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table of contents PRESIDENT’S LETTER ........................................13 Mike Almond, President and CEO, Charlotte Regional Partnership

CHAIRMAN’S LETTER........................................11 Paul Grube, Chairman, Charlotte Regional Partnership

CHARLOTTEUSA: CROSSROADS OF SUCCESS .....................17 Diversity. Resilience. Commitment. The 16-county region comprising CharlotteUSA has grown by leaps and bounds in the past several years, largely due to its unique character and determination to move toward positive change.

BUSINESS STRENGTH: THE POWER OF THE PIEDMONT .........22 Introduction by Ruth G. Shaw, President, Duke Power Business Community: Major Employers, Employment by Industry, Global/International Connections Labor Force: Labor, Regional Commuting Patterns, Work Force Training, Union Activity, Personal Income/Salary Levels, Age of Work Force Governmental Incentives: Government & Taxes, NC/SC Incentives, Foreign Trade Zone

A C C E S S I B I L I T Y: P O R TA L S F O R P R O S P E R I T Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 Introduction by T. Jerry Orr, Aviation Director, Charlotte Douglas International Airport Location, Airports, Transportation, Availability of Energy, Telecommunications, Industrial Parks, Sites & Buildings

Q U A L I T Y O F L I F E : A B U N D A N T C U LT U R E A N D S P I R I T . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Introduction by Harriet Sanford, President and CEO, Arts & Science Council Live – Work – Play: Culture & Recreation, Arts & Entertainment, Sports & Sports Facilities, Climate, Population, Cost of Living, Housing Affordability, Retail Opportunities, Public Safety Index Education Health Care

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2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


table of contents choose charlotteUSA CHARLOTTEUSA: ENTREPRENEURIAL OPPORTUNITIES ......................54 Charlotte’s overwhelming growth, and the talent which spawned it, has created the perfect climate for nurturing new ideas and laid the framework for a fresh, new economic atmosphere.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE PUBLISHER

John Paul Galles jgalles@greatercharlottebiz.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/ EDITOR

Maryl A. Lane maryl.a.lane@greatercharlottebiz.com

CHARLOTTEUSA: MAKING A M O D E R N C I T Y- S TAT E . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 8 Once just a tiny blip on the national radar screen, the 16-county CharlotteUSA region has seen considerable growth in the past decade. Companies and families alike have been drawn to the region for its diversity, prosperity and high quality-of-life.

CREATIVE DIRECTOR/ ASSISTANT EDITOR

Tara Miller tmiller@greatercharlottebiz.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Susanne Deitzel BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Bill Lee blee@greatercharlottebiz.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Ken Biltcliffe

DUKE POWER: 100 YEARS OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT .......83 The Carolinas have been home to Duke Power for 100 years this year, in which time the company’s contribution to the economic development of the CharlotteUSA region has been significant.

kbiltcliffe@greatercharlottebiz.com

Emily G. Lundell elundell@greatercharlottebiz.com CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

cover image © 2003 Peter Brentlinger Wayne Morris Choose CharlotteUSA: Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide is published annually by Galles Communications Group, Inc., publisher of the monthly b2b magazine Greater Charlotte Biz, at 5601 Seventy-Seven Center Drive, Suite 250, Charlotte, N.C. 28217-0735 • 704.676.5850 Phone • 704.676.5853 Fax • www.greatercharlottebiz.com. Editorial or advertising inquiries, please call or fax at the numbers above or e-mail: info@greatercharlottebiz.com. Subscription inquiries or change of address, please call or fax at the numbers above or visit our Web site: www.greatercharlottebiz.com.

CHARLOTTEUSA NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY PROFILES ................62

CHARLOTTEUSA REGIONAL MAP ........................................44

Alexander,NC; Anson, NC; Cabarrus, NC; Catawba, NC; Chester SC; Chesterfield SC; Cleveland, NC; Gaston, NC; Iredell,NC; Lancaster, SC; Lincoln, NC; Mecklenburg, NC; Rowan, NC; Stanly, NC; Union, NC; York, SC

All contents © 2004, Galles Communications Group, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. The Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide is distributed directly and through the Charlotte Regional Partnership and local economic development agencies to over 25,000 businesses and executives engaged in recruiting or relocating businesses to the Charlotte region. Content including statistics and photography has been provided by the Charlotte Regional Partnership, and by the 16 counties for the county profiles, unless otherwise noted. While the information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, Galles Communications Group, Inc. makes no warranty to the accuracy or reliability of this information.

CHARLOTTE REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP INFORMATION..................86

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CONTACT INFORMATION .........................87

The views expressed herein are not necessarily those of Galles Communications Group, Inc., or Greater Charlotte Biz. Products named in these pages are trade names or trademarks of their respective companies.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


chairman’s letter | grube

chairman’s letter PA U L G R U B E , C H A I R M A N , C H A R L O T T E R E G I O N A L PA R T N E R S H I P

Global greetings from Charlotte USA, the 16-county region that has become one of North America’s most desirable destinations for corporate relocations and expansions.

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ompanies from across the country and around the world continue to discover Charlotte USA, which consists of 12 North Carolina and four South Carolina counties covering nearly 8,000 square miles (roughly the size of Massachusetts) with a total population of more than 2 million. Over the past decade, companies have invested $20 billion and brought more than 200,000 new jobs to Charlotte USA. While those are impressive numbers, they are hardly surprising to those of us who already call this region home. Charlotte USA’s unique balance of tremendous business strength, outstanding accessibility and wonderful quality of life clearly set our region apart from any area on the continent. Is it any wonder that the highly respected Business Facilities magazine ranked Charlotte USA No. 3 on its 2003 list of the best cities in America for corporate headquarters? As impressive as those statistics are, however, what is most exciting about Charlotte USA is not what it has done, but rather what it will do in the years to come as still more companies discover our life in balance. Here is why Charlotte USA is certain to continue as the premier region for business opportunities:

BUSINESS STRENGTH Charlotte USA has become the nation’s second largest financial center, with more than

$1 trillion in banking resources. While it ranks 21st in America in terms of population, Charlotte itself is home to the headquarters of more Fortune 500 companies than all but five U.S. cities. Charlotte’s eight Fortune 500 companies include two in the top 100 – Bank of America and Wachovia – and soon will include a third, when Lowe’s moves its corporate headquarters to the region. The Carolinas are rapidly becoming a magnet for global industry, with more than 1,800 foreign firms employing 350,000 people. Charlotte USA alone boasts over 600 foreign-owned companies.

ACCESSIBILITY Even the most distant cities are easily accessible to our region. Charlotte USA offers more commercial flights per capita than any other U.S. region, connecting our people and our companies to locations and customers around the world. More than 130 million people can be reached in two hours or less by air, and in one day by car or truck. More than half of the U.S. population and 62 percent of the nation’s industry are within 650 miles of Charlotte. Interstates 77 and 85 intersect in the heart of Charlotte USA, providing a trucking lifeline for companies shipping goods and materials in and out of the region. Charlotte USA also boasts the largest consolidated rail system in America, linking companies to distribution points nationwide, including easily accessible deep-water ports in Wilmington, N.C.; Charleston, S.C.; and Savannah, Ga.

QUALITY OF LIFE

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

Charlotte USA leads the nation in fundraising for the arts, a testament to the region’s commitment to making life better for its citizens and just one reason Money magazine rated Charlotte No. 2 on its 2002 list of Best Places to Live in America. Pro sports, outstanding entertainment and a wide variety of cultural offerings give Charlotte USA residents a diverse choice of after-work activities. Urban, suburban and rural settings give Charlotte USA residents a true choice of lifestyles – from traditional residential neighborhoods to high-rise luxury condos. From rolling farmland to lakefront resorts. The wholesome diversity of Charlotte USA’s people is matched by the rich variety in our communities and landscape. For quick excursions, the Carolina beaches are just a short drive away and the Blue Ridge Mountains are in full view from Charlotte’s rising skyline. And the region’s temperate climate still offers four distinct seasons without winter’s bitter extremes. Charlotte USA schools have received national recognition as models for excellence in public education, and the region’s wide variety of excellent colleges and universities allows students to get a quality education close to home, and ensures a highly skilled future workforce in an everevolving economy.

THE FUTURE IS NOW The world’s leading companies continue to discover Charlotte USA’s life in balance. New York-based financial services giant TIAA-CREF (No. 89 on the Fortune

continued on page 14 Grube continued from page 11

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president’s letter | almond

president’s letter MICHAEL ALMOND, PRESIDENT AND CEO, CHARLOTTE R E G I O N A L PA R T N E R S H I P

Charlotte Regional Partnership a national model for harnessing the power of regionalism

“The Charlotte Regional Partnership has pioneered the concept of regional cooperation …” ~ The Charlotte Observer, September 3, 2003

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his is a time of great opportunity for the region we call Charlotte USA.

Never before have our 16 counties been better positioned for sustainable economic expansion and long-term prosperity. Just as the world economy has evolved, so too has our region. As we have grown, boundary lines have blurred between towns, cities, counties – even the two Carolinas. Decisions made in one community affect its neighbors in terms of growth, transportation and the environment. Our leaders are coming to realize that planning for the future can no longer be done in isolation. It is now clear that major public policy issues are regional in scope and require regional solutions. The same is true for economic development. In 1991, as global competition began to make its mark on national, regional and local economics, a group of remarkable and visionary leaders concluded that regionalism is the key to our economic future – that by working together as a team, Charlotte USA’s 16 counties can collectively accomplish

more for the benefit of our region than can any single county acting alone. The product of that vision was the Charlotte Regional Partnership (CRP) a public/private non-profit cooperative that has acted as an effective catalyst for meaningful economic growth in Charlotte USA by identifying economic targets of opportunity, aggressively recruiting business prospects here and abroad, and tirelessly promoting our region as an attractive, globally-competitive and vibrant regional economy. What CRP’s forward-looking founders understood was that new or expanded business operations anywhere in our region benefit people everywhere in the region. The dollars generated by new business – whether payroll, vendor purchases or customer sales – do not stop at the city or county line, but circulate and multiply throughout our region. Similarly, our superbly trained and highly skilled workforce is mobile and responsive to job opportunities throughout Charlotte USA. We have confidence in the collective power of partnership, because we know it works. The CRP has played an important role in attracting $20 billion in investment and more than 200,000 new jobs to Charlotte USA over the past decade. However, if we are to maintain Charlotte USA’s momentum and create still more opportunity for our people, the CRP must grow and change along with the region we represent. As we move steadily in the 21st century, the CRP is today aggressively and effectively positioning the Charlotte region for new economic and business

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

opportunities that are, with increasing frequency, available to us. We are determined to work in even closer partnership with local economic developers and public and private sector allies to see to it that Charlotte USA – as one of America’s most economically viable and attractive regions – realizes its full economic development potential in the years ahead. The CRP will continue to build on the momentum of our nationwide “Charlotte USA” advertising and marketing campaign, which kicked off in mid-2002 and already has boosted the number of inquiries from companies interested in relocating to the Charlotte region. This effort has included national television commercials on CNN, CNBC, and on CBS and the USA network during the inaugural Wachovia Championship golf tournament, as well as targeted print advertisements in Fortune and Travel & Leisure Golf magazines. While the CRP focuses on the future with a regional scope, past and current efforts to market the region are clearly gaining traction. In a recent benchmark study of regional competitiveness commissioned by CRP, most companies surveyed had a strongly favorable impression of Charlotte USA, moving the Charlotte region past Atlanta and putting it ahead of all competing Southeast regions. That recognition is a direct result of a regional approach to defining Charlotte USA and the many attributes it offers as an integrated, diversified regional economy that is truly greater than the sum

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letters | grube and almond

100) moved its Southern Services Center to Charlotte USA in 2001, and now employs more than 1,000 of its 6,500 workers here. Goodrich (No. 385 on the Fortune 500), one of the world’s largest “pure play” aerospace companies, completed a recent move of its corporate headquarters to the region, and Toyota Motor Corp.’s Cataler North America opened its $60 million North American headquarters in Charlotte USA in 2002. At the same time, smaller companies specializing in fields such as automotive, plastics, financial services, industrial machinery, metalworking and aerospace continue to discover Charlotte USA. Johnson and Wales University is bring-

ing thousands of students to uptown Charlotte’s Gateway Village. Best known for its culinary arts program, Johnson and Wales will also offer students the opportunity to pursue a career education in business, hospitality, or technology as it undertakes the unusual task of moving its Charleston, S.C., and Norfolk, Va., campuses to our region in 2004. This influx is just the beginning of what Charlotte USA is poised to experi-

ence in the coming decade. Never before has our region been so ideally positioned to continue to grow and prosper through the strength of vibrant, stable industries; a skilled and productive workforce; and the people and communities that make everyone feel at home in Charlotte USA. I hope I’ll soon be calling you neighbor. Paul Grube, Chairman

continued on page 14 Almond continued from page 13 of its parts. In addition to recent announcements of new and expanded business activity in our region, dozens more companies are currently considering Charlotte USA as a future home. And as confirmation of Charlotte USA’s global strength and reach, more than half of those prospects are from outside the U.S. As leads and prospects turn into new business locations and expansions, it will be the people of Alexander, Anson, Cabarrus, Catawba, Cleveland, Gaston, Iredell, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, Rowan, Stanley and Union counties in North Carolina, and Chester, Chesterfield, Lancaster and York counties in South Carolina who will benefit most. And it is for them that Charlotte USA’s unique and powerful balance of business strength, accessibility and quality of life have been introduced to the world through the CRP’s regional approach to economic development. And it is for them that the Charlotte Regional Partnership will continue to bring a world of opportunity to Charlotte USA.

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2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


crossroads of success

CharlotteUSA

crossroads of success D I V E R S I T Y. R E S I L I E N C E . C O M M I T M E N T.

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Community leaders gather to celebrate the naming of Johnson and Wales Way in uptown Charlotte.

Rendering of Charlotte’s new $265 billion sports arena, which will host the NBA’s Charlotte Bobcats.

he 16-county region comprising CharlotteUSA has grown by leaps and bounds in the past several years, largely due to its unique character and determination to move toward positive change. The region’s impressive business climate, the evolution of its diverse industrial base, and the concert of effort forging its powerful cultural base, are rapidly distinguishing Charlotte and its surrounding region as an economic powerhouse. The success of the Charlotte region has not been a quiet one. Over the past three years, companies have invested over $6.6 billion, and brought 38,000 jobs to the area. Money magazine rated Charlotte No. 2 on its list of ‘Best Places to Live in America,’ and Business Facilities magazine ranked Charlotte No. 3 on its 2003 list of ‘Best Cities for Corporate Headquarters.’ Business leaders in the region are generally unanimous in ascribing credit for the success. Remarks Arthur Gallagher, president of the newly relocated Johnson and Wales University; “There is an enormous synergy in this city between business leaders, local, county and city government and the people of Charlotte that facilitates a sense of responsibility and community. By pooling our efforts, we have been able to get great things done.” Johnson and Wales (J&W), the nationally renowned culinary, hospitality and business school, underwent a very public courtship by Charlotte, ending in J&W’s $82 million investment to develop a campus in uptown’s Gateway Village. The J&W relocation was a coup for Charlotte leaders; it is expected to generate nearly $60 million in annual economic activity once it reaches its projected 2007 enrollment. The addition of J&W also promises a boon to Charlotte employers. By providing an experienced and educated talent pool to area businesses, and providing students with hands-on experience in their chosen field, it has created a professional reciprocity that guarantees success for both parties. These partnerships with city businesses, the development of retail, restaurant and residence space, as well as revenue generated by the 3,000+ student population promise significant additions to the center city landscape. Another high-profile addition to Charlotte’s growing metropolis is the $265 billion sports arena, which will host its newest professional sports franchise, the NBA’s Charlotte Bobcats. Ticket sales, sponsorships, merchandising and hospitality agreements promise to create additional revenue streams for the economy, as well as nurture the sports passion endemic in the community. Says Bobcats owner Bob Johnson, “The city of Charlotte is, in my opinion the best place to start an NBA franchise, and I am very excited and optimistic about the future.” The banking industry shares Johnson’s enthusiasm. Now the second leading banking center in the nation, Charlotte now boasts over $1 trillion in assets – and that number is steadily growing. Numerous banking institutions such as First Charter and Alliance Bank and Trust have chosen the Charlotte region to host new branches. Plus, the big league has gotten even bigger after Wachovia’s supermergers with First Union and Prudential Securities, and Bank of America’s merger with Fleet Boston, which will make Bank of America the second largest bank in

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

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crossroads of success

the country. These two financial behemoths represent two Fortune 500 companies. of the region’s nine This ripe lending and investment atmosphere has helped to attract a number of large corporations to the Charlotte region. Global aerospace and defense systems supplier, Goodrich Corporation relocated to Charlotte in 1998 as it evolved from a tire business to an aerospace supplier. Says senior vice president, Steve Huggins, “Charlotte is always changing and growing, which supports our company’s efforts to change and grow.” David Burner, recently retired chairman and chief executive of Goodrich says of the decision, “Moving to Charlotte was the best move we ever made.” He adds, “It allowed us to rejuvenate ourselves.” General Dynamics Armaments Division has also announced plans to move its headquarters and manufacturing plant to Charlotte. Scheduled to open in 2004, it will bring 405 new jobs and a $30 million investment to the area. Linda Hudson, president of Armament and Technical Products, attributes the move to Charlotte’s accessibility, low cost of living and competitive business incentives. General Dynamics’ interest illustrates the defense industry’s powerful thrust in the region. Another influential addition to the region is TIAA-CREF, the financial services giant, which moved its Southern Service Center to the Charlotte region. While TIAA-CREF found Charlotte’s quality of life, diverse workforce and accessibility to its New York headquarters appealing, it also found another goldmine: Charlotte’s commitment to higher education. Initially founded by college professors as a pension system after World War II, TIAA-CREF is still largely devoted to college and university employees. It manages over $256 billion in assets, a pension system of over 2.9 million individuals and 15,000 institutions fall under its umbrella. University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNC Charlotte) Chancellor John Woodward approached TIAA-CREF about forming a partnership with the University hosted in the 3200-acre campus of Charlotte’s University Research Park. The result was a synergistic union, which has provided valuable hands-on training for students, a well-educated talent pool for local businesses, and a facility that employs over 22,000 workers. The TIAA-CREF partnership demonstrates Chancellor Woodward’s mission to sustain the business community in which UNC Charlotte operates. Says Woodward, “We look constantly at what this community needs; that drives our planning from a strategic perspective.” Woodward also piloted the brand new Charlotte Research Institute which houses schools for Optoelectronics and Optical Communications, the eBusiness Technology Institute, and the Center for Precision Metrology. North Carolina’s success in the glass fiber market, its financial centers relying heavily on security, privacy and IT systems, as well as the textiles, manufacturing and motor sports roots plainly define what UNC Charlotte believes Charlotte’s industry focus should be. Already Woodward’s efforts are bearing some sizeable fruit. For fiscal year 2001, the Association of University Technology Managers has determined that results per $10 million of research expenditures, UNC Charlotte ranked first in

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The University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC)

“Moving to Charlotte was the best move we ever made.” He adds, “It allowed us to rejuvenate ourselves.” ~ D AV I D B U R N E R , R E C E N T LY R E T I R E D CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OF GOODRICH

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


crossroads of success

to provide new oppor-

start-ups formed, 2nd in invention disclosures received, 2nd in patent applications, 3rd in patents issued, 5th in licenses executed and 20th in licenses and options yielding income. No small bananas for a fledgling operation! Just up the highway from UNC Charlotte’s wellspring of academia, hums Lowe’s Motor Speedway. Attracting fans the world over, NASCAR’s racing legends all make turns on this professional track. By one estimate, companies have invested $5.8 billion and brought almost 33,000 jobs to the CharlotteUSA region in the past 3 years. The success of the NASCAR industry is firmly rooted in the region, training drivers, technicians, inspiring merchandisers and engineering innovation, and hosting the headquarters of some of the biggest celebrities on the circuit, such as Petty Racing and the Earnhardts. While NASCAR is part of North Carolina’s legacy, the film industry is a relative newcomer to the Charlotte region’s entertainment profile. Because of the region’s accessibility, diverse geography from the mountains to the beaches, and its up-and-coming production facilities, the film industry appears to promise a bright source for employment and outside revenue. Several major films, including Shallow Hal and The Patriot, have been filmed in and around Charlotte since 1998, as well as independent undertakings, network television series and commercial productions generating more than $6 billion in local revenue. With a return on investment that can be as high as 650:1, filmmaking is a surprising boon for the Charlotte region. While Charlotte and Mecklenburg County have had substantial successes in attracting new and different businesses to the region, the encircling counties have been developing in concert. The synergy resulting from the economic development efforts of all continue to provide new opportunities for growth and development in the CharlotteUSA region. What was once merely a crossroads of two American Indian trading routes has surely become the crossroads for the success of the entire CharlotteUSA region.

tunities for growth and

ALEXANDER COUNTY

While Charlotte and Mecklenburg County have had substantial successes in attracting new and different businesses to the region, the encircling counties have been developing in concert. The synergy resulting from the economic development efforts of all continue

development in the CharlotteUSA region.

Alexander County is experiencing growth in its small business sector. Many locally owned businesses are looking to expand into new markets. Additionally, a new state prison will open in 2004, introducing approximately 400 new jobs to the county. Alexander has a substantial manufacturing base, with over 100 companies in the industry. Eighty-five per cent of these companies produce furniture, resulting in Alexander County’s climate of history and artisanship.

ANSON COUNTY Anson County is home to the Triangle Brick Project, which operates a $32 million state-of-the-art facility supporting 60 jobs, shipping product to customers throughout the southeast. The coordination, teamwork and successful completion of the project by the local utility, the rail service and the county working in partnership highlight Anson County’s proactive approach to economic development.

CABARRUS COUNTY

NASCAR’s racing legends all make turns on the professional track at Lowe’s Motor Speedway in Concord.

Cabarrus County is a tourist destination for hundreds of thousands of race fans attending races at Lowe’s Motor Speedway each year. In addition, Concord Mills attracts tourists with the finest regional shopping and entertainment. Another milestone for the county is the building of the Corning Optical Fiber plant in Midland.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

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crossroads of success C ATA W B A C O U N T Y Catawba County is a heavily industrialized area. It is known worldwide as a furniture manufacturing center with internationally known showrooms such as the Hickory Furniture Mart. Its traditional industries of furniture, hosiery and textiles have been expanded by new businesses in the technology sector. It is the nation’s center for the manufacture and development of fiber optics and telecommunications cable. Siecor and CommScope are two of the county’s major employers, each with more than 2,000 employees. Alcatel, NA, the world’s largest manufacturer of telecommunications cable products and the second-largest telephone equipment company, is headquartered in Hickory. Two of the largest printers and publishers in the state are located in Catawba County. The Hickory Metro Higher Education Center (HMHEC), a joint education center, serves the needs for graduate, undergraduate, non-credit certificate courses, research, and specialized workforce training.

CHESTER COUNTY One of Chester County’s most significant recent economic development milestones is its newly rededicated economic development department. Chester County is pleased to announce that three existing industries are currently undertaking expansion projects, and the expansion of Highway 9 between Interstate 77 and the City of Chester, will facilitate its plans for future growth.

CHESTERFIELD COUNTY Chesterfield is home to the Wal-Mart Distribution Center in Pageland, which dramatically helped diversify the economy. Since its opening in 1997, the county has announced more than $72 million in new capital and 424 new jobs with the addition of five new manufacturing companies.

CLEVELAND COUNTY Ranked one of the top ten best small markets by Southern Business and Development magazine, Cleveland County is home to numerous ISO 9000 certified companies, has no union activity, and is classified as an attainment county. In addition, the cities of Kings Mountain and Shelby, located in Cleveland County, are ranked by Site Selection Magazine as two of the top 100 small cities for corporate location. In late 2000,Wal-Mart became one of Cleveland County’s newest residents. The Wal-Mart Distribution center was initially expected to provide a possible investment of $50 million and at least 500 jobs. As of November 2003, the center has more than a million square feet under roof and nearly 800 employees. The $75 million facility has far exceeded expectations.

GASTON COUNTY Gaston Memorial Hospital is state of the art, and was recently named one of the top 100 hospitals in the country. Gaston is also home to the newly relocated Buckeye Technology $100 million facility manufacturing air laid, non-woven products.

IREDELL COUNTY Lowe’s Companies, Inc., the world’s second largest home improvement retailer, has moved its corporate headquarters to a 165-acre site located south of Lake Norman. Lowe’s will be the first Fortune 500 company to open corporate offices in Iredell County. When Lowe’s opened its first phase in September 2003, it

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2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


crossroads of success employed 1,000 and became the largest employer in Mooresville. The initial employee base of 1,000 is likely to grow considerably over the years, with a total of 8,000 to 10,000 employees expected by the final phase.

LANCASTER COUNTY The addition of Belden Wire and Cardinal Healthcare to the Macmillan Industrial Park in northern Lancaster County created nearly $60 million in investment and more than 700 jobs.

LINCOLN COUNTY Cataler North America opened a $60 million, 110,000 square-foot North American headquarters and manufacturing facility at the Lincoln County Industrial Park in the fall of 2002. Cataler, a Japanese company, is a subsidiary of the Cataler Corporation, which is owned by Toyota Motor Corporation. A catalyst manufacturer, the company has plans to triple the size of its facility.

MECKLENBURG COUNTY The relocation of Johnson & Wales University in downtown Charlotte from Charleston was an incredible milestone for the city. The renowned culinary arts and business school is building a campus of buildings in the Gateway Center area and bring several thousand students and faculty to downtown. The project will have a positive impact on housing, construction, the community’s tax base, employment and quality of life.

The milestones for Rowan County have been the attraction and expansion of automotive related industries including GDX Automotive, Meridian Automotive Systems, and significant expansions at the Freightliner plant. Rowan has also expanded distribution facilities along the I-85 corridor with the location of Dillard's and Aldi distribution centers.

In January 2001 the county began construction on several new school buildings that cost in excess of $39,000,000 when all are completed in 2004. Stanly Community College also added a new facility and 10-acre campus, a $5 million investment called the Crutchfield Education Center. A comprehensive land use study and a tourism authority were initiated to guide growth during the next twenty years. and the Albemarle-Stanly County Airport continues to improve its accessibility by expanding its full-service, certified aircraft maintenance and repair station. In June of 2003, Stanly County welcomed Cope Industries Inc., a furniture manufacturer with roughly a $2 million investment. And in October 2003, Superior Steel Components broke ground on a metal truss manufacturing facility in Western Stanly County, an approximate investment of $1 million.

S TA N LY C O U N T Y

UNION COUNTY

ROWAN COUNTY

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

In 1995, the City of Monroe created the Monroe Corporate Center, a 500acre Industrial Park designed to be a strategic location for successful companies. Since its inception, the park has attracted such multi-national companies as Coca-Cola Bottling, Greiner Bio-One, Goulston Technologies, and Scott Health and Safety, totaling nearly $70 million in capital investment and the creation of 825 jobs. The development of the park continues with a Shell Building program that has recently completed a 58,000 square foot facility, expandable to over 100,000 square feet.

YORK COUNTY York County is home to the headquarters of Muzak, which has evolved into an audio architecture firm providing all genres of music via satellite to over 300,000 businesses. Since Muzak, Employee Benefits Services moved 250 jobs to York County. Wells Fargo

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business strength | introduction

business strength:

the power of the piedmont I N T R O D U C T I O N B Y R U T H G . S H A W, P R E S I D E N T, D U K E P O W E R

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“Ample interstate highways, the nation’s largest consolidated rail system and an international airport (US Airways’ largest hub) make getting to and from the Charlotte region a breeze.” ~RUTH SHAW

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harlotte’s storied past includes its birth as an Indian trading crossroads, its post-Civil War economic demise, and its resurrection to become a bustling metropolis with characteristics so desirable, people from other areas of the country are moving here in record numbers. Charlotte has grown into the center of a region with 2.2 million people and is the nation’s 28th largest media market. The 2000 Census shows Charlotte’s growth rate is 22 percent, second only to Phoenix in the category of cities with more than 500,000 people. In a microcosm of this country’s early 20th century metamorphosis, the region is experiencing a unique blending of newcomers and natives. From the boardrooms to the classrooms, this blending of people, cultures and ideas has provided welcome diversity. People from Akron to Walla Walla have come to know and appreciate the benefits of Southern hospitality. As president of the largest electric utility in the Carolinas, it’s only fitting I write about the region’s energy as I share thoughts on doing business in the greater Charlotte region. Charlotte’s location astride the Carolinas border makes this region the logical choice for companies looking for the ideal location. Ample interstate highways, the nation’s largest consolidated rail system and an international airport (US Airways’ largest hub) make getting to and from the Charlotte region a breeze. The Charlotte/Douglas International airport is situated within 650 miles of more than 50 percent of our nation’s population. The region hosts 305 of the Fortune 500 companies and is home to eight of them. In the past 10 years alone, almost 9,000 new firms have opened in Charlotte, creating more than 77,000 new jobs and investing $7.4 billion in new facilities. And why not? The weather is moderate, schools are excellent and infrastructure solid. The Charlotte region offers opportunities. “Can do” is the abounding business attitude. The energy level here is infectious, enduring and exciting. It’s positive and powerful. Driving this attitude is a skilled, dedicated work force. A first-class public and private educational system, complemented by major universities and an outstanding community college system, provide the talent and skills necessary to keep the Charlotte region competitive. As we move toward a knowledge economy, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte is poised to train tomorrow’s workers as the region’s doctoral-research university. This talent is backed by the financial strength Charlotte possesses as the second largest banking center in the United States, outranked only by New York City. The big banks have been instrumental in developing the Charlotte uptown area, investing in a variety of center-city projects. Libraries, restaurants, hotels, night spots, condominiums and other amenities are designed to meet everyone’s needs. Often facilitated by the nation’s fourth largest chamber of commerce (as measured by membership), public – private partnerships help promote financial, intellectual and cultural prosperity in the region. The Blumenthal Performing Arts Center, Spirit Square, Charlotte/Douglas International Airport, Ericsson Stadium (home of the Carolina Panthers) are successful public – private partnerships.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


business strength | introduction

“Tar Heel native James Buchanan “Buck” Duke made a fortune in tobacco and textiles and when he joined the Entrepreneurs are considered the Charlotte region’s economic development catalysts. One entrepreneur that I’m particularly familiar with helped shape the region as it is today. At the turn of the 20th century, this region languished in the rural, postCivil War economic doldrums – an agrarian rut so deep that no one could see a clear way out. No one, that is, except Buck Duke. Tar Heel native James Buchanan “Buck” Duke made a fortune in tobacco and textiles and when he joined the team of Dr. Gill Wylie and William States Lee, he embarked on a journey of unprecedented change. He saw the power of the Catawba River, the production cotton fields and the application of electricity for textile factories. The Catawba River – rising in the mountains of North Carolina and flowing down through the Piedmont into South Carolina – offered a low cost source of energy. In 1904 the Catawba Hydro Station began producing electricity to its initial customer, the Victoria Cotton Mills. Duke Power Company was born. It was only the beginning. Buck Duke’s bold plan did not focus on a single factory, city limits, county lines or state borders. He looked at a region connected by its river highway and its natural resources. He saw an integrated system of large power generating systems with transmission lines to serve the needs of the region. He also saw the need for an electric railroad to move people and materials. In 1925, New England had 80 percent of the cotton textile industry. By 1954, most of it had moved to

team of Dr. Gill Wylie and William States Lee, he embarked on a journey of unprecedented change.” ~RUTH SHAW

the Carolinas. We had abundant, inexpensive electricity; access to raw materials; and people eager for work

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

23


business strength | introduction

in the mills. Duke developed the infrastructure so people could see the region’s potential for economic development. Some saw it right away. Others are discovering it now. More will come. Following Buck Duke’s lead, political and community leaders have provided parks, schools, cultural arts, sporting venues and infrastructure to ensure the region has everything a new or relocating business needs. Economic development in the form of “business clusters” fuel, and will continue to fuel the region. A business cluster is when a major corporation that relocates to the region brings with it numerous smaller businesses that provide the goods and services for that corporation. A good example is BMW in Spartanburg, South Carolina. Several businesses that support the automotive giant built facilities nearby, bringing in thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in revenue. Local leaders know we must think regionally and build on our competitive advantages. We know we must have first-class infrastructure and attract new commercial and industrial firms by providing a full package of incentives. Looking back, and looking forward, though much has changed, much is still the same for business development in this region. We have been favored with an abundance of natural resources, more than our share of visionary leaders and a work ethic that won’t quit until we’ve reached our goal. The Charlotte region has a well deserved reputation as a beautiful, dynamic and exciting region in which to live and work. As Duke Power celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2004, we stand ready to work with customers and communities to build on that reputation and look forward to celebrating our 200th anniversary.

24

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


business strength | business community

business strength BUSINESS COMMUNITY

Mega Financial Center • CharlotteUSA is the second largest financial center in the U.S. – second only to New York City • Over $900 billion in financial assets are managed in Charlotte • CharlotteUSA is headquarters to the 2nd largest (Bank of America) and 4th largest (Wachovia) bank holding companies in the U.S. • Other banks in CharlotteUSA have ranked in the top 25 banks in the U.S.: BB&T (#14); SouthTrust (#20)

The 2003 Charlotte skyline

Fortune 500 Firms • CharlotteUSA is home to two of the Fortune 20 companies: Bank of America and Duke Energy • Nine Fortune 500 companies are headquartered in the region Major Employers Along with financial institutions, CharlotteUSA includes employers in many different industries. Major employers in CharlotteUSA include the following corporations: • • • • • • • •

Bank of America Corporation BellSouth Carolinas Healthcare System Commscope Inc. Duke Energy Corporation Wachovia Freightliner Corporation Lowes Home Centers Inc.

• • • • •

Philip Morris U.S.A. Sara Lee Corporation Corning Cable Systems Springs Industries Inc. US Airways

CharlotteUSA is headquarters of the 2nd largest (Bank of America) and 4th largest (Wachovia) bank holding companies in the U.S.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

25


business strength | business community EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Source: NC/SC Employment Security Commission

• • • •

Manufacturing 28% Services 27% Retail Trade 15% Communication & Public Utilities 3% • Construction 7% • Transportation 4% • Finance, Insurance & Real Estate 6% • Wholesale Trade 6% • Government 2% • Agriculture & Mining 2%

G L O B A L / I N T E R N AT I O N A L C O N N E C T I O N S The Carolinas – A Global Economic Powerhouse • Population of more than 12.4 million people • Combined annual GSP of over $390 billion • 16th largest world economy Carolinas Global Business Connections • Over 1,600 foreign firms in the Carolinas employing approximately 350,000 people • 46 countries represented in the Carolinas • Over $21 billion in exports

CharlotteUSA Foreign-owned Firms 2003

1999

1995

GERMANY. . . . . . . . . . . 168 JAPAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 UNITED KINGDOM . . . . . . . 74 CANADA . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 SWITZERLAND . . . . . . . . . 43 FRANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 ITALY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 NETHERLANDS . . . . . . . . . 28 SWEDEN . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 BELGIUM . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 DENMARK . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 TAIWAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 AUSTRALIA . . . . . . . . . . . 6 SOUTH AFRICA . . . . . . . . . 6 BERMUDA . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 HONG KONG . . . . . . . . . . 4 IRELAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 AUSTRIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BRAZIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FINLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ISRAEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 OTHERS . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Country

. . . . . . . 130 . . . . . . . . 93 . . . . . . . . 87 . . . . . . . . 50 . . . . . . . . 43 . . . . . . . . 30 . . . . . . . . 23 . . . . . . . . 14 . . . . . . . . 15 . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . N/A . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . N/A . . . . . . . . 2

. . . . . . . 121 . . . . . . . . 72 . . . . . . . . 72 . . . . . . . . 36 . . . . . . . . 38 . . . . . . . . 36 . . . . . . . . 20 . . . . . . . . 11 . . . . . . . . 10 . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . N/A . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . N/A . . . . . . . N/A . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . N/A . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . N/A . . . . . . . N/A

1990

TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . 619

. . . . . . . 551

. . . . . . . 458 . . . . . . . 325

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . .

91 49 39 19 34 20 20 10 14 . . 7 . N/A . N/A . . 3 . N/A . N/A . N/A . . 1 . . 1 . N/A . . 2 . N/A . N/A

The total labor force in CharlotteUSA reaches more than one million.

Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership 2003

26

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


business strength | labor

LABOR FORCE 15% 13.4 12%

12.9

11.0 9.4

8.5

8.2

7.0

6.8

7.2

7.4

5.5

6%

6.9 5.9

6.0

ROWAN

8.3

7.9

MECKLENBURG

9%

5.2

YORK

UNION

STANLY

LINCOLN

LANCASTER

IREDELL

GASTON

CLEVELAND

CHESTERFIELD

CHESTER

CATAWBA

CABARRUS

ANSON

ALEXANDER

0%

REGION

3%

CharlotteUSA Labor Force 2002 County Name

Labor Force

Unemployment

Unemployment Rate (%)

ALEXANDER . . . . . . . . . 17,594 . . . . . . . . . . 1,383 . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.9 ANSON . . . . . . . . . . . 10,928 . . . . . . . . . 1,198 . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.0 CABARRUS . . . . . . . . . 74,477 . . . . . . . . . 4,085 . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.5 CATAWBA . . . . . . . . . 78,514 . . . . . . . . . 7,365 . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.4 CHESTER . . . . . . . . . . 14,941 . . . . . . . . . 2,001 . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.4 CHESTERFIELD . . . . . . . 19,387 . . . . . . . . . 1,614 . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.3 CLEVELAND . . . . . . . . 44,507 . . . . . . . . . 5,723 . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.9 GASTON . . . . . . . . . 105,071 . . . . . . . . . 8,625 . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2 IREDELL . . . . . . . . . . . 66,864 . . . . . . . . . 4,521 . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.8 LANCASTER . . . . . . . . 29,112 . . . . . . . . . 2,096 . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.2 LINCOLN . . . . . . . . . . 35,952 . . . . . . . . . 2,669 . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.4 MECKLENBURG . . . . . . 412,560 . . . . . . . . . 24,449 . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.9 ROWAN . . . . . . . . . . 68,623 . . . . . . . . . 4,147 . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.0 STANLY . . . . . . . . . . . 25,926 . . . . . . . . . 2,204 . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.5 UNION . . . . . . . . . . . 71,507 . . . . . . . . . 3,685 . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.2 YORK . . . . . . . . . . . . 91,730 . . . . . . . . . . 6,297 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.9 REGION . . . . . . . . . 1,167,693 . . . . . . . . . 82,062

. . . . . . . . . . . . 7.0

Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership 2003

Labor CharlotteUSA offers a productive work force for companies concerned about the quality of their products or services. North and South Carolina workers are more productive than other workers in the same industries nationally. The growing population of the area ensures a constant and predictable flow of workers into the job market. During the years 19902000, the Charlotte region’s population grew by 22%. Much of this growth was through the immigration of people from outside the region seeking job opportunities and the superior quality of life offered here. Regional Commuting Patterns The total labor force in CharlotteUSA reaches more than one million. Each day more than 146.000 workers commute to Mecklenburg County from outlying counties. This commuting labor force has increased significantly over recent years. As shown in the illustration to the right, daily commuting patterns give industries a broader workforce from which to draw employees. As traditional industries have reduced their labor needs, new industries have been able to tap this supply of labor. A significant supply of available labor remains to be tapped. Within a one-hour commute (50 miles), over 50,000 people are registered as seeking new employment within this area. In addition, this 50-mile radius has over 2,000 high school graduates directly entering the labor market each year. Work Force Training Superior job training is an asset in CharlotteUSA. Specialized training at no cost is available for companies through the community college

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

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business strength | labor

by both North Carolina and South Carolina, as well as two levels of local government: the county and the municipality.

35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10%

28

YORK

UNION

STANLY

ROWAN

MECKLENBURG

LINCOLN

LANCASTER

IREDELL

GASTON

CLEVELAND

CHESTERFIELD

CHESTER

CATAWBA

CABARRUS

$60K

$50K

$40K

$30K

YORK

UNION

STANLY

ROWAN

MECKLENBURG

LINCOLN

LANCASTER

IREDELL

GASTON

CLEVELAND

CHESTERFIELD

CHESTER

$10K

CATAWBA

$20K

CABARRUS

State Taxes Corporate Income Tax • North Carolina corporate income

ANSON

0%

Government & Taxes The CharlotteUSA area is served by both North Carolina and South Carolina, as well as two levels of local government: the county and the municipality. While generalization about the division of function among the local governments is difficult, generally speaking, the county is usually responsible for so-called “soft” \or people-related services such as education, health, social services, mental health, and others. Municipalities are usually responsible for the “hard” services such as transportation, water and sewer, sidewalks, street lighting and other infrastructure.

ALEXANDER

5%

ANSON

G O V E R N M E N TA L INCENTIVES

area is served

CHARLOTTE USA

Union Activity Both North and South Carolina have Right-to-Work laws, which permit individual workers to choose whether or not they wish to join a labor union. This helps establish a pro-business atmosphere for employers. North Carolina’s union membership is 3.2%, the lowest unionization rate in the nation with South Carolina ranking second lowest with a unionization rate of 4.9%.

The CharlotteUSA

ALEXANDER

network. The ten community colleges and technical institutes throughout CharlotteUSA, which form the Charlotte Region Workforce Development Partnership, offer customized training programs for each company seeking training assistance. The colleges provide instructors, standard training equipment, and all classroom materials required to produce qualified workers. Currently nearly 60,000 students are enrolled in the community college system.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


business strength | governmental incentives

Local Government The backbone of the local tax structure is the property tax. Revenues for local government are provided through property tax, a small portion of the overall sales tax and some minimal user fees. There is no local income tax. In comparison with the other states and with other local governments, both North and South Carolina and their respective local governments have low to moderate tax rates.

49

47 44 40

40

37 34 31

28

30 25

26

24

21

18

20 14 10

12 8

7

WYOMING

WISCONSIN

WASHINGTON

VIRGINIA

UTAH

OHIO

SOUTH CAROLINA

NORTH CAROLINA

NEW YORK

1 NEW JERSEY

NEVADA

MICHIGAN

MASSACHUSETTS

MARYLAND

ILLINOIS

FLORIDA

GEORGIA

3 0

CONNECTICUT

Sales & Use Tax • North Carolina’s sales and use tax at the rate is 4% 1/2 with a local rate of 2% 1/2 or 3% on transactions. The combined 7% tax is not applicable to raw materials, containers, labels, packaging and shipping materials. • South Carolina levies a 5% sales tax statewide and its counties may levy an additional 1%. Tax exemptions include equipment used in the production process; electricity and fuels used in the production process; raw materials; repair parts; and packaging materials.

50

CALIFORNIA

tax rate is 6.9% levied on net income allocable to the state. • South Carolina collects 5% of net taxable income.

Revenues for local government are provided through property tax, a small portion of the overall sales tax and some minimal user fees.

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North Carolina/South Carolina Incentives North Carolina and South Carolina offer a variety of incentives to firms relocating or expanding in the state, including investment, job creation and workforce training tax credits. Many of these credits are affected by the economic status of the county in which the investment takes place, and most of the business incentives are performance based. Both states give tax credits to companies that hire within the state. The incentives are designed to benefit companies that contribute to the long-range

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

Land Planning Landscape Architecture

Civil Engineering

Urban Design

www. colejeneststone. com

29


business strength | governmental incentives

Many new business economic growth of their respective state and create the most jobs for local residents. North Carolina was the first state in the nation to provide free customized job training for new and expanding industries. The program is offered through the Community College System, and it provides instructors, equipment and materials to companies. Firms eligible for the job creation or investment tax credit can take credit against training wages for eligible employees. South Carolina has introduced a similar program, known as South Carolina’s Special Schools, which allows companies locating in the state to use its extensive statewide network of technical colleges to recruit, screen, test and train workers at little or no cost to the company. Many new business incentives are driven by a growing concern for the environment. Both states have introduced initiatives which encourage companies to use renewable energy, and North Carolina awards income tax credits to manufacturers of renewable energy products and equipment. Environmental initiatives have spawned property tax exemptions for corporations and homeowners who use solar power to heat their office space and homes. In addition to state incentives, all of the counties in the Charlotte region encourage companies to settle inside their boundaries by providing incentive monies on a case-by-case basis. Many of these incentives come in the form of a grant – based on a “scorecard” that determines the project’s impact on the community. Local incentives are designed to stimulate development by offsetting up-

incentives are driven by a growing concern for the environment. front costs associated with an industry location or expansion. Companies may also qualify for property tax exemptions, depending on which county they decide to call home. There are no state property taxes in the Carolinas; property is assessed and taxed by county governments. City Councils in this area have come up with innovative ways to attract new companies. For example, Chesterfield County offers property tax abatements on a town-by-town basis, so that companies will be more likely to develop the more blighted areas of the county. Foreign Trade Zone Going south, away from Charlotte on Interstate 77, drivers may notice a small, non-descript, green sign on the side of the highway, just miles away from the South Carolina border, which reads: “Entering Foreign Trade Zone.” That may be the most information the public ever sees or hears about Foreign Trade Zone #57, because, until now, it has gotten very little attention from the media, and there have been few efforts to market this profitable piece of land. As a result, the zone remains a secret incentive for companies seeking to build manufacturing plants in the Charlotte region. Zone #57 is not the only Foreign Trade Zone kept under raps. There are actually 265 of these areas zoned in the United States, and only a handful of them receive the attention they deserve, because most people do not know what these zones have to offer. A Foreign or Free Trade Zone is a neutral, secured area legally outside

30

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


business strength | governmental incentives

U.S. Customs’ territory. Foreign or domestic merchandise may enter this enclave without a formal customs entry or the payment of customs duties or government excise taxes. If the final product is exported from the U.S., no customs duty is levied. If the final product enters the American market, duty and excise taxes are due only when the products are sold to U.S. buyers. The purpose of these zones is to encourage and expedite American participation in international trade. Any manufacturing plant that uses foreign components should consider locating in a Foreign Trade Zone, especially oil, chemical, automobile, pharmaceutical, electronic and technology companies. Foreign Trade Zones provide a myriad of economic advantages for businesses involved in international trade, including savings on customs, taxes, interest, labor and shipping costs. Conducting business inside a Foreign Trade Zone also benefits surrounding communities by bringing in jobs that would otherwise end up overseas. Located in the seventh largest trading area in the U.S.,

The purpose of these zones is to encourage and expedite American participation in international trade. 2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

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accessibility| introduction

accessibility:

portals for prosperity I N T R O D U C T I O N B Y T. J E R R Y O R R , A V I AT I O N D I R E C T O R , CHARLOTTE DOUGLAS REGIONAL AIRPORT

O

“My phone continually rings with someone asking “How is Charlotte able to do it?” ~JERRY ORR

32

n December 19, 2003, the world will celebrate the centennial of the first powered flight. Thanks to the determination of Orville and Wilbur Wright, in less than 100 years, the world has become accessible to all. This pioneering feat, which occurred on the dunes of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina has empowered millions to open new worlds for commerce and brought cultures together. Since the city’s founding in 1768, accessibility has long been a foundation of the community. Charlotte’s first transportation and commerce focused around the intersection of two trading paths – now known as Trade and Tryon Streets. Today these streets are the cornerstone of Charlotte’s Center City and the location of the country’s second largest financial center. In the early 1930’s, community leaders, led by Charlotte Mayor Ben E. Douglas shoveled small mounds of earth to build the region’s first airport in the “wild west” of the city. Development was minimal in this area between the heart of Charlotte and the Catawba River, but this single step of groundbreaking was the beginning of unprecedented regional progress. Today, over 68 years later, Charlotte is home to one of the world’s busiest airports – Charlotte Douglas International Airport. With 23 million passengers annually and service to more than 110 destinations, the airport is the cornerstone of accessibility for the Charlotte Region. Passenger and cargo air carriers, private aircraft, general aviation, corporate, military and trucking operations serve Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT). The airport has developed into a 5000-acre complex that is home to six major airlines, 13 regional airlines, a foreign flag air carrier and a low fare air carrier. US Airways, the nation’s seventh largest airline, operates its largest hub at CLT. Airlines have operated hubs in Charlotte since the late 1960’s. In the aviation industry, there are two kinds of cities – those that have a hub and those that want a hub. Traditionally, a community the size of Charlotte has not been able to support an airline hub. “As a hub airport, the city has a level of non-stop flight access that non-hub cities of

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


accessibility | introduction

“The single most important economic development tool I have is the airport.” ~TERRY ORELL, GROUP VICE PRESIDENT OF BUSINESS GROWTH, CHARLOTTE CHAMBER

similar size can only dream about,” states Michael Boyd of The Boyd Group, an aviation-consulting firm. Aviation experts say that we are lucky to have such a high volume of air service compared to the population of the Charlotte USA Region and that CLT defies the traditional airline hub model. My phone continually rings with someone asking “How is Charlotte able to do it?” For many years, our financial benchmark has been focused on the cost per boarded passenger to airlines. This fee of less than $2.00 is one of the lowest in the country has become particularly interesting to my peers in this post 9/11 environment. Our long-term benchmark is quickly becoming a standard measurement tool for other airports. Terry Orell, Group Vice President of Business Growth, Charlotte Chamber says, “The single most important economic development tool I have is the airport.” The airport is credited with attracting numerous domestic and internation-

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

33


accessibility | introduction

“We are continually analyzing every aspect of the airport, and from the time a passenger enters our parking facilities to the time of boarding, we want their visit to be flawless.” ~JERRY ORR

34

al corporations to the Charlotte USA Region, and the survival of the hub is directly related to the economic health of our community. We pride ourselves on being recognized as an industry leader. Recently Charlotte Douglas was recognized by J. D. Powers & Associates as one of the top airports in the world for customer satisfaction. CLT ranked seventh in the world, with Honk Kong International Airport ranking first. The survey, available in seven languages, was completed by more than 10,000 respondents from over a dozen countries. This recognition is the result of many years of dedication to enhancing the passenger experience. We are continually analyzing every aspect of the airport, and from the time a passenger enters our parking facilities to the time of boarding, we want their visit to be flawless. In our mission statement, we declare a commitment to the highest quality product for the lowest possible cost. This motto is known by all employees and is the fundamental basis of the airport’s daily operations. Like any other operation, it is important to invest wisely in order to sustain ourselves. In the post 9/11 culture, the aviation industry is fragile and everchanging. It is more important than ever to position ourselves for success by providing an exceeding-

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


accessibility | introduction

“With CLT’s proximity to major interstates and CLT’s existing Foreign Trade Zone, accessibility to the rest of the world would be unmatched.” ~JERRY ORR

ly economical cost structure to our business partners and developing a financing plan that lessens our dependence on airline fees. Charlotte Douglas is totally self-supporting and is fueled by user fees. There is no use of local tax dollars and our conservative economic practices are fundamental to our day-to-day operation. Recently, we completed an extensive financing plan and presented it to our signatory carriers. If approved, this plan could revolutionize the airport’s financial model. The new financial model will institute a Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) for CLT. The $3.00 per ticket fee will be used to make payments on bonds to expand Concourse E, the airport’s regional jet concourse and begin construction on a new runway. CLT is one of the last major airports to impose a PFC charge. The Charlotte Region continues to prove itself a leader with its development of a multi-modal transportation concept designed to bring together air, ocean, rail and surface transportation with CLT as the pivotal centerpiece. The initial step in this plan will be to relocate Charlotte’s existing rail yard, currently in the Center City, to airport property and further develop as a rail/truck yard along the Norfolk Southern Railway line, which borders the Airport. With CLT’s proximity to major interstates and CLT’s existing Foreign Trade Zone, accessibility to the rest of the world would be unmatched. Once in place, the “edge city” is expected to significantly enhance the Region’s transportation and distribution capabilities, create thousands of jobs, attract new firms to the Region, increase the tax base and position the Charlotte USA Region as one of the East Coast’s most advanced inland cargo centers. It is impossible to fathom what the next 100 years of aviation will bring to our community. Planning for the future is not an exact science. However, one can visualize where they want to be and establish goals to reach that point. Charlotte Douglas International Airport’s goal is to ensure that our business partners have the tools needed to operate and produce a high-quality aviation experience that,

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

35


accessibility

accessibility | location

A

n easy drive from either the serene Appalachian Mountains or the sandy beaches of South Carolina, CharlotteUSA’s location in the Piedmont offers the best of all worlds. Located midway between Miami and New York on the East Coast, it’s also a prime location from which to run a business. Four interstate highways, the largest consolidated rail system in the country, the sixth busiest airport in the nation and quick access to a number of deep-sea ports serve the region. CharlotteUSA has a clearly advantageous location in the eastern portion of the United States. Fifty-five percent of the U.S. population and 62 percent of U.S. industry are within 650 miles of Charlotte.

P O P U L AT I O N C O M PA R I S O N IN A 650-MILE RADIUS City Percentage of U.S. Population Charlotte .......................................57% Atlanta...........................................44% New York .......................................40%

• More than 130 million people can be reached in only 2 hours by air or one day by car or truck from CharlotteUSA • CharlotteUSA is the 6th largest major trading area • CharlotteUSA is a major transportation & distribution center

FLIGHT/DRIVING TIMES From Charlotte to Designated Cities City

Miles

Kilometers

Driving Time

Flight Time

Atlanta, GA

243

391

3:57

1:15

Chicago, IL

765

1231

12:13

2:00

Orlando, FL

524

843

8:13

1:30

New York, NY

646

1039

10:27

1:50

Memphis, TN

620

998

9:22

1:40

Washington, DC

400

644

6:24

1:15

Airports North Carolina has the proud reputation of “First In Flight,” and, in the Charlotte region, this is no misnomer. In addition to Charlotte/Douglas International, there are 22 other airports serving the region, 17 of which are public, full-service airports. These airports offer aircraft fuel, maintenance, parking, rental, charters and training, and provide an aviation link to Charlotte’s surrounding counties. Charlotte/Douglas International Airport The Charlotte/Douglas International Airport is midway between I-85 and I-77. This convenient location, with quick access entrances and exits, makes the

36

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


accessibility | airports airport easily accessible from all parts of the CharlotteUSA. With Charlotte/Douglas International Airport serving Charlotte, you are one plane change away from any important business destination in the world. • Over 500 flights daily • 146 cities served by non-stop and single plane service • 23.6 million passengers in 2002 • Over 1 million international passengers in 2002 • Ranked 14th nationwide in total operations and 19th nationwide in total passengers International Service (Non-stop/direct flights) • Frankfurt, Germany • London, England • Toronto, Canada • Aruba • Freeport/Grand Bahama Islands • Bermuda • Cancun, Mexico • Grand Cayman Islands • Montego Bay, Jamaica • Nassau, Bahamas • San Juan, Puerto Rico • Saint Maarten, Netherland Antillies • Providenciales, Turks & Caicos • St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands • Cozumel, Mexico • Mexico City, Mexico • Belize • Punta Cana, Dominican Republic

CHARLOTTEUSA REGIONAL AIRPORTS In addition to Charlotte-Douglas International Airport, there are several regional airports serving the CharlotteUSA area. Following are the location and operational scale of each: County Airport Number of Aircraft per day Anson .....................................Anson County ................................................18 Cabarrus ..................................Concord Regional ...........................................151 Catawba ..................................Hickory Regional.............................................125 Chester ....................................Chester Municipal ..........................................30 Chesterfield..............................Cheraw Municipal ..........................................57 Chesterfield..............................Pageland .......................................................43 Cleveland .................................Shelby Municipal ...........................................53 Gaston .....................................Gastonia Municipal.........................................137 Iredell .......................................Statesville Municipal .......................................85 Lancaster..................................Lancaster County............................................68 Lincoln .....................................Lincoln County ...............................................70 Rowan .....................................Rowan County ...............................................85 Stanly .......................................Albemarle/Stanly County ................................85 Union .......................................Monroe ..........................................................151 Union .......................................Jaars-Townsend ..............................................20 York .........................................Bryant Field ....................................................103

Top Destinations from Charlotte • Atlanta • New York • Dallas/Ft. Worth • Chicago • Newark • Philadelphia • Boston • Orlando • Tampa • Los Angeles • San Francisco • Denver • Las Vegas • Detroit

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accessibility | airports • Washington • St. Paul, MN Airlines • Air Canada • American Airlines • ATA • Continental Airlines • Delta, Comair • Northwest Airlines • United Airlines • US Airways/US Airways Express

T R A N S P O R TAT I O N CharlotteUSA’s transportation infrastructure plays a vital role in its economy. Much of the region’s recent growth can be attributed to the growth of US Airways’ hub and the accompanying expansion of facilities at Charlotte-Douglas International Airport. Since 1982, the number of gates at the airport has more than doubled, and terminal square footage has tripled. The airport also contains an Air Cargo Center, which handles nearly 180,000 tons of cargo a year. Excellent Interstates In addition to the airport, the region is served by four interstate highways: I-40, I-77, I-485 and I-85. These surface connections and proximity to a large portion of the country’s population make CharlotteUSA very attractive to the trucking industry – some 370 trucking firms are located in the region.

CharlotteUSA’s transportation infrastructure plays a vital role in its economy.

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2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


accessibility | transportation

Railroad CharlotteUSA is also served by the largest consolidated rail system in the country, which links it to twenty-two states in the eastern half of the U.S. Norfolk Southern Railway and CSX Transportation are main links in this system, bringing more than 200 trains through Charlotte each week. Ports Because of its rail connections to the Carolina coast, Charlotte enjoys the status of an inland port. Norfolk Southern Railway and CSX Transportation bring more than 200 trains through Charlotte each week, and the booming trucking industry delivers cargo where trains cannot. Accessible ports on the Atlantic Coast include Wilmington, Charleston, Savannah and Morehead City. Port

Miles/km

Time

196 mi/315 km

3.75 hours

Charleston

208 mi/335 km

3.5 hours

Savannah

250 mi/402 km

4 hours

Morehead City

316 mi/508 km

5.5 hours

Wilmington

CharlotteUSA’s transportation infrastructure is a vital factor contributing to its successful growth. So, whether planning a family camping trip to the mountains or transporting cargo from overseas, CharlotteUSA’s advantageous location and easy accessibility cut down on the time and expenses involved in any personal or business endeavor.

A VA I L A B I L I T Y O F E N E R G Y The recent blackout in the Northeast evoked newfound concern among companies dependent on reliable and efficient energy. Companies want to operate in a region where the energy flow is constant and affordable. Much of the business and industry located in the Carolinas has been attracted to this service region,

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accessibility | availability of energy

because its energy companies have earned reputations as dependable sources of efficiently priced energy. Their engineers offer energy and site analysis to help companies locating in the CharlotteUSA find the most competitive processes and facilities for their businesses. Duke Power and Piedmont Natural Gas are committed to serving the energy needs of the Charlotte region. Supplying electricity to more than two million residential, commercial and industrial customers in the Carolinas, Charlotte-based Duke Energy has become a diversified, multinational energy company. Duke Energy manages a dynamic portfolio of natural gas and electric supply, delivery and trading businesses; and is among the ten largest energy companies in the

The recent blackout in the Northeast evoked newfound concern among companies dependent on reliable and efficient energy. Companies want to operate in a region where the energy flow is constant and affordable. world. Duke Power has been helping the Piedmont region of North and South Carolina to grow since 1904 and is committed to providing customers with a continuous flow of service and expertise and to responding quickly to new opportunities. Also based in Charlotte, Piedmont Natural Gas is the second largest natural gas utility in the Southeast. With a customer growth rate three times the national average for their industry, Piedmont Natural Gas has been providing reliable and affordable energy to its customers for over fifty years. For further information on CharlotteUSA’s two largest energy providers, check their Web sites at www.dukepower.com/ecdev or www.piedmontng.com.

T E L E C O M M U N I C AT I O N S In order to compete in today’s rapidly changing business climate, companies must have access to leading edge telecommunications capabilities. According to a 2002 Assessment of North Carolina’s Telecommunications Infrastructure, performed by KPMG Public Consulting Services, the Charlotte region is wired with all the latest technology available. Services commonly deployed throughout the region include Asynchronous Transfer Mode, which is commonly used in video teleconferencing, voice transport, and multimedia applications; robust, reliable Broadband Services; DSL technology for bringing high-bandwidth information to homes and businesses; frame relay for cost-efficient data transmission for intermittent, burst-oriented traffic between end-points in a wide area network; Integrated Services Digital Network; Point-to-Point Services – Digital Signal (DS-0), DS-1 (T-1), and DS-3 Services, which are common baselines for telecommunications; cable modems and commercial unlicensed wireless spectrums. Although it may take a degree in rocket science to understand these technological terms, these high-tech telecommunications services make doing business much easier. The ability to connect is paramount in business development, as well as regional development, and the

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2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


accessibility | industrial parks

One reason for CharlotteUSA’s rapid growth in recent years has been the availability of established business and industrial parks.

CharlotteUSA is connecting.

I N D U S T R I A L PA R K S One reason for CharlotteUSA’s rapid growth in recent years has been the availability of established business and industrial parks. Over 300 industrial parks are located in the Charlotte region, providing well-planned sites that can accommodate both commercial and industrial growth. CharlotteUSA’s business parks range from higher-end corporate office parks to heavy industrial facilities with abundant energy infrastructure and rail, to parks focusing solely on providing amenities for technology companies engaged in research and development. The commercial and industrial real estate market remains fairly strong in CharlotteUSA, especially as the local economy continues to diversify. New business parks and commercial structures continue to be developed on a speculative basis, and there is an ample supply of existing buildings to meet immediate market demand. The Charlotte Regional Partnership maintains a database of specific sights at www.CharlotteUSA.com, with a search engine designed to locate industrial parks according to specific criteria.

SITES & BUILDINGS CharlotteUSA has over 900 available industrial buildings and sites listed on the Charlotte Regional Partnership’s online real estate database. Building sizes range from small spaces to a 687,863-square-foot facility. Listed buildings include stand-alone facilities with acreage as well as flexible multi-tenant spaces. Industrial sites range from several acres upwards to 1,000 acres in both greenfield sites and industrial/business parks. Samples of the Charlotte Regional Partnership’s real estate database are shown below. The Charlotte Regional Partnership maintains a database of specific sights at www.CharlotteUSA.com, with a search engine designed to locate industrial parks according to specific criteria. The Monroe Corporate Center Spec Building will have 56,000 square feet to be constructed later this year. The Monroe Corporate Center is located in the City of Monroe, Union County. The Bailes Business Park is located in Lancaster County minutes from Interstate 485. The 300-acre full service business park provides easy access to Interstates 77 and 85. Crosspoint Center is located in Mecklenburg County. Space is available for lease in sizes up to 127,000 square feet. This business park provides excellent access to transportation hubs.

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quality of life | introduction

quality of life:

abundant culture and spirit INTRODUCTION BY HARRIET SANFORD, PRESIDENT AND CEO, CHARLOTTE ARTS & SCIENCE COUNCIL – CHARLOTTE-MECKLENBURG

The 16-county Charlotte region bursts with cultural diversity and opportunities in a seamless web of arts, entertainment and sports opportunities.

O

“There's no doubt in my mind that Charlotte's cultivation of its artistic community has been invaluable in helping establish our reputation as a great place to live and do business.” ~ RUTH SHAW

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n a whim, a Duke Power employee took a role in an Opera Carolina production. When he donned his costume for a crowd scene, the unexpected happened. He got excited about opera. Soon, he spread his enthusiasm among his engineer colleagues. For moral support, they turned out to see him. Guess what? Opera Carolina won a handful of new fans. More important, these fledgling opera buffs learned there is life beyond work and that cultural pursuits help them find it, along with a heightened sense of identity and connectivity with each other. Their boss, Duke Power Company president Ruth Shaw, said, “It’s hard to overestimate the impact a vital arts scene can have on the quality of life.” We heartily agree at the Arts & Science Council (ASC), the region’s largest non-profit organization that provides planning, oversight and funding to cultural organizations. Because the Charlotte region of 16 counties in North and South Carolina does such a comprehensive job of supporting the arts, science and history with money, time and talent, our region is known as a place where the arts are thriving. Further, we enjoy a reputation for history museums and historic sites that are key to the cultural landscape, and science facilities that play a central role in providing life-long learning to the community. Whether it’s Historic Brattonsville in York County, the Daniel Stowe Botanical Gardens in Belmont, Unity Place or the Schiele Museum of Natural History in Gastonia, or the Jubilee: Harvest of the Arts festival in Rock Hill, cultural opportunities abound in Charlotte USA. Hickory boasts the Western Piedmont Symphony, the Hickory Museum of Art, and Catawba Valley Pottery Sale. To the east, the Blooming Arts Festival is the pride of Monroe, while on the west Shelby offers its Reel to Reel Film Festival. From the Piedmont Players in Salisbury to the Lincoln Cultural Center in Lincolnton, the Charlotte region bursts with cultural diversity and opportunities. In Mecklenburg County, Opera Carolina is one of 28 arts, science and history organizations supported by the ASC. Other organizations include the Charlotte Symphony, Discovery Place, the Afro American Cultural Center and the Charlotte Museum of History. The ASC supports these groups with funding, planning and technical assistance. The 2003 ASC annual fund drive raised more than $10.1 million, surpassing our goal and a new record for monies raised. We award that money to the North Carolina Dance Theatre, the Levine Museum of the New South, the Carolina Raptor Center and 25 other groups so these organizations can continue enhancing our lives. Business leaders such as Shaw see that it's working. “There’s no doubt in my mind that the Charlotte area’s cultivation of its artistic community has been invaluable in helping establish our reputation as a great

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


quality of life | introduction place to live and do business,” Shaw says. “I think there's a growing consensus that the arts and other ‘quality of life’ issues play a crucial role in making an area attractive to both employers and workers when it comes to relocation decisions.” Charlotte Chamber statistics substantiate what Shaw says. Charlotte USA counts offices of 286 Fortune 500 firms and eight of them call the region their headquarters. Those companies and thousands of others created more than 12,000 new jobs in 2002, a year of economic challenges throughout the country. These new work opportunities are a big reason people keep coming here to seek their fortune, swelling Charlotte's population past 600,000 and making it the country’s 21st largest city. Charlotte USA is the nation's second largest banking center, with two of America’s 10 biggest financial institutions. Leaders at Wachovia Corporation, which shares Charlotte as its headquarters city with Bank of America Corporation, appreciate the role of cultural organizations in the company's growth. “The area's quality of life is greatly enhanced by its flourishing arts community,” says Mac Everett, Wachovia’s director of Corporate and Community Affairs. “This gives companies like ours a real advantage when it comes to recruiting employees, because it makes our city a much more appealing place to work.” At ASC we appreciate the strong corporate support we receive, but we also understand the significance of contributions from individuals such as those who move to Charlotte USA to take a better job. “A very high percentage of our Charlotte area associates pledged funds to the Arts & Science Council campaign this year,” says Graham Denton, president of Bank of America North Carolina and Bank of America Charlotte. “We believe the arts are essential to the economic vitality of a city, touching the lives of nearly everyone.”

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43


44

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

charlotteUSA

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

choose


2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

45

Cleveland

Chester

York

Gaston

Lincoln

Catawba

Alexander

Union

Cabarrus

Rowan

Lancaster

Mecklenburg

Iredell

Chesterfield

Anson

Stanly

CHARLOTTEUSA CITY-STATE • Distribution hub for the fifthlargest urban region in the U.S. • More flights per capita than almost any other U.S. region • World’s 39th largest airport in total passengers • Served by nine of the nation’s top 10 trucking companies • Part of the nation’s 8th largest trucking center • Home to an inland intermodal terminal operated by the North Carolina State Ports Authority • At the center of the largest consolidated rail system in the country • Served by four interstate highways (I-40, I-77, I-485 and I-85) • Within a 24-hour drive of more than 56% of the nation’s population • Located midway on the East Coast between New York City and Miami, Florida

CharlotteUSA on the Move

CHARLOTTEUSA CORRIDORS OF COMMERCE


quality of life | introduction

Moving into the 21st century, Charlotte USA ranks among the country’s top cities in annualarts council revenues, right there with New York and San Jose and ahead of Los Angeles and Dallas.

46

Employees of Denton’s bank and at firms throughout the Charlotte region

provide essential support for the ASC and its cultural groups. More than 39,000 individual donors gave to the 2003 ASC drive, contributing whatever they could. In fact, over 21,000 people gave $50 or less. But perhaps most striking is the willingness of teachers, hospital workers, city and county employees and those in all walks of life to support groups that enrich the entire community. The ASC built its funding with hard work and public accountability. Each year for more than a decade, the amount raised for cultural support has increased. Moving into the 21st century, Charlotte USA ranks among the country’s top cities in annual arts council revenues, right there with New York and San Jose and ahead of Los Angeles and Dallas. Charlotte’s 2001 annual fund drive led the nation, beating out Milwaukee, Cincinnati, Louisville and Atlanta. Of those cities, only Cincinnati appears likely to join Charlotte this year in achieving its fund drive goal. All 28 ASC cultural institutions appreciate the continued success of the area’s funding campaigns and the sense of stability that success brings. Opera Carolina's leader articulated that appreciation succinctly. “Across America, arts vie for the limited resources of their community, often creating an atmosphere which goes against the very nature of human artistic creativity,” says James Meena, the opera’s general manager and principal conductor. “In our area,” Meena adds, “we have a unique and enlightened system of a unified campaign that maximizes

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


quality of life | introduction

“In our area we have a unique and enlightened system of a unified campaign that maximizes the generous support of the community to create a true cultural community for the enrichment, enlightenment and education of the largest number of citizens possible.” ~JAMES MEENA, GENERAL MANAGER AND P R I N C I PA L C O N D U C T O R , O P E R A C A R O L I N A

the generous support of the community to create a true cultural community for the enrichment, enlightenment and education of the largest number of citizens possible.” The ASC theme for the 2003 fund drive was “Bringing the Gifts to Life,” and we lived it with a program that continues. Our “Artist in the Workplace” initiative puts working artists at local businesses. Employees can watch them create their art and can get involved in the process. That program illustrates another ingredient for success. We encourage our organizations to promote accessibility. Art, science and history must be made relevant in our communities. Kids need to hear orchestral music in their own neighborhoods so they’re comfortable with it and not just on special occasions when they travel somewhere to hear it. We want people to realize that they don’t need a degree or special expertise to get involved in cultural pursuits. There are no rules; you simply like what you experience or you don’t. If you want to get back to pure economic reasons why the arts, science and history enhance the quality of life in Charlotte USA, consider this: “A viable arts community...is becoming as essential to recruiting companies who wish to relocate to Charlotte as housing, schools and the cost of living,” says Bank of America’s Denton. Those are significant sentiments when cities across the country, including Charlotte, seriously consider offering sizeable monetary grants to businesses that relocate or significantly add to their workforce. Further, numbers from a University of North Carolina at Charlotte study make a stark statement about culture’s contribution to our community’s bottom line. Figures for the year 2000 show that ASC-affiliated cultural organizations provided nearly 52,000 events attended by almost three million people. These events drew in excess of a half-million people from outside our county, and that was up 40 percent from 1998. Enhancing the attraction of our cultural amenities to visitors from outside our area is a major goal for the ASC. We have a singular opportunity to do this as travel patterns change and people are more apt to visit locations they can reach in reasonable highway travel time. Already, 10 cultural facilities are among our area’s top 25 attractions for those who visit here for work or play. Another serious initiative has to be taking our cultural opportunities to folks in the surrounding cities and towns. This is how we can show our neighbors the ways Charlotte USA institutions broaden horizons. This community has built broad support for its cultural programs. With hard work, generosity at every level, volunteers from all sectors and dedicated creative individuals, we’ve made Charlotte-Mecklenburg a coveted place to live, to work

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quality of life

quality of life | live–work–play

C

harlotteUSA has a unique combination of urban and rural settings. The region is situated two hours east of the Blue Ridge Mountains and three hours west of the beautiful beaches of the Carolinas. Along with its exemplary business climate, CharlotteUSA also offers a high quality of life emphasizing elements such as cost of living, housing, climate, health care, the arts, sports and recreation. The region enjoys pleasant weather; a mild four-season climate with an average of 214 days of sunshine.

C U LT U R E & R E C R E AT I O N Cultural Amenities CharlotteUSA has a cultural lineup that includes nationally recognized museums, symphony, opera, theater, and dance companies. The Blumenthal Performing Arts Center is home to the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra, Opera Carolina, Charlotte Repertory Theatre, Charlotte Choral Society, Charlotte Oratorio Singers, and the NC Dance Theater. The Discovery Place, a “hands-on” science museum, contains an OMNIMAX theatre and the Kelly Space Voyager Planetarium. The Mint Museum of Art hosts internationally renowned artists. Recreational Opportunities An incredible variety of recreational activities abound in CharlotteUSA: boating, fishing, golfing & professional sports. CharlotteUSA has: • Over 1,770 miles of shoreline on 8 lakes • Over 100 public and private golf courses • Close proximity to the golf capital of the country – Pinehurst • Close proximity to beautiful mountain scenery (2 hour drive) • Close proximity to several major beaches (within 4 hours’ drive) Arts & Entertainment Behind CharlotteUSA’s corporate façade lies a burgeoning arts scene. Although it may seem harder to find here than in New York or New Orleans, there are plenty of accessible opportunities to enjoy theater, dance, music and visual arts in and around Charlotte. In fact, Charlotteans have made the arts a priority, as their funding for it has surpassed all other major cities in the U.S. The Arts and Science Council raised more money in Charlotte in 2002 than any other local arts agencies in cities besides New York and San Jose. Thanks to the community’s generous support of arts, science and history, Charlotte is now a cultural model for cities across the country. Every season there are entertaining events planned for the whole family in Charlotte and its neighboring towns. There are arts and crafts festivals, free symphony concerts in the parks, parades, home shows, and art exhibits. The clubs and bars light up on weekends with young people, enjoying anything from techno to bluegrass. The finer restaurants often feature live music on their patios, and the city welcomes entertainers to its downtown courtyards for free concerts in the summer. There are arts and heritage museums located downtown and in surrounding counties. The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Library is state-of-the-art,

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quality of life | live–work–play

Children and adolescents are encouraged to gain an appreciation for the arts early on in Charlotte. There is a children’s theater, a youth ballet and community arts classes available for youth.

and neighboring Spirit Square houses a community school for the arts. Children and adolescents are encouraged to gain an appreciation for the arts early on in Charlotte. There is a children’s theater, a youth ballet and community arts classes available for youth. The art festivals often showcase the talent of Charlotte’s future, and the future of the arts in this region is bright. Sports & Sports Facilities CharlotteUSA is blessed with a rich and varied sports community. With some of the best facilities in the region, CharlotteUSA has added a new football stadium, is currently constructing a new basketball arena for its new NBA franchise, and hosts one of the most respected speedways on the NASCAR circuit. CharlotteUSA is proud to host: • NFL’s Charlotte Panthers • NBA’s Charlotte Bobcats • WNBA’s Charlotte Sting • Triple-A Baseball’s Charlotte Knights • ECHL’s Charlotte Checkers • Three NASCAR Nextel Cup events (Coca-Cola 600, Nextel, UAW-GM Quality 500) • Arena Football Carolina Cobras • PGA Tour’s Wachovia Championship • Greater Hickory Classic Seniors Golf Tournament • Over 100 public and private golf courses • Over 1,770 miles of shoreline on eight lakes

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Charlotte, NC Suite 2500 201 South College Street Charlotte, NC 28244 704.632.3500

Columbia, SC Suite 700 1901 Main Street Columbia, SC 29201 803.231.3100

Greensboro, NC Suite 300 628 Green Valley Road Greensboro, NC 27408 336.834.1200

Raleigh, NC Suite 130 4140 ParkLake Avenue Raleigh, NC 27612 919.881.2700

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quality of life | live–work–play

Charlotte, the hub of the region, is the largest city in both North and South Carolina; however, the region also contains many smaller cities and rural areas.

CharlotteUSA Population & Density County Name

2002 Population

ALEXANDER . . . . . . . . . 34,400 ANSON . . . . . . . . . . . 25,351 CABARRUS . . . . . . . . . 140,182 CATAWBA . . . . . . . . . 146,690 CHESTER . . . . . . . . . . 34,212 CHESTERFIELD . . . . . . . . 43,206 CLEVELAND . . . . . . . . . 97,960 GASTON . . . . . . . . . . 193,443 IREDELL . . . . . . . . . . . 130,178 LANCASTER . . . . . . . . . 62,220 LINCOLN . . . . . . . . . . . 66,598 MECKLENBURG . . . . . . 737,950 ROWAN . . . . . . . . . . 133,359 STANLY . . . . . . . . . . . 58,553 UNION . . . . . . . . . . . 139,611 YORK . . . . . . . . . . . 173,755

Land Area* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

260.18 531.57 364.39 399.97 580.52 798.60 464.63 356.21 575.57 548.99 298.79 526.28 511.31 395.06 637.37 682.45

Persons per Square Mile . . . . . . . . . . . . 132.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . 47.7 . . . . . . . . . . . . 384.7 . . . . . . . . . . . . 366.8 . . . . . . . . . . . . 58.9 . . . . . . . . . . . . 54.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . 210.8 . . . . . . . . . . . . 543.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . 226.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . 113.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . 222.9 . . . . . . . . . . . 1402.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . 260.8 . . . . . . . . . . . . 148.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . 219.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . 254.6

TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . 2,217,668 . . . . . . . . 7,931.89 . . . . . . . . . . . 4,645.5 *Square Miles

Source: U.S. Census 2002

14%

12.9

12% 10% 8%

7.0

50

1.7

2.3

1.4

1.6

YORK

UNION

STANLY

ROWAN

MECKLENBURG

LINCOLN

LANCASTER

IREDELL

0.8 GASTON

CATAWBA

CABARRUS

ANSON

ALEXANDER

CHESTER

0.4

1.0 CHESTERFIELD

2%

CLEVELAND

2.4 0.3

5.6

4.4

3.5

4%

0%

6.1

6.1

6%

Population CharlotteUSA is comprised of 16 counties stretching from the foothills to the central Piedmont in North and South Carolina. Charlotte, the hub of the region, is the largest city in both North and South Carolina; however, the region also contains many smaller cities and rural areas. CharlotteUSA covers nearly 8,000 square miles with a population of over 2.2 million.

C L I M AT E According to the State Climate Office’s 2001 Data Survey, the sun shines on Charlotte 223 days of the year. No wonder there are so many outdoor events planned in and around the city. Being outdoors, under the crystal clear, blue skies, lifts the spirit and begs even the busiest of businessmen to stop and smell the roses. And, there are an abundance of roses, thanks to the spring showers and summer thunderstorms that give Charlotte its lush, green grass and towering treetops. While Charlotte residents enjoy four distinct seasons, they avoid the oppressive heat of the Deep South and the wintertime blues of the North. There is rarely so much snow it needs shoveling, and, on the average, temperatures only reach 100 degrees twice a year. The transformations of the seasons are the most breathtaking times of the year, and both Spring and Fall are appreciably long. The pastel

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


quality of life | live–work–play blooms of the dogwood and crape myrtle trees of Spring or the brilliant red and yellow leaves of Fall set against the sapphire blue sky, create a visual extravaganza. This pleasant, moderate climate is one of the major draws for people moving to Charlotte.

134.7 121.2

125 103.9 100

97.9

96.2

WASHINGTON, DC

PHILADELPHIA, PA

50

CLEVELAND, OH

75

CHICAGO, IL

Housing options in and around Charlotte are as diverse as the region, itself. Affordability depends on location, and there are urban, rural and suburban homes to choose from within the region. According to the U.S. Census 2000 Summary of Housing Characteristics for the Charlotte – Gastonia – Rock Hill area, the median house value was $123,000, compared with $130,600 in Atlanta and $139,700 in Charleston. The median monthly mortgage cost was $269 – less than the national median. With interest rates so low, it is a good time to buy houses in the Charlotte region, but many transient residents choose to rent. The median monthly rent for 2000 was $627/ month. The condo and townhouse market is growing, and there are plenty of apartments available for rent in the urban and suburban areas. High-rise apartments with views of the Charlotte skyline are popping up in the city, as well as flats in remodeled, older buildings. The Charlotte region is rapidly growing and so are its housing markets. New housing developments are spreading throughout the sixteen counties, supplementing the already wide range of housing options. There are plenty of homes to choose

139.0

137.7

CHARLOTTE, NC

HOUSING AFFORDABILITY

150

BOSTON, MA

The following index compares the cost of consumer goods and services in cities across the nation. The average for the nation is 100. As shown in the following illustrations, Charlotte has a relatively low cost of living.

ATLANTA, GA

COST OF LIVING

According to the U.S. Census 2000 Summary of Housing Characteristics for the Charlotte – Gastonia – Rock Hill area, the median house value was $123,000, compared with $130,600 in Atlanta and $139,700 in Charleston. The median monthly mortgage cost was $269 –

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

less than the national median.

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quality of life | education

Aside from traditional enclosed and strip mall settings, the Charlotte region has increasingly more to offer in the sense of neo-traditional style shopping, in which apartments, single-family homes, and retail space are conveniently located in one place. from in any price range.

R E TA I L O P P O R T U N I T I E S Regardless of whether you to like to shop in up-scale stores, such as Nordstrom, or in large retail stores, such as Target and Wal-Mart, the Charlotte region has a store and atmosphere to suit your tastes. Large, indoor malls, such as Valley Hills in Catawba County and Carolina Place in Mecklenburg, offer shoppers the ease and convenience of visiting more than 100 specialty and department stores in one excursion. In addition, the recent completion of Concord Mills, a 1.4 million square feet outlet mall, gives visitors a wide array of shopping options as well as entertainment, such as its 24-screen movie theatre. Aside from traditional enclosed and strip mall settings, the Charlotte region has increasingly more to offer in the sense of neo-traditional style shopping, in which apartments, single-family homes, and retail space are conveniently located in one place. For example, Birkdale Village, located in North Mecklenburg County, combines shopping, dining, and entertainment all within walking distance of many residents. Regardless of what they are looking for, CharlotteUSA residents are bound to find it here.

PUBLIC SAFETY INDEX For a city of its size, Charlotte enjoys a comparably low crime incidence. City

Population

Crime Index

% of pop. crime victims

Richmond...................................203,799...............18,002 ....................................9 Knoxville.....................................177,191...............11,983 ....................................7 Nashville.....................................560,596...............46,018 ....................................8 Columbia ...................................119,036...............10,307 ....................................9 Jacksonville.................................769,253...............51,021 ....................................7 Tampa ........................................317,322...............35,380 ...................................11 Atlanta .......................................435,494...............49,451 ...................................11 Charlotte-Mecklenburg ..............646,864...............48,597 ....................................8 Raleigh .......................................285,383...............17,833 ....................................6

E D U C AT I O N There is an extensive network of universities, colleges and community colleges in the Charlotte region to serve individual education or business training needs. Influenced by the business culture of Charlotte, these schools incorporate practical training and experience into the curriculum, while encouraging students to improve themselves and contribute to our world. The universities and colleges have developed a partnership with their surrounding businesses and industries to provide knowledgeable and conscientious leadership to the community. There are 30 colleges and universities to choose from in the Charlotte region, covering a wide range of educational opportunities. From premier private liberal arts colleges like Davidson to public urban institutes like Central Piedmont Community College, the Charlotte region welcomes students of all ages, national-

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2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


quality of life | health care

John Woodward, Chancellor, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

The CharlotteUSA region has a great deal to offer its residents, both in terms of cutting edge medical technology as well as in proximity to numerous hospitals and specialist medical services, regardless of which county one is located.

ities and educational backgrounds. There are schools that offer technical training and schools that prepare health professionals for the challenges they will face in these booming and rapidly-changing industries. In addition to preparing more qualified individuals for the public and private sectors, these schools perform much needed research in evolving fields. The largest university in the Charlotte area is the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. With its current enrollment of more than 18,000 students, UNC Charlotte houses seven different colleges, from arts and sciences to engineering. The Charlotte region also encompasses a branch of the University of South Carolina at Lancaster, which brings benefits of the state’s flagship school to the rural communities of its northern territory. Central Piedmont Community College, North Carolina’s largest community college, teaches technical, collegetransfer and professional-development classes at six sites. Beyond baccalaureate degrees, schools in the Charlotte region offer graduate programs for professionals seeking masters or doctorates in fields ranging from information technology to chemistry. Several business programs have sprung up to cater to Charlotte’s corporate sector. Pfeiffer University, Lenoir-Rhyne College and Winthrop University are among the many schools offering MBA programs. Charlotte’s newest addition, DeVry, also offers an MBA. Providing an example of the ties that bind academia to commerce in Charlotte, the McColl School of Business at Queens University created a mentoring program to link graduate students to corporate leaders in the community. Wake Forest’s Babcock Graduate School of Management, which Forbes recently recognized as #28 on its list of best U.S. business schools, opened a Charlotte campus. Now, more than ever before, North Carolina’s business leaders don’t have to travel far to enhance their education. Whatever the education needs, there is a good chance that students will find what they are looking for in the Charlotte region. As the city continues to grow, so do its educational opportunities. Johnson & Wales, a prominent business, culinary arts and hospitality school will open an uptown campus in 2004, sure to assist the service industry in reaching even higher standards. Colleges and universities contribute to CharlotteUSA’s economic health by attracting talented individuals to the region and guaranteeing more qualified professionals in the workplace.

H E A LT H C A R E The CharlotteUSA region has a great deal to offer its residents, both in terms of cutting edge medical technology as well as in proximity to numerous hospitals and specialist medical services, regardless of which county one is located. The sixteen-county region is home to more than twenty-six local and regional hospitals, most of which are accessible from numerous counties. In addition, the Charlotte region is home to Carolinas Medical Center, the flagship facility of the Carolinas HealthCare System, the fourth largest healthcare system in the United States. The Dilworth area division of Carolinas Medical Center was recently listed in U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Hospitals” list for its orthopedic surgery and urology programs. In addition, CMC is classified as a Level 1 trauma center, equipped with a medical helicopter and airplane service. Novant, a health care provider that serves more than 3.4 million people (www.novanthealth.org) is also represented in the Charlotte region. Its hospitals include Presbyterian Hospital and Presbyterian Hospital Matthews and will soon include a new hospital to be built in North Mecklenburg County in 2005. In addition to emergency care and hospital services, the Charlotte region is home to an almost endless number of senior care facilities and specialist physician offices. Regardless of where one chooses to live or work in the Charlotte region,

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

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entrepreneurial opportunities

CharlotteUSA

entrepreneurial opportunities

C

harlotteUSA has become home not only to big corporations with deep pockets, but also to the ‘everyman’ looking to expand his horizon, and find that niche to fulfill a personal dream, and a market need. Charlotte’s overwhelming growth, and the talent which spawned it, has created the perfect climate for nurturing new ideas and has laid the framework for a fresh, new economic atmosphere. Not only does CharlotteUSA’s business environment attract newcomers to the region, but too, many individuals previously at the helms of big corporations choose to extend their expertise, and individuality, into new enterprises. CharlotteUSA’s market conditions are extraordinarily conducive to entrepreneurial activity, with government and agency support networks going the extra mile for the small business owner. As the area has grown, so do efforts to facilitate avenues for new and creative ventures. In fiscal 2003, the U.S. Small Business Administration backed 30 per cent more loans in North Carolina than in 2002, totaling more than $252 million. The community-mindedness and collaborative nature of CharlotteUSA has generated a number on non-profit agencies dedicated to the success of the small business owner. Led by business leaders, financiers, and consultants, these organizations are quickly becoming the life-blood of this energized entrepreneurial community. One of the most visible agencies in the region is the Charlotte Certified Development Corporation (CCDC). The CCDC was chartered by City Planners and the Mecklenburg County Board of Commissioners, to act as a ‘conduit’ to finance hard assets through commercial banks and other lenders. Working through the Small Business Association’s 504 Loan Program, the CCDC facilitates long term loans up to $750,000, and provides financing for up to 90 per cent of the cost of land, buildings, equipment and expansion. Centralina Development Corporation also supplies financing resources through the SBA 504 program. Another major player in the small business area is the Metrolina Entrepreneurial Council, which is undergoing drastic growth and repositioning under powerful new leadership. The MEC’s mission is to “serve as the catalyst for the 16-county economic area by promoting the formation and success of entrepreneurial companies.” By providing education, communication, capital formation, business development and resources, this organization provides the tools and the knowledge to make any sound business vision into reality. The MEC

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2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


entrepreneurial opportunities

Deborah Clayton, executive director of the Charlotte Research Institute of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte

“Doing Business with Small Business is Good Business, and we are investing everything we’ve got to make the Charlotte’s future very hospitable to small business formulation.” ~RICHARD BARGOIL, CITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT D E PA R T M E N T

Doug Lebda, founder and chief executive officer, LendingTree, Inc.

Bob Johnson, owner, NBA Charlotte Bobcats and WNBA Charlotte Sting

also functions to link the entrepreneur with appropriate lending, management and service contacts to make the start-up process more fluid. The Small Business and Technology Development Center provides general business services from management counseling and management education to special market development services including research, procurement, international business development, marine trades and Small Business Innovation Research. The SBTDC has seventeen offices throughout North Carolina and each is affiliated with a college or university dedicated to expanding local businesses and creating new jobs. The Ben Craig Center at the University of North Carolina – Charlotte is a business incubator established in 1986, to offer early-stage companies business advice, access to an extensive network of business leaders and successful entrepreneurs, office space, and shared administrative services. To join the center, a company must be starting out, have a plan for sustained growth, and not compete with current clients. The annual net revenues of the center’s clients range from $400,000 to $15 million. A majority of the center’s clients are technology and professional services companies. Through efforts at the Ben Craig Center and the new Charlotte Research Institute, the University of North Carolina-Charlotte won the #1 ranking in university led start-up businesses in fiscal year 2001. The AUTM* Survey Ranked UNC Charlotte • 1st in startups formed • 2nd in invention disclosures received • 2nd in patent applications • 3rd in patents issued • 5th in licenses executed • 20th in licenses and options yielding income *AUTM – Association of University Technology Managers Central Piedmont Community College’s Small Business Center offers support to those who want to start a small business or those who need help with an existing business. The Center is open to the public and provides reliable information, advice, additional training, one-on-one counseling, and business contacts. CPCC’s mission is to in developing solid marketing and business plans to ensure your business' success in a competitive marketplace. The City of Charlotte has made a concerted effort with these agencies to implement vital steps toward creating a positive entrepreneurial climate in the region.

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entrepreneurial opportunities

City planners created the Small Business Development Program to increase small business enterprise utilization, promote small business growth and opportunity for existing and start up organizations, as well as expand and market the resources available to business owners. Leading by example, Charlotte City Council required that Key City Business Units set and strive for Small Business Utilization goals, mandating that a percentage of informal purchases under $100,000 be sourced to small business enterprises. Analysis was then undertaken to gauge performance regarding these standards, and see what areas could use more emphasis. Many significant projects far exceeded their utilization goals: Business Unit

“Job growth has been and will be based on small business in the area. A lot of attention and effort

Percent of Utilization Goal Achieved

Aviation

284%

Char Meck Dept Transportation

477%

Char Meck Police Dept.

282%

Char Meck Utilities

137%

Economic Development

308%

Internal Audit

3092%

has been made to bring big companies to the region which has of course, been very positive. ~MARY BRUCE, KALEIDOSCOPE BUSINESS OPTIONS

City Planning 840%

These overwhelming figures demonstrate the City of Charlotte’s commitment to partnering with small business. Says Richard Bargoil of the City Economic Development Department, “Doing Business with Small Business is Good Business, and we are investing everything we’ve got to make the Charlotte’s future very hospitable to small business formulation.” In another example of partnership and collaboration, the City of Charlotte, the Self-Help Credit Union, area banks and other organizations launched a $10 million small business enterprise loan fund in December 2002. This fund is designated for small businesses facing capital challenges due to weak credit or collateral issues. As part of its Small Business

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2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


entrepreneurial opportunities

CharlotteUSA is unique in its commitment to sustained economic growth through synergy between city organizaHugh McColl, Jr. principal, McColl Partners

Bill Boyd, chairman, Muzak, Inc.

T O P T E N V E N T U R E C A P I TA L F I R M S F Y 2 0 0 2 Firm

Total Funds Raised

Industry Preference

Wachovia Capital Partners, Inc.

$2,400,000

Financial services, communications, growth Industrial/business services, health care, energy

Bank of America Capital Investors

$2,225,000

Telecommunications, media, health care, technology

Intersouth Partners

$300,000

Information technology, life sciences

Southeast Interactive Technology Funds LLC

$180,000

Information technology, communications technology

A.M. Pappas & Associates LLC

$150,000

Life Sciences

Kitty Hawk Capital

$100,000

All except real estate, natural resources, entertainment, single retail stores

CapitalSouth Partners

$75,000

n/a

Geneva Merchant Banking Partners

$75,000

Manufacturing service, distribution, telecommunications, technology

The Aurora Funds

$72,000

Information technology, life sciences

BB&T Capital Partners LLC

$70,700

All except banking and real estate

Source: Charlotte Business Journal 2002

TOP TEN SBA LENDERS IN NORTH CAROLINA Institution

Number of Loans

Amount of loans approved

Bank of America

102

$8,037,200

Wachovia Bank NA

66

$8,971,913

First Citizens Bank and Trust

55

$8,045,574

CIT Small Business Lending Corp.

50

$23,215,800

Branch Banking & Trust

42

$18,614,412

Self-Help Credit Union

31

$3,465,860

GE Capital Small Business Finance Group

27

$17,381,980

Temecula Valley Bank

26

$101,673,000

First Commerce Bank

19

$3,953,456

The Money Store Investment Corp.

18

$13,851,700

Source: Charlotte Business Journal 2002

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

tions and area agencies. Development Program, the City of Charlotte has also partnered with CPCC and area agencies to plan an online, and physical, Business Resource Center that will connect a library of business resources including access to capital, technical assistance and training initiatives. Though this vehicle, potential business owners can access financial resources including Equity Loans, grants, Business Corridor Assistance Programs (to promote growth in distressed communities,) industrial revenue bonds, Small Business Enterprise Loan funds and SBA micro loans. Says Mary Bruce of Kaleidoscope Business Options and a consultant for the new center, “Job growth has been and will be based on small business in the area. A lot of attention and effort has been made to bring big companies to the region which has of course, been very positive. However, there are so many opportunities for small businesses in Charlotte that go unnoticed. “The Business Resource Center will bring all of the agencies together that are committed to making this a hotbed for small business, and will provide everything the entrepreneur needs to get started, right at his fingertips. CharlotteUSA is unique in its commitment to sustained economic growth through synergy between city organizations and area agencies. Nowhere is this better demonstrated than the promise these partners have

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making a modern city-state

CharlotteUSA

making a modern city-state

O

nce just a tiny blip on the national radar screen, the 16-county CharlotteUSA region has seen considerable growth in the past decade. Companies and families alike have been drawn to the region for its diversity, prosperity and high quality-of-life. Endowed with a diverse geography, as well as four distinct seasons, CharlotteUSA is within a three-hour drive of salty beaches and crisp mountain ranges. The area’s culture is equally diverse, spanning across historically agrarian and manufacturing communities to the burgeoning urban center that has become its central city and hub: Charlotte, North Carolina. CharlotteUSA’s scope boasts an industry base ranging from Charlotte’s high-profile banking center, to a strong technology sector, and rich manufacturing and agricultural roots. Charlotte is anchored by banking scions, Wachovia and Bank of America, is home to successful technology endeavors such as Digital Optics Corporation and NuTech Solutions, and still maintains the warm history of rich farmland and humming factories. In addition to the wellspring of business resources in the region, CharlotteUSA also boasts a dedicated community including strong support from city, county and state government, extensive contributions from educational institutions, and passionate citizens; all working in concert to make the region’s incredible potential become a reality. In 1995, when the economic boom started shaking things up, Charlotte’s business community commissioned renowned analysts and writers, Neal Peirce and Curtis Johnson, to research the Charlotte region and provide opinions regarding the region’s growth opportunities. The findings of ‘The Peirce Report’ were received as essential missions for practically every major Charlotte institution. As well, the results seeded the creation of citizen and other non-profit organizations dedicated solely to meeting the report’s challenges. According to the Peirce Report, the most significant undertaking to support CharlotteUSA’s success is what the Pierce Report labels, “a simple premise.” Namely, “Charlotte and its sister communities are one region, one economy, one environmental area, one society.” A simple concept? Maybe. A simple undertaking? Definitely not. In order for Charlotte and its surrounding 16 counties to become what Peirce refers to as a modern ‘city-state,’ an intensive outline was developed to position the region for positive and sustained growth. Among the action items: deconstruct and update economic development plans and transit initiatives, and involve educational facilities in the creation of a tenacious business climate. Also of primary import: carefully plan renovation, preservation and new development of neighborhoods, as well as the environment, land-use/urban design, and utility grids to anticipate growth and increased interaction among counties in the region. The payoff of these endeavors is summarized by Pierce as “... a region consisting of one or more historic central cities surrounded by cities and towns which have a shared identification, function as a single zone for trade, commerce and

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“Charlotte and its sister communities are one region, one economy, one environmental area, one society.”

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


making a modern city-state

Each county of the CharlotteUSA region has dedicated itself to maximizing its own resources, thereby contributing its assets to the regional mix, with Charlotte as its core.

A simple concept? Maybe. A simple undertaking? Definitely not.

communication, and are characterized by social, economic and environmental interdependence.” To that end, each county of the CharlotteUSA region has dedicated itself to maximizing its own resources, thereby contributing its assets to the regional mix, with Charlotte as its core. As a result, the interstate system has been growing dramatically, efficiently linking the north to the south. One can travel from Cabarrus County’s legendary NASCAR hub and the retail mecca of Concord Mills, south to York County’s historical district and ‘smart growth’ corridor. Lincoln County, now the headquarters of Lowe’s, Inc. and the multi-use Birkdale community, is connected easily via the highway system to Gaston County’s manufacturing base and Revolutionary War monuments. Revolutionary steps are also underway for mass transit and light rail plans to even better connect the region. Charlotte’s powerful business, cultural and entertainment offerings also promise to firmly root the city as a reliable anchor for surrounding counties. Peirce remarks, “The Charlotte skyline has become the region’s signature,” and Charlotte’s uptown characterized by “big project dynamism.” Peirce’s report cited the city’s new convention center, the huge Carolinas Stadium, Discovery Place, the Afro-American Cultural Center, and the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center as major components of its growing culture. Since the report, Charlotte has also welcomed the prestigious Johnson and Wales University of Culinary Arts and Business, plans for a state-of the-art basketball arena for its new NBA franchise, and subsequent economic spin offs. Yet, as Charlotte’s urban areas promise more growth and more opportunity, great care is also being taken to preserve the region’s historical and cultural underpinnings. Charlotte’s historical trolley network has been revived. More and more developers strive for an ‘old towne’ feel, preserving as much of the existing edifices as possible, as well as reintroducing the charm of wrap-around porches, and common areas where children can play in the shade of old oak trees. Michael Gallis, a wellrespected architect and planner, described some of the region’s architectural backdrops, “Rock Hill is Richardsonian Romanesque, Monroe is variegated Victorian, Concord is Second Empire, Davidson is Georgian or Palladian, Gastonia is new-classic.” While this architectural nomenclature might be overwhelming for the layperson, it still translates the same: CharlotteUSA is a region with “history and a sense of place.” The success of these initiatives has not been coincidental, or lucky, but rather earned via hard-fought efforts among regional government, business, education and citizen organizations, which have parsed piles of numbers, and scores of ideas to find

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making a modern city-state

It is important to note that CharlotteUSA’s ‘citizenry’ does not apply solely to specific communities, individuals, or special interests. CharlotteUSA is also distinguished by a breathtaking level of corporate citizenship that is encouraged, in fact, ingrained in the corporate culture.

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a best-fit scenario. The Charlotte Planning Commission, Foundation for the Carolinas, Charlotte Regional Partnership, Charlotte City Partners, the Carolinas Partnership and business behemoths like Duke Power Foundation, Wachovia, Southern Bell, Lance and Branch Banking and Trust Co., among other partners, laid the funds and the ground swell to pioneer Charlotte’s future. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, led by Chancellor James Woodward has been instrumental in providing a resource base for businesses as well as an incubator of talent that will fuel the region with human and technological resources via the newly crowned ‘Charlotte Research Institute.’ This addition to the UNC Charlotte campus will be home to schools for Precision Metrology, Optoelectronics and Optics, and an eBusiness Institute, constructed to answer the needs of the region’s future talent pool. Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) has provided resources for Charlotte’s business community since its inception, offering local information, continuing education and training programs, and a vital connection between individuals and institutions for financing and partnerships. Johnson and Wales relocation to Charlotte has, and will continue to infuse the region with growth and opportunity with its prestige and unparalleled connection to the business community. In sum, these academic paragons continue to inspire, encourage and initiate a community mentality that underscores CharlotteUSA’s commitment to itself. Of course, no progress would be possible without the main engine of the region’s success: its citizens. The region is dedicated to making growth fair and balanced, and numerous citizen organizations have made a profound difference to the areas in which they live, work and play. For example, such coalitions as Central Carolinas Citizens provide a forum for the common person to be heard. Local school board meetings are busy and energy-charged. CharlotteUSA has built more Habitat for Humanity Houses than any city in America. Charlotte’s Arts and Science Council has received more donations than any organization of its kind in the country. Initiatives like ‘City Within a City,’ and the projects undertaken by the Children’s Services Network and ‘Hands-On Charlotte,’ have created an atmosphere of empowerment leading to positive change. It is important to note that CharlotteUSA’s ‘citizenry’ does not apply solely to specific communities, individuals, or special interests. CharlotteUSA is also distinguished by a breathtaking level of corporate citizenship that is encouraged, in fact, ingrained in the corporate culture. Most executives of major corporations sit on multiple boards, from business to cultural to charity, providing diverse perspectives culminating in visionary solutions. Many employees in the region are given incentives including paid time off for volunteering and community commitments, and some companies answer grassroots calls for matching investments for fundraisers. CharlotteUSA’s progress is undeniable. Since The Peirce Report, a 2002 poll conducted by RoperASW demonstrates that Charlotte has surpassed all other southeastern regions in terms of positive impression among companies outside the Charlotte region, as well as by national relocation consultants. Additionally, CharlotteUSA’s upward trend towards national recognition, quality of life and pro-business climate was decisively higher than its competitors. The numbers speak for themselves. Charlotte ranked second only to Atlanta in terms of awareness among national businesses. And not only is the awareness of Charlotte’s urban center growing, but satisfaction rates are skyrocketing. Charlotte ranked #1 among its major southeastern competitors, Atlanta, Tampa,

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


making a modern city-state

Raleigh and Nashville, in terms of favorable impressions. These figures indicate a ten per cent increase over a three-year period. Remarks Michael Almond of Charlotte Regional Partnership, “...These statistics [show that] CharlotteUSA’s outstanding business strength, accessibility and quality of life has begun to take hold. We must continue to build on this momentum...” By expanding and capitalizing on the region’s innate beauty, financial strength, diversity, quality of life and community conscience, CharlotteUSA is poised for unmitigated success. The emerging cultural growth is attracting a young, profes-

With constant dialogue, progress report cards, and new alliances formed with every initiative, the sixteen counties of CharlotteUSA and its components are forging a new path toward the future. sional crowd who are bringing their businesses – and their friends, with them. Transplants initially attracted to the increasingly vibrant and energetic city of Charlotte are finding expansive properties at low cost in surrounding counties and are flocking to make these hidden gems their home. With constant dialogue, progress report cards, and new alliances formed with every initiative, the sixteen counties of CharlotteUSA and its components are forging a new path toward the future. Economic and residential development, transit initiatives, historical preservation, and public empowerment have been and will continue to be vital to the region’s plan for progress. As Charlotte industry grows, diversifies and spreads, so do the nutrients that will sustain the promise

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

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NC

ALEXANDER COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Taylorsville Population: 1,819 Total County Population: 34,681 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 6,589 19.0% 35 - 54 Years 10,716 30.9% 55 - 64 Years 3,641 10.5% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Mining Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Waste Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Other Services (Excluding Public Administration) Public Administration Unclassified establishments

124 * 33 305 5,060 128 935 181 30 142

88 932 601 49 573 146 415 7

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

The Mitchell Gold Company Hancock & Moore, Inc. Broyhill Furniture Industries, Inc. Craftmaster Furniture Corporation Schneider Mills Industries, Inc. Alexander County Chamber of Commerce 2003

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Employees 275 250 200 200 175

2002 Annual Average 17,582 16,199 1,383 7.9%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

North Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

Percentage Total

22,729

Less Than High School

2,784

12.25%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency)

8,075

35.53%

Some College

4,018

17.68%

Associate Degree

1,400

6.16%

Bachelor Degree

1,511

6.65%

Master Degree

406

1.79%

Professional Degree

174

0.77%

22

0.10%

U. S. Census 2000

147 *

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

Doctorate Degree

18

NAICS Employment and Wages 2002 * disclosure suppression

(non-governmental) Company

A

lexander County is located in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains and bordered on the south by the Catawba River, covering 263 square miles, with Taylorsville its largest city. The Unifour area, which includes Alexander, Burke, Caldwell and Catawba counties, has a population of about 300,000 and is the fourth largest Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in the state following Charlotte, Raleigh-Durham, and Greensboro-WinstonSalem. Two-thirds of Alexander County is farmland. The average farm is approximately 90 acres. Major commodities include poultry, dairy, tobacco, apples, forestry products, grain crops and beef cattle, with income at approximately $6.5 million yearly. Even

though Alexander County is much smaller in area than its adjoining counties, it exceeds three of the four in agricultural income, and ranks 3rd in the state in poultry, 6th in dairy, 5th in apples, and 10th in beef cattle. Over 5,600 persons are employed in manufacturing; the county ranks 7th in the production of furniture. Other plants manufacture textiles, apparel, paper products, electrical components, and lumber products. Average annual rainfall is 49 inches with approximately 8 inches of annual snowfall; temperatures range from an average of 38 degrees in January to an average of 76 degrees in July. The Brushy Mountains provide a barrier to cold, winter winds. Summer days are often warm, but nights cool rapidly. Alexander County offers a slower paced, comfortable lifestyle for all residents affording an excellent and desirable quality of life.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$36,855

$23,046

2000

$38,684

$23,361

1999

$38,684

$22,236

1998

$36,869

$21,130

1997

$35,302

$19,577

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Alexander County Chamber of Commerce Keith Hertzler, Executive Director 104 West Main Avenue Taylorsville, NC 28681 828-632-8141 phone 828-632-1096 fax alexdir@bellsouth.net

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


NC

ANSON COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Wadesboro Population: 3,494 Total County Population: 25,537 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 4,699 18.4% 35 - 54 Years 7,457 29.2% 55 - 64 Years 2,375 9.3% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Mining Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Waste Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Other Services (Excluding Public Administration) Public Administration Unclassified establishments

361 * * 315 2,156 395 631 259 37 123

213 756 1,010 * 370 160 954 *

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

Dan River Hornwood Wade Manufacturing Universal Fiber Systems Coffing Hoists Anson County Economic Development 2003

Employees 500 330 288 160 160

2002 Annual Average 10,921 9,730 1,198 11%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

North Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

Percentage Total

16,824

Less Than High School

1,565

9.30%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency)

6,462

38.41%

Some College

2,853

16.96%

Associate Degree

942

5.60%

Bachelor Degree

1,106

6.57%

Master Degree

289

1.72%

Professional Degree

128

0.76%

24

0.14%

U. S. Census 2000

141 *

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

Doctorate Degree

*

NAICS Employment and Wages 2002 * disclosure suppression

(non-governmental) Company

A

nson County represents the best of both worlds – open, tranquil spaces in the rolling hills of the Piedmont and a dedicated business community. Formed in 1750 from Bladen County, Anson subsequently gave birth to Rowan, Mecklenburg, Richmond, Montgomery and Union counties. Its rich past is kept alive through written and oral tradition, three museums, theater, and the art and historical societies. The textile industry’s struggle in the past decade has only made Anson’s industrial and business community more determined to seek innovative solutions to improve the economic climate. Expanding and upgrading existing businesses is as much a focus

as attracting new ones. The recent introduction of Alltel’s DSL (digital subscriber lines) to 96 percent of the county further illustrates Anson’s eagerness to embrace technology as a tool for growth. One of Anson’s significant advantages is the willingness of South Piedmont Community College to offer support and training opportunities responsive to business needs. Anson County school facilities have all been built or upgraded in the last decade; Anson Community Hospital, a part of the Carolinas HealthCare System, has recently announced plans to add new equipment and services. As might be expected in this largely rural county, Ansonians find their entertainment out of doors through community parks, an 18-hole golf course, and fishing, hunting and boating opportunities. However, access to “big city” amenities is only minutes away.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$27,724

$22,752

2000

$29,849

$21,662

1999

$29,849

$20,443

1998

$28,153

$19,874

1997

$27,703

$19,135

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Anson County Economic Development Kevin Gullette, Director of Economic Development P.O. Drawer 339 Wadesboro, NC 28170 704-694-9513 phone 704-694-3830 fax kgullette@email.co.anson.nc.us

63


NC

CABARRUS COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Concord Population: 58,490 Total County Population: 136,964 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 26,845 19.6% 35 - 54 Years 42,459 31.0% 55 - 64 Years 12,053 8.8% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Mining Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Waste Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Other Services (Excluding Public Administration) Public Administration Unclassified establishments

103 93 148 4,076 11,934 2,280 8,277 1,827 816 811

2,695 4,106 7,318 1,813 4,825 1,530 2,470 59

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Northeast Medical Center Phillip Morris Wal Mart CT Communications Sysco Food Services

3,700 2,600 750 670 575

Cabarrus Economic Development Commission 2003

2002 Annual Average 74,425 70,340 4,085 5.5%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

North Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

Percentage Total

86,732

Less Than High School

6,579

7.59%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 26,101

30.09%

Some College

18,978

21.88%

Associate Degree

6,188

7.13%

Bachelor Degree

12,503

14.42%

Master Degree

2,680

3.09%

Professional Degree

1,078

1.24%

313

0.36%

U. S. Census 2000

1,170 1,097

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

Doctorate Degree

705

NAICS Employment and Wages 2002

64

A

s Cabarrus County heads into the future, it is poised for sustained growth and development. The county is attractive to businesses with its close proximity to Charlotte and the I-85 corridor, well-trained diversified workforce, multitude of available sites and buildings, and its excellent quality of life. The economic progress and expansion of the county has been directly related to the variety and proximity of the transportation network. This includes mainline rail, nearby Charlotte Douglas International Airport, Concord Regional Airport and a superb highway system comprised of I-85, US 29, US 601, NC 73, NC 49, and I-77.

A diversified employee base with a strong work ethic brings companies to Cabarrus County. A well renowned school system prepares students for future careers. Local colleges and universities offer advanced training and degrees. Cabarrus County offers many available sites and buildings with excellent infrastructure. Well-designed business parks with accessible utilities and easy road access are located across the county. Buildings are available from under 5,000 sq. ft. to almost 700,000 sq. ft. Cabarrus County is a tourist destination for hundreds of thousands of race fans attending races at Lowe’s Motor Speedway each year. Concord Mills attracts tourists with its super regional shopping and entertainment. Reed Gold Mine, the site of the first documented gold find in the United States, is located in eastern Cabarrus County.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$50,170

$28,917

2000

$46,140

$28,697

1999

$46,140

$27,459

1998

$43,813

$26,626

1997

$41,781

$24,836

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Cabarrus Economic Development Commission Maurice Ewing, President & CEO 2325 Concord Lake Road Concord, NC 28025 704-784-4600 phone 704-784-4603 fax mdewing@cabarrusedc.com

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


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NC

C ATAWBA COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Hickory Population: 39,153 Total County Population: 145,780 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 28,719 19.7% 35 - 54 Years 44,609 30.6% 55 - 64 Years 13,849 9.5% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Mining Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Waste Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Other Services (Excluding Public Administration) Public Administration Unclassified establishments

137 36 468 3,281 34,656 3,464 10,093 3,467 641 1,576

3,777 4,750 8,140 862 6,117 1,706 3,002 *

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Commscope Frye Regional Medical Center Corning Cable Systems Hickory Springs Mfg. Co.

Over 1,000 Over 1,000 Over 1,000 Over 1,000

Thomasville Furniture Industries

Over 1,000

Catawba County Economic Development Corporation 2003

2002 Annual Average 78,461 71,096 7,365 9.4%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

North Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

Percentage Total

94,747

Less Than High School

8,033

8.48%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 29,677

31.32%

Some College

18,436

19.46%

Associate Degree

6,639

7.01%

Bachelor Degree

11,658

12.30%

Master Degree

3,135

3.31%

Professional Degree

1,073

1.13%

260

0.27%

U. S. Census 2000

1,358 2,293

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

Doctorate Degree

558

NAICS Employment and Wages 2002 * disclosure suppression

66

C

atawba County is located in the western part of North Carolina in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Its estimated population of 146,690 covers 405 square miles; its largest city is Hickory. Catawba County's three lakes and its location exert a strong influence on the county's climate, moderating winter temperatures and providing refreshing summer breezes. The county's scenic beauty has been used on two occasions for major motion pictures and is home to seven beautiful golf courses, the Hickory Motor Speedway, Bass Fishing Tournaments, minor league baseball, the symphony, the Hickory Museum of Art, theatre, choral, and much more.

Catawba County is a heavily industrialized area. It is known worldwide as a furniture manufacturing center with internationally known showrooms such as the Hickory Furniture Mart. Its traditional industries of furniture, hosiery and textiles have been expanded by new businesses in the technology sector. It is the nation's center for the manufacture and development of fiber optics and telecommunications cable. Siecor and CommScope are two of the county’s major employers, each with more than 2,000 employees. Alcatel, NA, the world's largest manufacturer of telecommunications cable products and the second-largest telephone equipment company, is headquartered in Hickory. Two of the largest printers and publishers in the state are located in Catawba County. The Hickory Metro Higher Education Center (HMHEC), a joint education center, serves the needs for graduate, undergraduate, non-credit certificate courses, research, and specialized workforce training.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$36,636

$27,381

2000

$40,536

$27,880

1999

$40,536

$26,671

1998

$40,481

$26,149

1997

$38,456

$25,230

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Catawba County Economic Development Corporation Scott L. Millar, President Physical Address: 100A Southwest Blvd., Ste. 201 Newton, NC 28658 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3388 Hickory, NC 28603 828-464-7198 phone 828-465-8150 fax smillar@catawbacountync.gov

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


SC

CHESTER COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Chester Population: 6,409 Total County Population: 34,315 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 5,834 17.0% 35 - 54 Years 10,226 29.8% 55 - 64 Years 3,397 9.9% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting

126

Mining

126

Construction

564

Manufacturing

4,350

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

1,777

Wholesale Trade

516

Retail Trade

938

Transportation and Warehousing

297

Information

138

Finance and Insurance

173

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing

51

Professional, Scientific & Technical Services

99

Administrative & Support & Waste Services

254

Educational Services

395

Health Care and Social Assistance

391

Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation

37

Accommodation and Food Services

570

Other Services (Except Public Administration)

162

Unclassified

12

SC Employment Commission 2002

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company Springs Industries F. Schumacher & Company Weyerhaeuser Guardian Industries Cultured Stone Chester County Economic Development 2003

Employees 1,526 390 375 295 255

C

hester County’s brand of ‘Southern Hospitality’ extended by its citizenry is second to none. Whether choosing to live in a small town or on an expansive country farm, Chester County is the best place in South Carolina to raise a family! Chester County is strategically located in the center of three large commercial centers – Charlotte, N.C.; Columbia, S.C.; and the Greenville-Spartanburg metropolitan area. Rail and highway transportation feeding each of these centers is impressive and allows area businesses and industry to send and receive goods quickly and at low cost. Although textiles served as the major industrial base for decades, Chester County

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

2002 Annual Average 14,941 12,940 2,001 13.4%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

South Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

Percentage Total

22,043

Less Than High School

2,426

11.01%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency)

7,962

36.12%

Some College

3,533

16.03%

Associate Degree

1,198

5.43%

Bachelor Degree

1,355

6.15%

Master Degree

549

2.49%

Professional Degree

140

0.64%

63

0.29%

Doctorate Degree U. S. Census 2000

has enjoyed a diversification of its industrial base over the past 20 years. Textiles remain a major player in the area economy, but other businesses and industry have found the workforce in Chester County to be reliable and productive and the infrastructure beneficial for their businesses. Today the county produces textiles, plastics, steel, glass, fiberglass, paper, wood products, and several types of specialty chemicals. The area's retail businesses have also seen growth with the changeover from an agrarian economy to a more diverse manufacturing economy. Greater employment opportunities yielding greater disposable income have attracted a host of new retail establishments, giving residents more shopping choices and keeping the county's dollars at home. More than 300 businesses and industries make up the membership of the Chester Chamber of Commerce.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$30,728

$19,800

2000

$32,425

$19,631

1999

$32,425

$18,594

1998

$30,335

$18,046

1997

$29,110

$17,257

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Chester County Economic Development Rick Moorefield, Director P.O. Drawer 580 Chester, SC 29706 803-377-1216 phone 803-377-2102 fax rmoorefield@chestercounty.org

67


CHESTERFIELD COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Cheraw Population: 5,436 Total County Population: 43,440 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 7,732 17.8% 35 - 54 Years 13,119 30.2% 55 - 64 Years 4,257 9.8% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting

277

Natural Resources & Mining

379

Construction

338

Manufacturing

6,156

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

5,898

Wholesale Trade

2,768

Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing

C

hesterfield County is located just southeast of the city of Charlotte in the northern portion of South Carolina. With the greatest number of manufacturing employers per capita in the region, Chesterfield boasts considerable economic leverage by virtue of its proximity to larger cities including Charlotte, N.C.; Florence, S.C., and Columbia, S.C. Chesterfield also provides easy access to no less than five major highway systems and the Port of Charleston. Chesterfield County has a proud labor force, both in terms of quality and quantity, with a talented manufacturing pool in a

311 1,299

Information

91

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

South Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

13.19%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency)

9,593

34.55%

Some College

4,257

15.33%

Associate Degree

1,567

5.64%

Bachelor Degree

1,834

6.60%

Master Degree

645

2.32%

Professional Degree

129

0.46%

72

0.26%

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing

360

U. S. Census 2000

Professional, Scientific & Technical Services

329

Administrative & Support & Waste Services

101

Education & Health Services

59 169 1,010

Accommodation and Food Services

856

Other Services (Except Public Administration)

823

Unclassified

375

SC Employment Commission 2002

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company INA USA Corporation Conbraco Industries A.O. Smith Corporation Wal-Mark Distribution Center Highland Industries

Employees Unlisted 732 664 639 377

Chesterfield County Economic Development Board 2003

68

27,769 3,663

Doctorate Degree

Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation

Percentage Total

Less Than High School

459

Health Care and Social Assistance

2002 Annual Average 19,387 17,773 1,614 8.3%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

Finance and Insurance

union-free environment. The county has sustained its industry base by developing educational centers such as the Gene Crawford Accelerated Technology School and a satellite campus for Northeastern Technical College. Yet, while Chesterfield has one foot planted firmly in its history, it clearly has its eyes trained on the future. By encouraging existing industry expansion, hi-tech jobs, technology and small business development, Chesterfield has diversified offerings and is a vital partner in the Charlotte USA region. The location of WalMart’s new distribution center offers great opportunities for the area, and has encouraged new manufacturing facilities to relocate or expand nearby. Chesterfield County continues to grow: In 2003, Chesterfield county announced more than $72 million in new capital and announced 424 new jobs.

SC

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$27,648

$19,972

2000

$29,483

$19,605

1999

$29,483

$18,865

1998

$28,909

$18,106

1997

$28,442

$17,371

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Chesterfield County Economic Development Board Cherry G. McCoy, Executive Director P.O. Box 192 Chesterfield, SC 29709 843-623-6500 phone 843-623-3127 fax cherryatcc@shtc.net

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


NC

CLEVELAND COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Shelby Population: 19,598 Total County Population: 98,202 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 17,676 18.0% 35 - 54 Years 29,068 29.6% 55 - 64 Years 9,820 10.0% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Mining Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Waste Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Other Services (Excluding Public Administration) Public Administration Unclassified establishments

109 106 62 1,471 8,994 1,512 3,943 841 320 529 204

1,215 3,678 4,665 245 2,264 952 1,193 *

Employees

PPG Industries Cleveland Regional Medical Center Wal-Mart Distribution Universal Manufacturing and Logistics Reliance Electric Rockwell Automation

1,500 1,100 600 600 550

2002 Annual Average 44,477 38,755 5,722 12.9%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

North Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

Percentage Total

63,396

Less Than High School

5,828

9.19%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 21,632

34.12%

Some College

11,326

17.87%

Associate Degree

4,410

6.96%

Bachelor Degree

5,683

8.96%

Master Degree

1,732

2.73%

Professional Degree

724

1.14%

Doctorate Degree

264

0.42%

HOUSEHOLD INCOME

219

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce 2003

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

U. S. Census 2000

532

NAICS Employment and Wages 2002 * disclosure suppression

(non-governmental) Company

R

anked one of the top ten best small markets by Southern Business and Development magazine, Cleveland County is easily accessed by four major interstates (I-85, I-77, I-26 and I-40) that connect the county to the southeast and beyond. Charlotte Douglas International Airport is just 40 minutes away and links Cleveland County to the world. The manufacturing climate in Cleveland County is diverse with such products as truck cabs, compact discs, transmissions, aircraft parts, ceramic capacitor material, electric motors, emergency products, and various specialized textiles. Industries range from operations that employ just a handful of people to

large manufacturing plants with well over 1,000 employees. Cleveland County is home to numerous ISO 9000 certified companies, has no union activity, boasts 35 percent of the workforce involved in manufacturing, and is classified as an attainment county. Officials in Cleveland County are committed to attracting new industry partners. Since 1997, three new industrial parks have been developed, each served with water, sewer and fiber optic infrastructure. The county also maintains an inventory of over 2.8 million square feet of Class A Industrial space ready for tenant occupancy. In addition, the cities of Kings Mountain and Shelby, located in Cleveland County, are ranked by Site Selection Magazine as two of the top 100 small cities for corporate location.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$32,843

$21,975

2000

$35,283

$22,307

1999

$35,283

$21,372

1998

$34,996

$21,127

1997

$33,552

$20,221

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce Scott Darnell, Senior VP for Economic Development P.O. Box 879 Shelby, NC 28151 704-487-8521 phone 704-487-7458 fax scott@clevelandchamber.org

69


NC

CLEVELAND COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Shelby Population: 19,598 Total County Population: 98,202 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 17,676 18.0% 35 - 54 Years 29,068 29.6% 55 - 64 Years 9,820 10.0% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Mining Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Waste Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Other Services (Excluding Public Administration) Public Administration Unclassified establishments

109 106 62 1,471 8,994 1,512 3,943 841 320 529 204

1,215 3,678 4,665 245 2,264 952 1,193 *

Employees

PPG Industries Cleveland Regional Medical Center Wal-Mart Distribution Universal Manufacturing and Logistics Reliance Electric Rockwell Automation

1,500 1,100 600 600 550

2002 Annual Average 44,477 38,755 5,722 12.9%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

North Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

Percentage Total

63,396

Less Than High School

5,828

9.19%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 21,632

34.12%

Some College

11,326

17.87%

Associate Degree

4,410

6.96%

Bachelor Degree

5,683

8.96%

Master Degree

1,732

2.73%

Professional Degree

724

1.14%

Doctorate Degree

264

0.42%

HOUSEHOLD INCOME

219

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce 2003

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

U. S. Census 2000

532

NAICS Employment and Wages 2002 * disclosure suppression

(non-governmental) Company

R

anked one of the top ten best small markets by Southern Business and Development magazine, Cleveland County is easily accessed by four major interstates (I-85, I-77, I-26 and I-40) that connect the county to the southeast and beyond. Charlotte Douglas International Airport is just 40 minutes away and links Cleveland County to the world. The manufacturing climate in Cleveland County is diverse with such products as truck cabs, compact discs, transmissions, aircraft parts, ceramic capacitor material, electric motors, emergency products, and various specialized textiles. Industries range from operations that employ just a handful of people to

large manufacturing plants with well over 1,000 employees. Cleveland County is home to numerous ISO 9000 certified companies, has no union activity, boasts 35 percent of the workforce involved in manufacturing, and is classified as an attainment county. Officials in Cleveland County are committed to attracting new industry partners. Since 1997, three new industrial parks have been developed, each served with water, sewer and fiber optic infrastructure. The county also maintains an inventory of over 2.8 million square feet of Class A Industrial space ready for tenant occupancy. In addition, the cities of Kings Mountain and Shelby, located in Cleveland County, are ranked by Site Selection Magazine as two of the top 100 small cities for corporate location.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$32,843

$21,975

2000

$35,283

$22,307

1999

$35,283

$21,372

1998

$34,996

$21,127

1997

$33,552

$20,221

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce Scott Darnell, Senior VP for Economic Development P.O. Box 879 Shelby, NC 28151 704-487-8521 phone 704-487-7458 fax scott@clevelandchamber.org

69


NC

IREDELL COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Statesville Population: 23,846 Total County Population: 128,056 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 23,306 18.2% 35 - 54 Years 39,953 31.2% 55 - 64 Years 12,293 9.6% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Mining Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Waste Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Other Services (Excluding Public Administration) Public Administration Unclassified establishments

427 * 130 3,557 13,454 2,127 7,558 1,904 355 979

2,495 3,751 7,093 1,465 3,944 1,536 2,067 73

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S Employees

Lowe’s Companies, Inc. Lake Norman Regional Medical Center Wal-Mart Supercenter Mooresville Graded School District SuperTarget Greater Statesville Development Corporation 2003

72

1,000 930 500 465 350

2002 Annual Average 66,817 62,296 4,521 6.8%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

North Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

Percentage Total

82,036

Less Than High School

6,359

7.75%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 26,309

32.07%

Some College

17,295

21.08%

Associate Degree

6,388

7.79%

Bachelor Degree

10,406

12.68%

2,613

3.19%

Professional Degree

992

1.21%

Doctorate Degree

285

0.35%

U. S. Census 2000

1,043 218

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

Master Degree

362

NAICS Employment and Wages 2002 * disclosure suppression

(non-governmental) Company

I

redell County is one of the few counties in the Carolinas with two connecting interstates; I-77 north and south, and I40 east and west. Additionally, I-85 is only fifteen miles away. Recreation, fun and quality of life abound on and along Lake Norman’s 532-mile shoreline. The county is a very pro-business community. Local taxes favor business, and the tax rate remains among the lowest of all the counties surrounding Charlotte. Health care is served in three local hospitals. Nearby large cities of Charlotte and WinstonSalem provide medical school referrals and consultations. Lowe’s Companies, Inc., the world’s second largest home improvement retailer,

has opened its new corporate headquarters, a 165-acre campus with over 1,000 employees which is expected to grow to 8,000 to 10,000 employees. The move has attracted numerous vendors to nearby offices and showroom space; over 400 vendors are anticipated in the next three years. Nicknamed “Race City USA,” Mooresville has become to racing what Hollywood is to the movies. Approximately 60 race teams and over 100 race-related suppliers are located throughout the county. Fully served industrial sites ranging from 2 to 10-plus acres are zoned for industrial use available throughout the country. Norfolk Southern Railroad considers Iredell County one of its top three sites in North Carolina. A variety of existing and new spec industrial buildings provide opportunities for new business location and growth.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$40,418

$25,399

2000

$41,920

$25,746

1999

$41,920

$24,960

1998

$40,389

$24,218

1997

$38 086

$23,132

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Greater Statesville Development Corporation Jeff McKay, Director 115 E. Front Street Statesville, NC 28677 704-871-0062 phone; 704-871-0223 fax jmckay@velocenet.net

Mooresville-South Iredell Chamber

Melanie O’Connell Underwood, Executive Vice President P.O. Box 628 Mooresville, NC 28115 704-664-3898 phone; 704-664-2549 fax msi@charlotteregion.com

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


SC

LANCASTER COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Lancaster Population: 8,395 Total County Population: 62,478 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 11,621 18.6% 35 - 54 Years 18,930 30.3% 55 - 64 Years 6,185 9.9% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting

82

Natural Resources & Mining

101

Construction

917

Manufacturing

5,630

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

3,063

Wholesale Trade Retail Trade

L

ancaster County is located adjacent to Charlotte, in the nothern portion of South Carolina. its metropolitan area offers a wide array of opportunities. The county has 14 industrial parks, with more than 5,000 available acrees, and millions of gallons of excess capacities of water and sewer. The county’s close proximity to Charlotte Douglas International Airport and Interstates 77, 85, and 485, and the convenience of rail service provided by CSX, Norfolk-Southern, and

288 2,463

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

South Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

4,232

10.44%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 14,447

35.65%

Some College

7,058

17.42%

Associate Degree

2,657

6.56%

Bachelor Degree

2,742

6.77%

Master Degree

1,010

2.49%

Professional Degree

277

0.68%

100

0.25%

263

Information

172

Finance and Insurance

985

Doctorate Degree

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing

144

U. S. Census 2000

Professional, Scientific & Technical Services

239

Administrative & Support & Waste Services

806

Education & Health Services

1,609

Health Care and Social Assistance

1,600

Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation

154

Accommodation and Food Services

992

Other Services (Except Public Administration)

302

Unclassified

17

SC Employment Commission 2002

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company Springs Industries Duracell Cardinal Healthcare U.S. Textile Corporation Belden Wire

Employees 1,800 900 545 360 200

Lancaster County Economic Development Commission 2003

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

Percentage Total

40,520

Less Than High School

Transportation and Warehousing

Lancaster & Chester Railway short line, make Lancaster County and excellent location for manufacturing and distribution centers. The northern section of Lancaster County borders the city of Charlotte and the Ballantyne community, the premier residential and business location in Charlotte metropolitan area, making this area the perfect location for corporate headquarters and back office facilities. In addition, the incentives offered by the county and the state of South Carolina are among the best in the Southeastern U.S. Lancaster County understands the needs of business and welcomes all opportunities for economic development.

2002 Annual Average 29,112 27,016 2,096 7.2%

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$32,827

$21,710

2000

$34,688

$21,052

1999

$34,688

$19,983

1998

$33,614

$19,147

1997

$32,656

$18,414

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Lancaster County Economic Development Commission Keith Tunnell, Interim Executive Director P.O. Box 973 Lancaster, SC 29721 803-285-9471 phone 803-285-9472 fax keith.tunnell@lancastersc-edc.com

73


NC

LINCOLN COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Lincolnton Population: 9,996 Total County Population: 66,219 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 12,515 18.9% 35 - 54 Years 20,925 31.6% 55 - 64 Years 6,622 10.0% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Mining Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Waste Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Other Services (Excluding Public Administration) Public Administration Unclassified establishments

73 * * 1,436 5,924 628 2,292 695 160 347

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

North Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

1,055 495 922 13

Employees

RSI Home Products, Inc. The Timken Company Cochrane Furniture Co., Inc. Mohican Mills, Inc. Robert Bosch Tool Corporation Lincoln County Economic Development Authority 2003

680 639 509 500 476

Percentage Total

43,259

Less Than High School

3,941

9.11%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 13,772

31.84%

Some College

9,212

21.29%

Associate Degree

2,435

5.63%

Bachelor Degree

4,147

9.59%

Master Degree

962

2.22%

Professional Degree

404

2.93%

93

0.21%

HOUSEHOLD INCOME

55 946 1,597 1,770 254

2002 Annual Average 35,927 33,258 2,669 7.4%

U. S. Census 2000

311

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

74

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

Doctorate Degree

125

NAICS Employment and Wages 2002 * disclosure suppression

(non-governmental) Company

L

incoln County is a place where things are still made; where skilled workers know how to use their hands as well as their heads; where business, industry and distribution exist comfortably side-by-side with quality small town, country and lakeside living; where traffic doesn’t roar by but interstates are just down the road; where big city amenities are nearby but urban sprawl doesn’t yet intrude. Lincoln County provides the perfect environment for business. The county boasts a highly responsive infrastructure. From a strong business retention and expansion program to an extensive

selection of prime business parks, up to 600 acres, and free-standing locations, Lincoln County is the perfect locality for all types of business. Because of Lincoln County’s superior business climate, the county is rapidly being recognized as a manufacturing and distribution hub with a growing automotive sector. Companies are taking advantage of Lincoln County’s low tax rate, available skilled labor, commitment to learning and absence of labor unions. Because of Lincoln County’s high quality of life, the county has become attractive to a diversity of international and domestic companies. From location to quality of life, Lincoln County, North Carolina, is the perfect place for living and the perfect place for working.

Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$41,314

$20,970

2000

$41,421

$21,174

1999

$41,421

$20,264

1998

$37,077

$19,857

1997

$35,811

$19,852

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Lincoln County Economic Development Authority Barry I. Matherly, Executive Director P.O. Box 2050 Lincolnton, NC 28093 704-732-1511 phone 704-736-8451 fax leda@vnet.net

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


MECKLENBURG COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Charlotte Population: 580,597 Total County Population: 729,507 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 175,082 24.0% 35 - 54 Years 229,065 31.4% 55 - 64 Years 53,254 7.3% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Mining Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Waste Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Other Services (Excluding Public Administration) Public Administration Unclassified establishments

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

2002 Annual Average 412,270 387,822 24,448 5.9%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

North Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

29,980 21,362 46,922 10,189 30,240 21,615 41,959 24,969 42,808 7,899 35,820 15,196 14,226 580

Employees

Wachovia Corporation

15,000 - 19,999

Bank of America Carolinas Healthcare System Duke Energy Corporation US Airways

10,000 - 14,999 10,000 - 14,999 5,000 - 9,999 5,000 - 9,999

Percentage Total

455,163

Less Than High School

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

Charlotte Chamber of Commerce 2003

NC

843 175 * 31,232 44,920 35,599 52,290

NAICS Employment and Wages 2002 * disclosure suppression

(non-governmental) Company

M

ecklenburg County offers an opportunity to experience the advantages of a “big-city” location but in a much more manageably sized community and at a cost that is consistently below the national average. Charlotte and Mecklenburg County also have a well-diversified economy. Mecklenburg County has more manufacturing firms than any other county in the Carolinas; over 1,275. It is also one of the nation’s largest distribution and trucking center locations. More recently, Charlotte has become well known for its financial services industry, now ranking second only to New York. At present, Mecklenburg County is home to nine Fortune® 500 company headquarters facilities.

20,152

4.43%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 90,543

19.89%

Some College

102,244

22.46%

Associate Degree

30,726

6.75%

Bachelor Degree

121,256

26.64%

Master Degree

33,908

7.45%

Professional Degree

10,136

2.23%

Doctorate Degree

3,657

0.80%

U. S. Census 2000

Quality of life is one of the county’s principal advantages. Charlotte residents enjoy a cost of living that is below the national average. Charlotte has a thriving arts community and consistently leads the nation in giving for the arts. Sports fans have the year-round enjoyment of the NFL Panthers, NBA Bobcats, WNBA Sting, Arena Football League Cobras, NASCAR, PGA Tour golf, AAA baseball, minor league hockey, and various college football and basketball teams. Living accommodations range from waterfront housing and recreational opportunities along any of three lakes, urban dowtown living, stately older neighborhoods near downtown, suburban planned communities with golf, swimming and tennis facilities, and even rural pastoral areas. Mecklenburg County also boasts four of the nation’s top 100 high schools. Its most notable institutions include UNC Charlotte, Davidson College, Queens University, Johnson C. Smith University, and Central Piedmont Community College, the nation’s fifth largest community college.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$57,459

$38,404

2000

$50,579

$37,664

1999

$50,579

$35,701

1998

$46,033

$34,024

1997

$45,350

$31,462

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Charlotte Chamber of Commerce Terry Orell, Senior VP of Business Development P.O. Box 32785 Charlotte, NC 28232 704-378-1311 phone 704-374-1903 fax torell@charlottechamber.com

75


NC

ROWAN COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Salisbury Population: 26,444 Total County Population: 133,773 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 24,614 18.4% 35 - 54 Years 39,864 29.8% 55 - 64 Years 12,307 9.2% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Mining Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Waste Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Other Services (Excluding Public Administration) Public Administration Unclassified establishments

250 203 256 2,098 11,696 1,623 4,753 2,851 282 781 253

* 1,333 4,000 6,359 476 3,157 1,415 2,419 45

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

Freightliner Food Lion Rowan Regional Medical Center KoSa GDX Automotive

Employees 2,500 2,310 1,250 1,200 705

Salisbury Rowan Economic Development Commission 2003

76

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

2002 Annual Average 68,575 64,428 4,147 6.0%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

North Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

Percentage Total

86,345

Less Than High School

7,793

9.03%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 28,964

33.54%

Some College

17,550

20.33%

Associate Degree

5,311

6.15%

Bachelor Degree

8,899

10.31%

Master Degree

2,289

2.65%

Professional Degree

770

0.89%

Doctorate Degree

284

0.33%

U. S. Census 2000

882

NAICS Employment and Wages 2002 * disclosure suppression

(non-governmental) Company

R

owan County is centered in the triangle of North Carolina's three interstates and offers immediate access to the Interstate 85 Boom Belt, and Interstates 77 and 40. Located halfway between the exploding Charlotte region and the vibrant Piedmont Triad area, it provides easy access to three major international airports, 13 regional airports and two modern deep-water ports. All segments of Rowan County work together to promote business development. A pro-business attitude and competitive wage rates supply ample opportunities for profitability. As a result, Rowan County offers some of the lowest personal/property taxes and land/construction

costs in the Southeast, and maintains a diversified industrial/economic base. Rowan County is an ideal place to call home, offering excellent public and private schools, an advanced regional medical center, a variety of cultural opportunities and a low crime rate. Plentiful parks and recreational facilities provide numerous opportunities for fishing, camping, boating and organized sports. From anywhere in the county, it’s never far to lakes, mountains and beaches. The county has a history of business successes and is the birthplace of some notable companies including: Food Lion, grocery store chain; Cheerwine, the soft drink; and Power Curbers, manufacturer of specialized machines for the building of sidewalks and gutters, and even parts of the Chunnel linking England and France! Top private employers include Freightliner and Food Lion.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$35,727

$23,688

2000

$37,494

$23,681

1999

$37,494

$22,631

1998

$36,409

$21,685

1997

$35,112

$20,450

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Salisbury Rowan Economic Development Commission Randy Harrell, Executive Director 204 East Innes Street Salisbury, NC 28144 704-637-5526 phone 704-637-0173 fax harrellr@co. rowan.nc.us

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


NC

S TA N LY COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Albemarle Population: 15,452 Total County Population: 59,138 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 10,408 17.6% 35 - 54 Years 17,564 29.7% 55 - 64 Years 5,736 9.7% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Mining Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Waste Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Other Services (Excluding Public Administration) Public Administration Unclassified establishments

123 * 60 1,116 5,223 770 2,425 201 96 398 116

125 457 1,942 2,531 99 1,544 496 1,481 10

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S Employees

Collins & Aikman Corporation Michelin Aircraft Tire Corporation HBOS Manufacturing (Homes by Oakwood) American Fiber & Finishing, Inc. E.J. Snyder & Co., Inc. Stanly County Economic Development Commission 2003

78

550 385 293 220 200

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

2002 Annual Average 25,907 23,704 2,203 8.5%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

North Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

Percentage Total

38,702

Less Than High School

3,533

9.13%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 13,911

35.94%

Some College

6,859

17.72%

Associate Degree

2,714

7.01%

Bachelor Degree

3,540

9.15%

Master Degree

1,062

2.74%

Professional Degree

229

0.59%

Doctorate Degree

103

0.27%

U. S. Census 2000

233

NAICS Employment and Wages 2002 * disclosure suppression

(non-governmental) Company

L

ocated just 45 miles northeast of Charlotte, Stanly County is at the forefront in offering business incentives, labor and a friendly environment for economic development. A low tax rate and strong economic aid packages that include low interest rates for renovations and equipment as well as tax credits for newly created jobs make the county very attractive for expansion, as do the abundance of affordable greenfield and industrial sites. The result is a diverse group of companies that call Stanly County home, from Michelin Aircraft Tire Co. to S.T. Motorsports. The county also boasts the largest available workforce in the region, with a virtually non-existent unionization rate. It has two

HOUSEHOLD INCOME of the best work training institutions in the state, Stanly Community College and Pfeiffer University; a nationally recognized Stanly Memorial Hospital offering more than twenty-five different specialties; and the Roy M. Hinson Cancer Center offering state-of-the-art technology. Goods are easily transported by interstate (Interstates 85 and 77), rail (Norfolk Southern, CSX and Winston-Salem Southbound), sea (Wilmington, Morehead City, Charleston and Savannah) or air (Albemarle/Stanly County Airport, accommodating virtually any type of private and corporate jet up to a Boeing 737-300, as well as Charlotte Douglas International Airport). Stanly County residents appreciate living in a small community where the standard of living is high but access to metropolitan Charlotte is less than an hour away. Stanly County continues to offer business “the best of both worlds.�

Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$34,806

$22,953

2000

$36,898

$22,979

1999

$36,898

$22,238

1998

$36,322

$21,416

1997

$34,437

$20,262

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Stanly County Economic Development Commission 201 South 2nd Street, Room 103 Albemarle, NC 28001 704-986-3683 phone 704-986-3685 fax stanedc@vnet.net

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


NC

UNION COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Monroe Population: 27,532 Total County Population: 131,070 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 25,428 19.4% 35 - 54 Years 41,025 31.3% 55 - 64 Years 11,010 8.4% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Mining Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Waste Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Other Services (Excluding Public Administration) Public Administration Unclassified establishments

666 * 137 7,599 12,379 2,117 4,774

265 922 57 1,800 3,987 3,365 329 2,539 1,119 1,980 71

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

Tyson Foods, Inc. Allvac Pilgrim’s Pride, Inc. Charlotte Pipe & Foundry Plastics Division TYCO/Scott Health and Safety

Employees 1,200 1,120 923 615

Union County Economic Development Commission 2003

430

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

2002 Annual Average 71,456 67,771 3,685 5.2%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

North Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

Percentage Total

78,878

Less Than High School

1,490 333 602

NAICS Employment and Wages 2002 * disclosure suppression

(non-governmental) Company

C

ompanies are moving to Union County to take advantage of its hardworking, well-educated workforce, large tracts of land, and a pro-business environment. Adjacent to Charlotte and Interstate 485, Union County has become so attractive it is now the 18th fastest growing county in the nation, surpassing all others in both Carolinas. With assets such as the Monroe Regional Airport and its recently completed taxiway improvements, Union Regional Medical Center, and South Piedmont Community College, Union County is a premier location for business in the Charlotte region.

5,458

6.92%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 24,308

30.82%

Some College

16,490

20.91%

Associate Degree

5,672

7.19%

Bachelor Degree

12,371

15.68%

Master Degree

3,332

4.22%

Professional Degree

823

1.04%

Doctorate Degree

293

0.37%

U. S. Census 2000

South Piedmont Community College offers the productive and competitive labor force of 70,000 the innovative curriculum demonstrating the college’s eagerness to adapt to the needs of industry. Union Regional Medical Center is continuing to build upon its reputation as a technologically advanced regional healthcare campus with the recent $47 million expansion of its Outpatient Diagnostic Treatment Facility, Cancer Treatment Center, and radiation therapy services. Wingate University will also play a significant role in the developing Medical Cluster with their new $6 million School of Pharmacy. Finally, a local development group has announced plans for a 430,000square-foot medical park that will generate nearly 800 jobs and $65 million in capital investment. Evidence by the increase in population and record capital investment, Union County has earned its reputation as a “Great Place to Live and Work.”

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$60,785

$24,890

2000

$50,638

$24,299

1999

$50,638

$23,544

1998

$44,382

$22,454

1997

$41,145

$21,058

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Union County Economic Development Commission Jackie Morgan, Interim Executive Director P.O. Box 292 Monroe, NC 28111 704-283-3592 phone 704-283-3861 fax jackiemorgan@co.union.nc.us

79


SC

YORK COUNTY

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Rock Hill Population: 54,606 Total County Population: 170,584 Percentage Total Age Total Population 21 - 34 Years 31,899 18.7% 35 - 54 Years 53,563 31.4% 55 - 64 Years 15,353 9.0% U.S. Census 2002

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

Average Employment

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting

219

Mining

55

Construction

3,324

Manufacturing

10,191

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

13,891

Wholesale Trade

3,473

Retail Trade

7,985

Transportation and Warehousing

974

Information

1,493

Finance and Insurance

1,407

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing

589

Professional, Scientific & Technical Services

1,682

Administrative & Support & Waste Services

3,736

Educational Services

90

Health Care and Social Assistance

5,325

Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation

1,568

Accommodation and Food Services

5,297

Other Services (Except Public Administration)

1,871

Unclassified

86

SC Employment Commission 2002

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S (non-governmental) Company

Employees

Bowater Coated and Specialty Papers Division Duke Power - Catawba Nuclear Station Ross Distribution Wells Fargo Home Mortgage U.S. Foodservice, Inc. York County Economic Development Board 2003

80

York County capitalizes on its geography, combining the advantages of a South Carolina location and business climate with easy access to the largest metropolitan area in the two Carolinas – Charlotte. Just immediately across the North Carolina border, York County brings together the grace and charm of life in a small community with the opportunities and advantages of the big city. The city of Rock Hill serves as the commercial center, while the city of York is the county seat. Accessibility is key to economic development and York County boasts many transportation advantages. I-77 runs through the eastern portion, I-85 runs

1,150 1,088 852 850 825

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N

2002 Annual Average 91,730 85,433 6,297 6.9%

Labor Force Employed Unemployed Rate

South Carolina Employment Security Commission 2002

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Total Total Population 25 and Over

Percentage Total

105,757

Less Than High School

8,177

7.73%

High School Graduate (Includes Equivalency) 30,127

28.49%

Some College

21,842

20.65%

Associate Degree

7,610

7.20%

Bachelor Degree

14,945

14.13%

Master Degree

5,310

5.02%

Professional Degree

1,327

1.25%

531

0.50%

Doctorate Degree U. S. Census 2000

near the northwestern part, and they are joined together by an excellent highway network. Charlotte Douglas International Airport is less than 30 minutes away and the Port of Charleston, the busiest container port in the Southeast and fourth nationally, is a three hour drive. The diversity and strength of the business community continually support growth. In the past several years, York County has averaged $200 million in industry and business development and 1,700 new jobs annually. So, why York County? It offers the best of all worlds: Quality of life including top ranking schools in the state, excellent business climate, and accessibility are just the beginning. South Carolina incentives make the move to York County a smart one. The reasonable cost of operation and productive labor force make staying in business in York County even smarter.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Year

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

2002/2001

$45,567

$26,386

2000

$44,539

$25,844

1999

$44,539

$24,436

1998

$40,365

$23,559

1997

$39,728

$22,582

Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture 2002; Bureau of Economic Analysis 2003

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Rock Hill Economic Development Corporation Stephen Turner, Executive Director P.O. Box 11706 Rock Hill, SC 29731 803-329-7090 phone; 803-329-7007 fax stephenturner@ci.rock-hill.sc.us

York County Economic Development Board J. Mark Farris, Director 1830 Second Baxter Crossing Fort Mill, SC 29708 803-802-4300 phone; 803-802-4299 fax mark.farris@yorkcountygov.com

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


duke power | 100 years

Duke Power

100 years of economic development The Carolinas have been home to Duke Power for 100 years this year. In her remarks at the annual meeting of the Charlotte Regional Partnership (June 17, 2003), Ruth G. Shaw, president of Duke Power, discussed the company’s contribution to the economic development of the CharlotteUSA region. Pertinent excerpts follow.

I

’ll confess it: I like power. I did my Ph.D. dissertation on power – the kind people have – and it is probably some sort of cosmic joke that I ended up at Duke Power Company, focused on the kind of power people need every day. So I like being in this crowd – a powerful group if there ever was one, committed to shaping the future of this region, knowing that together, we can make a difference. Duke Power has been at the forefront of economic development of this region for nearly a century, building on a clear vision, business savvy, sound principles – and delivering reliable competitively priced power for our customers. This partnership in economic development has been important throughout our history – and never more so than today.

In 1899, James Buchanan Duke (1856-1925) organized the American Development Company to acquire land and water rights on Catawba River in Chester, Lancaster and Fairfield counties. Shortly after the turn of the century, workers installed power lines to energize the Charlotte region. In 1904, Catawba Power Company’s Catawba Hydro Station began operation with 3,300 kilowatts. This was the first generating station on the Duke system, and this date is considered to be the birth of Duke Power Company.

PROVEN HISTORY Many of you know the story of Duke Power’s beginnings, when Buck Duke, Gill Wylie, and our other founders became the most formidable economic developers in the history of the piedmont Carolinas. At the turn of the century, this region languished in the rural, post-Civil War economic doldrums – an agrarian rut so deep that no one could see a clear way out. No one that is, but Buck Duke. Duke saw the power of the Catawba River, the productive cotton fields, and the application of electricity to textile factories – and a vision was in the making. Duke was no dreamer, he was a doer, and in March of 1904, the Catawba Hydro Station began producing electricity to its sole customer, the Victoria

Duke Power has been at the forefront of economic development of this region for nearly a century, building on a clear vision, business savvy, sound principles – and delivering reliable competitively priced power for our customers.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

83


duke power | 100 years

Many people feared electricity in the early 1900s, and one mill owner was emphatic: “You must be drunk or a damn fool if you think I will bring electricity into my mill to kill my people.”

Cotton Mills. That small station, with its rope-driven generation, began the realization of a vision of interconnected power plants, located along the 220 miles of the Catawba/Wateree river system. Duke did not stop there. He knew the importance of transportation, and he build an electric railroad, the Piedmont and Northern, which ran from Anderson to Gastonia, carrying freight and passengers, and bearing the proud logo of “A Mill to the Mile.” The stage was set for one of the most spectacular industry raids in history: abundant, inexpensive electricity; access to raw materials; people hungry for work in the mills. In 1925, New England had 80 percent of the cotton textile industry. By 1954, it had 20 percent. And much of the remainder was in the Carolinas. It was not an easy road – economic development rarely is. Many people feared electricity in the early 1900s, and one mill owner was emphatic: “You must be drunk or a damn fool if you think I will bring electricity into my mill to kill my people.” Others were ready to be partners, and Duke was willing to invest in mills that would locate near his hydro plants. From the beginning, Buck Duke had a bold plan – a plan that did not recognize city limits, county lines or state borders. He looked at the region connected by its river highway and its natural resources. He did not envision a few power plants serving or two mills, but an integrated system of large generating stations with transmission lines

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that would enable them to serve the needs of the region.

BRIGHT FUTURE Over the years, Duke Power has continued this tradition of expansive vision, executive leadership, customer focus and public/private partnerships to promote prosperity in our region. It was no surprise that former Duke Power Chairman and CEO Bill Lee was one of the founders of this partnership, or that Bill spent the last day of life lobbying for a jobs tax credit bill that would help attract more jobs for the region. He was worried that we were losing the economic recruiting wars to other southern states that were determined to “eat our lunch,” since the Carolinas hand long been the states to beat. We were, he thought, losing our edge, and he intended to do what he could to make sure we kept it. Today, the counties of the partnership are at a critical juncture. Like the rest of the country –and, indeed, the world – we are battling extended economic doldrums. We have fact the reality that the hundreds of thousand of textile jobs we have lost over the past decade are not coming back. Our competitors for business are not just other states; that are other nations. On the bright side, we are seeing the power of new “business clusters” such as the automotive services cluster surrounding BMW or the biopharma cluster in the Research Triangle. We know we must think regionally; that we must build on our competitive

advantages; that we must have firstclass infrastructure; and that we must compete head-to-head with a full package of benefits to attract big business that can become the center of a potent cluster. There is no substitute for hard work toward a shared vision. At Duke Power, we are committed to doing our part. That starts with competitively priced electric power. Our retail rates are 21 percent below the national average, and we are holding at roughly the same price as in 1986. We are focused on innovative approaches that will help attract new and expanding businesses by providing some period of reduced electricity cost. Make no mistake: we do not intend to disadvantage existing customers, and we work hard to address business expansion as well as new business. We must have a full quiver of incentives if we are to reap the benefits of business growth in our region. The latest example of this innovation – featured on the partnership’s web page – is an economic redevelopment tariff designed to attract tenants to vacant commercial and industrial buildings, and which offers half-priced electricity for the first year of occupancy in eligible facilities. New business benefits us all, as jobs are created and revenues increase. And despite the travails of the recent hard winters storms, Duke Power’s customers satisfaction is consistently at or near the top on a range of national measures and surveys. Duke Power is also committed to be a steward of our environment and a

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


duke power | 100 years

responsible corporate citizen. Clean air and water are fundamental to good life and good business. Emissions from the burning of fossil fuels in transportation, industry and power plants contribute to smog and other air quality concerns in the Carolinas. Duke Power’s investment of nearly $2.2 billion in emission controls for our coal-fired power plants over the next decade will mean that these plants will be far below current federal limits for nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide emissions. These reduction sin emissions are a significant response to the upcoming designation of ozone and particulate matter “non-attainment” areas. We are in the midst of renewing our federal license to operate the Catawba/ Wateree system, bringing to the table many stakeholders who care about recreations, water supply, and environmental preservation, as well as electric generation. The result will surely be an approach that takes into consideration the many voices of the river – that vital current of our region. Beyond this basic strategy, Duke Power is putting more mind, muscle, and money into economic development. We will be at the table, doing what we can to drive deals to the finish line. What’s more, Duke Power has created a Carolinas Investment fund which directs cold, hard cash through economic development organizations to help attract new businesses to our service territory. In one recent example, Mike Almond was down to the wire with one international prospect considering two sites – one in the Partnership, and one in Georgia. Duke Power cam to the table with a grand to be directed to the business throughout the Charlotte Regional Partnership, and the field was narrowed to one locations – ours.

CONCLUSION Looking back, and looking forward, though much has changed, much is still the same in economic development for the Charlotte region. WE have been favored with an abundance of natural resources, more than our share of visionary leaders, and a work ethic that goes after business the old-fashioned way. Just as Duke Power has helped shape this region over the past century, you can count on us to be part of building a bright future, at the table with ideas, solutions resources – and competitive rates and superior service for electric customers in the Carolinas. We thank you for your business – now let’s go get more of it for the Charlotte Regional Partnership.

Duke Power is putting more mind, muscle, and money into economic development. We will be at the table, doing what we can to drive deals to the finish line.

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

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Charlotte Regional Partnership Services I N F O R M AT I O N A N D S E R V I C E S A VA I L A B L E F O R R E L O C AT I N G B U S I N E S S E S

WHO WE ARE Founded in 1992, the Charlotte Regional Partnership is a nonprofit, private/ public organization dedicated to the planned growth and prosperity of the Charlotte region. Roughly the size of the state of Massachusetts, our region includes 16 counties - 12 in North Carolina and 4 in South Carolina. Together we are Charlotte USA. The organization brings together government and local businesses to market and promote Charlotte USA as a highly competitive, vibrant regional economy with a unique balance of business strength, accessibility, and increasingly attractive quality of life.

W H AT W E P R O V I D E The Charlotte Regional Partnership provides assistance to any company considering relocation or expansion. Best of all, these services are offered free of charge. The Charlotte Regional Partnership can provide information concerning • Site and building searches • Regional economic trend data and statistics • Airport and transportation information • Introductions to service providers, potential customers and strategic partners • Cultural, international and educational organizations

R E A L E S TAT E D ATA B A S E The Charlotte Regional Partnership’s database of industrial properties consists of over 700 buildings and sites. This database can be found at www.charlotteusa.com under the “Find A Site” category.

R E S E A R C H C A PA B I L I T I E S The Research department has many resources to provide statistics on a variety of subjects. From standard demographics to custom presentations, the Charlotte Regional Partnership can provide excellent research for your economic development needs. Examples of research products include: Demographics • Education • Labor Force • Quality of Life • Salaries • Taxes & Incentives • Transportation • Union information • Geographic comparisons

R E G I O N A L C O N TA C T S

www.charlotteusa.com

The Charlotte Regional Partnership can facilitate introductions to a variety of partners throughout the region. These partners support our economic development efforts and can be of service to companies interested in relocating. Businesses include law firms, accounting firms, financial institutions, construction companies, real estate firms, and utilities.

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N Charlotte Regional Partnership 1001 Morehead Square Drive, Suite 200 Charlotte, NC 28203, USA Toll Free 800.554.4373; Telephone 704.347.8942; Fax 704.347.8981

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2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


Contact Information ALEXANDER COUNTY

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Alexander County Chamber of Commerce Keith Hertzler, Executive Director 104 West Main Avenue Taylorsville, NC 28681 828-632-8141 phone 828-632-1096 fax alexdir@bellsouth.net

Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce Scott Darnell, Senior VP for Economic Development P.O. Box 879 Shelby, NC 28151 704-487-8521 phone 704-487-7458 fax scott@clevelandchamber.org

ANSON COUNTY Anson County Economic Development Kevin Gullette, Director of Economic Development P.O. Drawer 339 Wadesboro, NC 28170 704-694-9513 phone 704-694-3830 fax kgullette@email.co.anson.nc.us

CABARRUS COUNTY Cabarrus Economic Development Commission Maurice Ewing, President & CEO 2325 Concord Lake Road Concord, NC 28025 704-784-4600 phone 704-784-4603 fax mdewing@cabarrusedc.com

C ATA W B A C O U N T Y Catawba County Economic Development Corporation Scott L. Millar, President Physical Address: 100A Southwest Blvd., Ste. 201 Newton, NC 28658 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3388 Hickory, NC 28603 828-464-7198 phone 828-465-8150 fax smillar@catawbacountync.gov

CHESTER COUNTY Chester County Economic Development Rick Moorefield, Director P.O. Drawer 580 Chester, SC 29706 803-377-1216 phone 803-377-2102 fax rmoorefield@chestercounty.org

CHESTERFIELD COUNTY Chesterfield County Economic Development Board Cherry G. McCoy, Executive Director P.O. Box 192 Chesterfield, SC 29709 843-623-6500 phone 843-623-3127 fax cherryatcc@shtc.net

GASTON COUNTY Gaston County Economic Development Commission Donny Hicks, Executive Director P.O. Box 2339 Gastonia, NC 28053 704-867-4771 phone 704-861-8302 fax dhicks@co.gaston.nc.us

IREDELL COUNTY Greater Statesville Development Corporation Jeff McKay, Director 115 E. Front Street Statesville, NC 28677 704-871-0062 phone; 704-871-0223 fax jmckay@velocenet.net Mooresville-South Iredell Chamber Melanie O’Connell Underwood, Executive Vice President Mooresville, NC 28115 704-664-3898 phone; 704-664-2549 fax msi@charlotteregion.com

LANCASTER COUNTY Lancaster County Economic Development Commission Keith Tunnell, Interim Executive Director P.O. Box 973 Lancaster, SC 29721 803-285-9471 phone 803-285-9472 fax keith.tunnell@lancastersc-edc.com

LINCOLN COUNTY Lincoln County Economic Development Authority Barry I. Matherly, Executive Director P.O. Box 2050 Lincolnton, NC 28093 704-732-1511 phone 704-736-8451 fax leda@vnet.net

2004 CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

MECKLENBURG COUNTY Charlotte Chamber of Commerce Terry Orell, Senior VP of Business Development P.O. Box 32785 Charlotte, NC 28232 704-378-1311 phone 704-374-1903 fax torell@charlottechamber.com

ROWAN COUNTY Salisbury Rowan Economic Development Commission Randy Harrell, Executive Director 204 East Innes Street Salisbury, NC 28144 704-637-5526 phone 704-637-0173 fax harrellr@co. rowan.nc.us

S TA N LY C O U N T Y Stanly County Economic Development Commission 201 South 2nd Street, Room 103 Albemarle, NC 28001 704-986-3683 phone 704-986-3685 fax stanedc@vnet.net

UNION COUNTY Union County Economic Development Commission Jackie Morgan, Interim Executive Director P.O. Box 292 Monroe, NC 28111 704-283-3592 phone 704-283-3861 fax jackiemorgan@co.union.nc.us

YORK COUNTY Rock Hill Economic Development Corporation Stephen Turner, Executive Director Rock Hill, SC 29731 803-329-7090 phone; 803-329-7007 fax stephenturner@ci.rock-hill.sc.us York County Economic Development Board J. Mark Farris, Director 1830 Second Baxter Crossing Fort Mill, SC 29708 803-802-4300 phone; 803-802-4299 fax mark.farris@yorkcountygov.com

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Charlotte Regional Economical Development Guide 2004  
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