Issuu on Google+

Collective

G R E AT E R

GREEN

B AY

CHAMBER

|

FALL

2016

2015-16 ANNUAL REPORT


HIRE skilled, job ready technical college grads FREE – no cost to employers FAST – jobs posted daily EASY – post a job in minutes TARGETED to a technically skilled workforce REACH students, graduates and faculty statewide with a single job entry VIEW candidate resumes from programs matching your job postings

www.wisconsintechconnect.com

Questions?

Call NWTC - Career Services call 920-498-6250 or email careers@nwtc.edu


Collective GREATER GREEN BAY CHAMBER 2015-16 ANNUAL REPORT

FALL 2016 | ISSUE #15 PUBLISHED BY THE GREATER GREEN BAY CHAMBER FOR CHAMBER MEMBERS VISIT THE GREATER GREEN BAY CHAMBER AT: TITLETOWN.ORG PRESIDENT Laurie Radke EDITOR/PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Levin ART DIRECTOR Dana Jacobson WRITER Jen Hogeland Collective Impact is published quarterly by the Greater Green Bay Chamber, 300 N. Broadway, Ste. 3A, Green Bay WI 54303. Collective Impact is supported by advertising revenue from member companies of the Greater Green Bay Chamber. For information about the advertising rates and deadlines, contact sales at 920.593.3418. Collective Impact (USPS 10-206) is published quarterly for $18 a year by the Greater Green Bay Chamber, 300 N. Broadway, Ste. 3A, Green Bay, WI 54303. Periodicals postage paid at Green Bay, WI. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Collective Impact, 300 N. Broadway, Ste. 3A, Green Bay WI 54303. PH: 920.593.3423. COMMERCIAL LITHOGRAPHY

A DV E RT I S E R S

Start or expand your business in the FASTEST GROWING

WISCONSIN COMMUNITY

0 0 Northeast Wisconsin Technical College -

Career Services 0 1 Village of Hobart 0 2 Tundraland 2 2 North Star Mohican Casino Resort 2 2 Element 2 3 Green Bay Packers 2 4 SCORE 2 4 Range Bank 2 4 Robinson Heating and Cooling 2 5 SM Advisors 2 5 National Railroad Museum 2 5 YMCA 2 6 UnitedHealthcare 2 6 St. Norbert College 2 7 Boys & Girls Club of Green Bay 2 8 Northeast Wisconsin Technical College Corporate Training & Economic Development 2 8 Thornberry Creek at Oneida 2 9 Prevea360 BAC K C OV E R Cellcom

Be part of the progress by leasing space in a great new multi-tenant building or select land for design/build construction. This is the ideal location if you are looking to command market share in western Brown County.

With $108 million of private development realized already, the Village of Hobart is charging ahead with continued commercial, manufacturing, and residential expansion. The Village of Hobart offers: • tax increment incentives • immediate customers with median HH income among highest in the state

The 100 acre MarketPlace District in Centennial Centre capitalizes on the work-live trend. Medical and dental services, restaurants, salon/spa, grocery store, bank/credit union, and professional service providers would benefit from locating a business in Hobart.

• high visibility and ready access to people traveling daily in the 23,600 vehicles on state highway 29/32 For more details visit www.buildinhobart.com OR contact Andrew Vickers, Village Administrator 920-869-3804 • Andrew@hobart-wi.org


(920) 734-4786 www.tundraland.com 2  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016


From the chair of the board

I

t has been a distinct honor to serve the Greater Green Bay Chamber as its Chairman of the Board for the last year, and as an active board member for the past six years. During this time, I have been able to witness significant progress throughout the Greater Green Bay area, especially within the business community, and it’s been a privilege to see the growth happen through the lens of the Chamber.

I would like to first reflect on the mission of the Greater Green Bay Chamber – To strengthen member businesses by enhancing economic and workforce development, resulting in improved quality of life in our community and region. When I started in my role as Chairman of the Board, I had the opportunity to sit down with Laurie Radke, the President and CEO of the Chamber, to discuss major objectives for the year.The objectives included advancing economic development through the building of a strategic plan for Brown County, evaluating and improving all K-12 workforce development programs and further advancing capability of the Chamber Board of Directors to support the Chamber’s mission through the formation of a board development committee. I’m happy to say that all goals were reached. I would like to reflect on one of the most significant accomplishments this past year, which was the progress on the economic development strategic plan for Brown County. Peter Zaehringer joined the Chamber as the new Vice President, Economic Development just over

a year ago. He facilitated the selection of a consulting firm to lead the economic development strategic plan. Since then, TIP Strategies has conducted more than a dozen focus group discussions collecting input from community leaders in manufacturing, education, municipalities and also young leaders in our community.This plan will set out our priorities, projects and timelines for economic development as well as workforce development. The target is to have the plan finalized by the end of the year with implementation in 2017. At the end, we will be successful as a community and a region if we create a place where people locate because they want to, not because they have to. The Chamber can lead the way into our future, but one of the things that Dr. Rai worked to accomplish last year in his role serving as the Chairman of the Board was to encourage the community — specifically our business leaders, municipalities and elected officials — to work collaboratively in support of the greater community. I continued that work this year and encourage Mark Higgins, who will be replacing me as the new Chairman of the Board, to continue to

promote that collaborative approach especially through the implementation of the strategic plan. We need to remind ourselves that economic development does not stop at the municipal boarders. Mark, I wish you the best as you begin your new role with the Greater Green Bay Chamber. It’s a wonderful opportunity to work with a truly gifted group of individuals to enhance economic and workforce development in our area with the end result of improving the quality of life for all in our community and region. And to Laurie Radke, the rest of the talented Chamber staff and to all members of the Greater Green Bay Chamber, I would like to extend a sincere thank you for the opportunity to serve as the Chairman of the Board over the past year. It has been an honor to work with each of you.

— Todd Cullen

Georgia-Pacific outgoing chairman of the board, Greater Green Bay Chamber

Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  3


SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS THIS PAST FISCAL YEAR:

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Advance, the economic development arm of the Greater Green Bay Chamber, provides a variety of resources to support local small businesses. While the Advance Business & Manufacturing Center incubator program and the Brown County Culinary Kitchen have a tremendous impact on companies starting or growing their business, the department also recognizes the accomplishments of members with several business awards. Advance proactively looks for opportunities to improve and diversity the local economy for the benefit of Brown County.

The Advance Business & Manufacturing Center is home to

39 DIFFERENT COMPANIES and 10 VIRTUAL BUSINESSES. It welcomed three new businesses and celebrated the graduation of five companies.

PHOTO BY ELIZABETH SLADE

THE INCUBATOR PROGRAM HAD AN

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF

$73 MILLION

AND PROVIDED 871 JOBS WITH AN ANNUAL PAYROLL OF $42.7 MILLION. 4  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016


The 2015 Manufacturing Awards of Distinction was awarded to: SEURA, INC. BAY TEK GAMES, INC. LAFORCE, INC.

50%

Usage of the Brown County Culinary Kitchen increased by 50 percent. 17 licensed processors utilized the kitchen to create artisan products.

PHOTO BY ELIZABETH SLADE

Retention volunteers visited more than 70 BROWN COUNTY BUSINESSES representing more than 14,000 EMPLOYEES.

Advance kicked off the Strategic Planning Project in March 2016 — a critical step forward for

economic growth in the region.

154 COMPANIES

responded to survey questions within the Wage & Benefit Study, reporting compensation for 4,331 positions and responding to nearly 175 benefit questions.

The 2015 Excellence in Business Award was presented to

MASTER FLEET, LLC

for excellence in business practices, business success and community involvement. Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  5


GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Most businesses don’t have the time or know-how to participate in policy debates or to push legislation that can have a significant impact on their company. The Government Affairs department within the Greater Green Bay Chamber acts in the best interest of its members by serving as the voice of area employers. Government Affairs was busy this fiscal year and made significant progress on some of its top priorities.

SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS THIS PAST FISCAL YEAR:

17 STUDENTS

completed a two-night training session as part of the Greater Green Bay Chamber’s first Candidate Training Institute. 6  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016


42 PEOPLE

participated in the first “Speed Lobbying” event with seven lawmakers.

11

public policy council meetings took place over the last fiscal year.

GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS SUPPORTED LEGISLATION TO:  Allow municipalities to work together to create tax increment financing (TIF) districts.  End the prohibition of constructing nuclear power plants. More than 5,200 emails were sent to members of Congress by over 500 local advocates in support of federal legislation that would allow local hospitals to establish medical residency programs. Retaining graduates from the Medical College of Wisconsin-Green Bay is sure to benefit the community.

 Transfer liquor licenses within districts.  Provide greater scrutiny of administrative rules, which would increase the cost of compliance by $10 million or more statewide.

Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  7


SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS THIS PAST FISCAL YEAR:

PARTNERS IN EDUCATION

Partners in Education is committed to meeting the current and future workforce needs of Greater Green Bay employers. Professional and leadership development programs designed to attract, retain and engage employees continue to be successful. Newer programs, such as FYI (Find Your Inspiration) and Your Future, were created to reach Brown County’s future workforce. Support of these programs demonstrates a growing need to catch students in the classroom and get them thinking about their career options early.

The YOUR FUTURE program was established.

MORE THAN 50

GREATER GREEN BAY BUSINESSES and their career opportunities were presented to 500 educators and students.

A partnership with the Brown County Library resulted in a college planning corner, equipped with a college planning and financial aid guide.

85 STUDENTS were placed in the Youth Apprenticeship program.

8  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016


SIX

of Greater Green Bay’s finest teachers were recognized at the 2016 Golden Apple Awards.

Five financial aid seminars were held with two in Spanish.

500

INDIVIDUALS ATTENDED THE SEMINARS.

ACHIEVE BROWN COUNTY ADDED TWO NEW STAFF MEMBERS TO GROW THE PROGRAM.

$25,500

in scholarships were awarded to 23 students for post-secondary education.

In its inaugural year, FYI (Find Your Inspiration) showcased 60 Greater Green Bay businesses and 16 career clusters, inspiring

1,400

8TH GRADE STUDENTS to start career exploration.

Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  9


BROWN COUNTY TEEN LEADERSHIP

For years, the Greater Green Bay Chamber has brought area high school students together to develop their leadership skills and to engage them in a group community service project. Brown County Teen Leadership participants are introduced to various facets of the community throughout the year program. The hope is the teens will be inspired to create positive change in Brown County now and for years to come.

SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS THIS PAST FISCAL YEAR:

10  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016


SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS THIS PAST FISCAL YEAR:

The Brown County Teen Leadership class consisted of

35 STUDENTS from 11 area high schools.

REPRESENTED SCHOOLS INCLUDE: GREEN BAY EAST HIGH SCHOOL

5

Five community service projects were completed, including an activity day at Synergy with students from Syble Hopp School, a social media campaign to raise awareness of the CP Center’s Celebrating All Abilities initiative, providing blankets to residents and increasing visibility of volunteer opportunities at ManorCare, raising money for cleaning supplies and supporting the Golden House’s spring cleaning efforts and fundraising school supplies for students at Tank Elementary School.

WEST DE PERE HIGH SCHOOL PULASKI HIGH SCHOOL WRIGHTSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL NOTRE DAME ACADEMY ASHWAUBENON HIGH SCHOOL GREEN BAY PREBLE HIGH SCHOOL DENMARK HIGH SCHOOL DE PERE HIGH SCHOOL GREEN BAY WEST HIGH SCHOOL GREEN BAY SOUTHWEST HIGH SCHOOL Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  11


LEADERSHIP GREEN BAY

Leadership Green Bay appeals to professionals interested in growing as a leader and becoming more engaged in the community. To date, more 1,000 graduates have not only developed valuable leadership skills to improve area businesses, but are making an impact on Brown County. Eyes are open to the community’s needs — the Leadership Green Bay program inspires graduates long after classes and group projects are complete.

SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS THIS PAST FISCAL YEAR:

12  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016

42 MEMBERS GRADUATED

bringing the total number of graduates to 1,123 since its inception.


Members of the 2016 Leadership Green Bay class participated in nine sessions. Professionals were exposed to 90 presenters and 35 different venues.

THE LEGACY OF LEADERSHIP ALUMNI EVENT BROUGHT TOGETHER CLASSES OF 1986 AND 1987.

Six community projects were complete, including:  Stage at Whitney Park in downtown Green Bay  Natural playground at Encompass Early Education and Care Center in De Pere  Awareness and recruiting marketing plan for foster parent opportunities in Brown County  Water source, educational areas, water fountain and park benches at Navarino Park  Mobile unit to showcase safety products and common unsafe practices which children are exposed in the home for the Center for Childhood Safety  A dramatic program for teens called Wrecked at the Weidner demonstrated issues of distracted driving

Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  13


MEMBER SERVICES

Member Services is one of the most visible departments within the Greater Green Bay Chamber. The Member Services team actively works to increase membership, connects individuals and businesses through networking events, promotes local businesses with an annual expo and celebrates member successes with ribbon cuttings, groundbreakings and awards ceremonies. They bring together and showcase the best of Brown County.

The member services team brought in

SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS THIS PAST FISCAL YEAR:

The 38 Greater Green Bay Chamber ambassadors participated in more than 80 events, including 43 ribbon cuttings and grand openings.

14  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016

98 NEW MEMBER

BUSINESSES These businesses represent

893 EMPLOYEES.


The Chamber celebrated member accomplishments —

270 PEOPLE were at the Manufacturing Awards of Distinction event and the Business Recognition Luncheon had nearly 450 ATTENDEES.

485 PEOPLE

ATTENDED THE ANNUAL DINNER.

Brown County loves its Packers. The

Welcome Back Packers Luncheon

was sold out with more than 1,000 attendees.

The 2016 Business Showcase featured 136 Greater Green Bay Chamber businesses; 255 people attended the expo.

The 35th annual Green Bay Packers Chamber Golf Outing Classic was sold out for the second year in a row with

160 PARTICIPATING GOLFERS. Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  15


SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS THIS PAST FISCAL YEAR:

CURRENT YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK

A young professional’s happiness — and the likelihood he or she stays with an employer — goes beyond their experiences in the workplace. The community plays an important role. Current Young Professionals Network is dedicated to connecting those newer in their career, and possibly new to the community, to fellow young professionals in hopes of keeping talent in Brown County. Each year, thousands attend Current events. The Young Professionals Network also celebrates the members making an impact in the community.

16  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016

Approximately

4,500 PEOPLE attended the 50 scheduled events, group activities and signature affairs organized by Current.


17 events were held during

YP WEEK

.

The first-time Green Bay S.O.U.P. (Support of Urban Projects) was one of the stand-out events. More than $1,000 was collected and awarded to the winning presentation.

A MENTOR PROGRAM WAS PILOTED, MATCHING YOUNG PROFESSIONALS WITH AN EXECUTIVE IN THEIR CAREER CLUSTER.

More than 30 SUMMER INTERNS working at area businesses participated in three events showcasing the best of Greater Green Bay.

The annual Future 15 event had record attendance with more than

600 PEOPLE celebrating the accomplishments of 15 young professionals. Awards were also given to the young professional of the year, young entrepreneur of the year and next generation best place to work.

MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES MORE THAN 100 CORPORATE MEMBERS AND 2,000 INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS. Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  17


The Education is a high priority in Brown County. Our dedication to high-quality education is apparent through our average ACT scores (23.5) which is higher than the state average (22.1) and the national average (21.0).

YOUR FUTURE PROGRAM is expected to grow to over

100 BUSINESSES impacting the lives of

5,000 STUDENTS AND EDUCATORS in year two.

DID YOU LEADERSHIP GREEN BAY participants assisted SIX DIFFERENT NON-PROFITS with items and monetary donations as part of their session days.

Social media engagement in Chamber-related websites continued to rise this year with nearly

19,000 INDIVIDUALS

connecting through Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

Nearly 4,000 students are projected to attend the FYI (Find Your Inspiration) program in 2017,

REACHING NEARLY EVERY 8TH GRADER IN BROWN COUNTY. 18  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016


Green Bay S.O.U.P.

The purpose of (Support of Urban Projects) is to promote community-based development through crowdfunding, creativity, collaboration, democracy, trust and fun. The program included five short local project presentations. There was time for questions, soup, networking and for attendees to vote on the project they believed the evening’s proceeds should support.

ACHIEVE BROWN COUNTY

continues to make progress on the missions of the three outcome teams.

KNOW? The

OF THE WAGE & BENEFIT STUDY RESPONDENTS, 51% REPORT PLANS TO INCREASE WAGES 2-3%; 30% PLAN TO INCREASE WAGES HIGHER THAN 3%.

participated in local events, including the Taste of Entrepreneurship event at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, New Leaf Winter Farmers’ Market and Saturday Farmers’ Market.

Of the 70 Brown County businesses visited by retention volunteers, 75% are experiencing issues recruiting for specific skill sets, nearly 80% indicated the area is a good or excellent place to do business and 1 in 3 plan to expand their facility in some capacity within the next two years.

BROWN COUNTY CULINARY KITCHEN

Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  19


From the Chamber president

LOOKING FORWARD

O

ne doesn’t have to look far from the Chamber building to see economic development at work. There’s activity next door on Broadway and just across the river, as well as pockets of activity in every corner of Brown County.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT The Greater Green Bay area stands at the threshold of a new economic era. There are great opportunities to make both nearsighted and farsighted investments into the economic competitiveness and sustainability of our region. What excites me about the direction of economic development in our county is the Chamber’s role in leading through collaboration by spearheading a transformative and inclusive economic development planning process. Advance, the economic development arm of the Chamber, kicked off a strategic planning venture in March 2016. Our goal for months’ worth of interviewing hundreds of (and counting) community leaders, businesses, our boards of directors, elected officials, residents and other stakeholders is to create one coordinated strategy the community can all rally around and use to align private, public and private/public investments and resources. More importantly, the plan will lead us to tangible action steps for achieving our shared destiny for an excellent quality of life through economic development efforts.

20  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016

We realize this will be a shift for the community, as to my knowledge, Brown County has never had a sole economic development plan that’s the culmination of a collaborative effort. I’d like to emphasize that this is not the Chamber’s plan — this is our region’s plan. Our consulting partner in this work, TIP Strategies, is taking a very purposeful and deliberate approach to this engagement to ensure we are inclusive of numerous stakeholders and industry clusters.We chose TIP Strategies, through a competitive vetting process, because of their expertise, track record and work nationally, including in another Wisconsin community. TIP has great success showing, through their methods of research and engagement, the positive impact collaborative planning can have on impacting a region’s economic development acceleration and attainment. I’m very excited to see where we land in terms of selecting an achievable, yet forward thinking direction for our community. The number of aligned efforts could be endless toward growing our economy, remaining competitive and attracting and retaining talent, ensuring that we continue to have positive trends in our economic indicators. Once this community-owned plan is adopted, that’s


when the “real work” begins as we’ll have action steps on how to move forward in a complementary manner, without duplicating efforts, from the same shared goals that will propel us forward as a community. This is a great time to advance this region and I hope you will all join us in this monumental effort.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT The work that’s occurring internally at the Chamber for the future is similarly focused on sustainability and serving the broad needs of the business and educational community. While this article is focused on looking forward, I have to say that I’m very proud of what our K-12 programming and workforce programs have accomplished. But we’re never content to sit on our laurels; our staff continues to reassess and reevaluate our programs. That’s true of our K-12 programming as well as post-secondary education and on to the young professional audience through programs including Current. Our young professionals’ voice is an important voice for our community, one that we make a very purposeful effort to ensure is represented. That’s why we formed a Young Professionals Advisory Council with area young professionals, harnessing their collective thoughts and driving policies that are important to attracting and retaining young professionals.

of programs and services is ever-changing, and we want to help members figure out how to best tap the Chamber to help their business. What’s exciting to me is that members who attend are going back to their workplaces and acting as Chamber “champions” within their organizations.They’re sharing what the Chamber has that’s relevant to them and their business with co-workers.

SERVANT LEADERSHIP PROPELS US FORWARD I know this column is focused on looking forward, but we wouldn’t be looking forward to the 135th fiscal year of the Chamber if we didn’t have such a great membership and community and business partners. As we prepare not only for the economic development plan as well as the next LIFE Study in collaboration with the United Way of Brown County and the Greater Green Bay Community Foundation (results will be available at the end of January/ early February), I continue to be amazed at how selfless the leadership in our community is. People in Greater Green Bay aren’t looking for credit; they are sincerely vested in creating change that benefits our youth and everybody who lives here. I am proud to work among people who recognize the uniqueness of our community and have the sincerity and passion to collaborate. Here’s to another successful year!

MEMBERSHIP Your voice is also something that contributed to the establishment of a Membership ROI presentation this year, and we’re continuing to fine-tune that presentation based on the feedback you’re sharing. Whether you’re a Chamber member of one year or 25, we realize that our toolbox

— Laurie Radke

president, Greater Green Bay Chamber

Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  21


WORTH THE TRIP

Take a journey down a path in the Northwoods to a place where winning & extraordinary entertainment unite. slots  tables games  bingo big name entertainment  golf  hotel

When the strategy is on and all parts work together, the results are pretty sweet. Local and customized PR, digital, SEO, inbound, social media, advertising, ROI analysis … the whole honey pot, it’s all here. Let’s get busy. goelement.com

northstarcasinoresort.com 800.952.0195

W12180 County Road A, Bowler, WI 54416

Strategy

Advertising

Marketing

Digital

Web

PR

22  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016 A_EC00-0915 Buzz Ad_Collective Impact Half_UpdatedSize_Final.indd 1

6/8/16 11:20 AM


Chamber member anniversaries 30 YEARS

Green Bay Area Public School District Green Bay Insurance Center Inc.

25 YEARS

Comfort Inn Suites Hotel and Conference center/Rock Garden/1951 West Village of Howard

15 YEARS

Cherney Microbiological Services Ltd. Great Lakes Asset Corp. Kress Inn Northwestern Mutual Financial Network

10 YEARS

Benechex Inc. Insight Creative Inc. Seura Inc.

5 YEARS

Segway the Fox Tours Kalihwisaks Joseph A Interiors Layered Systems LLC Alliance Construction and Design Inc. Oneida Seven Generations Corp.

PACKERS STRONG ALL YEAR LONG.

Visit the most legendary Lambeau Field yet. BOOK YOUR EVENT | STADIUM TOURS | PACKERS PRO SHOP HALL OF FAME | 1919 KITCHEN & TAP packers.com Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  23


Would you like to give back to your community while helping local businesses?

www.greenbay.score.org facebook.com/GreenBaySCORE

24  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016

Phone: 920-222-2167

twitter.com/GreenBaySCORE


TIME COMMITMENT

STOP SELLING VANILLA ICE CREAM MENU EFF

OR T

Book

Workbook

$

Keynote

OI

S/R ULT

RES

Workshop

Certified Strategy &

Talent Advisors $$$

INVESTMENT

95% of the organizations that implement t h e S t o p S e l l i n g Va n i l l a I c e C r e a m P r o c e s s experience an increase in sales and p r o fi t a b i l i t y i n t h e i r fi r s t y e a r. Choose the option that works best for you. Those Who Plan – PROFIT! www.stopsellingvanillaicecream.com •

GOOD HEALTH IS GOOD BUSINESS

920-884-8442

CONTACT MICHELLE to find out how to get started with the Y.

michelle.murton@greenbayymca.org 920 436 9626

YMCA Workplace Wellness Program

Workplace Wellness does more than provide membership cards. We create a partnership in well-being and provide a plan that offers a healthier workplace environment. The Y offers a wellness program tailored to your company’s specific needs that can increase employee productivity, reduce absenteeism, and help lower insurance claims by designing on-site programming that can include:  Membership Match Incentive Wellness Coaching

 Employee Education  Personal Training

 Fitness Assessments  On-Site Wellness Activities

 On-Site Group Fitness Classes

GREEN BAY YMCA  www.greenbayymca.org  920 436 9622 Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  25


Supply-chain & manufacturing. Health care. Business. THE DONALD J. SCHNEIDER School of Business & Economics

www.snc.edu/go/ggbcmba

In Wisconsin there are a lot of things to cheer about. Including one of the largest networks in the state. Switching insurance companies doesn’t always mean you have to switch doctors. With one of the largest networks in Wisconsin, chances are your employees’ doctors are included. And with some of the most competitive rates in the area, you won’t just enjoy healthy employees — you’ll enjoy a healthy bottom line. Now’s the time to switch your business to UnitedHealthcare. Call your broker today or visit uhc.com/wi Insurance coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or its affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health plan coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare of Wisconsin, Inc. MT-1027508.0 6/16 ©2016 United HealthCare Services, Inc. 16-2206

26  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016


Fall 2016 | Collective IMPACT  27


REGISTER TODAY NEWBIZSUMMIT.COM - breakout session topics include-

2016 BUSINESS

LEADERSHIP

TECHNOLOGY - 2 016 -

LEGAL & FINANCIAL MARKETING

Attend the premier regional conference for growth-minded business owners & entrepreneurs!

REGISTER TODAY, Only $79!

EVENT HOSTED BY: NWTC SMALL BUSINESS INITIATIVE

THORNBERRY CREEK AT ONEIDA | JULY 3 - 9, 2017 FOR TOURNAMENT INFORMATION AND PARTNERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES GO TO: WWW.THORNBERRYCREEKLPGACLASSIC.COM 28  Collective IMPACT | Fall 2016


Fueling Business with Health and Happiness. HOW RETHINKING HEALTH INSURANCE CAN HELP BOOST PRODUCTIVITY AND SAVE COST.

s health insurance costs continue to rise, businesses are seeing their margins squeezed. It’s a landscape that has companies looking for ways to trim budgets. A great deal of cost-cutting effort is coming from a source you may not expect: health insurance.

A

estimates the annual cost of those productivity losses to be $1,685 per employee. At 20 full-time employees, that’s $33,700 a year in preventable losses.

One insurer that’s helped businesses make a dent in health-related costs is Prevea360 Health Plan. Prevea360 is one of a new breed of health insurance options — a coordinated-care health plan that includes not only insurance coverage, but healthcare and wellness offerings designed to improve employee health.

“The nut we’ve been able to crack is connecting all the data that’s available to health care professionals to individualized risk-reduction programs on the insurance and employer side,” said Jim Nelson, director of sales for Prevea360. “By bringing health care and health insurance so closely together, we’re able to help employers make a real impact on the overall health of their workforce.”

450

THE TRUE COST OF UNHEALTHY EMPLOYEES

MAKING HEALTH AND HAPPINESS A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

There are hidden costs when an employee isn’t out sick but also isn’t fully healthy. It’s a phenomenon known as “presenteeism,” and the resulting productivity loss costs U.S. businesses $150 billion a year. Add that to annual productivity losses of $225 billion due to absenteeism and it’s clear that poor employee health is a huge drain on business.

more sick days than healthy employees and 4x more indirect costs

There’s another benefit to consider. A recent study suggests that happier employees are 12 percent more productive.

Even in a small business, those costs can be substantial. The Centers for Disease Control

That’s where Prevea360 saw an opportunity to be more than a health insurance provider.

“There’s a well-established link between health and happiness,” said Dr. Ashok Rai, president and CEO of Prevea360’s co-founder Prevea Health. “If we can help employees get healthier, they’ll also be happier.” That healthy-happy connection is something

Prevea360 Health Plan is banking on to help employers gain back some of those shrinking margins. Jim Nelson summed it up: “From the results we’ve been seeing, it’s working.”

chronic health conditions result in

million

prevea360.com/groupinsurance


Greater Green Bay Chamber 300 N. Broadway, Ste. 3A Green Bay, WI 54303

$100 GUARANTEED TRADE IN with a Smartphone (Flex or two-year agreement required)

············································ ·················· ··············· ········· ·········

1.800.236.0055

www.cellcom.com

·· · · · · · ·· ·· · · · · · · · ···· ················· ·········································································

facebook.com/cellcom

Any Retail Location

Offer valid 9/29/16 through 1/4/17 or while supplies last. No rain checks. Activation at time of service, service agreement and credit approval required. New line activation or qualified upgrade required. Universal Service Fund (USF) and regulatory and other recovery fees charged on all service lines. An E911 fee or Police & Fire Protection Fee is charged on all service lines. Taxes, fees and surcharges vary and are subject to change without notice. See retail location or www.cellcom.com/fees for details. Promotional offers subject to change. Visit Cellcom.com/ special-offers-business for details. $100 Trade In: Trade in of good working condition, latest smartphone required. Reimbursement applied as invoice credits within 3 billing cycles. 15 Day Guarantee: If within 15 days you are not completely satisfied with Cellcom’s wireless service, pay for the services you have used and return the equipment in acceptable condition. Other restrictions apply. See store for details. Trademarks and trade names are the property of their respective owners.

···· ·

···


Collective Impact Fall 2016