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charlotteUSA choose

A WORLD CLASS REGION WITH SMALL TOWN VALUES

2005 CHARLOTTE

REGIONAL ECONOMIC

© 2005, Galles Communications Group, Inc.

DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

3


table of contents A C C E S S I B I L I T Y: Introduction by Linda P. Hudson, President, General Dynamics Armament and Technical Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

REGIONAL OVERVIEW: CharlotteUSA: t h e re g i o n a t a g l a n c e Regional Economic Development Strategy

8

12

Michael G. Mayer Chairman Charlotte Regional Partnership

Ta r g e t e d I n d u s t r y C l u s t e r s

14

18

Access by Air

19

Access by Highways, Railway and Port

20

A c c e s s t o E n e r g y, Wa t e r a n d Te c h n o l o g y

24

Electricity Natural Gas Telecommunications Water/Waste Water

BUSINESS STRENGTH:

QUALITY OF LIFE:

Introduction by Carroll Gray, President, Charlotte Chamber of Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Introduction by Gloria Pace King, President, United Way of Central Carolinas, Inc. .................................42

Business Community

L i v e + Wo r k + P l a y

29

Major Employers Employment In Industries Global/International Connections

46

Cultural Amenities Recreational Opportunities Arts & Entertainment Sports & Sports Facilities

Region

30

International

31

Population

48

Wo r k F o rc e

33

Climate

48

Cost of Living

50

Income

50

H o u s i n g A ff o rd a b i l i t y

50

Retail Opportunities

51

Education

52

H e a l t h C a re

54

Work Force Facts Population by Age Employment by Industry Average Wage Work Force Training Union Activity

Ta x e s & I n c e n t i v e s Government & Taxes NC/SC Incentives Foreign Trade Zone

4

Summary

36

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table of contents >>

choose charlotteUSA 2005 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL

CONTINUED

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

LAND lby

GASTON

Mount Holly

Island Lake

29

C A B A R RU S

ST

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDITOR Maryl A. Lane maryl.a.lane@greatercharlottebiz.com

Locust

85

74

PUBLISHER John Paul Galles jgalles@greatercharlottebiz.com

Gastonia

Kings Mountain Crowders Mtn.St. Pk. 321

Kings Mtn

Charlotte

Mint Hill

MECKLENBURG

200

601

UNION

485

PA RT N E R I N G R E S E A R C H & BUSINESS:

REGIONAL MAP: CharlotteUSA Map . . . . 60

New Opportunities and New Products Stem from Synergy Between Education and Industry: UNCC CRI, A Case in Point . . . . . . . . .56

CharlotteUSA City-State Map

CREATIVE DIRECTOR/ASST. EDITOR Sean Farrow sfarrow@greatercharlottebiz.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Susanne Deitzel ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Bill Lee blee@greatercharlottebiz.com Amy Jo Robinson arobinsonl@greatercharlottebiz.com

CharlotteUSA on the Move CharlotteUSA Corridors of Commerce Map

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

cover image © 2003 Jim Lockman ON THE COVER:

Raymond Kaskey's fluid-like sculpture of Queen Charlotte holding her crown aloft greets visitors in front of the terminal building at the Charlotte Douglas International Airport. Charlotte, “The Queen City,” is named for Queen Charlotte Sophia, wife of King George III, ruler of Great Britain from 1760 to 1820.

Lincoln Cabarrus Cleveland

Stanly

Gaston Mecklenburg

York

Union

Anson

CHARLOTTEUSA COUNTY PROFILES: North and South Carolina County Profiles . . . . . . . 62

6

Alexander, NC

62

Anson, NC

63

Cabarrus, NC

64

Catawba, NC

65

Chester, SC

66

Chesterfield, SC

67

Cleveland, NC

68

Gaston, NC

69

Iredell, NC

70

Lancaster, SC

71

Lincoln, NC

72

Mecklenburg, NC

73

Rowan, NC

74

Stanly, NC

75

Union, NC

76

York, SC

77

PA R T N E R S H I P I N F O R M AT I O N : CharlotteUSA Economic Development Contacts

78

Charlotte Regional Partnership Information

71

Regional Economic Development Partners

80

Choose CharlotteUSA: Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide is published annually by Galles Communications Group, Inc., publisher of the monthly b2b magazine Greater Charlotte Biz, at 5601 Seventy-Seven Center Drive, Suite 250, Charlotte, N.C. 28217-0735 • 704-676-5850 Phone • 704.676.5853 Fax • www.greatercharlottebiz.com. Editorial or advertising inquiries, please call or fax at the numbers above or e-mail: info@greatercharlottebiz.com. Subscription inquiries or change of address, please call or fax at the numbers above or visit our Web site: www.greatercharlottebiz.com. All contents © 2005, Galles Communications Group, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. The Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide is distributed directly and through the Charlotte Regional Partnership and local economic development agencies to over 25,000 businesses and executives engaged in recruiting or relocating businesses to the Charlotte region. Content including statistics and photography has been provided by the Charlotte Regional Partnership, and by the 16 counties for the county profiles, unless otherwise noted. While the information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, Galles Communications Group, Inc. makes no warranty to the accuracy or reliability of this information. The views expressed herein are not necessarily those of Galles Communications Group, Inc., or Greater Charlotte Biz. Products named in these pages are trade names or trademarks of their respective companies. Greater Charlotte Biz (ISSN 1554-6551) is published monthly by Galles Communications Group, Inc., 5601 77 Center Dr., Ste. 250, Charlotte, NC 28217-0736. Telephone: 704-676-5850. Fax: 704-676-5853. Subscription rate is $24 for one year. Periodicals postage pending at Charlotte, N.C., and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Greater Charlotte Biz, 5601 77 Center Dr., Ste. 250, Charlotte, NC 28217-0736.

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regional overview | at a glance

CharlotteUSA: the region at a

T

The Charlotte region’s he Charlotte region consists of over 2.2 million people living economy draws its strength in 16 counties in two different states: 12 counties in North from its remarkable diversity. Carolina and four in South Carolina. It is strategically located In recent years, Charlotte in the center of the East Coast, and the importance of this Eastern time USA has emerged as a prezone location cannot be overestimated. For example, within two hours’ mier banking and financial flight time or one day’s delivery by motor freight, businesses in the center in the United States, Charlotte USA region can reach almost 60 percent of the population of second only to New York the United States and more than 60 percent of the nation’s industrial base. City. Yet, for every financial If you erase the boundary line between North and South Carolina, the services worker in Charlotte, two states together, with Charlotte at the center, consist of more than 12 four others go to work each day in manufacturing plants. million people producing an annual gross domestic product that Charlotte USA is home to the world headquarters of nine Fortune 500 approaches $400 billion. If the Carolinas were a separate country, it would companies, and since 1990, new and expanding businesses have invested have the 12th largest economy in the world, slightly smaller than Australia, more than $18 billion here, creating more and slightly bigger than Switzerland. Charlotte and its than 170,000 new jobs. Charlotte USA is very well connected to sister communities are The Charlotte region is also determined the global economy. More than 1,800 forto preserve its exceptional quality of life. In eign-owned companies employ more than one region, one economy, the global economy, where anything can be 350,000 people in the two Carolinas, and one environmental area, made everywhere and sold anywhere, busimore than one-third of these are located in one society. nesses will increasingly locate and expand the Charlotte region. There are more than - The “simple premise” for the their operations in places where their 165 German-owned companies in the foundation of Charlotte’s regional success. The Pierce Report, 1995. employees like to live and work. The Charlotte region alone. All depend upon a Charlotte region is first in the nation in per capita fundraising for the arts, major international airport for quick and convenient access to the global enjoys multiple professional sports teams, hosts a variety of national economy. As a result of direct flights to Frankfurt, London, and Munich events, and is within two hours drive time of the mountains and three from Charlotte Douglas International Airport, the Charlotte region is, at hours of the beach. most, one plane change away from any important busiTo make a long story short, more people in the Charlotte region ness destination in the world. have better jobs, earn more money, and enjoy a higher quality of life than ever before.

Charlotte Region Work Force Education Number

% Total Work Force

1,505,225

-

Less Than High School, No Diploma

327,404

21.75%

High School Graduate

421,559

28.01%

College, No Diploma

312,883

20.79%

Associate Degree

101,695

6.76%

Bachelors Degree

245,111

16.28%

96,573

6.42%

Population Age 25+

Graduate or Professional Degree Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

8

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regional overview | at a glance

Charlotte Region Population Total Region Population:

2,291,628

Age

Number

20-34 years

478,033

35-54 years

693,217

55-64

226,642

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

Charlotte Region Labor Participation 2004 Estimate Population 16+

1,771,034

Labor Force

1,216,063

Unemployed

61,832

% Unemployed

5.08%

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

W H AT I S C H A R L O T T E U S A ? Charlotte Region Household Income Year

Total

2000 Median

$43,385

2004 Median

$47,238

2009 Median

$53,299

2004 Per Capita

$24,639

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

Charlotte Region Employment By Industry Major Industry

2004 Employees

Agriculture/Forestry/Fishing

8,729

Contract Construction

56,902

Financial/Insurance/Real Estate

77,919

Manufacturing Mining Public Administration

U N PA R A L L E L E D A C C E S S I B I L I T Y • Fifth largest wholesale trade center in the U.S. (equidistant between New York and Miami) enabling more than 130 million people to be reached within 2 hours by air or 1 day by truck • 62% of the U.S. industrial base and over 52% of the U.S. population are accessible within 650 miles/1,000 kilometers of Charlotte USA • Air service to more than 22 million people a year on 550 daily departures to over 120 destinations from Charlotte Douglas International Airport, the 6th largest major airline hub in the nation, including daily nonstop service to Munich, Frankfurt, London, Toronto and Mexico City, among others • Served by four major interstate highways (I-40, I-77, I-485, I-85) • 8th largest U.S. trucking center • Within 200 miles of three major seaports, including the 2nd largest on the eastern coast of the U.S. – Charleston, SC • Served by CSX, Norfolk Southern, Lancaster & Chester Railway, and short-line railroads within the Charlotte region

165,366 614 45,434

Retail Trade

201,967

Services

346,234

Transportations/ Communications/Utilities

48,846

Wholesale Trade

65,242

Unclassified

The Charlotte region continues to strengthen its position as one of the most dynamic and diversified locations in North America with unparalleled accessibility, robust business strength, and an exceptional quality of life.

6,694

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

ROBUST BUSINESS STRENGTH • Second largest financial center in the U.S.; only New York is larger • Nine Fortune 500 companies headquartered here; 286 Fortune 500 represented here • Top U.S. city in foreign firms growth; North and South Carolina home to more than 1,800 foreign firms employing 350,000 people (nearly 700 firms in the Charlotte region) • Second in the nation in number of new factories opened during the 1990s • Among the top five U.S. cities in expansion of existing facilities • Average asking lease rate ($/psf/yr) in the region is $4.10 for industrial space • State and local tax incentives for job creation and capital investment; state and local infrastructure development incentives; utility cost economic development incentives available • Among the most competitive utility rates in the U.S. !

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

9


regional overview | at a glance

Top 15 Largest Regional Employers Name

Local Employees

Local Facilities

Type of Business

Wachovia Corporation

19,000

117

Financial Services

Carolinas HealthCare System

17,600

130

Health Care

Bank of America Corporation

13,000

75

Financial Services

Duke Energy

9,000

27

Energy

Delhaize America Inc./Food Lion LLC

8,600

116

Retail Supermarkets

Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

8,140

25

Discount Retailer

Ruddick Corporation

7,000

59

Holding Company for American & Efird Inc. and Harris Teeter Inc.

Presbyterian Healthcare/Novant Health Inc.

6,850

4

Health Care

US Airways

5,700

7

Airline

Freightliner LLC

4,468

4

Truck Manufacturer

NorthEast Medical Center

4,100

26

Health Care

Lowe’s Cos. Inc.

3,800

17

Retail, Home Improvement

CaroMont Health

3,100

27

Health Care

Springs Industries

3,000

16

Textile Manufacturer & Marketer

BellSouth

2,770

67

Telecommunications

Source: Charlotte Business Journal, 2005

• North Carolina and South Carolina rank 9th and 14th, respectively, as the fastest growing states in the U.S. (Census, 1990-2000) • Regional workforce expected to increase from 1.2 million to 1.3 million by 2009 • North Carolina and South Carolina lead the nation in worker productivity among manufacturing industries • North Carolina and South Carolina have the lowest percentage, 3.6% and 4.2% respectively, of unionized workers in the U.S. (2004) • The Charlotte region is home to 19 universities and 14 community and technical colleges with customized workforce development programs • Over 12,000 degrees awarded in science, engineering, and technology disciplines in North Carolina and South Carolina’s public universities EXCEPTIONAL QUALITY OF LIFE • Rural and urban settings provide a range of activities within a short drive, from hiking in the mountains and bathing on the beaches, to attending major league sporting events and cultural festivities 10

• Low cost of living, reasonable housing costs and access to quality healthcare • Home to NFL’s Carolina Panthers, NBA’s Charlotte Bobcats, WNBN’s Charlotte Sting, Triple-A baseball’s Charlotte Knights, ECHL’s Charlotte Checkers, three NASCAR Nextel Cup events, and PGA’s Wachovia Championship • #1 in the nation in per capita giving to the arts and sciences • Over 100 public and private golf courses • Over 1,770 miles of lake shoreline • Over 35 colleges, universities in the region • A mild four-season climate with an average annual temperature of 61°F/16°C and average of 214 days of sunshine O U T S TA N D I N G R A N K I N G S • Business Facilities magazine ranked Charlotte USA 3rd on its list of best cities for corporate headquarters (2003) • North Carolina ranked 1st, South Carolina ranked 9th on Site Selection’s Most Favorable Business Climate (2003) • North Carolina ranked 4th, South Carolina ranked 1st on Pollina Corporate Real Estate’s Top 10 Pro-Business States (2004) • Charlotte USA has been ranked 1st in “pro business attitude” by Fortune magazine • South Carolina ranked 2nd, North Carolina

ranked 4th in Plants, Sites and Parks Magazine’s Readers Survey of Preferred States for Corporate Relocation (2003) • South Carolina ranked 1st, North Carolina ranked 3rd in Expansion Management Magazine’s Top State Workforce Training Programs in the U.S. (2003) • Charlotte ranked in Top 20 Boomtowns for hottest job markets in U.S. (Business 2.0, March 2004) • Charlotte cited among ‘most livable’ cities in U.S. (Partners for Livable Cities, 2004) • Charlotte-Gastonia-MSA ranked #1 city in economic strength (Policom Corporation, 2004)

contact information:

Kenny McDonald Sr. Vice President

Charlotte Regional Partnership

1001 Morehead Square Dr., Ste. 200 Charlotte, NC 28203 USA 800-554-4373 toll free 704-347-8942 phone 704-347-8981 fax www.charlotteusa.com

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A REWARDING COLLABORATIVE EXPERIENCE. YOU CAN EVEN CO-LOCATE. There is synergy between industry and the Charlotte Research Institute on the regional to the global scale. We provide opportunities for companies seeking collaborative research in: • eBusiness Technology • Optoelectronics and Optical Communications • Precision Metrology • Motorsports • Bioinformatics • Nanotechnology Perhaps best of all, your company can locate its R&D facility right on the UNC Charlotte campus, with brand new state-of-the-art facilities. It's the ideal place to leverage our richest resource - the bright minds of our students and faculty. For a rewarding collaborative experience, contact: Deborah Clayton, Executive Director 704.687.4100 • dclayton@uncc.edu

www.charlotteresearchinstitute.com MODEL OF SYNERGY BALL CREATED BY PATRICK G. SALSBURY


regional overview | strategy

a region with unbounded opportunities

MICHAEL G. MAYER

CHAIRMAN Charlotte Regional Partnership

C

harlotte USA is a region of diversity and contrast. Sometimes we wish we were more carefree and bohemian, like Paris or New Orleans, but, truth be known, we have much more in common with the bankers and merchants of Zurich and Frankfurt. Like it or

not, we are a city and a region historically defined by trade and commerce. The business of Charlotte

tradition of good government and transparent, inclusive processes that have been effective, efficient, and remarkably free of the taint of corruption and self-interest.

is business. There is no seaport, no river, no mountain pass to explain why we are where we are. As former Charlotte mayor John Belk likes to say, Charlotte is a “man made city” that grew up around the intersection of two important Indian trading paths at what is now the precise center of the city. The city itself has a population of almost 600,000, and even though we are the most urban region in both Carolinas, three-quarters of us live in smaller cities, towns, and communities that dot the regional landscape. More than 40% of our people live in rural areas; almost 30% of our land area is in small family farms. For every banker, lawyer, or financial services worker in Mecklenburg County, four others go to work in manufacturing plants, big and small, scattered throughout the region. And while traditional industries, such as furniture and textiles, remain important components of our economy, new economy companies and technologies are on the rise. Charlotte is now the second biggest banking and financial services center in the United States, trailing only New York City. Nearly seven-hundred foreign-owned companies from 34 different countries have operations in our region, and Charlotte/Douglas International Airport is US Airways’ biggest and most profitable hub. Our three daily nonstop flights to London, Frankfurt, and most

III. Anticipation We do not mean to suggest that there are never problems in the Charlotte region or that we always see eye-to-eye on every issue. But Charlotte has had a history of vision and foresight in anticipating problems and dealing with them effectively before such issues rise to the level of threat or crisis. We do try to look “over the horizon.” Neal Peirce and Curtis Johnson noted this in their 1997 book, Boundary Crossers: Community Leadership for a Global Age. They wrote, “Charlotte has made a practice of dealing with problems before they turn into crises. There’s something in the Charlotte culture that suggests action, forethought, boldness…. Here is a community that does manage to act in the absence of severe crisis.”

recently Munich (via Lufthansa German Airlines) make Charlotte at most one plane change away from any important business destination in the world. To make a long story short, more people in the Charlotte region have better jobs, earn more money, and enjoy a higher quality of life than ever before. So-how do we account for this? What is responsible for our growth and prosperity? We believe there are four important factors to consider: Leadership, Partnership, Anticipation and Regionalism.

I. Leadership If the “business of Charlotte is business,” it should come as no surprise that we have drawn our most effective community leadership from the private sector. The positive impact of talented, engaged, involved, and committed local business leadership cannot be overestimated. In the past 25 years or so, we in the Charlotte region have been blessed with such leaders as Hugh McColl of Bank of America, Ed Crutchfield of First Union, Bill Lee of Duke Power, and John Belk, chairman of the department store chain that bears his family’s name. And there are others, newer names, the next generation of leaders who have made our 12

region’s welfare their business and who have applied themselves and their irrepressible “can do” spirit to the tasks at hand without hope or promise of financial gain or the realization of personal ambition. We must never lose sight of the power of local leadership; we must always harness this power for the public good. II. Partnership Business leadership, of course, is not enough. Effective community leadership requires a true partnership between the public and private sectors with everyone working together for our common benefit. Throughout the region there has emerged a

IV. Regionalism The fourth important factor at work in the Charlotte region is regionalism. In the last dozen years leadership, partnership, and anticipation have led us to a regional approach in dealing with the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century. And right here, right now, regionalism is working for us. We believe that regionalism is the best strategy for a well-developed city-region like Charlotte to compete and thrive in a truly global economy. We are convinced that our sixteen counties can collectively accomplish things for the benefit of all of us that are beyond the reach of any one of us acting alone. But to understand the power of regionalism, one must approach the concept from two very different perspectives-the glo b al view and the local view. At the global level, none of us needs to be

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regional overview | strategy

reminded that the world is changing – and quickly. And there will be winners and losers in the global economy. But driven by technology and capital, the ultimate winner is globalization itself. Like it or not, globalization, both politically and economically, is here to stay. In Charlotte we have learned an important lesson: there is safety in numbers. No single city, county, or community in our region, not even the City of Charlotte, has the assets or resources to go it alone in the global economy. But it is just as clear that, when we combine our region’s assets and resources, we are a force to be reckoned with. In his book, The End of the Nation State: The Rise of Regional Economies, best selling author and economist Kenichi Ohmae says that “ . . . The territorial dividing lines that make sense belong to . . . ‘region states.’ In a borderless world, these are the natural economic zones. What matters most is that each region state possesses, in one or another combination, the essential ingredients for successful participation in the global economy.” Ohmae goes on to say that “city-regions” of between 500,000 and 3 million people are optimal size for success in the global economy. He also suggests that wealth produced by such a region’s own people or local resources is not enough. Ultimate success in the 21st century requires cityregions to invite the global economy “in”, to use local resources to attract and leverage the global economy’s potential. Fair enough, but the question we continually ask ourselves in Charlotte USA is, “Do we qualify? Do we measure up?” Nine years ago, again attempting to anticipate the issue, we commissioned a regional study by Neal Peirce and Curtis Johnson of The Citistates Group. Their conclusion: “Charlotte and its sister communities are one region, one economy, one environmental area, one society. The Charlotte area is becoming a major national and world economic region.” In a global economy, in a borderless world, the future does indeed belong to cities and, more precisely, city-regions, like Charlotte USA. And as city-regions emerge on the global stage, it is increasingly important that regions like ours establish contacts, communications, and relationships with our counterparts around the world. In Charlotte USA we are aggressively “inviting the global economy in” by establishing such links with other significant city-regions worldwide. Everywhere we have found solid confirmation of

our commitment to regionalism. And everywhere we have found a genuine eagerness to develop closer ties with us. Earlier this year, Dan Hamilton and Joe Quinlan published a book called Partners in Prosperity: The Changing Geography of the Transatlantic Economy. They used Charlotte USA as a case study of effective international economic development and noted that “… the Charlotte region in particular, and North and South Carolina in general, are increasingly linked to the global business cycle. The economic future of both states is increasingly bound to the ebb and flow of the regional economy, meaning the more the U.S. and Europe work together to promote greater global cooperation in the realms of trade, investment and other market-liberalizing efforts, the greater the rewards for such global-linked regions of the United States as the greater Charlotte area.” One thing seems clear: if city-regions like Charlotte are to have an economic future of our own making, then we must develop and implement a global economic strategy – a foreign policy, if you will – of our own design. But what does regionalism mean, what can it offer, at the local level, in the cities, small towns, and rural communities in Charlotte USA? • First, a regional identity, meaning a sense of place, a state of mind, a concept of the region itself as something more and larger than its member communities. • Second, a regional consensus, meaning a shared confidence throughout the region that local leadership is truly dedicated to the greater good of the region. While community differences and diversities will and should remain, everyone in the region must share a common purpose and goal to bring greater success and prosperity to everywhere in the region. In other words, there must be a sense of regional trust. • And third, regional commitment, meaning dedication to the principle that success anywhere in the region benefits people everywhere in the region. And external marketing and promotional efforts must focus on the region itself as the “product” we are selling. It took us about five years of “region building” to achieve the sort of internal identity, consensus, and commitment we needed to make our case and stake our claim externally, throughout the country and around the world. But we did it. We got there, and the benefits have been well worth the struggle. A different question, but just as important, is

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

how we got there. Different regions may have different answers, but for us in Charlotte , the benefits of regionalism became achievable only once we realized that we needed an institution, an organization dedicated to the proposition that regionalism is the best and most effective strategy to move us forward. In Charlotte USA, that organization is the Charlotte Regional Partnership. We are a small organization, 11 employees and an annual budget of about $3.7 million. A quarter of our budget comes from the State of North Carolina, which in 1996 adopted the Charlotte model and declared regionalism to be the economic development strategy for the entire state. Another 25% comes from a 30-cent per capita fee paid annually by each of our 16 counties. And, again reflecting our reliance on regional public/private partnerships, a little more than half comes from more than one hundred private investors like Bank of America, Wachovia, Duke Power, BellSouth, and US Airways. In Charlotte USA, we learned early on that the “new” economy really means the “global economy.” Today, the Charlotte region finds itself playing on a truly global stage. Our competition is Stuttgart, Singapore, and Seattle, not just Richmond, Tampa, and Atlanta. Obviously, our small organization cannot do everything that needs to be done. We must therefore focus our resources on doing those things which need to be done on a regional basis, but which will not or cannot be done unless the Charlotte Regional Partnership does them. We must always test our program of work by asking, “If we don’t do this, who will?” Now that the “region building” part of our mission is complete, our primary objective is to market and promote the Charlotte region to the world, to achieve sustained and sustainable growth and prosperity throughout the region. And we have been successful. Dan Hamilton and Joe Quinlan also point out in their book that, “Because of its strategic foresight and success in attracting foreign direct investment, the Charlotte Regional Partnership has helped ‘globalize’ the greater Charlotte area, integrating a large swath of the southeast into the global economy.” So, keep your eye on us as we once again reconfirm and recommit ourselves to what is great about the Charlotte region. We are convinced and determined that Charlotte’s best days lie ahead of us and that our future is bright and promising. 13


regional overview | targeted clusters

targeted industry clusters Automotive The Charlotte region has long been a location that is highly attractive to the automotive industry – with over 250 automotive companies in the region, employing over 15,000 people. Freightliner, a subsidiary of DaimlerChrysler, has 3 major assembly plants in the region, and the BMW facility lies just 1 hour 15 minutes from Charlotte Douglas International Airport – the only airport in the region with non-stop flights to Detroit and Munich. Other significant facilities include Dana Corporation, ArvinMeritor, Continental Tire, Eaton Corporation, Goodyear, Hella Lighting, Mayflower Vehicle Systems, Meridian Automotive Systems, and ZF Lemforder. Machine Manufacturing Since the 1960s the machine manufacturing industry has been expanding in Charlotte USA. Originally drawn to the region by its proximity to textiles and furniture, machine manufacturing started with textile and wood-working machinery. Over 1,250 companies engaged in machine and machine parts manufacturing can be found in the Charlotte USA region, employing 12,300 people today. Larger companies, like Cooper Tools, Honeywell, Ingersoll-Rand, and Siemens Westinghouse all have production facilities in the Charlotte region. However, the majority of the machine manufacturing industry in the Charlotte region is made up of worldclass medium-sized manufacturers, such as Colfax, Chiron America, INA, Okuma Machine Tools, PCI Wedeco, Schrader-Bridgeport, and Timken. Motorsports The Charlotte region is the hub for NASCAR, with over 90 percent of NASCAR teams built and operating within a 50 mile radius of downtown Charlotte. The NASCAR Research and Development Center is located here, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte offers a program in Motorsports and Automotive Engineering, and there are two wind tunnel testing facilities located in the region. There are three major races at the Lowe’s 14

Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C.: the CocaCola 600, The Nextel All-Star Challenge (formerly The Winston), and the UAW-GM 500. Financial Services and Insurance Charlotte is the second largest financial center in the United States. Only New York holds more financial assets than Charlotte. Bank of America, the largest bank in the U.S., and Wachovia Corporation, the fourth largest bank in the country, are headquartered here. Their presence has spawned a growing financial services industry in the Charlotte region. There are currently 253 companies in the Charlotte region offering financial services that employ almost 60,000 professionals. Besides being the home to major corporate operations of commercial banks, the Charlotte region also houses many large operational and customer service centers for companies like CitiFinancial, GE Capital/Lowe’s Credit, and Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Inc. In 2000, TIAA-CREF, the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association College Retirement Equities Fund, opened a major new operations, data, and customer service center in Charlotte. The Charlotte region also houses the corporate headquarters of Royal & Sun Alliance and Transamerica Reinsurance. Allstate, AmeriCredit, The Hartford, Kemper, Liberty Mutual, MetLife, Nationwide, State Farm and Travelers all have operational or processing centers in the Charlotte region. The local Central Piedmont Community College also offers a variety of finance-related courses and certification classes to further train a workforce for the financial services industry. Plastics With its distribution advantages (rail and road) and its proven manufacturing capabilities, the Charlotte region has a growing plastics industry. There are currently 218 plastics manufacturers operating in the Charlotte region. These companies employ approximately 8,000 workers. The Charlotte region offers these companies relatively low utility rates, lower wages, great distribution capabilities, and a great qual-

ity of life. In cooperation with the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, the Polymers Center of Excellence offers a variety of services to the plastics industry, including testing, workforce development, process problem solving, as well as research and development. Some of the larger plastics manufacturers include Charlotte Pipe & Foundry Co., Otto Industries, Polar Plastics Inc., and RBX Industries Inc. Metalworking The strong machine manufacturing industry in the Charlotte region is further supported by a strong metal working skills base. There is a leading technical college system, which has many specialized courses and certifications for metalworking and machine manufacturing. All told, there are over 850 companies in fabricated and primary metal manufacturing in the Charlotte region that employ nearly 18,000 people. Medical Equipment Manufacturing The machine manufacturing industry has also created a niche in medical device and equipment manufacturing. The creation of this niche, which requires a highly skilled and trained workforce, speaks highly to the capabilities of the Charlotte region’s diverse and adaptable workforce. Over 100 companies specializing in this field are located within the Charlotte USA region, exporting their products to domestic and international destinations. Some of the larger manufacturers are Hartmann-Conco Inc., Scott Health and Safety, and Zimmer Orthopedic Surgical. Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Building on the strength and volume of surrounding firms in the medical support field, as well as an educated workforce, small yet solid pharmaceutical manufacturing initiatives have grown to incorporate an increasingly larger role in the local economy. As a result, approximately 40 pharmaceutical-related manufacturing companies are located in the Charlotte USA region.

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Discover The L&C Railway Super-Site Site

Region

• Located in Chester County, South Carolina • 45 minutes from Charlotte Douglas International Airport • 167 miles to the Port of Charleston • Served by CSX and NS, via L&C Railway • Over 8,000’ of road frontage on I-77 between two interchanges • Located in EPA Attainment Zone • All 1,151 acres under one ownership • All preliminary studies completed • Over 3,000 Industrially zoned acres available for supplier parks and greenfield sites

Major Industries in L&C Corridor • Allvac • Ameristeel • DOW Chemical • Duracell • GAF Corporation

• Guardian Industries • Owens Corning • PPG • Thyssen/Krupp • Weyerhaeuser

• Fortune Magazine has ranked the Charlotte Region as a #1 business environment • Over 250 automotive companies are located in the Charlotte Region • 62 percent of the U.S. Industrial base is located within a 650 mile radius • 52 percent of the US population lives within a 650 mile radius • North Carolina and South Carolina have the lowest percentage of union workers in the U.S. • Direct flights to Munich, Frankfurt, London, Toronto, and Mexico City as well as 120 other destinations • Outstanding tax incentive programs We invite you to locate your industry in the L&C Industrial Corridor. Contact Steve Gedney at 803-286-2100, or visit our Web site at www.landcrailroad.com.


accessibility | introduction

accessibility key in relocation decision INTRODUCTION BY LINDA P. HUDSON, PRESIDENT, GENERAL DYNAMICS ARMAMENT AND TECHNICAL PRODUCTS

I

PHOTO: WAYNE MORRIS

n 2000, General Dynamics Armament Systems was a relatively small subsidiary of the General Dynamics Corporation and was located in Burlington, Vermont. After two acquisitions in 2001 and 2002, the company dramatically expanded its product offering to include composite structures and chemical and biological detection systems and became known as General Dynamics Armament and Technical Products with nine locations in eight states. Having practically no direct flights from Burlington to the new locations, what would normally be a one-hour meeting became a three-day event. Airline service out of Burlington simply could not support our company’s new, larger footprint, so in early 2003 we began the search for a new location for our company’s executive offices.

“With direct flight service to most sites and key customers, the excellent labor force availability and superb quality of life, Charlotte, N.C. was the easy answer.” -Linda P. Hudson

To begin our search we developed a set of essential relocation search criteria. Number one on our list: improved access to GDATP sites and customers. The ability to attract and retain key senior executives and staff was also essential criteria for us. Moreover, we needed a business-friendly environment conducive to continued growth and access to available and affordable commercial office space. After selecting 10 sites for analysis we began our evaluation process. Through extensive research we studied a host of factors from hous16

ing values and utility costs to population demographics. The local airport had to offer not only daily national and international direct flights, but it also had to offer a substantial number of flight alternatives. We measured the available labor force by the number of business and MBA graduates, graduates and post graduates in engineering and science, public and private research and development spending and the number of graduates who remain in state. To measure quality of life, we looked at numerous factors including workforce diversity, charitable giving and community service, employment statistics, the cost of living index as a national average and the total personal tax burden. Hard data now in hand, we began interfacing with state and local economic development organizations to validate and update our research. We visited prospective cities and participated in tours and chamber presentations. We assessed commercial real estate availability and rates along with the crucial element of maintaining strong national, state and local political support. However, our focus remained on our two major requirements: accessible, extensive and dependable air transportation and the ability to attract and retain key talent. With direct flight service to most sites and key customers, the excellent labor force availability and superb quality of life, Charlotte, N.C. was the easy answer. We began moving our offices to Charlotte in October 2003, and by January 2004 we were occupying our current office space in LakePointe Plaza. Moving our company offices was just part of a larger company-wide reengineering initiative to enhance productivity and position us for future growth. In order to remain at the leading edge of technology with state of the art facilities in our Chemical/Biological Detection business, the operation needed to

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accessibility | introduction

be part of a larger infrastructure that could support the rapid changes in this sophisticated technology field. We required more space, new labs and efficient production, integration and test operations. When we discovered researchers with the Charlotte Research Institute at UNC Charlotte were working on similar technologies that our own engineers were using, the decision was made to create a showcase Chem/Bio facility in Charlotte. Originally, the Raleigh-Durham area was our initial tech focus, but we have been very pleased with both the technology resources in the Charlotte area and our strategic partnership with the Charlotte Research Institute. To staff our Chem/Bio facility we relocated approximately 85 employees from Florida and other sites, and we have hired more than 100 employees out of the local labor market. While exceptional air service at Charlotte Douglas International Airport was by far the biggest factor in our decision process, the personal involvement of Mayor Pat McCrory had a very big impact on our decision to move to Charlotte, as did the diligent work of the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce. At the end of the day, we also have to make a business case for the relocation, and the incentives offered by the State made it fiscally possible to make it happen. Now that we are here, we are impressed by the wide variety of lifestyle choices in the greater Charlotte area, all within reasonable distance to our offices. We appreciate the receptive climate (not just the weather), and the willingness of people to come talk to our employees and families in order to help demystify the prospect of moving. Unlike the

industry standard, more than 70 percent of our employees elected to relocate. Additionally, we have been very pleased with our ability to hire key local talent for top positions and manufacturing jobs. Charlotte is simply a great place for defense contractors to conduct business. 2004 was an exceptional year for GDATP; we relocated more than 200 people (almost 10 percent of our entire workforce), stood up two new facilities and re-engineered our company for the future, all while executing our aggressive growth plans. Now, after being in Charlotte for one year, I can safely say it was all worth it. Charlotte is a great place to live and work, and the move here has positioned GDATP for continued success

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

and growth as a recognized leader in the defense community. We are committed to providing superior systems for our nation’s defense, and we have invested in the future of our employees and our communities. General Dynamics Armament and Technical Products provides a broad range of system solutions for military and commercial applications. The company designs, develops and produces high-performance armament systems, a full range of advanced compositebased products, biological and chemical detection systems, and mobile shelter systems. Parent company, General Dynamics, headquartered in Falls Church, Virginia, employs approximately 71,600 people worldwide and had 2004 revenue of $19.2 billion. The company is a market leader in mission-critical information systems and technologies; land and expeditionary combat systems, armaments and munitions; shipbuilding and marine systems; and business aviation.

17


accessibility | introduction

accessibility • Fifth largest wholesale trade center in the U.S.

Population Comparison Within a 650-Mile Radius

(equidistant between

% OF U.S. POPULATION

New York and Miami)

CITY

enables more than 130

Charlotte Atlanta New York

million people to be reached within 2 hours by air or 1 day by truck

52% 44% 40%

Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership 2004

• 62% of the U.S. industrial base and over 52% of the U.S. population is accessible within 650 miles (1,000 kilometers) of Charlotte USA • Air service to more than 22 million people a year on over 550 daily departures to over 120 destinations from Charlotte Douglas International Airport, the 6th largest major airline hub in the nation • Within 200 miles of three major seaports, including the 2nd largest on the eastern coast of the U.S. – Charleston, S.C.

{}

AIR ACCESS • Charlotte Douglas International Airport has more flights per capita than any other U.S. region • Direct non-stop service to 125 destinations including Frankfurt, Munich, London, Toronto, Montreal, Mexico City, among others • Full air-cargo service – ranked 30th nationwide in cargo H I G H W AY A C C E S S • Served by four major interstate highways: I-40, I-77, I-485 and I-85 • 8th largest U.S. trucking center; 450 trucking firms are located in the region; served by nine of the nation’s top 10 trucking companies 18

Getting into and out of the airport is very easy... Air service was something we looked at pretty hard.

- Steve Huggins Senior V.P., Goodrich Corp., on relocating its headquarters to Charlotte from Ohio in 1999.

PORT ACCESS • Rail connections to the Carolina coast give the Charlotte region status as an inland port; home to an inland intermodal terminal • Charleston, Savannah, Wilmington and Morehead City deep sea ports accessible via rail or truck within 4 hours. RAIL ACCESS • At the center of the largest consolidated rail system in the country • Serviced by CSX, Norfolk Southern, Lancaster & Chester railway and a number of short line railroads, bringing more than 200 trains through Charlotte each week.

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accessibility | air

ACCESS BY AIR Airlines • American Airlines • Continental Airlines • Northwest Airlines • US Airways • Independence Air

• Air Canada • Delta Air Lines • United Airlines • Lufthansa • Air Tran Airways

Direct Domestic Flights From Charlotte To Designated Cities Atlanta

15 Flights per day

Boston

8 Flights per day

Chicago

27 Flights per day

Detroit

13 Flights per day

Los Angeles

3 Flights per day

Miami

12 Flights per day

New York

27 Flights per day

Philadelphia

10 Flights per day

San Francisco Washington

2 Flights per day 25 Flights per day

Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership 2003

Air Cargo Center • Handles over 184,282 tons of cargo a year • Ranked 30th nationwide in cargo Charlotte Douglas Int’l Airport Stats • 1.7 million terminal square footage • 2 parallel runways and 1 cross wind runway • Runway #1: 10,000 ft • Runway #2: 8,676 ft • Crosswind #3: 7,500 ft • Proposed parallel runway #4: 9,000 ft International Service (Non-stop Flights) • Dominican Republic • Caribbean Destinations • Germany: Munich, Frankfurt • England: London • Canada: Montreal, Toronto • Mexico: Mexico City, Cancun, Cozumel

CharlotteUSA Regional Airports Airport

County

Anson County

Anson

18

Concord Regional

Cabarrus

151

Hickory Regional

Catawba

125

Chester Municipal

Chester

30

Cheraw Municipal

Chesterfield

57

Pageland

Chesterfield

43

Shelby Municipal

Cleveland

53

Gastonia Municipal

Gaston

137

Statesville Municipal

Iredell

85

Lancaster County

Lancaster

68

Lincoln County

Lancaster

70

Rowan County

Rowan

85

Albemarle/Stanly

Stanly

85

Monroe

Union

151

Jaars-Townsend

Union

20

Bryant Field

York

103

Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership 2003

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

# of Aircraft Per Day

Time Difference: • UK and the East Coast US = -5 Hours • UK and the West Coast US = -8 Hours • Mainland Europe and the East Coast US = -6 Hours • Mainland Europe and the West Coast US = -9 Hours International Connections For foreign companies relocating or expanding into the United States, the accessibility of the parent company to the U.S.-subsidiary is very important. The time difference, therefore, between the parent company and the subsidiary plays an important role in any location decision. Similarly, it is important for managers and executives to be able to travel back and forth between the U.S. subsidiary and parent company. Luckily, you are only one plane change away from any important business location in the world. Also, with direct flights to 125 destinations, executives, salespeople and technicians can quickly connect to their customers worldwide. ! 19


accessibility | highway, rail, and port

A C C E S S B Y H I G H W AY, R A I L W AY A N D P O R T C h a r l o t t e R e g i o n ’s S t a t u s as an Inland Port • Charlotte USA is served by the largest consolidated rail system in the country • Links to 22 states in the eastern half of the U.S. • Rail connections to the Carolina coast give the region the status of an inland port • Access to a Foreign Trade Zone

77

Alexander

Iredell

64

21

40

70

70

Rowan

Catawba

21 52

321

Rail Connections • CSX and Norfolk Southern both operate large, well-equipped rail yards in Charleston, S.C. • Daily express services inbound and outbound • Double stack trains • Exceptionally high and wide rail clearances • Intermodal service provided to Wando Welch Terminal via direct dray to the railhead allowing for more generous cutoff times

Lincoln

29

77

Cabarrus

85

Cleveland 485

Gaston 74

Stanly

601

85

52

Mecklenburg 74

485

321

York

Union

74 74

Anson

601

52

With Charlotte USA’s proximity to major interstates and Charlotte’s existing Foreign Trade Zone, accessibility to the rest of the world would be unmatched.

77

21

9

9

Lancaster

Chester

9 601 151

521

Chesterfield 1

LEGEND Railways US Highways

Interstate Highways

- Charlotte Business Journal, 2003

Largest Freight Trucking Companies in the Charlotte Region Company

Area Served

CNF Inc.

50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico

Roadway Corp.

50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Virgin Islands, Europe Pacific Rim, Latin American

Schneider National Inc.

48 states, Canada, Mexico

Yellow Corp.

50 states, parts of Canada, Pacific Rim, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Europe

USF Corp.

Central and Southeastern United States, Ontario, Quebec

Arkansas Best Corp.

50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico, Mexico, International

Overnite Transportation Co.

50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam

Watkins Motor Lines Inc.

41 states, Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico

Estes Express Lines Inc.

50 states

Averitt Express Inc.

Global

Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership 2004

20

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accessibility | highway, railway, and port

Flight/Driving Times From Charlotte to Designated Cities City Atlanta, GA . . . Chicago, IL . . . Orlando, FL . . New York, NY . Memphis, TN . . Washington, DC Charleston, SC .

Miles . . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Driving Time

243 . . . . . . . . . . 3:57 765 . . . . . . . . . 12:13 524 . . . . . . . . . . 8:13 646 . . . . . . . . . 10:27 620 . . . . . . . . . . 9:22 400 . . . . . . . . . . 6:24 177 . . . . . . . . . . 3:25

Flight Time (hrs) . . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . 1:15 . . . . . 2:00 . . . . . 1:30 . . . . . 1:50 . . . . . 1:40 . . . . . 1:15 less than 1 hour

Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership 2004

CSX Transportation • Provides rail transportation and distribution services over 18,759 route miles and 32,462 track miles in 20 states in the East, Midwest, and South; the District of Columbia; and Ontario, Canada. Norfolk Southern Railway • Rail lines extend over 14,300 miles of road in 20 states, primarily in the Southeast and Midwest, and the Province of Ontario, Canada. !

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

21


accessibility | highway, railway, and port

L&C Railway Transportation • Privately owned and well-capitalized; financially strong; short line railroad based in Lancaster, South Carolina (35 miles south of Charlotte, N.C.). • Connects to the national rail network through both CSX and Norfolk Southern. Port of Charleston • Busiest container port along the Southeast and Gulf coasts. • Ranks 4th nationally. • Access to 13 of the top 15 carriers in the U.S. container trade. • Intermodal access via rail and highways to the Charlotte region. Port of Savannah • Features the largest single-terminal complex with the longest contiguous dock on the east coast. • Terminal offers 7,617 linear feet of docking space at seven berths. • Rail access to the Charlotte region via Norfolk Southern and CSX Transportation.

Port of Morehead City • Ranks 2nd only to New Orleans, La., in U.S. rubber imports. • Direct highway access – I-95, I-40, US Hwy 17. • Direct rail access via Norfolk Southern. Port of Wilmington • Full service deepwater port and marine terminal. • Rail access to the Charlotte region via Norfolk Southern and CSX. • Deck height averages 12 ft. above mean low water. • Facility can outload over 800 tons per hour with a70,000 ton storage capacity. !

The Charlotte region’s transportation infrastructure plays a vital role in its economy. Distances to Carolina Ports Port Wilmington . Charleston . . Savannah . . Morehead City

Miles/km . . . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

Time

. 196 mi/ 315 km . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.75 hours 208 mi/ 335 km . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5 hours 250 mi/ 402 km . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 hours 316 mi/ 508 km . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.5 hours

Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership 2004

22

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accessibility | energy, water and technology

A C C E S S T O E N E R G Y, W AT E R A N D T E C H N O L O G Y Electricity • Aggressive growth strategies, combined with new technologies, regional expertise and strong demand, have allowed local industries to thrive. As a result, local operations are benefiting from an efficient, cost competitive, and reliable utility environment. • Major electric service providers include Duke Power, Progress Energy, and Barnhardt Electric Company. • Various regional cooperatives, such as Union Power Cooperative, EnergyUnited, and York County Cooperative, provide alternative sources for electrical services within the region to ensure abundant supply. Natural Gas • Piedmont Natural Gas distributes natural gas to a 28-county region with approximately 354,000 customers in north, central and western North Carolina. • Commercial and industrial service priced competitively. • Main provider in the Charlotte region is Piedmont Natural Gas. • Headquartered in Charlotte, Piedmont Natural Gas is among the ten largest energy companies in the world. Telecommunications • Charlotte USA remains one of the largest fiber-producing regions of the world. • Well maintained service network with unsurpassed access to: • Extensive fiber optic network with digital switching capability • DSL technology • Frame relay for cost-efficient data transmission for intermittent-burst-oriented traffic between end-points in a wide arena network • Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) • Point-to-point services (DS-O), DS-1 (T-1), and DS services. • Major telecommunications center with substantial backoffice/shared services facilities. • Facilities whose primary function is data processing, customer service center, electronic mail order processing, or central administrative services are eligible for tax credits. • Telecomm taxes for out-of-state incoming calls capped at $50,000 (NC only). • BellSouth, Time Warner Cable and Sprint are primary telecommunications providers in the region.

• Over 18 inter-exchange carriers operate POPs and other facilities. • Additional resources in the region include: • Over 50 cellular and mobile telephone companies • Over 80 Internet companies • including Web hosting: Peak 10, Inc. and Springboard Managed Hosting are two Charlotte-based vendors who provide managed Web hosting and “cold” (or “dim lit”) office space for companies that want emergency and disaster recovery back-up data capacity. • New, robust telecom carrier space in the heart of Charlotte’s Network Access Point (NAP). Pinnacle Properties is a local commercial real estate development firm specializing in telecommunications facilities. Water/Waste Water The Catawba river and its reservoirs, located in the Santee River Basin, supply drinking water and hydroelectric power to the Charlotte and Hickory metropolitan statistical areas (MSA). Rhodhiss Lake, Lake Hickory and Mountain Island Lake are the primary reservoirs for this region.

24

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2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

25


business strength | introduction

CharlotteUSA: a head for business INTRODUCTION BY CARROLL GRAY, PRESIDENT, CHARLOTTE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

C

ommerce is in our hearts, in our heads, and in our history. From its humble beginnings as an Indian trading crossroads, Charlotte’s center city and surrounding areas have developed into a thriving economic cityregion. From when gold was discovered here in 1799 to our present day incarnation as the nation’s second largest financial center, CharlotteUSA has a head for business.

A Business Town One of the Charlotte region’s most surprising characteristics for those who don’t know us is our business strength; this “little” Southern city and its surrounding areas are home to some of the largest corporations in North America. Our seven Fortune 500 headquarters within the city limits tied us for 5th in a recent national ranking. That list didn’t include corporate

“One of the Charlotte region’s most surprising characteristics for those who don’t know us is our business strength; this ‘little’ Southern city and its surrounding areas are home to some of the largest corporations in North America.“ - Carroll Gray giants Lowe’s, Family Dollar Stores and Food Lion, which operate just outside our city limits. Nor did it count privately held Compass Group North America or Belk Inc., each with annual sales in excess of $2.2 billion. In fact, CharlotteUSA is home to 32 companies with more than $1 billion in annual sales. CharlotteUSA is first and foremost a banking mecca. With more than $1.3 trillion in assets, it is the second largest financial center in the nation, behind only New York. Two of the nation’s largest banks, Bank of America and 26

Wachovia, are headquartered here. In total, 20 banks with more than 218 local branches, as well as a Federal Reserve Branch, are located in Charlotte. Our banks provide a wealth of services to commercial and individual customers and are leaders in the financial services industry.

Major Banking Centers Assets Rank

City

(Billions)

1

New York

2,370.5

2

Charlotte

1,284.0

3

Chicago

513.0

4

San Francisco

455.9

5

Cleveland

237.1

Source: SNL Securities, 2004

CharlotteUSA is also a major manufacturing force. Mecklenburg County has 1,195 producers generating an annual payroll of nearly $2.4 billion. The region has 2,400 manufacturers that employ more than 120,000 workers. In addition to the traditional furniture and textile industries, the electronics, printing, plastics, industrial machinery and metal working industries have significant presence in the area. With so many companies based or doing business here, it’s natural to conclude that CharlotteUSA’s business is business. We have such a pro-business environment that nearly 300 Fortune 500 companies have placed one or more facilities within the region. The Queen City is one of the most business-focused cities in the country. While Charlotte is best known for our banking powerhouses, which helped grow this once-sleepy town into a sit-up-and-take-notice metro area, our largest industry segment is wholesale trade, followed by services, manufacturing and construction. CharlotteUSA offers a

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business strength | introduction

nurturing climate for regional, national and international companies of all sizes. The region also has a balanced economy, with employment well-distributed among all major business sectors. This is critical when it comes to weathering recessions. Of the 537,703 persons employed in the county, there are 75,646 in finance and insurance, 47,968 in retail trade, 43,611 in wholesale trade and 38,891 in manufacturing. Small and medium-size companies are equally important to CharlotteUSA’s economy. The city has been cited by Entrepreneur magazine as one of the nation’s best large cities for entrepreneurs to start and run a small business. Of the 24,341 companies with operations in Charlotte, 22,509 employ fewer than 50 workers and 1,721 employ between 50 and 500 workers. Only 111 firms employ more than 500 workers. Both companies and individuals are attracted to the thriving Charlotte region. Booming with economic and commercial activity, CharlotteUSA has all the advantages of one of the most rapidly growing metropolitan areas in the nation. Yet the people are warm and friendly, and many areas still retain their small town flavor.

A Pro-Business Environment CharlotteUSA has a long-standing tradition of public-private cooperation. Public sector leaders work closely with the private sector when planning development and carrying out large projects for the good of our region. Working together, public and private leaders in recent years transformed the downtown streetscape from a business-centric center that appeared dormant after dusk into a vibrant 24/7 metropolis bustling with residents, restaurants, retail and entertainment. It took public and private efforts to build our downtown basketball arena, under construction now, and bring back NBA basketball. Our business community is also actively engaged in setting public policy. Many of Charlotte’s top leaders, including our current mayor, come directly from the corporate sector. Utilities are economical in the Charlotte region, especially when compared to most U.S. locations. Duke Energy Corporation, a national

leader in the utilities industry, generates power to the area from an efficient combination of nuclear, coal-fired and hydroelectric facilities with rates at 15 percent below the national average. A plentiful supply of natural gas is available from Piedmont Natural Gas. Telephone and telecommunications services are provided locally by BellSouth and Alltel. Long distance service is provided by a wide variety of telecommunications firms. A jewel in our crown is the generous and high quality water supply from the mountainstream-fed Catawba River. The countywide water system has a maximum daily treatment capacity of 242 million gallons with an average daily usage of 101 million gallons. Wastewater treatment daily capacity is 113 million gallons with average usage of 86.7 million gallons per day. Water and sewer rates are among the lowest in the nation.

A Ready, Willing and Able Workforce Our high quality of life, reasonable cost of living, world-class arts and major league sports, as well as educational and advancement opportunities, attract talented individuals from around the globe. In fact, according to the 2000

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

Census, the Charlotte region saw one of the biggest rates of increase in the number of young people of any city in the country. Charlotte’s young professional population increased by slightly more than one-third, earning Charlotte a rank of No. 3 on the list of top cities. A steady influx of new residents moving to Charlotte each year keeps the city’s business and social structure fresh and vibrant. The Queen City welcomes – and even encourages – new leaders to help shape and build its future. This is an easy city for making fresh starts and leaving a mark on a company or on the community. Our workforce is smart and educated, ranking 7 th in the percentage of high school graduates, and 11th in the nation in the number of residents with four-year college degrees. That workforce is supported by an outstanding system of higher education. We are fortunate to have 35 colleges and universities that serve over 150,000 students. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte is known to be one of the best education values available. Central Piedmont Community College is one of the top five two-year institutions in the country. Higher education is key to any region’s – and company’s – future growth and ! 27


business strength | introduction

current strength. Within our city-region, 16 public and private institutions offer baccalaureate degrees. Ten schools offer graduate degrees, including master’s and doctoral programs, in a variety of disciplines and with flexibility to meet the hectic schedules of today’s employees. Charlotte is home to the state’s largest community college, and the Charlotte campus of The University of North Carolina is the fourth largest in the 16-campus UNC system. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte has grown to become one of the top players in developing optoelectronics and other advanced technologies. UNC Charlotte’s College of Information Technology is one of only 50 universities recognized by the National Security Agency as a Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education, and the university has one of the few Ph.D. programs in information technology in the country.

Great Air Access & Excellent Roads CharlotteUSA is a huge transportation and distribution center. At its heart, Charlotte Douglas International Airport currently offers non-stop service to 112 different cities, including Frankfurt, London and Mexico City. The airport is less than 25 minutes away from most CharlotteUSA business parks. Just as the airport draws regional offices of multinational corporations, our interstate system attracts manufacturing and distribution. Interstate 77 passes through Charlotte on its route north and south. Interstate 85 leaves Charlotte toward Atlanta to the south and

Washington, D.C. to the north. CharlotteUSA’s balanced transportation infrastructure includes one of the nation’s major, advanced airport facilities, direct rail and interstate highway access to major southeastern deep water seaports, import/export facilitation and intermodal shipping.

Dynamic International Community Culturally diverse businesses and social organizations enrich our region and, in recent years, have become integral threads in our community fabric. Growing Hispanic and Asian enterprises blend with Charlotte’s long-time community of African American businesses, small and large. Nearly 700 foreign-owned firms, representing 36 countries, operate in the metro area, which includes Charlotte-Mecklenburg and surrounding counties. A large number of major manufacturers and service providers here have overseas operations, joint ventures and/or export sales. The Mayor’s International Cabinet serves as a forum for international issues and interests. The cabinet offers citizens access to local government officials and works with local international organizations to promote public awareness of Charlotte’s ethnic diversity and international connections. Four public “immersion” schools instruct students exclusively in Japanese, French, German and Spanish. Collectively, area residents speak 600 languages.

Shaping CharlotteUSA’s Future CharlotteUSA’s balanced economy didn’t

Why International Companies Choose CharlotteUSA Excellent U.S. market access from a central Atlantic coast location Large airport hub with direct international flights Pro-business local government Highly productive workforce for manufacturing and services State-funded worker training programs Extraordinary quality of life Below-average cost of living Rich international business and cultural communities Foreign language schools Excellent universities and community colleges

28

Foreign Firm Growth Since 1990, the number of foreign-owned firms operating in CharlotteUSA has grown by over 80 percent. Year

Total

2003

589

2000

550

1995

458

1990

32

“just happen.” For decades, this city’s business and civic leaders have actively sought to lay the foundation to encourage this economic success. Several years ago, the Charlotte Chamber took a lead role in creating a strategic plan for the region designed to maintain and expand the balanced economy this city enjoys now. The plan – called Advantage Carolina – helps develop initiatives that will support existing businesses as they expand and mature, as well as attract new businesses. The process has led CharlotteMecklenburg to position itself as a “global knowledge center,” in which highly skilled workers apply the latest in technology to create products and services for a diversified global market. Specifically, the city is particularly well suited to host operations for a number of “focus indutries,” including precision metrology/optoelectronics, bio sciences, security technology, as well as traditional industries related to information, financial services, transportation and manufacturing. Clearly, the Charlotte region enjoys a strong economy with a breadth and depth that is virtually unparalleled in any other U.S. market. Charlotte’s business and civic leaders are committed to maintaining that advantage. As the 21st century moves forward, CharlotteUSA is poised to create and nurture an economic “sustainable advantage” as powerful as the one it currently has. If you are looking for a region that has a top pro-business climate, a ready and able workforce, a temperate climate, an unparalleled quality of life, and a vibrant business community, I invite you to join us in Charlotte USA.

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business strength | business community

business strength BUSINESS COMMUNITY Top 10 Pro-Business States • Second-largest financial center in the U.S.; only New York is larger. • Nine Fortune 500 firms headquartered in CharlotteUSA. • North and South Carolina home to more than 1,800 foreign firms employing 350,000 people (almost 700 firms in the Charlotte region). • Regional work force expected to increase from 1.2 million to 1.3 million by 2009. Business Climate Rankings • North Carolina and South Carolina rank 1st and 9th, respectively, in “Top 25 State Business Climate” rankings. NC topped list, SC in top ten for past three years. Source: Site Selection, November 2003.

• North Carolina ranked 4th, South Carolina ranked 1st on real estate survey for “Top 10 Pro-Business States.” Source: Pollina Corporate Real Estate 2004. • The Charlotte region rated one of the “Top 10 Cities for Entrepreneurs.”

South Carolina

1

Virginia

2

South Dakota

3

North Carolina

4

Alabama

5

Wyoming

6

Georgia

7

Washington

8

Florida

9

Oklahoma

10

Source: Pollina Corporate Top 10 Pro-Business States 2004

Source: Entrepreneur magazine, Dun & Bradstreet, 2002.

• The Charlotte metro area ranked 7th on the list “50 Best Large Metro Areas to Start and Grow a Company.” Source: Industry Week, April 16, 2001 • Charlotte was cited as “Top Metro Area for European Expansion.” The area ranked 10th in European-based company expansions or relocations within the past 24 months. Source: Expansion Management, August 2001.

!

Top 10 States For Business Climate Texas

1

New York

2

Illinois

3

Georgia

4

North Carolina

5

Florida

6

Tennessee

7

South Carolina

8

Ohio

9

Alabama

10

Source: Site Selection, November 2004

Population Growth Charlotte USA

{

Ranked by Money magazine as one of the “10 Best Places to Live” out of 57 cities with populations of 300,000 or more. - Money magazine, 2002

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

}

2,291,628

2004

2,496,974

2009

926,253

2004

1,060,185

2009

Population

1,771,034

2004

(age 16+)

1,943,904

2009

Total Households

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

29


business strength | region

REGION

CharlotteUSA 2004 2003 Employment In ByIndustries Industry

Economic Clusters Manufacturing & Distribution • Medical Devices & Equipment • Automotive, Motorsports • Industrial Machinery • Metalworking • Plastics, Polymers Technical Services • Backoffice and Shared services • Finance and Insurance services Corporate Headquarters • Fortune 500 • Divisional Headquarters International Investment • Small & Medium Manufacturing • International/Divisional Headquarters

Wholesale Trade 6.4% Agriculture Forestry Fishing less than 1% Construction 5.6%

Services 33.8%

Finance Insurance Real Estate 7.6% Mining less than 1%

Transportation Communications 4.8%

Manufacturing 16.2%

Unclassified less than 1% Public Administration 4.4%

Retail Trade 19.7%

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

Top 25 Largest Regional Employers Name

Local Employees

Local Facilities

Type of Business

Wachovia Corp.

19,181

117

Financial Services

Carolinas HealthCare System

17,665

130

Health Care

Bank of America Corp.

13,000

NA

Financial Services

Duke Energy Corp.

9,000

NA

Energy

Delhaize America Inc./Food Lion LLC

8,658

NA

Retail Supermarkets

Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

8,140

NA

Discount Retailer

Ruddick Corporation

7,000

59

Holding Company for American & Efird Inc. and Harris Teeter Inc. Health Care

Presbyterian Healthcare/Novant Health Inc.

6,850

4

US Airways Group Inc.

5,749

NA

Airline

Freightliner LLC

4,468

4

Truck Manufacturer

NorthEast Medical Center

4,100

26

Health Care

Lowe’s Cos. Inc.

3,800

17

Retail, Home Improvement

CaroMont Health

3,144

27

Health Care

Springs Industries Inc.

3,000

NA

Textile Manufacturer and Marketer

BellSouth Corp.

2,770

67

Telecommunications

Philip Morris USA

2,600

1

Cigarette Manufacturer

Bi-Lo LLC

2,538

34

Retail Supermarkets

Belk Inc.

2,500

17

Department Stores

Compass Group North America

2,419

3

Contract Food Service, Vending and Restaurants

Winn-Dixie Inc.

2,374

37

Retail Supermarkets

CommScope Inc.

2,100

5

Designer and Manufacturer of Cable and Connectivity Solutions

International Business Machines Corp.

2,000

1

Computer Technology Sales & Solutions

Continental Tire North America Inc.

1,800

2

Tire Manufacturer

Iredell Memorial Hospital’s Health Care System

1,675

1

Health Care

Wix Filtration Corp.

1,618

4

Filtration Products for Vehicles

Source: Charlotte Business Journal, 2005

30

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business strength | international

trust + strategy + integrity

I N T E R N AT I O N A L Overview Charlotte USA has become a major center for foreign investment in the United States. Textiles and furniture attracted the first foreign investors in the 1960s from Germany, Japan, Italy and Switzerland. They came here to build machinery for these U.S. industries. Soon after, foreign investors discovered that this region was a great place to build other more complex machines, such as hi-tech industrial machinery and automobiles. Today, the economic landscape has become very diverse. Currently, there are almost 700 foreignowned companies in the Charlotte region. In fact, if North and South Carolina were a separate nation, it would be the 12th largest economy in the world, slightly smaller than Australia and bigger than Switzerland, generating $397 Billion in gross domestic product. The region’s unique balance of business strength, accessibility, and quality of life cer-

planning + insight + experience

tainly attracted many of these companies from abroad. The international flavor of Charlotte USA means that not only are the American workers acclimated to employment at foreign companies, but the supporting service industries have a great deal of experience with foreign companies as well. Lawyers, accountants, bankers, construction companies, !

“We consider Daniel, Ratliff & Largest Foreign-Owned Firms in the Charlotte Region

Company to be true business partners.

Number of Employees

Company

Product

HQ

Food Lion Inc.

Food Retailing

Belguim

8,658

Freightliner LLC

Transport Equipment

Germany

3,700

Compass Group USA

Food/Vending Service

Great Britain

2,410

Royal & Sun Alliance USA

Insurance

Great Britain

1,500

Continental Tire

Radial Tires

Germany

1,400

Celanese Acetate LLC

Synthetic Fibers

Germany

1,000

Clariant Corp.

Dyes, Specialty Chemicals

Switerland

883

Blyth Construction Inc.

Construction, Utilities

France

850

Alcatel Cables & Components

Fiber Optic Cable

France

825

Equitable

Life Insurance

France

770

They have assisted in refining our financial systems, planning our cash flow, negotiating with our bankers, and reviewing our tax strategies. We could not be more satisfied with the services they provide.”

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp.

Turbines for power plants

Germany

750

–Alan Baldwin

ASMO North Carolina Inc.

Motor Manufacturing

Japan

700

President, FreemanWhite, Inc.

Stabilus

Gas Springs

Germany

700

Pass & Seymour/Legrand

Electrical Devices

France

650

VermontAmerican Tool Co.

Cutting tools accessories

Germany

628

Universal Manufacturing & Logistics

Compact Discs

France

600

AmeriSteel

Concrete reinforcing products

Brazil

575

Michelin Aircraft Tire Corporation

Aircraft Parts & Equipment

France

553

Maersk Sealand

Containerized Cargo Carrier

Denmark

550

Source: Charlotte Business Journal, 2003

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

www.danielratliff.com 301 S. McDowell Street Suite 502 Charlotte, NC 28204 704.371.5000

125 E Plaza Drive Suite 101 Mooresville, NC 28115 704.663.0193

it all Adds up. 31


business strength | international

and engineers are all familiar with international companies. Many have multilingual employees who can explain the intricacies of the American way of business in a foreign language. Naturally, many international business organizations have been formed that support this intricate network of foreign business. Carolinas Global Business Connections • Over 1,800 foreign firms in the Carolinas employing approximately 350,000 people. • 37 countries represented in the Carolinas. • Over $23 billion in exports. Success Stories in CharlotteUSA Company: Cataler North America Corp. Parent Company: Cataler Corporation (Japan) Product: Catalytic converters Investment: $50 Million / 82 Jobs (3/2001) Location: Lincoln County, North Carolina Success: Company added an additional production line ($10 Million) in 2003

If The Carolinas Were A Country, It Would Rank As The 12th Largest Economy In The World Country

2001

2002

2003

1.

UNITED STATES . . . . . . $10,100.78

2.

JAPAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,163.10 . . . . . . . . $3,973.39

3.

GERMANY

. . . . . . . $1,992.34

. . . . . . . $2,408.59

4.

UNITED KINGDOM . . . . . $1,431.38 . . . . . . . . $1,565.67

. . . . . . . $1,798.57

5.

FRANCE . . . . . . . . . . $1321.75 . . . . . . . . $1,438.36

. . . . . . . $1,754.26

6.

ITALY

. . . . . . . . . . . $1,091.41 . . . . . . . . $1,189.92

. . . . . . . $1,470.93

7.

CANADA . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$715.06 . . . . . . . . . $735.96

. . . . . . . . $866.92

8.

SPAIN . . . . . . . . . . . . $585.13 . . . . . . . . . $657.26

. . . . . . . . $840.15

9.

KOREA

. . . . . . . . $1,857.35

. . . . . . $10,480.83 . . . . . . . $10,985.45

. . . . . . . . . . . $481.89 . . . . . . . . . $546.94

10. NETHERLANDS

. . . . . . . $384.36 . . . . . . . . . $419.77

. . . . . . . $4,301.82

. . . . . . . . $605.35 . . . . . . . . $512.62

11. AUSTRALIA . . . . . . . . . $358.55 . . . . . . . . . $399.37

. . . . . . . . $508.24

12. CAROLINAS

. . . . . . . . $390.82 . . . . . . . . . $405.53

. . . . . . . . $397.69

13. SWITZERLAND . . . . . . . . $245.24 . . . . . . . . . $267.74

. . . . . . . . $309.43

14. BELGIUM . . . . . . . . . . $227.40 . . . . . . . . . $245.41

. . . . . . . . $303.06

15. SWEDEN

. . . . . . . . $301.75

. . . . . . . . . . $219.42 . . . . . . . . . $241.08

Units: U.S. Dollars in billions Gross domestic product, current prices Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

Company: SAERTEX USA, LLC Parent Company: SAERTEX Wagener GmbH & Co. KG (Germany) Product: Technical textiles Investment: $2.4 Million/ 10 Jobs (12/2000) Location: Iredell County, North Carolina Success: Company has doubled production capacity and has a total employment of 25 in 2004

32

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business strength | work force

WORK FORCE Key Work Force Facts • Both North and South Carolina have Right-to-Work laws that permit individual workers to choose whether or not they wish to join a labor union. • In 2004, North Carolina’s union membership was 3.6% the lowest unionization rate in the nation. • In 2004, South Carolina ranked second lowest in the nation with a unionization rate of 4.2%. Work Force Training Programs North Carolina • Customized workforce development programs ranging from recruitment assistance to worker training, as well as easily accessible hiring incentive information. • Worker Training tax credits available for qualifying firms, including at least $500 per worker if minimum requirements are met. !

CharlotteUSA Population By Age 55 yrs to 64 yrs 9.9% 25 yrs to 54 yrs 44.7%

65 yrs and Over 11.1%

Under 17 yrs 32.4%

18 yrs to 24 yrs 13% Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 estimates

CharlotteUSA Employment By Industry

% Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing

8,729

0.85%

% Construction

56,902

5.56%

% Finance, Insurance and Real Estate

77,919

7.6%

% Manufacturing

165,366

16.15%

614

0.06%

% Public Administration

45,434

4.44%

% Retail Trade

201,967

19.7%

% Services

346,234

33.8%

% Transportation and Communications

48,846

4.8%

% Unclassified

6,694

0.7%

% Wholesale Trade

65,242

6.4%

% Mining

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

Our relocation package featured a provision that, after one year, anyone who wanted to return to New York would be able to do so.

- Tom Hughes, Hearst Corporation, recalling the relocation of a large contingent from Manhattan to Charlotte in 1990. Out of 270 employees who came to Charlotte, only 3 moved back to New York.

33


business strength | work force

Average Weekly Wage By Industry All Industries

$550

Construction

$570

Manufacturing

$695

Wholesale Trade

$706

Retail Trade

$386

Transportation & Warehousing

$656

Information

$669

Finance & Insurance

$760

Real Estate

$428

Professional & Technical Services

$696

Management

$869

Administrative & Waste Services

$360

Educational Services

$646

Health Care & Social Assistance Services

$618

Accommodation & Food Services

$200

Training programs for new and expanding industries vary in scope.

Source: State LMI 2004 Q3

• While state training programs for new and expanding industries vary in scope, available development programs include: • Occupational continuing education • Human resources development • Specialized industrial training • Workforce and training initiatives • Ranked #1 State Training program in the United States (Expansion Management, 2001). !

Unionization Activity Union Membership Rates By State 2004

North Carolina

3.6%

South Carolina

4.2%

Florida

7.7%

Virginia

6.6%

Georgia

7.5%

Mississippi

6.3% 11.5%

Alabama Tennessee

7.7% 11.6%

Kentucky Illinois

17.9%

Michigan

22.4%

New York

26.4%

0.0%

5.0%

10.0%

15.0%

20.0%

25.0%

30.0%

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Table 5 "Union Affiliation of Employed Wage and Salary Workers by State," 2004

34

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business strength | work force

CharlotteUSA Work Force Statistics 1990-2009

% In Labor Force % Unemployed Age 16+ pop Total Employed

1990

2000

2004

67%

68%

69%

2009 69%

3%

5%

5%

1,274,703

1,564,947

1,771,034

1,943,904

852,270

1,014,578

1,153,210

1,265,450

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 estimates

• Center for Accelerated Technology Training (CATT), operated by a statewide Technical Education College System, provides recruiting, screening, and training programs for new and expanding businesses.

5%

South Carolina • Training programs customized to fit unique employer requirements. • CATT program has trained workers for nearly 1,600 firms, including BMW, Siemens, Bosch, Bayer, Chrysler, Fuji and Kyocera Mita.

TA X E S & I N C E N T I V E S North Carolina Taxes Corporate Income Tax Flat rate of 6.9% of net income allocable to the state. Sales & Use Tax 4.5% statewide with a local rate of 2.5% or 3% on transactions (combined 7% tax is not applicable to raw materials, containers, labels, packaging and shipping materials). State rate will decrease to 4% after 6/30/05. Franchise Tax $1.50 per $1,000 and is applied to the greatest base determined as set forth in the law. Inventory Tax North Carolina does not impose an inventory tax. ! 36

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business strength | taxes & incentives

Property Tax North Carolina does not impose a state property tax. Subject to local rates (county rates range 4.2-11%, city rates range 2.4-8%). Manufacturing Fuels 1% on fuel for agricultural or manufacturing use or to commercial laundries other than electricity or piped natural gas. Manufacturing Equipment 1% on farm machinery, mill machinery, parts and accessories sold to manufacturing industries and plants

Many new business decisions are driven by a growing concern for the environment.

Electricity 2.83% on sales of electricity, piped natural gas to farmers, manufacturers, and commercial laundry and dry cleaning establishments. Natural Gas 2.83% tax is imposed in North Carolina Telephone Service 3% local 6% intrastate - $50,000 cap applies for call center operations !

NC Individual Income Tax Rates Federal Deductibility No Marginal Rates and Taxes 6%>$0 7%>$12,750 7.75%>$60,000 8.25%>$120,000 Standard Deduction Single $3,750 Joint $6,100 Personal Exemptions Single $1,050 Dependents $1,050 Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership 2004

38

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•

www.charlotteUSA.com


business strength | taxes & incentives

Unemployment Insurance Rate Average tax rate of 1.2% New Employers rate 1.2% Maximum Rate (Deficit Employers) 5.7% Taxable base $16,200 South Carolina Taxes Corporate Income Tax Flat rate of 5% of net income allocable to the state

Sales & Use Tax 5% statewide with a local rate of 1% or 2% on transactions

SC Individual Income Tax Rates Federal Deductibility

Franchise Tax South Carolina does not impose a franchise tax

No Marginal Rates and Taxes 2.5%>$0 3%>$2,400

Inventory Tax South Carolina does not impose an inventory tax

4%>$4,800 5%>$7,200 6%>$9,600 7%>$12,000 Standard Deduction Single $4,750 Joint $7,950 Personal Exemptions Single $3,050 Dependents $3,050 Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership 2004

Property Tax South Carolina does not impose a state property tax. Subject to local rates (county rates range .41-1.93%, county & school rates range 4.07%) Manufacturing Fuels South Carolina does not impose a manufacturing fuels tax Manufacturing Equipment South Carolina does not impose a manufacturing equipment tax Electricity South Carolina does not impose an electricity tax Natural Gas South Carolina does not impose a natural gas tax Unemployment Insurance Rate New Employers rate 3.34% Maximum Rate (Deficit Employers) 6.1% Taxable base $7,000 40

ChooseCharlotteUSA

•

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quality of life | introduction

quality of caring demonstrates quality of life INTRODUCTION BY GLORIA PACE KING, PRESIDENT, UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL CAROLINAS, INC.

A

s the “safety net” for our region, we at the United Way of Central Carolinas make it our business to know the character of the business community. We can’t raise the necessary dollars this community needs – in excess of $39 million for 2004 – without keeping a finger on the pulse of the businesses that play a major part in that fund drive. The truth is that while the Charlotte region is serious about business, it’s also concerned about the health and well being of its citizens. This is demonstrated by its philanthropic efforts and emphasis on volunteerism. “We ought to brand the people who live here,” I tell all who will listen, “for their caring and compassion.” It’s rare to find chief executives who take the time to serve on a United Way board. However, this does not hold true for Charlotte. We just had Ken Thompson, CEO of Wachovia Corporation, as our chairman, and it hasn’t

“At the United Way of Central Carolinas, we bring people together, to help each other live a better life...the whole Charlotte region is a better place to live, work and play.“ - Gloria Pace King been long since Ken Lewis, CEO of Bank of America, took his turn. This strong sense of community flows much deeper than the top echelon of two of the country’s largest banks. It filters through business organizations and into the general population. At United Way of Central Carolinas, we enjoy watching mid-level executives come to us as volunteers, perform in various positions and grow into effective community leaders. It is a 42

privilege to be part of their growth in areas from public speaking to collaborative leadership skills. We engage people everywhere we operate, from center city Charlotte to suburban Union and Cabarrus counties and the resortracing area of southern Iredell County. People Believe in Us Because We Deliver People believe in us. The year before textile giant Pillowtex Corporation went bankrupt and eliminated more than 4,500 jobs in Cabarrus County, its employees, who knew their positions were as tenuous as the company’s prospects, donated more than $350,000 to the United Way. When Pillowtex closed its doors in 2003, we sent three staffers to a service center to counsel people and connect them with organizations that could help them through their crisis. We were physically on site near the plant for three months. Although we were greatly impacted by their dire circumstances, it gave us great satisfaction to give back to the Pillowtex workers who had generously supported us through the years. We didn’t stop with Cabarrus County. We reached out to a separate United Way in neighboring Rowan County, also hard hit by the Pillowtex situation, and did what we could to help there. Now we are strengthening our relationship within the stock car racing industry. This is vital because of racing’s growing importance in Cabarrus County and in Mooresville-Lake Norman. The many racing teams that are headquartered near Lowe’s Motor Speedway are prospering and becoming a bigger economic spark. We weren’t involved in home improvement warehouse Lowe’s decision to locate a major corporate presence in Mooresville, but as soon as we knew they were coming, we dispatched

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quality of life | introduction

people to their North Wilkesboro headquarters to see how we could assist them. We initiated a working relationship with the United Way in Wilkes County. To the east, Union is the fastest growing county in North Carolina. It faces unique issues in assimilating suburbanites who identify with Charlotte, as well as large numbers of Latinos who are attracted by the growing employment opportunities. Part of the United Way’s job is to create a network to connect these individuals. We’re specialists at mixing newcomers with people who’ve been here a while. We help them get to know each other by accomplishing goals together. Shortly after David Burner, then chief executive, brought Goodrich here, we visited him. He asked, “So how much do you want?” I said, “We don’t want anything. We came to say hello.” He said, “You’re kidding me.” I said, “We’ll be back.” We learned that uniquely friendly approach in Charlotte and, in the Goodrich example, it worked wonderfully. Goodrich has been a strongly committed supporter.

When General Dynamics moved its Armament and Technical Products unit to Charlotte in 2003, we were the first people they called to get connected. John Suttle, Charlotte-based director of communications for General Dynamics, says philanthropic engagement is important because it puts a face on a firm that keeps a low profile. “We picked Charlotte because the city has a tremendous workforce and has great civic leadership, with The Chamber and United Way,” Suttle says. “Our company has pledged $104,000 for the United Way of Central Carolinas this year. It is our biggest philanthropic engagement. Linda Hudson, our president, sits on its board.” We make every effort to reach out to newcomers to the Charlotte region. When we found out that Johnson & Wales University was going to open a new campus in Charlotte’s Gateway Village, we made an appointment to see Art Gallagher, their Charlotte president. We’re proud to say that Art became a United Way board member and understands the value and importance of philanthropy and getting involved in the community. “This is a very embracing community, and it’s important that people who hold key positions get engaged and respond,” Gallagher says. “There is a very clear and unwavering buy-in on the part of the business community that the United Way is the way to go. One of the successful components for business in Charlotte is to be engaged in community work and the United Way is one of the lynchpins for it.” If People Get Along Better, Businesses Prosper Clearly, Art “gets it.” We regularly help other executives in that learning process, thanks to a suggestion by Bill Vandiver, now retired from a long tenure as an executive vice president at Bank of America. Bill told me, “You ought to put your board on a bus and take them around the city so they can really see why they’re supporting the United Way.” We did just that, starting about a year ago, with our first Community Impact Tour. We took community leaders to Hope Haven, a United Way agency that rehabilitates individuals recovering from drug and alcohol

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

addiction. Then we drove them through lessaffluent areas of Charlotte, including parts of North Davidson Street, along Freedom Drive and along West Boulevard. We had a narrator who pointed out demographics, provided relevant statistics and communicated the difference United Way is making thanks to their contributions. Wachovia Chairman Ken Thompson toured with us and he couldn’t stop talking about what he saw and what he learned. Since then, we’ve taken a large number of people on tours. The experience raises their consciousness and changes their hearts and minds. “I’m a great believer in putting your feet where your mouth is,” Vandiver says as he discusses his tour idea. “People need to see the front line. The United Way is trying to make the

social side of the community work a lot better for everybody.” “If I were a business person (considering Charlotte for a presence), maybe the first thing I would look at is how effective is the United Way,” Vandiver adds. “If housing is better, health and human services is better; if people are getting along better, you’re going to have a better business climate, your company’s going to prosper and everybody’s going to be better off.” Another way we at the United Way meet our challenges is to work with businesses, helping them understand that without us, it would be quite difficult for them to achieve the economic well-being they want for the Charlotte region. Our corporate citizens want to know there’s a go-to organization for their employees when they’re struggling with any number of issues. ! 43


quality of life | introduction

With Charlotte short-listed for its southern service center, a scout team from retirement systems giant TIAA-CREF wanted details about this region. UNC Charlotte Chancellor Jim Woodward invited us to join other community leaders in selling TIAA-CREF on our culture and quality of life. We told the TIAA-CREF scouts what a giving community we are and how the people are so gracious, caring and accepting. “Charlotte is deeply entrenched in volunteerism and philanthropy,” I said. “You will be embraced and immediately assimilated into business and volunteer activities.” I spoke from the heart because of the warm welcome I received when I moved here from Cleveland 10 years ago. The community embraced me as leader of the United Way.

money but from much larger population bases. The Atlanta campaign is $60 million, but it’s from an MSA of 3 million. Per capita, we give much more here in Charlotte. That demonstrates the generosity of this community. We have 100 member organizations with more than 200 programs. Many people do not clearly understand the services that United Way provides. We fund programs that assist the old, the young, the wealthy and the poor. We deal with issues throughout the community, from the poverty of Piedmont Courts to the affluence of Ballantyne. We are an organization whose focus is to help everyone, regardless of gender, race or socio-economic background. The issues we address are as varied as the people we help.

We’ve made it easier than ever to get help or get involved through the 2-1-1 information and referral system. Anyone can dial that number free, 24 hours a day and seven days a week, for advice on where to turn for help with problems that range from housing to health care. It’s also a vehicle for people who wish to volunteer their services. Our United Way of Central Carolinas staff is highly educated and motivated. They work for us because they love what they do, but they could work anywhere in corporate America. At the United Way of Central Carolinas, we bring people together, to help each other live a better life. That’s what businesses want and it’s what we all aspire to. Because we try so hard to attain it, the whole Charlotte region is a better place to live, work and play.

“I wanted Gloria to talk about the success of the United Way,” Chancellor Woodward recalls. “In many ways, it’s the measure of the heart of a community. She did a great job. I have no doubt she was a participant in attracting TIAA-CREF to Charlotte.” TIAA-CREF opened its Charlotte service center in 2001. Since then, TIAA-CREF’s employees have been passionately involved with United Way of Central Carolinas.

We save taxpayers money because of the services our agencies provide. Businesses understand numbers and we can show statistics that ultimately translate into dollars saved. Consider services to older adults. Eighty percent of our community’s seniors must choose between paying rent, buying food or purchasing medications. MedAssist, a United Way agency, is working to address this need. For every dollar MedAssist receives, it secures $8 towards medication. Recent studies show MedAssist services save Mecklenburg County an estimated $6 million a year. Charlotte is the nation’s 8th wealthiest city, measured by median household income. We raise over $39 million, and it is a top priority to increase this number. On the other hand, we are small geographically. Our metropolitan statistical area is 1.3 million, but the United Way of Central Carolinas covers only about 800,000 people. New York, Chicago and Los Angeles raise more 44

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quality of life | live + work + play

quality of life

C

harlotteUSA has a unique combination of urban and rural settings. The region is situated two hours east of the Blue Ridge Mountains and three hours west of the beautiful Carolina beaches. Along with its exemplary business climate, CharlotteUSA also offers a high quality of life emphasizing elements such as cost of living, housing, climate, health care, the arts, sports and recreation. The region enjoys pleasant weather; a mild four-season climate with an average of 223 days of sunshine. • Rural and urban settings provide a range of activities within a short drive, from hiking in the mountains and bathing on the beaches, to attending major league sporting events and cultural festivities. • Low cost of living, reasonable housing costs and access to quality healthcare. • A mild four-season climate with an average of 214 days of sunshine. • Over 35 colleges and universities in the region.

Live + Work + Play Cultural Amenities CharlotteUSA has a cultural lineup that includes nationally recognized museums, symphony, opera, theater, and dance companies. The Blumenthal Performing Arts Center is home to the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra, Opera Carolina, Charlotte Choral Society, Charlotte Oratorio Singers, and the NC Dance Theater. Discovery Place, a “hands-on” science museum, contains an OMNIMAX theatre and the Kelly Space Voyager Planetarium. The Mint Museum of Art hosts internationally renowned artists. 46

Recreational Opportunities An incredible variety of recreational activities abound in CharlotteUSA: boating, fishing, golfing & professional sports. CharlotteUSA has: • Over 1,770 miles of shoreline on 8 lakes • Over 100 public and private golf courses • Close proximity to the golf capital of the country – Pinehurst, NC • Close proximity to beautiful mountain scenery (2 hour drive) • Close proximity to several major beaches (within 4 hours’ drive)

Children are encouraged to gain an appreciation for the arts early on in Charlotte. There is a children’s theater, a youth ballet and community arts classes available for youth.

Arts & Entertainment Behind CharlotteUSA’s corporate façade lies a burgeoning arts scene. Although it may seem less obvious here than in New York or New Orleans, there are plenty of opportunities to enjoy theater, dance, music and visual arts in and around Charlotte. In fact, Charlotte is #1 in per capita funding for the arts, surpassing even New York in 2001. Thanks to the community’s generous support of arts, science and history, Charlotte is now a cultural model for cities across the country. Every season there are entertaining events planned for the entire family in Charlotte and its neighboring towns. There !

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quality of life | live + work + play

CharlotteUSA Population Growth

7&'8)*+'# 9#'+'&&

2000-2004 23.5

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3.6 2.6

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are arts and crafts festivals, free symphony concerts in the parks, parades, home shows, and art exhibits. The clubs and bars light up on weekends with young people, enjoying anything from techno to bluegrass. The finer restaurants often feature live music on their patios, and the city welcomes entertainers to its downtown courtyards for free concerts in the summer. There are arts and heritage museums located downtown and in surrounding counties. The Charlotte- Mecklenburg Public Library is state-of-the-art, and neighboring Spirit Square houses a community school for the arts. Children and adolescents are encouraged to gain an appreciation for the arts early on in Charlotte. There is a children’s theater, a youth ballet and community arts classes available for the youth. The art festivals often showcase the talent of Charlotte’s future, and the future of the arts in this region is bright. Sports & Sports Facilities CharlotteUSA is blessed with a rich and varied sports community. CharlotteUSA has added a new football stadium, is currently constructing a new basketball arena for its new NBA franchise, and hosts one of the most respected speedways on the NASCAR circuit. CharlotteUSA is proud to host: • NFL’s Carolina Panthers • NBA’s Charlotte Bobcats

YORK

UNION

STANLY

ROWAN

MECKLENBURG

LINCOLN

LANCASTER

IREDELL

GASTON

CLEVELAND

CHESTER

CATAWBA

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2000 & 2004 Estimates

48

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004.

-0.7 CABARRUS

ALEXANDER

ANSON

-0.5

0

CHESTERFIELD

4

• WNBA’s Charlotte Sting • Triple-A Baseball’s Charlotte Knights • ECHL’s Charlotte Checkers • Three NASCAR Nextel Cup events (Coca-Cola 600, All-Star Race, UAW-GM Quality 500) • PGA Tour’s Wachovia Championship • Greater Hickory Classic Seniors Golf Tournament P O P U L AT I O N CharlotteUSA is comprised of 16 counties stretching from the foothills to the central Piedmont in North and South Carolina. Charlotte, the hub of the region, is the largest city in both North and South Carolina; however, the region also contains many smaller cities and rural areas. CharlotteUSA covers nearly 8,000 square miles with a population of over 2.2 million.

are an abundance of roses, thanks to the spring showers and summer thunderstorms that give Charlotte its lush, green grass and towering treetops. While Charlotte residents enjoy four distinct seasons, they avoid the oppressive heat of the Deep South and the wintertime blues of the North. There is rarely so much snow it needs shoveling, and, on the average, temperatures only reach 100 degrees twice a year. The transformations of the seasons are the most breathtaking times of the year, and both Spring and Fall are appreciably long. Whether Spring or Fall, both flowering trees and colored leaves create a visual extravaganza when set against the sapphire blue sky. This pleasant, moderate climate is one of the major draws for people moving to the Charlotte region. !

Total # of Households CharlotteUSA, 1990 - Projected 2009 1,000,000 900,000 800,000

C L I M AT E

700,000 600,000

According to the State Climate Office’s 2001 Data Survey, the sun shines on Charlotte an average of 214 days of the year. No wonder there are so many outdoor events planned in and around the region. Being outdoors, under the crystal clear, blue skies, lifts the spirit and begs even the busiest of businessmen to stop and smell the roses. And, there

500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0

1990

2000

2004

2009

Source: Applied Geographics Solutions, 2004 Estimates

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ANOTHER YEAR CHOSEN A S Y O U R M O S T P R E F E R R E D H O S P I TA L .

7hanks!

As a result of your vote of confidence, we have been awarded the 2004 Consumer Choice #1 Award from the National Research Corporation for the seventh year in a row. We humbly thank you for your confidence in our ability to provide the finest healthcare in the region. Our thanks also to the hundreds of specialists, physicians,

nurses, technologists and support staffs who provide unparalleled service to our patients. When you choose any of the four Carolinas Medical Center hospitals, you receive nationally recognized care. But then you already knew that – seven years in a row. Why would you go anywhere else?

www.carolinashealthcare.org CAROLINAS MEDICAL CENTER • CAROLINAS MEDICAL CENTER-MERCY • CAROLINAS MEDICAL CENTER-PINEVILLE • CAROLINAS MEDICAL CENTER-UNIVERSITY


quality of life | cost of living

COST OF LIVING

INCOME

The following index compares the cost of consumer goods and services in cities across the nation. The average for the nation is 100. As shown in the following illustrations, Charlotte has a relatively low cost of living.

Total Number of Households • The total number of households in CharlotteUSA has increased by 42.2% 1990 to 2004. • This trend is expected to continue as the total number of households is projected to increase from 926,253 in 2004 to 1,060,185 by 2009 (+14.5%).

Cost of Living Composite Index (US Average = 100) New York

211.6

San Jose, CA

168.9

Los Angeles, CA

156.4

Chicago, IL

130.3

Denver, CO

103.3

Richmond, VA

100.5

Phoenix, AZ

98.7

Raleigh-Durham, NC

92.7

Orlando, FL

95.8

Atlanta, GA

96.5

Cincinnati, OH

94.1

Charlotte, NC

92.3

Austin, TX

95.0

Source: ACCRA Cost of Living Index, 2004 Q4.

Per Capita Income

Median Household Income • In 2004, median household income in the Charlotte region was $47,238, slightly above the U.S. median household income of $45,660. • Median household income for the Charlotte region is expected to increase to $53,299 by the year 2009. Per Capita Income • In 2004, the per capita income in the Charlotte region was $24,639, slightly

CharlotteUSA, 1990 - Projected 2009 $30,000

$25,000

$20,000

$15,000

$10,000

$5,000

0 1990

2000

2004

2009

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

above the national per capita income of $24,583. • The 2004 average household income for this area was $60,493, below the U.S. average which was $61,396. HOUSING AFFORDABILITY Housing options in and around Charlotte are as diverse as the region itself. Affordability depends on location, and there are urban, rural and suburban homes to choose from within the region. According to the U.S. Census 2000 Summary of Housing Characteristics for the Charlotte – Gastonia – Rock Hill MSA, the median house value was $123,000, compared with $130,600 in Atlanta and $139,700 in Charleston. With interest rates so low, it is a good time to buy a house in the Charlotte region, but many transient residents choose to rent. The condo and townhome market is growing, and there are plenty of apartments available for rent in the urban and suburban

CharlotteUSA Per Capita Income Trends Year

Per Capita Income

1990

$13,863

2000

$21,675

2004

$24,639

2009

$28,863

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

50

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quality of life | retail opportunities

Median Household Income CharlotteUSA, 1990 - Projected 2009

$53,299

2009

$47,238

2004

$43,385

2000

$29,525

1990

$0

$10,000

$20,000

$30,000

$40,000

$50,000

$60,000

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

areas. High-rise apartments with views of the Charlotte skyline are popping up in the city, as well as flats in remodeled, older buildings. The Charlotte region is rapidly growing and so are its housing markets. New housing developments are spreading throughout the sixteen counties, supplementing the already wide range of housing options.

There are plenty of homes to choose from in any price range. R E TA I L O P P O R T U N I T I E S Regardless of whether you to like to shop in up-scale stores, such as Nordstrom, or in large retail stores, such as Target and Wal-

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

Mart, the Charlotte region has a store and atmosphere to suit your tastes. Large, indoor malls, such as Valley Hills in Catawba County and Carolina Place in Mecklenburg, offer shoppers the ease and convenience of visiting more than 100 specialty and department stores in one excursion. In addition, the recent completion of Concord Mills, a 1.4 millionsquare-feet outlet mall, gives visitors a wide array of shopping options as well as entertainment, with a 24-screen movie theatre. Aside from traditional enclosed and strip mall settings, the Charlotte region has increasingly more to offer in the sense of neo-traditional style shopping, in which apartments, single-family homes, and retail space are conveniently located in one place. For example, Birkdale Village, located in North Mecklenburg County, combines shopping, dining, and entertainment all within walking distance of many residents. Regardless of what they are looking for, CharlotteUSA residents are bound to find it here. !

51


quality of life | education

E D U C AT I O N There is an extensive network of universities, colleges and community colleges in the Charlotte region that serves individual education and business training needs. Influenced by the business culture of Charlotte, these schools incorporate practical training and experience into the curriculum, while encouraging students to improve themselves and contribute to our society. The universities and colleges have developed a partnership with their surrounding businesses and industries to provide knowledgeable and conscientious leadership to the community. There are 35 colleges and universities to choose from in the Charlotte region, covering a wide range of educational opportunities. From premier private liberal arts colleges such as Davidson, to public urban institutes, such as Central Piedmont Community College, the Charlotte region welcomes students of all ages, nationalities and educational backgrounds. There are schools that offer technical training and schools that prepare health professionals for the challenges they will face in these booming and rapidly-changing industries. In addition to preparing more qualified individuals for the public and private sectors, these schools perform much needed research in evolving fields. The largest university in the Charlotte area is the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. With its current enrollment of more than 18,000 students, UNC Charlotte houses seven different colleges, from arts and sciences to engineering. The Charlotte region also encompasses a branch of the University of South Carolina at Lancaster, which brings benefits of the state’s flagship school to the rural communities of its northern territory. Central Piedmont Community College, North Carolina’s largest community college, teaches technical, college-transfer and professional-development classes at six campuses. Beyond baccalaureate degrees, schools in the Charlotte region offer graduate programs for professionals seeking masters or doctorates in fields ranging from information technology to chemistry. Several business 52

tality school opened an uptown campus in 2004 to assist the service industry in reaching even higher standards. Colleges and universities contribute to CharlotteUSA’s economic health by attracting talented individuals to the region and guaranteeing more qualified professionals in the workplace.

programs have sprung up to cater to Charlotte’s corporate sector. Pfeiffer University, Lenoir-Rhyne College and Winthrop University are among the many schools offering MBA programs. Charlotte’s newest addition, DeVry, also offers an MBA. Providing an example of the ties that bind academia to commerce in Charlotte, the McColl School of Business at Queens University created a mentoring program to link graduate students to corporate leaders in the community. Wake Forest’s Babcock Graduate School of Management, which Forbes recently recognized as #28 on its list of best U.S. business schools, opened a Charlotte campus. Now, more than ever before, North Carolina’s business leaders don’t have to travel far to enhance their education. Whatever the education needs, it is a likely chance that students will find what they are looking for in the Charlotte region. As the city continues to grow, so do its educational opportunities. Johnson & Wales, a prominent business, culinary arts and hospi-

Educational Resources • Extensive regional educational system includes over 300,000 students enrolled from kindergarten through twelfth grade. • Language immersion and specialty programs available from kindergarten through twelfth grade. • French • Spanish • German • International Baccalaureate • Japanese • Global Studies • Home to 35 colleges and universities, offering degrees in 150 different subjects, as well as 50 different graduate programs in: • Business Administration • Chemistry • Precision Engineering • Personnel/Industrial Relations • Mechanical Engineering • Electrical Engineering College and Universities in the Region Barber-Scotia College Belmont Abbey College Carolinas College of Health Sciences Catawba College Catawba Valley Community College Central Piedmont Community College Cleveland Community College Clinton College Davidson College !

Charlotte Region Work Force Education Number

% Total Work Force

1,505,225

-

Less Than High School, No Diploma

327,404

21.75%

High School Graduate

421,559

28.01%

College, No Diploma

312,883

20.79%

Associate Degree

101,695

6.76%

Bachelors Degree

245,111

16.28%

96,573

6.42%

Population Age 25+

Graduate or Professional Degree Source: Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

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quality of life | education

Gardner-Webb University Gaston College Johnson & Wales University Johnson C. Smith University Keller Graduate School of Management in Charlotte Kings College Lenoir-Rhyne College Livingstone College Mitchell Community College North Carolina Center for Applied Textile Technology Northeastern Technical College Pfeiffer University Queens University Rowan-Cabarrus Community College South Piedmont Community College Stanly Community College University of North Carolina at Charlotte University of South Carolina at Lancaster Wingate University Winthrop University York Technical College Source: NC Department of Commerce, 2004

H E A LT H C A R E The CharlotteUSA region has a great deal to offer its residents, both in terms of cutting edge medical technology, as well as in proximity to numerous hospitals and specialist medical services, regardless of which county one is located. The sixteen-county region is home to more than twenty-six local and regional hospitals, most of which are accessible from numerous counties. In addition, the Charlotte region is home to Carolinas Medical Center (CMC), the flagship facility of the Carolinas HealthCare System, the fourth largest healthcare system in the United States.

In early 2005 OrthoCarolina formed and became one of the nation’s largest and most comprehensive orthopedic practices. The Dilworth area division of Carolinas Medical Center was recently listed in U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Hospitals” list for its orthopedic surgery and urology programs. In addition, CMC is classified as a Level 1 trauma center, equipped with a medical helicopter and airplane service. Novant, a health care provider that serves more than 3.4 million people is also represented in the Charlotte region. Its hospitals include Presbyterian Hospital, Presbyterian Hospital Matthews, and Presbyterian Hospital Huntersville. In addition to emergency care and hospital services, the Charlotte region is home to an almost endless number of senior care facilities and specialist physician offices. Regardless of where one chooses to live or work in the Charlotte region, state-of-the-art medical and emergency care is readily accessible.

Ifyou ever had to find a needle in a haystack, The first step in removing a brain tumor is knowing precisely where it is. That’s why Gaston Memorial Hospital uses the StealthStation® surgical navigation system. Prior to surgery, a patient will have an MRI or CAT scan. These images are then converted to a 3D map of the patient’s brain, pinpointing the tumor. This allows our neurosurgeons to determine exactly “The school system how they will remove the tumor, well in advance. Which, in surpassed our expectaturn, can help reduce operation and recovery times. tions.... Many of the kids CaroMont Health is proud to bring advanced, innovative actually behind medical technology to were our community. Image-guided when of they enrolled in neurosurgery is just one example our commitment. To the learn more, please call usschools at 704-671-7804, here.visit online at - Billdoctor. Boyd, President & CEO, Musak LLC www.caromont.org, or ask your

On relocating 90 employees and their families from Seattle to Rock Hill, SC, when the company moved its corporate headquarters to the area.

54

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partnering research & business

partnering research & business: UNCC CRI, a case in point

S

eated on the border of north Charlotte’s NASCAR, manufacturing and newly-emerging retail centers, and the ever-expansive and diverse uptown region, is one the area’s most promising economic engines. The Charlotte Research Institute, a state-of-the-art addition to the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, occupies one hundred acres on the campus, and hosts three major technology centers.

New Opportunities and New Products Stem from Synergy Between Education and Industry Since committing $92 million from a 1996 state bond referendum, receiving a $10 million endowment from Duke Energy and a $1 million endowment from Wachovia, the Charlotte Research Institute (CRI) has been turning heads. This is because CRI, more than just an educational center, is a carefully crafted, meticulously planned clearinghouse for the technological innovation and intellectual capital that will work to propel the region into a dominant position over the next few decades. Deborah Clayton, founding executive director of the Charlotte Research Institute explains, “Within the past decade, collaboration between industry and higher education has become highly integrated, with both the public and the private sector benefiting from the partnership. The collaboration fuels innovation, economic development, and employment.” Nowhere is the potential of CRI more eas56

ily seen than when considering the disciplines it offers. Pursuant to a study undertaken pro bono by McKinsey and Co. in 1999 that outlined the technical strengths and weaknesses of the Charlotte region, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte created three centers to address the needs of the region. Contained under the umbrella of CRI, each center focuses on a particular partnering with the business community. The Center for Optoelectronics and Optical Communications, which conducts studies on data transmission via light rather than wire, directly benefits the area’s communication, digital technology, and medical imaging and signals an industry resurgence. The Center for Precision Metrology provides solutions concerning advanced manufacturing, precision engineering and measurement. By providing technological innovations for mechanical parts measured to a millionth of a meter, the $5 billion NASCAR industry, growing aerospace and defense community, and the area’s troubled manufacturing industry stand to benefit greatly. The Center for eBusiness Technology caters primarily to Charlotte’s formidable financial industry. Issues of security, data capture, transmission and management, creation of faster and more efficient applications, and customer privacy are at the heart of the banking and mortgage industry that has made Charlotte the second largest banking center in the United States. The Center for eBusiness has generated significant interest from Charlotte’s business community and seeks to grow exponentially in the next decade. A recent endeavor, the proposed Center for Bioinformatics, will levy and expand upon North Carolina’s considerable prominence as the third largest biotechnology center

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partnering research & business

in the nation in applied medical, biological, and pharmaceutical technology. The Center recently received a $35 million state appropriation, which will fund the bricks and mortar. This accomplishment heralds a major step toward solidifying the city’s dominance in bioinformatics. While the most obvious benefit appears to favor the major industries that partner with and utilize the institute’s facilities, intellectual talent and innovation, the impact will inevitably be felt throughout all of Charlotte’s communities. Explains Clayton, “The industry/university collaboration by virtue of generating new products, ideas and businesses create new jobs, new spin-off companies, and increased revenue for the region. Further, the person who runs the dry cleaning business, the restaurant, or the local retailer, ends up with more volume and thus more revenue. She adds, “The model of the institute is to enhance economic development through applied research, which inevitably functions to increase the standard of living for the entire community.” Clayton’s enthusiastic and energetic advocacy of CRI, paired with the considerable financial, industrial and political support the endeavor has attracted, has significantly undergirded the institute’s success. For the 2002-2003 year, UNC Charlotte was ranked as the leading southeastern university for number of patents per $10 million of R&D funding. The university ranked second nationally for the opening of fourteen new start-ups, ranked second nationally in inventions disclosed and third and fourth nationally, respectively, for patent applications filed and licenses executed. Among these accomplishments, core technologies emerged in security, telecommunications, microchip circuitry, genetically modified (GM) organism assessments, and aerospace manufacturing. Prominent names such as Boeing, Duke Power, General Dynamics, Goodrich, Digital Optics Corporation and others have worked hand-in-hand with UNC Charlotte to create and harness the benefits of intellectual property development. The Charlotte Research Institute has also received considerable federal financial support for its initiatives, including funds from the

National Institute of Health, The Department of Defense, the Department of Education and the National Science Foundation. The amount of support is only expected to grow as the institute evolves, eventually culminating in certification of UNC Charlotte as a “Research Extensive University,” which, by definition, produces 50+ doctorate degrees over fifteen disciplines annually. Recognition A well-recognized study executed by the Centralina Council of Governments (CCOG) highlighted the Charlotte Research Institute’s considerable assets to the region, as well as provided a blueprint for further developing and nurturing economic growth and stability in the region. Within this blueprint, CCOG not only recognized CRI’s contribution to development and entrepreneurial activity, but also recommended six target industries “with high growth potential that also play to the area’s strengths.” All six target industries, Defense/Security, Automotive/NASCAR, Software Development, Bioinformatics, Optoelectronics and Hybrid Vehicle Development, are served by the carefully developed curriculum of the Charlotte Research Institute. This curriculum facilitates the development of a rich local labor pool, which when combined with well-outfitted research facilities, makes Charlotte a very attractive destination to new and relocating businesses. The CCOG study formally recognized the Charlotte Research Institute for its contribution to Charlotte’s growth potential. CRI’s renowned faculty and state-of-the-art facilities, paired with Charlotte’s stable yet diverse economic platform, thriving business community and reasonable cost of living suggest a powerful formula for success. The evidence thus far supports this.

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

Word of the Charlotte Research Institute has already begun to ripple through the halls of major educational institutions across the country, and to industries in the region. Certified as a “Research Intensive University” by the Carnegie Foundation, UNC Charlotte is well on its way to achieving its ‘Research Extensive” status. In addition to awarding the required number of annual doctorates to receive these certifications, the institute has also developed a competitive fund-matching program to facilitate research funding for post-doctorate candidates. CRI has also established partnerships with Western Carolina University and Clemson University to maximize academic, financial and political resources to strengthen the region’s draw to the micro-optics industries, as well as establishing s i g n i fi c a n t industrial partnerships in its three major centers. Major corporations such as Caterpillar, Intel, Corning Cable Systems, and Boeing are currently on board utilizing its technological and intellectual offerings. These companies, called corporate affiliates, corporate representatives or corporate tenants, represent the heart of the educational/industrial collaborative that supports the framework for the institute’s success. As for the community of higher education, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte has firmly established itself by virtue of its intellectual property (IP) statistics and respected faculty. As a result, CRI is enjoying considerable recognition and interest in its symposia and conferences. This fall, a visit by Noble Laureate, Dr. Leo Esaki, was wellattended by physics experts. Also this fall, leaders from government, industry, education, community and civic organizations, joined the Charlotte Research Institute, Centralina Council of Governments, and the ! 57


partnering research & business

Charlotte Regional Partnership for the presentation of the strategic regional economic development plan that welcomed Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Economic Development, David Sampson. Nationally prominent cyber security experts representing industry, government and academia gathered to discuss current findings in the IT community, and the institute also hosted the Third Annual Southeast Optics Conference and Symposium, attracting a number of wellknown speakers. Most notably, the inaugural Charlotte Research Institute Conference featured a compelling presentation on ‘slow light,’ which attracted hosts of scholars and leaders from around the world. These conferences demonstrate the power and possibilities of a unified front to bettering economic, political, technological and humanitarian situations in the world community. Comments Clayton, “Seeing the vast amount of interest in the institute and its numerous offerings is enormously gratifying. We are definitely on course to achieve our ultimate goal: to become globally recognized as a top-tier research community.” Future Major Charlotte businesses and government officials are also leading the charge to establish the research institute. External funding for CRI increased 146 percent in the 2002-2003 fiscal year, firmly securing what has been referred to as a healthy “market share,” against competitive R&D research facilities. A large number of prominent business leaders from Duke Power, Bank of America, Goodrich, General Dynamics, and Wachovia, just to name a few, now champion the institute by serving on its board of directors. Several regional organizations extended their influence and resources to the Kaiser and McKinsey Studies, which inspired the creation of CRI, and CCOG’s Economic Assessment Report brought CRI to the forefront of the region’s economic development plan. As a result, several state and local leaders have embraced the aims of the institution and are now vocal advocates for its prosperity and continued success. As Mayor Patrick McCrory has commented, “The work of UNCC’s Charlotte Research Institute will help 58

to keep Charlotte on the cutting edge of the technologies of the future, such as Optoelectronics, Bioinformatics and Hybrid Automotive and Motorsports.” According to Clayton, “These groups, in concert, have allowed the institute to thrive, and we enjoy a level of collaboration, partnership and community building that really separates the Charlotte Research Institute from anything in which I have ever been involved. An overall optimism, energy and enthusiasm for what is truly best for the region far supercedes the needs of any one

organization. It is a real gift to be involved in this effort.” As 2005 unfolds, the Charlotte Research Institute and its many allies will see some palpable fruits of their labor, as it begins the process of moving into new buildings. Clayton and her colleagues will continue coordinating academic resources and industrial inspiration to move the University of North Carolina at Charlotte to the top of the class, and propel Charlotte and the surrounding counties into the next wave of their economic futures.

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www.charlotteUSA.com


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2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

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59


Shelby

74

150

321

Crowders Mtn.St. Pk.

85

70

40

150

Gastonia

27

Mount Holly

Lowesville

73

Lake Norman

16

77

21

77

150

485

Stallings

74

Mint Hill 601

UNION

200

52

Albemarle

Richfield

24

742

KY

MI OH WV

Morrow Mtn. St. Pk.

GA

Lake Tillery

Badin

Badin Lake

FL

SC

100m

NC

VA

MD

PA

NY

400m

NJ

650m

CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

2005

Charlotte

IN

AL

TN

S T A N LY Locust

73

MS

IL

Tuckertown Lake

High Rock Lake

Rockwell

Concord

85

152

C A B A R RU S

29

Kannapolis

Mooresville

601

The Charlotte Region Salisbury

R O WA N

Charlotte

Mtn. Island Lake

Duke Power St. Pk.

Statesville

IREDELL

MECKLENBURG

C A T AW B A

Newton

GASTON

Kings Mtn. St. Pk.

182

Lincolnton

Kings Mountain

CLEVELAND

27

LINCOLN

321

Hickory

16

64

Taylorsville

ALEXANDER

21

charlotteUSA choose


Sumter Nat. For.

Riv e r

K E Y

Catawba

Expressways Railroads

CharlotteUSA

Major Highways

601

Kershaw

Airports

ANSON

9

Cheraw St. Pk.

Cheraw

52

Chester

York

Gaston

Lincoln

Catawba

Alexander

Union

Cabarrus

Rowan

Lancaster

Mecklenburg

Iredell

Chesterfield

Anson

Stanly

CHARLOTTEUSA CITY-STATE

Cleveland

1

CHESTERFIELD

Pageland

C A R O L I N A

742

Wadesboro

C A R O L I N A

• Part of the nation’s 8th largest trucking center • Home to an inland intermodal terminal operated by the North Carolina State Ports Authority • At the center of the largest consolidated rail system in the country • Served by four interstate highways (I-40, I-77, I-485 and I-85) • Served by nine of the nation’s top 10 trucking companies

601

S O U T H

N O R T H

LANCASTER

200

Lancaster

75

CharlotteUSA on the Move

Great Falls

9

River

• Distribution hub for the fifthlargest urban region in the U.S. • More flights per capita than almost any other U.S. region • Airport ranked 13th nationwide in operations • Located midway on the East Coast between New York City and Miami, Florida • Within a 24-hour drive of more than 56% of the nation’s population

CHESTER

Chester

21

521

74

e

CHARLOTTEUSA CORRIDORS OF COMMERCE

S

E

9

72 121

Rock Hill

Monroe

De

W

N

Broad

YO R K

49

York

e Pe

Riv e r


ALEXANDER COUNTY

W

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Taylorsville Population: 1,819 Total County Population: 35,156 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 19.6% 29.5% 11.7%

Number 6,890 10,367 4,103

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division) Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

ith a new emphasis on economic development, Alexander County’s probusiness leadership has the county ready and poised for growth. Located in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, Alexander’s major transportation corridors, US Hwy. 64, NC 90, and NC 127 put most areas of the county within 15-20 minutes of Interstates 40 and 77. According to the NC Association of County Commissioners, the county boasts the seventh lowest 2004-05 property tax rate compared to the state’s 100 counties. And, the John Locke Foundation lists the county as having the lowest combined property tax burden in the state.

www.co.alexander.nc.us

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N % Total Number Work Force Population Age 25 Plus

23,655

Contract Construction (15-17)

318

Less Than High School, No Diploma

7,458

31.53%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

201

High School Graduate

8,434

35.65%

College, No Diploma

4,166

17.61%

Associate Degree

1,456

6.16%

1,528

6.46%

613

2.59%

67

Manufacturing (20-39)

2,893

Mining (10-14)

1

Public Administration (90-98)

268

Retail Trade (52-59)

1,601

Bachelor’s Degree

Services (70-89)

2,727

Graduate or Professional School Degree

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

188

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

129

Unclassified (99)

43

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

The Mitchell Gold Company Hancock & Moore, Inc. Craftmaster Furniture Corporation Schneider Mills Industries, Inc. Broyhill Furniture Industries, Inc. Alexvale Furniture Inc.

600 500 430 356 330 330

Alexander County Economic Development Office 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

62

27,505 19,506 490 2.51%

Low taxes, affordable land and buildings, and ready and willing work force make Alexander County an attractive location for new industry and business. The public school system consists of 10 facilities all of which have seen new construction in the past several years. More than $25 million has been spent recently on school construction. At total cost of $1.6 million, Alexander County has the only satellite site for Catawba Valley Community College. Manufacturing employs 30 percent of the workforce with companies like The Mitchell Gold Co., Hancock & Moore, Broyhill Furniture, Schneider Mills, and Shurtape Technologies providing stable, quality employment. Agribusiness is also important in the county economy with 2003 Farm income estimated at $88.2 million. Alexander County offers residents a chance to work in high growth industrial and commercial areas while living in crime-free and traffic-free communities.

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$38,687

2004 Median Household

$41,015

2009 Median Household (Projected)

$45,817

2004 Per Capita

$21,047

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Alexander County Chamber of Commerce David A. Icenhour Economic Development Director 621 Liledoun Rd. Taylorsville, NC 28681 828-632-1161 phone 828-632-0059 fax dicenhour@co.alexander.nc.us

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ANSON COUNTY

A

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Wadesboro Population: 3,494 Total County Population: 25,140 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 19.5% 28.4% 10.6%

Number 4,907 7,142 2,679

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division)

nson County represents the best of both worlds – open, tranquil spaces in the rolling hills of the Piedmont and a dedicated business community. Formed in 1750 from Bladen County, Anson subsequently gave birth to Rowan, Mecklenburg, Richmond, Montgomery and Union counties. Its rich past is kept alive through written and oral tradition, three museums, theater, and the art and historical societies. The textile industry’s struggle in the past decade has only made Anson’s industrial and business community more determined to seek innovative solutions to improve the economic climate. Expanding and upgrading existing

www.ansoncounty.org

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N % Total Number Work Force

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

52

Population Age 25 Plus

16,703

Contract Construction (15-17)

58

Less Than High School, No Diploma

5,021

30.06%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

134

High School Graduate

6,441

38.56%

Manufacturing (20-39)

326

College, No Diploma

2,817

16.87%

Associate Degree

935

5.60%

Bachelor’s Degree

1,064

6.37%

425

2.54%

Mining (10-14)

0

Public Administration (90-98)

449

Retail Trade (52-59)

724

Services (70-89)

Graduate or Professional School Degree

1,439

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

176

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

20

Unclassified (99)

5

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Dan River Hornwood Wade Manufacturing Cuddy Universal Fiber Systems Coffing Hoists

500 330 228 220 160 160

Anson County Economic Development 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

19,653 10,775 651 6.04%

businesses is as much a focus as attracting new ones. The recent introduction of Alltel’s DSL (digital subscriber lines) to 96 percent of the county further illustrates Anson’s eagerness to embrace technology as a tool for growth. One of Anson’s significant advantages is the willingness of South Piedmont Community College to offer support and training opportunities responsive to business needs. Anson County school facilities have all been built or upgraded in the last decade; Anson Community Hospital, a part of the Carolinas HealthCare System, has recently announced plans to add new equipment and services. As might be expected in this largely rural county, Ansonians find their entertainment out of doors through community parks, an 18-hole golf course, and fishing, hunting and boating opportunities. However, access to “big city” amenities is only minutes away.

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$29,583

2004 Median Household

$32,107

2009 Median Household Projected

$34,852

2004 Per Capita

$15,436

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Anson County Economic Department Kevin Gullette Director of Economic Development P.O. Drawer 339 Wadesboro, NC 28170 704-694-9513 phone 704-694-7015 fax kgullette@email.co.anson.nc.us

63


CABARRUS COUNTY

A

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Concord Population: 58,490 Total County Population: 146,248 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 20.5% 30.0% 9.6%

Number 30,024 43,903 14,112

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division) Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

s Cabarrus County heads into the future, it is poised for sustained growth and development. The county is attractive to businesses with its close proximity to Charlotte and the I-85 corridor, well-trained diversified workforce, multitude of available sites and buildings, and its excellent quality of life. The economic progress and expansion of the county has been directly related to the variety and proximity of the transportation network. This includes mainline rail, nearby Charlotte Douglas International Airport, Concord Regional Airport and a superb highway system comprised of I-85, US 29, US 601, NC 73, NC 49, and I-77.

www.co.cabarrus.nc.us

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N % Total Number Work Force

452

Population Age 25 Plus

95,308

Contract Construction (15-17)

2,926

Less Than High School, No Diploma

21,001

22.01%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

1,656

High School Graduate

28,853

30.27%

Manufacturing (20-39)

7,461

College, No Diploma

20,784

21.81%

Associate Degree

6,795

7.13%

13,508

14.17%

4,397

4.61%

Mining (10-14)

52

Public Administration (90-98)

2,611

Retail Trade (52-59)

14,462

Bachelor’s Degree

Services (70-89)

19,759

Graduate or Professional School Degree

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

1,634

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

2,946

Unclassified (99)

127

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Northwest Medical Center

3,700

Philip Morris

2,600

Wal-Mart

750

CT Communications

670

Sysco Food Services

575

Cabarrus Regional Partnership 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

64

112,068 77,965 3,306 4.24%

A diversified employee base with a strong work ethic brings companies to Cabarrus County. A well renowned school system prepares students for future careers. Local colleges and universities offer advanced training and degrees. Cabarrus County offers many available sites and buildings with excellent infrastructure. Well-designed business parks with accessible utilities and easy road access are located across the county. Buildings are available from under 5,000 sq. ft. to almost 700,000 sq. ft. Cabarrus County is a tourist destination for hundreds of thousands of race fans attending races at Lowe’s Motor Speedway each year. Concord Mills attracts tourists with its super regional shopping and entertainment. Reed Gold Mine, the site of the first documented gold find in the United States, is located in eastern Cabarrus County.

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$46,218

2004 Median Household

$49,661

2009 Median Household Projected

$55,192

2004 Per Capita

$25,172

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Cabarrus Regional Partnership Ryan McDaniels Director of Economic Development 3003 Dale Earnhardt Blvd. Kannapolis, NC 28083 704-784-4600 phone 704-784-4603 fax rlmcdaniels@cabarrusedc.com

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C ATAWBA COUNTY

C

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Hickory Population: 39,153 Total County Population: 148,471 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 20.2% 29.3% 10.7%

Number 30,080 43,591 15,945

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division) Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

atawba County is located in the western part of North Carolina in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Its estimated population of 148,500 covers 405 square miles; its largest city is Hickory. Catawba County's three lakes and its location exert a strong influence on the county's climate, moderating winter temperatures and providing refreshing summer breezes. The county's scenic beauty has been used on two occasions for major motion pictures and is home to seven beautiful golf courses, the Hickory Motor Speedway, Bass Fishing Tournaments, minor league baseball, the symphony, the Hickory Museum of Art, theatre, choral, and much more.

www.catawbacounty.biz

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total % Number Work Force Population Age 25 Plus

99,121

Contract Construction (15-17)

4,159

Less Than High School, No Diploma

25,183

25.40%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

2,554

High School Graduate

31,207

31.48%

College, No Diploma

19,230

19.40%

Associate Degree

6,934

7.00%

409

Manufacturing (20-39)

29,272

Mining (10-14)

30

Public Administration (90-98)

3,021

Retail Trade (52-59)

17,049

Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree

11,985

12.09%

Services (70-89)

23,787

Graduate or Professional School Degree

4,582

4.62%

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

4,833

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

6,758

Unclassified (99)

334

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

CommScope Inc.

2,000 +

Frye Regional Medical Center

1,000 +

Corning Cable Systems

1,000 +

Hickory Chair Co.

850 +

Bassett Upholstery

800 +

Catawba County Economic Development Corporation 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

116,012 81,405 2,676 3.29%

Catawba County is a heavily industrialized area. It is known worldwide as a furniture manufacturing center with internationally known showrooms such as the Hickory Furniture Mart. Its traditional industries of furniture, hosiery and textiles have been expanded by new businesses in the technology sector. It is the nation's center for the manufacture and development of fiber optics and telecommunications cable. Siecor and CommScope are two of the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major employers, each with more than 2,000 employees. Alcatel, NA, the world's largest manufacturer of telecommunications cable products and the second-largest telephone equipment company, is headquartered in Hickory. Two of the largest printers and publishers in the state are located in Catawba County. The Hickory Metro Higher Education Center (HMHEC), a joint education center, serves the needs for graduate, undergraduate, non-credit certificate courses, research, and specialized workforce training.

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$40,589

2004 Median Household

$43,650

2009 Median Household Projected

$48,883

2004 Per Capita

$23,189

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Catawba County Economic Development Corporation Scott L. Millar President 100A Southwest Blvd., Ste. 201 Newton, NC 28658 828-464-7198 phone 828-465-8150 fax smillar@catawbacountync.gov

65


CHESTER COUNTY

C

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Chester Population: 6,409 Total County Population: 33,833 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 19.0% 28.8% 11.2%

Number 6,421 9,730 3,820

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division) Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

hester County’s brand of ‘Southern Hospitality’ extended by its citizenry is second to none. Whether choosing to live in a small town or on an expansive country farm, Chester County is the best place in South Carolina to raise a family! Chester County is strategically located in the center of three large commercial centers – Charlotte, N.C.; Columbia, S.C.; and the Greenville-Spartanburg metropolitan area. Rail and highway transportation feeding each of these centers is impressive and allows area businesses and industry to send and receive goods quickly and at low cost. Although textiles served as the major industrial base for decades, Chester

www.chestercounty.org

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total % Number Work Force

65

Population Age 25 Plus

22,191

Contract Construction (15-17)

375

Less Than High School, No Diploma

7,309

32.94%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

265

High School Graduate

8,016

36.12%

College, No Diploma

3,554

16.02%

Associate Degree

1,204

5.43%

1,356

6.11%

752

3.39%

Manufacturing (20-39)

5,377

Mining (10-14)

0

Public Administration (90-98)

784

Retail Trade (52-59)

1,508

Bachelor’s Degree

Services (70-89)

2,749

Graduate or Professional School Degree

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

485

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

513

Unclassified (99)

424

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Springs Industries

1,092

F. Schumacher & Company

390

Weyerhaeuser

375

Guardian Industries

335

Cultured Stone

276

Chester County Economic Development 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

66

26,332 16,104 1,098 6.82%

County has enjoyed a diversification of its industrial base over the past 20 years. Textiles remain a major player in the area economy, but other businesses and industry have found the workforce in Chester County to be reliable and productive and the infrastructure beneficial for their businesses. Today the county produces textiles, plastics, steel, glass, fiberglass, paper, wood products, and several types of specialty chemicals. The area's retail businesses have also seen growth with the changeover from an agrarian economy to a more diverse manufacturing economy. Greater employment opportunities yielding greater disposable income have attracted a host of new retail establishments, giving residents more shopping choices and keeping the county's dollars at home. More than 300 businesses and industries make up the membership of the Chester Chamber of Commerce.

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$32,701

2004 Median Household

$35,101

2009 Median Household Projected

$37,956

2004 Per Capita

$17,453

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Chester County Economic Development Karlisa Parker Economic Development Director P.O. Drawer 580 Chester, SC 29706 803-377-1216 phone 803-377-2102 fax kparker@chestercounty.org

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CHESTERFIELD COUNTY

C

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Cheraw Population: 5,436 Total County Population: 43,366 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 19.4% 29.4% 11.2%

Number 8,443 12,745 4,870

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division)

hesterfield County is located just southeast of the city of Charlotte in the northern portion of South Carolina. With the greatest number of manufacturing employers per capita in the region, Chesterfield boasts considerable economic leverage by virtue of its proximity to larger cities including Charlotte, N.C.; Florence, S.C., and Columbia, S.C. Chesterfield also provides easy access to no less than five major highway systems and the Port of Charleston. Chesterfield County has a proud labor force, both in terms of quality and quantity, with a talented manufacturing pool in a

www.chesterfieldcountysc.org

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total % Number Work Force

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

144

Population Age 25 Plus

28,663

Contract Construction (15-17)

217

Less Than High School, No Diploma

10,054

35.07%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

301

High School Graduate

9,936

34.66%

College, No Diploma

4,341

15.14%

Associate Degree

1,610

5.62%

1,861

6.49%

861

3.00%

Manufacturing (20-39)

3,240

Mining (10-14)

31

Public Administration (90-98)

658

Retail Trade (52-59)

3,083

Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree

Services (70-89)

2,932

Graduate or Professional School Degree

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

460

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

1,155

Unclassified (99)

87

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

INA USA Corporation

Unlisted

Conbraco Industries

732

A.O. Smith Corporation

644

Wal-Mart Distribution Center

639

Highland Industries

377

Chesterfield County Economic Development Board 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

33,821 20,133 1,810 8.99%

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

union-free environment. The county has sustained its industry base by developing educational centers such as the Gene Crawford Accelerated Technology School and a satellite campus for Northeastern Technical College. Yet, while Chesterfield has one foot planted firmly in its history, it clearly has its eyes trained on the future. By encouraging existing industry expansion, hi-tech jobs, technology and small business development, Chesterfield has diversified offerings and is a vital partner in the Charlotte USA region. The location of Wal-Martâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new distribution center offers great opportunities for the area, and has encouraged new manufacturing facilities to relocate or expand nearby. Chesterfield County continues to grow: In 2003, Chesterfield county announced more than $72 million in new capital and announced 424 new jobs.

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$29,575

2004 Median Household

$31,575

2009 Median Household Projected

$34,309

2004 Per Capita

$16,202

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Chesterfield County Economic Development Board Cherry G. McCoy Executive Director P.O. Box 192 Chesterfield, SC 29709 843-623-6500 phone 843-623-3167 fax cherryatcc@shtc.net

67


CLEVELAND COUNTY

R

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Shelby Population: 19,598 Total County Population: 98,808 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 18.9% 28.8% 11.0%

Number 18,724 27,942 10,868

Applied Greographics Solutions, 2004 estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division) Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

230

Contract Construction (15-17)

1,414

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

anked one of the top ten best small markets by Southern Business and Development magazine, Cleveland County is easily accessed by four major interstates (I-85, I-77, I-26 and I-40) that connect the county to the southeast and beyond. Charlotte Douglas International Airport is just 40 minutes away and links Cleveland County to the world. The manufacturing climate in Cleveland County is diverse with such products as truck cabs, compact discs, transmissions, aircraft parts, ceramic capacitor material, electric motors, emergency products, and various specialized textiles. Industries range from operations that employ just a

978

Manufacturing (20-39)

5,505

Mining (10-14)

20

www.clevelandchamber.org

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N % Total Number Work Force Population Age 25 Plus

64,926

Less Than High School, No Diploma

18,118

27.91%

High School Graduate

22,233

34.24%

College, No Diploma

11,573

17.82%

Associate Degree

4,520

6.96%

Public Administration (90-98)

2,376

Retail Trade (52-59)

8,506

Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree

5,722

8.81%

Services (70-89)

12,165

Graduate or Professional School Degree

2,760

4.25%

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

871

Wholesale Trade (50-51) Unclassified (99)

INCOME

147

Applied Greographics Solutions, 2004 estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

PPG Industries

1,500

Cleveland Regional Medical Center

1,100

Wal-Mart Distribution

600

Universal Manufacturing and Logistics

600

Reliance Electric Rockwell Automation

550

Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Greographics Solutions, 2004 estimates

68

Applied Greographics Solutions, 2004 estimates

3,081

76,685 48,997 2,648 5.40%

handful of people to large manufacturing plants with well over 1,000 employees. Cleveland County is home to numerous ISO 9000 certified companies, has no union activity, boasts 35 percent of the workforce involved in manufacturing, and is classified as an attainment county. Officials in Cleveland County are committed to attracting new industry partners. Since 1997, three new industrial parks have been developed, each served with water, sewer and fiber optic infrastructure. The county also maintains an inventory of over 2.8 million square feet of Class A Industrial space ready for tenant occupancy. In addition, the cities of Kings Mountain and Shelby, located in Cleveland County, are ranked by Site Selection Magazine as two of the top 100 small cities for corporate location.

Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$35,317

2004 Median Household

$38,071

2009 Median Household Projected

$41,302

2004 Per Capita

$18,940

Applied Greographics Solutions, 2004 estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce Scott Darnell Senior VP for Economic Development P.O. Box 879 Shelby, NC 28151 704-487-8521 phone 704-487-7458 fax scott@clevelandchamber.org

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â&#x20AC;˘

www.charlotteUSA.com


GASTON COUNTY

G

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Gastonia Population: 67,821 Total County Population: 193,911 Age 20- 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 19.6% 29.5% 10.7%

Number 38,181 57,320 20,903

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division) Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

700

Contract Construction (15-17)

3,039

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

2,290

Manufacturing (20-39)

14,171

Mining (10-14)

aston County is the second largest county in the Charlotte region (population near 200,000) and aims to be “the most desirable place to locate a new or expanding business,” as promoted in its ‘Gaston 2012’ strategic plan. With 16 fully equipped business parks – among the most in the region – and numerous buildings ranging from high-end to inexpensive, Gaston has a site to suit any prospect. Gaston’s location just west of Charlotte means it is closer to Charlotte Douglas International Airport than any other county, and even many CharlotteMecklenburg locations. Interstate 85 runs through Gaston’s center, providing superior interstate access for hundreds of businesses. Many sites also have rail service.

15

Public Administration (90-98)

3,368

www.gaston.org

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total % Number Work Force Population Age 25 Plus

129,889

Less Than High School, No Diploma

37,444

28.83%

High School Graduate

38,620

29.73%

College, No Diploma

27,564

21.22%

Associate Degree

8,249

6.35%

Retail Trade (52-59)

14,679

Bachelor’s Degree

13,136

10.11%

Services (70-89)

25,191

Graduate or Professional School Degree

4,876

3.75%

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

1,964

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

3,572

Unclassified (99)

313

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

CaroMont Health

1,000 +

Dana Spicer

1,000 +

American & Efird, Inc.

1,000 +

Pharr Yarns, Inc.

1,000 +

Sara Lee

1,000 +

Gaston County EDC

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

151,558 98,740 5,572 5.64%

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

Due to a number of recent textile plant closings, Gaston offers Tier III incentives (among the best in the region) and a workforce eager for new opportunities. Gaston College provides a broad range of general and customized training, including state-of-the-art CNC machines and other advanced equipment – whatever a new or expanding company needs for its workforce. Gaston’s public schools and personnel have won dozens of state and national awards in recent years, including State Superintendent of the Year in 2001. Gaston Memorial Hospital is very advanced and was recently named one of the top 100 hospitals in the country. The Gaston County Economic Development Commission has more years of experience than any other EDC outside of Charlotte and is highly adaptable to client requirements.

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$39,515

2004 Median Household

$42,424

2009 Median Household Projected

$47,645

2004 Per Capita

$21,839

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Gaston County Economic Development Commission Donny Hicks Executive Director P.O. Box 2339 Gastonia, NC 28053-2339 704-825-4046 phone 704-825-4066 fax dhicks@co.gaston.nc.us

69


IREDELL COUNTY

I

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Statesville Population: 23,846 Total County Population: 136,650 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 19.0% 30.0% 10.4%

Number 25,977 41,035 14,252

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division) Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

redell County is one of the few counties in the Carolinas with two connecting interstates; I-77 north and south, and I-40 east and west intersecting in Statesville, the county seat. Additionally, I-85 is only fifteen miles away. Recreation, fun and quality of life abound on and along Lake Norman’s 532-mile shoreline. The county is a very pro-business community. Local taxes favor business, and the tax rate remains among the lowest of all the counties surrounding Charlotte. Health care is served in three local hospitals. Nearby large cities of Charlotte and Winston-Salem provide medical school referrals and consultations.

www.mooresvillenc.org

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N % Total Number Work Force

425

Population Age 25 Plus

90,188

Contract Construction (15-17)

3,038

Less Than High School, No Diploma

19,592

21.72%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

1,794

High School Graduate

29,010

32.17%

College, No Diploma

19,039

21.11%

Associate Degree

6,991

7.75%

Manufacturing (20-39)

10,677

Mining (10-14)

11

Public Administration (90-98)

3,039

Retail Trade (52-59)

12,032

Bachelor’s Degree

11,329

12.56%

Services (70-89)

21,598

Graduate or Professional School Degree

4,227

4.69%

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

1,547

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

3,607

Unclassified (99)

497

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Lowe’s Companies, Inc.

1,500

Lake Norman Regional Medical Center

930

Wal-Mart Supercenter

500

NGK Ceramics USA, Inc.

380

SuperTarget

350

Mooresville-South Iredell Chamber 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

70

105,371 71,007 2,839 4.00%

It is corporate headquarters to Lowe’s Companies, Inc., the world’s second largest home improvement retailer, situated on a 165-acre campus with 1,500 employees, and expected to grow to 8,000 to 10,000 employees. Numerous vendors are moving to nearby offices and showroom space; over 400 vendors are anticipated in the next few years. Nicknamed “Race City USA,” Mooresville has become to racing what Hollywood is to the movies. Approximately 60 race teams and over 100 race-related suppliers are located throughout the county. Fully served industrial sites ranging from 2 to 100-plus acres are zoned for industrial use and available throughout the county. Norfolk Southern Railroad considers Iredell County one of its top three sites in North Carolina. Statesville Regional Airport is currently undergoing a major expansion which will lengthen the runway to 7,000 feet.

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$42,090

2004 Median Household

$45,651

2009 Median Household Projected

$51,242

2004 Per Capita

$22,790

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Greater Statesville Development Corporation Jeff McKay, Director, Economic Development 115 E. Front St. Statesville, NC 28677 704-871-0062 phone; 704-871-0223 fax jmckay@gsdc.org

Mooresville-South Iredell Chamber

Melanie O’Connell Underwood, Executive Vice President P.O. Box 628 Mooresville, NC 28115 704-664-6922 phone; 704-664-2549 fax mou@mooresvillenc.org

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LANCASTER COUNTY

L

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Lancaster Population: 8,395 Total County Population: 62,895 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 20.2% 29.8% 11.2%

Number 12,736 18,730 7,056

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division) Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

ancaster County is located adjacent to Charlotte, in the northern portion of South Carolina. Its metropolitan area offers a wide array of opportunities. The county has 14 industrial parks, with more than 5,000 available acres, and millions of gallons of excess capacities of water and sewer. The countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s close proximity to Charlotte Douglas International Airport and Interstates 77, 85, and 485, and the convenience of rail service provided by CSX, Norfolk-

www.lancastersc-edc.com

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total % Number Work Force

214

Population Age 25 Plus

42,434

Contract Construction (15-17)

1,099

Less Than High School, No Diploma

12,914

30.44%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

1,296

High School Graduate

15,126

35.65%

Manufacturing (20-39)

4,655

College, No Diploma

7,355

17.33%

Associate Degree

2,759

6.50%

Mining (10-14)

10

Public Administration (90-98)

999

Retail Trade (52-59)

4,025

Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree

2,843

6.70%

Services (70-89)

7,504

Graduate or Professional School Degree

1,437

3.39%

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

384

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

558

Unclassified (99)

133

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Springs Industries

2,400

Cardinal Health

700

Duracell, USA

601

Kanawaha Insurance

560

Berkshire Weaving

145

Lancaster County Economic Development Commission 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

49,885 31,537 2,026 6.42%

Southern, and the Lancaster & Chester Railway short line, make Lancaster County an excellent location for manufacturing and distribution centers. The northern section of Lancaster County borders the city of Charlotte and the Ballantyne community, the premier residential and business location in the Charlotte metropolitan area, making this area the perfect location for corporate headquarters and back office facilities. In addition, the incentives offered by the county and the state of South Carolina are among the best in the Southeastern U.S. Lancaster County understands the needs of business and welcomes all opportunities for economic development.

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$34,772

2004 Median Household

$37,483

2009 Median Household Projected

$40,113

2004 Per Capita

$18,794

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Lancaster County Economic Development Commission Keith Tunnell President P.O. Box 973 Lancaster, SC 29721 803-285-9471 phone 803-285-9472 fax keith.tunnell@lancastersc-edc.com

71


LINCOLN COUNTY

L

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Lincolnton

things are still made; where skilled workers know how to use

their hands as well as their heads;

Population: 9,966

where business, industry and distribution

Total County Population: 68,354 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

incoln County is a place where

% Total Population 19.0% 30.3% 11.1%

Number 12,980 20,745 7,648

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

quality small town, country and lakeside living; where traffic doesn’t roar by but interstates are just down the road; where big city amenities are nearby but urban sprawl doesn’t yet intrude.

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division)

exist comfortably side-by-side with

www.lincolneda.org

Lincoln County provides the perfect environment for business. The county

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N % Total Number Work Force

boasts a highly responsive infrastructure. From a strong business retention and

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09) Contract Construction (15-17)

143

Population Age 25 Plus

45,739

1,110

Less Than High School, No Diploma

13,057

28.55%

639

High School Graduate

14,592

31.90%

College, No Diploma

9,728

21.27%

Associate Degree

2,547

5.57%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69) Manufacturing (20-39)

6,186

Mining (10-14)

10

Public Administration (90-98)

1,572

Retail Trade (52-59)

3,571

Bachelor’s Degree

4,305

9.41%

Services (70-89)

6,111

Graduate or Professional School Degree

1,510

3.30%

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

615

expansion program to an extensive

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

716

selection of prime business parks, up to

Unclassified (99)

163

600 acres, and free-standing locations, Lincoln County is the perfect locality for

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

INCOME Year

Total

all types of business.

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

The Timken Company

682

RSI Home Products, Inc.

650

Mohican Mills, Inc.

500

Robert Bosch Tool Corporation

490

Blum, Inc.

410

Lincoln County Economic Development Authority 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed

2004 Annual Average 53,312 36,131 1,415 3.92%

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

72

2000 Median Household

$41,817

business climate, the county is rapidly

2004 Median Household

$44,830

being recognized as a manufacturing

2009 Median Household Projected

$50,008

and distribution hub with a growing

2004 Per Capita

$21,707

Because of Lincoln County’s superior

automotive sector. Companies are taking advantage of Lincoln County’s low tax

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

rate, available skilled labor, commitment

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N

to learning and absence of labor unions. Because of Lincoln County’s

Lincoln County Economic Development Authority

high quality of life, the county has become attractive to a diversity of international and domestic companies. From location to quality of life,

Executive Director P.O. Box 2050

Lincoln County, North Carolina, is the perfect place for living and the perfect place for working.

Barry I. Matherly

Lincolnton, NC 28093-2050 704-732-1511 phone 704-736-8451 fax leda@vnet.net

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MECKLENBURG COUNTY

M

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Charlotte Population: 580,597 Total County Population: 769,746 Age 20- 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 22.6% 31.4% 8.7%

Number 174,501 241,931 67,198

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division) Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

ecklenburg County offers an opportunity to experience the advantages of a “big-city” location but in a much more manageably sized community and at a cost that is consistently below the national average. Mecklenburg County also has a diversified economy. Mecklenburg County has more manufacturing firms than any other county in the Carolinas; over 1,275. It is also one of the nation’s largest distribution and trucking center locations. Charlotte has become well known for its financial services industry, now ranking second only to New York. At present, Mecklenburg County is home to nine Fortune 500 company headquarters facilities.

www.charmeck.nc.us

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total % Number Work Force

4,023

Population Age 25 Plus

502,200

Contract Construction (15-17)

26,471

Less Than High School, No Diploma

70,134

13.97%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

59,694

High School Graduate

100,917

20.09%

Manufacturing (20-39)

42,490

College, No Diploma

113,045

22.51%

Associate Degree

33,992

6.77%

Bachelor’s Degree

132,199

26.32%

51,913

10.34%

Mining (10-14)

218

Public Administration (90-98)

13,536

Retail Trade (52-59)

86,102

Services (70-89)

158,145

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

30,545

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

31,906

Unclassified (99)

3,092

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Wachovia Corporation

17,000

Carolinas HealthCare System

13,246

Bank of America

12,770

Presbyterian Healthcare

6,000

Duke Energy Corporation

5,614

Charlotte Chamber of Commerce 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

589,480 426,194 22,138 5.19%

Quality of life is one of the county’s principal advantages. Charlotte residents enjoy a cost of living that is below the national average. Charlotte has a thriving arts community and consistently leads the nation in giving for the arts. Sports fans have the year-round enjoyment of the NFL Panthers, NBA Bobcats, WNBA Sting, NASCAR, PGA Tour golf, AAA baseball, minor league hockey, and various college football and basketball teams. Living accommodations range from waterfront housing and recreational opportunities along any of three lakes, urban downtown living, stately older neighborhoods , suburban communities with golf, swimming and tennis facilities, and even rural pastoral areas. Mecklenburg County also boasts four of the nation’s top 100 high schools. Its most notable institutions include UNC Charlotte, Davidson College, Queens University, Johnson C. Smith University, Johnson & Wales, and Central Piedmont Community College, the nation’s fifth largest community college.

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

Graduate or Professional School Degree

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$50,754

2004 Median Household

$54,783

2009 Median Household Projected

$61,369

2004 Per Capita

$29,802

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Charlotte Chamber of Commerce

Terry Orell, Senior Vice President Business Development P.O. Box 32785 Charlotte, NC 28232 704-378-1311 phone; 704-374-1903 fax torell@charlottechamber.com

City of Charlotte

Tom Flynn, Economic Development Director 600 East 4th St. Charlotte, NC 28202-2244 704-432-1396 phone; 704-336-6644 fax tflynn@ci.charlotte.nc.us

73


ROWAN COUNTY

R

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Salisbury Population: 26,444 Total County Population: 135,024 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 19.9% 28.9% 10.2%

Number 26,896 39,035 13,893

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division) Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

owan County is centered in the triangle of North Carolina's three interstates and offers immediate access to the Interstate 85 Boom Belt, and Interstates 77 and 40. Located halfway between the exploding Charlotte region and the vibrant Piedmont Triad area, it provides easy access to three major international airports, 13 regional airports and two modern deep-water ports. All segments of Rowan County work together to promote business development. A pro-business attitude and competitive wage rates supply ample opportunities for profitability. As a result, Rowan County offers some of the lowest personal/property taxes and

www.rowanedc.com

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N % Total Number Work Force

330

Population Age 25 Plus

89,496

Contract Construction (15-17)

2,578

Less Than High School, No Diploma

23,150

25.87%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

1,504

High School Graduate

30,116

33.65%

Manufacturing (20-39)

8,338

College, No Diploma

18,177

20.31%

Associate Degree

5,507

6.15%

Mining (10-14)

120

Public Administration (90-98)

3,847

Retail Trade (52-59)

8,250

Bachelor’s Degree

9,105

10.17%

Services (70-89)

18,113

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

Graduate or Professional School Degree

3,441

3.84%

1,548

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

1,917

Unclassified (99)

632

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Freightliner

3,600

Food Lion

2,200

Rowan Regional Medical Center

1,250

KoSa

1,200

GDX Automotive

855

Salisbury-Rowan Economic Development Commission 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

74

105,911 68,592 4,285 6.24%

land/construction costs in the Southeast, and maintains a diversified industrial/ economic base. Rowan County is an ideal place to call home, offering excellent public and private schools, an advanced regional medical center, a variety of cultural opportunities and a low crime rate. Plentiful parks and recreational facilities provide numerous opportunities for fishing, camping, boating and organized sports. From anywhere in the county, it’s never far to lakes, mountains and beaches. The county has a history of business successes and is the birthplace of some notable companies including: Food Lion, grocery store chain; Cheerwine, the soft drink; and Power Curbers, manufacturer of specialized machines for the building of sidewalks and gutters, and even parts of the Chunnel linking England and France! Top private employers include Freightliner and Food Lion.

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$37,658

2004 Median Household

$40,591

2009 Median Household Projected

$45,712

2004 Per Capita

$20,068

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Salisbury-Rowan Economic Development Commission Randy Harrell Executive Director 204 East Innes St. Salisbury, NC 28144 704-637-5526 phone 704-637-0173 fax harrellr@carolina.rr.com

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S TA N LY COUNTY

L

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Albemarle Population: 15,452 Total County Population: 59,068 Age 20- 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 18.9% 28.5% 10.8%

Number 11,187 16,852 6,397

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division)

ocated just 45 miles northeast of Charlotte, Stanly County is at the forefront in offering business incentives, labor and a friendly environment for economic development. A low tax rate and strong economic aid packages that include low interest rates for renovations and equipment as well as tax credits for newly created jobs make the county very attractive for expansion, as do the abundance of affordable greenfield and industrial sites. The result is a diverse group of companies that call Stanly County home, from Michelin Aircraft Tire Co. to S.T. Motorsports. The county also boasts a large available work force in the region, with a virtually non-existent unionization rate. It

www.stanlyedc.org

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total % Number Work Force

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

113

Population Age 25 Plus

39,268

Contract Construction (15-17)

946

Less Than High School, No Diploma

10,500

26.74%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

773

High School Graduate

14,176

36.10%

College, No Diploma

6,966

17.74%

Associate Degree

2,729

6.95%

Manufacturing (20-39)

3,734

Mining (10-14)

50

Public Administration (90-98)

2,134

Retail Trade (52-59)

4,176

Bachelor’s Degree

3,515

8.95%

Services (70-89)

6,988

Graduate or Professional School Degree

1,382

3.52%

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

471

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

1,078

Unclassified (99)

20

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Collins & Aikman Corporation Michelin Aircraft Tire Corporation Schult Homes American Fiber & Finishing, Inc. Clayton Homes CTX Builders Supply

475 375 310 200 200 200

Stanly County Economic Development Commission 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

46,365 29,998 1,355 4.51%

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

has two of the best work training institutions in the state, Stanly Community College and Pfeiffer University; a nationally recognized Stanly Memorial Hospital offering more than twenty-five different specialties; and the Roy M. Hinson Cancer Center offering state-of-the-art technology. Goods are easily transported by interstate (Interstates 85 and 77), rail (Norfolk Southern, CSX and WinstonSalem Southbound), sea (Wilmington, Morehead City, Charleston and Savannah) or air (Albemarle/Stanly County Airport, accommodating virtually any type of private and corporate jet up to a Boeing 737-300, as well as Charlotte Douglas International Airport). Stanly County residents appreciate living in a small community where the standard of living is high but access to metropolitan Charlotte is less than an hour away. Stanly County continues to offer business “the best of both worlds.”

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$37,111

2004 Median Household

$39,861

2009 Median Household Projected

$44,765

2004 Per Capita

$19,553

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Stanly County Economic Development Commission Robert M. Van Geons Executive Director 201 South 2nd St., Rm. 103 Albemarle, NC 28001 704-986-3683 phone 704-986-3685 fax stanedc@vnet.net

75


UNION COUNTY

C

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Monroe Population: 27,532 Total County Population: 152,765 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 20.8% 30.1% 9.2%

Number 31,836 46,104 14,054

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division) Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

690

Contract Construction (15-17)

5,591

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

1,262

Manufacturing (20-39)

10,220

Mining (10-14)

21

Public Administration (90-98)

1,565

Retail Trade (52-59)

8,194

Services (70-89)

949

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

4,579

Unclassified (99)

329

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Tyson Foods, Inc. Allvac Pilgrim’s Pride, Inc. Charlotte Pipe & Foundry Plastics Division TYCO/Scott Health and Safety

1,200 1,120 923 615 430

Union County Economic Development Commission 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

114,159 80,123 3,469 4.32%

www.unioncpp.com

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N % Total Number Work Force Population Age 25 Plus

95,814

Less Than High School, No Diploma

19,126

19.96%

High School Graduate

29,742

31.04%

College, No Diploma

19,973

20.85%

Associate Degree

6,871

7.17%

Bachelor’s Degree

14,787

15.43%

5,315

5.55%

Graduate or Professional School Degree

12,518

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

76

ompanies are moving to Union County to take advantage of its hardworking, well-educated work force, large tracts of land, and a pro-business environment. Adjacent to Charlotte and Interstate 485, Union County has become so attractive it is now the 18th fastest growing county in the nation, surpassing all others in both Carolinas. With assets such as the Monroe Regional Airport and its recently completed taxiway improvements, Union Regional Medical Center, and South Piedmont Community College, Union County is a premier location for business in the Charlotte region. South Piedmont Community College offers the productive and competitive

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

labor force of 70,000 the innovative curriculum demonstrating the college’s eagerness to adapt to the needs of industry. Union Regional Medical Center is continuing to build upon its reputation as a technologically advanced regional healthcare campus with the recent $47 million expansion of its Outpatient Diagnostic Treatment Facility, Cancer Treatment Center, and radiation therapy services. Wingate University will also play a significant role in the developing Medical Cluster with their new $6 million School of Pharmacy. Finally, a local development group has announced plans for a 430,000-square-foot medical park that will generate nearly 800 jobs and $65 million in capital investment. Evidenced by the increase in population and record capital investment, Union County has earned its reputation as a “Great Place to Live and Work.”

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$50,777

2004 Median Household

$54,389

2009 Median Household Projected

$60,387

2004 Per Capita

$24,280

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Union County Partnership for Progress Maurice Ewing, President & CEO P.O. Box 292 Monroe, NC 28111-0292 704-283-3592 phone; 704-283-3861 fax mdewing1@ctc.net

Monroe Economic Development

Chris Platé, Director P.O. Box 69 Monroe, NC 28111-0069 704-282-5780 phone; 704-282-5788 fax cplate@monroenc.org

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YORK COUNTY

Y

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Rock Hill Population: 54,606 Total County Population: 182,193 Age 20 - 34 Years 35 - 54 Years 55 - 64 Years

% Total Population 21.0% 30.7% 10.3%

Number 38,333 55,951 18,729

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY 2004 Employees

Industry (SIC Division) Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing (01-09)

ork County capitalizes on its geography, combining the advantages of a South Carolina location and business climate with easy access to the largest metropolitan area in the two Carolinas – Charlotte. Just immediately across the North Carolina border, York County brings together the grace and charm of life in a small community with the opportunities and advantages of the big city. The city of Rock Hill serves as the commercial center, while the city of York is the county seat. Accessibility is key to economic development and York County boasts many transportation advantages. I-77 runs through the eastern portion, I-85 runs near the northwestern part, and

www.ycedb.com

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total % Number Work Force Population Age 25 Plus

119,630

Contract Construction (15-17)

3,563

Less Than High School, No Diploma

27,373

22.88%

Financial, Insurance and Real Estate (60-69)

2,578

High School Graduate

34,140

28.54%

Manufacturing (20-39)

10,821

College, No Diploma

24,571

20.54%

Associate Degree

8,596

7.19%

16,868

14.10%

8,082

6.76%

672

Mining (10-14)

25

Public Administration (90-98)

5,207

Retail Trade (52-59)

14,005

Bachelor’s Degree

Services (70-89)

24,508

Graduate or Professional School Degree

Transportation, Communications and Utilities (40-49)

2,176

Wholesale Trade (50-51)

2,707

Unclassified (99)

348

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Bowater Coated and Specialty Papers Division Duke Power - Catawba Nuclear Station Ross Distribution Stacy’s

1,350 1,150 1,088 852 800

York County Economic Development Board 2004

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2004 Annual Average Population Age 16+ Labor Force Unemployed Percentage Unemployed Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

142,917 98,757 6,054 6.13%

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

they are joined together by an excellent highway network. Charlotte Douglas International Airport is less than 30 minutes away and the Port of Charleston, the busiest container port in the Southeast and fourth nationally, is a three hour drive. The diversity and strength of the business community continually support growth. In the past several years, York County has averaged $200 million in industry and business development and 1,700 new jobs annually. So, why York County? It offers the best of all worlds: Quality of life including top ranking schools in the state, excellent business climate, and accessibility are just the beginning. South Carolina incentives make the move to York County a smart one. The reasonable cost of operation and productive labor force make staying in business in York County even smarter.

2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

INCOME Year

Total

2000 Median Household

$44,605

2004 Median Household

$47,987

2009 Median Household Projected

$53,522

2004 Per Capita

$24,797

Applied Geographic Solutions, 2004 Estimates

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Rock Hill Economic Development Corporation Stephen Turner, Executive Director P.O. Box 11706 Rock Hill, SC 29731 803-329-7090 phone; 803-329-7007 fax stephenturner@rhedc.org

York County Economic Development Board J. Mark Farris, Director 1830 Second Baxter Crossing Fort Mill, SC 29708 803-02-4300 phone; 803-802-4299 fax mark.farris@yorkcountygov.com

77


CharlotteUSA Economic Development Contacts ALEXANDER COUNTY Alexander County Chamber of Commerce David A. Icenhour Economic Development Director 621 Liledoun Rd. Taylorsville, NC 28681 828-632-1132 phone; 828-632-0059 fax dicenhour@co.alexander.nc.us www.co.alexander.nc.us

GASTON COUNTY Gaston County Economic Development Commission Donny Hicks Executive Director P.O. Box 2339 Gastonia, NC 28053-2339 704-825-4046 phone; 704-825-4066 fax dhicks@co.gaston.nc.us www.gaston.org

ROWAN COUNTY Salisbury-Rowan Economic Development Commission Randy Harrell Executive Director 204 East Innes St. Salisbury, NC 28144 704-637-5526 phone; 704-637-0173 fax harrellr@carolina.rr.com www.rowanedc.com

ANSON COUNTY Anson County Economic Development Kevin Gullette Director of Economic Development P.O. Drawer 339 Wadesboro, NC 28170 704-694-9513 phone; 704-694-7015 fax kgullette@email.co.anson.nc.us www.ansoncounty.org

IREDELL COUNTY Greater Statesville Development Corporation Jeff McKay Director, Economic Development 115 E. Front St. Statesville, NC 28677 704-871-0062 phone; 704-871-0223 fax jmckay@gsdc.org www.gsdc.org

STANLY COUNTY Stanly County Economic Development Commission Robert M. Van Geons Executive Director 201 South Second St., Rm. 103 Albemarle, NC 28001 704-986-3683 phone; 704-986-3685 fax stanedc@vnet.net www.stanlyedc.org

Mooresville-South Iredell Chamber Melanie O’Connell Underwood Executive Vice President P.O. Box 628 Mooresville, NC 28115 704-664-6922 phone; 704-664-2549 fax mou@mooresvillenc.org www.mooresvillenc.org

UNION COUNTY Monroe Economic Development Chris Platé Director P.O. Box 69, Monroe, NC 28111-0069 704-282-5780 phone; 704-282-5788 fax cplate@monroenc.org www.developmonroe.com

CATAWBA COUNTY Catawba County Economic Development Corporation Scott L. Millar, President 100A Southwest Blvd., Ste. 201 Newton, NC 28658 828-464-7198 phone; 828-465-8150 fax smillar@catawbacountync.gov www.catawbacounty.biz

LANCASTER COUNTY Lancaster County Economic Development Commission Keith Tunnell, President P.O. Box 973 Lancaster, SC 29721 803-285-9471 phone; 803-285-9472 fax keith.tunnell@lancastersc-edc.com www.lancastersc-edc.com

Union County Partnership for Progress Maurice Ewing President & CEO PO Box 292, Monroe, NC 28111-0292 704-283-3592 phone; 704-283-3861 fax mdewing1@ctc.net www.unioncpp.com

CHESTER COUNTY Chester County Economic Development Karlisa Parker Economic Development Director P.O. Drawer 580, Chester, SC 29706 803-377-1216 phone; 803-377-2102 fax kparker@Chestercounty.org www.chestercounty.org

LINCOLN COUNTY Lincoln Economic Development Authority Barry I. Matherly Executive Director P.O. Box 2050 Lincolnton, NC 28093-2050 704-732-1511 phone; 704-736-8451 fax leda@vnet.net www.lincolneda.org

CABARRUS COUNTY Cabarrus Regional Partnership Ryan McDaniels Director of Economic Development 3003 Dale Earnhardt Blvd. Kannapolis, NC 28083 704-782-4000 phone; 704-782-4050 fax rlmcdaniels@cabarrusedc.com www.co.cabarrus.nc.us

CHESTERFIELD COUNTY Chesterfield County Economic Development Board Cherry G. McCoy Executive Director P.O. Box 192, Chesterfield, SC 29709 843-623-6500 phone; 843-623-3167 fax cherryatcc@shtc.net www.chesterfieldcountysc.org CLEVELAND COUNTY Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce Scott Darnell Sr. VP for Economic Development P.O. Box 879, Shelby, NC 28151 704-487-8521 phone; 704-487-7458 fax scott@clevelandchamber.org www.clevelandchamber.org 78

MECKLENBURG COUNTY Charlotte Chamber of Commerce Terry Orell Senior Vice President Business Development P.O. Box 32785 Charlotte, NC 28232 704-378-1311 phone; 704-374-1903 fax torell@charlottechamber.com www.charlottechamber.com City of Charlotte Tom Flynn Economic Development Director 600 East 4th St. Charlotte, NC 28202-2244 704-432-1396 phone; 704-336-6644 fax tflynn@ci.charlotte.nc.us www.charmeck.nc.us

YORK COUNTY Rock Hill Economic Development Corporation Stephen Turner Executive Director P.O. Box 11706 Rock Hill, SC 29731 803-329-7090 phone; 803-329-7007 fax stephenturner@rhedc.org www.rhedc.org York County Economic Development Board J. Mark Farris Director 1830 Second Baxter Crossing Fort Mill, SC 29708 803-802-4300 phone; 803-802-4299 fax mark.farris@yorkcountygov.com www.ycedb.com

Charlotte Region

Charlotte Regional Partnership Kenny McDonald Sr. Vice President 1001 Morehead Square Dr., Ste. 200 Charlotte, NC 28203 800-554-4373 toll free 704-347-8942 phone; 704-347-8981 fax kmcdonald@charlotteusa.com www.charlotteusa.com

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TYPES OF ACTIVITIES Business Missions:

WHO WE ARE

The CRP creates and builds upon business relationships with industry executives and their advisory firms around the world by visiting them directly to discuss the Charlotte region as a business location alternative.

The Charlotte Regional Partnership is an independent, non-profit, regional economic development organization representing 16 counties (12 in N.C., 4 in S.C.). Our group works closely with both states, local communities, utilities, as well as private companies to recruit new businesses, new investments, new jobs to the Charlotte region, which contribute to raising the standard of living for everyone in our area.

Industry Conferences: The CRP identifies a small number of industry conferences to target for business development purposes.

Regional Information and Services Available for Relocating Businesses

OUR SERVICES We assist companies free of charge in a variety of ways: • Site/Location Search • Workforce Demographics • Transportation Analysis • Customized Research • Tax and Project Incentive Analysis • Introduction to Service Providers PROGRAM OF WORK Goal #1: To market and promote Charlotte USA to the world as a superior business location Goal #2: To allocate and leverage regional and organizational resources to sustain and enhance the economic growth, prosperity, and global competitiveness of the Charlotte region. Goal #3: To initiate and participate in strategic organizational and regional planning to identify, assess, and develop assets required to provide sustained and sustainable economic growth, prosperity, and superior quality of life in the Charlotte region. ATTRACTING NEW AND EXPANDING COMPANIES Targeted types of business: • Headquarters and back office operations • Advanced manufacturing and distribution operations • US subsidiary operations of foreign based multinational companies Targeted industry clusters: • Automotive • Machine Manufacturing • Medical Equipment Manufacturing • Pharmaceutical Manufacturing • Financial Services and Insurance

• • • •

Motorsports Metalworking Medical Device and Supplies Manufacturing Plastics

Targeted geographic areas: • North America: Northeast, Mid-West, California, Canada • Europe: Western Europe, Scandinavia • Asia: Japan, Korea

Charlotte Regional Partnership 1001 Morehead Square Dr., Ste. 200 Charlotte, NC 28203 USA 800-554-4373 toll free 704-347-8942 phone • 704-347-8981 fax www.charlotteusa.com 2005 Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide

Hosted Events: The CRP hosts business executives throughout the year at various events in the region in order to review specific regional assets and to build familiarity with the region. Such events include the U.S. Open for 2005, which will be held in North Carolina. Business Development Research: The CRP conducts and procures research within industry clusters and other baseline databases to create target lists of companies and business executives to whom high-level, informational messages about Charlotte USA are sent. Public Relations & Advertising: Over the past two years the Charlotte USA campaign has had a dramatic impact on the ability of the CRP to “brand” the region. Building upon that work with targeted public relations messages in top ten, target industry, and regional publications is essential. Editorial content about growing businesses and economic issues in the Charlotte region are a proven way to increase awareness of the area. Limited advertising to procure editorial content for reprint is also warranted to provide material that can be used for select industries. Web Site Development & Marketing: The Web site is a critical asset for the region. It is used both as a business development tool to reach companies around the world and as a research tool for companies and economic developers across the region. Consistent investment in this asset is important so that it remains relevant and can be found by those searching for business locations. 79


Thanks the generosity of companies in the Charlotte Region that support regional economic development. ACCOUNTING FIRMS

HEALTH CARE

BDO Siedman, LLP Cherry, Bekaert & Holland LLP Greer & Walker LLP KPMG LLP

Ortho Carolina (formerly Miller Orthopedic Clinic)

CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES Blythe Development Company C.D. Spangler Construction Company Choate Construction Company FN Thompson Intercon Building Corporation R.T. Dooley Construction Company Skanska USA Building, Inc.

CONSULTING FIRMS Luquire George Andrews The McAulay Firm Tribble Creative Group Sockwell & Associates

DISTRIBUTORS Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated Cummins Atlantic, Inc. Lance, Inc. Pepsi Cola Bottling Company

ENGINEERING FIRMS Arcadis PARSONS

ENTERTAINMENT Charlotte Regional Visitors Authority Carolina Panthers Speedway Motorsports, Inc.

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS Bank of America BB&T Deutsche Bank Alex Brown Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas First Gaston Bank Founders Federal Credit Union Regions Bank United Community Bancorp Wachovia Corporation

HOSPITALITY The Westin Charlotte 80

INSURANCE FIRMS Cameron M. Harris & Company Glauerdt GmbH Glauerdt U.S.A. TIAA-CREF Watson Insurance Company

LAW FIRMS Alston & Bird LLP Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP Robinson, Bradshaw & Hinson P.A.

MANUFACTURING Goodrich Corporation Parkdale Mills, Inc. Pharr Yarns Philip Morris U.S.A. Ruddick Corporation Shurtape Technologies SPX Corporation Steel Fab, Inc. The Springs Company Verbatim Corporation

MEDIA Galles Communications Group, Inc. The Charlotte Observer Time Warner Cable WSOC-TV

REAL ESTATE – COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL Childress Klein Properties Lauth Property Group The Crosland Group The Keith Corporation The Staubach Company Whiteside Industrial Properties

TRANSPORTATION Lancaster & Chester Railway Company Lufthansa German Airlines US Airways

UTILITIES BellSouth Chester County Natural Gas Authority Chester Telephone Company Duke Energy Corporation Lancaster County Natural Gas Authority Palmetto Economic Development Corporation Piedmont Natural Gas PSNC Energy Sprint

REAL ESTATE - RESIDENTIAL Allen Tate Company Inc. Prudential Carolinas Realty

RETAIL Belk, Inc. ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


Charlotte Regional Economical Development Guide 2005  
Charlotte Regional Economical Development Guide 2005  

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