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www.carolinasmedicalcenter.org

It’s no secret who nurtures a family. It’s no surprise who nurtures the region’s women.

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Uncompromising Excellence. Commitment to Care.


in this issue

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cover story

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated Hiring quality people and helping them grow professionally and spiritually is at the core of the phenomenal success of Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated, according to J. Frank Harrison III, fourth generation family leader of what has become the nation’s second-largest Coca-Cola bottler.

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Stanford Financial Group David Morgan, Audrey Truman and Hunter Widener opened the Charlotte office, Stanford Group Company, in July 2006. Since then, they’ve lived their dream of providing high-networth individuals as well as businesses with financial advice and services.

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BAE Systems This textile manufacturing company in Union County produces a high performance tape called Tensylon, strong enough to protect soldiers and gentle enough to be used for dental floss. Now, they are receiving international attention for the versatile product.

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Decision Support Data exchange is a constant conversation—and data packets are the words in that conversation. So it’s a good thing that there are folks like Bruce Wilkinson who understand this language and can provide the support to translate it in a meaningful way for businesses.

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departments publisher’spost

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bizXperts Smart Salvos, Select Strategies and Succinct Solutions

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employersbiz Legislative and Regulatory Highlights for Area Employers

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workforcebiz

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bizlife Pursuing a Balance of Business and Life

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biznetwork

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ontop

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executive homes Luxury Homes above $500,000

IBC

on the cover:

J. Frank Harrison III Chairman and CEO Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated

RedSky Gallery

When Kellie Scott found herself at a professional crossroads, she made the singularly dramatic decision to leave her banking career and open an art gallery. Five years later the gallery is nationally recognized and one of the largest fine craft galleries in the Southeast.

Photography by Wayne Morris

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[publisher’spost] Three Critical Factors in Duke/Lacrosse Player Defense One of the best speeches I have ever heard came from James P. Cooney III at a recent meeting of The Rotary Club of Charlotte. His presentation focused on three critical factors that saved three young men from prosecution after having been falsely accused of raping and kidnapping an exotic dancer at a teammate’s house on February 13, 2006. As the defense attorney for Reade Seligman, one of the three young men, Mr. Cooney had the inside story. Having graduated from Duke University and the University of Virginia Law School, Mr. Cooney, a lawyer with Womble, Carlyle, Sandridge & Rice, PLLC, presented his case extremely well. John Paul Galles Facing prosecution by then District Attorney Mike Nifong, Reade Seligman, Collin Finnerty and David Evans were the three Duke Lacrosse players accused of crimes punishable with up to 30 years in prison. Mr. Cooney credited three critical factors that were instrumental in having the charges dismissed and having the North Carolina Attorney General declaring the three men innocent. He listed North Carolina’s “open file discovery” statute, intense scrutiny of DNA evidence, and a vote by the North Carolina Bar Association ethics committee as the essential elements that eventually freed the three young men. After successfully defending and overturning the conviction and sentence of death row inmate Allen Gell, Mr. Cooney and others worked with North Carolina legislators in 2004 to pass the “Open File Discovery” law that requires prosecutors to give defense attorneys everything they have in their case files. District attorneys could no longer decide what the defense would receive. As a result, defense attorneys could better prepare and defend their clients from prosecution. In the Duke/Lacrosse case, all information and evidence was required to be shared before the prosecution of the case began. In reviewing the files, defense attorneys learned about the frailty of the prosecution’s evidence and the weaknesses within their case. Mr. Cooney also described the intense examination of DNA evidence that had been compromised while it was being studied. When they learned that none of the DNA evidence came from the three young men, they felt an obligation to take the next step and initiate action with the North Carolina Bar Association to turn back the actions of D.A. Nifong. Seldom does the N.C. Bar interfere with a case that is in progress. The organization often waits until proceedings have ended before they consider any action against any of the parties. However, in this case, the evidence against D.A. Nifong was substantial. When the ethics violation was first filed against Mr. Nifong, the ethics committee of the N.C. Bar stalemated (tie vote of 8 to 8) after much internal debate as to whether to even consider the evidence. Subsequently, the committee chair broke the tie and the issue was forwarded to the N.C. Attorney General for review. Once A.G. Roy Cooper reviewed the charges and the evidence, he directed that all charges be dropped against the three young men. Seligman, Finnerty and Evans were released. The three men have moved on with their lives and are now living in different urban areas. Adding insult to injury, they were told it not worthwhile to file charges against their accuser. Even if they were to do so, the case would drag out even longer with little gain in the end. In North Carolina a false accuser may only be charged with a misdemeanor. That simply was not worth the time and effort. Mike Nifong was disbarred and filed for personal bankruptcy. In closing, Mr. Cooney reminded everyone that for justice to prevail, everyone must work incredibly hard to make sure that justice is served at the end of the day. He described where the three boys have pursued their futures. David Evans, who had graduated from Duke just before he was indicted, has gone to work on Wall Street. Collin Finnerty has moved to Loyola University to play Lacrosse and graduate. Reade Seligman went to Brown University to also play Lacrosse and finish school. He also expects to practice law and is currently working with Barry Scheck on the Innocence Project that is dedicated to exonerating wrongfully convicted people through DNA testing. Finally, Mr. Cooney reminded everyone that prosecutors are still trying to overturn the “open discovery file” statute to this day. He hopes they will not succeed. biz

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March 2008 Volume 9 • Issue 3 Publisher John Paul Galles jgalles@greatercharlottebiz.com

Associate Publisher/Editor Maryl A. Lane maryl.a.lane@greatercharlottebiz.com

Creative Directors Bruce Austin Rebecca Fairchild Editorial & Sales Assistant Janet Kropinak jkropinak@greatercharlottebiz.com

Account Executive Locke Burnette lburnette@greatercharlottebiz.com

Contributing Writers Ellison Clary Susanne Deitzel Casey Jacobus Janet Kropinak Contributing Photographers Wayne Morris Janet Kropinak Galles Communications Group, Inc. 5601 77 Center Drive • Suite 250 Charlotte, NC 28217-0737 704-676-5850 Phone • 704-676-5853 Fax www.greatercharlottebiz.com • Press releases and other news-related information, please fax to the attention of “Editor” or e-mail: editor@greatercharlottebiz.com. • Editorial or advertising inquiries, please call or fax at the numbers above or e-mail: info@greatercharlottebiz.com. • Subscription inquiries or change of address, please call or fax at the numbers above or visit our Web site: www.greatercharlottebiz.com. © Copyright 2008 by Galles Communications Group, Inc. All rights reserved. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. However, Galles Communications Group, Inc. makes no warranty to the accuracy or reliability of this information. Products named in these pages are trade names or trademarks of their respective companies. Views expressed herein are not necessarily those of Greater Charlotte Biz or Galles Communications Group, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher. For reprints call 704676-5850 x102. Greater Charlotte Biz (ISSN 1554-6551) is published monthly by Galles Communications Group, Inc., 5601 77 Center Dr., Ste. 250, Charlotte, NC 28217-0737. Telephone: 704676-5850. Fax: 704-676-5853. Subscription rate is $24 for one year. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Greater Charlotte Biz, 5601 77 Center Dr., Ste. 250, Charlotte, NC 28217-0737.

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[bizXperts] Smart Salvos, Select Strategies and Succinct Solutions

having trouble collecting your receivables? part I Our business owner clients often turn over past due accounts receivable to us for collection. We initially gather all of the factual and legal information necessary to file a lawsuit for collection of the account. Unfortunately, in many of these cases we end up advising our clients that the particular circumstances surrounding the past due receivable do not warrant the legal expense of pursuing a lawsuit. Why do we often reach that conclusion? What are the steps a business owner can and should take to insure that substantially all of his receivables are collectible and collected? There is no one method which insures against an account “going bad” or, alternatively, insures the collection of an account that is past due. Owners should contact an experienced “collections attorney” for advice which pertains to their particular situation. However, we find that owners experience the best outcomes in collecting their receivables when they have a “system” which includes the following: Step One—Make certain that your business has an appropriate process to determine whether you wish to extend credit to a particular customer. The creditworthiness of the customer is the single most important consideration. Businesses which are successful in collecting a maximum percentage of their receivables are ones which avoid doing business with customers who either cannot or will not pay. You must have a system for gathering information about the prospective customer which will assist you in making a decision as to whether you wish to extend credit to the particular customer. Credit applications are often a good way to help you gather the information to determine this. For example, it is imperative to determine what type of entity you are dealing with (individual, partnership (limited or general), corporation, limited liability company, etc.) as well as the company’s full company name and the names of its officers (corporation), managers (limited liability company), or partners (partnership). Except for general partnerships and individuals, this information can easily be verified (and should be) at the Web site of the Secretary of State: www.secstate.state.nc.us. You can also determine from the records of the Register of Deeds whether an entity (particularly a general partnership or individual) is doing business under another name. Credit applications can also gather information as to trade references and bank references for the potential customer, which are helpful to your decision. Step Two—Make certain you have a written contract, which contains the “appropriate language” and information. A written contract should not only specify the products sold and/or services to be performed for the customer, but should include provisions such as warranty disclaimers, limitation of liability in the event of default, collection of attorney fees and interest in the event an

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account becomes overdue and is placed for collection, etc. It may also include a binding arbitration clause which avoids the hassle and expense of the courts in the event of a dispute, as well as a clause which sets forth where a claim must be filed (“venue”) and which state law governs in the Robert Norris event the customer is located in a different state. In most cases, you cannot recover either interest or your attorney fees as part of a judgment against the customer unless you have taken adequate legal steps to have certain provisions in the contract. Interest is properly charged to an account only so long as it is agreed to in advance in writing signed by the parties. An interest rate of 12 percent to 18 percent per annum is common and is currently acceptable to the courts. Attorney fees are not recoverable unless expressly provided for in a signed agreement which contains an obligation to pay money. If expressly provided for, attorney fees are recoverable at the agreed upon rate up to a maximum of 15 percent of the amount of the outstanding balance at the time of the default. Additionally, if the contract involves goods or service used in connection with real property, in order to file a claim of lien on the real property you must determine the legal relationship of your customer to the property, whether as a general contractor, subcontractor lessee or otherwise, and you must know who the owner is. Step Three—Make certain that the written contract is signed by the “appropriate representative” of the customer. The contract needs to be signed by someone with the legal authority to sign on behalf of the entity. Without a signed contract, the interest and attorney fees provisions will not be enforceable. Furthermore, the customer may raise a defense that the contract is voidable. Step Four—Attempt to have a guaranty sgned. If possible, have the principals of a corporation or the spouse of an individual debtor execute individual guarantees of the debt. Without guarantees, individual property cannot be used to satisfy corporate debt, and property owned in the names of the husband and wife cannot be used to satisfy the debt of only one spouse. Next month we will discuss the remaining steps which are often important for a collections system which maximizes collections of receivables. Robert Norris is managing partner of Wishart, Norris, Henninger & Pittman, P.A., a law firm which focuses on helping business owners define and achieve their business and personal objectives. Contact him at 704-364-0010 or visit www.wnhplaw.com.

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Smart Salvos, Select Strategies and Succinct Solutions

[bizXperts]

danger lurks in your inventory Carrying an unnecessary amount of inventory can be a dangerous thing. Some businesses manage to trade quite profitably without much inventory at all. Let’s start 2008 with a better understanding of this investment called inventory. The basis of any inventory management strategy is having accurate sales forecasts. First, it is critical to determine the demand for each item on a period by period basis for your entire operating cycle. This concept of ‘just in time’ manufacturing can be successfully applied to just about every inventory situation. Orders for components can be placed just far enough in advance to get them there when they will be needed, eliminating the need to retain huge inventories. This sort of analysis can be very revealing. For instance, look at the age of what’s in stock as well as how quickly each item turns over and the search will soon reveal some real opportunities to cut down on the number of items there. It’s also possible to discover some items in the inventory that haven’t moved for so long they’re virtually obsolete. Now look at the profit margins the business earns on each item in the inventory. Relate this to the turnover rate for each item and some surprising facts will emerge.

Finding items that turn over slowly and generate low profit margins should ring a huge alarm bell that perhaps these products can be either dropped from the range or sourced from suppliers ‘on demand.’ Inventory on its own doesn’t sell itself. Certainly a business wants to be able to provide its customers Deborah Daniel with fast moving, high margin items with the least possible delay, and that’s where the focus should be. The desire to hold a lot of stock so as to maximize sales opportunities is a real trap. It even has a name—the ‘chasing the last sale’ fallacy. If you usually sell 100 pieces of Item X per month and you are stocking 120 ‘just to capture the last sale,’ then you have added 20 percent to the amount invested in inventory. Factor in the annual carrying cost of the extra inventory, and that last sale is not nearly as profitable as you might think. Always keep in mind that inventory represents cash you can’t use. It’s not cash in the bank; it’s cash that’s been invested and which needs to generate a return as quickly as possible. Deborah Daniel, C.P.A., is principal with Daniel, Ratliff & Company, a full service accounting and business development firm. Contact her at 704-371-5000 or visit www.danielratliff.com.

we’ve seen all this before Thousands of foreclosed properties are being sold at deep discounts in many parts of the country, and it looks like this situation will get worse, maybe a lot worse, before it gets better. Writedowns and writeoffs are surging within the financial industry, including the big banking firms. Home prices have virtually crashed in overbuilt areas like Florida, the unemployment rate is rising, and corporate profits are falling. Recession is the talk of the day. Panic fills the air. Financial columnist Jane Bryant Quinn, in a Newsweek cover story, writes that home prices have eroded so far below mortgage balances that if banks and mortgage companies write the collateral down to what it’s actually worth, the entire banking system might go under. Citibank, despite a huge personal investment from Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, remains in trouble and could go bust. There’s only one thing wrong with the scenario above. Although it sounds like it’s happening now, it actually occurred in 1990-91. The bank-

pursuing a balance of business and life

ing system didn’t go under. Citibank (now Citigroup) didn’t go belly up. The economy recovered nicely. Stocks took off. So why won’t that same positive script play out again? The U.S. economy and banking system is Bill Staton probably no worse off than it was roughly 20 years ago, and in fact just might be in better shape. And a lot of stocks look cheap to me, very, very cheap. Columnist Nick Murray points out, “Financial folly is, always and everywhere, a conscious decision to forget the past. You don’t have to be able to foresee the future. You simply have to refuse to forget the past. You simply have to remember that you’ve seen this movie before…and that you know exactly how it ends.” Bill Stato n, M.B.A., CFA, is ch airm an o f Stato n Financial Ad viso rs LLC, a m o ney m anagem ent firm . Co ntact h im at 704-365-2122 o r visit w w w.stato nfinancial.co m .

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[bizXperts] Smart Salvos, Select Strategies and Succinct Solutions

“did you hear the one about…” Everybody likes a good joke, right? Maybe so, but too often, when you hear jokes at work, they are at someone else’s expense. Perhaps they’re referring to an ethnic group, or a particular race or gender. When this happens in your company, you’re on dangerous ground. Workplace harassment is a real issue. The news is peppered with reports of judgments and settlements regarding charges of workplace harassment. If your company employs 15 or more people, you operate under the guidelines of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Most harassment isn’t intentionally hurtful. It usually stems from insensitivity to or ignorance about the differences of others. In today’s workplace, as our work force becomes more diverse, we need to pay special attention to educating our team members about behaviors that could be hurtful, and worse, illegal. Even without the EEOC component, it’s good business to make your workplace comfortable for all who work there. Do you want employees to dread coming to work because of the offhand remarks they hear day in and day out? Do you want them to avoid one another because of offensive behavior? Neither is productive for your company. So, how can you prevent harassing behavior? First, educate your team about it. Don’t assume they know what is and isn’t appropriate.

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Innocent remarks, when made repeatedly, can be construed as harassment if directed at a protected group. Help them become more sensitive to the feelings of others on the team. Second, institute a written policy against workplace harassment. Let your team know that it’s to everyone’s Denise Altman advantage to have a harassment-free workplace and that you’re committed to making your company harassment-free. Third, practice what you preach. Don’t stand for inappropriate behavior. Be attentive to the interactions in your company. Coach people if they are being inappropriate, if the behavior continues, terminate them. A policy without enforcement won’t do you any good. If you do receive a complaint about workplace harassment, demonstrating that you have done your part to make the workplace harassment free can help you defend against the claim. More important, though, having a workplace that is harassment free will improve communication among your team, improve productivity and should make claims regarding harassment unnecessary. Denise Altman is president of Altman Initiative Group, Inc., which provides training on preventing workplace harrassment. Contact her at 704-315-9090 or visit www.altmaninitiative.com.

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[employersbiz]

Legislative and Regulatory Highlights for Area Employers

WHAT TO KEEP IN A PERSONNEL FILE The following items should be kept in a basic personnel file. Records related to employment, such as: • Employment application and resume. • College transcripts. • Job descriptions. • Hiring, promotion, demotion, transfer, layoff, rates of pay, other forms of compensation and education and training records. • Other employment practices. • Letters of recognition. • Disciplinary notices or documents. • Performance evaluations. • Test documents used by an employer to make an employment decision. • Exit interviews. • Termination records. The following items should be maintained in separate files:

• Medical Records—The American with Disabilities Act requires employers to keep all medical records separate. Many states have privacy laws to protect employees. • Equal Employment Opportunity—To minimize claims of discrimination, it is important to keep source documents, such as voluntary self-identification forms that identify an applicant’s race and sex in a separate file. • Immigration (I-9) Forms—It is recommended that I-9 forms be maintained in a separate file (or notebook). • Invitation to Self-Identify Disability or Veterans Status—This information is required to be maintained by federal contractors. Laws prohibit employ ment decisions on the basis of certain

protected classes; however, managers have the right to access an employee’s file for a number of operational issues. • Safety Training Records—OSHA may audit a company’s training records; keeping this information separate will protect the employer from an auditor pursuing and investigating other information in the personnel file. (Society of Human Resource Management)

E-mail Etiquette How do I compose an e-mail to someone I don’t know? There are a few important points to remember when composing e-mail, particularly when the e-mail’s recipient is a superior and/or someone who does not know you. • Be sure to include a meaningful subject line; this helps clarify what your message is about and may also help the recipient prioritize reading your e-mail. • Just like a written letter, be sure to open your e-mail with a greeting like Dear Dr. Jones, or Ms. Smith: • Use standard spelling, punctuation, and capitalization. THERE’S NOTHING WORSE THAN AN E-MAIL SCREAMING A MESSAGE IN ALL CAPS. • Write clear, short paragraphs and be direct and to the point; professionals and academics alike see their e-mail accounts as business. Don’t write unnecessarily long e-mails or otherwise waste the recipient’s time. • Be friendly and cordial, but don’t try to joke around (jokes and witty remarks may be inappropriate and, more commonly, may not come off appropriately in e-mail). What are some guides for continuing e-mail conversations? Once you have exchanged e-mails with a

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person on a given subject, it is probably okay to leave greetings out of your follow-up e-mails. Here are some other points to consider about continuing conversations over e-mail: • Try to respond within a reasonable time frame. • Trim back the old messages. • If someone asks a lot of questions, it may be okay to embed your answers into the sender’s message copied at the bottom of your e-mail. What sorts of information shouldn’t be sent via e-mail? Most people do not realize that e-mail is not as private as it may seem. Without additional setup, email is not encrypted; meaning that your e-mail is “open” and could possibly be read by an unintended person as it is transmitted to your reader. With that in mind, never send the following information over e-mail: • Usernames and passwords • Credit card or other account information Additionally, avoid sensitive or information that could be potentially damaging to someone’s career and/or reputation, including your own. Beyond e-mail’s general lack of security and confidentiality, your recipient can always accidentally hit the Forward button, leave their e-mail account

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N.C. OFFICIALS LAUNCH MORE INVESTIGATIONS State examiners looking into wage-andhour violations at North Carolina businesses opened 7,665 investigations in 2006. That’s an 18 percent increase over the previous year and a nearly 40 percent increase from 2003 investigation levels, according to the North Carolina Labor Department’s 2006 annual report. The investigations are led by the state’s Wage and Hour Bureau, which administers the N.C. Wage and Hour Act. That law includes the minimum wage, overtime pay and wage payment (promised wages including wage benefits, such as vacation pay, sick leave, holiday pay, and bonuses and commissions). The average number of days it took to close an investigation nearly doubled, from 32 days in 2005 to 62 days last year. The bureau aims to close investigations within 60 days, but it said high staff turnover has caused more delays. (HR Specialist)

open on a computer or print and forget that they have printed a copy of your e-mail. What about sending attachments? The ease of transmitting files to a particular person makes e-mail very attractive. However, there are some guidelines you should follow: • Never send an attachment to someone you don’t know the first time you contact them (unless, of course, the contact has posted a job ad requesting a resume in a Word document). • Avoid unnecessarily large file sizes. Digital photos especially: most digital photos come off the camera much larger than can be viewed on screen. Learn how to resize your digital photographs. • When you must send a large file or set of files, do the recipient the courtesy of sending an e-mail telling them what you’ll be sending and why. • Be sure to have anti-virus software installed on your computer to scan all of your outgoing and incoming messages for viruses. (Purdue University)

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Work Force Training and Development

[workforcebiz]

Fast Track to Automotive and Motorsports Careers

C

entral Piedmont Community College’s (CPCC) Transport Systems Technology Division is racing ahead with its mission to prepare the work force for the burgeoning demands of the motorsports and automotive industries, two of the fastest growing occupations in the country. Labor needs in these fields are expected to increase 10 to 20 percent by 2010. CPCC’s Transport Systems programs are preparing students to work in one of the estimated 80,000 to 160,000 new jobs that will be created. In order to ensure competitive graduates with hands-on experience, CPCC partners with leaders in the industry to develop its certificate programs, diploma programs, and two-year associate degrees.

Programs of study are available in four areas: The Auto Body Repair Program—The Auto Body Repair Program exposes students to all aspects of auto body repair. Students get specialized hands-on training in labs and optional work-based experience. The program encompasses welding, cutting, alignment and paint mixing, as well as repair of non-structural and structural damage on cars and trucks. All 43 industry standard regulations set forth by the I-CAR Education Foundation Curriculum are fulfilled by this course. Graduates qualify for entry-level employment opportunities as technicians in dealerships or independent auto shops. The Automotive Systems Program— The Automotive Systems Program is offered at the Transport Systems Technology Center located on CPCC’s North Campus in Huntersville, home to GM and General Automotive Programs. The program is also offered in Matthews at the Levine Campus’s state-of-the-art Joe Hendrick Center for Automotive Technology, home to BMW and Toyota Programs. Graduates qualify for entry-level employment opportunities in dealerships, fleet shops or independent shops as technicians. All programs are

National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) certified. The Heavy Equipment/Diesel Program—The Heavy Equipment/Diesel Program ensures graduates are able to diagnose and repair brakes, diesel engines, steering and suspension, hydraulics and a host of other features characteristic of large trucks. Partnerships with International Trucking, Eaton, Freightliner and Meritor expose students to current manufacturer training. Various nationally recognized partners including Caterpillar and Mack, for example, ensure that training is enriched by equipment and training resources reflective of the industry. Entry-level opportunities abound for graduates to work in dealerships, fleet shops, or independent shops as trained technicians. Motorsports—The Motorsports Program facilitates work-based learning experience through partnerships within the motorsports industry. The certificate program offers options in Welding, Machining and Motorsports. A highlight of this program is the opportunity to prepare one of CPCC’s four arena racing cars. Select students will work with a team to design and build a Formula One Society of Automotive Engineering race-car scheduled to compete in two international competitions. CPCC’s world-class facilities offer handson state-of-the-art training opportunities. The Transport Systems Technology building at CPCC’s North Campus encompasses 100,000 square-feet and serves as home for the Heavy Equipment, Auto Body, and Motorsports programs, as well as portions of the Automotive Systems program. The facility’s 16 service bays provide students with access to the latest tools and techniques. A Motorsports lab is expected to open within the Transport Systems Technology building this fall, providing hands-on instruction in fabrication, painting, welding, machining, decaling and assembly training. The Joe Hendrick Center for Automotive Technology at the CPCC Levine Campus

pursuing a balance of business and life

encompasses 35,000 square feet and houses the College Automotive Systems partnerships with BMW, Toyota, and GM. The facility has capacity for 19 vehicle bays and 31 manufacturer-provided training-vehicles. Eighty computers and six labs ensure that diagnostic training meets industry standards. This center is instrumental in assuring the highest skill level for program graduates. Students are kept abreast of technology and repair techniques as vehicle components and systems become increasingly sophisticated. As the number of vehicles on our roads increase and the technology ‘driving’ them evolves, it’s critical that the automotive work force be prepared. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that by 2016 there will be a 14 percent increase in the number of jobs for automotive service technicians— an above average increase translating into 110,000 new jobs. The statistics also show 51,000 new jobs for automotive body and related repairers, an average increase of 10 percent. In addition, diesel service technicians and mechanics will jump 11 percent adding 32,000 new jobs to the work force for the same time period. The motorsports industry in North Carolina alone provided 24,000 jobs in 2005, generating approximately $5.1 billion in revenue. With projections hovering around the five to six percent mark for the industry, its likely job growth will continue at a rate of almost four percent over the next five years. To learn more about CPCC’s Transport Systems Technology program, please visit www.cpcc.edu, or call 704-330-2722. biz

This section is intended to highlight work force training and development programs and initiatives delivered by community colleges within the Charlotte region. Community colleges are invited to submit substantive content ideas to editor@greatercharlottebiz.com.

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(l to r) David J. Morgan, Managing Director; Audrey K.Truman, Vice President; C. Hunter Widener, Senior Vice President Stanford Financial Group Stanford Group Company

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by ellison clary

[bizprofile]

Stanford Applies Focused Investment Approach “There must be a better way of doing business.”

Career people often think:

That’s what three executives from Bank of America’s private bank were thinking when they opened the Charlotte office of Stanford Group Company in July 2006. Since then, David Morgan, Audrey Truman and Hunter Widener have lived their dream of providing high-net-worth individuals as well as organizations and businesses with financial advice and services—and doing it on a more personal basis to which they had long aspired. Their SouthPark office, under the management of native Charlottean Eddie Rollins, opened with seven employees. Now it boasts 23 professionals, including new hires who migrated to Stanford from other area financial services firms. As executive director for the Carolinas, Rollins also manages the Stanford Greensboro office that has a dozen associates. Stanford Group Company is a member of the Stanford Financial Group, a privately held, wholly owned global group of financial services companies that traces its roots to Lodis B. Stanford. He started Stanford Insurance Company in 1932, in the depth of The Great Depression, in the central Texas town of Mexia. The Stanford Difference Today, the Stanford Financial Group of companies has $43 billion in assets under management or advisement and has expanded into a global network of !

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financial services companies with more than 50 offices in North America, Latin America, the Caribbean and Europe. Its chief executive and chairman is a Texan who’s been appointed Knight Commander of the Most Distinguished Order of the Nation by Antiqua and Barbuda. Hence, he is known as Sir Allen Stanford. Morgan muses, “It’s interesting to hear somebody with a good Texas accent addressed as ‘Sir.’” Then the 26-year veteran of private banking quickly lists more serious attributes of Stanford Financial Group that he likes. At Stanford, he can concentrate on client investment needs without worrying about other components of a banking relationship, as can be the case with other firms. He likes the track record the familyrun company has established for product consistency and diversification. “The Stanford Investment Model (SIM) and Stanford Allocation Strategies (SAS) are a more global approach and seek a targeted absolute rate of return, using broad global diversification and employing non proprietary, registered and/or unregistered products to achieve the client objective. It is a more European-style management of absolute returns as opposed to a focus solely on a single benchmark such as the S&P 500,” Morgan explains. Widener, with 13 years in private banking, relishes the lack of pressure. “We don’t want to be all things to all people,” he says. “We provide the best service to highnet-worth clients in a low-volume environment.” He feels Stanford’s status as a private company lowers pressure. “Every other firm rolls up to a public company somewhere, and eventually they feel the quarterly pressure to perform,” he says. Widener got his fellow associates interested in Stanford after he heard that a group of former Wachovia bankers established a Stanford presence in Atlanta. “The way we’re doing business at Stanford, it’s more focused on the investment management, the estate and tax planning and risk management. We’re not spending time on some of the more retail components to a banking relationship.” Truman, who had 14 years at Bank of America, was only too happy to follow

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Widener and Morgan into the new venture, she says, because she, too, saw a chance to focus rather than scurry between duties related to lending, deposits and credit cards. Widener also likes the autonomy Stanford allows. “We don’t have someone somewhere else telling us how to run our business,” he says. “They give us parameters but they trust us to make the right

HARD WORK CLEAR VISION VALUE for the CLIENT

decisions. We have the ability to really build a brand.” That autonomy along with a few broad guidelines, applies to the investments the local office makes in the community, the trio says. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis is Stanford’s global charity of choice and the company looks to support St. Jude initiatives in the markets in which it does business. It also is strong on backing for the arts and sports, but seeks local advice on where those dollars should go. So it’s not surprising that on the list of regional organizations the Charlotte Stanford office supports are such names as The Children’s Theatre of Charlotte and the Broadway Lights Series at the North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. The Arts & Science Council also benefits, and President and Chief Executive Lee Keesler praises Stanford support for solid financial management among arts organizations. “The Stanford Financial Excellence in

the Arts Award, now in its second year, recognizes cultural organizations that demonstrate exemplary financial management,” Keesler says. “Long-term financial sustainability of the cultural sector is an important ASC priority and the generosity of the Stanford Group allows us to reward excellence in this area.” Then there are the Championships at the Palisades that brings top-name champion tennis luminaries such as Jim Courier, John McEnroe and Pete Sampras to the Queen City each fall. Throughout its footprint, Stanford supports golf, sailing, polo, tennis and, in appropriate parts of the world, cricket. In fact, it was his passion for reviving cricket in the West Indies that inspired Sir Allen Stanford to develop the Stanford 20/20 Cricket tournament, a month-long West Indies tournament held in Antigua. “We have chosen to align the Stanford brand with a handful of sports that we know fit with our client demographics,” says Morgan. For a high-net-worth individual, he adds, that stimulates more business than a print advertisement. Flexibility a Distinguishing Mark The Charlotte office likes to see $1 million in liquidity for high-net-worth individuals, but Widener is quick to point out that Stanford allows much flexibility. He and his associates often work with a person who has low liquidity but high net worth. “That differentiates us from banks or anybody else,” Widener says. “We don’t have the segmentation where, if you have this amount of assets you get this level of service. Stanford lets us decide what the right relationship is.” For institutions and emerging growth companies, Stanford in Charlotte follows the Stanford Financial Group offering line. The trio touts Stanford’s global expertise in asset allocation strategies, investment advisory services, equity research, policy research, international private banking and trust administration, commercial banking, investment banking, merchant banking, institutional sales and trading, real estate investment and insurance. Morgan, Truman and Widener are

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(l to r) David J. Morgan, Managing Director; Audrey K. Truman, Vice President; Eddie T. Rollins, Executive Director of the Carolinas; C. Hunter Widener, Senior Vice President

close-mouthed about numbers, whether related to clients or business volume. They maintain they are steadily growing their client rolls in the face of stiff competition. “We’re in the same city with two of the top five banks in the country,” Widener explains matter-of-factly. “But it’s a battle we’re winning.” The trio makes it a point to serve on boards for well-thought-of organizations, but not so much for business development, they say, as for devotion to plain old civic duty. Word of mouth is perhaps the strongest business stimulus, Widener says. That is particularly true now that people in these parts have begun to learn more about the company, he adds, and have largely stopped asking, “Stanford who?” Morgan likes to tell the story of a Charlotte client who benefited from Stanford’s flexibility. He took several million dollars out of the client’s equity portfolio, he says, and diversified it further to offer a lessrisky path to asset growth. The result for the client who has been associated with Morgan for more than 10 years is that he was largely insulated from the recent stock market downturn. “This client has an eight-figure net worth,” Morgan smiles. “He was absolutely thrilled.” Clients often praise the insight provided by the Stanford Policy Research Group, Morgan says. That group includes such respected experts as Lyle Gramley who specializes in monetary policy. Stanford in Charlotte The trio sees controlled growth for Stanford in Charlotte. “We don’t want to

get to the point where we’ve got more clients than we can service the way they want to be serviced,” says Truman. “That’s a commitment to ourselves and to our clients—that we want to maintain reasonable ratios of client-to-advisor.” Morgan hopes that in five years the assets the Charlotte office manages will have grown “exponentially.” But he agrees with Widener and Truman that the office likely won’t add many more professionals, preferring to grow client rolls judiciously. As he gazes out an eighth floor conference room window at a panoramic view of Center City, Morgan vows the Charlotte office will remain “a focused, smaller, nimble organization that can deliver a big punch for our clients.” Morgan paraphrases a thought voiced by Sir Allen Stanford in a gathering at the company’s European headquarters in Zurich. The gist is that the firm should never grow as large as to lose its soul. It is, Morgan says, the most reassuring thought he could hear from his leader. That sounds right coming from a person who professes he was ready to leave private banking to teach history in high school for maybe $30,000 a year. It’s an illustration of how much job satisfaction he had lost. Hooking on with Stanford wasn’t about money, Morgan says. He calls other Stanford professionals he meets “kindred souls” because they share his vision for how to serve clients. “If I put a percentage on the amount of time each day that my team and I spend on the clients, it’s probably 85 to 90 percent, and that’s something that’s rather

pursuing a balance of business and life

unique in this business,” Morgan says. The result these days is that he’s far better at preventing financial surprises for his clients and keeps them much happier. For her part, Truman professes to have experienced a sea change in lifestyle since affiliating with Stanford. She likes knowing she has the ability to serve her clients the way she wants to, she says, and that helps her focus on her family when she gets home. “It’s fun again,” she says with conviction. biz Ellison Clary is a Charlotte-based freelance writer.

Stanford Financial Group Stanford Group Company Two Piedmont Town Center 4725 Piedmont Row Dr., Ste. 800 Charlotte, N.C. 28210 Phone: 704-571-7900 Principals: Sir Allen Stanford, Chairman and CEO; Charlotte Office: Eddie T. Rollins, Executive Director of the Carolinas; David J. Morgan, Managing Director; C. Hunter Widener, Senior Vice President; Audrey K. Truman, Vice President Established: 1932, Mexia, Texas, as Stanford Insurance Company Headquarters: North America: Houston; Latin America: Miami; Caribbean: St. Croix; Europe: Zurich Offices: Over 50 offices; Charlotte office established in 2006 Assets: $43 billion under management or advisement Charlotte Employees: 23 Business: Stanford Group Company is a member of the Stanford Financial Group, a privately held, wholly owned global group of financial services companies with over 50 offices in North America, Latin America, the Caribbean and Europe. Stanford’s core businesses are private wealth management and investment banking for institutions and emerging growth companies. www.stanfordfinancial.com

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Game Monroe A textile manufacturing company in Union County produces a high performance tape strong enough to protect soldiers in Iraq and gentle enough to be used for dental floss and surgical sutures. Based on Japanese technology, Integrated Textile Systems began manufac-turing the high strength material Tensylon at its plant in Monroe in 1999. Two major acquisitions over the past two years have created international attention for the versatile product.

Photo courtesy of Gary Kessler

Lisa Owen Vice President and General Manager BAE Systems Tensylon High Performance Materials Inc.

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by casey jacobus

[bizprofile]

Changing Technology plant produces innovative ballistic fiber Integrated Textile Systems was acquired by Armor

by the end of this year, when additional production lines

Holdings in July 2006. A year later, Armor itself was

may be added, Owen says. The facility also houses the

acquired by BAE Systems, a giant in the global defense

research and development operation.

and aerospace industry. BAE Systems delivers a full range

The reason for all this attention is that the Monroe site

of products and services for air, land and naval forces, as

is the only place in the world that manufactures Tensylon

well as advanced electronics, information technology solu-

materials, which are derived from an ultra-high molecular

tions and customer support services. Renamed Tensylon

weight polyethylene polymer and utilized in a wide variety

High Performance Materials, the company is a subsidiary

of applications, including advanced fiber composites in

of their Land and Armaments operating group.

ballistic products. !

“These acquisitions are very positive for this little business,” says Lisa Owen, vice president and general manager of Tensylon. “Armor offered $3 billion in sales, while BAE Systems gives us a $27 billion pie to go after.” The acquisitions have also impacted the Monroe facility, which has recently added 18,000 square feet to its original 30,000 square feet of manufacturing space. The plant expansion cost an estimated $7.9 million and supports 42 jobs, more than doubling the plant’s work force. The company is expected to employ about 60 people

Caiman 6x6

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The Tensylon high performance fiber or tape can be processed into any number of specially tailored composites, depending on the unique application. It is one of the materials being used for ballistic protection in the crew cabin of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) armored vehicles currently deployed in Iraq. It can also be used in the M1114 Up-Armored HMMWV. “BAE Systems acquired all the technology, assets and know-how associated with Tensylon,” says Owen. “The only machines in the world that produce Tensylon are here in Monroe.” Armored Personnel Owen, a native of South Carolina, earned a bachelor degree in chemical engineering from the University of South Carolina in 1986 and spent 10 years working in high performance fibers for Allied Signal, now Honeywell International. After acquiring an M.B.A. from the Richard S. Reynolds Graduate School of Business at the University of Richmond in Virginia, she joined the rigid packaging business of NatureWorks LLC, an international biopolymer manufacturer. In this role, Owen was responsible for the commercialization and global implementation of a new platform of renewable thermoplastic polymers for rigid packaging.

“For twenty years, I was a real ‘material girl,’” laughs Owen, “working with plastic, fibers and armor materials. I loved it; I understood the end result and liked developing strategies for commercialization.” In the 19 months since joining Armor Holdings in 2006, Owen has faced a different set of challenges, overseeing two acquisition assimilations, managing the site expansion, dealing with equipment and technology vendors from all over the world, and, perhaps her biggest challenge, staffing the plant. “We run 24/7,” she says, “and it is a physically intensive environment. We plan to reach 60 employees by late 2008 or early 2009, and I’m not sure we’ll stop there.” In her current position, Owen is responsible for the integration of the Tensylon business and technology into the BAE Systems products portfolio. Linda Hudson, president of BAE Systems Land and Armaments based in Arlington, Virginia, is wellknown to many in the Charlotte business world from her active work with the Chamber of Commerce while she was president of Charlotte-based General Dynamics Armament and Technical Products. Hudson still maintains a home in Charlotte and she attended the special grand opening ceremony which BAE Systems

held in December to celebrate the expansion of the Tensylon facility in Monroe made possible by a $40,000 One North Carolina Fund grant and an economic development grant of up to $86,820 provided by the Union County Board of Commissioners. BAE Systems invested $7.9 million in Monroe in 2007. “We have a very dedicated work force and Monroe is a terrific community,” Hudson told the congressional and community members who gathered for the ceremony. “We appreciate the support we have received from the state and the county and look forward to contributing to the economic vitality of the region.”

Photos courtesy of Gary Kessler

Global Gameboard So, what is Tensylon and why is there so much interest in it? Tensylon is similar to other high performance fiber materials, including para-aramids, fiberglass and other ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene fibers, but Tensylon products create a unique combination of ballistic and structural performance, weight and cost savings when compared with these other fibers. The polyethylene used in Tensylon is a powder. This powder is subjected to extreme pressures and tightly controlled temperature as it is passed through rollers to make a very thin sheet that is then slit to form fibers. The fibers are then either woven or laid parallel in the same plane and crossplied at angles to one another to produce specially tailored composites, depending on the application requirements. “It has the strength and ability to absorb energy,” says Owen. “It floats in water; it is chemically and abrasion resistant. It is very strong and durable.” Tensylon will not stretch out Tensylon is a family of Ultra High MolecularWeight Polyethylover time, as nylon does, for ene products made with solid state extrusion technology.This instance. With no “creep propercost effective technology offers increased survivability and ties,” it can be used to tether offreduced behind armor effects for the warfighter.Tensylon armor shore oil platforms to the ocean products are available exclusively from BAE Systems. Tensylon’s floor. Other applications most immediate applications have been for troop protection include aerospace, sporting products, such as wheeled-vehicle systems, helmets and body goods, high performance armor for military customers. sails, ropes, cordage and netting. Johnson & Johnson

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Based on the ultra-reliable Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) platform and the combat-proven Low Signature Armored Cab (LSAC), the Caiman 6x6 incorporates the demonstrated performance of these components into a survivable protected vehicle designed to defeat current and emerging threats on today’s battlefield. The high level of parts commonality with the FMTV ensures that the Caiman will maintain the same levels of readiness, mobility, serviceability, and worldwide support. uses Tensylon in one type of its Reach dental floss. However, Tensylon’s most immediate applications have been for troop protection products, such as wheeled-vehicle systems, helmets and body armor for military customers. “This is a young technology and our team is proud to be pioneers in the development, manufacturing and marketing of Tensylon for the protection of our troops,” says Owen. The Monroe plant produces about 100,000 pounds of polyethylene fiber per month. Further growth next year may double that, Owen says. While all of that capacity is currently being used to support military programs, Owen expects that some of the plant’s production may be funneled to commercial applications in 2008. Tensylon has shown great promise in everything from tennis racquets to fishing nets, but the applications development program has been put on hold to meet the needs of the U.S. military. Military Coup Utilizing innovation, state-of-the-art engineering and technology to support military forces is a tradition at BAE Systems which dates back to 1560 when the Royal Powder Factory was established at Waltham Abbey in Essex, England. Today, BAE Systems’ Land and Armaments operating group encompasses major business operations in South Africa, Sweden, across the United Kingdom and the United States. BAE Systems is currently playing a major and increasing role in protecting front-line troops in Iraq and Afghanistan from roadside bombs and ambushes through the design and manufacture of three different vehicles for the U.S. Department of Defense’s MRAP armed vehicle

program, which is being spearheaded by the U.S. Marine Corps. MRAPs are the Pentagon’s top acquisition priority to meet today’s threats and BAE Systems-designed and built vehicles account for more than 4,300 of almost 6,400 ordered so far, with total potential defense requirements in excess of 20,000 vehicles. The Caiman 6x6 is one of the variants of the MRAP armored vehicles currently deployed in Iraq which uses Tensylon in the composite anti-ballistic door panels. There are currently 1,838 Caimans under contract. Tensylon can also replace fiberglass in the M1114 Up-armored HMMWV driver door. The Tensylon liner is thinner and lighter than fiberglass, but provides equal ballistic protection. Tensylon can also be used for personal armor protection and helmets for troops. Tensylon panels retain stiffness and delaminate less than other polyethylene composites after initial hits, resulting in better multi-hit performance and making it ideal for protecting soldiers in armored vehicles. Owen compares it to a catcher’s mitt; while the outer steel and aluminum shell deform and slow a projectile, the Tensylon panel inside absorbs the interior spall resulting from the projectile impact, stopping these secondary projectiles. While Owen believes Tensylon has unique attributes for armor and non armor use, early exploration of its properties has been concentrated on the military side. “There are similar benefits for the commercial side, but that’s in the future,” she says. “The immediate future, based on demand/capacity, lies in meeting the needs of the domestic military, as well as the military abroad.” Even if the war in Iraq were to end tomorrow, the replenishment of lost

pursuing a balance of business and life

vehicles and the need for future military readiness will keep the military demand high. Owen expects that long term the manufacture of Tensylon will continue to expand and grow. She envisions that growth may even result in the opening of other facilities to produce even more of the innovative fiber. biz Casey Jacobus is a Charlotte-based freelance writer.

BAE Systems Tensylon High Performance Materials Inc. 1901 Piedmont Drive Monroe, N.C. 28110 Phone: 704-283-8887 Principals: Lisa Owen, Vice President and General Manager Parent: BAE Systems Inc.’s Land and Armaments operating group (LSE:BA.L) Origination: Founded as Integrated Textile Systems Inc. in 1986; the company joined BAE Systems in July 2007 and is a subsidiary of BAE Systems Inc.’s Land and Armaments operating group. Business: Production of Tensylon materials, which are derived from an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene polymer and utilized in a wide variety of applications, including advanced fiber composites in ballistic products. Parent company BAE Systems is the premier global defense and aerospace company delivering a full range of products and services for air, land and naval forces, as well as advanced electronics, information technology solutions and customer support services; 96,000 employees worldwide; sales (2006) exceeded $27 billion. www.baesystems.com

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J. Frank Harrison III Chairman and CEO Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated

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by ellison clary

H

iring quality people and helping them grow professionally and spiritually is at the core of the phenomenal success of Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated (“Coke Consolidated”), its leader says with conviction. “To make, sell and deliver soft drinks better than anyone else,” comes first in the company’s mission statement, but right after that is: “Our values honor God.” It is a promise a visitor hears early on from J. Frank Harrison III, fourth generation family leader of what has become the nation’s second-largest Coca-Cola bottler. Harrison, 53, quickly cites the Bible verse from which that promise originates: “The Lord God declares those who honor me I will honor,” he paraphrases from 1 Samuel, Chapter 2, Verse 30.

pursuing a balance of business and life

[bizprofile]

Living on the better side of life “When we say our values are about honesty, integrity, teamwork and no politics, morality and ethics, running a clean operation, we’re really serious about it,” Harrison says in his baritone Southern drawl that he acquired growing up in Chattanooga, Tennessee. For Harrison, success in his personal, family and business life is more than a matter of good faith; it’s putting that faith into practice on a daily basis and in all matters. And in his case, it has benefited both Coke Consolidated and the Charlotte YMCA. Harrison’s strong beliefs parallel those of the YMCA, an organization he started a lifelong affiliation with as a youth in Chattanooga playing in sports leagues for elementary school kids. He laces his comments about Coke Consolidated, as the company often refers to itself, with references to “the Y” and correlates the success of both. !

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“Why am I so passionate about the Y?” he asks rhetorically. “Their mission is to put Christian principles into practice through programs that build a healthy spirit, mind and body for all. They really serve their members, and when you serve the community, people tend to get passionate about you.” Bubbling Up Growth and Variety The Harrison formula of combining his own strong religious convictions with the precepts of the YMCA is working for Coke Consolidated. With corporate headquarters in Charlotte’s SouthPark, the company operates in 10 states. It enjoys one of the highest per capita soft drink consumption rates in the world and manages bottling territories with a consumer base of 18.7 million people. The company, which will report 2007 financial performance at the end of this month, enjoyed $1.431 billion in sales for 2006, up from $1.380 billion in 2005 and $1.267 billion in 2004. Coke Consolidated has 1,250 employees in the Charlotte region and 6,000 system-wide. The firm operates bottling plants in Roanoke, Va.; Bishopville, S.C.; Mobile, Ala.; and Nashville, Tenn.; as well as a 700,000-square-foot facility in Mecklenburg County near Highway 16. That plant alone produces 45 million cases of soft drinks annually, helping supply 53 Coke Consolidated distribution centers. Coke Consolidated has had a huge growth spurt that started in the 1980s, roughly coinciding with Harrison’s tenure. At that time, the company was about onefifth its current size and began buying up mostly family-run Coca-Cola bottlers around the Southeast. Harrison’s firm didn’t feel pressure to grow for survival. “We thought we’d be far more effective from the basic advantages that come from consolidation,” he

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explains, “purchasing power; more customers and capable people.” It’s about economies of scale, adds Lauren Steele, long-time vice president of Corporate Affairs. Today, Coke Consolidated produces more than 500 products, counting the various sizes and packages of drinks that

“Why am I so passionate about the Y? Their mission is to put Christian principles into practice through programs that build a healthy spirit, mind and body for all. They really serve their members and when you serve the community, people tend to get passionate about you.” ~ Frank Harrison III, Chairman and CEO

range from Coca-Cola Classic to something called Scalded Dog. It has three subsidiaries, one of which, BYB Brands, Inc., creates new beverages that Coke Consolidated sells under its own labels. Energy drink Scalded Dog is among them along with the related Frigid Dog, a “sensation beverage” that delivers a cooling, menthol agent. Other proprietary products from BYB include a vitamin-enhanced water called Respect and a non-carbonated, flavored item known as Tum-E Yummies. Sometimes products augment a line offered by Coca-Cola. For instance, the Atlanta-based soft drink giant has a premium ice tea called Gold Peak. Coke Consolidated produces a ‘down home’ variety, Country Breeze, that Harrison dubs Bubba Tea.

In another instance, BYB licensed the name Cinnabon, and launched Cinnabon Premium Coffee Lattes in the Coke Consolidated sales territories in 2006. By early 2007, Cinnabon Lattes were available in 41 states. Another subsidiary is Swift Water Logistics, which Harrison says was formed to conjure up innovations such as a package of soft drinks designed for easy use in home refrigerators. Coke Consolidated invented that, but other companies quickly copied it because Coke Consolidated didn’t pursue a patent. Swift Water Logistics won’t let that happen again. Perhaps Swift Water’s most important creation in its two-year existence is CooLift, a delivery system that puts customer orders on custom-designed pallets. Combined with special lift devices on trucks, these pallets cut delivery time in half and improve productivity between 30 and 40 percent. The system is in about half of Coke Consolidated’s operations. Further, Swift Water sells the system and its equipment to other bottlers and distributors. The third subsidiary is Data Ventures, an 8-year-old operation which taps scientists in New Mexico’s Los Alamos National Laboratories for price elasticity studies and to map consumer patterns for supermarkets such as Harris Teeter. The core business remains making and bottling non-alcoholic beverages. Classic Coke is still Coke Consolidated’s most popular product, accounting for about one-third of its business. Next is Diet Coke, claiming about 17 percent. A Taste of Different Jobs If this kind of innovation is surprising, maybe it shouldn’t be. After all, the company that Harrison’s great-grandfather J.B. Harrison founded in 1902 was one of the first to market Coca-Cola in bottles.

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Though his family owns controlling interest in Coke Consolidated, Harrison believes in allowing people to work their way up in the organization. He did that, to an extent. Harrison toiled as a teen in his father’s Chattanooga glass plant that produced those familiar Coke bottles. After completing a business administration degree at the University of North Carolina in 1977, he signed on with Coke Consolidated, but later took time off to get his M.B.A. at Duke University. Through the years, he spent time as a management trainee and as division sales manager and vice president. In 1987, he became vice chairman of the board of directors; in 1994, he took over as chief executive officer; and in 1996 he became chairman of the board. Looking back, Harrison recalls an instructive experience from a summer job during college when he was operating a Coke distribution route in Raleigh. “I had this store manager actually throw cans of Coca-Cola at me because I was taking a little bit too much space in his cooler,” Harrison recounts with a shake of his head. He calls that an example of how experience in a base-level job teaches valuable principles such as patience, endurance and humbleness. “Our business is a very rewarding, fun, challenging business,” he says, “but its hard work and its always changing.” Consumer tastes continue to demand more beverage options. Coke Consolidated produces many of them and plans to add more. The company added 130 new SKUs in 2007, which Harrison calls incredible since it had only 200 just five years ago. “What’s driving all that,” Harrison says, “is the consumer. The health and wellness trend, that’s alive and well. On the other end, you’ve got energy drinks, caffeinated

products, sugar-loaded products. Different consumers drink different beverages on different occasions. We’re already in juices, coffees and teas. We’ve got just

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about everything but milk.” He pauses, then chuckles, “There are even vitaminadded sparkling drinks—Diet Coke with vitamins.” !

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Harrison cites product proliferation in playing down the rivalry between CocaCola and Pepsi. “It’s no longer Coke and Pepsi. It’s Coke and everybody,” he says. “We’re just as aggressive now whether it’s the energy drink category or teas and coffees.” Parallels to the YMCA Driving Coke Consolidated’s success is its quality work force, Harrison believes. “We want our folks to be very capable and sharp and able,” he says, “but in

addition, they’ve got to have strong character.” He brings up the YMCA mission to build spirit, mind and body: “See, there are a lot of parallels in the way we do business and the way the Y does things,” he says. When he took that summer route job for Coke in Raleigh, Harrison lived in the Raleigh Y until he found an apartment. He still works out at the Y every other day. When he travels, he always asks, “Where is the Y?” although he

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“I’m an Angela fan. She’ll always have my business. Plus, it is rewarding to walk through the door and everyone knows you.” – I’m Sarah McAulay, community leader, and my banker is Angela Lovelace.

acknowledges he sometimes ends up using hotel exercise facilities. Soon, the YMCA of Greater Charlotte will honor Harrison with its John R. Mott Award. It’s named for a man who championed the cause of displaced prisoners during both World Wars and who won a Nobel Peace Prize in 1946. The honor goes to one person annually who exemplifies John Mott’s ideals

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated 4100 Coca-Cola Plaza Charlotte, N.C. 28211 Phone: 704-557-4400 Principals: J. Frank Harrison III, Chairman and CEO; William B. Elmore, President and COO; William J. Billiard, Vice President, Controller and CAO; James E. Harris, Senior Vice President and CFO NASDAQ: COKE Net Sales: $1.431 billion (2006) Facilities: 5 bottling plants; 53 distribution centers

Member FDIC

Employees: 6,000 system-wide; 1,250 in Charlotte area Established: 1902 by J.B. Harrison in Greensboro, N.C.

Cornelius/Lake Norman 704.987.9990 Matthews 704.814.1200 SouthPark 704.442.5900 Uptown Charlotte 704.945.6565

Business: Second largest Coca-Cola bottler in the United States. Produces, markets and distributes nonalcoholic beverages, primarily products of The Coca-Cola Company but also several other beverage brands, including carbonated soft drinks, bottled water, teas, juices, sports drinks and energy products. Maintains corporate offices in Charlotte; operations in 10 states principally in the Southeast. www.cokeconsolidated.com

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through long service to the YMCA. It celebrates commitment to the Y’s Christian mission and “visionary leadership that encourages leadership in others.” “Mr. Mott was an outstanding Christian business leader,” says Harrison, adding that he’s honored to be named in the company of other area winners such as Mac Everett, the Dowd Family and Russell Robinson. Most satisfying for him, Harrison says, is seeing employees grow and develop in personal life as well as in a career. For much of this, he credits the company’s devotion to values shared by the Y. “Taking care of our people, serving our people,” Harrison says, “I want to

continue to get better at that. If you have great people and you care for them, the loyalty and commitment that comes from all that is incredible.” He believes it is important for workers to be “selfless” rather than “selfish.” To promote this ideal, Coke Consolidated has developed about 30 Stewardship Programs in which employees can serve their communities. These programs remind him of the Y, he says, because they meet community needs related to physical, emotional and spiritual matters. Among the more popular is a program that lets employees take time off to visit people in elder care facilities. They talk with the residents, provide them with companionship and, if someone has a need such as a new bathrobe, the employee makes sure it is filled. Coke Consolidated operations elsewhere work with the homeless or do prison ministry, and the list continues. Another internal program that has proved to be very popular with

employees is “sick car Saturday.” This periodic program targets single, working mothers at Coke Consolidated, Harrison says, and gives them free mechanical service for their vehicles at the Charlotte bottling plant’s fleet facilities. Morgan Harrison, eldest daughter of Frank and Jan Harrison, runs the Stewardship Program. “She has a real heart for people,” Harrison smiles. Other Harrison children are high school student Carter and collegians James and Caroline. Harrison admits that his offspring tease him sometimes about his devotion to the Y, but he doesn’t mind. “The Y is an organization that has had a very positive influence on me and my family,” he says. “I’ve seen it influence lots of other families, too.” Certainly, in Harrison’s case, practicing Christian values has helped his family and his company to live on the better side of life. biz Ellison Clary is a Charlotte-based freelance writer.

The YMCA Honors George Williams Award Recipients The original YMCA started in London in 1844 as twenty-two-year-old George Williams and eleven friends came together for prayer and reflection. They were compelled to help other young men find what they felt: God’s grace. In recognition of George Williams’ leadership, each year YMCAs across the world recognize outstanding volunteers at their branches. This year, YMCA of Greater Charlotte branches honor… • Marley Carroll, YMCA Camp Thunderbird and YMCA Camp Harrison at Herring Ridge • Scott Wilson, Childress Klein YMCA • Patti Murphy, YMCA Community Development • Pete Lash, Dowd YMCA • Maureen Smith, Gateway Village YMCA • Suzy Johnson, Harris YMCA • Bill Tome, Johnston YMCA • Blanche Parker, Lake Norman YMCA

• Linda Harrill-Rudisill, Lincoln County YMCA • Mark Brodsky, Lowe’s YMCA • Deb Hanna, McCrorey YMCA • Terry Knotts, Morrison YMCA • Reggie Pincham, Simmons YMCA • Jeff Sherman, Siskey YMCA • Robert McMillan, Steele Creek YMCA • Jo Washington, Stratford Richardson YMCA • Mike Ham, University City YMCA

Willie J. Stratford, Sr. Diversity Award Recipient In 1998, an award was established in recognition of Willie J. Stratford, Sr., a devoted champion of diversity in the YMCA and community, for his faithful service and dedication to practicing John 17:21 “That they may all be one even as thou, Father, art in me and I in Thee, that they also may be in us; that the world may believe that Thou didst send me.”

pursuing a balance of business and life

This award is given to someone who recognizes, leads and inspires others to help create a stronger community through valuing diversity. This year, the award honors… • Dianne English

Previous John R. Mott Award Recipients 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996

Steele Dewey The Dowd Family Russell M. Robinson, II Malcolm (Mac) Everett Robert (Bob) King, Jr. Graeme M. Keith H.C. (Smoky) Bissell Harry H. Brace Thomas M. Belk James J. Harris William M. Barnhardt Joseph W. Grier, Jr.

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by susanne deitzel

[bizprofile]

DECISION SUPPORT The New Face of Technology

Gone is the paradigm of IT people as pallid-skinned geeks pouring over lines of code in the back office. Today’s techies are the new rock stars. This isn’t just because they can make things look hip on the screen we are currently affixed to or because they make our reports look slicker. They are cool because they have known for a while what a lot of us are just catching onto—that any part of technology we can immediately experience—sound, graphics, animation, etc. is the icing on the cake of technological potential. It is the data buried deep in our systems where the real inspiration and innovation lies. The information we collect tells the truth about what is important to us, and where we want to be headed. Because of this understanding, technology has emerged less as a tool than a medium. Data exchange is a constant conversation between people, organizations, businesses, economies, governments, sciences—and data packets are the words in that conversation.

pictured left to right Page Winchester, President of the Data Integration and Reporting Line of Business; Sam Wazan, President of the Business Intelligence and Reporting Line of Business; Bruce Wilkinson, Chief Executive Officer; T.J. Felice, Chief Operating Officer; Mike Sibley, President of Secure Elections Management Line of Business; Babette Buehner,Vice President Administration;

and his team at Decision Support who understand this language and can

Winn Maddrey,Vice President Business Development (not pictured)

provide the support to translate it in a meaningful way. !

Decision Support LLC

Which is why it’s a good thing that there are folks like Bruce Wilkinson

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Knowledge is Power Wilkinson has over 25 years of experience in the IT industry. He is recognized as an innovator in cross-platform data integration and reporting, most recently as a CIO of a $1.3 billion property and casualty insurance carrier. He served as a director on the board of Decision Support for 5 years before deciding to make an offer to purchase the business in 2004. Wilkinson purchased Decision Support from founder Herb Verbesey who has retired but remains on the board of directors. When Verbesey created the company in 1984, it was an inspired combination between his love for mathematics and drive toward invention. The result was the formulation of a software product called DARGAL (Data Access,

Reporting, Graphics and Analysis Language), which allowed companies to access specialized data from giant mainframes. After DARGAL came the company’s second coup, DQ (distributed query) products that access and integrate data from mainframes, servers and desktops to produce fast and vital information. These two components formulate part of the legacy line of the company, a branch called Data Integration & Reporting. Within Data Integration & Reporting, however, were nascent buds of innovation waiting for the right leadership to bring them to fruition. Today, Decision Support

Wilkinson is a leader’s leader. He is not a push-andpull kind of executive, but a modern, culturally-sensitive, people-centric, have fun or go home kind of guy. He’s passionate, he’s committed, and he wants to win.

has two additional business units, Business Intelligence & Reporting and Secure Elections Management. Wilkinson explains, “As a director for the company I saw tremendous value in its code innovation and company culture. As CEO, my job is to be the catalyst to take these core strengths and leverage them into new opportunities.” Wilkinson is a leader’s leader. He is not a push-and-pull kind of executive, but a modern, culturally-sensitive, people-centric, have fun or go home kind of guy. He’s passion-

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ate, he’s committed, and he wants to win. But he also knows that to do that his employees need a life outside the innovation vortex of Decision Support. This kind of insight is valuable to more than Wilkinson’s employees, or to the company’s bottom line. It is the lifeblood of the company and its creativity. By acknowledging the human element behind their organization, he and his employees are acculturated to the human needs of their clients, and their client’s clients. It is this human understanding that spurs the technology that drives businesses to nextlevel results. This is the wisdom that separates the men from the boys in today’s technology. Tech Life Cycle Agility doesn’t hurt either. Wilkinson explains, “Software products have always had a very predictable, bell-curved life cycle. What has changed is that a cycle that used to be five to six years has shrunk to three years.” Oddly, he sounds excited about this. “That is what makes what we do fun! Coming up with the next way to leverage technology to create a solution for somebody and be the first one to the gate—that is what this business is about.” He adds, “That is our game here; we want to be in and out of a market before our competition even knew there was a market to tap into.” Here is one case study. One of Decision Support’s most crucial assets is its cultural mantra: “Delight the customer.” Because of this, the company is able to create and maintain long-term, trusting relationships with its clients. In this case the client was a banking services customer who had been a client with Decision Support for over a decade. In the process of developing a software solution the company requested, Decision Support learned about the client’s business, its customers, its market and its challenges. By listening to nuances in the human element of the business—Decision Support’s multifaceted software developers were able to develop a major reporting innovation for the client. This is standard operating procedure at Wilkinson’s company. “Why did the customer say this? Why did they have that problem? Why is this area complicating things for them? These are all questions that could become a potential new prod-

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uct, market or niche,” he says. Decision Support proposed a prototype for the banking services client that served as the inspiration for a completely new product and became the springboard for Decision Support’s Business Intelligence & Reporting unit. “Based upon what we were able to learn about the company by cultivating a trusting relationship, we helped to define their objective and create a reporting tool around it. It ran seamlessly and invisibly within their application, without creating user problems for tellers or their customer. That was a huge accomplishment.” It was also this kind of vision that precipitated the Secure Elections Management unit of Decision Support. “Some people are reluctant to embrace the introduction of new technology into the voting check-in process—some reasons more valid than others. But after researching the reality of the voting process, we saw not just a business opportunity but a deep need for this technology,” says Wilkinson. The EViD system, Electronic Voter Identification System, is the delivery method that Decision Support proposes to drastically reduce a troubled process. Wilkinson says, “For example, we found that to run a county election involves hiring 1,000 temporary employees for one day, most of them elderly, provide them a couple hours of training, have them work for 12 plus hours straight without a break, and expect them to execute detailed tasks and carry off a perfect election in front of cameras, lawyers and the news media. It is a Herculean task.” Decision Support leverages its data collection, integration and reporting expertise to streamline the registration process, and speed up the results and reporting. “Speed and accuracy are critical in an election. Delays undermine the perception of fairness. We like to think that our work will create great strides in assuring the accuracy and integrity of the democratic process in the U.S. and other countries as well.” The Calculus of Success But, says Wilkinson, don’t forget that it’s all about the data. “We aren’t after all of IT. But if it involves data—accessing it, integrating it, or assembling it so that it provides measurable results for our clients—then we are on it.”

One of Decision Support’s clients is the General Services Administration (GSA), and the software is used by hundreds of end users with little technological expertise to cross-reference requests for automobile purchases with government-contracted vendors. “Our software reaches between several different data sources to provide a report on the most cost-efficient purchase of, for example, a white truck, with specific features, in specific locations, from approved vendors and sends that back in a report. It is quick, doesn’t require hours of labor, and gets the best price.” And this is perhaps the merging of two of Wilkinson’s great passions, people and results. He forges relationships with clients, employees and suppliers to create partnerships to move things forward for everybody. Then he demands—you guessed it— data, to show where the company has made a difference. “It is great to be to be told we are doing a good job, but if the service or product I am providing is not worth more value than what the customer has paid for it, I haven’t achieved my purpose. If I am not increasing your revenue or decreasing your cost, I want to know what I have been doing for you. What am I providing—speed, flexibility, decreased risk? I need to know so that I can determine my efficacy,” provides Wilkinson. At this stage of the game, Wilkinson gets an A. He has a profitable company with three business units functioning off of the same core competency; discrete software products that can be combined to yield innovative if not quantum shifts in business reporting and functionality; and a business development unit dedicated to the primary objective of rolling these pieces into new entities. Wilkinson says his vision is to make his employees so financially independent that they don’t have to come to work—but still do. But he also says that beyond financial incentive, the crucial component to a creative, motivated and inspired team is to allow them room to take care of all of the important areas of their life—especially their family—so that they have the mental freedom to perform on the job. “If I leave here at 6 or 7 at night, I want to be the last one out. People have to have balance to be happy, and to perform at the level our people perform.”

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The Future is Now Wilkinson says the Decision Support team has a top-quality management team dedicated to innovation, and technology developers that demonstrate two difficult qualities to find in the same package— flexibility of mind and extensive experience. “The two together is nothing short of sheer brilliance,” says Wilkinson. Today’s business leaders demand nothing less. CEOs and their teams are so dependant and fluent on their PC software that they demand more and more from their business applications. Wilkinson says that while there are good reasons for why the two don’t work the same way, he says there is not a good reason for why they should stay that way. Says Wilkinson, “This is how people, businesses and technology work together to create and make strides in every area of our lives. We push each other further to open possibilities, and this is one of the most exciting games in town.” biz Susanne Deitzel is a Charlotte-based freelance writer.

Decision Support LLC 3326 Siskey Pkwy., Ste. 300 Matthews, N.C. 28105 Phone: 704-845-1000 Principal: Bruce Wilkinson, CEO Established: 1984 Employees: 26 full time Revenues: $9.2M (2007); $6.1M (2006) Clients: Approx. 150 Type of Business: Provides professional services and software integration from business analysis, performance dashboards and reporting portals to customized information management solutions. Works with clients to analyze their business and help them evaluate options for improving performance. Experience in helping banks, credit unions, insurers, manufacturers, healthcare providers and government agencies improve different aspects of their operations. www.decisionsupport.com

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Kellie D. Scott Owner RedSky Gallery

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Artwork Credits: p. 32 Terry Thirion, Mixed media on canvas, “Revealed”; p. 33 Herman Leonhardt, glass, “Large yellow wavy platter with orange rim”; p. 33 Bob & Laurie Kliss, glass, “BOBTANICAL series”; p. 34 Ben Parish, metal, “Blown Dancer”; p. 34 Tim McMahon, oil on canvas, “The River”; p. 34 Edgecomb Potters, Assorted pottery with crystalline glazes; p. 34 Union Street Glass, assorted hand blown glass stemware; p. 35 Kenny Pieper, glass, “Red Ibix Vase/Chaotic Cane series”; p. 36 Thomas Kelly, glass, “Blue/Purple Pyroplasm.”

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by janet kropinak

[bizlife]

A Different Palette

RedSky colors your surroundings with inspiration

W

hen Kellie Scott found herself at a crossroads with her professional life, she made the singularly dramatic decision to leave her respected banking career and open an art gallery. Although fairly swift, her decision was anything but impulsive and only undertaken after extensive planning and research. “I wanted to help introduce art to a new generation and I wanted to do so through a different kind of gallery,” she says. “I was also looking for a way to support people who are creative by giving these artists a place to showcase and display their work.” Growing up the child of an artist, Scott was exposed to the arts at an early age and was encouraged to think creatively and outside the box. Although she describes herself as not particularly artistic, she has always had an eye for creativity and an innate ability to select art. Combining her artistic appreciation with her business savvy and an ability to see the “big picture,” Scott began to put the pieces together for her new business. Banking on Art Scott spent almost 30 years working in financial services with her last position as an executive with Wachovia, but as she approached her 50th birthday she realized she had achieved her professional aspirations and was ready for a new challenge. Conveniently, in conjunction with a merger, she opted to leave Wachovia to pursue other opportunities. “Because I had run a division of a large corporation, I had a solid understanding of the business world and I knew who to ask questions of and how to ask them,” Scott recalls. She had started over a year earlier, researching and setting up a business plan and was close to seeing her dreams come to fruition. But first, she wanted to gain a better understanding of art itself and what it took to be an artist. “Before I opened the gallery, I took a lot of art classes and read every book imaginable. I learned how to blow glass, do slab ceramics, throw pots, and paint,” Scott says. “I was never particularly gifted at any !

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of them, but I knew it was important for me to understand the different mediums and their complexities if I was going to be selecting pieces for the gallery.” Scott says one of the biggest challenges to launching the gallery was learning to be a small business owner. “I had worked for a large corporation for so long—I quickly realized that you have to do all the same things, only now, you are doing them all yourself,” she recalls. “It definitely gave me some great insight into how difficult it can be to start and maintain a small business today.” What helped Scott overcome these challenges? Tenacity and drive she is quick to answer. “You just have to keep trying when things don’t work out. You just have to keep trying until you find what works for you.” Scott was involved in every step of the development process and handpicked the art and artists for the gallery herself. With a team of just three people, RedSky Gallery, which Scott named after the beautiful Carolina red skies, was on track. In 2003, Scott realized her dreams when her gallery’s doors opened in SouthPark across from the Phillips Place shopping center, her first location. From initial conception, Scott knew that she wanted to create a place that offered patrons a unique type of gallery experience. “I wanted a place that really reflected fine craft,” she explains. RedSky has more than accomplished Scott’s goals; just five years later they are nationally recognized and one of the largest glass and fine craft galleries in the Southeast. Sculpting Out a Niche Although being part of the SouthPark shopping district did hold some advantages, Scott says that being on a divided road was ultimately a larger obstacle than they could overcome. In 2006, she began searching for a second location that lent itself to being more of a destination site. “I knew the minute I drove by the house, before I even stepped inside, that this was it,” she says of their current home in the heart of Dilworth. The house, a 6,000-square-foot 3-story home built in the ’20s needed extensive reconfiguration before it could be an effective gallery, but Scott’s vision was clear. She set about trans-

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forming the house into a sophisticated showcase for arts of all mediums. Now that RedSky was gaining a reputation for being a one-of-a-kind gallery, and had a fairly central location, Scott decided to close the doors of the SouthPark gallery. Although Charlotte itself is bustling with new life and business, Scott says it is still a very traditional town. “People aren’t always ready to try new things and bring new things into their home,” she comments. “But we are really beginning to see a change in direction.” At any given time, RedSky is home to 400 to 600 artists from across the country, with about 40 percent representing regional artists from North and South Carolina. Because of its unique niche, RedSky gets more than 25 submissions a day from hopeful artists who want their work showcased in the gallery. Scott herself continues to handpick the artists and spends quite a bit of time on the road at art shows and visiting art schools in hopes of discovering up and coming artists and budding new talent. RedSky’s inventory is comprised of twodimensional art and fine crafts. The main floor holds all media, including glass, sculptural ceramics, furniture, lighting and paintings. As you walk up the stairs to the second floor you find the current exhibitions as well as home accessories, glassware and painting galleries. As you continue up to the loft, you find ceramics, lighting and more paintings. On the lower level is the boutique featuring art-to-wear, as well as jewelry, jewelry boxes, perfume bottles, scarves, purses and cufflinks. Being part of a global marketplace, where everything can be found on the Internet and almost everything is being mass produced, is in striking contrast to the value that Scott believes her gallery offers. “It makes what we do that much more important. We are teaching people the difference between one-of-a-kind art and mass-produced objects. Making an investment in a piece of art, and in an artist, is something so invaluable,” she says proudly. “What we are able to offer our customers isn’t something they can get walking into a department store.” Scott says that word of mouth has been the gallery’s best form of advertising. But

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Red Sky Gallery, Ltd. dba RedSky Gallery 1244 East Blvd. Charlotte, N.C. 28203 Phone: 704-377-6400 Principal: Kellie D. Scott, Owner Established: 2003 Gallery Size: 6,000 square feet Representation: 400-600 local, regional and national artists in different media (40 percent regional) Business: Commercial gallery showcasing contemporary paintings and other two-dimensional art in oils, pastels, acrylics, mixed media, and watercolors; an extensive inventory of exceptional fine crafts in glass, metal, ceramics, wood, and basketry; wide variety in home accessories, tableware, lighting, garden art, furniture, sculpture, jewelry and art to wear. Additional services include art consultation, bridal registry, wish-lists and corporate gift program. www.redskygallery.com

motivated and inspired. Art also helps relieve the potential visual boredom for employees, this being especially true for those employees without the view from a window. Scott sees the investment of art for the workplace as a win-win situation: “Not only are you supporting the arts, but you are making a positive impression for your company. People both inside and outside of your company will be impacted positively by these decisions.” Another facet of the corporate services group is personalized gifts. Scott works with companies who are looking for unique ways to reward or acknowledge a person or business. “People today don’t want the clock

engraved with the company logo. They want something they can display in their home or office, and really take notice when you give them a personalized gift,” says Scott. “It doesn’t go unnoticed when you choose to spend a little more, and it allows you to really give someone a taste of how you’d like to be represented to the outside world.” Scott acknowledges how lucky she is do be enjoying her passion while running a business and she is eager to introduce and share this passion with an entirely new generation of art enthusiasts. So, if you are looking for art for your place of business or for your home, or simply want to be inspired by what you see, a trip to RedSky Gallery should be in your future. biz Janet Kropinak is a Charlotte-based freelance writer.

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[ontop] Awards & Achievements Allied Van Line’s 40th Magnet States Report has ranked North Carolina second in highest net relocation gain in 2007. The Mint Museum and Donald Haack Diamonds & Fine Gems have announced the recipients of the 2007 Spirit Awards, one of the Charlotte metro area’s highest honors in the arts: Dr. Monique Abner, Richard and Margaret Dreher, Marie Mitchell, Marc and Mattye Silverman, Allegro Foundation, and Moore & Van Allen. Advertising & Media Carolina Public Relations has promoted Amanda Kirkpatrick to account manager and hired Emily McIntire as an administrative coordinator. Corder Philips has promoted Ben Watt to new media associate director and hired Rich Rabassa as new media director. Ben Watt The Marketing Consortium, a Charlotte-based marketing communications firm, has added two new employees: Pamela Ridge and Emily Woods. Rich Rabassa Nathan Diehl has joined Creatrix Design as creative director and operations manager. Judy Shewmaker and David Fulton have joined WAXN-TV as account executives. Burke Communications, Inc. has hired Kristin Spoerre as account coordinator.

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Business & Professional Forty-four Kennedy Covington attorneys have been named on the 2008 North Carolina Super Lawyers list. Jo Ann J. Brighton, special counsel has been invited by The American College of Bankruptcy, to be inducted as a college fellow. Mason Alexander Mason Alexander, managing partner of the Charlotte office of

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[ontop] labor law firm Fisher & Phillips LLP, has been named to the list of 2008 North Carolina Super Lawyers. Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP has elected Richard Rivera, a member of the litigation department, and Kent Workman, a member of the business law Richard Rivera department, to partners in its Charlotte office. Sixteen of the firm’s attorneys have also been named to Business North Carolina’s Legal Kent Workman Elite for 2008. Fourteen attorneys from the Charlotte office of Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, PLLC have been named to the 2008 Super Lawyers list, published annually by Law & Politics. Law & Politics has included 16 attorneys from the Charlotte office of Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP on its list of North Carolina Super Lawyers. Robert R. Marcus and Larry B. Sitton from the Charlotte office of Smith Moore LLP have been listed among 2008’s list of North Carolina Super Lawyers. Four lawyers from the Charlotte office of Poyner & Spruill LLP were selected for inclusion in Law & Politics ranking of North Carolina Super Lawyers. Helms Mulliss & Wicker, PLLC has announced that 18 of its attorneys were named North Carolina Super Lawyers 2008, with three named among the Top 100 in their specialties, and Peter Covington, Doug Ey and Mark Anderson were named Top 100 in their practice fields. The firm has also promoted six associate attorneys to member status: Jill Crawley Griset, J. Kate Harris Hatcher, Matthew John Hoefling, Brian Kahn, Ingrid Olson McClintock and Amy Reeder Worley. Three partners in Shumaker, Loop, & Kendrick’s Charlotte office have been recognized as 2008 North Carolina Super Lawyers: Scott M. Stevenson, William H. Sturges, and Steele B. Windle III. The firm has also elected Steven A. Meckler

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[ontop] to the firm’s partnership and hired Tasha L. Winebarger to practice with the medical malpractice group in its Charlotte office. Horizon Lines, Inc. has been awarded the 2007 Platinum Carrier Award by home improvement retailer Lowe’s Companies Inc. Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP has appointed Joseph P. Topolski as a partner in the structured finance department in its Charlotte office. Charlotte’s VR Mergers and Acquisitions has hired Rhyne Cannon as a professional intermediary. Business Service Associates, LLC has added Terry J. Sigmon to their coaching staff. Construction & Design Little, a national architecture and design firm headquartered in Charlotte, is among the top five finalists in the 21st Century Project Design Showcase, a prestigious national student housing design competition sponsored by the Association of College and University Housing Officers. Superintendents Michael McIlvane and Gerzon Lopez have been named Top Dogs 2007 at Tyler 2 Construction. ColeJenest & Stone has Gerzon Lopez hired David Baker and Kory Hedrick as civil designers I; Jason Barbosa as a staff accountant; and Sarah Fields as an administrative assistant/receptionist. Michael McIlvane SFL+a Architects has hired Lauren Paulson, CSI, in its Charlotte office as an interior designer. Lynda Lenderman Stephens has joined residential architectural firm Lindsay Daniel ArchitecLauren Paulson ture as office manager and executive assistant. Gantt Huberman Architects has hired Catherine Cervantes and Evan Brickman have as intern architects; Melanie Anderson and Marques Moore as interns; and Suzanne Froedge as interior designer.

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[ontop] Education & Staffing Financial Times of London has ranked the Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina 55th in the world for its master’s programs in the 2008 ranking. CPCC’s Harper National Flexographic Center’s Graphic Arts and Imaging Technology (GAIT) students have been honored with 12 PICA (Printing Industry of the Carolinas) Awards. Dr. Ronald L. Carter has been appointed Johnson C. Smith University’s 13th president, effective July 1, 2008. Dr. Ronald Pfeiffer University has L. Carter appointed Dr. Robert Spear as interim dean of the School of Business Administration; and Dr. Don Poe as interim dean of the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Robert Spear Engineering Paddy Jordan, a senior designer, has been elected to serve as vice president of the North Dr. Don Poe Carolina chapter of Women in Transportation. Brian Dehler, P.E., has Paddy Jordan joined Chas. H. Sells, Inc. where he will lead its newly expanded transportation group. Finance & Insurance Bank of Granite has honored 39 service awards to employees and directors with five, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 years of service and Susan D. Lindsey with its Distinguished Service Award. The Bank’s Long View office has also been named Outstanding Philanthropic Organization from the Northwest North Carolina Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Susan Lindsey

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[ontop] Professionals and the Wilkesboro office was named Office of the Year for 2007. Leigh Elizabeth Celones has joined RSM McGladrey as marketing manager Anthony Ruffalo has been named a district manager of the South Central Anthony Ruffalo Division of AXA Advisors. Government & Non-Profit The Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, Inc. has awarded a $100,000 grant to the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Housing Partnership, Inc.

TOPIC 2008:

VALUE BUILDERS… VALUE BUSTERS! You know you need to spend time working “ON” your business, not just “IN” it. You may have wondered how you could find the time with all you have to juggle. Business Success Institute is the answer. Our five meetings a year can make a real difference in your business. We address practical business concerns, share insights and advice, and give you a chance to network with other business owners who are facing the same challenges and opportunities you are. Learn how to increase the value of your business by developing a good management team, improving your sales and marketing, using technology wisely and practicing sound financial management.

VALUE BUILDERS…

2008 Meetings April 22 June 24 August 26 October 28

VALUE BUSTER

For times, locations and membership information visit www.business-success-institute.com or call Denise Altman at 704-315-9090.

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march 2008

Health Care Catawba Valley Medical Center has been recognized for service excellence under the J.D. Power and Associates Distinguished Hospital Program. Southeast Anesthesiology Consultants has promoted Michele Houck to director of business development and marketing and hired Christa Osswald as marketing manager. Michele Houck Allison Brashear, M.D., professor and chair of Neurology, and Neal D. Kon, M.D., professor of surgical sciences and chair of Cardiothoracic Surgery Christa Osswald f Wake Forest University Medical School have been elected to the board of directors of Wake Forest niversity Baptist Medical Center. Manufacturing SouthWood Corporation has pledged to donate $50,000 of consulting and creative services and/or signage products over the next five years to support the Carolina Thread Trail. Real Estate Commercial/Residential Joe Nicks, an agent with WEICHERT, REALTORS Amity Partners in Statesville, has been presented with a medallion

w w w. g r e a t e r c h a r l o t t e b i z . c o m


[ontop] commemorating the North Carolina Real Estate Commission’s 50th Anniversary for his work in providing information to update the newly released North Carolina Real Estate Agent Safety Guide. J. Gary Hill has joined Charlotte-based McAlpine Group, LLC, and will lead its expansion efforts into the Triad and Triangle regions. NORCOM Properties has added Gary Turner as senior project manager and Brian Cillian as an associate. Connie Jarrett of Dulin Real Estate recently acquired the Seniors Real Estate Specialist Designation. Retail & Sports & Entertainment CenterStage@NoDa has received the Bride’s Book Magazine’s Reader’s Choice Award as the favorite venue in the Charlotte area. Charlotte Arrangements has received the Bride’s Book Magazine’s Reader’s Choice Award as the favorite wedding consultant in the Charlotte area. The company has also promoted Erin Faucette to senior account executive and Katie Brown to tours and transportation manager; and hired Sara Cockfield as an account manager and Damon Phillips as operations manager. Technology OmniVue Business Solutions has been named to Accounting Technology magazine’s Pacesetters list. Travel & Tourism Ballantyne Resort, the Spa at Ballantyne Resort, and the Gallery Restaurant have earned AAA Four rated Diamond facilities for 2008. biz To be considered for inclusion, please send your news releases and announcements in the body of an e-mail (only photos attached) to editor@greatercharlottebiz.com, or fax them to 704-676-5853, or post them to our business address—at least 30 days prior to our publication date.

pursuing a balance of business and life

march 2008

43


JAGUAR XF

2008 JAGUAR XF AVAILABLE AT SCOTT JAGUAR IN MARCH 2008. SCOTT JAGUAR

400 Tyvola Road • 704-527-7000

Now accepting orders at www.scottjag.com.


Featuring Executive Homes in the Charlotte Region CHAPEL WATCH IN FOURTH WARD Charlotte, North Carolina Live in Uptown luxury in this incredible condo. It features black galaxy granite and London Ashe wide-plank hardwood floors. A wall of windows in the living room allows for a view of the private garden. The lavish master suite has marble floors, garden tub and separate shower. 3BRs/2.1BAs MLS# 692736 - $998,000 Property Address: 534 North Church Street Dawn Krieg - 704-331-2122 www.allentate.com/dawnkrieg

THE RATCLIFFE IN CENTER CITY Charlotte, North Carolina Luxury, location and city lights – this penthouse has it all. It features floor-to-ceiling windows, Brazilian cherry flooring, custom built-ins, wet bar with sink, wine cooler, marble counters, steam shower, whirlpool tub, central audio/video system, custom lighting and much more. Plus, enjoy extraordinary sunset views. 2BRs/2.1BAs MLS# 707519 - $1,350,000 Property Address: 435 South Tryon Street, Unit 906 Nancie Woods - 704-331-2122 www.allentate.com/nanciewoods

WATERFRONT ON LAKE WYLIE Lake Wylie, South Carolina Stately Mediterranean style home only 1 year old located on Lake Wylie. This 7,100-square-foot home features 4-car garage, in-ground pool, courtyard, and attached guest house. Inside are 2 kitchens, huge great room plus media, recreation, billiard and exercise rooms. Ideal for 2 families. Located on 2.7 private wooded acres. 6BRs/5.1BAs MLS# 743479 YMLS# - 1048253 - $1,970,000 Property Address: 2601 Cozy Cove Linda Snipes - 803-417-9600 www.allentate.com/lindasnipes

GORGEOUS WATERFRONT ESTATE Lake Wylie, South Carolina Spectacular custom built home beautifully situated on Lake Wylie. Electronic entry gates, elevator, heated floors, lakeside heated pool/spa, and 2 boat slips with lifts. Views of lake from most rooms, second kitchen in recreation room, 3 car garage, doubled covered terraces, huge walk-in storage, and lush grounds. 4BRs/5.1BAs MLS# 741568 - $2,000,000 Property Address: 333 River Point Road Connie Nuttall - 704-367-7249; Kay Grigsby - 803-322-7024 www.allentate.com/connienuttall

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Greater Charlotte Biz 2008.03  

Greater Charlotte Biz

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