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Average Daily Commute Time To Work Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q

15 Minutes Visionary. Business Friendly. Neighborly. If this describes you and your employees then welcome to Concord, NC. We are a city who believes that with imagination and a little elbow grease dreams of success come to life. We believe in performing well both at work and at play. We welcome entrepreneurship. We are high performing at its best. Join us. We are waiting to make your dreams of success come true.

Average Speed While At Work Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q

158.679 MPH Find out what the City of Concord can do for your business: visit www.ci.concord.nc.us or call 704.920.5121


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S E R I O U S B U S I N E S S. S E R I O U S F U N. Minutes from uptown Charlotte. Light-years away in attitude. That’s North Carolina’s Lake Norman Region, a 32,500-acre water wonderland surrounded by beautiful lakefront neighborhoods, spectacular golf, great shopping and the charming communities of Cornelius, Davidson and Huntersville. Think of it as “Charlotte casual” – a place where you can enjoy the benefits of doing business in one of America’s most dynamic metropolitan areas, yet still find countless reasons to kick off those wingtips and ease into your flip-flops. It’s a rare blend of business and pleasure that has attracted the likes of Ingersoll-Rand, Daimler Chrysler Vans, GE, Joe Gibbs Racing, and Rubbermaid. North Carolina’s Lake Norman Region. A location worthy of serious consideration. Lake Norman Regional Economic Development Corporation, 13801 Reese Blvd. W. Suite 200-A, Huntersville, NC 28078, 704-992-2300, www.lakenormanregion.com


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Iptqjubm!pggfst!tpnf!pg!uif!nptu!bewbodfe!dbsf!jo!uif!bsfb/ ! Uif!Bnfsjdbo!Ovstft!Dsfefoujbmjoh!Dfoufs!ibt!eftjhobufe!Hbtupo! Nfnpsjbm!b!Nbhofu!Iptqjubm-!pof!pg!kvtu!5&!pg!iptqjubmt!obujpobmmz!up! bdijfwf!uijt!ipops/ ! Hbtupo!Nfnpsjbm!sfdfoumz!fbsofe!b!obujpobm!Qsfnjfs!Bxbse!gps! Rvbmjuz!jo!uif!bsfb!pg!Bdvuf!Nzpdbsejbm!Jogbsdujpo!)ifbsu!buubdl*!gps! pwfsbmm!dbsf!boe!pqfsbujoh!fggjdjfodz/

FURTHER PROOF THAT SOME OF THE BEST HEALTHCARE IN CHARLOTTE IS ACTUALLY HERE IN GASTON COUNTY.

! Uif!Dpnnjttjpo!po!Dbodfs!Pvutuboejoh!Bdijfwfnfou!Bxbse!qmbdft! uif!DbspNpou!Dbodfs!Dfoufs!bnpoh!uif!upq!21!qfsdfou!pg!dbodfs!qsphsbnt!! bddsfejufe!cz!uif!Bnfsjdbo!Dpmmfhf!pg!Tvshfpot/ ! ! Boe!Hbtupo!Nfnpsjbm!ibt!bmtp!cffo!tfmfdufe!! ! bt!pof!pg!uif!upq!211!obujpobm!iptqjubmt/!Uif!Upubm!! ! Cfodinbsl!Tpmvujpo!Upq!211!Rvbmjuz!Bxbse!jt!hjwfo! ! up!iptqjubmt!efnpotusbujoh!ijhi!rvbmjuz!Ifbsu!Buubdl! ! Dbsf-!Ifbsu!Gbjmvsf!Dbsf-!Qofvnpojb!Dbsf!boe!pwfsbmm! ! fydfmmfodf/!Pomz!uxp!Opsui!Dbspmjob!iptqjubmt!sfdfjwfe!! uif!ipops/!Jo!beejujpo-!xf!ibwf!cffo!obnfe!pof!pg!28!tubufxjef!Dbsejbd! Dfoufst!pg!Fydfmmfodf!cz!Cmvf!Dsptt!Cmvf!Tijfme!pg!Opsui!Dbspmjob/ ! XfÖsf!qspve!pg!pvs!bxbset/!Cvu!xfÖsf!npsf!qspve!pg!uif!sfbtpot!xiz!! xf!fbso!uifn/!Npsf!qsppg! that some of the most advanced healthcare in Charlotte is actually right here in Gaston County.

For more information: 704 834 2226 www.CaroMont.org


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t a b l e o f c o nt e nt s

CHARLOTTE REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP PRESIDENT’S LETTER ........................................15 INTRODUCTION TO CHARLOTTE USA Constructing a Citistate ......................................16

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT North Carolina Research Campus ...................... 34 Charlotte Research Institute .............................. 35

HUMAN RESOURCES Number of Households ...................................... 36

GLOBAL PRESENCE

Population ........................................................... 36

Global Map ..........................................................18

Work Force Education ........................................ 36

If the Carolinas Were a Country .........................19

Regional Colleges and Universities ................... 37

International Companies Choose Charlotte USA .... 20

Population by Age ........................................................ 37

Top Countries with Foreign-Owned Firms ........... 21

Projected % Change in Population Growth ........... 37

Largest Foreign-Owned Firms ............................. 21

Median Household Income ................................ 37

ACCESSIBILITY

QUALITY OF LIFE

Strategic Location Map ...................................... 22

Household Income ......................................... 39

Largest Freight Trucking Companies ................ 25

Per Capita Income ......................................... 39

Flight/Driving Times ............................................. 25

Per Capita Income Trends ............................. 39

Distances to Major Ports ...................................... 25

Cost of Living ................................................. 39

BUSINESS STRENGTH Top 25 Largest Regional Employers .................. 28 Taxes and Incentives ........................................... 29 Unionization Activity .......................................... 29 Work Force Statistics .......................................... 29

Major Tourist Attractions .............................. 41

CHARLOTTE CENTER CITY Constructing a Citistate ................................. 44 Unprecedented Investment .......................... 46 Charlotte Center City 2011 ........................... 48

Employment by Industry..................................... 29 Employment in Industries ................................... 31 Top 10 Pro-Business States ................................. 31 Top 10 States for Business Climate ................... 31

Charlotte USA Leakage/Surplus Factor ....................................... 50

Average Weekly Wage by Industry ................... 31

Charlotte USA Corridors of Commerce ....................................................... 50

BUSINESS SECTORS .......................................... 32

Charlotte USA Community™ Tapestry™ ....................................... 50

•• • ••• 12

CHARLOTTE USA AT A GLANCE

Constructing a Citistate ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

Charlotte USA Population Change ............................................ 50 Regional Map ...................................................... 51

CHARLOTTE USA COUNTY PROFILES Alexander, N.C. ................................................... 52 Anson, N.C. ......................................................... 54 Cabarrus, N.C. ..................................................... 56 Catawba, N.C. ..................................................... 58 Chester, S.C. ........................................................ 60 Chesterfield, S.C. ................................................ 62 Cleveland, N.C. ................................................... 64 Gaston, N.C. ........................................................ 66

2008

Iredell, N.C. ......................................................... 68 Lancaster, S.C. ..................................................... 70 Lincoln, N.C. ........................................................ 72 Mecklenburg, N.C. .............................................. 74 Rowan, N.C. ........................................................ 76 Stanly, N.C. .......................................................... 78 Union, N.C. .......................................................... 80 York, S.C. ............................................................. 82

CHARLOTTE REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP INFORMATION Charlotte USA Economic Development Contacts ....................................... 84 Charlotte Regional Partnership Information .................................... 86 Regional Economic Development Partners ....................................... 87

GUIDE TO ESRI TAPESTRY MAPS .............. 88

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

13


CHARLOTTE REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP PRESIDENT’S LETTER

CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE 2008 PUBLISHER John Paul Galles jgalles@greatercharlottebiz.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDITOR Maryl A. Lane maryl.a.lane@greatercharlottebiz.com ASSISTANT EDITOR Janet Kropinak jkropinak@greatercharlottebiz.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Trevor Adams tadams@greatercharlottebiz.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER Ellison Clary ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Joe Gleason jgleason@greatercharlottebiz.com CONTENT PROVIDERS Charlotte Regional Partnership Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) Charlotte Chamber of Commerce Charlotte Center City Partners LITTLE Diversified Architectural Consulting, Inc.

Choose CharlotteUSA: Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide is published annually by Galles Communications Group, Inc., publisher of the monthly b2b magazine Greater Charlotte Biz, at 5601 Seventy-Seven Center Drive, Suite 250, Charlotte, N.C. 282170737 • 704-676-5850 Phone • 704-676-5853 Fax • www.greatercharlottebiz.com.

Editorial or advertising inquiries, please call or fax at the numbers above or e-mail: info@greatercharlottebiz.com. Subscription inquiries or change of address, please call or fax at the numbers above or visit our Web site: www.greatercharlottebiz.com. All contents © 2008, Galles Communications Group, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. The Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide is distributed directly and through the Charlotte Regional Partnership and local economic development agencies to over 25,000 businesses and executives engaged in recruiting or relocating businesses to the Charlotte region. Content including statistics and photography has been provided by our partners: the Charlotte Regional Partnership, ESRI, the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce, Charlotte Center City Partners, LITTLE Diversified Architectural Consulting, Inc. and by the 16 counties for the county profiles, unless otherwise noted. While the information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, Galles Communications Group, Inc. makes no warranty to the accuracy or reliability of this information. The views expressed herein are not necessarily those of Galles Communications Group, Inc. or Greater Charlotte Biz. Products named in these pages are trade names or trademarks of their respective companies. Choose CharlotteUSA 2008 is an annual publication of Galles Communications Group, Inc., 5601 77 Center Dr., Ste. 250, Charlotte, NC 28217-0737. Telephone: 704-6765850. Fax: 704-676-5853. Issues available at $14.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Quantity and educational discounts available. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Galles Communications Group, Inc.; 5601 77 Center Dr., Ste. 250; Charlotte, N.C. 28217-0737.

Life. In balance Charlotte USA consistently makes the “best of” and “top” listings compiled by national and international publications as diverse as Fortune, the Financial Times’ fDi and Nations Restaurant News. Other areas look to our region and wonder what makes it such a magnet for business expansion and the 100,000 new arrivals each year. In short, it’s opportunity. The region’s business friendliness, outstanding accessibility and unparalleled quality of life make Charlotte USA a great place to live and do business. We are a 16-county, twostate region that provides the opportunity for business and personal dreams to be realized. Our economy is broadly focused in four industries: manufacturing, logistics, headquarters and back office operations, and technology industries. There’s opportunity for highly educated professionals and tech-savvy production workers. Our work force attracts diverse businesses, and diverse businesses draw an energetic work force, much of it the highly sought-after 25- to 44-year-old “creative class.”

And Charlotte USA has another secret—public/private collaboration. Our counties, the states, elected officials, colleges and universities, and private businesses all cooperate to recruit companies, welcome them, and engage them in the fabric of our communities.

Companies choose sites where their businesses can flourish and their employees can fulfill their potential. Location decisions are influenced by life. In balance.”

There’s more to site selection than industrial parks, a well-planned transportation infrastructure, and favorable business climate, although Charlotte USA has that in spades. Companies choose sites where their businesses can flourish and their employees can fulfill their potential. Location decisions are influenced by life. In balance. Ronnie L. Bryant, CEcD, FM, HLM President and CEO Charlotte Regional Partnership

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

15


INTRODUCTION TO CHARLOTTE USA

•• • •••

Constructing a Citistate

Charlotte USA is undergoing a metamorphosis.

Bank of America has a 30-plus level office

One of the mixed-use developments

From Charlotte’s thicket of construction cranes

building rising beside a new Ritz-Carlton Hotel,

intended to serve that influx as well as Center

in Center City to office parks and new home

while Wachovia is developing its own 48-story

City is the EpiCentre, a mixed-use development

developments throughout the region’s 16 coun-

structure that includes a cultural complex with

that features 18 bars and restaurants along with

ties, change is remarkably visible, abundant and

multiple art museums, a theater, high-rise office

movie theaters, a high-end bowling facility, a 53-

forward thinking. Charlotte has been building a

and residential components and retail.

story condo tower and a high-rise hotel. Whisky River, a bar designed and owned by NASCAR

foundation for economic growth for many years.

Charlotte Center City, the heart of the

The accumulated impact of its planning and

region, is bursting at its seams. It boasts 70,000

progress is transforming this region into a mag-

workers today and Charlotte Center City Part-

Construction is also underway for the

netic and attractive citistate for business reloca-

ners (CCCP) projects that number to reach

NASCAR Hall of Fame that will open in 2010

tions and expansion.

icon Dale Earnhardt Jr., is an early favorite.

95,000 by 2020. With condo towers sprouting

alongside a 19-story NASCAR office building.

To be sure, Charlotte USA is a banking

like weeds, the urban core soon could see its

Plans are also in the works for a sparkling new

mecca, home to behemoths Bank of America and

13,000 residents double. CCCP is pushing for

Triple-A baseball stadium in Center City for the

Wachovia, both recovering from fevers con-

uptown retail, from department stores to neigh-

Charlotte Knights. They’ll be a stone’s throw

tracted from the mortgage and credit maladies.

borhood services establishments. Part of its case

from Bank of America Stadium, where the Car-

Though cutting back, they continue to focus on

is that thousands of the 25- to 34-year-olds, with

olina Panthers play National Football League

growth as well as development within Center

average household income north of $60,000,

opponents, and Time Warner Cable Arena,

City that accounts for many of those building

regularly flock to Center City for dining and

home of the National Basketball Association’s

cranes maneuvering throughout the skyline.

entertainment.

Charlotte Bobcats.

16

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


INTRODUCTION TO CHARLOTTE USA

Another important catalyst for economic

and local service. Final construction of the I-

are an abundance of small towns and communi-

growth is the Charlotte Douglas International

485 beltway will also improve travel through-

ties with a sparkle and character all their own.

Airport. Since it was established in 1936 with

out Charlotte USA.

Each and every county is like a star in the constellation Charlotte USA.

major upgrades in 1954 and 1982, the Charlotte

The UNC Charlotte campus is rapidly

Douglas International Airport has grown to a

expanding to accommodate growth of its stu-

Charlotte USA continues to attract new

size that ranks ninth nationally in operations,

dent population from current enrollment of

firms. The Charlotte Chamber reports 282 new

serving more than 33 million passengers in 2007.

21,000 to over 35,000 students within 15 years.

business locations or expansions for first quar-

A third runway is currently under construction

It boasts a graduate school with 18 doctoral and

ter 2008, accounting for more than 3,000 new

that will place it among the few nationally that

62 master’s degree programs in a wide variety of

jobs. And the figures are comparable for 2006

can land three planes simultaneously.

fields as it becomes a more complete research

and 2007, showing the region continues to thrive

As fuel becomes increasingly expensive,

university. Its students hail from nearly every

in a slowing national economy.

transportation systems are even more essen-

state as well as from Europe, Asia, Africa, Central

tial to healthy economic growth. Making it eas-

America and South America.

Charlotte USA has the second-highest inmigration of young, educated workers of any place

ier for folks to get to work as well as experi-

Two significant research centers help Char-

in the country, allowing the work force to con-

ence all its Center City, Charlotte’s new light

lotte USA develop new industries.The brainchild

tinue to grow. Annual in-migration growth is

rail line operates along nine miles of track

of billionaire David Murdock, the new North

expected to continue at about 3 percent per year

from Center City to the southern suburbs.

Carolina Research Campus is rising in Kannapo-

for the foreseeable future.That projects growth of

Ridership has far surpassed all expectations

lis as a biotechnology center and promises to

approximately 100,000 new residents to the area

averaging 13,000 riders per month.

bring thousands upon thousands of jobs. Also,

each year. Our current regional population of

The Charlotte Area Transit System is devel-

the Charlotte Research Institute at the Univer-

nearly 2.5 million residents is likely to grow to

oping plans for more commuter rail lines to

sity of North Carolina at Charlotte is partnering

over 4 million people in the next 20 years.

the university area as well as northward to the

with area enterprises to produce basic research

Lake Norman area. In addition, it is growing the

as a building block to even greater growth.

bus system and expanding commuter routes

These are exciting and important times.

Throughout the Charlotte USA region, there

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

17


GLOBAL PRESENCE

LITTLE Diversified Architectural Consulting, Inc.

Global investment is flowing to those areas that are exceptionally accessible, attractive to young, talented workers, and have proven to be amenable to international investment—Charlotte USA has all three of these characteristics in abundance. ~ Kenny McDonald Senior Vice President Charlotte Regional Partnership

Charlotte USA

18

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


GLOBAL PRESENCE

Building an International City •• • •••

Preserving Small-town Appeal

N

Not long ago, the Charlotte region could fly under the radar of most international city watchers. Not anymore. The region with deep business roots and a rich economic base strengthened by diverse industry is now a magnet that attracts foreign-owned companies and valuable employees. Charlotte is a multicultural metropolitan area that embraces diverse ideas, opinions, business operations and residents. Foreign-owned firms enrich our business community, IF THE CAROLINAS WERE A If The Carolinas Were A COUNTRY, IT WOULD RANK cultural amenities and daily lives. In turn, Charlotte offers an environment that helps forCountry, It Would Rank As AS THE 17TH LARGEST eign-owned firms grow and makes foreign-born workers feel at home. The 17th Largest Economy ECONOMY IN THE WORLD In total, North Carolina and South Carolina are home to more than 1,800 foreign In The World firms with a total employment of 350,000. COUNTRY 2007 For foreign-owned firms in particular, the Charlotte region offers exceptional air serv1. United States $13,201,819 ice, foreign trade zones, transparent government and business practices and numerous 2. Japan $4,340,133 non-profit organizations that focus on international business, foreign policy and global 3. Germany $2,906,681 culture. Charlotte-Mecklenburg is home for the honorary consuls of Austria, Canada, 4. China $2,668,071 France, Germany, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. 5. United Kingdom

$2,345,015

companies are located in Charlotte, ranking the

6. France

$2,230,721

Charlotte Douglas International Airport

city 11th in the country with 284 companies.

7. Italy

$1,844,749

offers extensive commuter and airfreight serv-

Two major rail systems, Norfolk Southern and

8. Canada

$1,251,463

ices to destinations around the globe. Home to

CSX, link the Charlotte region to 23 states. Some

9. Spain

$1,223,988

US Airways’ largest hub, the airport offers non-

300 trains pass through Charlotte weekly.

10. Brazil

$1,067,962

International Accessibility

stop service to 129 different cities, including Frankfurt, Munich, London, Montreal, Toronto

Pro-Business Climate

and Mexico City as well as to Central America

Charlotte is one of the most business-focused

and Caribbean cities. More than 600 flights

cities in the United States. For three years run-

leave Charlotte daily.

ning, North Carolina has claimed the top spot in

Charlotte ranks 30th nationwide in air cargo. More than 140,000 tons of cargo was enplaned

11. Russian Federation

$986,940

12. India

$906,268

13. Korea, Rep.

$888,024

14. Mexico

$839,182

Site Selection magazine’s listing of the best busi-

15. Australia

$768,178

ness climates in North America.

16. Netherlands

$657,590

in Charlotte in 2007. More than 500,000 square

The Queen City has such a pro-business

17. Carolinas

$523,739

feet of warehouse space in the Charlotte Air

environment that nearly 300 Fortune 500 com-

18. Turkey

$402,710

Cargo Center offers quick proximity to runways,

panies have placed one or more facilities within

19. Belgium

$392,001

railways and interstate highways.

Mecklenburg County.

20. Sweden

$379,758

The Charlotte region is at the heart of a high-

Foreign Direct Investment magazine ranked

way and railroad system that stretches across the

Charlotte 3rd among the North American Cities

Eastern and Southern United States. More than

of the Future. In addition to being 3rd overall,

40 percent of the nation’s top 100 trucking

Charlotte also ranked 1st in Best Economic

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

Units: U.S. Dollars in millions Gross domestic product, current prices Sources: World Bank 2007, BEA 2007

19


GLOBAL PRESENCE

INTERNATIONAL COMPANIES CHOOSE CHARLOTTE USA • Charlotte USA provides excellent access to the U.S. market from a central, strategically well-positioned location in one of the most important manufacturing regions of the United States.

• Charlotte USA has superb infrastructure: ➤ International airport with over 600 daily flights to 129 cities in the U.S. and abroad, including direct daily flights to Frankfurt, Munich, London, Toronto, Mexico City and over 20 destinations in Central America and the Caribbean. ➤ Excellent interstate highways and rail connections.

Potential, 3rd in Best Development and Invest-

below-average cost of living, world-class arts

ment Promotion, 1st in Quality of Life, and 5th in

and major league sports, as well as abundant

Human Resources.

opportunities attract talented individuals from

More than half of the 1,274 manufacturing

around the globe. Approximately 9 percent of

firms in Mecklenburg County are involved with

Mecklenburg’s population was born outside of

importing or exporting goods. The Charlotte For-

the United States.

eign Trade Zone, which allows goods to be brought in from overseas duty-free and stored or manufactured into a product, is one of the largest in the state. The Charlotte chapter of the North Carolina World Trade Association, which promotes international trade, is one of the largest in the nation. Charlotte is also known for its banking powerhouses, namely Bank of America and

• Charlotte USA has a highly productive work force. Only 3.3 percent of North Carolina and South Carolina workers belong to labor unions, the lowest unionization rate in the U.S.

• Charlotte USA has a company-customized training program that is subsidized by North Carolina and is nationally recognized as one of the best programs of its type in the country.

• Charlotte USA has a remarkable, high quality of life that attracts both top managers and a highly skilled professional and manufacturing work force: ➤ Beautiful countryside and neighborhoods between some of the best beaches on the East Coast and the Appalachians, the highest mountains in Eastern North America. ➤ A rich offering of arts and culture. ➤ Exceptionally pleasant climate: four distinct seasons and mild winters. ➤ Below-average cost of living.

• Charlotte USA is an internationally oriented city and region with numerous cultural, social and business organizations, a highly engaged foreign-owned business sector, and foreign language schools, all of which support a large and active expatriate community.

Wachovia. These Charlotte-headquartered banks

operate in 45 countries, including the financial

~ Tom Dorsey, Senior Vice President Corporate Real Estate Wachovia Corporation

capitals of Frankfurt, Hong Kong, London, Mex-

ico City, Milan, Paris, Sao Paulo, Seoul, Singapore, Taipei and Tokyo. More banking resources are headquartered in Charlotte than in any other U.S. city except New York.

People like living here and companies based

in Charlotte successfully recruit highly talented

High Quality of Life

individuals from around the world and all regions

The Charlotte region’s high quality of life,

20

Charlotte is a place of bold vision, coupled with the courage and commitment to realize its dreams. It is a welcoming and compassionate community that is built on traditional values and sustained by public and private partnerships. The result is an environment that is attractive to families, businesses, employers and visitors—one that we are proud to call home.”

of the U.S.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


GLOBAL PRESENCE

Emphasis on Education

TOP COUNTRIES WITH FOREIGN-OWNED FIRMS IN CHARLOTTE USA

Charlotte’s future strength is in development today in schools across the region. The Charlotte-

186 Germany

Mecklenburg School (CMS) system alone supports and encourages cultural and foreign-lan-

134 United Kingdom

guage education and operates four language immersion schools for students who study Ger-

83 Japan

72

man, French, Japanese or Spanish. More than 12,443 CMS students speak a foreign language, representing a total of 120 different languages and 151 countries of origin. Eight international schools also help students

Canada

48 France

46 Switzerland

maintain language skills and cultural identity while they are in Charlotte: a Japanese school, a

37 Italy

German school, two Chinese schools, a Korean school, a Greek school, a Swedish School, and a

31 Belgium

29

Russian school. Many of the colleges and universities in the

Netherlands

26

Carolinas are recognized for their excellence both nationally and internationally.

Sweden

15

The Charlotte area is a large community of educated individuals. We were recently ranked as America’s 6th most literate city based on the percentage of residents having a high school diploma or greater and the percentage of residents with a

Australia

13 Mexico

11 Denmark

bachelor’s degree.

Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership and Charlotte Chamber of Commerce 2007

www.charlottechamber.comLARGEST FOREIGN-OWNED FIRMS The Charlotte Chamber of Commerce works

COMPANY

PRODUCT

HQ

Freightliner Corp.

Transport Equipment

Germany

7,129

Food Lion, LLC

Retail Supermarkets

Belgium

7,000

recruits new businesses and retains and sup-

Compass Group USA, Inc.

Food/Vending Service

United Kingdom 2,031

ports existing businesses to promote quality

Springs Global US, Inc.

Textile Manufacturing

Brazil

1,500

economic growth; and represents members’

Ingersoll-Rand Energy Systems Energy Systems

Bermuda

1,000

interests in government and legislative issues.

Maersk Sealand

Containerized Cargo Carrier

Denmark

1,000

Cemex

Concrete Products

to grow the economy; serves as a voice for local business and deliver value in order to ignite success for chamber members and for Charlotte;

# EMPLOYEES

Mexico

900

Siemens Power Generation, Inc. Electrical Product Manufacturer

Germany

800

US Foodservice, Inc.

Food Distributor

Netherlands

800

AXA Advisors, LLC

Life Insurance

France

725

Securitas Systems

Security Installation

Sweden

700

Babcock & Brown Residential, LLC Real Estate Investing

Australia

650

Blythe Construction, Inc.

Road, Bridge, Utility Construction

France

650

Areva NP, Inc.

Manufacturing and Nuclear Fuel

France

600

Clariant Corporation

Chemical Manufacturing

Switzerland

600

EquiFirst Corp.

Lending Firm

United Kingdom

600

Schaeffler Group USA, Inc.

Machinery Manufacturing

Germany

570

Hella Lighting Corp.

Automotive Headlights Manufacturing Germany

550

ASMO North Carolina, Inc.

Automotive Parts Manufacturing

Japan

545

Infosys Technologies Ltd.

Consulting & IT Services

India

500

Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership and Charlotte Chamber of Commerce 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

21


ACCESSIBILITY

LITTLE Diversified Architectural Consulting, Inc.

Charlotte USA: strategic location

POPULATION COMPARISON WITHIN 650-MILE RADIUS CITY

% OF U.S. POPULATION

Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60% Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44% New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40% Source: Charlotte Chamber of Commerce 2007

100m STRATEGIC LOCATION

250m

650m

DISTANCES TO MAJOR PORTS PORT

MILES/KM

TIME

Charleston, S.C. . . . . . . . 208 mi/ 335 km . . . . 3.5 hours Morehead City, N.C. . . 316 mi/ 508 km . . . . 5.5 hours Savannah, Ga. . . . . . . . . 250 mi/ 402 km . . . . 4.0 hours Wilmington, N.C. . . . . . 196 mi/ 315 km. . . . 3.75 hours Source: MapQuest 2007

22

• The area east of the Mississippi represents 29% of the contiguous land of the U.S., 59% of the population, 60% of all manufacturing establishments, and 65% of all manufacturing employment. • 50% of all exports come from the eastern U.S. • 35 of the nation’s 50 metropolitan markets with over one million in population are within these eastern states. • 31% of these markets lie within a 650-mile radius of Charlotte. • Charlotte business can reach 60% of U.S. population within two hours by air or 24 hours by truck. • Charlotte’s population in a 100-mile radius exceeds that of Birmingham, Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Memphis, Nashville, or Norfolk. • Charlotte is the only major distribution center midway between the Northeast, Midwest and Florida markets. • Charlotte is considered an inland port facility with quick access via rail or truck to regional sea ports: Charleston, Savannah, Wilmington, and Morehead City. Source: Charlotte Chamber of Commerce 2007

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


ACCESSIBILITY

Preferred Site

T

•• • •••

Strategically Accessible

The Charlotte region is the 5th largest urban region of the United States following New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Miami. It is the number one industrial hub in the Southeast, and the 6th largest wholesale center nationwide. It has over 6,000,000 people living within a 100-mile radius; over 60 percent of the nation’s population is within a two-hour flight or one-day drive. Charlotte is served by an excellent state and

major rail systems, Norfolk Southern Railway

federal highway network, including major

and CSX Transportation, link 27,000 miles of

north-south and east-west interstate arteries, as

rail between Charlotte and 23 eastern states.

well as a modern, expanded international air ter-

Each offers piggyback facilities combining with

minal. Ten major airlines offer direct and non-

more than 450 trucking firms located here.

stop flights to over 125 cities for over 33 million

Direct connections are provided to major east-

passengers annually making it the 16th nation-

ern seaboard ports—Charleston, S.C. (the 2nd

wide in passengers and over 140,000 tons of

largest), Wilmington and Morehead City, N.C.,

cargo are forwarded by over 20 cargo airlines to

and Savannah, Ga.

destinations worldwide.

Strategic location: Centered at the intersection

The Charlotte region is also the center of the

of two Native American trading paths (Trade and

country’s largest consolidated rail system. Two

Tryon Streets), Charlotte’s location is more strategic than ever. More than 60 percent of U.S. population and more than 60 percent of its industrial base lies within a two-hour flight or a day’s motor freight delivery. This 650-mile radius is bordered by the major cities of New York, Chicago and Orlando. Trade center: Roughly equidistant between New York and Miami, Charlotte USA is the 6th largest wholesale trade center in the United States. Highway

access:

Charlotte USA counts four interstate highways: I-40, I-77, I-85 and I-

passengers a year, Charlotte Douglas Interna-

485. Not coincidentally,

tional Airport is 9th in operations and the 10th

it is the 8th largest truck-

busiest airport in the U.S.

ing center in the U.S.,

Regional airports also serve the area. The

with more than 450

airport boasts 600+ flight departures daily, more

motor freight firms oper-

per capita than any other U.S. region. There is

ating in the region,

direct, non-stop service to more than 125 destina-

including the nation’s

tions, including Frankfurt, Munich, London,

top 10.

Toronto, Mexico and cities in the Caribbean. Char-

Air

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

access:

With

lotte is no more than one plane change away from

more than 33 million

any major city worldwide. The full air-cargo

23


ACCESSIBILITY

intermodal

terminal.

The deep-sea ports of Charleston, S.C., Wilmington and Morehead City, N.C., and Savannah, Ga., are accessible via rail or truck within four hours. Time difference: Charlotte USA is in the U.S. Eastern Time Zone. The time difference between Charlotte and the United Kingdom is minus 5 hours, compared to minus 8 hours between the U.K. and

the

west

coast.

Between Charlotte and mainland Europe, the time difference is minus 6 hours; it’s minus 9 between mainland Europe and the west coast. Access to energy— electricity: Major electric service comes from Duke Energy, Progress Energy and Barnhardt Electric Company, as well service handles about 140,000 tons of cargo annu-

as various regional cooperatives. Utility service

ally through 20 cargo airlines.

is efficient, cost-competitive and reliable.

Rail access: The Charlotte

Access to energy—natural gas: Distrib-

region is at the center of the coun-

uting natural gas to a 28-county area, Char-

try’s largest consolidated rail sys-

lotte-based Piedmont Natural Gas serves more than 350,000 cus-

tem. It is served by CSX and

tomers. Its commercial and

Norfolk Southern, which,

industrial rates are com-

between them, oper-

petitive.

ate on more than 46,000

miles

Access to water

of

and waste water: The

track. Lancaster & Chester

Catawba

Railway

and its reser-

S.C., and a number of other

voirs supply drinking

short lines connect the

water

region to the points these two

and

giants serve in the South,

hydroelec-

East, Midwest and Canada.

tric power. Access

More than 300 trains rumble

to technology

through Charlotte weekly.

and telecommunications:

Port access: Rail connections

24

River

based in Lancaster,

to points on the Southeastern coast make Charlotte

The Charlotte region enjoys a well-maintained

an inland port and the region is home to an inland

service network and unsurpassed access to an

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


ACCESSIBILITY

LARGEST FREIGHT TRUCKING COMPANIES

extensive fiber optic network with digital switching capability. Also readily available are

COMPANY

AREA SERVED

CNF Inc.

50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico

Roadway Corp.

50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Virgin Islands, Europe Pacific Rim, Latin American

primary telecommunications providers. The

Schneider National Inc.

48 states, Canada, Mexico

region is home to more than 50 cellular and

Yellow Corp.

50 states, parts of Canada, Pacific Rim, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Europe

DSL technology, cost-efficient data transmission, and Integrated Services Digital Network and point-to-point services. AT&T (formerly BellSouth), Time Warner Cable and Sprint are

mobile telephone firms, and more than 80 Internet companies.

USF Corp.

Central and Southeastern United States, Ontario, Quebec

Arkansas Best Corp.

50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico, Mexico, International

Overnite Transportation Co.

50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam

Watkins Motor Lines Inc.

41 states, Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico

Estes Express Lines Inc.

50 states

Averitt Express Inc.

Global

Source: Reference USA 2007

FLIGHT/DRIVING TIMES From Charlotte to Designated Cities CITY

MILES

DRIVING TIME

Atlanta, Ga.

243

3:57

FLIGHT TIME (HRS) 1:15

Charleston, S.C.

208

3:25

less than 1 hour

Chicago, Ill.

765

12:13

2:00

Memphis, Tenn.

620

9:22

1:40

New York, N.Y.

646

10:27

1:50

Orlando, Fla.

524

8:13

1:30

Washington, D.C.

400

6:24

1:15

Source: MapQuest 2007

LITTLE Diversified Architectural Consulting, Inc.

100m

200m

250m

- Major Corridors of Commerce - Major Cities - Major Roadways - International Airport - Major Ports

Source: MapQuest 2007

DISTANCES TO MAJOR • • •• •• PORTS Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

PORT

MILES/KM

TIME

Charleston, S.C. . . . . . . . . . . 208 mi/ 335 km . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5 hours Morehead City, N.C. . . . . . 316 mi/ 508 km . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.5 hours Savannah, Ga. . . . . . . . . . . . 250 mi/ 402 km . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 hours Wilmington, N.C. . . . . . . . . 196 mi/ 315 km . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.75 hours

25


BUSINESS STRENGTH

Epicenter of Economic Growth

C

•• • •••

Business Strength

Commerce is Charlotte USA’s raison d’être. Founded at a Native American trading crossroads, Charlotte has relied on trading longer than anyone knows. From the 1799 discovery of gold to today’s status as a major financial center, Charlotte USA has always meant business—strong business. Commerce center: Charlotte is the epi-

struction. Employment is well distributed

center for business and economic growth in

among major business sectors. This is invalu-

the Carolinas. Together, the two states boast

able in weathering a recession.

annual gross domestic product of almost $523 billion.

GDP: Charlotte MSA’s GDP is the largest in

the finance and insurance sector in the Southeast. It also ranks 1st in manufacturing and

Business friendly: Expansion Magagement magazine ranks the Charlotte region 2nd for recruitment and attraction among the largest metro areas. Start-up friendly: Entrepreneur magazine recognizes the area as the 2nd best city in the

jobs, wages, earnings; non-farm proprietors,

Financial center: Charlotte is home to Bank

U.S. to start and grow a company (2006), and

construction, retail; and welfare, Medicaid

of America and Wachovia, the nation’s 2nd and

among the nation’s best for starting and running

factored in also.

4th largest banks, making it the 2nd largest finan-

a small business. The vast majority of firms

cial center following New York. Banks in the

employ 50 or fewer workers.

3rd in wholesale trade.

Cost-effective utilities: Duke Energy Corporation is headquartered in the region and its

Young professional friendly: The Char-

electricity rates are 15 percent below the

Corporate headquarters: No less than 9

lotte region is a magnet for young professionals.

national average. Other utilities such as Pied-

Fortune 500 companies are headquartered

Bizjournal ranks the area 7th among the top 67

mont Natural Gas, AT&T (formerly BellSouth)

within the region and nearly 300 Fortune 500

metropolitan areas for young adults, 2008.

and Alltel also provide cost-effective service.

region control more than $1 trillion in assets.

companies maintain a presence. Large private

Public-private cooperation: Charlotte USA

Flowing though the heart of Charlotte USA, the

firms include Compass Group North America

enjoys a long tradition of public-private cooper-

Catawba River provides a plentiful supply of

and Belk Inc., each with annual sales topping

ation. Leaders of government and industry

water that originates in mountain streams.

$2.2 billion. Charlotte USA is home to 32

work closely for the common good. Such coop-

Outstanding higher education: The region’s

companies with more than $1 billion in

eration helped transform Charlotte’s Center

work force is smart and educated, supported by

annual sales. Pollina Corporation ranks Char-

City, the heart of the 16-county area, from a

an outstanding system of higher education. The

lotte USA No. 1 on its list of the Top 10 Pro

business-centric 9-to-5 profile to a vibrant

region is home to 33 colleges and universities,

Business States.

metropolis that bustles 24/7. People live, work

with 51 campuses, that serve more than

and play in the region’s urban core.

150,000 students. Central Piedmont Commu-

Economic growth: The NC-SC MSA is 1st in economic strength as listed by Policom Cor-

Economic Strength: Policom Corporation

nity College in Charlotte is the largest school in

ranks Charlotte No. 1 out of 363 metropolitan

North Carolina’s community college system,

Balanced economy: The economy of

MSAs in their 2008 Economic Strength

which is the 3rd largest in the U.S. and the Uni-

Charlotte USA is balanced. While the largest

Ranking, based on population of at least

versity of North Carolina at Charlotte, with an

industry segment is wholesale trade, it is bol-

50,000 with a high degree of social and eco-

enrollment over 21,000, is the fourth largest in

stered by services, manufacturing and con-

nomic integration. Three other data sectors,

the 16-campus UNC system.

poration in 2008.

26

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


BUSINESS STRENGTH

CCCP

Patents: UNC Charlotte is the largest

research institute within a 90-mile radius of the city. The University ranks first in the number of startups for every $10 million of research and development funding, second in the number of

“Charlotte USA continues to get things done that promote our collective prosperity. That is because we have a common vision for a stronger future, one that we all can share.” ~ Bob Morgan, President Charlotte Chamber

Location Advisors July 2007. The ranking is based on educational attainment of the work force 25 years and older.

patent applications and third in patents issued.

Population growth: The median age of

Attracting young professionals: Char-

the estimated 100,000 newcomers, an

lotte MSA is among leading cities in attracting

amount larger than the total population of

the young, professional and educated—a cov-

Asheville, N.C., who moved to the Charlotte

eted demographic. A recent study released by

region in 2005, is 29, compared with 38 for

the Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce

non-newcomers (Census ACS 2005). The

ranks Charlotte 2nd among 50 largest metro-

newcomers are more likely to be single, well-

politan areas, behind only Las Vegas, in this

educated and more than twice as likely to

demographics’ growth rate (1990-2000), and

work in the IT field as current residents.

total employment of 350,000. Eye on the future: The Charlotte Chamber has developed Advantage Carolina, a plan

5th in its share of an area’s overall population.

Foreign firm friendly: Charlotte is the top

to foster business expansion while attracting

Nearly 17 percent of Charlotte-area residents

U.S. city in growth for foreign firms. Within the

new firms. This focus on the future ensures

are young professionals.

16 counties of Charlotte USA, more than 800

that the region will continue building its envi-

Educated work force: Charlotte takes the

foreign firms operate and employ almost

able business strength.

No. 1 spot as the city with the Most Educated

60,000. North Carolina and South Carolina are

Work Force by Business Facilities, The

home to more than 1,800 foreign firms with a

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

Other notable recognition: • MarketWatch ranks Charlotte 5th in Best U.S.

27


BUSINESS STRENGTH

cities for business

Launch 2008

• The Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord MSA is a 5-

• Forbes ranks Charlotte among its Top 10

• South Carolina ranks 2nd in Pollina’s Top 10

Star Logistics Metro according to Expansion

Recession-proof cities, 2008

Pro-Business States

Management magazine

• North Carolina ranks 3rd in 2007 Forbes Best

• North Carolina ranks 4th in Pollina’s Top 10

• North Carolina places 6th among Top 10

States for business

Pro-Business States

States with the best work force training pro-

• CNBC’s America’s Top States for Business

• Charlotte comes in 9th in Hottest Cities for

grams according to Expansion Management

ranks North Carolina 5th, citing the high quality

Job Growth by Business 2.0

magazine 2007

work force

• Charlotte places 6th in America’s Smartest

• South Carolina places 4th among Top 10

• South Carolina ranks 8th in Fortune’s Small

Cities by Bizjournal

States with the best work force training pro-

Business 10 Best States for Starting a Business,

• Charlotte ranks 6th in Top Cities for African

grams according to Expansion Management

2007

Americans by Black Enterprise magazine

magazine 2007

• Charlotte is in the overall top 10 of

• Charlotte ranks 2nd in Best Markets for Entre-

2007-2008 fDi North American Large Cities

preneurs in Entrepreneur magazine

of the Future, and is also in the top five for

• The Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord MSA ranks

Best Human Resources, Best Economic Poten-

3rd in Policom Corporation’s 10 Strongest Met-

tial, and Best Development and Investment

ropolitan Areas

Promotion

• The Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord MSA ranks

• Fortune Small Business has ranked Charlotte

1st in Policom Corporation’s Economic

No. 8 on its list of 100 Best Places to Live and

Strength rankings

TOP 25 LARGEST REGIONAL EMPLOYERS NAME

LOCAL LOCAL EMPLOYEE FACILITIES

Carolinas HealthCare System

22,159

168

Health Care

Wachovia Corp.

20,000

117

Financial Services

Bank of America Corp

15,000

WND

Financial Services

Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

13,192

34

Discount Retailer

Delhaize America Inc.

8,658

NA

Retail Supermarkets

Presbyterian Healthcare

8,505

141

Health Care

Duke Energy Corp.

7,757

NA

Energy

Ruddick Corp.

7,000

59

Holding Company

Lowe's Cos. Inc.

5,900

20

Retail, Home Improvement

Adecco SA

5,000

NA

Staffing

US Airways Group Inc.

4,981

NA

Airline

Carolinas Medical Center

4,200

30

Health Care

Compass Group, The Americas

3,518

262

Contract Food Service

CaroMont Health

3,442

39

Health Care

AT&T Inc.

3,160

63

Telecommunications

Belk Inc.

2,700

18

Department Stores

Phillip Morris U.S.A.

2,600

1

Cigarette Manufacturer

Bi-Lo LLC

2,538

34

Retail Supermarkets

CVS/Caremark Corp.

2,500

NA

Pharmacy Chain

Freightliner LLC

2,500

4

United Parcel Service, Inc.

2,500

NA

Package Delivery

Family Dollar Stores, Inc.

2,373

95

Discount Retailer

Target Corp.

2,210

NA

Discount retail stores

Truck Manufacturer

Paramont Carowinds Theme Park 2,110

1

Amusement park

CommScope Inc.

2,100

5

Cable

TIAA-CREF

2,100

NA

Financial Services

Time Warner Cable

2,100

79

Cable, Digital Media

Source: Charlotte Business Journal Book of Lists 2007

28

TYPE OF BUSINESS

“The greater Charlotte area continues to thrive because we enjoy a healthy cooperation between the public and private sectors. Working together enables us to support changes that lead to progress, and this helps us continue to attract enterprising people from across the country.” ~ Jennifer Roberts, Chair Mecklenburg Board of County Commissioners

• Charlotte ranks 7th in Forbes’ America’s Most

Wired Cities

• North Carolina ranks 4th in Most Popular State People Would Like to Live (apart from their own state) according to Harris Interactive Poll 2007

• Charlotte/Gastonia, N.C., ranks 7th in Best Cities for Relocating Singles in Sperling’s Best Places

• North Carolina is 1st in the Top State Business Climate Rankings in Site Selection magazine

• South Carolina ranks 10th in the Top State Business Climate Rankings in Site Selection magazine

• North Carolina places 2nd in Executive Survey of Business Climate Rankings in Site Selection magazine • South Carolina ranks 5th in the Executive Survey of Business Climate rankings in Site Selection magazine TAXES & INCENTIVES North Carolina and South Carolina’s job creation incentives vary by development level and

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


BUSINESS STRENGTH

UNIONIZATION ACTIVITY

number of jobs created. For Charlotte USA, the credit ranges from $750 per job to $12,500 per

Union Membership Rates By State

job. Both states offer tax increment financing for redevelopment areas. North Carolina Taxes Corporate income tax: Flat rate of 6.9 percent of net income allocable to the state. Sales and use tax: 4.25 percent statewide with a local rate of 2.5 percent or 3 percent on transactions (combined 6.75 percent tax is not applicable to raw materials, containers, labels, packaging and shipping materials). Franchise tax: $1.50 per $1,000, applied to the greatest base determined as set forth in law. Inventory tax: Non-existent in North Carolina. Property tax: North Carolina does not

North Carolina

3.3%

South Carolina

3.3% 4.0%

Virginia Georgia

4.4% 5.2%

Florida

5.6%

Mississippi Tennessee

6.0%

Alabama

8.8%

Kentucky

9.8% 16.4%

Illinois

19.6%

Michigan

24.4%

New York

impose a property tax. Taxes are subject to county rates which run from 4.2 percent to 11 percent and city rates from 2.4 percent to 8 percent.

0.0% 5.0% 10.0% Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2007

Manufacturing fuels: 1 percent on fuel agricultural or manufacturing use or commerManufacturing equipment: 1 percent on farm machinery, mill machinery, parts and accessories sold to manufacturing industries and plants.

20.0%

25.0%

30.0%

C H A R L O T T E W O R K F O R C E S TAT I S T I C S

other than electricity or piped natural gas for cial launderers.

15.0%

2000

2007

2000-2007 Change

Labor Force

1,144,163

1,279,376

11.8%

Employed

1,103,772

1,213,440

9.9%

40,391

65,576

62.4%

Unemployed

Source: NC Employment Security Commission and SC Employment Security Commission 2000 and 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Accommodation and Food Services

89,852

9.1%

Administrative and Waste Services

73,308

7.5%

4,324

0.4%

Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation

16,602

1.7%

Construction

71,739

7.3%

Educational Services

12,534

1.3%

Finance and Insurance

68,292

6.9%

Health Care and Social Assistance

93,151

9.5%

Information

24,063

2.4%

Management of Co

29,783

3.0%

169,619

17.3%

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting

Manufacturing Mining

1,035

0.1%

Other Services, Ex. Public Admin

29,671

3.0%

Professional and Technical Services

46,619

4.7%

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing

15,211

1.5%

125,353

12.8%

42,611

4.3%

4,138

0.4%

5,204

0.5%

59,893

6.1%

Retail Trade Transportation and Warehousing Unclassified establishments Utilities Wholesale Trade Source: NC ESC and SC ESC 2007 annual averages

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

29


BUSINESS STRENGTH

Electricity: 1.8 percent; on July 1, 2008 the

Backoffice Operation Expands Into Charlotte USA

rate will decrease to 1.4 percent. Beginning July

“We were overwhelmed with the hospitality and interest in our business that the citizens of Shelby, Kings Mountain and the Cleveland Chamber of Commerce have demonstrated.”

1, 2009, the rate will decrease to 0.8 percent and on July 1, 2010, a full exemption on sales and use tax for fuel and electricity sold to a

~ N.J. Bresemann, Jr., Senior Vice President Telerx

Customer care specialists Telerx looked at 38 states before finding just the right attitude for its new call center in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Telerx Senior Vice President N.J. Bresemann Jr. was overwhelmed by the welcome his company got. The Cleveland County 20/20 Economic Development Partnership and its investors, state departments of Commerce and Transportation, Charlotte Regional Partnership, city of Kings Mountain, Gardner Webb University and Cleveland Community College, and elected officials all worked with Telerx and the company’s consultants to work out building and build-to-suit options and temporary office facilities, infrastructure improvements, training assistance and tuition credits. One organization even pitched in to help Telerx HR management pre-screen 2,000 electronic resumes. Altogether, more than 75 business and government leaders were directly involved in the recruitment process.

manufacturer for use in connection with he operation of a manufacturing facility. Natural gas: 2.83 percent.

Telephone service: 3 percent local, 6 per-

cent intrastate. A $50,000 cap applies to call center operations.

“Charlotte is an open, can-do city. New people with new ideas have been embraced over the years, creating an evolving economy that adjusts exceptionally well to change.” ~ Ed Hawes, Charlotte President Regions Bank

“We are very impressed with the service orientation and work ethic of the people of North Carolina and the spirit of cooperation and community support,” Bresemann says.

Unemployment insurance rate: Average

The Telerx 60,000-square-foot call center has been open in Kings Mountain since 2007. The company has committed to investing more than $8.5 million and creating at least 450 jobs over five years. With more than 200 employees, it is well on its way to reaching both its employment and customer satisfaction goals.

tax rate of 1.2 percent; new employer’s rate of 1.2 percent; maximum rate, 6.84 percent; taxable base, $17,800.

South Carolina Taxes

Heavy Manufacturing Facility Chooses Charlotte USA

Corporate income tax: Flat rate of 5 per-

cent of net income allocable to the state.

“Located at the crossroads of Interstate 77 and Interstate 40, our site is ideally located to support our North America and international businesses.” ~ Larry Silber, President Doosan Infracore Portable Power

Statesville, N.C., has become home to one of the top 10 construction equipment makers in the world.

Sales and use tax: 6 percent with a local

rate of 1 percent or 2 percent on transactions. Franchise tax: $15 plus $1 for every

$1,000 of capital with $25 minimum. Inventory tax: South Carolina does not

impose.

Property tax: South Carolina does not

impose a state property tax. Subject to local rates (county rates range from .41 percent to 1.93 per-

With its acquisition of Ingersoll Rand Utility Equipment, Doosan Infracore International has made Statesville the new headquarters and primary manufacturing location for Doosan Infracore Portable Power. Doosan Infracore International is an affiliate of the Doosan Group, South Korea’s largest manufacturer of construction machinery and rising leader in the infrastructure support business.

cent, county and school rates are 4.07 percent).

“We are extremely excited by this acquisition,” says Larry Silber, Doosan Infracore Portable Power president. “Once again, Doosan has demonstrated its commitment to our construction markets by investing in a world-class manufacturing location that will help Portable Power meet its aspirations to double our business by 2012.”

does not impose.

The Statesville facility, which will be the largest Korean manufacturer in North Carolina, will generate new jobs in manufacturing, administration and technical support services. When it reaches its target number of employees, the site will have close to 400 people manufacturing and selling air compressors, light towers and portable generators for global markets.

Manufacturing fuels: South Carolina does

not impose.

Manufacturing equipment: South Carolina Electricity: South Carolina does not

impose. Natural gas: South Carolina does not impose. Unemployment insurance rate: New employers rate is 2.7 percent; maximum rate (deficit employers) 5.4 percent; taxable base, $7,000.

30

ChooseCharlotteUSA

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BUSINESS STRENGTH

Advanced Manufacturing Expands Into Charlotte USA “Our employees are smart, hard working and committed to the company's success.” ~ David Meyers, CEO Microban International Microban International CEO David Meyers views the company’s new 50,000-square-foot office and R&D facility as a bricks and mortar sign of the company’s commitment to its employees and to Charlotte USA. “Microban continues to benefit from being able to attract the caliber of employee it needs to sustain its growth,” Meyers notes as one reason the company decided to expand in Huntersville, N.C. “On the odd occasion that we can't identify the person we need in the Charlotte area, we've found that being based in this location has been a great advantage to attract the talent we need from across the country.” The innovative company, which builds antimicrobial protection into products during the manufacturing process, represents Charlotte USA’s new breed of manufacturing, one that has a smaller labor pool, high salaries and high-tech production facilities. In deciding to expand in Huntersville, the 14-year-old company committed to nearly doubling the number of employees, paying those new employees an average salary of $90,000, and making more than an $8 million investment in the region over five years. Although the company began in Huntersville, its expansion there was by no means certain. However, Microban wanted to continue doing business in Charlotte USA and worked with local elected officials, the state, the town of Huntersville, the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce and Lake Norman Regional EDC to craft a mutually beneficial plan. “We are pleased to remain in Huntersville,” Meyers says. “Our employees and the community can look to our new facility as another symbol of our commitment to grow our worldwide business from the Charlotte area.”

TOP 10 PRO-BUSINESS STATES VIRGINIA

1

SOUTH CAROLINA

2

FLORIDA

3

NORTH CAROLINA

4

UTAH

5

WYOMING

6

SOUTH DAKOTA

7

ALABAMA

8

GEORGIA

9

NEBRASKA

Source: Pollina Corporate Top 10 Pro-Business States 2007

TOP 10 STATES FOR BUSINESS CLIMATE NORTH CAROLINA

1

GEORGIA

2

TEXAS

3

VIRGINIA

4

ALABAMA

5

TENNESSEE

6

OHIO

7

KENTUCKY

8

FLORIDA

9

SOUTH CAROLINA

Wholesale Trade 6.1% Administrative and Waste Services 7.5% Trans/Ware/Utilities 4.8% Agriculture/Mining .5% Professional and Technical Services 4.7% Art/Entertainment/Rec/ Accom/Food 10.8% Other Services/ Unclassified 3.4% Construction 7.3%

Manufacturing 17.3% FIRE 8.5%

10

Source: Site Selection Magazine, November 2007

AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE BY INDUSTRY ALL INDUSTRIES

EMPLOYMENT IN INDUSTRIES

10

$816.48

Accommodation & Food Services

$268.90

Administrative & Waste Services

$522.11

Construction

$804.29

Educational Services

$595.74

Finance & Insurance

$1,698.89

Health Care & Social Assistance Services

$737.22

Information

$1,174.69

Management

$1,974.84

Manufacturing

$850.33

Professional & Technical Services $1,152.89

Management of CO 3% Information 2.4%

Retail Trade 12.8%

Education/Health Care/ Social Assn 10.8% Source: ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

Real Estate/Rental/Leasing

$831.39

Retail Trade

$479.20

Transportation & Warehousing

$752.26

Wholesale Trade

$1,000.68

Source: NC ESC 2007; SC ESC 2007

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BUSINESS SECTORS

Structural Resiliency

C

•• • •••

Booming Business Sectors

Charlotte USA’s regional economy has proven to be one of the most resilient in the United States, growing into the 2nd largest financial center, and expanding its manufacturing base into a variety of emerging industries. The region’s success is reflected in the numbers: As the 35th largest metropolitan area in the U.S., Charlotte USA boasts the 21st largest economy, growing by more than 20 percent in the first five years of the 21st century. The Charlotte region provides amenities and a long list of quality companies—both home-grown and new entries to the market—in each sector of its economy. MANUFACTURING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Historically, manufacturing has been the backbone of the Charlotte economy. Although the number of manufacturing jobs has decreased, the region’s manufacturing Gross Domestic Product, or the value of the goods that it creates, increased 9 percent between 2000 and 2005, proof that this sector remains as vital as ever. Manufacturing occupations account for nearly 17 percent of the total Charlotte USA work force, and several counties still have over one-fifth of their work force directly engaged in the manufacturing sector, which is well above the national average. The region is still very cost competitive, with an attractive business climate for new and expanding companies. Relatively low taxes, energy costs and housing prices, coupled with air and land access to markets around the world continue to place Charlotte USA at the top of the list as a business location. While furniture, textiles and fabricated metals still represent a large portion of the regional manufacturing economy, Charlotte is rapidly diversifying into a variety of exciting industries.

Aerospace & Defense The aerospace and defense industries continue to add jobs and investment across Charlotte USA. Over the past five years, the Charlotte region has added several companies, including General Dynamics Light Armament and Technical Products headquarters, Turbomeca (a division of the French company Safran Group), BAE Systems and Goodrich’s engineering and remanufacturing center. Goodrich is also headquartered in Charlotte, one of the nine Fortune 500 companies to call the area home. Motorsports & Automotive NASCAR has expanded throughout the United

32

States, but the industry is squarely centered in the Charlotte USA region. Ninety percent of the NASCAR teams are headquartered within 50 miles of Charlotte, and the industry contributes over a billion dollars to the Charlotte economy each year. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, a research university with both undergraduate and graduate programs in motorsports and automotive engineering, provides the private sector with the opportunity to team with top engineers and other faculty members on innovative, applied technology that gives motorsports teams their competitive advantage. Toyota Racing Development recently announced its engine and chassis facility in Rowan County, and the region also located Windshear, Inc., one of only three wind tunnels in the world that tests automotive aerodynamics. Cementing the region’s role as NASCAR central are Lowe’s Dragway, which will have its first race in September 2008, and the NASCAR Hall of Fame, scheduled to open in 2010. Automotive and Heavy Truck Manufacturing The automotive industry has moved to the Southeast, and Charlotte USA has benefited directly from the trend. Daimler Trucks North America, formerly Freightliner, added nearly 400 jobs in sales, marketing and customer service to the region, where it already employs hundreds of manufacturing workers at three separate facilities. Suppliers such as Sabo USA, Hella Lighting and Doosan continue to grow in the area, serving domestic and international customers. More than 250 automotive suppliers are located within the region. Life Sciences / Medical Technologies Nearly 200 Charlotte USA companies are associated with life sciences and medical technology

industries. Notable companies include Greiner BioOne, BSN-Jobst and Allvac. The region’s assets and academic programs are working diligently to meet the demand for applied technologies and trained workers. UNC Charlotte’s centers for precision metrology, bioinformatics and optoelectronics, plus a robust regional health care network, led by Carolinas Healthcare System, Presbyterian Healthcare System and the North Carolina Research Campus, offer a supportive infrastructure for the industry. Microban Products Co. recently expanded its Huntersville, N.C., operation, building a new 50,000-square-foot office and R&D facility. Global contract research firm PPD (Pharmaceutical Product Development Inc.) intends to expand into the North Carolina Research Campus, calling the project a “once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, where industry and academic scientists can freely collaborate to bring innovations in scientific research to market.” LOGISTICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . One key reason manufacturers choose to locate in Charlotte USA is logistics—getting raw materials to the plant and product to the customer via land, air and rail. Fortunately, the Charlotte region is dissected by four interstate highways and two mainline railroads, and it is anchored by the Charlotte Douglas International Airport, US Airways’ largest East Coast hub. The region has 23 million square feet dedicated to logistics operations, which are increasing high-tech and capital-intensive operations. Charlotte Douglas International Airport, the 10th busiest in the U.S., is the country’s sixth largest air hub with direct, nonstop service to more than 125 cities, 23 of which are international destinations. More than 33 million passengers and nearly 140,000 tons of cargo pass through the airport each year. The intermodal hub at Charlotte Douglas International Airport, now under construction, will further enhance the region’s attraction as a distribution center. Products shipped from the Charlotte region can reach about 65 percent of the U.S. population and more than 60 percent of the nation’s industrial base within two hours by air or within a day by ground. Additionally, Charlotte USA is within 200 miles of three major seaports, including Charleston, S.C., the second largest on the East Coast. Demonstrat-

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BUSINESS SECTORS

ing just how important this sector is, the industry’s leading non-profit trade association, Material Handling Industry of America, has located its headquarters in Charlotte. HEADQUARTERS & BACKOFFICE . . . . . . . Charlotte is the 15th fastest growing metropolitan area in the country and its second largest financial center. Only five cities have more Fortune 500 headquarters. The Charlotte region attracts about 100,000 people each year, and many companies have sought to leverage this growing work force to staff headquarters functions, customer service support and business process outsourcing operations. The Cost of Living Index for the metro area is 10 percent lower than the national average, among the lowest for major Fortune 500 cities. Charlotte was named one of America’s most livable communities by the Partners for Livable Communities and the best performing metro market for the past 15 years by Southern Business & Development. It consistently ranks highly in national quality of life studies. In addition to an educated work force, Charlotte USA boasts a mild climate, a competitive and growing office market and a pro-business climate. As the sixth fastest-growing U.S. city, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Charlotte is attracting high-energy, engaged professionals from throughout the world. This creative cadre fans out throughout the region seeking business opportunities. TECHNOLOGY SECTOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Though not well known as a technology hub, Charlotte is growing in stature and content within the technology community due to some unique developments and fast-growing talent pool. The Charlotte Research Institute, an initiative within the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, has well-established centers in precision metrology, e-commerce, bioinformatics and optoelectronics, connecting the core competencies that exist within the regional business community with the global technology community. The brand new North Carolina Research Campus, a 350-acre mixed-use development in Cabarrus County, will focus on agri-science and nutrition, among other research. The NCRC is

quickly becoming a biotechnology magnet. In addition to UNC Charlotte, Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State and other state universities, and the North Carolina Community College system, private companies, such as Anatomics and Red Hat are lending their brain power to innovations that can be taken to market. Dole Food Company owner David Murdock personally has invested more than $1 billion to provide some of the world’s foremost researchers with state-ofthe-art tools for discovery. The collaborative campus has more than one million square feet of leasable office and lab space. In addition to biotechnology, optoelectronics is a growing segment in the Charlotte region. UNC Charlotte’s Center for Optoelectronics serves as a link between the industry and the university. Two industry leaders are Tessera’s Digital Optics, which designs and manufactures photonic chips, and CommScope, an optical cable maker. High-tech manufacturing also extends into “traditional” sectors with companies, such as high-performance alloy manufacturer Allvac Metals and prototype maker 3D Systems, as well as cyber-security software designers that maintain online security. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS . . . . . . . . . . . . Drawn by Charlotte’s amenities, proximity to customers, central location and international airport, more than 800 foreign-owned firms from 46 countries call Charlotte USA their North American home. Over 70 international business and cultural organizations add vibrancy to the community and provide a network to help international companies navigate U.S. laws and customs.

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

Germany has one of the longest histories and the largest presence in the Charlotte USA 16county region. There are approximately 186 German companies, including Siemens, Getrag Corporation, Robert Bosch, Hella Lighting, ZF Lemforder and BMB Steering Innovation. Great Britain, with 134 companies, and Japan, with 83, round out the top three countries with the greatest regional presence. Daily, nonstop flights to London, Frankfurt and Munich from the Charlotte Douglas International Airport facilitate a close connection with the home office. Not only are international businesses locating in Charlotte USA, but they—and U.S.-owned companies—are sending locally produced products overseas. Machinery, chemicals, computer and electronic products, plastics and rubber products, and transportation equipment are the region’s top exports, valued at more than $4.1 billion. Most of them are headed to Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, China and Germany. This complementary diversity of countries and industries is one secret of Charlotte USA’s success. Talented professionals and expanding companies locate in the region known for its pro-business climate, accessibility and quality of life. In short, the region’s secret is life. In balance.

33


RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Breaking New Ground •• • •••

S

Cutting-edge Research Centers

Sprouting from Charlotte USA’s red clay are two cutting-edge research centers. Just 20 miles apart, they thrive in cooperation with each other as they attract new businesses while nurturing those that already exist. The North Carolina Research Campus is a $1.5 billion vision of billionaire David Murdock. It’s budding on a tract in downtown Kannapolis, N.C., where textile giant Pillowtex withered in 2003. Meanwhile, the Charlotte Research Institute spreads its roots at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, a 21,000-student campus just northeast of Charlotte Center City. It, too, is new this decade. North Carolina Research Campus

are shared by the remaining university partners, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, North Carolina A&T State University, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and North Carolina Central University. Impressive as this is, it isn’t the whole story. About three miles away is a 100-acre campus reserved for manufacturing entities that might want to be close by. It could attract bio-manufacturing firms or a plant that makes medical devices.

opportunity where industry and academic scientists

Private sector disciplines being sought for the

On 350 acres, the North Carolina Research

can freely collaborate to bring innovations in scien-

main campus includes nutrition research, food

Campus ultimately will be a complete village. It will

tific research to market, increasing the length and

biotechnology and agricultural biotechnology, and

include homes, shops, recreation areas, an 18-hole

quality of human life,” says Fred Eshelman, chief

companies in translational medicine.

golf course and dining facilities.

executive of PPD.

“These are companies that are truly trying to

All this is in addition to institutions of higher

PPD promises perhaps 300 jobs that pay

bring new therapies to market that are going to

learning and private companies collaborating to

$60,000 to $100,000 a year. “You start thinking

help with cancer and diabetes and illnesses of that

help people lead more healthy lives. Eight universi-

about the demographics of that group,” Higgs

nature,” Higgs says.

ties and a community college are committed to the

smiles, “and also the retail that’s going to follow.”

Also hot on the radar screen are what Higgs calls

Other initial structures include the David H.

ancillary companies. Software hotshot Red Hat has

“The goal is to make this into a center for

Murdock Core Laboratory, the Nutrition Research

committed to a spot on campus. Higgs explains,

science and research,” says Clyde Higgs, vice

Center and the Institute for Fruit and Vegetable Sci-

“An information technology piece is critical to get-

president of business development for Castle &

ence. All are certified as LEED (Leadership in

ting new therapies to market. So we’ll talk to addi-

Cooke North Carolina, LLC, the Murdock

Energy and Environmental Design) structures and

tional IT-related companies or medical device-

entity that oversees the project.

feature a “regency” design that is strong on Greek

related companies. What we’re trying to do is bring

columns and masonry. Occupancy for the trio is

an interesting gumbo of organizations here that can

scheduled for fall 2008.

feed off each other.”

campus and a dozen firms are on board.

So far, Higgs can count about 900 jobs but he’s confident that in 15 years, the campus will support 5,000 workers and will spawn another 30,000 ancillary jobs. “You can’t find one place that’s going to have eight universities all in one location,” Higgs says.

The nutrition building has 140,000 square feet

Among other entities already committed are

of space and the fruit and vegetable structure has

Anatomic (USA) and Carolinas HealthCare System.

120,000. Both are four stories and feature large rooms for maximum flexibility.

“That whole proposition is unheard of. When you

The 311,000-square-foot Core Lab building is

start thinking about innovation and collaboration, if

also four levels, and its basement has a 950-mega-

that’s really important to your company, you have to

hertz nuclear magnetic resonance machine, parts

take the next step and say, ‘this is the place for us.’”

for which were flown in from Germany and assem-

Some of the greatest discoveries of the last two

bled on site.

decades have come through collaboration among

By 2009, three more structures will be rising.

multiple organizations and disciplines, Higgs adds.

These include a medical office building, a

A recent buy-in to that line of thinking is PPD,

biotechnology training center and a biorepository,

Inc., a global contract research organization based in Wilmington, N.C., that will open a clinical research facility. “I realized this project is a once-in-a-lifetime

34

or tissue bank. Duke University has a presence in the Core Lab and Rowan-Cabarrus Community College is in charge of the training center. The other structures

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RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Charlotte Research Institute The first entity to occupy an office at the North Carolina Research Campus was the Charlotte Research Institute, its next door neighbor 20 miles to the south. The Institute maintains a business development office in a nearby Kannapolis storefront and expects its bioinformatics research center to be in the Core Lab by third quarter 2008. But its home is on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, where construction continues on a four-story, 90,000-square-foot building that will house more bioinformatics. “We’re growing the largest bioinformatics department in the country here,” says Robert Wilhelm executive director of CRI.

for spinning off businesses from its research. By the

Certainly, that’s not all that’s growing. The Insti-

University Technology Managers survey, which Wil-

tute occupies two 100,000-square-foot buildings

helm calls the “gold standard” for measuring output

that house myriad specialized research programs.

from technology transfer, CRI ranks with the Massa-

Bricks-and-mortar projects include a planned portal

chusetts Institute of Technology at the top of the

building for business partners and a bigger structure

national class.

that’s in design.

A recent successful spin-off is a Charlotte-based

That is a 200,000-square-foot building to

company called Aratae. It has developed a sophisti-

house EPIC, the Institute’s Energy Production and

cated data base and data sharing application that

Infrastructure Center. “We’re going to be investing

allows people to monitor the kind of food they eat,

significant resources to have an interdisciplinary

keep track of their caloric intake and see the results

research center targeted on energy production and

of any exercise they engage in. It has a feature that lets

infrastructure,” Wilhelm vows.

trainers and dieticians get involved, too.

Energy production already is a big economic engine in the Southeast as well as Charlotte USA,

“It’s like Facebook for diet and exercise,” Wilhelm smiles.

way we want that to work. We want academics

Wilhelm says, adding that he and the Institute antic-

His biggest success in the last year? “Bringing the

and businesses and research and development

ipate it will grow. In the next 18 months, the Institute

right kind of people to Charlotte to make this engine

partners to know that our Center for Precision

will become much more visible in this area, he says.

run,” Wilhelm answers. He points to medical

Metrology is competitive with any center around

Still, the 8-year-old Institute’s success list runs

researchers, including a cancer vaccine investigator

the world. Our cryptographers are well-known.

from the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. A world-renowned

That’s what we shoot for in terms of national and

material scientist who works in semiconductor and

international recognition.”

much longer than new buildings. Wilhelm quickly counts off research centers the Institute has developed in the last two years: preci-

optielectonic materials also is coming on board.

In that vein, Wilhelm says he and the Institute

sion metrology, optoelectronics, computing infor-

Newly under the CRI umbrella is the Ben Craig

work closely with the Charlotte Regional Partnership

matics as applied to business, information security,

Center, a non-profit business incubator that has fash-

(CRP) to both recruit new business for the area and

encryption and visual analytics—visualizing com-

ioned a 21-year reputation for nurturing startups.

provide resources to firms already in the region.

plex patterns in data.

With a new director, the center has moved to a closer

“We’ve also built up our capacity life sciences, medical research, biomedical engineering systems

relationship with parent UNC Charlotte.

“At any given time, we might be involved with the CRP on two or three different projects,” he adds.

Wilhelm has been with the University since 1993

And while federal research funding is drying

and was a founding faculty member for doctoral pro-

up for many research entities, Wilhelm says CRI is

Meanwhile, the motorsports program has revved

grams in mechanical engineering, biotechnology,

holding its own. That’s because the Institute is

up to much more than a spot for engineering under-

information technology and nanoscience. He took

growing in expertise.

graduates to dabble.

the Charlotte Research Institute reins in 2005.

and medical devices,” Wilhelm continues.

“Typically, we’re recruiting 40 to 50 new faculty

“We’re making a bigger commitment in motor

Awareness of the Institute and what it does is

members a year at the university,” Wilhelm says. “A

sports in a drive to more of a research position,” Wil-

building in Charlotte and the region, Wilhelm

large number of those are bringing expertise and

helm says. “We’re hiring six more faculty in engineer-

believes, with more people recognizing it as an

interest in terms of doing applied research in the

ing that will have expertise in automotive engineer-

important area portal for technology.

centers of CRI.

ing and motorsports.” Wilhelm takes pride in the Institute’s track record

“Beyond the region, we’re known in the areas of our expertise,” Wilhelm says, “and that’s the

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

“So the growth of the faculty is pretty astounding, actually,” Wilhelm concludes.

35


HUMAN RESOURCES

Solid Foundation

T

Skilled Workers

•• • •••

The 16 counties of Charlotte USA sprawl from the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains to the rolling terrain of the central Piedmont. Charlotte is the hub of the region and, with more than 631,000 people, is the largest city in North Carolina or South Carolina. The area contains many smaller cities and rural areas in its 8,000 square miles. Its total population is nearly 2.5 million, with 1.5 million older than 25. Average weekly wage: The region’s average

weekly wage is $816.48. The finance and insur-

South Carolina have Right-to-Work laws that allow individuals to choose whether to join a union. For 2007, North Carolina’s and South Carolina’s union membership was the nation’s lowest, at 3.3 percent. Work force training: State training programs

of $1,698.89; the average weekly check in the

for new and expanding industries vary in North

manufacturing sector is $850.33.

Carolina, but available development programs

Unionization: Both North Carolina and

ance sector leads with an average weekly wage

include: • Occupational continuing education

POPULATION

NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS

CharlotteUSA 2000 - Projected 2012

2007 Total Region Population: Age

• Human resources development 2,477,215 Number

• Specialized industrial training • Work force and training initiatives • The Center for Accelerated Technology Training, operated by the statewide Technical

20-24 years old

146,097

Education College System, provides recruiting,

25-29

160,943

screening and training programs for new and

30-34

187,824

CATT program trains workers for about 1,600

35-39

198,906

firms, including BMW, Siemens and Bayer.

40-44

204,029

45-49

194,667

50-54

167,730

expanding businesses. In South Carolina, the

By-industry employment: The services indus-

7

2

Source: ESRI 2007-2012 forecasts

try is the leading employer, with more than

Source: ESRI 2007

WORK FORCE EDUCATION NUMBER 25 OVER TOTAL LESS THAN 9TH GRADE

% TOTAL WORK FORCE

1,442,323 82,466

5.7%

9TH-12TH

158,829

11.0%

HIGH SCHOOL

416,352

28.9%

SOME COLLEGE

282,275

19.6%

ASSOC DEGREE

119,987

42.5%

BACHELORS

265,379

18.4%

GRADUATE OR PROFESSIONAL DEGREE

117,035

8.1%

PERCENT HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE OR HIGHER 83.3% PERCENT BACHELOR’S DEGREE OR HIGHER

26.5%

Source: US Census, ACS 2007 for Charlotte-Gastonia-Salisbury, NC-SC Combined Statistical Area

36

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HUMAN RESOURCES

POPULATION BY AGE 5 yrs to 14 yrs 13.7%

15 yrs to 24 yrs 12.6%

0 yrs to 4 yrs 7.0% 25 yrs to 34 yrs 14.1% 65+ yrs 10.9%

56 yrs to 64 yrs 10.9%

35 yrs to 44 yrs 16.3%

452,000 workers, or about a third of the work force. Manufacturing employs more than 189,000, or 16 percent. The finance, insurance and real estate sector, with about nearly 106,000 workers, ranks behind retail, which

45 yrs to 54 yrs 14.6%

Source: ESRI 2007

2 0 0 7 - 2 0 1 1 PROJECTED % CHANGE IN POPULATION GROWTH 31.8

counts more than 135,000.

REGIONAL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The Art Institute of Charlotte Belmont Abbey College Catawba College Catawba Valley Community College Carolinas College of Health Sciences Central Piedmont Community College Charlotte School of Law Cleveland Community College Davidson College DeVry University Gardner-Webb University Gaston College Johnson C. Smith University Johnson & Wales University King’s College Lenoir-Rhyne College Livingstone College Mitchell Community College Montreat College Northeastern Technical College Pfeiffer University Queens University Rowan-Cabarrus Community College South Piedmont Community College Stanly Community College Strayer University UNC Charlotte University of Phoenix USC Lancaster Wake Forest University/MBA School Wingate University Winthrop University York Technical College

13.9

16.0

15.3

14.5

9.6

5.5

5.3

4.0 2.4

0.2

2.3

2.7

2.6

2.2

-3.1

Source: ESRI 2007

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME 2000

2012

2012

$64,937

$55,019

2007

$43,301

Source: U.S. Census; ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

37


QUALITY OF LIFE

Multi-purpose Environment

A

•• • •••

A populace that truly cares about all its residents is important. But there are other reasons Charlotte is among the nation’s top 20 boomtowns.

Bringing Quality to Life Cost of living: The cost-of-living index for

than the national average. Projections show an

Charlotte USA is 92.6, lower than Dallas, Den-

increase from the 964,544 households in 2007

ver, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Cleveland or Miami.

to more than a million in 2012. Housing affordability, availability: The

(U.S. = 100) Relocation hot spot: Allied Van Line’s 40th

median house value in the Charlotte-Gastonia-

Magnet States Report ranks North Carolina 2nd

Rock Hill MSA was $157,600 in 2006, accord-

in highest net relocation gain for 2007.

ing to the American Community survey. It was

Income: The median household income is

$186,800 in Atlanta and $179,900 in

a little more than $55,000, slightly higher than

Charleston, S.C. Housing is available in all price

the national average. Median income is

ranges and from rural to urban settings. At least

expected to top nearly $65,000 by 2012. Per

a half-dozen high-rise condo developments are

capita income is $28,664, again a bit higher

on the drawing board or under construction in

than the national average. Average household

Charlotte Center City. Opportunities for renters

income is a bit more than $66,000, slightly less

also abound in all price ranges. Hot housing market: Charlotte was voted the No. 5 Best Housing Market by Forbes in May 2007. Rankings are based on median house price as compared to 2006 out of the 50 biggest markets. Best place for home sellers: Nationally recognized by Forbes (April 2008), Charlotte ranks as the 8th Best Place for Home Sellers. Each city was ranked by its 2007 unsold vacancy rate, calculated by the U.S. Census

CRVA

American Housing Survey, and how much the On March 6, 2006, NASCAR awarded the Hall of Fame to the city of Charlotte. To be developed by the city, the Hall of Fame will represent NASCAR's past, present and future. The $154.5 million project is slated to generate nearly $62 million yearly in revenue and attract over 400,000 visitors per year. Designed by the architectural firm Pei, Cobb & Freed Partners, the project will include a new ballroom for Charlotte's Convention Center and a 19floor, 400,000 square foot office tower. The Hall of Fame complex is scheduled for completion in 2010.

CRVA

38

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QUALITY OF LIFE

HOUSEHOLD INCOME YEAR

TOTAL

2000

$43,301

2007

$55,019

2012

$64,937

Source: ESRI 2007

PER CAPITA INCOME CharlotteUSA 2000 - Projected 2012

market had tightened or loosened when com-

2007

pared with 2006 conditions.

2012

Source: ESRI 2007

Cultural amenities: Charlotte USA has nationally recognized museums, as well as sym-

PER CAPITA INCOME TRENDS

phony, opera, theater and dance companies. Discovery Place is a hands-on science museum that

YEAR

houses an OMNIMAX theater.

PER CAPITA INCOME

2000

$21,939

Arts and entertainment: Charlotte is 1st in

2007

$28,664

per capita spending for the arts, making the city a

2012

$35,040

cultural model for the country. Amenities include

The success of the greater Charlotte region comes from consistent leadership that is not satisfied with doing the same old thing and getting the same old results. Innovation is alive and well, and we recognize that the vitality of economic development and community well-being is dependent on seeing what can be, not what is. ~ Vic Howie, Founder and Director U.S. National Whitewater Center

Source: U.S. Census; ESRI 2007

COST LIVING Cost OF of Living COMPOSITE INDEX (U.S. AVERAGE = 100) New York (Manhattan)

213.0

San Jose, CA

153.8

San Diego, CA

138.9

Chicago, IL

109.9

Richmond, VA

106.4

Denver, CO

105.0

Orlando, FL

104.6

Phoenix, AZ

100.9

Jacksonville, FL

99.4

arts and crafts festivals, free symphony concerts in

Raleigh-Cary, NC

99.1

parks and art exhibits. The Charlotte-Mecklen-

Columbus, OH

97.6

burg Public Library is state-of-the-art and its

Austin, TX

95.7

ImaginOn center concentrates on programs for

Charlotte, NC

92.6

youngsters, including a Children’s Theater.

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

Source: ACCRA Cost of Living Index 2007 Q3.

39


QUALITY OF LIFE

2008 The Dragway at Lowe’s Motor Speedway, a new $60 million drag strip, will host the inaugural NHRA Carolinas Nationals. Charlotte USA is also home to the PGA’s Wachovia Championship. The Bank of America Invitational Criterium has become an annual professional bicycle race in Charlote Center City. The Triple-A baseball Charlotte Knights and the Charlotte Checkers minor league ice hockey team offer economical sports experiences. U.S. National Whitewater Center: An official Olympic training site for whitewater slalom racing. Facility includes an artificial whitewater river for rafting, canoeing, and kayaking, as well as a rock climbing wall and biking/hiking trails. Climate: The sun shines 214 days a year. More than 50 inches of rainfall annually feed fragrant flowers, lush green grass and towering treetops. The region enjoys four distinct seasons while avoiding the oppressive heat of the Deep South and the icy intervals of counties, it was among the nation’s

the Northeast and Midwest. Rarely is there

first YMCAs to form a partnership

enough snow to shovel and temperatures hit

with a non-profit hospital, Caroli-

triple digits only twice a year, on average.

nas Healthcare Systems. Addition-

Retail opportunities: From the upscale

ally, the YWCA of Central Carolinas

atmosphere at Nordstrom’s to the basics of Wal-

provides myriad services.

Mart, and with the wide selection from

Sports and sports facilities: Charlotte USA is home to the Carolina Panthers of the NFL, the NBA’s Charlotte Bobcats. Three NASCAR Nextel Cup automobile Retirement friendly: Charlotte’s Uptown is

racing events, including the Nextel Cup and

among Money.com’s Best Places to Retire 2007,

Bank of America 500 take place annually at

citing low cost of living and light rail.

nearby Lowe’s Motor Speedway. In September

Recreational opportunities: Charlotte USA has more than 1,770 miles of shoreline on eight lakes and in excess of 100 public and private golf courses. It is a two-hour drive from Pinehurst, the nation’s golf capital. Two hours in the opposite direction is the breath-taking scenery of the Great Smoky Mountains. Major beaches are four hours away. The YMCA of Greater Charlotte, with over 20 facilities, ranks third in North America for people served, behind only Houston and Los Angeles. Operating in four of the region’s

40

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


QUALITY OF LIFE

homegrown department store chain Belk in between, the Charlotte area offers stores for any taste. Many malls dot the region and Concord Mills, a 1.4 million-square-foot mall, is North Carolina’s top tourist attraction. It’s on the northeastern edge of Charlotte. Walker friendly: Charlotte ranks No. 4 on American Podiatric Medical Associations list of Best Walking Cities of 2007. Rankings are based on fitness-walker friendliness, safe streets, beautiful places to walk, mild weather, and good air quality. Education: There are 33 colleges and universities in Charlotte USA, and they offer

U.S. National Whitewater Center The U.S. National Whitewater Center (USNWC) is the world’s premier outdoor recreation and environmental education center. Alongside mountain-biking and running trails, a climbing center, and challenge course, the park’s unique feature is a multiple-channel, customized whitewater river for rafting and canoe/kayak enthusiasts of all abilities. The USNWC is located only 10 minutes from downtown Charlotte on 300 acres of USNWC woodlands along the scenic Catawba River. The USNWC is the world’s largest artificial whitewater river and an official U.S. Olympic Training Site. The USNWC is a locally owned and operated non-profit dedicated to promoting healthy, active, outdoor lifestyles. Olympic-caliber athletes, weekend warriors and casual observers share this world-class sports and training center.

degrees in 150 subjects. The area’s largest university is the University of North Carolina at Charlotte with over 21,000 students and a cur-

riculum that includes doctorate degrees. Its Belk College of Business is among as many as a dozen in the region offering a master’s in busi-

ness administration. Johnson & Wales University has a Charlotte campus and offers degrees in culinary arts, hospitality and business.

Health care: Charlotte USA includes 26 local and regional hospitals, including Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, the flagship

facility of Carolinas HealthCare System, the

fourth largest health care system in the United

States. CMC is a Level 1 trauma center, equipped with a medical helicopter and airplane service. Also in the Charlotte region is

I have been awed at what a special place Charlotte is. I’m a really tough customer. I’ve lived a lot of places. This is a pretty incredible community. I buy into the fact that we have something special here that other communities would love to model.

Novant, a health care provider that serves

~ Cathy Bessant, Executive Bank of America

more than 3.4 million people. Its facilities include Presbyterian Hospital, Presbyterian Hospital Matthews and Presbyterian Hospital Huntersville. In 2005, OrthoCarolina formed and became one of the nation’s largest orthopedic practices.

1st:

The

Charlotte

region is 1st among America’s Most Livable Communities, in their most current ranking of 30 metropolitan areas by Partners for Livable Communities. Arts support leader:

Charlotte residents give the highest per capita to the arts and sciences, 3rd only to New York City and San

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

MAJOR TOURIST ATTRACTIONS • Concord Mills • Carowinds • Lowe’s Motor Speedway • Blumenthal Performing Arts Center • Christmas Town, USA • Discovery Place • Crowders Mountain State Park • Morrow Mountain State Park • Dale Earnhardt, Inc. • N.C. Auto Racing Hall of Fame • Hendrick Motorsports Museum • Carolina Raptor Center • U.S. National Whitewater Center • The Dirt Track at Lowe’s Motor Speedway • Mint Museum of Art • Mint Museum of Craft + Design • Museum of York County • Historic Brattonsville • Roush Racing Museum • Transportation Museum • Historic Spencer Shops • Levine Museum of the New South • Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden • The Light Factory • Charlotte Museum of History • Hezekiah Alexander Homesite • Cannon Village Visit Center • Textile Museum • Reed Gold Mine State Historic Site • The Energy Explorium • Historic Latta Plantation • Schiele Museum of Natural History • NC Transportation Museum Source: Charlotte Business Journal Book of Lists 2007

41


QUALITY OF LIFE

Carolina Photo Group

Carolina Photo Group

Carolina Photo Group

Carolina Photo Group

ited cities in the U.S. with a combination of 16.6 million annual visitors and 6.9 million Carolina Photo Group

Francisco in total dollars raised. Top echelon: The Charlotte region is among The 50 Cleanest Cities, in a 2005 national listing by Reader’s Digest. Tourist friendly: According to a study by the Travel Industry Association of America,

42

visitors to North Carolina spent

Moderate Climate: 61 degrees Fahrenheit

$16.5 billion in 2007. Golfer’s haven: 100 plus golf courses, both public and private, dot Charlotte USA. Land of lakes: 1,770 miles of lake shore-

is the average annual temperature for Charlotte USA. That’s 16 degrees Celsius. Sunny City: 214 sunny days a year in Charlotte USA’s mild, four-season climate.

line grace Charlotte USA. Most visited cities: Forbestraveler.com ranks Charlotte 26th among the 30 most

hotel rooms sold annually, 2008.

vis-

Cultural appeal: More than 300 cultural clubs, businesses and religious organizations

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


QUALITY OF LIFE

The multi-dimensional EpiCentre, which broke ground in June 2005, will become Uptown’s marquee entertainment and retail destination. Consisting of a 265,000-sq.-ft. retail center, a 53-story condominium tower, an aloft Hotel; and 60,000 sq. ft. of office space, the project will provide synergy with neighboring Time Warner Cable Arena. EpiCentre will also include a movie theatre, bowling alley, and numerous shops and dining options. The Ghazi Company

serve an international population of more than 120,000. Affordable utilities: Utility rates in Charlotte USA are among the most competitive in the United States. $18 billion invested: New and expanding businesses have invested more than $18 billion in Charlotte USA since 1990, adding 170,000 jobs. 2nd lowest building cost: Charlotte enjoys the 2nd lowest industrial building cost of 116 North American cities recently surveyed—less than 80 percent of the national average. 3rd and rising: Readers of Chief Executive magazine rank North Carolina the 3rd best state for doing business, 2006. Tops in job training: South Carolina is 1st and North Carolina 6th in Expansion Management magazine’s Top State Work force Training Programs in the U.S. for 2007. Special training: Charlotte USA’s Work Force Development Partnership addresses special train-

Carolina Thread Trail The Carolina Thread Trail will be a regional trail network that will eventually reach 15 counties and over 2 million people. Simply put, it will link people and places. It will link cities, towns and attractions. It will link lives. More than a hiking trail, more than a bike path, the Carolina Thread Trail will preserve our natural areas and will be a place for exploration of nature, culture, science and history, for family adventures and celebrations of friendship. It will be for young and old, athlete and average. While not every local trail will be part of the Carolina Thread Trail system, it will link the regionally significant trails and many regional attractions. Think of it as a “green interstate system” of major trails created by connecting smaller trail systems throughout the region. The trail will preserve our natural areas and will be a place for exploration of nature, culture, science and history, for family adventures and celebrations of friendship. This is a landmark project that will create a lasting legacy.

ing needs of business and industry through the collective educational resources of 10 area comthe percentage of Internet users with high-

1st for business: Charlotte, N.C., is 1st in pro-

World class: Charlotte USA is 41st of 125

speed access, the range of service providers

business attitude, according to Fortune magazine.

cities worldwide in a 2005 World Knowledge

within a city, and the availability of public

Expansion leader: The Charlotte region is

Competitiveness Index compiled by Robert Hig-

wireless hotspots.

munity and technical colleges.

gins Associates and based on ability to translate knowledge into economic value.

Expanding work force: The work force in Charlotte USA is expected to increase to 1.3

8th in the nation’s Top 20 Real Estate Markets for 2007, as listed by Expansion Management magazine.

Wireless leader: Forbes ranks Charlotte

million by 2010; currently it’s 1.2 million.

Hot Property: Forbes.com ranks Charlotte

No. 7 on its list of America’s Most Wired

That’s a 12.4 percent growth rate in the next

3rd most under-valued real estate market in the

Cities, January 2008. This ranking is based on

five years.

United States, 2007.

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

43


CHARLOTTE CENTER CITY

•• • •••

• • •• ••

• • •• ••

Constructing

Lowest office vacancy rate, 2%, of any Central Business District in the country

Photo provided by Charlotte Center City Partners

14,648 • • •• ••

14,648 new jobs were added in Charlotte in 2007

• • •• ••

Over 2 dozen cranes can be seen in Charlotte’s Center City

• • •• ••

9 regional Fortune 500 headquarters

• • •• ••

Forbes named Charlotte among its 10 “recession-proof ” cities in 2008

The main factor contributing to the economic success of Charlotte is what has occurred in our downtown in the last 10 or 15 years. Charlotte is among the cities at the top of the list for success in downtown renewal. It’s just incredible. It’s really a good place to be.”

13,

~ Brad Davis, Partner-in-Charge, LandDesign - Charlotte

“recession- proof ” 44

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


CHARLOTTE CENTER CITY

a Citistate

7 T

• • •• ••

Over $7 billion will be invested in Center City during this decade

• • •• ••

70,000 office workers Uptown

• • •• ••

More than 25 million unique visitors every year

• • •• ••

Currently 13,500 residents call Center City home, by 2020, this number is estimated to reach 25,000

500

Thirteen years ago, the Charlotte region undertook an extensive selfexamination at the invitation of the Knight Foundation, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and The Charlotte Observer, and with the assistance of Neal Peirce and Curtis Johnson. Their recommendations, referred to as the Peirce Report, challenged leaders and citizens of Charlotte to take charge of their future, to “democratize development,” bringing the public in on key decisions about how the region should grow. Charlotte’s ambition was to avoid the negative aspects of Atlanta’s development, to grow in a more purposeful and determined fashion. The 1995 report made clear that the only way to avoid the Atlanta condition was to invest in the five major transportation corridors—with both good roads and transit—and attract growth along those corridors. In 2008 The Citistates Group has been invited back (kudos to the sponsoring entities) to once again analyze our region’s development. While it is clear that this region is destined for enormous growth, the question remains how it will grow…how we will manage the challenges of industry stability and growth, urban development, mass transit, highway infrastructure, resource conservation, and regional cohesion. Charlotte has made substantial gains since the last report. It has made the most with public and private partnerships spawning greater growth. If Charlotte’s present skyline is any indication of its progress and the economic health of the region, it would seem that we are making progress on planned growth.

100,000 • • •• ••

100,000 newcomers annually to the Charlotte region

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

45


CHARLOTTE CENTER CITY

Unprecedented Investment

T

•• • •••

Continued Growth

Take a drive through Center City Charlotte and you’ll see a construction manager’s dream—more than two dozen cranes swinging overhead, hard hats and construction fencing on block after block in a city on the move. Charlotte remains at the center of a building boom driven by a high demand for office space and urban housing, plus public projects including a cultural campus, the NASCAR Hall of Fame and a recently completed light rail system. Over $7 billion will be invested in our Center City during this decade. We now have 70,000 office workers uptown, and see more than 25 million unique visitors every year. This enormous growth is to a large degree due to 40 years of advocacy, planning and execution of a shared vision for the Center City by partnerships between the public and private sectors. This success is testimony to the wisdom of prior investments and is grounded in a belief that a strong and healthy regional economy is built upon the foundation of a vibrant urban core. We have a nationally celebrated model for downtown development. Uptown’s office vacancy rate is the lowest of

for our region is a staggering 70,000 plus peo-

any Central Business District in the country.

ple per year. Chris Leinberger, Visiting Fellow

Currently, the overall vacancy rate is hovering

of the Brookings Institute, believes that 1 to 2

around 2 percent. Charlotte’s Center City is

percent of urban markets prefer urban living.

building another 4 million square feet of badly-

We currently have 13,500 Center City resi-

needed office space over the next three years.

dents, leaving significant unmet demand for

This is a 28 percent increase in office space.

existing and future Charlotte residents. We

While there is a fundamental softening of our national residential real estate markets,

46

amenities as well as premier sports and entertainment facilities. Fast becoming a national and international destination, Uptown boasts 3,800 hotel rooms with new inventory being added through the construction of four new hotels over the next three years to serve our growing population of visitors. Another driving force emanates from a

CCCP

residents by 2020. So what’s fueling Charlotte’s steady growth

in the housing market nationally. We have not

during a time when many cities across the

had the hyper-growth of other markets and

nation are seeing their boom markets go bust?

we do not have the same price volatility. We

Charlotte’s Center City development has

are also delivering housing into the Center

four strong and concurrent areas: residential,

City marketplace at a very digestible rate. In

office, transit, as well as hospitality and enter-

2007, just about 740 new condos came onto

tainment. Major projects include the Metro-

the market and almost 100 percent of those

politan, EpiCentre, Wachovia First Street Cul-

were sold. In 2008, the number of new units

tural Campus, One Bank of America Center

we expect to be built is 596; 737 in 2009 and

office tower and Ritz Carlton complex, the

831 in 2010. The market is closer to “normal”

NASCAR Hall of Fame and NASCAR office

patterns. But it is still selling well.

tower, and the Novare Carolinas Development

expansion of our Center City business district

restaurants, 50 nightspots and 50 cultural

believe we will reach approximately 25,000

Charlotte has been one of the few bright spots

Charlotte’s growth in population and

and our Center City will offer more than 120

complex including TWELVE, Catalyst and 440 South Church.

will support our ability to absorb these new

New “urbanites,” office workers and visi-

Center City homes. The population growth

tors are looking for the amenities of city life

ChooseCharlotteUSA

CCCP

www.charlotteUSA.com


CHARLOTTE CENTER CITY

CCCP

unique “Land Swap” proposal that was structured to exchange public and private land to achieve planning and development objectives that will move our major urban park to front on Tryon Street, bring AAA Baseball uptown near Bank of America Stadium, provide CMS with a viable and economically sound means

CCCP

to replace their substandard headquarters, and create the core of Brooklyn Village on the site of the current Marshall Park and CMS headquarters. Brooklyn Village is the revival of a vibrant urban neighborhood that was lost to “urban renewal” in the ’60s.

Charlotte Center City’s success is testimony to the wisdom of prior investments and is grounded in a belief that a strong and healthy regional economy is built upon the foundation of a vibrant urban core. We have a nationally celebrated model for downtown development.

CCCP

and county government to begin the process for a 2020 Vision Plan. We will also work with the County Parks and Recreation Department as they produce a Center City Open Space Plan

South End is undergoing a renaissance

for Uptown and South End. We are also tack-

with over $800 million of investment substan-

ling issues regarding expanding retail offerings

tially thanks to the November 2007 birth of

and improving the parking experience.

the light rail. The neighborhood will soon be

We believe the best days of our Center City

home to an urban Lowe’s Home Improvement

are ahead as our Central Business District con-

store as well as many new housing and office

tinues to expand and grow to become a more

projects to add to the flourishing retail market

vibrant urban neighborhood and a center for

and design district.

shopping, hospitality and entertainment.

CCCP

The context for many of our new and ongoing developments was established in the

Charlotte Center City Partners facilitates and

2010 Vision Plan, the latest in a series of mas-

promotes the cultural and economic development

ter plans guiding development of the Center

of Uptown and South End through business, cul-

City. Our work is far from complete. This

tural, retail and residential initiatives and events in

year, Center City Partners will work with city

Charlotte’s urban core. www.charlottecentercity.org

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

CCCP

47


CHARLOTTE CENTER CITY

Wachovia Corporate Center

400 South Church St.

NASCAR Hall of Fame

Bank of America Stadium

Charlotte Center City 2011 48

ChooseCharlotteUSA

•

www.charlotteUSA.com

The


CHARLOTTE CENTER CITY

The Financial Times group’s Foreign Direct Investment magazine ranks Charlotte 3rd overall among large U.S. cities. Within key categories, Charlotte finishes 1st in economic potential and quality of life, 3rd in best development and investment promotion, and 5th in human resources. ~fDi’s North American Cities of the Future 2007/08 Rankings

Vue

210 Trade Street

Bank of America Corporate Center Hearst Tower Time Warner Cable Arena

Digital Illustration Provided by Skyscraper3d A Division of LITTLE Diversified Architectural Consulting, Inc. www.littleonline.com | www.skyscraper3d.com

Photo Provided by Boyle Consulting Engineers www.boyleconsulting.com

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

49


CharlotteUSA Expressways Major Highways Railroads Airports

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

51


A LEXANDER COUNTY

A

ALEXANDER COUNTY POPULATION

Alexander County is located in the foothills of the

Appalachian Mountains and bordered on the south by the Catawba River. Alexander County industrial sites are within an easy 20-minute drive of Interstates 40 and 77 and the major urban areas of Hickory, Statesville and Charlotte. Low taxes, affordable sites and a dependable work force, combined with a “small-town” quality of life, make Alexander County an attractive location for new industry and business. Alexander County is often referred to as the “Gem of North Carolina” because of its geographic variety and the precious stones and gems that have been found near the community of Hiddenite. While other areas of North Carolina have become overpopulated, Alexander has maintained its rural nature.Two-thirds of Alexander County’s 263 square miles are farmland, with an average farm size of approximately 90 acres. Major

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

commodities produced include poultry, dairy, tobacco, apples, forestry products, grain crops and beef cattle. Farming is the backbone of the county; however, the majority of the county’s © ESRI 2007

ALEXANDER COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

37,000 residents are employed in manufacturing, producing goods such as furniture, textiles, apparel, paper products, electrical components and lumber products. Alexander County was established in 1847, the year of the first sale of land in the county seat—Taylorsville.The county is named in honor of the Alexander family who were leaders in Colonial North Carolina. Over the years the Alexander Railroad Company has had a great impact on the economic development of Alexander County and the town of Taylorsville. Today it is a locally owned, operated and maintained short line rail, offering weekday carload freight service along the Highway N.C. 90 corridor between Statesville and Taylorsville, connecting with Norfolk Southern Railroad. Its

64

brightly painted green and gold locomotives are nicknamed “The June Bug.”

Taylorsville

Recently, Jasper Group, a commercial furniture manufacturer headquartered in Indiana, announced a 93,000-square-foot production facility to be located in Stony Point

the county, creating 40 new jobs.The company joins Broyhill Furniture, Century Furniture, Bentley Churchill Furniture, Craftmaster Furniture, Fashion House Furniture, Ideal Frame Company, Jetton Furniture and Kincaid Furniture produc-

Bethlehem

tion facilities also located in Alexander County. Just a few years ago, Paragon Films, the sixth largest stretch film manufacturer in North America, relocated to a 40,000-square-foot manufacturing facility in

Tapestry by Block Group

Alexander County bringing another 25-plus new jobs.

LifeMode Name

52

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

Schneider Mills, one of the strongest textile mills in the country, was founded in Alexander County more than 50 years ago. It now employees 300 workers on a 75-acre campus and is in the process of a three-year, $15 © ESRI 2007

million equipment upgrade.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


NC

Alexander County David A. Icenhour, Economic Development Director 621 Liledoun Rd. • Taylorsville, NC 28681 828-632-1161 phone • 828-632-0059 fax dicenhour@alexandercountync.gov www.alexanderedc.org

P O P U L AT I O N

ALEXANDER COUNTY

Largest City: Bethlehem • Population: 4,097 • Total County Population: 37,076

LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33,603 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.6 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37,076 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.9 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39,054 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40.7 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.3% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33.7% Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.7% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.4% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.1% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.7% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.0% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.1% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.7% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.0% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.6% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,910

Company (non-governmental) Employees The Mitchell Gold Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700 Hancock & Moore, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550 Craftmaster Furniture Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475 Broyhill Furniture Industries, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330 Schneider Mills Industries, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Wal-Mart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250

33.7

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$45,324,633

20.8

$6,755,287

Electronics & Appliance Stores

64.9

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$51,922,555

14.0

Gasoline Stations

$16,225,759

4.8

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$47,583,286

-9.5

$15,564,729

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

13.5

General Merchandise Store

$2,309,153

-5.5

$39,105,661

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

26.8

$2,750,574

-51.9

$11,195,217

Food Services & Drinking Places

32.9

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

© ESRI 2007

$5,675,431

5.1

Health & Personal Care Stores

Nonstore Retailers

$1,002,941

39.7

Food & Beverage Stores

ESRI 2007

LARGEST EMPLOYERS

Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

$22,462,830 60

80 100

L/S Factor

ALEXANDER COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Alexander County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17,923 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,910 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.7% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .3,121 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.2% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma .4,886 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19.1% High School Graduate . . . . . . . . .9,081 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.5% Some College, No Degree . . . . . .4,527 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17.7% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,586 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.2% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . . .1,688 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.6% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree . .665 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.6% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25,579 ESRI 2000, 2007

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$31,449-$33,692

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$38,622 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,507 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,990 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$51,324 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,158 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$33,693-$43,565 $43,566-$47,432 $47,433-$53,915 © ESRI 2007

$53,916-$66,015

53


ANSON COUNTY

A

ANSON COUNTY POPULATION

Anson County, once the largest

county in North Carolina, was carved from Bladen County in 1750. It was named for Lord George Anson, a British admiral who circumnavigated the globe from 1740 to 1744 and later became First Lord of the Admiralty. Centrally located in the Piedmont, Anson is approximately one hour from Charlotte, two-plus hours from Raleigh and two hours from Greensboro. Established in 1783 as the county seat, Wadesboro was called New Town until 1787, when the name was changed to honor Revolutionary War patriot Col. Thomas Wade. Today, Uptown Wadesboro boasts architecture reminiscent of its long history as a cotton and textile center. Anson County’s oldest retail business, H.W. Little & Co., still offers hardware essentials. The county has numerous historic structures and museums; Wadesboro’s business district has been listed on the national Register of Historic Places since 1999.

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

Anson advantages include a pro-business attitude focused on growth and expansion, a solid infrastructure that provides ample capacity for heavy users of water and sewer, excellent accessibility to © ESRI 2007

ANSON COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

U.S. markets and the world, and an ideal location only 50 miles from the state’s largest city, Charlotte. Anson County also offers an excellent quality of life, outstanding health care and a strong school system and work force development programs. Local educational assets have received statewide and national recognition. South Piedmont Community College, ranked the 14th best community college in the nation by Washington Monthly magazine, provides cus-

Ansonville

tomized training programs to assist local employers. Anson County Early College High School was named a North Carolina School of Distinction for the 2006-2007 academic year. The Anson County Airport features a 5,500-square-foot runway and a

Polkton

Wadesboro

new 2,600-square-foot terminal building with a pilot lounge, on-site aircraft

Lilesville

maintenance capacity and a new Instrument Landing System.Approximately

74

52

1.3 acres are available on site for a commercial hangar operation. Rail service to the county’s industrial sites is provided by CSX Railroad and Winston-Salem Southbound.

Morven

Major employers in Anson County include Hornwood Inc, Wade Manufacturing, Coffing Hoists, Triangle Brick, CMH Flooring Products Inc., Val-

eland

ley Proteins, Cuddy Farms Poultry and Premiere Fibers. Like many North Tapestry by Block Group

Carolina communities,Anson County is transitioning from a traditional tex-

LifeMode Name

54

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

tile county to a more diversified manufacturing and distribution center. Recently, Hornwood, a privately owned tricot knitting, dyeing and finishing company, announced a $4.5 million investment in new equipment © ESRI 2007

and an additional 20 jobs at its Anson County facility.

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www.charlotteUSA.com


NC

Anson County Economic Development Misty Harris, Director 114 North Greene St. • Wadesboro, NC 28170 704-694-2796 phone • 704-694-7015 fax mharris@co.anson.nc.us www.ansonedc.org

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Wadesboro • Population: 3,902 • Total County Population: 26,040 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25,275 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.6 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26,040 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.2 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26,089 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39.7 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.27% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.8% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24.5% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.0% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.3% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.4% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.3% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.6% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.8% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.4% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.8% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,234

ANSON COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR 42.8

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

32.7

Employees

Hornwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Wade Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Coffing Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Triangle Brick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 CMH Flooring Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

$2,939,446 100.0

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

31.1

Food & Beverage Stores Health & Personal Care Stores

$27,546,140 21.9

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$4,970,870

4.6

General Merchandise Store

$870,016

0.9

$21,634,406

-1.9

$2,439,176 47.3

Food Services & Drinking Places

38.9

$194,029

36.3

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

© ESRI 2007

$6,528,483

3.5

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$31,394,451

8.4

Gasoline Stations

$0

$3,781,238

11.6

Nonstore Retailers

LARGEST EMPLOYERS

$20,343,478

Electronics & Appliance Stores

ESRI 2007

Company (non-governmental)

Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

$10,922,089

60

80 100

L/S Factor

ANSON COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Anson County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,187 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,234 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.5% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .1,665 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.3% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma 3,670 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20.5% High School Graduate . . . . . . . . .6,874 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.4% Some College, No Degree . . . . . .3,043 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17.0% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.6% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . . .1,181 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.6% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree . .465 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.6% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17,901 ESRI 2000, 2007

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$18,334-$21,769

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$29,842 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,854 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,939 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,208 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$40,708 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,771 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$21,770-$32,851 $32,852-$38,296 $38,297-$42,774 © ESRI 2007

$42,775-$50,444

55


CABARRU S COUNTY

C

CABARRUS COUNTY POPULATION

Cabarrus County is located

northeast of Charlotte, N.C., along the I-85 corridor. It was named after Stephen Cabarrus, speaker of the N.C. House of Representatives in 1793, who cast the deciding vote to create the new county. Today, Cabarrus is one of the fastest growing counties in North Carolina, with an expected population growth of 13.9 percent between 2007 and 2012. Low costs, a central location and great accessibility make Cabarrus County an ideal business location. Concord, Cabarrus County’s largest city established in 1796, was named as a symbol of harmony after much lively discussion about whether the center of trade should be in the northern or southern part of the county. Concord began as a small hamlet and became the major cotton market for an area that included parts of several surrounding counties.

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

As an example of the area’s transition away from textiles, Kannapolis is home to the 350-acre North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC), emerging on the site of the former Pillowtex Corp. headquar© ESRI 2007

CABARRUS COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

ters and manufacturing site. The NCRC is quickly becoming a biotechnology magnet for academic/industry collaboration. Dole Foods owner David Murdock has personally funded a $900,000 one-of-a-kind nuclear magnetic-resonance imager for the Core Laboratory. This tool will allow researchers to more closely study molecules by stretching and magnifying them.

Kannapolis

Murdock, Duke University, the UNC System, the N.C. Community College System and other institutions of higher education, as well as sev-

85

eral private corporations are working together at this $1.5 billion life-sciMount Pleasant

ences hub. Ultimately, the NCRC is expected to include over one million

Concord

square feet of office and laboratory space, 350,000 square feet of new

29

retail and commercial space, and approximately 700 new residential units, Harrisburg

employing approximately 5,000 people in research positions and creating as many as 30,000 jobs.

601

Cabarrus County is also a key location for the motorsports industry. It is home to Lowe’s Motor Speedway, a new state-of-the-art Dragway, numerous NASCAR race teams, the Concord Regional Airport (“NASCAR Air Force”), Windshear, a $40 million wind tunnel facility and the NASCAR Research and Development Center. Tapestry by Block Group

Today, the city of 65,180 is home to two of the top 10 tourist attrac-

LifeMode Name

56

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

tions in the state: Concord Mills Mall, with over 200 stores, and Lowe’s Motor Speedway. It also boasts the fourth busiest airport in North Carolina, Concord Regional Airport, which has no commercial traffic, yet © ESRI 2007

averages 75 flights daily in general aviation.

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NC

Cabarrus County Economic Development Ryan McDaniels, Director of Economic Development 3003 Dale Earnhardt Blvd. • Kannapolis, NC 28083 704-782-4000 phone • 704-782-4050 fax rmcdaniels@cabarrus.biz www.cabarrusedc.com

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Concord • Population: 65,180 • Total County Population: 159,612 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131,063 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.4 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159,612 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37.4 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181,772 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.7 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.9% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.3% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.5% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.8% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.1% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.3% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.8% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.1% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.8% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.6% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.6% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76,762

CABARRUS COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

Retail Sales -10.9

$523,949,054

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

23.6

Electronics & Appliance Stores

41.6

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$64,128,194 16.7

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$133,719,681 9.3

ESRI 2007

$133,097,802

-14.7

$34,434,026 14.0

Company (non-governmental)

Employees

$28,215,148

Philip Morris USA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,600

43.6

Food Services & Drinking Places

$6,120,350

6.7

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

Carolinas Medical Center Northeast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,200

$194,603,315

-0.1

Nonstore Retailers

LARGEST EMPLOYERS

$172,924,299

-15.5

General Merchandise Store Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$166,831,863

-29.1

Gasoline Stations Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$14,949,010

-1.6

Food & Beverage Stores Health & Personal Care Stores

$33,723,641

0

$202,934,867

20 40 60

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

80 100

L/S Factor

© ESRI 2007

Pass & Seymour. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 680 Windstream. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631

CABARRUS COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Shoe Show. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 625 Cabarrus County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81,318 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76,762 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.6% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .5,082 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.0% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma 10,796 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.6% High School Graduate . . . . . . . .32,467 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31.9% Some College, No Degree . . . . .20,877 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20.5% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . .10,373 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.2% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . .15,131 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14.9% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree .7,083 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.0% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101,809 American Community Survey 2006

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$24,881-$36,320

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$46,166 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,122 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$58,493 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,320 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$67,446 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,709 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$36,321-$48,804 $48,805-$59,822 $59,823-$74,060 © ESRI 2007

$74,061-$92,825

57


CATAWBA COUNTY

C

CATAWBA COUNTY POPULATION

Catawba County

is

located in the

western part of North Carolina in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, named for the Indian tribe which also gave its name to the Catawba River. Catawba County possesses a diverse economy with a strong manufacturing climate coupled with extensive retail and residential developments. Catawba Country’s largest city, Hickory, has always been a thriving manufacturing center, boasting 46 furniture plants, 9 hosiery mills, and 27 other manufacturers in the 1960s. Despite the plunge of the textile and furniture industries, 50 percent of the nation’s furniture is still produced within a 200mile radius of Hickory. Catawba’s present manufacturing sectors include machining and metal working, plastics, cable and furniture. Outlook Americas has ranked three Catawba County municipalities in the top five Best Manufacturing Small Towns

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

in the Country. Southern Business and Development ranked the Hickory Metro 3rd in its Small Market category for Top Deals and Hot Markets. NASCAR had its beginnings in Catawba County, which is the birthplace © ESRI 2007

CATAWBA COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

of racing stars Junior Johnson, Ned Jarrett, Ralph Earnhardt, Harry Gant, Dale Earnhardt and Dale Jarrett, among others. The Hickory Motor Speedway has been in continuous operation for 42 years and generates $2.5 million each year for the local economy. Catawba County’s manufacturing strength is supported by a rich geography and diverse lifestyle that has brought the area national recognition. Reader’s Digest named the Hickory Metro area the 10th Best Place to Live and Raise a Family in the United States. Business North Carolina magazine designated Hickory the 8th best city in the state for its quality of life. Forbes maga-

St. Stephens

zine rated the Hickory Metro area 3rd in the nation for lowest business costs.

Hickory Conover

40

Claremont

And most recently, MSNBC has recognized Hickory as the 14th Hottest

Catawba

Housing Market in the Nation.

Newton

Education and technical training continues to be a high priority for Sherrills Ford 321

Catawba County. The Hickory Metro Higher Education Center is a joint education venture developed to provide a unique, collaborative learning

Maiden Lake Norman of Catawba

experience to the Hickory, N.C., MSA. Appalachian State University, LenoirRhyne College and Catawba Valley Community College partner to offer graduate, undergraduate and non-credit certificate courses, as well as research opportunities and specialized work force training. A national home furnishings company has recently selected Hickory

Tapestry by Block Group LifeMode Name

58

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

as a site for a $2.7 million expansion that could create up to 820 jobs in the next five years. Sutter Street Manufacturing, a subsidiary of retailer Williams-Sonoma Inc., plans to build a new plant that will include prod© ESRI 2007

uct development, regional distribution and upholstered manufacturing.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


NC

Catawba County Economic Development Corporation Scott L. Millar, President 1960-B 13th Avenue Dr., SE • Hickory, NC 28602 828-267-1564 phone • 828-267-1884 fax smillar@catawbacountync.gov www.catawbaedc.org

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Hickory • Population: 38,950 • Total County Population: 155,050 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141,685 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.1 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155,050 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.3 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163,647 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40.0 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.5% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..34.2% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29.6% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.3% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.8% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.6% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.7% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.0% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.4% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71,312

CATAWBA COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

Company (non-governmental)

-51.3

$174,236,373 -3.6

$40,590,640

-18.3

$78,977,049

Food & Beverage Stores

-0.9

$211,987,864

Health & Personal Care Stores

-27.5

Gasoline Stations

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$235,257,908

-16.5

$114,295,883

-31.7

General Merchandise Store

-46.9

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

39.8

Food Services & Drinking Places

$118,897,306 -8.3

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$60,302,627 $462,530,003 $70,004,766 -11.5

$98,427,138

-8.9

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

CommScope, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+ Hickory Springs Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+

$649,967,846

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

Nonstore Retailers

Employees

-24.0

Electronics & Appliance Stores

ESRI 2007

LARGEST EMPLOYERS

Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

$237,279,213 0

20 40 60

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

80 100

L/S Factor

© ESRI 2007

Corning Cable Systems, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+ Century Furniture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+

CATAWBA COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Manpower Temporary Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500-999 Catawba County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76,564 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71,312 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.9% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .7,262 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.9% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma 13,807 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.2% High School Graduate . . . . . . . .34,458 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33.0% Some College, No Degree . . . . .19,929 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19.1% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,295 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.9% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . .13,138 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.6% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree .6,676 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.4% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104,565 American Community Survey 2006

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$23,704-$39,170

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$40,554 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,359 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$49,596 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,094 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$56,322 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$29,334 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$39,171-$49,653 $49,654-$60,252 $60,253-$86,284 © ESRI 2007

$86,285-$172,169

59


CH EST ER COUNTY

C

CHESTER COUNTY POPULATION

Chester County is strategically

located midway between three large metro areas—Charlotte, N.C., Columbia, S.C. and Greenville-Spartanburg, S.C. The markets are connected via interstate and rail, providing a reliable infrastructure network as the backbone for several manufacturing and logistics operations in the county. Chester County was settled in the mid 1700s by Scotch-Irish settlers from Pennsylvania and Virginia and named from a county with the same name in Pennsylvania. The county seat of Chester developed into a leading trade center for the surrounding farm communities and grew rapidly after the introduction of the first railroad in the area in 1851. Today, downtown Chester reflects its long and rich architectural heritage, with many homes still displaying their original Victorian-era facades and many historical sites from the Revolutionary War.

Density of Population per Square Mile

While the textile industry has served as the primary industrial base in

0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

Chester County for decades, the local economy has diversified over the past 20 years and continues to evolve. In addition to textiles, the local © ESRI 2007

economy produces plastics, steel, glass, fiberglass, paper, wood products and several types of specialty chemicals.

CHESTER COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

Chester County boasts the only available mega site in the Charlotte region, a 1,150-acre site along the I-77 corridor, south of S.C Highway 9. Situated approximately 35 miles south of Charlotte, the site has been primarily marketed to the automotive industry as an ideal location for an auto assembly plant. However, other industries are also showing interest in this unique property. Recent additions to the local business community include JRS Custom Fabrication, a Florida-based business that designs and manufactures custom sub-base fuel storage tanks for the power generation industry. The

Eureka Mill

Richburg

Gayle Mill Chester

21

Fort Lawn 77

company has announced a $3.5 million new manufacturing and logistics facility that will employ 150 people. Poly America LP, a manufacturer and nationwide distributor of polyethylene products, has announced plans for a new $100 million manufac-

321

turing and logistics facility which will create 400 jobs when operating at Great Falls

full capacity. Residents of Chester County truly have the best of both worlds. There are numerous small towns and communities offering a low cost of living and rural setting less than a 30-minute drive to the Charlotte

Tapestry by Block Group LifeMode Name

60

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

metropolitan area. Ideally situated, these communities provide an opportunity to enjoy the great outdoors and small town living while frequenting all of the cultural and entertainment endeavors offered by © ESRI 2007

America’s 20th largest city.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


SC

Chester County Economic Development Karlisa Parker, Economic Development Director 121 Main, P.O. Drawer 580 • Chester, SC 29706 803-377-1216 phone • 803-377-2102 fax kparker@choosechester.com www.chestercounty.org

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Chester • Population: 6,114 • Total County Population: 33,153 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34,068 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.0 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33,153 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.0 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32,137 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39.4 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-3.1% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34.2% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27.1% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.5% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.4% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.0% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.3% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.9% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.9% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.4% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14,407

CHESTER COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

Company (non-governmental)

Employees

$22,862,212

64.0

$2,803,360

Electronics & Appliance Stores

63.8

$923,789

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores Food & Beverage Stores

-50.5

$22,525,501 -13.3

$39,636,256

Health & Personal Care Stores

17.3

Gasoline Stations

$4,237,363

7.3

$38,021,061

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

57.5

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$2,810,526

14.4

General Merchandise Store

$1,174,919 27.7

$29,600,104

-6.4

$2,139,408

Nonstore Retailers

29.3

Food Services & Drinking Places

31.6

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

Cultured Stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510 Guardian Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335

48.7

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

ESRI 2007

LARGEST EMPLOYERS

Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

$899,818 $16,394,745 60

80 100

L/S Factor

© ESRI 2007

Allvac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 Chester Wood Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300

CHESTER COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Superior Essex. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264 Chester County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,580 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14,407 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.1% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .2,447 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.0% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma .4,871 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21.9% High School Graduate . . . . . . . . .8,030 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.1% Some College, No Degree . . . . . .3,559 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16.0% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,201 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.4% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . . .1,357 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.1% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree . .756 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.4% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22,244 ESRI 2000, 2007

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$22,774-$27,492

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,547 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,709 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$39,602 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,868 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45,596 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,263 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$27,493-$36,643 $36,644-$41,669 $41,670-$45,112 © ESRI 2007

$45,113-$52,261

61


CH EST ERFI ELD COUNTY

C

CHESTERFIELD COUNTY POPULATION

Chesterfield County is nestled

between Charlotte, N.C. and Columbia, S.C, in the upper portion of South Carolina’s coastal plain.These metropolitan areas allow for access to city life, while Chesterfield County remains relatively unspoiled by urban sprawl. Both the county and the county seat of Chesterfield were named for Lord Chesterfield, Philip Domer Stanhope, and a close friend of King George III. The largest city, Cheraw, sometimes called “The Prettiest Town in Dixie,” is located on the banks of the Pee Dee River. Named for its original inhabitants, the Cheraw Indians, what began as a small trading post became both the largest cotton market between Georgetown and Wilmington and the largest bank in South Carolina outside of Charleston by the early 1800s. Although occupied by Sherman’s Union troops in 1865, Sherman did not burn any public buildings or dwellings, thus more than 50 antebellum buildings and numerous Victorian and Revival Structures grace Cheraw’s historic

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

district today. A variety of industries are represented in Chesterfield County. These include manufacturing for the automotive, construction, textile and con© ESRI 2007

CHESTERFIELD COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

sumer goods markets, as well as logistics operations for major retailers such as Wal-Mart. Major employers in Chesterfield County include Highland Industries, Wal-Mart, Conbraco Industries, The Stanley Works, A.O. Smith Water Products, Schaeffler Group USA, Mar Mac Construction Products Co. Inc. and Talley Metals Technology Inc. National Choice Bakery, one of the premier suppliers of bagels in the country, has announced the location of a new manufacturing facility in Page-

Pageland Ruby

land, which will create 75 new jobs immediately and eventually employ as

Chesterfield

many as 140 workers.

Cheraw

The county boasts eight industrial parks, some of which still offer avail-

Jefferson

able land. CSX Corporation brings rail service to several industrial sites. 52

Three non-commercial airports operate within Chesterfield County, and

Patrick 1

Charlotte Douglas International Airport is less than an hour’s drive.The Port of Charleston, the second busiest container port along the eastern seaboard, is less than three hours away from Chesterfield County.

McBee

Northeastern Technical College (NTC), located in Cheraw, S.C., provides occupation, technical, college transfer, basic academic skills and continuing education programs for Chesterfield County residents.The award-winning state training initiative, Center for Accelerated Technology Training (CATT), utilizes NTC for work force training programs for new and

Tapestry by Block Group LifeMode Name

62

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

expanding companies in the area. Other schools located less than an hour from Chesterfield County include the University of South Carolina at Lancaster, Francis Marion University, Coker College, Wingate University and © ESRI 2007

Winthrop University.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


SC

Chesterfield County Economic Development Board Cherry G. McCoy, Executive Director P.O. Box 192 • Chesterfield, SC 29709 843-623-6500 phone • 843-623-3167 fax cherryatcc@shtc.net www.chesterfieldcountysc.org

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Cheraw • Population: 5,655 • Total County Population: 44,564 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42,768 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.7 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44,564 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.0 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45,640 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39.9 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.4% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31.7% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28.5% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.9% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.5% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.1% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.6% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.5% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.9% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,373

CHESTERFIELD COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

34.1

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

35.8

Electronics & Appliance Stores

Health & Personal Care Stores

$65,786,491

-18.1

$14,244,012 4.8 3.7

Company (non-governmental)

Employees

3.6

Wal-Mart Distribution Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 910

$65,609,198

-19.4

$4,657,074 10.0

Food Services & Drinking Places

$9,488,774

15.8

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

Schaeffler Group USA, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N/A

$4,263,558 $3,463,742

Nonstore Retailers

LARGEST EMPLOYERS

$45,258,232

-11.6

General Merchandise Store

ESRI 2007

$4,654,655

-6.5

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$1,604,046

40.1

Gasoline Stations

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$2,672,976

47.7

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores Food & Beverage Stores

$44,066,891

0

20

$24,692,469 40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

© ESRI 2007

Conbraco Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732 A.O. Smith Water Products Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 460

CHESTERFIELD COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Highland Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 Chesterfield County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19,575 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,373 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16.4% ESRI 2000, 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .3,956 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.2% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma .6,474 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21.6% High School Graduate . . . . . . . .10,340 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34.5% Some College, No Degree . . . . . .4,586 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15.3% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,678 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.6% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . . .1,978 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.6% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree . .899 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.0% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29,972 U.S. Census; ESRI 2007

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$13,762-$19,601

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$29,509 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,234 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$36,212 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,201 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$41,612 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,509 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$19,602-$32,438 $32,439-$39,035 $39,036-$47,711 © ESRI 2007

$47,712-$58,037

63


CLEVELA ND COUNTY

C

CLEVELAND COUNTY POPULATION

Cleveland County is located in the

rolling Piedmont of the southwestern portion of North Carolina, in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Pivotal in 1780 in halting the British advance into North Carolina at the Battle of Kings Mountain, the county was formed from two others in 1841 and named in honor of Revolutionary War hero Colonel Benjamin Cleveland. The county seat of Shelby was established the following year, named in honor of another war hero, Colonel Isaac Shelby. The founders of Shelby named the main streets after Revolutionary heroes Lafayette, Mario,Warren, DeKalb, Sumter, Morgan and Graham. The picturesque court house, now serving as the Cleveland County Historical Museum, was built in 1907 and still serves as the center of the uptown business district. Just west of Charlotte, Cleveland County has convenient access to the I85 corridor, and Charlotte Douglas International Airport provides reliable

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

infrastructure for local industry’s transportation needs. Cleveland Community College offers a diverse set of programs, including associate programs in applied science degrees with 28 technical specialty areas. The college serves © ESRI 2007

CLEVELAND COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

approximately 10,000 students each year in both curriculum and continuing education programs. From the 1800s to the 1960s Cleveland County’s primary form of subsistence was agriculture. Wheat, sweet potatoes and oats were all grown in the area, but cotton was king. During the height of cotton production there were 25 textile plants located in the county. By 1960 there were also more than 400 dairy farmers.

Belwood

While agriculture continues to be an important part of the county’s economy today, manufacturing also plays a major role. Truck cabs, yachts,

Polkville

Lawndale

motorcycles, compact discs, transmissions, aircraft tires, ceramic capacitor material, electric motors, production equipment and specialized textiles are

Kingstown

manufactured at local operations. One of the county’s largest and oldest employers, PPG Industries, opened 74

Shelby

its fiber glass plant in 1959 and has undergone several expansions since then.

Boiling Springs

Kings Mountain

The company continues to be one of Cleveland County’s best success stories. Additional major employers in the county include Copeland Corporation, Curtiss-Wright Flight Systems, Mayflower Vehicle Systems, Smurfit-Stone Con-

85

Grover

tainers, Eaton Corporation and Universal Manufacturing & Logistics. Chris Craft Boats and Indian Motorcycles recently relocated their man-

Tapestry by Block Group

ufacturing operations to Cleveland County from their Florida locations, cre-

LifeMode Name

64

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

ating more than 800 jobs and over $400 million in investment.Telerx, an out-

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

source provider for customer care services, also selected Cleveland County

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

© ESRI 2007

for its sixth customer contact center, a 60,000-square-foot facility to be constructed in Kings Mountain.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


NC

Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce Dave Hart, Vice President Economic Development P.O. Box 879 • Shelby, NC 28151 704-487-8521 phone • 704-487-7458 fax dave@clevelandchamber.org www.clevelandchamber.org

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Shelby • Population: 19,504 • Total County Population: 99,965 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96,287 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.5 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99,965 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.5 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102,293 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40.2 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.3% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37.7% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25.8% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.4% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.0% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.7% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.7% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.2% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.9% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43,604

CLEVELAND COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

19.8

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$147,199,817

11.0

Electronics & Appliance Stores

$19,526,333 50.6

-10.5

$44,779,933

Food & Beverage Stores

-8.0

$133,144,740

Health & Personal Care Stores

-36.7

Gasoline Stations

$59,432,000 -0.7

$122,518,064

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

19.9

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$18,466,400

-6.5

$6,359,302

General Merchandise Store

ESRI 2007

0.7

$179,560,185

-49.9

$16,305,732

Nonstore Retailers

LARGEST EMPLOYERS Company (non-governmental)

Employees

70.1

Food Services & Drinking Places

7.8

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

Wal-Mart Associates Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500-999 Gardner-Webb University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500-999

$4,721,017

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

0

$91,074,225

20 40 60

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

$2,999,027

80 100

L/S Factor

© ESRI 2007

Entertainment Distribution Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500-999 Eaton Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250-499

CLEVELAND COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

PPG Fiber Glass Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250-499 Cleveland County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47,359 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43,604 Unemloyment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.9% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .5,094 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.7% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma 10,234 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15.4% High School Graduate . . . . . . . .21,688 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32.7% Some College, No Degree . . . .14,503 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21.9% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,533 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.3% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . . .6,908 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.4% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree .4,317 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.5% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66,277 American Community Survey 2006

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$14,141-$24,197

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,294 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17,395 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42,642 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,410 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$48,186 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$24,602 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$24,198-$36,572 $36,573-$45,810 $45,811-$56,986 © ESRI 2007

$56,987-$81,825

65


GASTON COUNTY

G

GASTON COUNTY POPULATION

Gaston County is strategically

located just west of Charlotte in the southern Piedmont of North Carolina, approximately halfway between Atlanta and Washington, D.C., and New York and Miami. Gaston was formed from a lower portion of Lincoln County in 1846, named after William Gaston, a member of Congress and N.C. Supreme Court judge, highly admired by local citizens and writer of “The Old North State,” which later became North Carolina’s state song. As one of the fastest growing counties in the Charlotte region, Gaston has experienced an 8 percent gain in population over the past 10 years, with approximately 22,000 newcomers in the past two years. Gastonia, the county seat of Gaston County and once named the “All-American City” by Look Magazine, is North Carolina’s 13th largest municipality, with a population increase of 17 percent over the last decade. While Gaston County’s industrial base has historically comprised tradi-

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

tional industries, such as furniture and textiles, the county has used its manufacturing strength, talented work force and top-notch educational centers to capitalize on a transitioning economy. © ESRI 2007

Today, Gaston County is the second-largest county in the Charlotteregion, with a population of about nearly 200,000. It has 16 fully

GASTON COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

equipped business parks with a site to fit any project and enjoys a diverse industrial base with over 4,000 businesses employing nearly 95,000 workers. Thirty-five percent of the employment is in the service sector, 21 percent in manufacturing, 16 percent in retail and wholesale trade and 9 percent in construction. Two of Gaston County’s most recently located and expanded companies

High Shoals

are Dole Foods and National Gypsum. Dole Foods’ salad packaging plant

Cherryville

eventually will employ 525 workers and is expected to ultimately bring $60

Stanley 321

million in new investment to Gaston County. The company has already Dallas Spencer Mountain Mount Holly Bessemer City

85

Gastonia 29

Ranlo

announced plans for adding two new lines to the production floor. National Gypsum, manufacturer of gypsum wallboard, has invested $125

Lowell McAdenville

million in its new wallboard plant in Mount Holly. The facility will bring 100 Belmont

direct jobs and 100 indirect jobs to the area, and is recycling waste material

Cramerton

that would have otherwise ended up in landfills.

South Gastonia

Among this county’s notable assets is the Gastonia Technology Park, a Class A 350-acre North Carolina certified site. The park was designed as a campus-like setting with natural tree buffers, attractive landscaping, winding roads and sidewalks to create a pedestrian-friendly environment. Heavy util-

Tapestry by Block Group LifeMode Name

66

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

ities for a wide range of needs include a fiber optic vault. Institutions of higher education in the county include Gaston College, a county-supported community college, and Belmont Abbey College, a private © ESRI 2007

four-year institution.

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NC

Gaston County Economic Development Commission Donny Hicks, Executive Director P.O. Box 2339 • Gastonia, NC 28053 704-825-4046 phone • 704-825-4066 fax donny.hicks@co.gaston.nc.us www.gaston.org

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Gastonia • Population: 67,914 • Total County Population: 198,673 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .190,365 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.2 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198,673 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.2 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204,095 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39.8 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.7% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.2% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21.0% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.4% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.1% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.9% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.4% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.7% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.4% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.6% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.3% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95,524

GASTON COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

-7.3

$537,684,006

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

24.9

Electronics & Appliance Stores -6.2

Food & Beverage Stores

-4.0

Health & Personal Care Stores

-3.9

-3.0

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$70,378,810 $270,744,005 $201,292,686

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

General Merchandise Store

$249,897,424 $83,878,599

-20.8

$37,904,836 -4.9

$408,922,081

-14.7

$30,654,638

Nonstore Retailers

LARGEST EMPLOYERS Employees

Wix Filtration Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+

17.4

Food Services & Drinking Places

$12,716,650

5.0

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

Freightliner of Mount Holly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+

0

20

$220,196,326 40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

© ESRI 2007

$24,289,950

-34.1

Gasoline Stations

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$29,152,106

18.5

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

ESRI 2007

Company (non-governmental)

Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

60

80 100

L/S Factor

American and Efird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+ Pharr Yarns, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500-999

GASTON COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Hanesbrands, Inc (formerly Sara Lee) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500-999 Gaston County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102,130 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95,524 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.5% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . .11,832 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.8% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma 19,065 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14.1% High School Graduate . . . . . . . .41,076 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.5% Some College, No Degree . . . . .27,194 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20.2% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . .10,454 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.8% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . .17,238 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.8% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree .7,910 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.9% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134,769 American Community Survey 2006

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$16,852-$28,744

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$39,476 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$19,225 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$49,483 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$24,112 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$57,071 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$28,558 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$28,745-$40,000 $40,001-$49,629 $49,630-$65,149 © ESRI 2007

$65,150-$106,538

67


I REDELL COUNTY

I

IREDELL COUNTY POPULATION

Iredell County stretches for nearly 50 miles from Yadkin County

in the north to Mecklenburg in the south. Incorporated in 1788, it was named for Judge James Iredell, attorney general of North Carolina during the Revolutionary War and delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1788. The name Iredell, originally Eyredale, dates back to year 1066 to the Battle of Hastings, and it means “a valley of flowing air.” With one of the 10 lowest tax rates in North Carolina, Iredell County offers a pro-business climate for companies seeking a location close to the Charlotte market. Access to reliable infrastructure, such as interstates I-77, I-40 and I-85, and airport facilities, such as the Regional Statesville Airport and Charlotte Douglas International Airport, make this county an ideal location for manufacturers and distributors alike and give the county its slogan, “Crossroads for the Future.” The northern third of the county remains highly rural with farming—

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

particularly diary farming—as the major source of income. However, most of Iredell’s population is in the southern half of the county where the popularity of Lake Norman, the nation’s largest manmade lake (32,510 acres), © ESRI 2007

IREDELL COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

has led to rapid suburbanization and population growth. Statesville, the county seat, to the north and Mooresville to the south represent the largest municipalities in Iredell County. Site Selection magazine has named the Statesville-Mooresville, N.C., area the Top Micropolitan Area in the nation for last three consecutive years based on the area’s ability to secure new corporate facility projects and expand existing operations.

21

Harmony

In Statesville, recent significant projects include the relocation of Doosan Infracore Portable Power, the largest Korean operation in North Carolina, which is expected to bring more than 400 jobs to the area, and Newell-Rubbermaid’s $20 million investment to move its aviation division to the Statesville Regional Airport.

Statesville

40

Mooresville is national headquarters for home-improvement giant

70

Lowe’s, whose corporate headquarters is expanding capacity. Its 157-acre Troutman

campus eventually will employ 9,000 people, creating one of the largest cor-

77

porate campuses in the 16-county region. Lowe’s corporate headquarters relocation from Wilkesboro to Mooresville in 2000 has been the catalyst for Mooresville

tremendous growth in southern Iredell County. Mooresville is also the heart of NASCAR country. Today the city of about 24,000 is known as “Race City USA.” It is headquarters to about 60 Tapestry by Block Group

race teams as well as the NASCAR Technical Institute.

LifeMode Name

68

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

Last year, racing components manufacturer DeBotech invested $2 million in a new 16,000-square-foot plant in Mooresville, convincing Riley Technologies, LLC to build a 40,000-square-foot shop next door. In 2006 © ESRI 2007

Mooresville was voted a Top Ten Place in the U.S. for Economic Development.

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www.charlotteUSA.com


Greater Statesville Development Corporation

Mooresville-South Iredell Chamber

C. Michael Smith, Director of Economic Development 115 E. Front St. • Statesville, NC 28677 704-871-0062 phone • 704-871-0223 fax info@gsdc.org www.gsdc.org

Russel Rogerson, Executive Director 151 East Iredell Ave • Mooresville, NC 28115 704-664-6922 phone • 704-664-2549 fax info@edcmooresville.org www.mooresvillenc.org

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Statesville • Population: 26,083 • Total County Population: 149,877 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122,660 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.5 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149,877 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.4 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171,561 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39.7 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14.5% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.7% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21.0% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.2% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.4% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.5% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.2% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.0% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.6% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72,349

IREDELL COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

Company (non-governmental)

Employees

-6.7

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$447,363,345

-10.1

$49,757,104

Electronics & Appliance Stores Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

44.2

Health & Personal Care Stores

$141,886,156 10.0

$176,443,624

-37.5

$139,657,730

Gasoline Stations

5.6

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$185,108,442 23.3

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$35,159,722

-3.4

General Merchandise Store Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$10,807,655

-36.7

Food & Beverage Stores

$17,550,458

-7.6

$298,420,636

-22.5

$37,920,758

Nonstore Retailers

10.8

Food Services & Drinking Places

11.5

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

Lowe’s Companies,Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,400 Ingersoll-Rand Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,200

Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

ESRI 2007

LARGEST EMPLOYERS

NC

0

$26,375,438 $163,377,838

20 40 60

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

80 100

L/S Factor

© ESRI 2007

J.C.P. Logistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,032 Davis Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 640

IREDELL COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Statesville Auto Auction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584 Iredell County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76,178 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72,349 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.0% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .2,937 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.0% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma 11,881 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.1% High School Graduate . . . . . . . .34,170 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34.9% Some College, No Degree . . . . .18,834 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19.2% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,495 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.7% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . .15,849 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16.2% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree .5,829 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.9% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97,996 American Community Survey 2006

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$13,667-$34,764

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$41,970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,149 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$52,663 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$26,399 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$61,292 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$31,586 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$34,765-$45,401 $45,402-$56,587 $56,588-$73,253 © ESRI 2007

$73,254-$113,669

69


LANCA ST ER COUNTY

L

LANCASTER COUNTY POPULATION

Lancaster County is located just

south of Charlotte and within three miles of the prestigious Ballantyne corporate office, residential, and commercial-retail section of Charlotte. It offers business and industry access to all of Charlotte’s amenities while also providing the advantages of a South Carolina location. Lancaster’s name can be traced back through settlers from Lancaster, Pa., to the House of Lancaster in 15th century England, when the War of the Roses was fought. Lancaster, the county seat monikered the “Rose City,” is a flourishing community which has maintained its small town charm. It is well known for being the corporate home of KMG America, Springs Industries and Duracell. Lancaster’s busy and historic downtown is also a popular destination for tourists. Historically, Lancaster County’s economy has been dominated by the textile industry. However, like many similar communities, Lancaster County

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

has made great strides in diversifying the local economy. Manufacturing operations have grown to include companies that specialize in construction materials, fabricated metal products, consumer goods, automotive suppliers, © ESRI 2007

LANCASTER COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

food and beverage products, broadband and communications, medical and safety apparatus, and plastics. Back office service centers such as Kennametal, Senderra Lending and Sharonview Federal Credit Union are a dominant presence that has recently entered the Lancaster County landscape. Recent additions to Lancaster County’s corporate community include URS Corporation’s Nuclear Center in Ft. Mill, serving as the headquarters for the Washington Division’s commercial nuclear energy engineering and construc-

521

tion business. The Center provides licensing, design, engineering, procurement and construction services for new nuclear-generation facilities and will employ more than 400 nuclear professionals over the next several years. Continental Tire has announced it will move its North American headquar-

Lancaster Lancaster Mill

ters from Charlotte to Lancaster in 2009, investing approximately $11 million

Irwin Springdale Elgin

in a new 75,000-square-foot facility in the Macmillan Business Park. Metso Power, a part of Metso Paper headquartered in Charlotte, has

Heath Springs

expanded its boiler service capacity in the U.S. with a new service center in the

Kershaw

Lancaster Business Park. The new investment marks an expansion of service offerings to the North American pulp and paper, and power generation markets. Additionally, Lancaster County boasts available land priced affordably in the Tapestry by Block Group

fastest growing area of Charlotte; attractive state and local incentives; excellent

LifeMode Name

70

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

access to transportation corridors (I-485, I-77 and U.S. 521); fast access to Charlotte Douglas International Airport; skilled available labor; a low cost of doing business in a right-to-work state; and access to low cost utility infrastructure and © ESRI 2007

construction costs that average 21 percent below the national average.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

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SC

Lancaster County Economic Development Commission Keith Tunnell, President P.O. Box 973 • Lancaster, SC 29721 803-285-9471 phone • 803-285-9472 fax keith.tunnell@lancastersc-edc.com www.lancastersc-edc.com

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Lancaster • Population: 7,983 • Total County Population: 65,179 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61,351 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.9 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65,179 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37.9 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67,795 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39.6 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.0% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31.0% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27.3% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.2% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.2% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.0% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.5% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.1% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.2% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.5% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27,752

LANCASTER COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

21.6

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

20.0

Electronics & Appliance Stores Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

Company (non-governmental)

Employees

Cardinal Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700

$7,079,077 $39,228,503

5.3

$89,603,062

-15.4

$30,770,835

Gasoline Stations

6.7

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$62,404,688 18.3

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$11,617,160

3.9

General Merchandise Store

$4,148,813

-2.5

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$85,629,657

-15.5

$12,789,285

-35.9

$1,304,249

Food Services & Drinking Places

0.7

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

Lancaster Hospital Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700

$8,801,491

-27.8

Health & Personal Care Stores

Nonstore Retailers

$92,554,160

31.7

Food & Beverage Stores

ESRI 2007

LARGEST EMPLOYERS

Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

0

$72,132,874

20 40 60

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

80 100

L/S Factor

© ESRI 2007

Duracell, USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601 Sharonview Federal Credit Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250

LANCASTER COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Kanawha Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Lancaster County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31,752 Employment Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27,752 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.6% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .4,596 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.4% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma .8,706 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19.7% High School Graduate . . . . . . . .15,776 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.7% Some College, No Degree . . . . . .7,689 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17.4% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,917 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.6% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . . .3,005 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.8% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree .1,502 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.4% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44,191 ESRI 2000, 2007

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$16,590-$23,927

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$34,740 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$16,276 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42,703 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,772 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$48,984 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$24,641 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$23,928-$34,192 $34,193-$43,721 $43,722-$50,392 © ESRI 2007

$50,393-$62,803

71


LI NCOLN COUNTY

L

LINCOLN COUNTY POPULATION

Lincoln County is nestled in the

majestic foothills of the Piedmont region of North Carolina. The county is in close proximity to Charlotte, a thriving city in the southeastern portion of the United States. Lincolnton, the county seat, is only 15 minutes from I-85 to the south; 15 minutes from I-40 to the north; and 35 minutes from I-77 to the east. The convenient location to three major interstates makes Lincoln County very accessible and attractive for business. Touting its strategic location within the region, Lincoln County is conveniently positioned within 57 percent of the United States population. Sixty-two percent of U.S. industry is within a 650-mile radius of this region. In fact, more than 130 million people can be reached by highway transportation in one day or two hours by air. Lincoln County, named for Benjamin Lincoln, a general in the Ameri-

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

can Revolutionary War, was formed in 1779. Lincolnton is the county seat. Lincoln County’s population has grown 22 percent over the past 10 years, well above the state population gain of 18 percent during that time. © ESRI 2007

Approximately, 4,000 newcomers moved to the county last year. Lincoln County has had several recent successes in both recruiting

LINCOLN COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

new businesses to the area and expanding existing industry. The county’s traditional strengths lie in manufacturing and distribution, however, proximity to the Charlotte market has prompted recent Class A office space development. The area is accessible and affordable for companies needing office space near, but not necessarily in Charlotte. Sabo Inc, a Brazil-based automotive supplier, recently opened a 30,000-square-foot facility after Lincoln County won out over seven other states and counties. In early 2008, a new GM contract drove the Westport

321

Lincolnton

company to announce a $20 million expansion that will triple the size of its current facility by 2010.

Boger City

Crate & Barrel is doubling its space in Lincoln County Industrial Park Lowesville

with a 40,000-square-foot “green” distribution center. Expected to be completed by June 2009, the expansion will initially create 70 new jobs, which will eventually grow to over 200. Other large manufacturing and logistics employers in Lincoln County include RSI Home Products, R.W. Garcia and Big Dog Holdings, as well as major manufacturers such as The Timken Company, National Fruit Prod-

Tapestry by Block Group

ucts, GE Security, Calico Coatings and Cataler North America.

LifeMode Name

72

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

From the Industrial Managers Association, to training assistance through Gaston College, to existing industry programs and assistance to new businesses, Lincoln County recognizes the importance of strong © ESRI 2007

business support.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


NC

Lincoln Economic Development Association Barry I. Matherly, Executive Director 502 E. Main St. • Lincolnton, NC 28092 704-732-1511 phone • 704-736-8451 fax leda@lincolneda.org www.lincolneda.org

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Lincolnton • Population: 10,433 • Total County Population: 73,688 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63,780 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.4 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73,688 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39.0 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80,786 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41.0 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.6% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33.0% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24.3% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.7% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.8% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.0% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.7% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.8% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.7% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.7% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35,306

LINCOLN COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

Employees

10.2

$14,804,705 50.3

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

Health & Personal Care Stores

$4,146,769

-12.5

$37,122,607

Food & Beverage Stores

0.6

$120,718,990

-47.9

$72,300,407

Gasoline Stations

-9.2

$119,129,794

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

21.1

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$10,617,425

-20.1

$10,602,009

General Merchandise Store

9.3

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$92,548,718

-27.4

$15,117,278

-47.0

$4,026,854

Food Services & Drinking Places

31.1

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

RSI Home Products, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,100 The Timken Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 950

$165,666,259

Electronics & Appliance Stores

Nonstore Retailers

LARGEST EMPLOYERS

4.7

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

ESRI 2007

Company (non-governmental)

Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

0

$44,774,250

20 40 60

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

80 100

L/S Factor

© ESRI 2007

Robert Bosch Tool Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530 Blum, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480

LINCOLN COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Mohican Mills, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Lincoln County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37,770 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,306 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.5% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .4,860 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.9% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma .9,123 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18.6% High School Graduate . . . . . . . .14,454 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29.4% Some College, No Degree . . . . . .9,175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18.7% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,215 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.6% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . . .5,898 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.0% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree .1,410 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.9% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49,135 American Community Survey 2006

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$24,740-$33,327

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$41,659 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,877 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$49,819 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$23,106 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$55,718 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$26,308 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$33,328-$41,799 $41,800-$52,514 $52,515-$66,396 © ESRI 2007

$66,397-$103,676

73


M E C KLEN B U RG COUNTY

M

MECKLENBURG COUNTY POPULATION

Mecklenburg County is located in the

south central portion of North Carolina, with its center at the intersection of Interstates 77 and 85, and bordered on the west by the Catawba River, and on the south by South Carolina. The county was formed in 1763 and named for the German hometown of Charlotte Sophia of Mecklenburg-Stelitz, who became the bride of England’s King George III in 1762. The county seat, initially named “Charlotte Town” for Queen Charlotte, was established in 1768. The city of Charlotte, the largest urban area in the Carolinas, is located in the center of Mecklenburg County. The city is the heart of the greater metropolitan area and is ranked the 20th largest city in the U.S with nearly 700,000 residents. Over the next 10 years, Charlotte is expected to grow in population by another 40 percent, making it one of the fastest-growing cities in the country.

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

In addition to Charlotte, there are six separately incorporated municipalities located in Mecklenburg County, three to the north of Charlotte and three to the south. The creation of Lake Norman by © ESRI 2007

MECKLENBURG COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

Duke Power in 1963 helped shape the future of the three northern towns—Davidson, Cornelius and Huntersville—all part of the Lake Norman community. South of Charlotte, there are the separate municipalities of Pineville, Matthews and, the youngest of all, Mint Hill.

Cornelius

Davidson

While Charlotte is typically perceived as a banking center, the local economy enjoys a vibrant, balanced economy that encompasses many sectors. Eight Fortune 500 companies are headquartered here, and

Huntersville 21

Mecklenburg County is the largest manufacturing county in North Carolina. The commercial and industrial diversity enables the local 85

economy to withstand inevitable economic ups and downs. Manufacturing facilities, professional services centers, research and development laboratories and logistics operations all thrive simultaneously in

29

this vibrant economy.

277

521

Charlotte

74

Largest employers in the county include Bank of America, Wachovia,

Mint Hill

Duke Energy and Carolinas Healthcare System. While large corporations dominate the uptown landscape, there are many, smaller busi-

Matthews

77

nesses that thrive and provide stability for the local economy. Recently

Pineville 485

cited by Entrepreneur Magazine as one of the best cities in the nation for entrepreneurs to start and run a business, Charlotte’s access to capTapestry by Block Group

ital, intellect and professional services is unmatched by other cities in

LifeMode Name

74

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

the South. Recent relocations and expansions to the area include The Shaw Group, Maersk, SPEED Channel, Diamond Manufacturing, Convergys, © ESRI 2007

Tessera Technologies, Polypore International and LESER LLC.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


NC

City of Charlotte

Charlotte Chamber of Commerce Jeff Edge, Senior Vice President Business Development P.O. Box 32785 • Charlotte, NC 28232 704-378-1300 phone • 704-374-1903 fax jedge@charlottechamber.com www.charlottechamber.com

Tom Flynn, Economic Development Director 600 East 4th St. • Charlotte, NC 28202-2244 704-432-1396 phone 704-336-6644 fax tflynn@ci.charlotte.nc.us

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Charlotte • Population: 631,006 • Total County Population: 855,127 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .695,454 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33.1 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .855,127 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34.8 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .985,683 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.8 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15.3% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42.7% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15.1% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.5% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.2% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.5% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.4% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.1% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.2% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.2% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .424,061

MECKLENBURG COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

7.4

$2,440,257,885

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

5.2

$414,800,483

Electronics & Appliance Stores

$381,847,445

-10.0

$496,730,994

Food & Beverage Stores Health & Personal Care Stores

13.0

$1,014,707,774 12.6

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

-6.4

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

-4.8

General Merchandise Store Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$1,555,602,599

-33.1

Gasoline Stations

Nonstore Retailers

LARGEST EMPLOYERS

-0.5

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

ESRI 2007

Company (non-governmental) Employees Carolinas HealthCare System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26,283 Wachovia Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20,000 Bank of America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,960 WalMart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,918 Food Lion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,658 Duke Energy Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,500

Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

$1,028,167,245 $815,553,911 $194,125,312

-8.4

$1,274,630,008

-15.5

$258,502,464

-8.5

$527,474,160

Food Services & Drinking Places

2.3

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

0

20

$1,577,926,880 40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

© ESRI 2007

MECKLENBURG COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Mecklenburg County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 453,664 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424,061 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.5% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . .23,259 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.3% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma 42,481 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.9% High School Graduate . . . . . . .119,767 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22.3% Some College, No Degree . . . .105,114 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19.5% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . .42,809 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.0% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . .139,630 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25.9% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree 65,212 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.1% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .538,272 American Community Survey 2006

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$0-$44,473

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$50,638 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,353 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$65,741 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$36,594 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$78,572 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45,527 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$44,474-$68,440 $68,441-$98,031 $98,032-$151,882 © ESRI 2007

$151,883-$232,796

75


ROWAN COUNTY

R

ROWAN COUNTY POPULATION

Rowan County to the north-

east of Charlotte offers superior access to interstate highways, international and regional airports, as well as rail service.The county is located along I-85 and provides an ideal location for warehouses, manufacturing and distribution facilities. Convenient air access via two international airports within approximately 50 miles—Charlotte Douglas International Airport and the Triad International Airport in Greensboro, N.C.—provide the reliable infrastructure necessary for transporting goods and people. The largest consolidated rail system in the country is centered in this region. Rowan County was named for colonial governor Matthew Rowan, who signed the bill creating Rowan County in 1753. Salisbury, the county seat, was established two years later. Many prominent figures in history are connected with the area, among them Daniel Boone, Andrew Jackson and Peter Stuart Nay, one of Napoleon’s ablest generals.

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

Salisbury was named after the cathedral town in England. It was, at one time, the leading edge of the American frontier. As the largest city in western North Carolina in the 18th and early 19th centuries, © ESRI 2007

ROWAN COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

Salisbury was the major center for trade and politics. The coming of the railroad in 1859 further boosted the town’s economy and stimulated industry. Today Salisbury is known as “Tree City USA” and is home to the famed North Carolina soft drink, Cheerwine. It is the site of a noted prisoner of war camp during the American Civil War and has a large historic home district with many large mansions, several of which are on the national Register of Historic Places. Major employers in Rowan County include Daimler Truck North America’s heavy truck manufacturing facility, medical centers such as the

Cleveland 70

29

VA Medical Center and Rowan Regional Medical Center, corporate head-

Spencer

quarters for Food Lion LLC, and manufacturers such as Invista and PGT

Salisbury

Industries. Rowan County includes a healthy cross section of growing

601

industries, providing a stable economy for residents and newcomers alike.

Granite Quarry

Toyota Racing Development announced a new facility to house its

China Grove

29

NASCAR competition group and chassis engineering operation in Sal-

Rockwell

Landis 85

isbury, N.C. The company evaluated several other locations across the country before deciding Rowan County would provide the best location for this highly technical research and development operation.

Tapestry by Block Group

Food Lion LLC recently unveiled its new state-of-the-art customer

LifeMode Name

76

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

support center, a $26 million conversion of a one-story perishable

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

warehouse that meets LEED standards. The new facility will house

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

approximately 450 of the 1,200 associates that are employed at the © ESRI 2007

headquarters location.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


NC

Salisbury-Rowan Economic Development Commission Robert M. Van Geons, Executive Director 204 East Innes St. • Salisbury, NC 28144 704-637-5526 phone • 704-637-0173 fax vangeonsr@rowanedc.com www.rowanedc.com

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Salisbury • Population: 27,167 • Total County Population: 136,558 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130,340 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.5 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136,558 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.2 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140,092 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39.5 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.6% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.8% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20.9% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.1% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.3% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.2% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.0% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.4% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.4% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.2% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.6% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65,475

ROWAN COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

14.1

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$230,723,055 22.3

Electronics & Appliance Stores

29.9

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$51,273,234 17.5

Health & Personal Care Stores

$152,501,489

-29.9

Gasoline Stations

$96,142,090 -11.8

$216,600,892

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

22.5

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$15,462,757

-16.7

$150,558,639

-54.9

$41,605,984

Nonstore Retailers

LARGEST EMPLOYERS Company (non-governmental)

Employees

Food Lion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000

48.3

Food Services & Drinking Places

$12,481,082

17.9

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

Freightliner, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,000

$37,232,189

1.7

General Merchandise Store

ESRI 2007

$10,098,906

-6.5

Food & Beverage Stores

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$29,257,471

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

$110,493,369 60

80 100

L/S Factor

© ESRI 2007

Invista. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800 Wal-Mart Associates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500

ROWAN COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

PGT Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500 Rowan County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70,852 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65,475 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.6% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .7,451 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.1% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma 13,891 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15.2% High School Graduate . . . . . . . .29,304 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32.0% Some College, No Degree . . . . .18,491 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20.2% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,837 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.7% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . .10,434 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.4% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree .3,058 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91,466 American Community Survey 2006

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$18,447-$26,372

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37,541 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,072 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45,881 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,214 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$52,254 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,827 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$26,373-$42,210 $42,211-$50,119 $50,120-$61,377 © ESRI 2007

$61,378-$80,257

77


STA NLY COUNTY

S

STANLY COUNTY POPULATION

Stanly County is located 45

miles northeast of Charlotte in the Uwharrie Lakes Region of the state. It has been described as the “Central Park of North Carolina.” The area is rich in cultural, historical, natural and recreational assets. The county was established in 1841 and named for John Stanly, who served in the N.C. House of Commons and the United States House of Representatives. Stanly County is home to Morrow State Park, part of the Uwharrie Mountain Range, and two lakes, Lake Tilery and Baiden Lake. The city of Albemarle is the county seat. It was incorporated in 1857 and named for George Monck, the Duke of Albemarle, who was one of the eight Lords Proprietors granted the province of Carolina by King Charles II. Albemarle’s early growth in the late 19th and early 20th century was generated by the growth of large textile mills. These mills remained an important part of the city’s economy until the 1980s and 1990s when a

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

more diversified economy began to emerge. Stanly County boasts a low tax rate, substantial economic development incentives for new or expanding businesses, and a strong © ESRI 2007

STANLY COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

“right-to-work” philosophy. As a result, Stanly County presents a truly business-friendly and productive environment for corporate relocation or expansion. Educational assets in Stanly County include Pfeiffer University, which offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in business and liberal arts concentrations; Stanly Community College, which offers a

Richfield

variety of associates degrees, diploma programs and training programs

New London

linked to local industry needs; and the Stanly County Schools System Badin

52

in which seven schools were designated as Schools of Distinction and 100 as Schools of Excellence.

Albemarle

A wide variety of industry is represented throughout Stanly County, from manufacturers of power transmission components and hydraulic hoses to textiles and aircraft parts and equipment. Major employers in the region consist of industry leaders such as Collins & Aikman Corporation,

Locust

Stanfield

Oakboro

Michelin Aircraft Tires Corporation, Schult Homes, Fiber Composites

Norwood

LLC, American Fiber & Finishing and SPX Corporation. Stanly County includes an abundance of affordable greenfield and industrial sites, four of which have attained North Carolina certified status. Prime Power Park, one of the North Carolina certified sites, offers Tapestry by Block Group

direct rail access, redundant electrical power and on-site power genera-

LifeMode Name Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

tion to prevent brownouts and blackouts. The site sits adjacent to the Stanly County Airport, which features a 5,500-foot runway and a sophisticated Instrument Landing System that can accommodate military cargo © ESRI 2007

78

jets and more than 60 private, corporate jets.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


NC

Stanly County Economic Development Commission Michael Trotter, Executive Director 1000 N. First St. • Suite 11 • Albemarle, NC 28001 704-986-3683 phone • 704-986-3685 fax motrotter@comporium.net www.stanlyedc.org

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Albemarle • Population: 15,982 • Total County Population: 60,470 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58,100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37.0 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60,470 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39.1 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61,823 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40.6 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.4% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20.8% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.2% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.6% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.1% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.9% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.6% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.4% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.0% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.0% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28,394

STANLY COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

27.4

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

33.8

Electronics & Appliance Stores

$24,172,851 0.2

$29,390,082 -1.3

$67,401,110

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

26.9

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

20.7

General Merchandise Store

LARGEST EMPLOYERS

Michelin Aircraft Tire Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350

$83,436,739 $22,006,301

15.1

$14,730,402

19.4

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

International Automotive Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420

$3,366,625

-22.9

Food Services & Drinking Places

Employees

$7,325,630

1.3

Nonstore Retailers

Company (non-governmental)

$84,532,893

-22.7

Gasoline Stations

ESRI 2007

$2,643,742

-5.4

Food & Beverage Stores

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$5,979,383

38.1

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

Health & Personal Care Stores

$80,965,930

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

$42,445,069 60

80 100

L/S Factor

© ESRI 2007

Schult Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Palm Harbor Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250

STANLY COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Fiber Composites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Stanly County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30,047 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28,394 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.5% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .3,784 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.1% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma .7,235 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17.4% High School Graduate . . . . . . . .14,928 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.9% Some College, No Degree . . . . . .7,360 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17.7% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,911 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.0% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . . .3,784 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.1% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree .1,497 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.6% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41,583 ESRI 2000, 2007

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$19,503-$32,021

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$36,941 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17,825 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$44,575 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,798 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$50,403 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$24,983 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$32,022-$42,397 $42,398-$48,525 $48,526-$55,341 © ESRI 2007

$55,342-$70,290

79


U NI ON COUNTY

U

UNION COUNTY POPULATION

Union County is located in

the Southern Piedmont section of North Carolina, midway between the mountains and the coast. Established in 1842, its name was a compromise between the Whigs who wanted to name it for Henry Clay and the Democrats who preferred Andrew Jackson. The county seat, Monroe, was named in honor of James Monroe, the nation’s fifth president. The soil was great for farming and the new communities prospered. As the center of a successful agricultural area, Monroe prospered, particularly after 1874 when the Seaboard Railroad joined the town to other areas. Poultry, grain, dairy and beef cattle farms are still the backbone of agriculture in Union County. It is among the top poultry producers in North Carolina. Cuddy Farms, which includes both poultry growers and processing plants, employs approximately 900 people. Morgan horses are bred and trained at Apple Flat Farms, which occupies 73 acres in north-

Density of Population per Square Mile 0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

ern Union County. It has a training barn that can house 24 horses. Union County is the fastest growing county in North Carolina. The county’s population has increased by 66 percent in the past 10 years, © ESRI 2007

UNION COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

compared to 18 percent for the state as a whole. Nationwide, the county ranks as the 15th fastest growing. Monroe, the county’s largest city, increased its population by 30 percent since 2000. According to the last U.S. Census in 2000, approximately 41 percent of Union County residents commute to Mecklenburg County daily. Billed as “Charlotte’s best neighborhood,” the city of Monroe has evolved into far more than just a bedroom community for Charlotte. A highly diversified industrial base has helped Union County

601

weather fluctuations that inevitably arise during cyclical ups and

Stallings Hemby Bridge Lake Park Unionville

downs. And a skilled work force helps industry meet the changing

Indian Trail 74

needs. Today, Monroe is home to over 100 medium to large manufacWeddington Wesley Chapel

turing and distribution companies. Global giants such as Goodrich,

Monroe

Marvin Wingate

Marshville

ATI Allvac, Greiner Bio-One, Tyson Foods, TYCO/Scott Health and Safety, Cyril Bath and BonaKemi USA have substantial operations in

Mineral Springs Waxhaw

Union County. Union County also has strong international ties. Local developers visit the home office of these multinational companies as often as

JAARS

possible. Turbomeca Manufacturing Inc., a French-owned firm, recently located an advanced aerospace manufacturing facility in Tapestry by Block Group

Monroe. The company is investing $46 million in a 120,000-square-

LifeMode Name

80

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

foot plant. Additionally, ATI Allvac has completed a $210 million expansion to its existing facility, the largest expansion investment in Monroe’s his© ESRI 2007

tory, adding 125 new jobs.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


Union County Partnership for Progress

Monroe Economic Development

Maurice Ewing, President and CEO 903 Skyway Dr., P.O. Box 292 • Monroe, NC 28111-0292 704-291-9860 phone • 704-283-3861 fax mdewing1@ctc.net www.unioncpp.com

R. Christopher Platé, Director P.O. Box 69 • Monroe, NC 28111-0069 704-282-5780 phone • 704-282-5788 fax cplate@monroenc.org www.developmonroe.com

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Monroe • Population: 31,543 • Total County Population: 178,366 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123,677 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33.9 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178,366 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35.5 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .235,046 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.2 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31.8% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36.1% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.3% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.7% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.2% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.1% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.5% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.6% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81,302 ESRI 2007

UNION COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

10.9

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores Electronics & Appliance Stores Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

Employees

$78,593,063 18.2

ATI Allvac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,110

$219,019,529

-13.6

$97,899,404 8.9

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$189,845,264 30.8

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$8,502,609

16.9

$192,990,754

-3.8

$24,187,038 10.9

$84,594,101

Food Services & Drinking Places

40.2

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

© ESRI 2007

$41,855,745

11.5

General Merchandise Store

Tyson Foods, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,120

$35,780,858

-1.4

Gasoline Stations

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$30,784,974

19.7

Food & Beverage Stores Health & Personal Care Stores

$387,091,401 30.0

Nonstore Retailers

LARGEST EMPLOYERS Company (non-governmental)

NC

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

$94,539,358 80 100

L/S Factor

Union MMC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 956 McGee Brothers Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 720

UNION COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Charlotte Pipe & Foundry, Plastics Division. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650 Union County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85,820 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81,302 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .6,184 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.6% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma 12,728 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.4% High School Graduate . . . . . . . .31,851 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28.6% Some College, No Degree . . . . .21,832 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19.6% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.1% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . .22,010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19.8% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree .7,571 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.8% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111,179 American Community Survey 2006

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$25,818-$39,858

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$50,622 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,979 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$64,184 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$28,179 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$76,387 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$34,422 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$39,859-$55,848 $55,849-$67,241 $67,242-$80,614 © ESRI 2007

$80,615-$119,402

81


YORK COUNTY

Y

YORK COUNTY POPULATION

York County is located in the Piedmont of South Carolina, bordered by

the Broad River on the west and the Catawba River on the east, both of which originate in the Blue Ridge Mountains of western North Carolina. Much of the western part of the county is still agricultural and is home to peach orchards, strawberry and vegetable fields, and greenhouse operations. A historically significant development for York County was the 1904 completion of Catawba Dam and Power Plant, leading to the subsequent construction of a series of dams and hydroelectric facilities on the Catawba River. By 1911, the Catawba Power Plant alone was sparking the industrialization of the Catawba Valley, powering more than a million textile spindles. York County capitalizes on its geography, offering the advantages of a South Carolina location and business climate with benefits of being adja-

Density of Population per Square Mile

cent to Charlotte, the largest metropolitan area in the two Carolinas.

0 - 1,100

5,501 - 6,600

11,001 - 12,100

1,101 - 2,200

6, 601 - 7,700

12,101 - 13,200

2,201 - 3,300

7,701 - 8,800

13, 201 - 14,300

3,301 - 4,400

8,801 - 9,900

14,301 - 15,400

4,401 - 5,500

9,901 - 11,000

15,401 - 16,500

The county’s eastern third, which includes Rock Hill, is witnessing rapid growth and development, much of which is due to increasing devel© ESRI 2007

opment pressure from Charlotte. In the past several years, York County has averaged $200 million industry and business development and 1,700

YORK COUNTY COMMUNITY™ TAPESTRY™

new jobs annually. Since 2000, reported investment totaled over $1 billion and 8,000 new jobs. York Technical College’s training and degree programs prepare students for employment with major companies. The college has forged partnerships with local industry to provide technical skills employers are

Clover

seeking in the workplace. There is a broad spectrum of programs from

Lake Wylie

which students can choose. The campus also houses the Institute for Manufacturing Productivity, a joint effort between the college and local

Smyrna

Tega Cay

21

India Hook Riverview

York

Fort Mill

Recent additions to York County’s business community include Daim-

Newport

Hickory Grove

manufacturers to provide quality training opportunities for employees.

77

ler Trucks North America, formerly known as Freightliner, which is relo-

Sharon Rock Hill

cating its corporate sales and marketing operations to York County from

321

Lesslie

Portland, Ore., and will be employing approximately 300 employees. With a reliable infrastructure network to reach destinations across

McConnells

the country and beyond, logistics and manufacturing operations represent a growing sector of the local economy. Ross Stores, Black & Decker and Northern Tool & Equipment have significant distribution centers in the Tapestry by Block Group

county. Also prevalent are major manufacturers in the transportation

LifeMode Name

82

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Metropolis

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

Senior Styles

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Society

industry such as American Eagle Wheel Corp, Arvin Meritor, Atotech USA, Champion Laboratories and Hella Lighting. Domtar Paper recently announced plans to add 90 jobs at its Fort Mill operations center and © ESRI 2007

invest $1 million in expansions in the next year.

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www.charlotteUSA.com


Rock Hill Economic Development Corporation

York County Economic Development Board

Stephen Turner, Executive Director P.O. Box 11706 • Rock Hill, SC 29731 803-329-7090 phone • 803-329-7007 fax stephenturner@ci.rock-hill.sc.us www.rhedc.org

J. Mark Farris, Director 1830 Second Baxter Crossing • Fort Mill, SC 29708 803-802-4300 phone • 803-802-4299 fax mark.farris@yorkcountygov.com www.ycedb.com

P O P U L AT I O N Largest City: Rock Hill • Population: 57,672 • Total County Population: 203,817 Year Total Population Median Age 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164,614 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34.9 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203,817 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37.3 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .236,493 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.5 2007-2012 Percentage Growth Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16.0% ESRI 2007

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS) % Population Employees 16+ Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.2% Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17.6% Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.3% Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.1% Finance/Insurance/Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.0% Transportation/Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.9% Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.0% Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.7% Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.5% Agriculture/Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.6% Total Employed Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94,934

YORK COUNTY LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

Company (non-governmental)

Employees

-4.0

$576,900,683

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

8.7

Electronics & Appliance Stores Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

Health & Personal Care Stores Gasoline Stations

General Merchandise Store

$114,391,624 15.5

$293,704,820

-18.9

$133,755,087 -5.0

$296,384,061 5.5

$107,399,493

-0.4

$25,103,839

-6.1

$180,764,061

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

2.3

Nonstore Retailers

1.2

Food Services & Drinking Places

$35,171,334 $28,563,415 8.0

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

© ESRI 2007

$40,866,743

-15.0

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$76,103,557 20.1

Food & Beverage Stores

Ross Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,800 Wells Fargo Home Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,469

Retail Sales

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

ESRI 2007

LARGEST EMPLOYERS

SC

0

20

$234,281,748 40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Citi Financial. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,411 Duke Power - Catawba Nuclear Station. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,071

YORK COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Abitibi Bowater, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 957 York County 2007

L A B O R PA R T I C I PAT I O N 2007 Civilian Population 16+ in Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103,379 Employed Civilian Population 16+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94,934 Unemployment Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2% ESRI 2007

W O R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number % Work Force 25+ Less Than 9th Grade . . . . . . . . . .6,408 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.9% 9th to 12th Grade, No Diploma 12,034 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.2% High School Graduate . . . . . . . .40,173 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.8% Some College, No Degree . . . . .27,770 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21.3% Associate Degree . . . . . . . . . . . .12,632 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.7% Bachelor's Degree . . . . . . . . . . .21,150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16.2% Master's/Prof/Doctorate Degree 10,368 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.9% Total Population 25+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130,534 American Community Survey 2006

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME

$23,991-$36,992

Year Median Household Per Capita 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$44,564 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,536 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$55,229 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$26,561 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$64,676 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$31,905 ESRI 2007

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

$36,993-$49,902 $49,903-$62,844 $62,845-$103,328 © ESRI 2007

$103,329-$339,286

83


E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T C O N TA C T S

ALEXANDER COUNTY Alexander County David A. Icenhour Economic Development Director 621 Liledoun Rd. Taylorsville, NC 28681 828-632-1161 phone; 828-632-0059 fax dicenhour@alexandercountync.gov www.alexanderedc.org ANSON COUNTY Anson County Economic Development Misty Harris Director 114 North Greene St. Wadesboro, NC 28170 704-694-2796 phone; 704-694-7015 fax mharris@co.anson.nc.us www.ansonedc.org CABARRUS COUNTY Cabarrus County Economic Development Ryan McDaniels Director of Economic Development 3003 Dale Earnhardt Blvd. Kannapolis, NC 28083 704-782-4000 phone; 704-782-4050 fax rmcdaniels@cabarrus.biz www.cabarrusedc.com CATAWBA COUNTY Catawba County Economic Development Corporation Scott L. Millar, President

1960-B 13th Ave. Dr., SE Hickory, NC 28602 828-267-1564 phone; 828-267-1884 fax smillar@catawbacountync.gov www.catawbaedc.org CHESTER COUNTY Chester County Economic Development Karlisa Parker Economic Development Director 121 Main, P.O. Drawer 580, Chester, SC 29706 803-377-1216 phone; 803-377-2102 fax kparker@choosechester.com www.chestercounty.org CHESTERFIELD COUNTY Chesterfield County Economic Development Board Cherry G. McCoy Executive Director P.O. Box 192, Chesterfield, SC 29709 843-623-6500 phone; 843-623-3167 fax cherryatcc@shtc.net www.chesterfieldcountysc.org CLEVELAND COUNTY Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce Dave Hart Vice President Economic Development P.O. Box 879 Shelby, NC 28151 704-487-8521 phone; 704-487-7458 fax dave@clevelandchamber.org www.clevelandchamber.org

GASTON COUNTY Gaston County Economic Development Commission Donny Hicks Executive Director P.O. Box 2339 Gastonia, NC 28053 704-825-4046 phone; 704-825-4066 fax donny.hicks@co.gaston.nc.us www.gaston.org IREDELL COUNTY Greater Statesville Development Corporation C. Michael Smith Director of Economic Development 115 E. Front St. Statesville, NC 28677 704-871-0062 phone; 704-871-0223 fax info@gsdc.org www.gsdc.org Mooresville-South Iredell Chamber Russell Rogerson Executive Director 151 East Iredell Ave. Mooresville, NC 28115 704-664-6922 phone; 704-664-2549 fax info@edcmooresville.org www.mooresvillenc.org LANCASTER COUNTY Lancaster County Economic Development Commission Keith Tunnell, President P.O. Box 973 Lancaster, SC 29721 803-285-9471 phone; 803-285-9472 fax keith.tunnell@lancastersc-edc.com www.lancastersc-edc.com LINCOLN COUNTY Lincoln Economic Development Association Barry I. Matherly Executive Director 502 E. Main St. Lincolnton, NC 28092 704-732-1511 phone; 704-736-8451 fax leda@lincolneda.org www.lincolneda.org

trust+strategy+integrity+planning+insight+experience

p,

it all adds up.

At the lake:

Uptown office:

Daniel, Ratliff & Company 107 Kilson Dr., Ste. 205, Mooresville, NC 28117

Daniel, Ratliff & Company 301 S. McDowell St., Ste. 502, Charlotte, NC 28204

704.663.0193

704.371.5000

www.danielratliff.com

84

MECKLENBURG COUNTY Charlotte Chamber of Commerce Jeff Edge Senior Vice President Business Development P.O. Box 32785 Charlotte, NC 28232 704-378-1300 phone; 704-374-1903 fax jedge@charlottechamber.com www.charlottechamber.com City of Charlotte Tom Flynn Economic Development Director 600 East 4th St., Charlotte, NC 28202-2244 704-432-1396 phone; 704-336-6644 fax tflynn@ci.charlotte.nc.us www.charmeck.nc.us

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â&#x20AC;˘

www.charlotteUSA.com


ROWAN COUNTY Salisbury-Rowan Economic Development Commission Robert M. Van Geons Executive Director 204 East Innes St. Salisbury, NC 28144 704-637-5526 phone; 704-637-0173 fax vangeonsr@rowanedc.com www.rowanedc.com STANLY COUNTY Stanly County Economic Development Commission Michael Trotter Executive Director 1000 North First St., Ste. 11 Albemarle, NC 28001 704-986-3683 phone; 704-986-3685 fax motrotter@comporium.net www.stanlyedc.org

6*'%11.'49#;61

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UNION COUNTY Monroe Economic Development R. Christopher PlatĂŠ Director P.O. Box 69, Monroe, NC 28111-0069 704-282-5780 phone; 704-282-5788 fax cplate@monroenc.org www.developmonroe.com Union County Partnership for Progress Maurice Ewing President & CEO 903 Skyway Dr., PO Box 292 Monroe, NC 28111-0292 704-291-9860 phone; 704-283-3861 fax mdewing1@ctc.net www.unioncpp.com YORK COUNTY Rock Hill Economic Development Corporation Stephen Turner Executive Director P.O. Box 11706, Rock Hill, SC 29731 803-329-7090 phone; 803-329-7007 fax stephenturner@ci.rock-hill.sc.us www.rhedc.org York County Economic Development Board J. Mark Farris Director 1830 Second Baxter Crossing Fort Mill, SC 29708 803-802-4300 phone; 803-802-4299 fax mark.farris@yorkcountygov.com www.ycedb.com Charlotte Region Charlotte Regional Partnership Kenny McDonald Sr. Vice President 1001 Morehead Square Dr., Ste. 200 Charlotte, NC 28203 800-554-4373 toll free 704-347-8942 phone; 704-347-8981 fax kmcdonald@charlotteusa.com www.charlotteusa.com

;17 &10Âś6 *#8' 61 )1 61 )4'#6 .'0)6*5 61 )1 )4''0 6*#0-5 61 &+#/10& 524+0)5 174 4'6740#$.'    )#..10 $166.'5 #4' 6*1417)*.; %.'#0'&  5#0+6+<'& $'(14' $'+0) 4'(+..'& 9+6* 274' &'.+%+175 &+#/10& 524+0)5 9#6'4 +0 (#%6 9*'0 +6Âś5 6+/' 61 6#-' 6*'/ 176 1( 5'48+%' 6*';Âś4' 4'%;%.'& &1 ;1745'.( 51/' )11& $; .+(6+0) # ).#55 #0& &1 ;174 2.#0'6 51/' )11&9+6*176.+(6+0)#(+0)'4 &+#/10&524+0)56*'%11.'49#;61)1)4''0

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(14/14'+0(14/#6+10%#..148+5+6999&+#/10&524+0)5%#41.+0#5%1/

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

85


Charlotte Regional Partnership Kenny McDonald, Sr. Vice President 1001 Morehead Square Dr., Ste. 200 Charlotte, NC 28203 USA 800-554-4373 • 704-347-8942 phone • 704-347-8981 fax

REGIONAL INFORMATION AND SERVICES AVAILABLE FOR RELOCATING BUSINESSES WHO WE ARE The Charlotte Regional Partnership is an independent, non-profit, regional economic development organization representing 16 counties (12 in N.C., 4 in S.C.). Our organization works closely with both states, local communities, utilities, as well as private companies to recruit new businesses, new investments, and new jobs to the Charlotte region, to raise the standard of living for everyone in our area. PROGRAM OF WORK Goal #1: To market and promote Charlotte USA to the world as a superior business location. Goal #2: To allocate and leverage regional and organizational resources to sustain and enhance the economic growth, prosperity, and global competitiveness of the Charlotte region. Goal #3: To initiate and participate in strategic organizational and regional planning to identify, assess, and develop assets required to provide sustained and sustainable economic growth, prosperity, and superior quality of life in the Charlotte region.

TYPES OF ACTIVITIES Business Mission: The CRP creates and builds upon business relationships with industry executives and their advisory firms around the world by visiting them directly to discuss the Charlotte region as a business location alternative. Industry Conferences: The CRP identifies a small number of industry conferences to target for business development purposes. Hosted Events: The CRP hosts business executives throughout the year at various events in the region in order to review specific regional assets and to build familiarity with the region. Such events include NFL Carolina Panthers games and the Wachovia Championship golf tournament. Business Development Research: The CRP conducts and procures research within industry clusters and other baseline databases to create target lists of companies and business executives to whom high-level, informational messages about Charlotte USA are sent. 86

ATTRACTING NEW AND EXPANDING COMPANIES Targeted types of business: • Headquarters and back office operations • Advanced manufacturing and distribution operations • U.S. subsidiary operations of foreign-based multinational companies Targeted industry clusters: • Automotive • Financial Services and Insurance • Machine Manufacturing • Motorsports • Medical Equipment Manufacturing • Metalworking • Pharmaceutical Manufacturing • Plastics

Public Relations & Advertising: The Charlotte USA campaign has had a dramatic impact on the ability of the CRP to “brand” the region. Building upon that work with targeted public relations messages in target industry and regional publications is essential. Editorial content about growing businesses and economic issues in the Charlotte region are a proven way to increase awareness of the area. Limited advertising to procure editorial content for reprint is also warranted to provide material that can be used for select industries. Web Site Development & Marketing: The Web site is a critical asset for the region. It is used both as a business development tool to reach companies around the world and as a research tool for companies and economic developers across the region. Consistent investment in this asset is important so that it remains relevant and can be found by those searching for business locations. ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


T

www.charlotteusa.com hanks to the generosity of companies in the Charlotte region that support regional economic development...

Targeted geographic areas: • North America: Northeast, Midwest, California, Canada • Europe: Western Europe, Scandinavia • Asia: Japan, Korea, China OUR SERVICES We assist companies free of charge in a variety of ways: • Site/Location Search • Work Force Demographics • Transportation Analysis • Customized Research • Tax and Project Incentive Analysis • Introduction to Service Providers

Adams Outdoor Advertising A Home on the Go Corporate Suites Allen Tate Company Alston & Bird, LLP AME Inc. Industrial Contractors AM King Construction Apple Rock Displays Arcadis AT&T North Carolina Bank of America Corporation BB&T Beacon Partners Belk, Inc. Bissell Companies Black Pages USA BL Seamon Bobcats Sports & Entertainment Carolina CAT Carolina Panthers Castle & Cooke, Inc. CB Richard Ellis/ Trammel Crow Central Piedmont Community College Charlotte Business Journal Charlotte City Club Charlotte Regional Visitors Authority Cherry, Bekaert & Holland, L.L.P Chester County Natural Gas Authority Childress Klein Properties Choate Construction Company Coca-Cola Bottling Consolidated Consolidated Theatres Crowne Plaza Charlotte Daimler Trucks North America Deloitte Services LP Dole Fresh Vegetable Company Duke Energy - Carolinas ECS Carolinas, LLP EJB World Trade, LLC Enterprise Rent-A-Car Food Lion LLC FNB United Garfinkel Immigration Law Firm Glauerdt GmBH Glauerdt U.S.A. Goodrich Corporation Greater Charlotte Biz Greer & Walker LLP Hilton Charlotte Center City Holiday Inn Center City In 2 Furniture In the Public Interest Johnson & Wales University Klingman Williams Koll Development Company KPMG Lancaster & Chester Railway Company

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

Lancaster County Natural Gas Authority Langford de Kock LLP Lauth Property Group Lincoln Harris Little Diversified Architectural Consulting Lufthansa Luquire George Andrews Magellan Idea Center MarkPiercePoole Properties, Inc. Matrix Real Estate Services Merrifield Partners National Gypsum Company Nucor Corporation Palmetto Economic Development Corp. Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP Park Sterling Bank PARSONS Peak 10 Percival McGuire Commercial Real Estate Pharr Yarns Philip Morris USA Piedmont Natural Gas Company PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP PROSHRED Prudential Carolinas Realty PSNC Energy Samet Corporation Shelco, Inc. Sherpa LLC Shiel Sexton Company Inc. Southern Real Estate Speedway Motorsports, Inc. Stanford SteelFab, Inc. Stewart Engineering, Inc. Talking Points Technology Project Management The Charlotte Observer The Keith Corporation The Knox Group The McAulay Firm The Nichols Company The Springs Company The Westin Charlotte TIAA-CREF Time Warner Cable Tribble Creative Group UNC Charlotte US Airways Wachovia Corporation Watson Insurance Western Associates Wheeler Communication Group, LLC Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, PLLC WSOC-TV

87


G U I D E T O E S R I TA P E S T RY M A P S ESRI COMMUNITY TAPESTRY’S DISTINCT MARKET SEGments profile the diversity of the American population and also provide a way to summarize and simplify these differences by LifeMode summary groups. Segments within a LifeMode summary group share an experience, such as being born in the same time period, or a trait such as affluence. (Descriptions apply to ESRI CommunityTM Tapestry TM maps on the following pages.) factories and farms: Factories and Farms represent rural life – from small towns and villages to farms. Employment in manufacturing and agricultural industries is typical in these small, settled communities across America’s breadbasket. Population change is nominal, and the profile is classic. Most households are families, either married couples or married couples with children. By age, the residents of Factories and Farms mirror the U.S. distribution, with slightly more retirees. Median household income is a bit lower, almost $38,000, but so is home value, almost $88,000. Most own their homes. Their

lifestyle reflects their locale, emphasizing home and garden care, fishing and hunting, pets, and local clubs. american quilt: Location also links the four segments in American Quilt – America’s small towns and rural areas. Unlike Factories and Farms, this group represents a more diverse microcosm of small-town life, including Tapestry’s largest segment, Midland Crowd. Manufacturing and agriculture remain part of the local economy, but American Quilt also includes local government, service, construction, communication, and utility workers. In addition to

farmers, American Quilt includes Rural Resort Dwellers, an older population that is retiring to seasonal vacation spots, and Crossroads, a younger, family population that favors mobile homes. Households in American Quilt are also more affluent, with a median income of $43,000, and more are homeowners. However, the rural lifestyle is also evident, with fishing and hunting (and power boats), and a preference for pickups and country music. senior styles: Nearly 14.2 million households in the nine Senior Styles segments comprise one of the largest LifeMode summary groups. As the U.S. population ages, two of the fastest-growing American markets are found among The Elders and the Silver and Gold segments. Senior Styles segments illustrate the diversity among today’s senior markets. Although incomes within this group cover a wide range, the median is approximately $41,300, attributable mostly to retirement income or Social Security payments. Younger, more affluent seniors, freed of their child-rearing responsibilities, are traveling and relocating to warmer climates. Settled seniors are looking forward to retirement and remaining in their homes. Some of the older, less privileged segments live alone and collect Social Security and other benefits. Their choice of housing depends on their income. This group may reside in single-family homes, retirement homes, or high-rises. Their lifestyles can be as diverse as their circumstances, but senior markets do have common traits among their preferences. This is the most politically active market group, from voting to participating in election campaigns. Golf is clearly their sport of choice, from playing to just watching the Golf Channel. They read the newspaper daily and prefer to watch news shows on television. Although their use of the Internet is nearly average, they are more likely to shop through QVC than online. family portrait: Family Portrait has the fastest-growing population of the LifeMode summary groups. The growth is driven primarily by the rapid increase among Up and Coming Families. Youth, family life, and the presence of children are the common characteristics across the five markets in Family Portrait. The group is also ethnically diverse: nearly 30 percent of the residents are of Hispanic descent. The neighborhoods are predominantly comprised of homeowners who live in single-family homes. The majority of households include married couples with children, who contribute to the group’s large household size averaging more than 3.11 persons per household. Their lifestyle reflects their youth and family orientation – buying infant and children’s apparel and toys. Visits to theme parks and zoos are popular. Their vehicle of choice is typically a minivan or a full-size SUV. global roots: The common thread among the markets in Global Roots is ethnic diversity. Las Casas and NeWest Residents represent a strong Hispanic influence in addition to a broad mix of cultural and racial diversity found in Urban Melting Pot and International Marketplace. Typical of new households, Global Roots’ households are young with modest incomes and tend to rent in multiunit dwellings. The youth of this group reflects recent immigration trends; half of all households have immigrated to the United States within the past 10 years. The households range from married couples, typically with children, to single parents to individuals who live alone. Because households with children dominate this marketplace, it is not surprising that spending for baby goods, children’s apparel, and toys is higher here. Residents of Global Roots are less likely to have home PCs but just as likely to use cell phones. They maintain ties with friends and relatives in their countries of origin with foreign travel. traditional living: Traditional Living includes four markets that convey the common perception of middle America: hardworking, settled families. The group’s higher median age of 37.4 years also conveys their lifestage – a number of older residents who are completing their child rearing responsibilities and looking forward to retirement. The aging of the population has not slowed their participation in the labor force. They work hard to earn a modest living and typically own single-family homes in established neighborhoods that are experiencing slow population growth. Residents in the Traditional Living segments buy standard, four-door American cars; belong to veterans’ clubs and

88

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G U I D E T O E S R I TA P E S T RY M A P S fraternal organizations; take care of their homes and gardens; and rely on traditional information sources, such as newspapers, for their news. high hopes: High Hopes includes Aspiring Young Families and Great Expectations. The High Hopes group seeks the “American Dream” of homeownership and a rewarding job. Most live in singlefamily houses or multiunit buildings; approximately half own their homes. Many are willing to move to a new location to seek better opportunities. The residents in the summary group are young and college educated; one-third of the householders are younger than 35 years. Their median net worth is more than $81,400 – nearly 76 percent of the U.S. median. Households in this group include a mix of married couples, single-parent families, or single persons. scholars and patriots: This summary group is unique in the Tapestry system. Their shared traits include youth, with the attendant lower incomes, and atypical environments such as college life or military service. Because of their transient lifestyle and lifestage, their homeownership is low. Most live in townhouses or apartments, although one quarter resides in single-family homes. One segment, Military Proximity, is dominated by military life; the other two, College Towns and Dorms and Diplomas, are predominantly students who are pursuing college degrees. Although most of the military market is either on active duty or employed in civilian jobs on military bases, the students tend to work part-time at low-paying jobs to support themselves while attending school. However, low personal income does not inhibit their lifestyles. Scholars and Patriots are the most active participants in a wide variety of sports – from swimming and snorkeling to skiing and ice skating. They are style conscious; and well connected with PCs, cell phones, and MP3s; and just beginning to acquire household furnishings metropolis: The six segments of the Metropolis group live and work in America’s cities. They live in older, single-family homes or row houses built in the 1940s or earlier. Those living in larger cities tend to own fewer vehicles and rely more on public transportation, but the majority of markets in Metropolis feature commuters to service-related jobs. Depending on the area of the country where they live, the median value of their homes can range from $52,800 to $373,700. The Metropolis group reflects the segments’ diversity in housing, age, and income. For example, ages among segments range from Generation Xers to retirees; households include married couples with children and single parents with children. Employment status also varies from well-educated professionals to the unemployed. The median household income of the group is approximately $38,500. Their lifestyle is also uniquely urban – and media oriented. They like dancing and music, especially urban and jazz formats; watch a variety of television programs from news to syndicated sitcoms; and prefer movies to books. solo acts: The Solo Acts summary group features singles who prefer city life. Many are young, startup households located in America’s more densely populated neighborhoods; some are well-established singles who have eschewed homeownership and child-rearing responsibilities. Second only to High Society, this group tends to be well-educated, working professionals who are either attending college or already hold a degree. Their incomes reflect their employment experience, ranging from a low median of $40,400 among the newest households to approximately $91,000 among established singles. Contrary to modern migration patterns that flow away from the largest cities, Solo Acts’ residents are moving into major cities such as New York City; Chicago; Washington, D.C.; Boston; Los Angeles; and San Francisco. With considerable discretionary income and few commitments, their lifestyle is urban, including the best of city life – dining out, attending plays, and visiting museums – and, for a break from constant connectivity, extensive travel domestically and abroad.

average earnings. However, the choice of housing among the segments in Upscale Avenues reveals their distinct preferences. Urban markets such as Urban Chic and Pacific Heights favor townhouses and high-rises, Pleasant-Ville residents prefer single-family homes in suburban neighborhoods, and Green Acres residents opt for open spaces. Some have not settled on a home yet such as the renters among Enterprising Professionals; others, such as Cozy and Comfortable residents, have been settled for years. The median household income for the group is more than $66,700, and their median net worth exceeds $175,500. Prosperous domesticity also characterizes the lifestyle in Upscale Avenues. They invest in their homes, from landscaping and home remodeling among the homeowners to new furnishings among the renters. Their leisure includes sports such as golf and bicycling and, of course, domestic vacations. Although they are partial to new cars, they also save and invest their earnings.

high society: The markets in High Society are affluent and well educated. They represent slightly more than 12 percent of all U.S. households, but generate nearly one quarter of total U.S. income. Employment in high-paying positions, such as professional or managerial occupations, is common. As a result, the median household income for this group, $97,400, is almost twice that of the national median. Most households are marriedcouple families residing in affluent neighborhoods where the median home value approaches $346,400. Although this is one of the least ethnically diverse groups in the United States, it is one of the fastest growing, increasing by two percent annually. Residents of High Society are affluent and active – financially, civicly, and physically. They participate in a wide variety of public activities and sports and travel extensively. They are well connected, but not “couched.” Try the Internet or radio instead of television to reach these markets. ■

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upscale avenues: Prosperity is the overriding attribute shared by the seven segments in Upscale Avenues. Success has been earned from years of hard work. Similar to the High Society segments, many in this group are also well educated with above-

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2008

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Charlotte Regional Economical Development Guide 2008