy Schneider, Human Resources Manager 30 Duke St W, Suite 401 Kitchener, ON N2H 3W5 Email: hr@keolis.ca keolis.com Phone: (226) 647-6700

Kitchener Financial Centre Financial Planning Consultants Anil Lawrence, Senior Marketing Director 5 Manitou Dr, Suite 9 Kitchener, ON N2C 2J6 Email: anillawrence@yahoo.com worldfinancialgroup.com Phone: (416) 464-9237 Fax: (647) 930-1058 Lynda Spieser Health & Wellness Lynda Spieser, Owner Waterloo, ON Email: lynda.spieser@gmail.com Phone: (226) 988-1617 MAC Financial Services Inc. Financial Planning Consultants Shane Cartwright, Wealth Management Advisor 490 Dutton Dr, Suite C3 Waterloo, ON N2L 6H7 Email: scartwright@mac-ca.com mac-ca.com Phone: (519) 725-2600 Fax: (519) 725-2484 Marilou Lemay, CPA Accounting & Bookkeeping Services Marilou Lemay, Owner Kitchener, ON Email: marilou.lemay@live.ca Phone: (819) 698-7281

McPherson Communications Communication & Public Relations Consultants David McPherson, President 593 Leighland Dr, Waterloo, ON N2T 2J9 Email: david@mcphersoncommunications.com mcphersoncommunications.com Phone: (416) 459-8897 MOD Custom Catering Caterers Nicole Baumgartner, Owner 141 Whitney Pl, Unit 104, Kitchener, ON N2G 2X8 Email: info@mod-squad.ca mod-squad.ca Phone: (519) 242-0611 NaturalSci Regulatory Consulting Corp. Pharmaceutical Consulting Kyley Paul, President & CEO 53 Wilfred Ave Kitchener, ON N2A 1W9 Email: info@naturalscireg.ca naturalscireg.ca Phone: (519) 279-8080 New Approach Painting Painting Contractors Jordie Pancer, Director 228 Waterloo St Kitchener, ON N2H 3W1 Email: jordie@newapproachpainting.ca newapproachpainting.ca Phone: (519) 748-7447 Open Sky Incubator Office & Desk Space Rental Service Emile McLean, Co-Founder 41 Ardelt Pl Kitchener, ON N2C 2C8 Email: emclean@openskyincubator.ca openskyincubator.ca Phone: (226) 218-4939 Oxford Learning - Kitchener North Tutoring Jodi Pickles, Director 1425 Weber St E Kitchener, ON N2A 3A7 Email: kitchener@oxfordlearning.com oxfordlearning.com Phone: (519) 896-7281 advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016

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networking

Fall Networking

INSPIRING WOMEN EVENT KEYNOTE SPEAKER BONNIE BROOKS, VICE CHAIRMAN OF HUDSON’S BAY COMPANY

OXFORD LEARNING’S BOOTH AT THE HOME HARDWARE BUSINESS AFTER 5

NETWORKING & EXHIBITION AT THE 10TH ANNUAL INSPIRING WOMEN EVENT AT CENTRE IN THE SQUARE

MIKE MCCAFFREY, JEREMY SMITH, ADAM STEWART AND DAVID MACLELLAN

MEMBERS NETWORKING AT THE HOME HARDWARE BA5 KICK OFF EVENT

SPEAKER DINI PETTY SHARING HER JOURNEY AT THE 10TH ANNUAL INSPIRING WOMEN EVENT

OVER 600 ATTENDEES TAKING IN THE INSPIRATIONAL

LOBLAW’S CAO SARAH DAVIS SPEAKING AT THE 10TH ANNUAL INSPIRING WOMEN EVENT

TARGET PRACTICE WITH INTRIGUE MEDIA

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GUESTS AT THE 10TH ANNUAL INSPIRING WOMEN EVENT

TERESA NORRIS-LUE, BRYAN PERKINS, NEIL MORRISON MIKE MCCOURT TEAMED UP!

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INCOMING CHAIR ROSA LUPO WITH CEO IAN MCLEAN, PAST CHAIRS PAUL EICHINGER & SABRINA FITZGERALD

SHOT-SKI’S WITH HOLE SPONSOR CHICOPEE

NATE TEDESCO SINKING A PUTT CHAMBER’S ANNUAL GOLF SCRAMBLE

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PHOTO BOOTH FUN AT THE REGION OF WATERLOO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BOOTH

SPEAKER TRACY MOORE, HOST OF CITYTV’S CITYLINE TOOK THE STAGE AT THE INSPIRING WOMEN EVENT

MEMBERS KRIS RONAN, JEFF SHEPPARD, JEN DOL, KYLE PRIESTLEY AND JACOB HRYCAK

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advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016

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new members

August 1, 2016 to September 30, 2016 Roevin/Adecco Employment Agencies Laura Tarrant, Senior Technical Account Executive 5770 Hurontario St, Unit 300 Mississauga, ON L5R 3G5 Email: ltarrant@roevin.ca roevin.ca Phone: (519) 504-3111 Sage Naturopathic Clinic Health & Wellness Samina Mitha, Naturopathic Graduate 585 Queen St S Kitchener, ON N2G 4S4 Email: info@thesageclinic.com thesageclinic.com Phone: (519) 573-6700 Sessiff Educational Consultants Manal Chakra, Team Lead Waterloo, ON Email: contact@sessiff.ca sessiff.ca Phone: (647) 971-7537 Steadfast Gas Services Heating Contractors (Main), Air Conditioning Contractors Darren Potter, Management 597 Colby Dr, Unit 6, Waterloo, ON N2V 1A1 Email: info@steadfastgasservices.com steadfastgasservices.com Phone: (519) 603-9916

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Sylvie Drader Independent Cabi Stylist Women's Apparel - Retail Sylvie Drader, Independent Cabi Stylist Kitchener, ON Email: sylviedrader@gmail.com sylviedrader.cabionline.ca Phone: (519) 741-9652 The Chopped Leaf Waterloo North Restaurants Laura Oliveira, Owner 36 Northfield Dr E, Unit 10, Waterloo, ON N2L 6A1 Email: waterloonorth@choppedleaf.ca choppedleaf.ca Phone: (519) 772-0296 Token Creative Services Marketing Consultants Mohsan Abdullah, CEO 79 Shoemaker St, Kitchener, ON N2E 3B5 Email: mohsan@tokencs.ca tokencs.ca Phone: (519) 498-5405 TruPrint Printing Services Printers Jenn Givlin, President 11 Samuel St Kitchener, ON N2H 1N9 Email: info@truprint.ca www.truprint.ca Phone: (519) 744-5946 Fax: (519) 744-7962

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cover story

On the Right Track BY STEPHANIE BIGELOW When Central Transit Corridor discussions began in the Region of Waterloo, the CN Tower had just opened, the Timbit had just been invented, and the Berlin Wall was still standing. In 1976, only 3 years after the creation of the Region of Waterloo municipality, the first proposal for a Rapid Transit Central Corridor was presented. The forward thinking Regional government relaunched Rapid Transit discussions in 2000. Our community’s 40-year march towards integrated rapid transit is coming to an end, with multiple significant intersections open to vehicles again as of October 2016. Now that we can finally see the light at the end of the tunnel it is time to answer the question about where development along the corridor currently is, and what The Changing Face of Waterloo Region will mean for the Central Transit Corridor. Development has soared along the LRT Route, primarily in the Downtown Cores of both Waterloo and Kitchener. Once the announcement was made for the LRT route through Waterloo and Kitchener, 21 separate construction cranes could be counted along

Development has soared along the LRT Route the line.i One of the key factors driving development around the Ion LRT route is the permanence of the infrastructure. While developers may take bus routes into consideration when in the planning stages of a project, few if any, will launch a project based on the strength of the bus transit due to the transience of bus routes. LRT is the opposite. There is no rerouting of the line once it is in, and this has driven development. This transit based development phenomenon is not unique to Waterloo Region. One study in Vancouver determined that “office buildings located within 500 meters of rapid transit stations benefit from lower vacancy rates and higher rents than those areas not served directly by rapid transit.”ii In our brokerage experience, there has not been any redevelopment or relocation that has not at least taken the LRT stations into consideration in the last 5 years since funding was approved. There have also been numerous new developments along the LRT line, both in suburban and urban

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markets to the tune of over 750,000 SF of new space since the LRT route was announced. It is anticipated that Rapid Transit will continue to be one of the most significant considerations for office tenants when looking for space in the core office markets.

Rapid Transit will continue to be one of the most significant considerations for office tenants While there has not been a similar pre-development of retail space along the LRT line, the promise of a guaranteed 25,000 riders in the first year and a projected 53,000 daily riders by 2031iii will unquestionably affect retailer’s real estate decisions into the future. As of 2014, there are less than a dozen individual roads in the region with that volume of traffic. One of the most important deciding factors for any retailer looking to open a new location is the amount of traffic that passes by a property daily. This number drives real estate decisions for every retailer from a multi-national to a local retail owner. LRT construction has been a tough time for retailers throughout the cores of UpTown Waterloo and Downtown Kitchener, but for those who have been able to survive and for those who are yet to arrive, the foot traffic is coming. Residential development is unquestionably the area that has seen the most development around the LRT route. Some of this precedes the LRT route announcement, such as the Kaufman Lofts, but much of it does not. The most prominent example of this is the One Victoria building at King and Victoria in Downtown Kitchener. This 19 floor mixed-use condo building will have retail uses on the main floor and condo units above once complete. The developer, Momentum Developments, even commented to The Record in 2012, “obviously the LRT is one of the catalysts for this particular site,” Mike Maxwell said. “We have been optimistic on Kitchener for a long time and this was the right site and the right time for us as well.”iv That particular corner had seen more than $117 million in new development before Momentum’s arrival and will quickly become one of the most vibrant corners in the area. While this is not the only project to put shovels into the ground after the announcement of the LRT, it


cover story

is certainly the easiest one to point to. Since LRT was announced, there have been the 5 new condo or rental developments in Waterloo, and 4 new developments in Kitchener that have all commenced construction within 500m of the LRT route. This is to say nothing of the numerous other projects that have been proposed along the line.

there is significantly more densification on the way Looking to the future of LRT and real estate development, there is significantly more densification on the way as it is anticipated that the region will grow to 729,000 people by the year 2031. Due to a lack of development land within the borders of the tri-cities, much of this growth will need to occur through intensification in the cores, and much of the movement of people within the city will need to move out of personal vehicles. It has been estimated that the Rapid Transit system will prevent the construction of over 500 km of new road infrastructure. The future of mobility in the Region will also include and require an increase in alternate modes of transit. In a survey completed by the University of Waterloo in 2015 in UpTown Waterloo, it was suggested that 70% of shoppers had traveled there via alternate transportation methods. This will only increase as LRT becomes more a part of people’s daily lives and cycling and walking become more common modes of transportation.

Urbanization is no longer a trend; it is the new normal. The most significant proposed development intensification will be the immediate surroundings of King and Victoria Streets surrounding the proposed transit hub. There are also a significant number of proposed projects for both office and residential space along the Central Transit Corridor that are waiting for critical mass to begin construction. As younger generations continue to seek a lifestyle with amenities and work within walking distance of their homes, this will only accelerate. Urbanization is no longer a trend; it is the new normal.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Stephanie Bigelow Stephanie Bigelow is the Senior Research Analyst with Cushman & Wakefield Waterloo Region and is an AACI candidate with the Appraisal Institute of Canada.

i

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/transportation/2015/12/10/while-gta-crawls-ahead-waterloo-region-leads-way-on-light-rail.html

ii

https://www.biv.com/article/2014/11/suburban-office-landlords-find-transit-vital/

iii

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/transportation/2015/12/10/while-gta-crawls-ahead-waterloo-region-leads-way-on-light-rail.html

iv

http://waterlooregionconnected.com/showthread.php?tid=11

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016

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events

Mark Your Calendar November 15, 2016

November 22, 2016

Point of View with Howard Eng: Southern Ontario Regional Airports Strategy

Heffner Women’s Leadership Lunch and Life Lessons with Ginny Dybenko

11:30am-1:30pm at the Crowne Plaza Kitchener-Waterloo Members: $40 • Table of 6: $225 General Admission: $50

11:30am-1:30pm at Westmount Golf & Country Club Members: $40 • General Admission: $50

Howard Eng is the President & CEO of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA). By 2043 southern Ontario will be home to 15.5 million people & regional air travel volume is expected to reach more than 90 million passengers annually. Air travel demand over the next two decades puts Toronto Pearson at roughly 65 million passengers annually by the mid 2030's with no signs of slowing down. The creation of an integrated airport system is a possible solution. There is also a future need to connect air travel passengers to airports. What could this mean for the Waterloo Region and our International Airport?

Almost everyone knows of Ginny, but do you know her and her story? Ginny Dybenko is the Executive Director of the University of Waterloo's Stratford Campus. Previously Ginny was the Dean of the School of Business & Economics at Wilfrid Laurier University, after a successful corporate career including a number of senior executive roles at Bell Canada and a high tech telecommunications start-up, and was the founding President and CEO of Bell Advanced Communications. Title Sponsor:

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December 14, 2016 Chamber Holiday Open House 4:00-6:00pm at the Chamber of Commerce Members: Complimentary Celebrate the season with fellow Chamber members and staff! We will be accepting donations of non-perishable items or an unwrapped toy.

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advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016

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feature

The Evolution of the Region of Waterloo as a World-Class Cosmopolitan Community (2018 to 2041) BY PAUL F. PUOPOLO In 2011, the Region of Waterloo announced its commitment to the largest single project in its history, the ION Rapid Transit System connecting the cities of Waterloo, Kitchener and Cambridge. Some of the anticipated key benefits of ION include moving people more efficiently, transforming and shaping our neighbourhoods and communities, intensifying core areas of our communities, and managing urban growth. Furthermore, it is anticipated that ION would further assist local businesses in attracting new talent to Waterloo Region, and stimulating the local economy with new businesses and job growth. During the construction period, there have been issues of how it has affected local business in the short-term. As a professional land-use planner for over 40 years, I will provide my insights of our community - the Region of Waterloo after 2017-2018 when ION will be operational. Secondly, I will provide some of my observations for business opportunities for local Chamber members and community leaders. However, my first observation is that the new infrastructure ION has created is a “sleek modern” feel that will enhance the Regional streetscape and propel us forward as a world-class cosmopolitan region. It reminds me of the sleek Bombardier LRT system in Bordeaux, France nestled in 5 to 6 storey heritage buildings. I will focus my attention to the following areas: 1.

Intensification and Greater Density in Neighbourhoods around the Station and the Central Transit Corridor (CTC)

With the combination of the high-tech industry, the presence of the two universities and ION, there will be a greater concentration of medium to high rise buildings located along the station routes. Already, we have seen, from 2009 to present, a significant number of student housing projects due to the presence of both Wilfrid Laurier University and the University of Waterloo. The King/Victoria station area has seen a major redevelopment with the construction of the Kaufman Lofts, the Tannery and 1 Victoria. The future Transit Hub centre will add some office, residential and employment opportunities. It is foreseen that the neighbourhoods around all the stations will see some major urban form changes with denser housing, mixed land uses and more walkable areas. I would project that the trend to condo and rental apartment buildings will continue, but with more emphasis on “liveable” medium rise buildings that create a more suitable environment for future residents.

2.

The Increase in Land Prices

With the recent building activity in the CTC from 2003 to 2014, both residential and non-residential uses have totaled over $550,000,000. However, with the recent success of some residential projects, it has led to a dramatic increase in land values in both Kitchener and Waterloo. The greatest increase of land value has been in Waterloo due to the concentration of student housing projects which has skewed land values. The future effect of increased land value will be the slow down of new investment and growth, the affect on housing affordability, and the increase in household debts for the average resident (due to a large portion of income being spent on housing). In the last two years, I have witnessed land values increase 20% to 40%. Clearly, there is research from other communities and my personal experience that identifies the impact of the LRT on housing and land values, and the broader assessment of how the LRT contributes to gentrification of neighbourhoods that leads to increased land values. 3.

The Future of Home Ownership Affordability along the Stations of the ION

In 2011, 62% of housing transactions were affordable to low and moderate income households within the CTC. With the higher land costs along the LRT route, and the need to create higher density and smaller housing units for first-time buyers, empty nesters, retirees, and the young millennium, future Waterloo residents will face challenges in locating and securing appropriate affordable housing. Studies in the City of Toronto, undertaken by Ryerson, have shown that areas along the transit lines have been built with “little to no” affordable housing opportunities. Unless more proactive

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feature

municipal and provincial/ federal incentives are provided, I would project that the theme of displacing lower income families to the edges of the neighbourhood, around the stations of the LRT, would occur in our community. There are valid concerns regarding the impact of the LRT on affordability. 4.

The Creation of New Mixed-Use Nodes and Areas and the Need for More Employment Opportunities along the CTC

By focusing development and investment within the built-up areas to create more compact urban form, we are creating /stimulating vibrancy and building neighbourhoods that are more valuable and liveable. However, we do need to create a mixture of housing form. For future success, we will need significantly more employment/office investment along the CTC. Therefore, people can work, live and recreate in their neighbourhoods. It is important that the growth of the tech sector, with its propensity to locate in re-imaged space continue to contribute re-urbanization and employment opportunities. 5.

The Changing Ethnic Landscape of our Community

Our community is growing and will continue to see a major change in the ethnic landscape of our neighbourhoods and businesses. The Region of Waterloo had a major influx of immigrants in the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s from European countries such as Germany, Austria, Poland, Croatia and other Mediterranean countries. However, now and in the future, there has been change in immigration patterns with new residents arriving from the Middle East, Asia, China, India, and most recently refugees from Syria.

Texas through Charity Black Fret) Some of the challenges facing Chamber members are: 1.

The viability (financial) of small local businesses to afford the new highly-priced lands along the CTC;

2.

The ability to attract/employ workers who have to commute longer distances to businesses in the CTC;

3.

The ability to integrate new Canadians into the business.

Clearly, as we move beyond 2018 to 2041 the urban form and the faces of the Region of Waterloo are going to change dramatically and our community and its leaders will need to be ready for the challenges. ABOUT THE AUTHOR

This new trend will have challenges and benefits to the community with:

Paul F. Puopolo

• • • •

With over 35 years’ experience in Municipal and Land Use Planning, Mr. Puopolo’s areas of expertise has involved a variety of planning, landscaping and project management assignments for both private and municipal clients, including the preparation and/or review and interpretation of Official Plans, Secondary Plans and sitespecific Zoning By-laws. He was the Resident Planner at the University of Waterloo and is Co-Chair of the Capstone Urban Studies Program at Wilfrid Laurier University.

The diversity of eateries; The need for different schooling; The need for more cultural facilities; and The availability of a diverse labour pool.

The face of the Region of Waterloo will be changing and coupled with land-use diversity, will all contribute to a new urban vibrancy. In summary, what does this mean to Chamber members and community leaders? They will need to: 1.

Address the local needs of the tech industry and millenniums from a housing and commercial aspect;

2.

Open and create business from different ethnic roots;

3.

Create more social cultural/art facilitators in our community to meet the growing and diverse population;

4.

Provide newer small mixed-used business which caters to diverse groups.

5.

Provide funds and grants to artists/musicians (i.e. Austin,

You can contact Paul at Paul@polocorpinc.com

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016

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feature

The Future of Air Travel in Southern Ontario BY CHRIS WOOD The Region of Waterloo International Airport (YKF) is one of the top 20 busiest airports in Canada. In 2015 there were more than 150,000 passengers who used the airport and over 100,000 aircraft landings or take-offs. Waterloo Region has a highly mobile population and the numbers show there is a strong demand for air travel.

report suggests Toronto Pearson investigate working with regional airports in southern Ontario to design an integrated multi-airport system which could help move capacity from Toronto Pearson to other airports. The Region of Waterloo International Airport is one of several airports that could play a major role in helping to meet this regional aviation demand.

It is projected that by 2036 Waterloo Region will grow to 789,000 residents. It is also estimated that by 2043 southern Ontario will be home to 15.5 million people and regional air travel volume is expected to reach more than 90 million passengers annually. Air travel demand over the next two decades puts Toronto Pearson at roughly 65-70 million passengers annually by the mid 2030’s. With the potential for this increased demand for air travel the time to plan for it is now.

Preparing for this next phase of development is an important consideration in being able to respond to the passengers that could go unserved at Toronto Pearson. YKF is well positioned geographically to play a larger role in this potential new system of airports. Currently the airport only captures four per cent of the passengers in its immediate catchment area, approximately 35 kilometers around the airport. However it is estimated there could be up to two million passengers that travel from within this catchment area annually. More flights to more places would allow business and leisure passengers who currently travel to Toronto Pearson to fly from YKF.

The Region of Waterloo is currently in the process of approving a 20 year Master Plan to guide the future of the Airport from 2016 to 2035. This plan takes a number of factors into consideration: •

The opportunities and challenges the airport will face over the next 20 years

How to best meet the travel and connectivity needs of our growing community, and

A projected capacity shortfall at Toronto Pearson International Airport that by 2043 could leave an estimated 20 million passengers unserved annually.

Air travel demand over the next two decades could see Toronto Pearson at roughly 65 million passengers – and there are no signs of slowing down. A study completed in September 2015 by the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA), Growth, Connectivity, Capacity: The future of a key regional asset, proposed a potential solution to this passenger shortfall. The

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The ever-changing nature of the aviation industry could also affect the future growth at YKF and the entry of ultra low cost air carriers into the Canadian marketplace would increase passenger traffic. With increased passengers at YKF comes the need for airport enhancements including increasing the size of the air terminal building, additional parking and improvements to the connecting road network. There is also added pressure to connect passengers into the local transportation system which would allow them to easily get to and from the airport. A proposed new GO Station in Breslau at Shantz Station near Greenhouse Road and the need for increased service by GRT would help to connect these passengers and fully-integrate the transportation networks. Airports are significant drivers of economic development. In 2015 it was estimated that YKF contributed $90 million to the Region’s economy.* Currently over 25 businesses operate from the airport


feature

and employ more than 300 people. With the demand for increased passenger service and better global connectivity these numbers will only grow. We encourage you to be part of this important conversation. Join us at these two events to find out more about the potential opportunities and challenges the airport may face, and how it is preparing to meet the future travel and connectivity needs in Waterloo Region.

Thursday November 10 – 4 to 8 p.m. Airport Master Plan Public Consultation Centre at the Waterloo Region Museum waterlooairport.ca/masterplan Tuesday November 15 – 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The Greater KW Chamber of Commerce presents a Point of View Luncheon with Guest Speaker Howard Eng, President and CEO of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) Not able to attend? Join the conversation online at: engageregionofwaterloo.ca

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Chris Wood, BSc., AAE Chris is the Airport General Manager, Region of Waterloo International Airport The Region of Waterloo International Airport is owned and operated by the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). *Wilfrid Laurier University 2015 Economic Impact Study

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016

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member notables

MEMBER NOTABLES Peter Benninger Appointed as Chair of Conestoga Board of Governors Peter Benninger, founder and owner of Kitchener-based Coldwell Banker Peter Benninger Realty, has been appointed as Chair of the Board of Governors for Conestoga College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning. Mr. Benninger has served on Conestoga’s board since 2012 and replaces Frank Boutzis of KPMG, who served as Chair from 2012 through 2016. In a September 30, 2016 news release, Conestoga President John Tibbits noted that Peter’s vision, business expertise and longstanding commitment to serving the local community will help guide their efforts as they grow and evolve to meet changing workforce needs and promote economic prosperity across Waterloo Region and beyond. Mr. Benninger has been recognized with multiple awards over his 39-year real estate career and his firm employs more than 100 people.

New Inductees Announced for Waterloo Region Entrepreneur Hall of Fame Junior Achievement (JA) Waterloo Region recently announced three local business leaders as the 2016 inductees into their Waterloo Region Entrepreneur Hall of Fame. Originally created by the local Prosperity Council, the Hall of Fame event was hosted by Communitech from 2006 to 2012 and commenced again in 2015 through Junior Achievement. The 2016 awards honored the traditions from previous years while incorporating elements recognizing youth entrepreneurship and achievements. The 2016 inductees are Larry Hundt, Great Canadian Holidays, Coaches and Fleet Services, Peter van der Heyden, Goliger’s Travel Plus, and John Whitney, WHITNEY & Company Realty Limited, who were all formally inducted at an event at Bingemans on November 3.

Firehouse Subs opens in Kitchener Firehouse Subs is opening its first Waterloo Region location at 310 Fairway Road South in Kitchener. The grand opening to the public is scheduled for Sunday, November 20, 2016. Firehouse opened their first Canadian outlet in October 2015. Their Public Safety Foundation accepts donations which support firefighters, police and EMS to purchase life saving equipment, organize prevention education, and assist local members of the military.

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member notables

MEMBER NOTABLES The Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery Announces Major Award Winners The Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery recently announced that Amelie Proulx has won the 2016 Winifred Shantz Award for Ceramics and Aaron Oussoren is the recipient of the 2016 RBC Award for Glass. The Winifred Shantz Award for Ceramics is supported by the Keith and Winifred Shantz Fund for the Arts through The Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation. The RBC Award for Glass is supported by the RBC Foundation as part of the RBC Emerging Artists Project. The awards will be formally presented at a Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery event on November 12, 2016, which will include remarks from Ms. Proulx and Mr. Oussoren.

Wilfrid Laurier University Appoints New Chancellor Business leader, corporate director and governance expert Eileen Mercier has been appointed chancellor of Wilfrid Laurier University. Ms. Mercier succeeds Michael Lee-Chin who served in the position from October of 2011. She is the ninth chancellor since WLU became a public institution in 1973, will be a member of the Board of Governors and Senate, preside over graduation ceremonies, and officially bestow all degrees and diplomas. Eileen Mercier graduated with a BA from the former Waterloo Lutheran University and received graduate degrees from the University of Alberta and York University. Her distinguished business career includes Chair of the Boards of Payments Canada and the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan, president of Finvoy Management, and chief financial officer of Abitibi-Price.

United Way Kitchener Waterloo & Area – 75 Years of Service This year marks the 75th Anniversary of United Way of Kitchener Waterloo & Area. What started with eleven volunteers, four agencies, an $80,000 campaign and one staff person has grown to thousands of volunteers and supporters, a network of community partners, year-round fundraising of $5 million, and a skilled staff team. In 2014, one in three local residents was impacted by services provided by United Way KW & Area. Over 1,000 kids experienced improved self-esteem through supported programs and nearly 15,000 people became more involved in their neighbourhoods. Congratulations to CEO Jan Varner, the staff and board on this important achievement in serving the community.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016

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Helping Us Make Our Vision Possible A special Thank You to each of these Chamber Sponsors.

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MEDIA PARTNERS 34

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Works W orks ffo for or m me. e.

®

Find a benefits plan that works for you and for your employees. Since 1984, Equitable Life® has been proud to partner with Cowan and the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce to provide members and their employees with a cost-effective group benefits program. n do for you. Call the Chamber Concierge rge S Service: er vice: 1 1-888-333-6337 -888-333-6337 email: chamber@cowangroup.ca roup.ca or visit: https://www.cowangroup.ca/en/industry-segments/ angroup.ca/en/industr y-segments/ cowan-programs/one-source-advantage-gkwcc/ ne-source-advantage-gkwcc/

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November-December 2016 Advocate  
November-December 2016 Advocate