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How a team of heart specialists helped Hugh McColl make the best investment of his life. When Hugh McColl, the man who changed American banking, learned he needed heart bypass surgery, he chose the team that has outpaced all others for years. He chose the Carolinas Heart Institute at Carolinas Medical Center and the Sanger Clinic’s Dr. Mark Stiegel. Carolinas Heart Institute has a rich and storied history of groundbreaking innovations; some of the finest medical minds in

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Mr. Hugh McColl and R. Mark Stiegel, MD


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Some of the subdivisions at Lake James, Lake Keowee, Lake Wylie, and Lake Norman are registered with the office of the Interstate Land Sales Registration of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Obtain the property report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not an offer or solicitation to residents in GA, NJ, NY, CT, PA, VA, or any other state where such offer or solicitation is prohibited by applicable law. Crescent Communities is a trademark of Crescent Resources, LLC. Renderings may vary in detail. We reserve the right to alter home specifications and pricing without notice or obligation. Marketed exclusively by Crescent Communities Realty, LLC.

In a Crescent community, your window to the world is filled with so many things to see and do. We have a tantalizing array of communities from which to choose, each with its own distinct personality. Discover the one that best fits you today.

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CENTRAL

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COMMUNITY

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Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) welcomes you to Charlotte. CPCC serves more than 70,000 people with over 100 degree, diploma, and certificate programs on our six campuses throughout Mecklenburg County. Our unique Business and Industry Training program addresses the ever-changing needs of today’s workplace. CPCC offers training solutions for business and industry that are customized and affordable. ! ! !

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table of contents T H E C R P P R E S I D E N T ’ S LE T TE R . . . . . 1 3 Introduction from TheCharlotte Regional Partnership

BUSINESS STRENGTH ............24 If the Carolinas Were a Country

25

Work Force Education

25

Ronnie Bryant, CEcD, FM President and CEO, Charlotte Regional Partnership

ACCESSIBILIT Y ......................

26 REGIONAL OVERVIEW .............. 14

H i g h w a y, Ra i l w a y a n d Po r t

Easy Accessibility Flight/Driving Times

14

Daily Non-stop Flights

14

Regional Airports

15

Distances to Carolina Ports

15

Largest Freight Trucking Companies

15

Ro b u s t B u s i n e s s S t re n g t h

HUMAN RESOURCES ..............28 Population

28

Population by Age

28

Average Weekly Wage by Industry

28

Top 10 States for Business Climate

16

Unionization Activity

29

Top 10 Pro-Business States

16

Work Force Statistics

29

Employment in Industries

17

Employment by Industry

29

Top 25 Largest Regional Employers

17

Largest Foreign-Owned Firms

18

Top Countries With Foreign-Owned Firms in CharlotteUSA 2005

18

Cost of Living

19

QUALIT Y OF LIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

10

Number of Households

30

Projected Population Growth

30

Median Household Income

31

Household Income

31

BUSINESS PRESENCE ..............21

Per Capita Income Trends

31

Ta rg e t e d I n d u s t r y C l u s t e r s

Per Capita Income

31

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


choose charlotteUSA CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE 2006 PUBLISHER John Paul Galles jgalles@greatercharlottebiz.com

TA X E S A N D INCENTIVES ...........33

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/EDITOR Maryl A. Lane maryl.a.lane@greatercharlottebiz.com

CHARLOTTEUSA COUNTY PROFILES ........ 40 North and South Carolina County Profiles GUIDE TO ESRI TA P E S T R Y M A P S . . . . 3 4

CREATIVE DIRECTOR/ASST. EDITOR Carrie Boyd carodesign@bellsouth.net CONTRIBUTING WRITER Ellison Clary ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Michelle Killi mkilli@greatercharlottebiz.com Mimi Zelman mzelman@greatercharlottebiz.com

Alexander, N.C.

40

Anson, N.C.

42

Cabarrus, N.C.

44

Catawba, N.C.

46

Chester, S.C.

48

Chesterfield, S.C.

50

CHARLOT TEUSA MAPS ..................36

Cleveland, N.C.

52

CharlotteUSA Leakage/Surplus Factor

Gaston, N.C.

54

Iredell, N.C.

56

Lancaster, S.C.

58

Lincoln, N.C.

60

Mecklenburg, N.C.

62

Rowan, N.C.

64

Editorial or advertising inquiries, please call or fax at the numbers above or e-mail: info@greatercharlottebiz.com. Subscription inquiries or change of address, please call or fax at the numbers above or visit our Web site: www.greatercharlottebiz.com.

36

CharlotteUSA Corridors of Commerce

36

CharlotteUSA Community™ Tapestry™

36

CharlotteUSA Population Change

36

Stanly, N.C.

66

CharlotteUSA Map

37

Union, N.C.

68

York, S.C.

70

CHARLOTTE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE 2006 $14.95

PARTNER SHIP I N F O R M AT I O N . . . . . . . 76 NC

Raleigh

CHARLOTTE

CharlotteUSA Economic Development Contacts

76

Charlotte Regional Partnership Information

77

Regional Economic Development Partners

78

Business Strength

Columbia

SC

Accessibility

Quality of Life

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

DATA PROVIDER AND CARTOGRAPHER

ESRI With annual sales of more than $560 million, ESRI is the world leader in the geographic information system (GIS) software industry, developing and supporting GIS software for all types of organizations – from the one-person office to multinational corporations to innovative Internet GIS solutions. More information at www.esri.com. Choose CharlotteUSA: Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide is published annually by Galles Communications Group, Inc., publisher of the monthly b2b magazine Greater Charlotte Biz, at 5601 Seventy-Seven Center Drive, Suite 250, Charlotte, N.C. 28217-0735 • 704-676-5850 Phone • 704.676.5853 Fax • www.greatercharlottebiz.com.

All contents © 2006, Galles Communications Group, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. The Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide is distributed directly and through the Charlotte Regional Partnership and local economic development agencies to over 25,000 businesses and executives engaged in recruiting or relocating businesses to the Charlotte region. Content including statistics and photography has been provided by the Charlotte Regional Partnership, by ESRI, and by the 16 counties for the county profiles, unless otherwise noted. While the information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, Galles Communications Group, Inc. makes no warranty to the accuracy or reliability of this information. The views expressed herein are not necessarily those of Galles Communications Group, Inc. or Greater Charlotte Biz. Products named in these pages are trade names or trademarks of their respective companies. Greater Charlotte Biz (ISSN 1554-6551) is published monthly by Galles Communications Group, Inc., 5601 77 Center Dr., Ste. 250, Charlotte, NC 28217-0736. Telephone: 704-676-5850. Fax: 704-676-5853. Subscription rate is $24 for one year. Periodicals postage pending at Charlotte, N.C., and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Greater Charlotte Biz, 5601 77 Center Dr., Ste. 250, Charlotte, NC 28217-0736.

11


CHARLOTTE RESEARCH INSTITUTE AT

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte The Research University in the Charlotte Region

PORTAL FOR SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS We partner with regional and national companies to: • co-locate businesses at UNC Charlotte • engage science and technology experts • contract with application/solution specialists • leverage cutting edge equipment and technology for your R&D efforts • license our inventions and intellectual property

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to start, grow, or locate your business in the Charlotte region and learn more about the following programs at UNC Charlotte:

Biomedical Engineering Systems Biotechnology Bioinformatics E-Business Technology Nanotechnology Optoelectronics Precision Metrology Motorsports and Automotive Engineering Robert G. Wilhelm, Executive Director Charlotte Research Institute at The University of North Carolina at Charlotte 9201 UNIVERSITY CITY BLVD. CHARLOTTE, NC 28223-0001 704-687-4100 (PHONE) 704-687-3183 (FAX) www.charlotteresearchinstitute.com


T H E C R P P R E S I D E N T ’ S LE T TE R

Charlotte USA – Incomparable

C

CHARLOTTE USA IS BOOMING. INCREASINGLY BUSINESS LEADERS ARE discovering Charlotte USA offers the best in business strength, accessibility and quality of life. There is something for everyone. Whether your business is better served in uptown Charlotte or in a more rural location, the Charlotte Regional Partnership can assist you in finding the best match. This year, North Carolina and South Carolina received great national recognition for business strength. Pollina Real Estate named South Carolina the “Most Business-Friendly State.” North Carolina was tapped as the “Top Pro-Business State” by Southern Business & Development magazine and “Top Pro-Business State” by Site Selection magazine. Once people experience the distinctiveness of our region, they don’t want to leave. In 1990 when Hearst Corp. was relocating almost 300 employees to the Charlotte region, management made an offer that, after a year, those employees wanting to move back to New York City would be offered the opportunity. Of the 270 employees who relocated to Charlotte, only three returned to New York City. There are many new developments in Charlotte USA that keep international and national attention on our area. One example is the much-promoted $1 billion, 350-acre North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC) being constructed in Kannapolis. This biotechnology project is the product of foresight by Dole Foods/Castle & Cooke billionaire David Murdock. So u th e rn Bu s in e ss an d Development magazine named the NCRC the “Best Biotech Project” for 2006. The NCRC is a true testimony of North Carolina’s strength in public-private partnerships. Murdock has invested his own money and time in the project and the State of North Carolina, Concord/Kannapolis local governments, and universities and community colleges have collaborated on making this vision a reality. The NCRC is being constructed on the former Pillowtex textile company property, and former workers are being retrained for jobs at the Campus. Charlotte USA attracts the best and the brightest workforce talent. Charlotte was named sixth in “America’s Smartest Cities” in 2006 by Bizjournals.com. The accessibility of 34 colleges and universities provides the region with a great supply of educated

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

and trained workers. Just a few ad d itio nal re as o n s to lo c ate yo u r b u s i n e s s t o C h arl o t t e USA: • Accessibility by air, roads, water, and rail • The best of the “New South” – hip and hospitable • Lower cost of living than comparable metro areas • Strong international presence with more than 650 foreign-owned firms in the region The Charlotte USA region also boasts a number of recreational and cultural activities. The drive to expand tourism attractions continued this year with the announcement that Charlotte USA will be home to the NASCAR Hall of Fame. The U.S. National Whitewater Center, which borders Mecklenburg and Gaston counties, will soon be fully operational. The center will be the world's only multi-channel re-circulating whitewater river. This U.S. Olympic whitewater training facility also will provide a unique outdoor experience for the public. Additional Charlotte USA attractions dot the whole region. Outdoor activities include boating, hiking and playing on some of the nation’s most outstanding golf courses. The region also is a short drive to the Blue Ridge Mountains or the famed Carolina beaches. The Charlotte region continues to be recognized as a national sports market. Sports enthusiasts can enjoy the action of teams such as the NFL Panthers, NBA Bobcats, Wachovia Championship golf, AAA baseball Knights, NASCAR races, and much more. If you are considering Charlotte USA as a business location, the Charlotte Regional Partnership would be delighted to show you all our area has to offer. Ronnie L. Bryant, CEcD, FM President and CEO

13


R E G I O N A L OV E RV I E W

N

DAILY NON-STOP FLIGHTS

NAMED FOR A QUEEN, THE CHARLOTTE REGION HAS

FROM CHARLOTTE TO DESIGNATED CITIES

long given business the royal treatment. Queen Charlotte was the 18th century German wife of England’s King George III. Charlotte adopted her name to impress influential leaders from afar. Today, CharlotteUSA imports and nurtures economic investment from across the United States and around the world. That welcoming attitude has helped

23 Flights per day

Boston

10 Flights per day

Chicago

15 Flights per day

Detroit

10 Flights per day

Los Angeles

2 Flights per day

Miami

7 Flights per day

New York

35 Flights per day

Philadelphia

11 Flights per day

San Francisco

build a diversified and independent econ-

4 Flights per day

Washington D.C.

omy for CharlotteUSA, a region where

27 Flights per day

Source: Charlotte Douglas Int’l Airport 2005

more than 2.3 million people thrive. The size of Massachusetts, it straddles two states and includes 16 counties, 12 in North Carolina and four in South Carolina.

EASY ACCESSIBILIT Y strategic spot: Centered at the intersection of two Native American trading paths, Charlotte’s location is more strategic than ever. More than 60 percent of the U.S. population and more than 60 percent of its industrial base lies within a two-hour flight or a day’s motor freight delivery. This 650-mile radius is bordered by New York, Chicago and Miami.

Atlanta

trade center: Equidistant from New York and Miami, CharlotteUSA is the 5th largest wholesale trade center in the U.S. 22 million air passengers: With more than 22 million passengers a year, Charlotte Douglas International Airport is the nation’s 6th largest major airline hub. Fifteen regional airports also serve the area.

500+ daily flights: Charlotte Douglas International Airport offers more than 500 daily departures with direct flights to 123 destinations. These include 10 or more to Atlanta, Detroit and Philadelphia, and more than two dozen to New York and Washington, D.C. 6 daily international flights: International flights leave Charlotte-Douglas International Airport daily for Frankfurt, London, Mexico City, Montreal, Munich and Toronto. Charlotte is no more than one plane change away from any major city worldwide.

FLIGHT/DRIVING TIMES From Charlotte to Designated Cities CITY

MILES

DRIVING TIME

Atlanta, GA

243

3:57

FLIGHT TIME (HRS) 1:15

Chicago, IL

765

12:13

2:00 1:30

Orlando, FL

524

8:13

New York, NY

646

10:27

1:50

Memphis, TN

620

9:22

1:40

Washington, DC

400

6:24

1:15

Charleston, SC

177

3:25

less than 1 hour

Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership 2005

14

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


R E G I O N A L OV E RV I E W

RegionalAIRPORTS Airports REGIONAL AIRPORT

COUNTY

# OF AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS PER DAY

Anson

18

Concord Regional

Cabarrus

178

Hickory Regional

Catawba

125

Chester Municipal

Chester

30

Cheraw Municipal

Chesterfield

57

eastern time zone: The time difference between CharlotteUSA and the United Kingdom is minus 5 hours. For mainland Europe, it’s minus 6 hours.

Pageland

Chesterfield

44

Cleveland

53

Gaston

137

largest rail system: The country’s largest consolidated rail system serves CharlotteUSA. Norfolk Southern and CSX operate more than 46,000 miles of track in the South, East, Midwest and Canada. Connecting regional points to these two lines is Lancaster & Chester Railway, a private, well-capitalized short line based in Lancaster, S.C.

Lancaster County

Anson County

Shelby Municipal Gastonia Municipal Statesville Municipal

Iredell

85

Lancaster

68

Lincoln County

Lincoln

70

Rowan County

Rowan

85

Albemarle/Stanly

Stanly

85

Monroe

Union

151

York

116

Bryant Field

Source: Regional/Municipal Airports in CharlotteUSA 2005 www.airnav.com

DistancesTO toCAROLINA Carolina Ports DISTANCES PORTS PORT

MILES/KM

TIME

Wilmington

196 mi/ 315 km

3.75 hours

Charleston

208 mi/ 335 km

3.5 hours

Savannah

250 mi/ 402 km

4 hours

Morehead City

316 mi/ 508 km

5.5 hours

Source: MapQuest 2005

LARGEST FREIGHT TRUCKING COMPANIES

4 ports: Shipping is through Charleston, S.C., the 2nd largest east coast port, as well as facilities in Wilmington and Morehead City, N.C., and Savannah, Ga. 450 trucking companies: Motor freight firms in CharlotteUSA number 450 and they serve 50 states, Puerto Rico and Canada. 4 interstate highways: Facilitating these trucking companies are 4 major interstate highways that serve the region: I-77, I-40, I-85 and I-485. ➤

COMPANY

AREA SERVED

CNF Inc.

50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico

Roadway Corp.

50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Virgin Islands, Europe Pacific Rim, Latin American

Schneider National Inc.

48 states, Canada, Mexico

Yellow Corp.

50 states, parts of Canada, Pacific Rim, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Europe

USF Corp.

Central and Southeastern United States, Ontario, Quebec

Arkansas Best Corp.

50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico, Mexico, International

Overnite Transportation Co.

50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam

Watkins Motor Lines Inc.

41 states, Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico

Estes Express Lines Inc.

50 states

Averitt Express Inc.

Global

Source: Reference USA 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

15


R E G I O N A L OV E RV I E W

ROBUST BUSINESS STRENGTH financial center: The 2nd largest financial center in the U.S., CharlotteUSA includes headquarters for Bank of America and Wachovia. Banks in the region control more than $1 trillion in assets. 9 Fortune 500 headquarters: Bank of America, Wachovia, Nucor, SPX, Sonic Automotive, Duke Energy, Family Dollar, Lowe’s and Goodrich are the 9 Fortune 500 companies that have headquarters in Charlotte. Fortune 500 companies with a presence in the region number 286. headquarters leader: Business Facilities magazine ranks Charlotte 3rd on its 2003 list of best cities for corporate headquarters. TOP 10 STATES FOR BUSINESS CLIMATE NORTH CAROLINA

1

Texas

2

Georgia

3

Ohio

4

Tennessee

5

Indiana

6

Alabama

7

Michigan

8

Kentucky

9

SOUTH CAROLINA

10

Bank of America has played a key role in Charlotte’s development as one of America’s prime business-friendly destinations. Our associates enjoy the benefits of the region’s high quality of life and rich cultural amenities. We are proud to call Charlotte our corporate home and encourage other companies to make it theirs too.

– Graham Denton, Charlotte market president, Bank of America

Source: Site Selection, November 2005

TOP 10 PRO-BUSINESS STATES SOUTH CAROLINA

1

Virginia

2

South Dakota

3

NORTH CAROLINA

4

Alabama

5

Wyoming

6

Georgia

7

Washington

8

Florida

9

Oklahoma

10

$400 billion GDP: Charlotte is the Carolinas’ business capital. Together, the 2 states boasted annual gross domestic product of over $470 billion in 2004. 1st: The Charlotte region is 1st among 573 metropolitan statistical areas for social and economic integration in a 2004 Policom Corporation ranking. 650 foreign firms: Within the 16 counties of CharlotteUSA, 650 foreign firms operate and employ almost 120,000.

1st in foreign firm growth: Charlotte is the top U.S. city in growth for foreign firms. More than 650 foreign companies operate in the region and N.C. and S.C. are home to more than 1,800 foreign firms with a total employment of 350,000. 4th: Among site selection consultants, the Charlotte area is 4th most attractive of 70 U.S. cities for business expansion or relocation, according to a 2005 listing by Expansion Management magazine. ➤

Source: Pollina Corporate Top 10 Pro-Business States 2005

16

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


R E G I O N A L OV E RV I E W

EMPLOYMENT IN INDUSTRIES

We are committed to being the best company we can for our consumers, our employees and our community. We feel like a lot of other people in the region – very blessed to be here.

– Gary Ruth, vice president and general manager of the Cabarrus Manufacturing Center for Philip Morris USA

Source: ESRI 2005

TOP 25 LARGEST REGIONAL EMPLOYERS NAME

LOCAL EMPLOYEES

Wachovia Corp.

LOCAL FACILITIES

TYPE OF BUSINESS

19,181

117

Financial Services

Carolinas HealthCare System

17,665

130

Health Care

Bank of America Corp.

13,000

NA

Financial Services

Duke Energy Corp.

9,000

NA

Energy

Delhaize America Inc./Food Lion LLC

8,658

NA

Retail Supermarkets

Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

8,140

NA

Discount Retailer

Ruddick Corporation

7,000

59

Holding Company for American & Efird Inc. and Harris Teeter Inc.

Presbyterian Healthcare/Novant Health Inc.

6,850

4

Health Care

US Airways Group Inc.

5,749

NA

Freightliner LLC

4,468

4

Truck Manufacturer

NorthEast Medical Center

4,100

26

Health Care

Lowe’s Cos. Inc.

3,800

17

Retail, Home Improvement

Airline

CaroMont Health

3,144

27

Health Care

Springs Industries Inc.

3,000

NA

Textile Manufacturer and Marketer

BellSouth Corp.

2,770

67

Telecommunications

Philip Morris USA

2,600

1

Cigarette Manufacturer

Bi-Lo LLC

2,538

34

Retail Supermarkets

Belk Inc.

2,500

17

Department Stores

Compass Group North America

2,419

3

Contract Food Service, Vending and Restaurants

Winn-Dixie Inc.

2,374

37

Retail Supermarkets

CommScope Inc.

2,100

5

Designer and Manufacturer of Cable and Connectivity Solutions

International Business Machines Corp.

2,000

1

Computer Technology Sales & Solutions

Continental Tire North America Inc.

1,800

2

Tire Manufacturer

Iredell Memorial Hospital’s Health Care System

1,675

1

Health Care

Wix Filtration Corp.

1,618

4

Filtration Products for Vehicles

Source: Charlotte Business Journal, Dec. 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

17


R E G I O N A L OV E RV I E W LARGEST FOREIGN-OWNED FIRMS NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

COMPANY

PRODUCT

HQ

Food Lion Inc.

Food Retailing

Belgium

7,000

Freightliner Corp.

Transport Equipment

Germany

5,329

Compass Group USA, Inc.

Food/Vending Service

United Kingdom

2,031

Eckerd Drugs

Drug Chain

Canada

1,455

Continental Tire North America, Inc.

Radial Tires

Germany

1,324

Royal & SunAlliance

Insurance

United Kingdom

1,000

US Food Services

Food Distribution

Netherlands

972

AXA-Equitable

Life Insurance

France

725

Securitas Security Services

Security Installation

Sweden

700

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp.

Turbines for Power Plants

Germany

650

Blythe Construction Inc.

Construction, Utilities

France

650

INA USA Corp.

Bearings & Precision Metals

Germany

600

Clariant Corp.

Dyes, Specialty Chemicals

Switzerland

600

Areva Framatome ANP

Advanced Engineering

France

600

Alcatel Cables & Components

Fiber Optic Cable

France

825

ASMO North Carolina Inc.

Small Motors for Auto Industry

Japan

591

Maersk Sealand

Containerized Cargo Carrier

Denmark

550

Scott Health and Safety

Respiratory Protection Systems

Bermuda

500

Engineered Sintered Components

Metal Components

Japan

500

From a global perspective, Charlotte is probably as enlightened a city as you can find. The banking business has brought a lot of highly educated people here. The legal community is very bright.

– John D. Bond III, partner, Bradley Arant Rose & White LLP in Charlotte

Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership 2005

TOP COUNTRIES WITH FOREIGN-OWNED FIRMS IN CHARLOTTEUSA

169 Germany

74 United Kingdom

75 Japan

53 Canada

43 Italy

entrepreneurial: Charlotte is the 2nd best city in the U.S. to start and grow a company, a 2005 ranking of 50 metros by Entrepreneur magazine shows.

37 Switzerland

37

top 5 for expansion of existing facilities is Charlotte’s national rank.

France

30 Sweden

31 Netherlands

10 Belgium Source: Charlotte Regional Partnership, Charlotte Chamber of Commerce 2005

18

1st in economic strength: The Charlotte MSA is 1st in economic strength, as listed by Policom Corporation in 2006. 1st in state: The Charlotte MSA area led North Carolina on the Expansion Magazine 2006 list of America’s Hottest Cities for business relocation or expansion.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


R E G I O N A L OV E RV I E W

E XCEPT IONAL QUALIT Y OF LIFE most livable: The Charlotte region is 1st among America’s Most Livable Communities, says a 2004 ranking of 30 metropolitan areas by Partners for Livable Communities. arts support leader: Charlotte residents give the highest per capita to the arts and sciences, second only to New York City in total dollars raised. cleanest: The Charlotte region is among The 50 Cleanest Cities, in a 2005 national listing by “Reader’s Digest.” 100-plus golf courses: More than 100 public and private golf courses dot CharlotteUSA.

I’ve been awed at what a special place Charlotte is. I’m a really tough customer. I’ve lived in a lot of places. This is a pretty incredible community. I buy into the fact that we have something special here that other communities would love to model.

– Cathy Bessant, global marketing executive, Bank of America

1,770 miles of lake shoreline grace CharlotteUSA. 61 degrees is the average annual temperature, Fahrenheit, for CharlotteUSA. That’s 16 degrees Celsius. 214 sunny days a year in CharlotteUSA’s mild, four-season climate. big leagues: Charlotte is major league, with sports franchises in the NFL, NBA and WNBA, three major NASCAR Nextel events and a PGA tournament. It also enjoys AAA baseball and minor league hockey. 34 higher learning institutes: CharlotteUSA offers a consistent supply of young talent that annually enters an already skilled and disciplined work force.

low cost of living: The cost-of-living index for CharlotteUSA is 92.2, lower than Denver, Chicago, Orlando, Phoenix, Austin or Atlanta. (U.S. = 100)

more than 300 cultural clubs, businesses and religious organizations in CharlotteUSA serve an international population of more than 120,000. ➤

COST LIVING Cost OF of Living COMPOSITE INDEX (US AVERAGE = 100) New York (Manhattan)

201.2

San Jose, CA

166.2

Los Angeles, CA

157.4

Richmond, VA

108.4

Chicago, IL (Joliet)

103.3

Orlando, FL

100.8

Denver, CO

99.6

Phoenix, AZ

99.0

Atlanta, GA

97.7

Austin, TX

97.0

Raleigh-Durham, NC

94.0

Cincinnati, OH

92.8

CHARLOTTE, NC

92.2

Source: ACCRA Cost of Living Index 2005 Q3.

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

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R E G I O N A L OV E RV I E W

OVERALL BUSINESS DESIRABILITY

State Work Force Training Programs in the U.S. for 2003.

affordable utilities: Utility rates in CharlotteUSA are among the most competitive in the U.S.

special training: CharlotteUSA’s Work Force Development Partnership addresses special training needs of business and industry through the collective educational resources of 10 area community and technical colleges.

$18 billion invested: New and expanding businesses have invested more than $18 billion in CharlotteUSA since 1990, adding 170,000 jobs. 2nd lowest building cost: Charlotte, N.C. enjoys the second-lowest industrial building cost of 116 North American cities recently surveyed – less than 80 percent of the national average. number 3 and rising: Readers of Ch ief Executive magazine rank N.C. the 3rd best state for doing business in 2006, up from fifth in 2005. tops in job training: S.C. is first and N.C. 3rd in Expansion Management magazine’s Top

world class: Charlotte MSA is 30th of 125 cities worldwide in a 2003-04 Wo rld Knowledge Competitiveness Index compiled by Robert Higgins Associates and based on ability to translate knowledge into economic value. wireless leader: Charlotte MSA is 17th of 100 Most Unwired Cities in a 2005 Intel ranking based on public and commercial wireless access points, cell phone coverage and Internet penetration. nearly 1.2 million work force: The work force in CharlotteUSA is expected to increase to 1.3 million by 2010; currently it’s 1.2 million. That’s a 12.4 percent growth rate in the next five years.

low union membership: The Carolinas boast the nation’s lowest unionization rate for 2004 (3.6 percent union membership in N.C.; 4.2 percent in S.C.). For 3 straight years, N.C. unionization has declined. Both N.C. and S.C. are right-to-work states. Charlotte MSA has 3.3 percent union membership. 1st for business: Charlotte, N.C., is 1st in “probusiness attitude,” says Fortune magazine. expansion leader: The Charlotte region is 20th in the nation’s Top 40 Real Estate Markets for Expanding Companies f o r 2 0 0 5 , a s l i s t e d b y E x p an s i o n Managem ent magazine. top 20 boomtown: Charlotte is among Top 20 Boomtowns, according to a March 2004 listing of hottest U.S. job markets by Business 2.0. top tier in livability: Charlotte is among the “most livable” U.S. cities, as listed by Partners for Livable Cities in 2004.

we want your business

T

he Charlotte USA region is united. By bringing together the public and private sectors to market and promote the area, with the common purpose of attracting new business and industry and keeping existing businesses happy, we are confident that we have the most effective strategy for promoting growth and prosperity in the 21st century world economy. Leaders throughout the 16 counties in Charlotte USA cooperate to reinforce regionalism and work very hard to present a uniform message: The Charlotte region wants your business. We hope the information provided to you in this Guide encourages you to consider Charlotte USA as a premier location for your company’s operations. Not only will your business thrive, but you and your

20

employees will find a quality of life that is unmatched anywhere else. The Charlotte Regional Partnership team works closely with the economic development professionals and existing industry representatives in all 16 Charlotte USA counties. We invite site location consultants and company executives to contact us so we can arrange networking opportunities with leaders from their respective industries who already operate in Charlotte USA. We also coordinate site visits and arrange peer-topeer interviews, both aimed at helping relocation prospects understand the benefits of doing business in the Charlotte region. The Charlotte Regional Partnership can provide customized regional data on education and workforce development, demographics, available industrial buildings and sites, and local and state incentives.

And we serve as a one-stop-shop for information on everything from Uptown Charlotte skyscrapers to family farms and super sites. Whatever your business needs, you can find it in Charlotte USA.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

KENNY MCDONALD SR. VICE PRESIDENT

CHARLOTTE REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP 1001 MOREHEAD SQUARE DR., STE. 200 CHARLOTTE, NC 28203 USA 800-554-4373 TOLL FREE 704-347-8942 PHONE 704-347-8981 FAX WWW.CHARLOTTEUSA.COM

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BUSINESS PRESENCE

targeted industry clusters

AUTOMOT IVE The Charlotte region has been highly attractive to the automotive industry for years. More than 250 automotive companies operate in the area and they employ 15,000. DaimlerChrysler’s Freightliner division has three major assembly plants in CharlotteUSA. BMW makes sports cars in the Greenville-Spartanburg area, just an hour and 15 minutes from Charlotte Douglas International Airport, which offers non-stop flights to Munich as well as Detroit. Other significant auto-related facilities include those for Dana Corporation, ArvinMeritor, Continental Tire, Eaton Corporation, Goodyear, Hella Lighting, Mayflower Vehicle Systems, Meridian Automotive Systems, ZF Lemforder, Cataler, and NGK Ceramics.

FINANCIAL SERVICES AND INSURANCE Charlotte is the second largest financial center in the United States, behind only New

CharlotteUSA is a place that is constantly reinventing itself. We’re also the place where progress has always been the product of close collaboration between many partners.

– Hugh L. McColl Jr., retired chairman and chief executive of Bank of America, now chief executive of McColl Brothers Lockwood

York City. Bank of America Corporation and Wachovia Corporation, the country’s secondand fourth-largest banks respectively, are headquartered in Charlotte. Their presence along with that of several regional institutions has spawned a growing financial services industry throughout CharlotteUSA. More than 250 companies in the region offer financial services and they employ nearly 60,000 professionals. The Charlotte region also is home to many large operational and customer service centers for companies such as CitiFinancial, GE Capital/Lowe’s Credit and Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Inc. TIAACREF, the Teachers Insurance and Annuity

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

Association College Retirement Equities Fund, opened a major operations, data and customer service center in Charlotte in 2000. The Charlotte region also includes the headquarters of Royal & SunAlliance and Transamerica Reinsurance. Others with operational or processing centers in the Charlotte region include Allstate, AmeriCredit, The Hartford, Kemper, Liberty Mutual, MetLife, Nationwide, State Farm and Travelers. Charlotte’s Central Piedmont Community College offers a variety of finance-related courses and certification classes to further train the work force in financial services disciplines. ➤

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BUSINESS PRESENCE

MACHINE M A N U FAC T U R I N G The machine manufacturing industry has been expanding in CharlotteUSA since the 1960s. Initially drawn by textiles and furniture, the industry now counts more than 1,250 companies in the region engaged in machine and machine parts manufacturing. These firms employ about 12,300. The region boasts production facilities for well-known names such as Cooper Tools, Honeywell, Ingersoll-Rand and Siemens Westinghouse. Yet, the majority of the industry near Charlotte is made up of worldclass medium-sized manufacturers such as Colfax, Chiron America, INA, Okuma Machine Tools, PCI Wedeco and Schrader-Bridgeport. Drawing on machine manufacturing strengths, CharlotteUSA boasts strong metalworking skills. More than 800 companies employ nearly 18,000 in fabricated and primary metal manufacturing. They are supported by a leading technical college system, with many specialized courses and certifications for metalworking and machine manufacturing. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte is home of the world’s premier university metrology laboratory, housed in its Center for Precision Metrology. The lab includes a precisely controlled environment that meets 10,000 clean room requirements. It features traditional dimensional metrology and controlled coordinate measuring machines. The Surface Metrology Lab measures two- and three-dimensional surface finish and form. Using both practical and experimental applications, faculty leaders from various science-based backgrounds focus on competitive programs to meet area industry needs. North Carolina leads the United States in National Institute for Metalworking Skills credentials.

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The Charlotte region is recognized worldwide as the home for NASCAR, but it is also home for the nation’s highest concentration of motorsports educational institutions ranging from trade schools to universities offering advanced graduate degrees. The Charlotte region takes training tomorrow’s work force in automotive and motorsports very seriously.

– James Cuttino, program director, UNCC Motorsports Research Center

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT M A N U FAC T U R I N G The machine manufacturing industry has spawned a medical device and equipment concentration with about 45 such companies within CharlotteUSA. These firms export to both domestic and international destinations. The existence of this niche is

testimony to the adaptability of the work force since it requires highly skilled and trained employees. The Charlotte Research Institute at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte operates a center for Precision Metrology and a Center of Opto Electronics and Optical Communications. There are 60 companies in CharlotteUSA that produce medical devices and equipment. They employ 2,000 specially talented people. Larger manufacturers include Hartmann-Conco Inc., Scott Health and Safety and Zimmer Orthopedic Surgical.

MOTOR SPORTS With more than 90 percent of NASCAR teams operating within a 50-mile radius of center city Charlotte, the region is the hub of the premier auto-racing association in the United States. The economic impact to the state of North Carolina is more than $5 billion a year. Mutually complimentary are the NASCAR Research and Development Center and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC) program in Motorsports and Automotive Engineering. The NASCAR facility houses the racing association’s rules officials, corporate officers, accident investigators and directors of its various racing series, as well as its research and development. UNCC’s strengths include vehicle dynamics, aerodynamics, instrumentation, safety and metrology. The UNCC program has developed more than $2.25 million in external research related to vehicle technologies. On-site equipment includes chassis dyno, shock dyno, engine dyno, scales and Pi/CDS Data Acquisition. Aerodynamic testing is performed at two wind tunnel facilities, one of which boasts a one-of-a-kind yawing, rolling road. Belmont Abbey College in Gaston County

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BUSINESS PRESENCE

– just across the Catawba River from Charlotte – recently announced the school will offer a new, four-year degree focusing on business and management in motorsports. Lowe’s Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C., hosts three major races: the Coca-Cola 600, the Nextel All-Star Challenge and the UAW-GM 500.

PHARMACEUTICAL MANUFACTURING CharlotteUSA has built a solid pharmaceutical manufacturing sector that counts 40 companies with about 5,800 workers. Nearly 125 pharmaceutical/medical equipment manufacturing and manufacturing-related companies operate in the region. This relatively small but growing sector draws on innovative and aggressive local research programs in precision metrology, opto electronics

and nanotechnology at the Charlotte Research Institute, a part of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. UNCC’s Office of Technology Transfer has achieved several

CharlotteUSA is not only a great place to produce our product, but it’s positioned perfectly to deliver it to any destination. Between the major interstates, the hub airport and ports to the north and south distribution is never a business barrier for NGK Ceramics.

– Steve Dailey, general manager, NGK Ceramics

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

high rankings nationally, including first in start-ups formed, second in invention disclosures received, second in patent applications, third in patents issued and fifth in licenses executed.

PLASTICS Drawing on rail and road distribution advantages as well as its proven manufacturing capabilities, the Charlotte region enjoys a growing plastics industry. More than 280 plastics companies have facilities within CharlotteUSA and they employ about 12,200 workers. Nurturing this segment are relatively low utility rates, reasonable wage expectations, superior distribution capabilities and an enviable quality of life. In cooperation with the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, the Polymers Center for Excellence offers a variety of services to the plastics industry. These include research and development, testing, work force development and process problem solving. The Center’s mission is to help area plastics firms reduce costs, increase productivity, expand market share and shorten time to market. It offers training either at the Center or at the plant site. Larger plastics manufacturers in the Charlotte region include Charlotte Pipe & Foundry Co., Otto Industries, Polar Plastics Inc. and RBX Industries Inc. 23


BUSINESS STRENGTH

business strength

C

COMMERCE IS CHARLOTTEUSA’S RAISON D’ETRE. Founded at a Native American crossroads, trading has happened here longer than anyone knows. From the 1799 discovery of gold to today’s status as a major financial center, CharlotteUSA has always meant business – strong business. financial muscle: Charlotte is home to Bank of America and Wachovia, the nation’s 2nd and 4th largest banks. Further, 9 Fortune 500 companies are headquartered within the region and nearly 300 Fortune 500 companies maintain a presence. Large private firms include Compass Group North America and Belk Inc., each with annual sales topping $2.2 billion. CharlotteUSA is home to 32 companies with more than $1 billion in annual sales. balanced economy: The economy of CharlotteUSA is balanced. While the largest industry segment is wholesale trade, it is bolstered by services, manufacturing and construction. Employment is well-distributed among major business sectors. This is invaluable in weathering a recession. start-up friendly: Entrepreneur magazine recognizes the area as among the nation’s best for starting and running a small business. The vast majority of firms employ 50 or fewer workers. public-private cooperation: Maybe because of natural friendliness, CharlotteUSA enjoys a long tradition of public-private cooperation. Leaders of government and industry work closely for the common good. Such cooperation helped transform Charlotte’s center city, the heart of the 16-county area, from a business-centric 9-to-5 profile to a vibrant metropolis that bustles 24/7. People live, work and play in the region’s urban core.

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The banks in this community employ 30,000 people. The small and middle market companies here employ over 300,000. The point is that the economy is being driven by those smaller companies. That is our market.

– Frank L. Bryant, partner, Poyner & Spruill LLP, Charlotte office

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BUSINESS STRENGTH

TheCAROLINAS Carolinas Were AA IF IfTHE WERE Country, It Would Rank As COUNTRY, IT WOULD RANK TheAS 17th Largest Economy In THE 17TH LARGEST TheINWorld ECONOMY THE WORLD

This is undoubtedly the best experience of the public and private realms working together that I have ever had. The help that has come from the powers-that-be has far exceeded my expectations, and has also exemplified politicians executing the true purpose of their position working for the good of the people.

– David Murdock, billionaire who is creating the N.C. Research Campus where the giant Pillowtex textile complex stood in Cabarrus County

cost-effective utilities: Duke Energy Corporation is headquartered in the region and its electricity rates are 15 percent below the national average. Other utilities such as Piedmont Natural Gas and BellSouth and Alltel also provide cost-effective service. Flowing though the heart of CharlotteUSA, the Catawba River provides a plentiful supply of water that originates in mountain streams.

COUNTRY 1.

United States

2. Japan 3. Germany

2004 $11,667,515 $4,623,398 $2,714,418

4. United Kingdom

$2,140,898

5. France

$2,002,582

6. Italy

$1,672,302

7.

People’s Republic of China

eye on the future: The Charlotte Chamber has developed Advantage Carolina, a plan to foster business expansion while attracting new firms. This focus on the future ensures that the region will continue building its enviable business strength.

$1,649,329

8. Spain

$991,442

9. Canada

$979,764

10. India

$691,876

11. South Korea

$679,674

12. Mexico

$676,497

13. Australia

$631,256

14. Brazil

$604,855

15. Russia

$582,395

16. Netherlands

$577,260

17. CAROLINAS

$472,523

18. Switzerland

$359,465

19. Belgium

$349,830

20. Sweden

$346,404

Units: U.S. Dollars in billions Gross domestic product, current prices Source: BLS, World Bank 2004

WORK FORCE EDUCATION

educated work force: The work force is smart and educated, supported by an outstanding system of higher education. The region is home to 34 colleges and universities that serve more than 150,000 students. Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte is the largest school in North Carolina’s community college system and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, with an enrollment approaching 21,000, is the 4th largest in the 16-campus UNC system.

NUMBER Population Age 25+

% TOTAL WORK FORCE

1,532,374

-

Less Than High School, No Diploma

325,843

21.3%

High School Graduate

452,988

29.6%

College, No Diploma

272,766

17.8%

Associate Degree

124,047

8.1%

Bachelors Degree

251,746

16.4%

Graduate or Professional Degree

105,581

6.9%

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions 2004 Estimates

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

25


ACC E S S I B I L I T Y

highway, railway and port Mexico City, Toronto and Montreal. The full air-cargo service handles about 185,000 tons of cargo annually. Increased capacity via new $66 million intermodal facility slated for 2007. highway access: CharlotteUSA counts four interstate highways: I-40, I-77, I-85 and I-485. Not coincidentally, it is the 8th largest trucking center in the U.S., with 450 motor freight firms operating in the region, including the nation’s top 10. railway access: The Charlotte region is at the center of the country’s largest consolidated rail system. It is served by CSX and Norfolk Southern which, between them, operate on more than 46,000 miles of track. Lancaster & Chester rail systems and a number of other short lines connect the region to the points

Charlotte Douglas International Airport was created to make travel efficient and affordable. My bet is that once all is said and done, Charlotte will be one of two major airports left in the Southeast. It’s a great airport. I’ve seen none better.

– Jerry Orr, aviation director, Charlotte Douglas International Airport

F

FEW PLACES ARE EASIER TO GET INTO AND OUT OF THAN CharlotteUSA. Charlotte is equidistant from New York and Miami. More than 60 percent of the U.S. population and its industrial base lie within a two-hour flight or a day’s motor freight delivery. The region is within 200 miles of three major seaports, including Charleston, S.C., the second largest on the eastern seaboard. But CharlotteUSA isn’t content to rely on location alone. Consider: air access: Charlotte Douglas International Airport boasts 500+ flight departures daily, more per capita than any other U.S. region. There is direct, non-stop service to 123 destinations, including Frankfurt, Munich, London,

26

these two giants serve in the South, East, Midwest and Canada. More than 200 trains rumble through Charlotte weekly. port access: Rail connections to points on the Southeastern coast make Charlotte an inland port and the region is home to an inland intermodal terminal. The deep-sea ports of Charleston, S.C., Wilmington and Morehead City, N.C., and Savannah, Ga., are accessible via rail or truck within four hours. time difference: CharlotteUSA is in the U.S. Eastern Time Zone. The time difference between Charlotte and the United Kingdom is minus 5 hours, compared to minus 8 hours between the U.K. and the west coast. Between Charlotte and mainland Europe, the time difference is

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ACC E S S I B I L I T Y

Among the many reasons why Charlotte is extremely attractive to business and industry is that we are imminently accessible. You can fly directly to most places in the country from Charlotte Douglas International Airport and you are only one plane change away from virtually any point on the globe. We are where you want to be.

– Bob Morgan, president, Charlotte Chamber of Commerce

minus 6 hours; it’s minus nine between mainland Europe and the west coast.

ACC E S S TO E N E R GY, WATE R A N D TE C H NO LO GY electricity: Major electric service comes from Duke Power, Progress Energy and Barnhardt Electric Company, as well as various regional cooperatives. Utility service is efficient, costcompetitive and reliable. natural gas: Distributing natural gas to a 28-county area, Charlotte-based Piedmont Natural Gas serves more than 350,000 customers. Its commercial and industrial rates are competitive.

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

telecommunications: The Charlotte region enjoys a well-maintained service network and unsurpassed access to an extensive fiber optic network with digital switching capability. Also readily available are DSL technology, cost-efficient data transmission, Integrated Services Digital Network and point-to-point services. BellSouth, Time Warner Cable and Sprint are primary telecommunications providers. The region is home to more than 50 cellular and mobile telephone firms, and more than 80 Internet companies. water/waste water: The Catawba River and its reservoirs supply drinking water and hydroelectric power.

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HUMAN RESOURCES

human resources

T

THE 16 COUNTIES OF CHARLOTTEUSA SPRAWL from the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains to the rolling terrain of the central Piedmont. Charlotte is the hub of the region and, with more than 600,000 people, is the largest city in N.C. or S.C. The area contains many smaller cities and rural areas in its 8,000 square miles. Its total population is more than 2.3 million, with 1.5 million older than 25. Yet 34 percent is younger than 17. average weekly wage: The region’s average weekly wage is $626. The management sector leads with an average weekly wage of $1,069; the average weekly check in the finance and insurance sector is $779.

POPULATION Total Region Population:

2,369,607 (2005)

Age

Number

25-34 years

339,412

35-44 years

391,108

45-64 years

337,423

Source: ESRI 2005

unionization: Both N.C. and S.C. have Right-to-Work laws that allow individuals to choose whether to join a union. For 2004, N.C.’s union membership was the nation’s lowest, at 3.6 percent; S.C. was 2nd lowest at 4.2 percent. Charlotte MSA has 3.3 percent union membership.

POPULATION BY AGE 55 yrs to 64 yrs 10.1% 25 yrs to 54 yrs 45%

20 yrs to 24 yrs 16.3% Source: ESRI 2005

28

65 yrs and Over 11.0%

Under 19 yrs 27.6%

AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE BY INDUSTRY All Industries

$626

Construction

$621

Manufacturing

$776

Wholesale Trade

$711

Retail Trade

$394

Transportation & Warehousing

$624

Information

$858

Finance & Insurance

$779

Real Estate

$560

Professional & Technical Services

$668

Management

$1,069

Administrative & Waste Services

$470

Educational Services

$425

Health Care & Social Assistance Services

$439

Accommodation & Food Services

$224

Source: NC LMI 2005 Q2; SC LMI 2005 Q2

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HUMAN RESOURCES

work force training: State training programs for new and expanding industries vary in N.C., but available development programs include: • Occupational continuing education • Human resources development • Specialized industrial training • Work force and training initiatives The Center for Accelerated Technology Training, operated by the statewide Technical Education College System, provides recruiting, screening and training programs for new and expanding businesses. In S.C., the CATT program trains workers for about 1,600 firms, including BMW, Siemens and Bayer.

UNIONIZATION ACTIVITY Union Membership Rates By State 2004

North Carolina

3.6%

South Carolina

4.2%

Florida

7.7%

Virginia

6.6%

Georgia

7.5%

Mississippi

6.3% 11.5%

Alabama Tennessee

7.7% 11.6%

Kentucky Illinois

17.9%

Michigan

22.4%

New York

Mecklenburg County’s greatest strength is its people. While we have excellent geography, weather and natural resources, it has been the traditional leadership of men and women in the public and private sectors that have translated these assets into a quality of life that is unequalled in the United States.

0.0%

26.4%

5.0%

15.0%

20.0%

25.0%

30.0%

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2004

WO R K F O R C E S TAT I S T I C S 1 9 9 0 - 2 0 0 9 % In Labor Force % Unemployed

1990

2000

2004

67%

68%

69%

2009 69%

3%

5%

5%

Age 16+ pop

1,274,703

1,564,947

1,771,034

1,943,904

Total Employed

5%

852,270

1,014,578

1,153,210

1,265,450

Source: Applied Geographic Solutions 2004

– Parks Helms, chairman, Mecklenburg County Board of Commissioners

by-industry employment: The services industry is the leading employer, with more than 420,000 workers, or about a3rd of the work force. Manufacturing employs more than 178,000, or 16 percent. The finance, insurance and real estate sector, with about 95,000 workers, ranks behind retail which counts more than 120,000.

10.0%

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY % Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing

6,254

Less than 1%

% Construction

95,024

8.7%

% Finance, Insurance and Real Estate

95,312

8.8%

% Information

21,614

2.0%

% Manufacturing

178,592

16.5%

% Mining % Public Administration

473 30,782

Less than 1% 2.8%

% Retail Trade

120,868

11.2%

% Services

420,440

38.9%

% Transportation and Utilities

57,007

5.3%

% Wholesale Trade

54,766

5.1%

Source: ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

29


Q UA L I T Y O F L I F E

quality of life

T

“THE TRUTH IS THAT WHILE THE CHARLOTTE REGION IS serious about business, it’s also concerned about the health and well-being of its citizens,” says Gloria Pace King, who has served as president of the United Way of Central Carolinas for more than a decade. “We ought to brand the people who live here for their caring and compassion,” adds King, whose United Way effort raised $41 million in 2005 to fund 98 human services agencies. A populace that truly cares about all its residents is important. But there are other reasons Charlotte is among the nation’s top 20 boomtowns. cost of living: The cost-of-living index for CharlotteUSA is 92.2, lower than Dallas, Denver, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Cleveland or Miami. (U.S. = 100) income: The median household income is a little more than $49,000, slightly higher than the national average. Median income is expected to top $57,000 by 2010. Per capita income is about $26,100, again a bit higher

NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS

housing affordability, availability: The median house value in the CharlotteGastonia-Rock Hill MSA was $128,513 in 2000 U.S. Census. It was $130,000 in Atlanta and $139,000 in Charleston, S.C. Housing is available in all price ranges and from rural to urban settings. At least a half-dozen high-rise condo developments are on the drawing board or under construction in center city Charlotte. Opportunities for renters also abound in all price ranges.

Source: U.S. Census; ESRI 2005-2010 forecasts

than the national average. Average household income is a bit more than $66,000, slightly less than the national average. Total households in CharlotteUSA increased by 45 percent from 1990 to 2005. Projections show an increase from the 924,175 households in 2005 to more than a million in 2010, an annual increase of 2.3 percent.

2 0 0 5 - 2 0 1 0 PROJECTED POPULATION GROWTH

cultural amenities: CharlotteUSA features nationally recognized museums, as well as symphony, opera, theater and dance companies. Discovery Place is a hands-on science museum that houses an OMNIMAX theater.

Source: ESRI 2005-2010 forecasts

30

arts and entertainment: Charlotte is first in per capita spending for the arts, making the city a cultural model for the country. Amenities include arts and crafts festivals, free symphony concerts in parks and art exhibits. The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Library is stateof-the-art and its new ImaginOn center concentrates on programs for youngsters, including a Children’s Theater.

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Q UA L I T Y O F L I F E

KENT SMITH/NBAE

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Source: U.S. Census; ESRI 2005-2010 forecasts

HOUSEHOLD INCOME YEAR

TOTAL

2000 Median

$43,385

2005 Median

$49,716

2010 Median

$57,176

Source: ESRI 2005

recreational opportunities: CharlotteUSA has more than 1,770 miles of shoreline on eight lakes and in excess of 100 public and private golf courses. It is a two-hour drive from Pinehurst, the nation’s golf capital. Two hours in the opposite direction is the breathtaking scenery of the Great Smoky Mountains. Major beaches are four hours away.

The Charlotte area meets a lot of the criteria that Nordstrom considers when planning a new location. SouthPark has a wonderful family atmosphere that lends itself to strong growth potential, plus the area has a growing economy that is well-supported by a healthy shopping environment.

– Carla Brown, store manager, Nordstrom SouthPark

sports and sports facilities: CharlotteUSA is home to the NFL Carolina Panthers, the NBA’s Charlotte Bobcats, the WNBA’s Charlotte Sting, three NASCAR Nextel Cup automobile racing events and the PGA’s Wachovia Championship.➤

PER CAPITA INCOME

PER CAPITA INCOME TRENDS

the YMCA of Greater Charlotte ranks third in North America for people served, behind only Houston and Los Angeles. Operating in four of the region’s counties, it was among the nation’s first YMCAs to form a partnership with a non-profit hospital, Carolinas Healthcare Systems. Additionally, the YWCA of Central Carolinas provides myriad services.

YEAR

PER CAPITA INCOME

1990

$13,863

2000

$21,675

2005

$26,129

2010

$31,272

Source: US Census; ESRI 2005 & 2010 forecasts

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

Source: U.S. Census; ESRI 2005-2010 forecasts

31


Q UA L I T Y O F L I F E

The AAA baseball Charlotte Knights and the Charlotte Checkers minor league ice hockey team offer economical sports experiences. climate: The sun shines 214 days a year. More than 50 inches of rainfall annually feed fragrant flowers, lush green grass and towering treetops. The region enjoys four distinct seasons while avoiding the oppressive heat of the Deep South and the icy intervals of the Northeast and Midwest. Rarely is there enough snow to shovel and temperatures hit triple digits only twice a year, on average.

In Charlotte, we see increasing numbers of patients who could go virtually anywhere in the world for medical care, but who choose to come here. In many areas of medical specialty, the quality of our facilities and staff is second to none. The challenge that lies ahead is to maintain that level of quality, while keeping pace with community growth and successfully promoting preventive health as a way to ensure the highest possible quality of life for everyone.

– Michael Tarwater, president and chief executive, Carolinas HealthCare System

health care: CharlotteUSA includes more than 35 community and regional hospitals, including Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, the flagship facility of Carolinas HealthCare System, the fourth largest healthcare system in the United States. CMC is a Level 1 trauma center, equipped with a medical helicopter and airplane service. Also in the Charlotte region is Novant, a healthcare provider that serves more than 3.4 million people. Its facilities include Presbyterian Hospital, Presbyterian Hospital Matthews and Presbyterian Hospital Huntersville. In 2005, OrthoCarolina formed and became one of the nation’s largest orthopedic practices.

retail opportunities: From the upscale atmosphere at Nordstrom’s to the basics of Wal-Mart, and with the wide selection from home-grown department store chain Belk in between, the Charlotte area offers stores for any taste. Many malls dot the region and Concord Mills, a 1.4 million-square-foot mall, is North Carolina’s top tourist attraction. It’s on the northeastern edge of Charlotte. education: There are 34 colleges and universities in CharlotteUSA and they offer degrees in 150 subjects. The area’s largest university is the University of North Carolina at Charlotte with 21,000 students and a curriculum that includes doctorate degrees. Its Belk School of Business is among as many as a dozen in the region offering a master’s in business administration. Johnson & Wales University has a Charlotte campus and offers degrees in culinary arts, hospitality and business.

32

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TA X E S A N D I N C E N T I V E S

taxes and incentives

N

NORTH CAROLINA HAS JOB CREATION INCENTIVES that include $4,000 per job within a State Development Zone and additional tax credits scales to degree of d e v e l o p m e n t , b y c o u n t y. F o r CharlotteUSA, that runs from $500 per job to $4,000 per job. South Carolina also offers tax credits per job created, depending on development in a particular area. Both states offer tax increment financing for redevelopment areas.

NO RT H C A RO LI N A TA X E S corporate income tax — flat rate of 6.9 percent of net income allocable to the state. sales & use tax — 4 percent statewide with a local rate of 2.5 percent or 3 percent on transactions (combined 6.5 percent tax is not applicable to raw materials, containers, labels, packaging and shipping materials). franchise tax — $1.50 per $1,000, applied to the greatest base determined as set forth in law. inventory tax — Non-existent in North Carolina. property tax — North Carolina does not impose a property tax. Taxes are subject to county rates which run from 4.2 percent to 11 percent and city rates from 2.4 percent to 8 percent.

electricity — 2.83 percent on sales of electricity.

inventory tax — South Carolina does not impose.

natural gas — 2.83 percent.

property tax — South Carolina does not impose a state property tax. Subject to local rates (county rates range from .41 percent to 1.93 percent, county and school rates are 4.07 percent).

telephone service — 3 percent local, 6 percent intrastate. A $50,000 cap applies to call center operations. unemployment insurance rate — Average tax rate of 1.2 percent; new employers rate of 1.2 percent; maximum rate, 5.7 percent; taxable base, $16,200.

manufacturing fuels — South Carolina does not impose. manufacturing equipment — South Carolina does not impose.

S O U T H C A RO LI N A TA X E S manufacturing fuels — 1 percent on fuel for agricultural or manufacturing use or to commercial laundries other than electricity or piped natural gas. manufacturing equipment — 1 percent on farm machinery, mill machinery, parts and accessories sold to manufacturing industries and plants.

electricity — South Carolina does not impose. corporate income tax — Flat rate of 5 percent of net income allocable to the state. sales & use tax — 5 percent with a local rate of 1 percent or 2 percent on transactions. franchise tax — South Carolina does not impose.

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

natural gas — South Carolina does not impose. unemployment insurance rate — New employees rate is 3.34 percent; maximum rate (deficit employers) 6.1 percent; taxable base, $7,000.

33


E

G U I D E TO E S R I TA P E S T RY M A P S

ESRI COMMUNITY TAPESTRY’S DISTINCT MARKET SEGments profile the diversity of the American population and also provide a way to summarize and simplify these differences by LifeMode summary groups. Segments within a LifeMode summary group share an experience, such as being born in the same time period, or a trait such as affluence. (Descriptions apply to ESRI CommunityTM Tapestry TM maps on the following pages.)

occupations, is common. As a result, the median household income for this group, $97,400, is almost twice that of the national median. Most households are married-couple families residing in affluent neighborhoods where the median home value approaches $346,400. Although this is one of the least ethnically diverse groups in the United States, it is one of the fastest growing, increasing by two percent annually. Residents of High Society are affluent and active – financially, civicly, and physically. They participate in a wide variety of public activities and sports and travel extensively. They are well connected, but not “couched.” Try the Internet or radio instead of television to reach these markets.

high society: The markets in High Society are affluent and well educated. They represent slightly more than 12 percent of all U.S. households, but generate nearly one quarter of total U.S. income. Employment in highpaying positions, such as professional or managerial

upscale avenues: Prosperity is the overriding attribute shared by the seven segments in Upscale Avenues. Success has been earned from years of hard work. Similar to the High Society segments, many in this group are also well educated with above-average earnings. However, the

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metropolis: The six segments of the Metropolis group live and work in America’s cities. They live in older, single-family homes or row houses built in the 1940s or earlier. Those living in larger cities tend to own fewer vehicles and rely more on public transportation, but the majority of markets in Metropolis feature commuters to service-related jobs. Depending on the area of the country where they live, the median value of their homes can range from $52,800 to $373,700. The Metropolis group reflects the segments’ diversity in housing, age, and income. For example, ages among segments range from Generation Xers to retirees; households include married couples with children and single parents with children. Employment status also varies from well-educated professionals to the unemployed. The median household income of the group is approximately $38,500. Their lifestyle is also uniquely urban – and media oriented. They like dancing and music, especially urban and jazz formats; watch a variety of television programs from news to syndicated sitcoms; and prefer movies to books. solo acts: The Solo Acts summary group features singles who prefer city life. Many are young, startup households located in America’s more densely populated neighborhoods; some are well-established singles who have eschewed homeownership and child-rearing responsibilities. Second only to High Society, this group tends to be well-educated, working professionals who are either attending college or already hold a degree. Their incomes reflect their employment experience, ranging from a low median of $40,400 among the newest households to approximately $91,000 among established singles. Contrary to modern migration patterns that flow away from the largest cities, Solo Acts’ residents are moving into major cities such as New York City; Chicago; Washington, D.C.; Boston; Los Angeles; and San Francisco. With considerable discretionary income and few commitments, their lifestyle is urban, including the best of city life – dining out, attending plays, and visiting museums – and, for a break from constant connectivity, extensive travel domestically and abroad.

Property

1001 Morehead Square Drive Suite 400 Charlotte, NC 28203

choice of housing among the segments in Upscale Avenues reveals their distinct preferences. Urban markets such as Urban Chic and Pacific Heights favor townhouses and high-rises, Pleasant-Ville residents prefer singlefamily homes in suburban neighborhoods, and Green Acres residents opt for open spaces. Some have not settled on a home yet such as the renters among Enterprising Professionals; others, such as Cozy and Comfortable residents, have been settled for years. The median household income for the group is more than $66,700, and their median net worth exceeds $175,500. Prosperous domesticity also characterizes the lifestyle in Upscale Avenues. They invest in their homes, from landscaping and home remodeling among the homeowners to new furnishings among the renters. Their leisure includes sports such as golf and bicycling and, of course, domestic vacations. Although they are partial to new cars, they also save and invest their earnings.

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senior styles: Nearly 14.2 million households in the nine Senior Styles segments comprise one of the largest LifeMode summary groups. As the U.S. population ages, two of the fastest-growing American markets are found among The Elders and the Silver and Gold segments. Senior Styles segments illustrate the diversity among today’s senior markets. Although incomes within this group cover a wide range, the median is approximately $41,300, attributable mostly to retirement income or Social Security payments. Younger, more affluent seniors, freed of their child-rearing responsibilities, are traveling and relocating to warmer climates. Settled seniors are looking forward to retirement and remaining in their homes. Some of the older, less privileged segments live alone and collect Social Security and other benefits. Their choice of housing depends on their income. This group may reside in single-family homes, retirement homes, or high-rises. Their lifestyles can be as diverse as their circumstances, but senior markets do have common traits among their preferences. This is the most politically active market group, from voting to participating in election campaigns. Golf is clearly their sport of choice, from

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G U I D E TO E S R I TA P E S T RY M A P S playing to just watching the Golf Channel. They read the newspaper daily and prefer to watch news shows on television. Although their use of the Internet is nearly average, they are more likely to shop through QVC than online. scholars and patriots: This summary group is unique in the Tapestry system. Their shared traits include youth, with the attendant lower incomes, and atypical environments such as college life or military service. Because of their transient lifestyle and lifestage, their homeownership is low. Most live in townhouses or apartments, although one quarter resides in single-family homes. One segment, Military Proximity, is dominated by military life; the other two, College Towns and Dorms and Diplomas, are predominantly students who are pursuing college degrees. Although most of the military market is either on active duty or employed in civilian jobs on military bases, the students tend to work part-time at low-paying jobs to support themselves while attending school. However, low personal income does not inhibit their lifestyles. Scholars and Patriots are the most active participants in a wide variety of sports – from swimming and snorkeling to skiing and ice skating. They are style conscious; and well connected with PCs, cell phones, and MP3s; and just beginning to acquire household furnishings.

Traditional Living segments buy standard, four-door American cars; belong to veterans’ clubs and fraternal organizations; take care of their homes and gardens; and rely on traditional information sources, such as newspapers, for their news. factories and farms: Factories and Farms represent rural life – from small towns and villages to farms. Employment in manufacturing and agricultural industries is typical in these small, settled communities across America’s breadbasket. Population change is nominal, and the profile is classic. Most households are families, either married couples or married couples with children. By age, the residents of Factories and Farms mirror the U.S. distribution, with slightly more retirees. Median household income is a bit lower, almost $38,000, but so is home value, almost $88,000. Most own their homes. Their lifestyle reflects their locale, emphasizing home and garden care, fishing and

hunting, pets, and local clubs. american quilt: Location also links the four segments in American Quilt – America’s small towns and rural areas. Unlike Factories and Farms, this group represents a more diverse microcosm of small-town life, including Tapestry’s largest segment, Midland Crowd. Manufacturing and agriculture remain part of the local economy, but American Quilt also includes local government, service, construction, communication, and utility workers. In addition to farmers, American Quilt includes Rural Resort Dwellers, an older population that is retiring to seasonal vacation spots, and Crossroads, a younger, family population that favors mobile homes. Households in American Quilt are also more affluent, with a median income of $43,000, and more are homeowners. However, the rural lifestyle is also evident, with fishing and hunting (and power boats), and a preference for pickups and country music.

high hopes: High Hopes includes Aspiring Young Families and Great Expectations. The High Hopes group seeks the “American Dream” of homeownership and a rewarding job. Most live in single-family houses or multiunit buildings; approximately half own their homes. Many are willing to move to a new location to seek better opportunities. The residents in the summary group are young and college educated; one-third of the householders are younger than 35 years. Their median net worth is more than $81,400 – nearly 76 percent of the U.S. median. Households in this group include a mix of married couples, single-parent families, or single persons. global roots: The common thread among the markets in Global Roots is ethnic diversity. Las Casas and NeWest Residents represent a strong Hispanic influence in addition to a broad mix of cultural and racial diversity found in Urban Melting Pot and International Marketplace. Typical of new households, Global Roots’ households are young with modest incomes and tend to rent in multiunit dwellings. The youth of this group reflects recent immigration trends; half of all households have immigrated to the United States within the past 10 years. The households range from married couples, typically with children, to single parents to individuals who live alone. Because households with children dominate this marketplace, it is not surprising that spending for baby goods, children’s apparel, and toys is higher here. Residents of Global Roots are less likely to have home PCs but just as likely to use cell phones. They maintain ties with friends and relatives in their countries of origin with foreign travel. family portrait: Family Portrait has the fastest-growing population of the LifeMode summary groups. The growth is driven primarily by the rapid increase among Up and Coming Families. Youth, family life, and the presence of children are the common characteristics across the five markets in Family Portrait. The group is also ethnically diverse: nearly 30 percent of the residents are of Hispanic descent. The neighborhoods are predominantly comprised of homeowners who live in single-family homes. The majority of households include married couples with children, who contribute to the group’s large household size averaging more than 3.11 persons per household. Their lifestyle reflects their youth and family orientation – buying infant and children’s apparel and toys. Visits to theme parks and zoos are popular. Their vehicle of choice is typically a minivan or a full-size SUV. traditional living: Traditional Living includes four markets that convey the common perception of middle America: hardworking, settled families. The group’s higher median age of 37.4 years also conveys their lifestage – a number of older residents who are completing their child rearing responsibilities and looking forward to retirement. The aging of the population has not slowed their participation in the labor force. They work hard to earn a modest living and typically own singlefamily homes in established neighborhoods that are experiencing slow population growth. Residents in the

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

35


CharlotteUSA at a glance C H A R LOT TE U S A LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR Retail Sales

Food Services & Drinking Places

13.2

$653,079,810 $2,924,449,950

-1.9

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

Food & Beverage Stores

$404,946,988

3.2

$1,235,703,885

-18.8

Gasoline Stations Health & Personal Care Stores

$512,325,712

-10.5

General Merchandise Store

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$2,585,548,534

19.3

Nonstore Retailers Miscellaneous Store Retailers

25.9

$1,276,533,020 $1,356,478,154

-15.1 -1.0

$4,597,313,700

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

18.3

$862,336,372

Electronics & Appliance Stores

16.9

$312,712,635

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

C H A R LOT TE U S A CORRIDORS OF COMMERCE

$736.497,671

-2.6

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

$5,239,739,153

10.6

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

© ESRI 2005

© ESRI 2005

C H A R LOT TE U S A CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

2005 Dominant LifeMode by Block Group Factories & Farms

Senior Styles

High Hopes

American Quilt

Metropolis

Solo Acts

Upscale Avenues

High Society

Global Roots

Traditional Living

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

© ESRI 2005

36

C H A R LOT TE U S A P O P U L AT I O N C H A N G E

COUNTY ANSON ALEXANDER STANLY LINCOLN CLEVELAND ROWAN IREDELL CABARRUS

2000 25,275 33,603 58,100 63,780 96,287 130,340 122,660 131,063

2005 25,431 35,727 59,915 71,623 98,269 135,305 141,404 150,712

2010 25,272 37,435 60,860 79,600 98,954 138,271 160,778 169,831

COUNTY UNION CATAWBA GASTON MECKLENBURG CHESTER CHESTERFIELD LANCASTER YORK

2000 123,677 141,685 190,365 695,454 34,068 42,768 61,351 164,614

2005 155,736 152,680 196,927 813,852 33,775 43,683 63,825 190,743

2010 193,017 161,995 201,814 946,370 33,140 44,245 66,053 219,403

© ESRI 2005

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Discover The L&C Railway Super-Site Region

Site • Located in Chester County, South Carolina • 45 minutes from Charlotte Douglas International Airport • 167 miles to the Port of Charleston • Served by CSX and NS, via L&C Railway • Over 8,000’ of road frontage on I-77 between two interchanges • Located in EPA Attainment Zone • All 1,151 acres under one ownership • All preliminary studies completed • Over 3,000 Industrially zoned acres available for supplier parks and greenfield sites • 229 Acre PAD Site in Place.

Major Industries in L&C Corridor • ADM • Allvac • Ameristeel • DOW Chemical • GAF Corporation • Guardian Industries

• Owens Corning • PPG • SYNSIL - Division of Mineral Technologies, Inc. • Thyssen/Krupp

• Fortune Magazine has ranked the Charlotte Region as a #1 business environment • Over 250 automotive companies are located in the Charlotte Region • 62 percent of the U.S. Industrial base is located within a 650 mile radius • 52 percent of the US population lives within a 650 mile radius • North Carolina and South Carolina have the lowest percentage of union workers in the U.S. • Direct flights to Munich, Frankfurt, London, Toronto, and Mexico City as well as 120 other destinations • Outstanding tax incentive programs We invite you to locate your industry in the L&C Industrial Corridor. Contact Steve Gedney at 803-286-2100, or visit our Web site at www.landcrailroad.com.


ALEXANDER COUNTY

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A L E X A N D E R C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

ear the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains within easy distance of Interstates 40 and 77, Alexander County is poised for business expansion. County residents can have “the best of both” – employment opportunities near a large urban area while enjoying small-town community life and a low cost of living. A talented work force and low property tax rates are other pluses offered by Alexander County. ESRI demographic data reveals that Alexander County’s 2000 population of 33,603 in 13,137 households rose slightly to 35,727 in 14,213 households in 2005; 4,103 people live in Bethlehem, the county’s largest city. In 2010, county population figures are expected to increase to 37,435 people in 15,023 households. The expected population growth rate of 0.94 percent is slightly lower than that of 1.2 percent, the national growth rate. Age ranges are fairly evenly distributed from 0 to 4 years at 6.92 percent to a high of 8.58 percent for those aged 40 to 44 years. Senior ranges are lower at 4.09 percent for those aged 65 to 69 years declining to a low of 1.18 percent for those aged 85+ years.

Per U.S. Census Block Group

The county’s racial composition is fairly homogeneous with a low diversity index of 21.7 percent, lower than the national figure of 58 percent. More than 91 percent of the residents are white; 4.71 percent are black, and 3.10 percent are Hispanic.

665-990 991-1,247 1,248-1,496 1,497-1,822 1,823-2,359

© ESRI 2005

A LE X A N D E R CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

Employed county residents work primarily in the construction, manufacturing, retail, and healthcare/social assistance industry sectors. According to NC ESC data, Alexander County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 4.7 percent, as of December 2005. Income figures show a slight increase from the 2000 figure. The per capita income figure for 2000 was $18,507; $20,933 was reported in 2005, and $24,049 is the projected figure for 2010. Median household income rose from $38,622 in 2000 to the current figure of $43,457, and is expected to increase to $48,684 in 2010. Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that 34.9 percent of county residents are high school graduates; 16.5 percent have attended more than one year of college, and 9.0 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. Residents of Alexander County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for each group found in Alexander County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms American Quilt Upscale Avenues

40

© ESRI 2005

ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provide a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Alexander County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are not meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant leakages occur in the Gasoline Stations and the Electronics & Appliance Stores sectors.

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NC

Alexander County David A. Icenhour, Economic Development Director 621 Liledoun Rd. • Taylorsville, NC 28681 828-632-1161 phone • 828-632-0059 fax dicenhour@co.alexander.nc.us www.alexandercountync.gov

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Bethlehem • Population: 4,103 • Total County Population: 35,727 Age

% Total Population

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.8% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.7% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.1% ESRI 2005

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .326 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,144 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,240 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .498 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,517 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .717 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .380 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .434 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .951 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,533 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175 ESRI 2005

50

The Mitchell Gold Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700 Hancock & Moore, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525 Craftmaster Furniture Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 430 Schneider Mills Industries, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350 Broyhill Furniture Industries, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330 Clayton-Marcus Furniture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240

$2,535,862

25

General Merchandise Store

$2,113,164 $35,807,504

19

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$1,273,471

46

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$2,964,804

1

Gasoline Stations

63

$5,848,965

Health & Personal Care Stores

16

$7,646,448

Food & Beverage Stores

17

$47,341,088

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$6,250,663

45

Electronics & Appliance Stores Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

65

$10,187,770

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$337,959

-12

$31,472,630

50

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

Employees

$19,917,708

39

Nonstore Retailers

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S Company (non-governmental)

Retail Sales

Food Services & Drinking Places

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

A LE X A N D E R CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

A LE X A N D E R CO U N T Y M E D I A N H O U S E H O L D I N CO M E

Alexander County 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18,597 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,707 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.7% NC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number

% Total Work Force

Population Age 25 Plus 24,186 Less Than High School, No Diploma 6,917 High School Graduate 8,441 College, No Diploma 3,991 Associate Degree 1,790 Bachelor’s Degree 2,177 Graduate or Professional School Degree 871

28.6% 34.9% 16.5% 7.4% 9.0% 3.6%

Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME Year

$29,247-$32,303

Total

$32,304-$41,057

2000 Median Household $38,622 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $43,457 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,684 2005 Per Capita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,933

ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$41,058-$44,612 $44,613-$50,201 © ESRI 2005

$50,202-$61,722

41


ANSON COUNTY

I

A N S O N C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

n the rolling hills of North Carolina’s Piedmont region, Anson County is struggling to regain its business strength after the loss of the area’s textile industry. A welcoming business environment, a low cost of living, a willing work force, and a rich history that dates back to the 1700s, are just a few of the advantages that Anson County offers to businesses, residents, and visitors. ESRI demographic data notes that Anson County’s population shows very little growth from 2000 with a figure of 25,275 people living in 9,204 households to the 2005 figure of 25,431 people who live in 9,442 households. The projected figure for 2010 shows a very small drop in population to 25,272 in 9,468 households. At -0.13 percent, Anson County’s population growth rate is below the national growth rate of 1.2 percent. The population for Wadesboro, Anson County’s largest city is 3,387. Age ranges remain consistent between 6 and 7.5 percent for ages up to 60 to 64 when it drops to 4.96 percent. Populations of other senior age ranges drop from 3.01 percent for ages 70 to 74 to 1.98 percent for those aged 85+ years.

Per U.S. Census Block Group

The diversity index of 53 is slightly below the national index of 58 percent. Racial diversity is nearly even; 48.71 percent of the population is white; 49.16 percent is black; other races show very small percentages.

499-699 700-952 953-1,338 1,339-1,682 1,683-2,247

© ESRI 2005

A N S O N CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that more than 37 percent of the population have graduated from high school; nearly 16 percent have attended more than one year of college, and 8.8 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. Industry sectors such as construction, manufacturing, retail, and healthcare/social assistance sales, provide jobs for most of the 9,441 county residents who are working. According to NC ESC data, Anson County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 6.3 percent, as of December 2005. Income has risen very slowly; per capita income for 2000 was $14,853; the 2005 figure is $17,564, and the projected figure for 2010 is $20,588. Median household income has seen a similar slow increase; $29,842 in 2000; $33,395 for 2005, and $37,281 is projected for 2010. Residents of Anson County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for each group found in Anson County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provide a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Anson County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are not meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant leakages occur in the Nonstore Retailers (catalog, Internet, mail and phone orders), and the Electronics & Appliance Stores sectors.

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms Senior Styles Metropolis Traditional Living

42

© ESRI 2005

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NC

Anson County Economic Department Kevin Gullette, Director of Economic Development P.O. Drawer 339 • Wadesboro, NC 28170 704-694-9513 phone • 704-694-7015 fax kgullette@co.anson.nc.us www.ansoncounty.org

A N S O N CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Wadesboro • Population: 3,387 • Total County Population: 25,431 Age

% Total Population

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.4% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28.9% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.2% ESRI 2005

Retail Sales

Food Services & Drinking Places Nonstore Retailers

65

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .372 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .739 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,386 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .381 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .914 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .308 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .190 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .266 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .827 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,203 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 ESRI 2005

General Merchandise Store

$2,376,287 $20,192,980

13

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$444,062

52

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$4,128,964

1

Gasoline Stations

32

Health & Personal Care Stores Food & Beverage Stores

$9,801,544 $5,509,031

10 -5

$45,921,727

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$3,315,004

49

Electronics & Appliance Stores

71

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$24,178,156

39 0

20

$218,319 $2,609,888

24

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$257,115

10

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S Company (non-governmental)

$15,842,041

24

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

Hornwood. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 Wade Manufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Coffing Hoists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Triangle Brick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 CMH Flooring Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

A N S O N C O U N T Y MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD I N C O M E

Anson County Economic Development 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,322 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 718 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.3% NC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number

% Total Work Force

Population Age 25 Plus 16,647 Less Than High School, No Diploma 4,545 High School Graduate 6,259 College, No Diploma 2,647 Associate Degree 1,132 Bachelor’s Degree 1,465 Graduate or Professional School Degree 583

27.3% 37.6% 15.9% 6.8% 8.8% 3.5%

Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

INCOME Year

Per U.S. Census Block Group

Total

$18,490-$21,525

2000 Median Household $29,842 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $33,395 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37,281 2005 Per Capita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,564

$21,526-$29,170 $29,171-$35,000 $35,001-$42,374

ESRI 2005

© ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$42,375-$47,277

43


CABARRUS COUNTY

P

C A B A R R U S C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

roximity to major transportation and urban areas, a talented work force, and an excellent quality of life are favorable conditions for the continued growth of Cabarrus County. The draw of NASCAR fans to races at the adjacent Lowe’s Motor Speedway have increased revenues from tourism in addition to the more traditional industry sectors. ESRI population figures show consistent growth from 131,063 people living in 49,519 households in 2000, to the current figure of 150,712 people in 57,462 households, and the projected increase of 169,831 people in 64,942 households in 2010. The population growth rate of 2.42 percent is higher than the national growth rate of 1.2 percent. Concord is the county’s largest city with a population of 64,991. Population age ranges vary from a high of 8.73 percent for the 40 to 44 range to a low of 1.39 percent for those who are aged 85+ years. All other ranges are between 5 and 7 percent. Racial composition in the county is predominantly white at 82.09 percent; 12.28 percent of the county population is black. Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that more than 28 percent of the population are high school graduates; 19.6 percent have attended more than one year of college, and more than 18 percent hold a bachelor’s degree.

Per U.S. Census Block Group 389-1,050

The construction, manufacturing, retail, and healthcare/social assistance industry sectors provide employment for the county residents who are working. According to NC ESC data, Cabarrus County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 3.9 percent, as of December 2005.

1,051-1,625 1,626-2,332 2,333-3,457 3,458-8,162

© ESRI 2005

C A B A R R U S CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

Per capita and household median income figures show consistent increases. In 2000, the per capita income was $21,121; in 2005, the figure was $24,751, and the projection for 2010 is $28,628. Median household income has slowly increased: the figure in 2000 was $46,166; in 2005, the amount rose to $52,040; and the projection for 2010 is $59,696. Residents of Cabarrus County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for each group that is found in Cabarrus County: • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families • Family Portrait: Youth, family life and children • High Hopes: Young, striving households seeking the “American Dream” • Global Roots: Ethnic diversity, age and median income • High Society: Affluent, well educated, married couple homeowner families • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms Upscale Avenues American Quilt Senior Styles

ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provides a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Cabarrus County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are not meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant leakages occur in the Nonstore Retailers (catalog, Internet, mail, and phone orders); Gasoline Stations; and the Electronics & Appliance Stores sectors.

Traditional Living Family Portrait High Hopes Global Roots High Society Metropolis

44

© ESRI 2005

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www.charlotteUSA.com


NC

Cabarrus Regional Partnership Ryan McDaniels, Director of Economic Development 3003 Dale Earnhardt Blvd. • Kannapolis, NC 28083 704-782-4000 phone • 704-892-4050 fax rmcdaniels@cabarrus.biz www.cabarrusedc.com

C A B A R R U S CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Concord • Population: 64,991 • Total County Population: 150,712 Age

% Total Population

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.9% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31.1% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.1% ESRI 2005

Retail Sales

Food Services & Drinking Places Nonstore Retailers

39

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .470 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,813 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,945 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,824 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,786 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,046 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .909 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,586 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,484 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,108 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,583 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,522 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,161 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,529 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,716 ESRI 2005

$43,635,866

General Merchandise Store

$167,642,300

3

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$44,623,776

-10

$135,450,400

-29

Gasoline Stations Health & Personal Care Stores

36

$60,210,761 $81,904,874

-11

Food & Beverage Stores

9

$207,575,852

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$45,556,913

26

Electronics & Appliance Stores

41

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$6,831,480 $25,592,378

20

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$7,273,488

-2

$342,993,673

7

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S Company (non-governmental)

$156,626,900

19

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

Northeast Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,116 Philip Morris USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,600 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 983 Pass & Seymour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 692 CT Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631

C A B A R RU S C O U N T Y M E D I A N H O U S E H O L D I N C O M E

Cabarrus Regional Partnership 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79,934 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,098 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.9% NC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Population Age 25 Plus Less Than High School, No Diploma High School Graduate College, No Diploma Associate Degree Bachelor’s Degree Graduate or Professional School Degree

Number

% Total Work Force

97,831 19,077 28,077 19,175 8,120 17,805 5,674

19.5% 28.7% 19.6% 8.3% 18.2% 5.8%

Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME Year

Total

$23,136-$31,230

2000 Median Household $46,166 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $52,040 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59,696 2005 Per Capita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,751

$31,231-$43,300 $43,301-$54,854 $54,855-$63,368

ESRI 2005

© ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$63,369-$83,942

45


C ATAWBA COUNTY

N

C ATA W B A C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

ear the foothills of North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains, Catawba County has long been known for its manufacturing capabilities in furniture, textiles, and hosiery. Employment opportunities at these traditional industries are expanding by technology sectors such as fiber optics and telecommunications cable. ESRI demographic data shows Hickory is the county’s largest city with a 2005 population of 40,042. County population figures show a modest increase; in 2000, 141,685 people lived in 55,533 households; in 2005, the figures increased to 152,680 people living in 60,551 households, and the projection for 2010 shows 161,995 people in 64,594 households. The population growth rate is 1.19 percent, slightly lower than the national growth rate of 1.2 percent. Population age ranges remain consistent for all ranges at between 5 and 7 percent with a peak of 8.20 percent for the 40-44 range. “Senior” age ranges drop steadily from 4.83 percent for ages 60 to 64 down to a low of 1.47 percent for those aged 85+ years. Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that 30 percent of county residents have graduated from high school; nearly 18 percent have attended college for more than one year, and 15.7 percent hold a bachelor’s degree.

Per U.S. Census Block Group

The manufacturing, construction, retail, and healthcare/social assistance industry sectors supply most of the jobs for county residents who are working. According to NC ESC data, Catawba County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 5.2 percent, as of December 2005.

68-891 892-1,441 1,442-2,049 2,050-2,920 2,921-3,919

© ESRI 2005

C A T A W B A CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

Incomes have grown modestly since 2000. The per capita income figure for 2000 was $20,358; in 2005 that rose to $23,566, and the projected figure for 2010 is $27,546. Median household income was $40,554 in 2000, $45,616 in 2005 and projected to be $51,316 in 2010. Residents of Catawba County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for each group that is found in Catawba County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families • High Hopes: Young, striving households seeking the “American Dream” • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • Global Roots: Ethnic diversity, age and median income • Solo Acts: Singles who prefer city life • High Society: Affluent, well educated, married couple homeowner families • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • Family Portrait: Youth, family life and children

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group

46

Factories & Farms

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

Senior Styles

Metropolis

American Quilt

Global Roots

Family Portrait

Traditional Living

Solo Acts

High Society

© ESRI 2005

ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provides a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Catawba County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant surpluses occur in the Miscellaneous Store Retailers; Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores; Health & Personal Care Stores; and Furniture & Home Furnishing Stores sectors.

ChooseCharlotteUSA

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NC

Catawba County Economic Development Corporation Scott L. Millar, President 1960-B 13th Avenue Drive, SE • Hickory, NC 28602 828-267-1564 phone • 828-267-1884 fax smillar@catawbacountync.gov www.catawbaedc.org

C A T A W B A CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Hickory • Population: 40,042 • Total County Population: 152,680 Age

% Total Population

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14.2% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.1% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.2% ESRI 2005

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .276 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,091 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19,273 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,126 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,494 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,280 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .550 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .612 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,594 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .738 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,517 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,004 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,091 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,428 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .749 ESRI 2005

Company (non-governmental)

Nonstore Retailers

5

$61,360,750

-40

General Merchandise Store

$64,939,664 $263,928,280

-22

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$38,767,050

-12

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$104,575,085

-42

Gasoline Stations

25

Health & Personal Care Stores

$78,902,691

-37

Food & Beverage Stores

$148,362,944 -12

$305,175,935

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

17

$51,073,767

Electronics & Appliance Stores

19

$13,445,407

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$168,246,663

-59

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$433,596,128

-4

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

$212,030,531

2

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

Retail Sales

Food Services & Drinking Places

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

Frye Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+ CommScope, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+ Catawba Memorial Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+ Hickory Springs Manufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+ Century Furniture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+

C ATA W B A C O U N T Y M E D I A N H O U S E H O L D I N C O M E

Catawba County Economic Development Corporation 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77,336 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,016 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.2% NC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Population Age 25 Plus Less Than High School, No Diploma High School Graduate College, No Diploma Associate Degree Bachelor’s Degree Graduate or Professional School Degree

Number

% Total Work Force

100,861 22,795 30,258 17,752 8,271 15,835 5,951

22.6% 30.0% 17.6% 8.2% 15.7% 5.9%

Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

INCOME Year

Per U.S. Census Block Group

Total

$22,889-$34,642

2000 Median Household $40,554 2005 Median Household . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $45,616 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $51,316 2005 Per Capita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,566

$34,643-$44,222 $44,223-$52,347 $52,348-$60,631

ESRI 2005

© ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$60,632-$77,436

47


CHESTER COUNTY

T

C H E S T E R C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

he welcome mat is out in Chester County for businesses, residents, and visitors, so “Ya’ll come!” Southern hospitality and charm are personified in the county’s small towns and farms. Centered between the Charlotte, N.C., Columbia, S.C., and Greenville-Spartanburg, S.C. metropolitan areas, Chester County is strategically located for commercial growth. A variety of industry sectors provide job opportunities for the reliable local work force. ESRI demographic data shows Chester, the county’s largest city, has a population of 6,235. The county population has remained stagnant since 2000, when the figure was 34,068 people living in 12,880 households. In 2005, the population dropped very slightly to 33,775 in 13,091 households, and in 2010, the figure is projected to be 33,140 in 13,013 households. The population growth rate is -0.38 percent, lower than the national figure of 1.2 percent. The population by age ranges is fairly evenly distributed between 6 and 7 percent for all ages, before dropping sharply to 3.87 percent for those aged 65 to 69 years. This decline continues to a low of 1.37 percent for those aged 85+ years. The county’s racial composition is 59 percent white, 39.29 percent black, with smaller percentages for Asians, Hispanics, and those of other races. The county’s diversity index is 50.6, lower than the national figure of 58.

Per U.S. Census Block Group 650-745 746-965 966-1,170 1,171-1,488 1,489-1,869

© ESRI 2005

C H E S T E R CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

The construction, manufacturing, retail, and healthcare/social assistance industry sectors are providing jobs to most county residents who are working. According to SC ESC data, Chester County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 10.4 percent, as of December 2005. Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that nearly 35 percent of county residents are high school graduates; 16 percent have attended more than one year of college, and 8 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. Figures show very slight increases for per capita and household median incomes: 2000 per capita income was $14,709; in 2005 the figure was $17,522, and the projected figure for 2010 is $20,238. Median household income rose from $32,547 in 2000 to $36,955 in 2005, and is projected at $41,487 for 2010. Residents of Chester County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for each group that is found in Chester County: • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provides a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Chester County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant leakages in Chester County occur in the Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book, and Music Stores; Building Materials, Garden Equipment & Supply Stores; and Electronics & Appliance Stores sectors. A surplus appears in the Furniture & Home Furnishing Stores sector.

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms Metropolis American Quilt Senior Styles Traditional Living

48

© ESRI 2005

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


SC

Chester County Economic Development Karlisa Parker, Economic Development Director P.O. Drawer 580 • Chester, SC 29706 803-377-1216 phone • 803-377-2102 fax kparker@choosechester.com www.choosechester.com

C H E S T E R CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Chester • Population: 6,235 • Total County Population: 33,775 % Total Population

Food Services & Drinking Places

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.7% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28.9% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.5%

Nonstore Retailers

Age

ESRI 2005

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,064 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,016 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,144 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .410 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .243 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .326 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .367 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .840 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,203 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223 ESRI 2005

Miscellaneous Store Retailers General Merchandise Store

$26,937,519

8

$1,237,424

14

$2,670,737

9

$23,007,241

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$1,388,065

37

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$8,028,497

-2

Gasoline Stations

31

Health & Personal Care Stores

$13,138,829 $5,754,939

12

Food & Beverage Stores

-8

$64,638,752

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$3,607,528

52

Electronics & Appliance Stores Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

65

$34,651,906

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$650,125

-48

$54,168,441

14

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S Company (non-governmental)

Retail Sales 14

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

Springs Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,092 Cultured Stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350-750 Chesterwood Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Guardian Industries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Superior Essex. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265

C H E S T E R C O U N T Y MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD I N C O M E

Chester County Economic Development 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15,880 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,650 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.4% SC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number

% Total Work Force

Population Age 25 Plus 21,951 Less Than High School, No Diploma 6,827 High School Graduate 7,661 College, No Diploma 3,512 Associate Degree 1,273 Bachelor’s Degree 1,756 Graduate or Professional School Degree 922

31.1% 34.9% 16.0% 5.8% 8.0% 4.2%

Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

INCOME Year

Per U.S. Census Block Group

Total

$22,870-$26,603

2000 Median Household $32,547 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $36,955 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,487 2005 Per Capita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,522

$26,604-$32,707 $32,708-$37,829 $37,830-$42,089

ESRI 2005

© ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$42,090-$47,723

49


CHESTERFIELD COUNTY C H E S T E R F I E L D C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

A

lthough rich in history and tradition, Chesterfield County has its eye on tomorrow. A business-friendly environment, a talented work force, and easy access to transportation hubs, place Chesterfield County at the forefront of areas poised for business growth. ESRI demographic data notes that Chesterfield County’s largest town is Cheraw with a population of 5,714. The county’s population shows a very slight increase from the 2000 figure of 42,768 people in 16,557 households to an increase in 2005 to 43,683 in 17,348 households. The projected figure for 2010 is 44,245 in 17,811 households. The expected population growth rate is 0.26 percent, lower than the national figure of 1.2 percent. Age ranges are fairly evenly distributed at between 5 to 7 percent with a spike of 8.04 percent for the 40 to 44 age group. Senior ranges drop to 3.88 percent for the 65 to 69 age group down to 1.34 percent for those aged 85+ years. The construction, manufacturing, retail, education services, and healthcare/social assistance industry sectors provide most of the job opportunities for those who are working. According to SC ESC data, Chesterfield County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 8.9 percent, as of December 2005.

Per U.S. Census Block Group 623-759

The county’s racial composition is divided into 63.37 percent white, 33.63 percent black and smaller percentages for Hispanics and those of other races. The diversity index is 51.3, slightly lower than the national figure of 58.

760-1,037 1,038-1,334 1,335-1,682 1,683-2,151

© ESRI 2005

C H E S T E R F I E L D CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that nearly 34 percent of the county residents have graduated from high school; more than 15 percent have attended more than one year of college, and 8.4 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. Per capita and median household income show slight increases. In 2000, the per capita income was $14,233, increasing in 2005 to $16,796, and projected for 2010 to $19,541. The county’s median household income showed similar small increases. In 2000, the figure was $29,509; in 2005, it rose to $33,728, and is projected to $37,968 in 2010. Residents of Chesterfield County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for each group found in Chesterfield County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • Family Portrait: Youth, family life and children • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provides a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Chesterfield County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant leakages in Chesterfield County, occur in the Building Materials, Garden Equipment & Supply Stores; Electronics & Appliance Stores; and Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers sectors. A surplus appears in the Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores sector.

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms Senior Styles American Quilt Metropolis Family Portrait Traditional Living

50

© ESRI 2005

ChooseCharlotteUSA

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SC

Chesterfield County Economic Development Board Cherry G. McCoy, Executive Director P.O. Box 192 • Chesterfield, SC 29709 843-623-6500 phone • 843-623-3167 fax cherryatcc@shtc.net www.chesterfieldcountysc.org

C H E S T E R F I E L D CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Cheraw • Population: 5,714 • Total County Population: 43,683 Age

% Total Population

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.9% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29.8% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.5% ESRI 2005

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .432 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,343 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,413 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .381 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,953 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .623 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .599 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .480 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,290 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,533 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138 ESRI 2005

-2

$7,631,566

-25

General Merchandise Store

$5,803,568 $115,726,499

-28

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$3,054,432

-2

$3,418,196

-47

Gasoline Stations Health & Personal Care Stores

24

$20,689,871 $8,836,545

-19

Food & Beverage Stores

-5

$68,390,551

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$5,445,539

38

Electronics & Appliance Stores

26

$1,185,829

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

24

$2,321,262

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$44,697,356

34

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S Company (non-governmental)

Nonstore Retailers

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$33,244,003

13

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

Retail Sales

Food Services & Drinking Places

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

INA USA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N/A Conbraco Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732 Wal-Mart Distribution Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 729 A.O. Smith Water Products Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469 Highland Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341

CHESTERFIELD COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Chesterfield County Economic Development Board 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18,270 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,630 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.9% SC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number

% Total Work Force

Population Age 25 Plus 28,449 Less Than High School, No Diploma 9,417 High School Graduate 9,559 College, No Diploma 4,324 Associate Degree 1,707 Bachelor’s Degree 2,390 Graduate or Professional School Degree 1,081

33.1% 33.6% 15.2% 6.0% 8.4% 3.8%

Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

INCOME Year

Per U.S. Census Block Group

Total

$13,068-$19,633

2000 Median Household $29,509 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $33,728 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37,968 2005 Per Capita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,796

$19,634-$29,651 $29,652-$35,323 $35,324-$40,303

ESRI 2005

© ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$40,304-$53,744

51


CLEVELAND COUNTY C L E V E L A N D C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

T

he strategic location between the Carolinas’ two largest metro areas – Charlotte, N.C., and Greenville/Spartanburg, S.C. – provides Cleveland County with multiple opportunities for business expansion. Easy access to interstate transportation, diversified industry sectors, low cost of living, and a large labor force are just a few advantages offered to existing and prospective Cleveland County residents and businesses. ESRI demographic data reveals that Shelby, Cleveland County’s largest city, has a 2005 population of 19,633. In 2000, the total county population was 96,287 in 37,046 households; that figure grew slightly in 2005 to 98,269 in 38,330 households, and in 2010, is projected to be 98,954 in 38,830 households. The county’s population growth rate is 0.14 percent, somewhat lower than the national figure of 1.2 percent. Age ranges of between 5 to 7 percent remain fairly consistent for all groups up to ages 40 to 44 when the rate jumps to 8.01 percent, then declines to 4.01 percent for those aged 65 to 69 to a low figure of 1.74 percent for those aged 85+ years.

Per U.S. Census Block Group 583-940 941-1,200 1,201-1,556 1,557-1,911 © ESRI 2005

1,912-2,839

C L E V E L A N D CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™ Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms Senior Styles American Quilt Upscale Avenues Traditional Living Metropolis High Hopes

Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that 33 percent of county residents are high school graduates; 16.4 percent have attended more than one year of college, and 11.7 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. Per capita and median household income figures show very slight increases. In 2000, the per capita income was $17,395; in 2005, it rose to $20,348, and it projected to be $23,676 in 2010. In 2000, the median household income was $35,294; rising to $39,730 in 2005, with a projected increase to $44,710 in 2010. The construction, manufacturing, wholesale and retail trade, education services, healthcare/social assistance, transportation, and accommodation/food services industry sectors provide most of the job opportunities for Cleveland County workers. According to NC ESC data, the unemployment rate is 6.9 percent for those aged 16+ years, as of December 2005. Residents of Cleveland County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for each group found in Cleveland County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • High Hopes: Young, striving households seeking the “American Dream” ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provides a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Cleveland County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. Modest leakages occur in the Food Services & Drinking Places; Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book and Music Stores; Gasoline Stations; and Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers sectors. A more significant leakage occurs in the Electronics & Appliance Stores sector. A small surplus appears in the Building Materials, Garden Equipment & Supply Stores sector.

© ESRI 2005

52

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NC

Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce Stuart C. Gilbert, President P.O. Box 879 • Shelby, NC 28151 704-487-8521 phone • 704-487-7458 fax stuart@clevelandchamber.org www.clevelandchamber.org

C L E V E L A N D CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Shelby • Population: 19,633 • Total County Population: 98,269 Age

% Total Population

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.8% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29.2% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.4% ESRI 2005

Retail Sales

Food Services & Drinking Places Nonstore Retailers

16

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .333 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,966 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,509 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,588 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,360 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,233 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .375 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .439 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,002 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .376 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .865 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,178 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,121 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,101 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .448 ESRI 2005

$15,211,654 $87,568,519

10

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$14,873,530

7

Gasoline Stations

29

Health & Personal Care Stores

$45,982,947 $33,253,811

2

Food & Beverage Stores

-1

$159,544,122 $87,001,945

-18

Electronics & Appliance Stores

42

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$4,421,238 $13,618,401

12

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$5,806,209

26

$138,956,805

25

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S Company (non-governmental)

$5,676,714

-1

General Merchandise Store

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$74,518,683

23

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

Wal-Mart Distribution Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,100 Sara Lee Intimate Apparel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 Eaton Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650 PPG Fiber Glass Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550 Entertainment Development Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550

C LE V E L A N D CO U N T Y M E D I A N H O U S E H O L D I N CO M E

Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45,799 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,171 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.9% NC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Population Age 25 Plus Less Than High School, No Diploma High School Graduate College, No Diploma Associate Degree Bachelor’s Degree Graduate or Professional School Degree Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

Number

% Total Work Force

65,546 16,452 21,630 10,750 5,375 7,669 3,605

25.1% 33.0% 16.4% 8.2% 11.7% 5.5%

INCOME Year

Per U.S. Census Block Group

Total

$12,810-$25,769

2000 Median Household $35,294 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,730 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $44,710 2005 Per Capita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,348

$25,770-$34,541 $34,542-$41,866 $41,867-$48,420

ESRI 2005

© ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$48,421-$79,199

53


GASTON COUNTY

J

G A S TO N C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

ust west of Charlotte with easy access to the airport and interstates, Gaston County offers businesses and residents many advantages of small-town life with adjacent big-city amenities. Job opportunities, a talented work force, and a low cost of living are attracting prospective companies to the area. ESRI demographic data notes that the 2005 population for Gastonia, Gaston County’s largest city, was 68,098. The total county population figures show a modest growth from 2000 when the population was 190,365 in 73,936 households. In 2005, the population was 196,927 in 77,900 households, and the projection for 2010 is a population of 201,814 in 80,574 households. The population growth rate of 0.49 percent is lower than the national figure of 1.2 percent. Age ranges between 5 and 7 percent are fairly evenly distributed for all age groups up to ages 40 to 44, when the figure jumps to 8.18 percent. For ages 60 to 64, the figure declines to 4.64 percent, with lower figures for all senior groups with the lowest figure of 1.46 percent for those aged 85+ years. Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that nearly 29 percent of county residents have graduated from high school; 19.5 percent have attended more than one year of college, and 13.4 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. According to NC ESC data, the county’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 5.4 percent, as of December 2005.

Per U.S. Census Block Group 531-758 759-1,019 1,020-1,395 1,396-2,042 2,043-3,256

© ESRI 2005

G A S T O N CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

Per capita and median household income figures show modest increases from 2000 when the per capita income was $19,225, increasing to $22,376 in 2005, and projected to be $25,938 in 2010. Median household income in 2000 was $39,476, rising to $44,583 in 2005, and projected to be $50,441 in 2010. Residents of Gaston County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for each group found in Gaston County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing • High Hopes: Young, striving households seeking the “American Dream” • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • High Society: Affluent, well educated, married couple homeowner families • Family Portrait: Youth, family life and children • Solo Acts: Singles who prefer city life • Global Roots: Ethnic diversity, age and median income

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms Traditional Living Senior Styles American Quilt Upscale Avenues High Hopes Metropolis High Society Family Portrait Solo Acts Global Roots

54

© ESRI 2005

ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provides a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Gaston County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. Modest leakages occur in the Nonstore Retailers; Building Materials, Garden Equipment & Supply Stores; and Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores sectors. A more significant leakage occurs in the Electronics & Appliance Stores sector. A surplus appears in the Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores; and the Health and Personal Care Stores; and the Food & Beverage Stores sectors.

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NC

Gaston County Economic Development Commission Donny Hicks, Executive Director P.O. Box 2339 • Gastonia, NC 28023-2339 704-825-4046 phone • 704-825-4066 fax dhicks@co.gaston.nc.us www.gaston.org

G A S T O N CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Gastonia • Population: 68,098 • Total County Population: 196,927 % Total Population

Food Services & Drinking Places

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.9% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.2% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.0%

Nonstore Retailers

Age

ESRI 2005

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

Retail Sales

26

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

2005 Employees

ESRI 2005

Company (non-governmental)

$282,298,089

-6

$38,756,470

1

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$69,352,364

-13

Gasoline Stations

Food & Beverage Stores

24

$91,673,986 $128,542,413

-24 -16

$467,227,815

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores Electronics & Appliance Stores

44

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$8,012,910 $25,292,377

24

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$40,373,436

35

$501,576,240

-3

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

$34,097,363

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

Health & Personal Care Stores

$12,096,538

0

General Merchandise Store

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,826 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19,919 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,632 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,076 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,127 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,035 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,276 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,315 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,281 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,465 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,558 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,877 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,061 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,016

$199,999,363

15

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

Wix Filtration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+ Freightliner of Mount Holly, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+ American & Efird, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+ Pharr Yarns, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+ Freightliner of Gastonia, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000+

G A S TO N C O U N T Y MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD I N C O M E

Gaston County Economic Development Commission 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103,243 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,624 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.4% NC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Population Age 25 Plus Less Than High School, No Diploma High School Graduate College, No Diploma Associate Degree Bachelor’s Degree Graduate or Professional School Degree Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

Number

% Total Work Force

130,641 33,836 37,625 25,475 9,798 17,506 6,401

25.9% 28.8% 19.5% 7.5% 13.4% 4.9%

INCOME Year

Per U.S. Census Block Group

Total

$15,296-$28,362

2000 Median Household $39,476 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $44,583 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50,441 2005 Per Capita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,376

$28,363-$38,205 $38,206-$46,967 $46,968-$60,631

ESRI 2005

© ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$60,632-$102,154

55


IREDELL COUNTY

I

I R E D E L L C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

n gently rolling countryside punctuated by small river valleys, Iredell County, in western North Carolina’s Piedmont Region, is growing rapidly. Lake Norman, one of North Carolina’s largest manmade lakes, is the most prominent geographic feature of southern Iredell County. Iredell County is home to many NASCAR race shops located in and around the county. ESRI demographic data reveals that Iredell County’s 2000 population of 122,600 in 47,360 households increased to 141,404 people in 55,288 households in 2005; 25,468 people live in Statesville, the county’s largest city. In 2010, county population figures are expected to increase to 160,778 people and 63,218 households. The 2005-2010 annual population growth rate of 2.6 percent is more than twice that of the national growth rate of 1.2 percent. Age ranges are fairly evenly distributed between 5 and 7 percent, with a high of 8.83 percent for those aged 40 to 44 years. Senior ranges drop to 3.76 percent for those aged 65 to 69 years down to a low of 1.42 percent for those aged 85+ years. Nearly 65,000 people are employed, working primarily in the construction, manufacturing, retail, healthcare, and transportation/material moving industry sectors. According to NC ESC data, Iredell County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 4.4 percent, as of December 2005.

Per U.S. Census Block Group 637-1,043 1,044-1,557 1,558-2,060 2,061-2,651 2,652-3,617

© ESRI 2005

I R E D E L L CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

Income figures are steadily increasing. The per capita income figure for 2000 was $21,148; the current figure is $24,585, and $28,957 is the projected figure for 2010. Median household income rose from $41,970 in 2000 to the current figure of $47,360, and is expected to increase to $53,892 in 2010. Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that 30.5 percent of county residents are high school graduates; 19.1 percent have attended more than one year of college, and more than 16.2 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. Residents of Iredell County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for the groups found in Iredell County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families • High Society: Affluent, well educated, married couple homeowner families • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • High Hopes: Young, striving households seeking the “American Dream” • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing • Family Portrait: Youth, family life and children • Global Roots: Ethnic diversity, age and median income • Solo Acts: Singles who prefer city life

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms American Quilt Traditional Living High Society Senior Styles High Hopes

ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provide a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Iredell County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are not meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant leakages occur in the Gasoline Stations and Electronics & Appliance Stores sectors.

Metropolis Upscale Avenues Family Portrait Global Roots Solo Acts

56

© ESRI 2005

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Greater Statesville Development Corporation

Mooresville-South Iredell Chamber

C. Michael Smith, Director of Economic Development 115 E. Front St. • Statesville, NC 28677 704-871-0062 phone • 704-871-0223 fax info@gsdc.org www.gsdc.org

Melanie O’Connell Underwood, Executive Vice President P.O. Box 628 • Mooresville, NC 28115 704-664-6922 phone • 704-664-2549 fax mou@mooresvillenc.org www.mooresvillenc.org

NC

I R E D E L L CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Statesville • Population: 25,468 • Total County Population: 141,404

Retail Sales

% Total Population

Food Services & Drinking Places

25

$128,407,279

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.0% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.9% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.8%

Nonstore Retailers

26

$13,691,176

Age

ESRI 2005

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .837 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,735 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14,114 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,553 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,662 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,532 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .587 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .697 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,244 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,008 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,016 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,990 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,562 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,354 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,537 ESRI 2005

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

-13

General Merchandise Store Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

Company (non-governmental)

$155,633,867

7

$14,357,121

14

$37,456,087

-5

Gasoline Stations Health & Personal Care Stores

31

$70,826,734 $74,201,766

-8

Food & Beverage Stores

10

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$198,361,616 $93,620,620

-2

Electronics & Appliance Stores

38

$7,886,205

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

24

$18,291,516

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

21

$248,691,449

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

$44,684,023

© ESRI 2005

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

Lowe’s Companies,Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,700 Ingersoll-Rand Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,200 Lake Norman Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 930 J.C.P. Logistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 900 Davis Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 640

I R E D E L L C O U N T Y MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD I N C O M E

Greater Statesville Dev. Corp. & Mooresville-South Iredell Chamber 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70,523 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,104 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.4% NC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Population Age 25 Plus Less Than High School, No Diploma High School Graduate College, No Diploma Associate Degree Bachelor’s Degree Graduate or Professional School Degree Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

Number

% Total Work Force

92,445 17,842 28,196 17,657 8,320 14,976 5,547

19.3% 30.5% 19.1% 9.0% 16.2% 6.0%

INCOME Year

Per U.S. Census Block Group

Total

$13,304-$31,313

2000 Median Household $41,970 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $47,360 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $53,892 2005 Per Capita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,585

$31,314-$42,603 $42,604-$54,362 $54,363-$72,110

ESRI 2005

© ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$72,111-$106,917

57


LANCASTER COUNTY

C

L A N C A S T E R C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

omfortably nestled between the metropolitan areas of Charlotte, North Carolina and South Carolina’s capital city of Columbia, Lancaster County has much to offer. Lancaster County’s strategic location is adjacent to rail, road, and air transportation in addition to prime acreage available for headquarter and warehouse facilities. A business-friendly environment is ready to welcome companies that are expanding or relocating. ESRI demographic data reveals that Lancaster County’s 2000 population of 61,351 people in 23,178 households has increased to 63,825 people in 24,723 households in 2005; 8,366 people live in Lancaster, the county’s largest city. In 2010, county population figures are expected to increase to 66,053 people and 25,961 households. The 2005-2010 annual population growth rate of .69 percent is lower than the national growth rate of 1.2 percent. Age ranges are fairly evenly distributed between 6 and 7 percent, spiking f 8.08 percent for those aged 40 to 44 years. Senior ranges drop to 3.9 percent for those aged 65 to 69 years to a low of 1.41 percent for those aged 85+ years. Nearly 23,000 people are employed, working primarily in the construction, manufacturing, retail, finance/insurance, healthcare/social assistance, and education services industry sectors. According to SC ESC data, Lancaster County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 8.6 percent, as of December 2005.

Per U.S. Census Block Group 571-901 902-1,193 1,194-1,577 1,578-2,065 2,066-3,182

© ESRI 2005

L A N C A S T E R CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

Income figures have steadily increased. The per capita income figure for 2000 was $16,276; the current figure is $19,289, and $22,667 is projected for 2010. Median household income rose from $34,740 in 2000 to the current figure of $39,887, and is expected to increase to $45,101 in 2010. The county’s racial composition is fairly homogeneous with a nearly average diversity index of 45.7 percent. Seventy percent of the residents are white; 27.32 percent are black; 2.03 percent are Hispanic. Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that 34.4 percent of county residents are high school graduates; more than 17.2 percent have attended more than one year of college, and 8.6 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. Residents of Lancaster County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for the groups found in Lancaster County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Global Roots: Ethnic diversity, age and median income • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms Senior Styles Metropolis American Quilt Global Roots Traditional Living Upscale Avenues

58

© ESRI 2005

ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provide a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Lancaster County This data concludes that current retail offerings are not meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant leakages occur in the Non-Store Retailers (catalog, mail, phone, and Internet) and Gasoline Stations sectors.

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SC

Lancaster County Economic Development Commission Keith Tunnell, President P.O. Box 973 • Lancaster, SC 29721 803-285-9471 phone • 803-285-9472 fax keith.tunnell@lancastersc-edc.com www.lancastersc-edc.com

L A N C A S T E R CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Lancaster • Population: 8,366 • Total County Population: 63,825 Age

% Total Population

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.5% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29.8% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.1% ESRI 2005

Retail Sales

Food Services & Drinking Places Nonstore Retailers

73

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,444 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,825 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .935 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,699 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .549 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .260 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .363 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,019 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .574 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .663 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,573 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,866 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .267 ESRI 2005

Company (non-governmental)

-14

General Merchandise Store

$88,038,338

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$3,997,534

14

$11,724,473

-20

Gasoline Stations Health & Personal Care Stores Food & Beverage Stores

29

$26,154,093 $28,854,323

-18 -13

$134,634,641

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$24,716,471

5

Electronics & Appliance Stores

21

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$6,744,177 $9,030,781

9

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$309,725 $14,512,914

-7

$100,583,286

18

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

$48,807,638

20

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

Springs Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,000 HSBC Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 900 Springs Memorial Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800 Cardinal Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700 Duracell, USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601

L A N C A S TE R CO U N T Y M E D I A N H O U S E H O L D I N CO M E

Lancaster County Economic Development Commission 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30,060 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,590 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.6% SC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number

% Total Work Force

Population Age 25 Plus 42,281 Less Than High School, No Diploma 12,135 High School Graduate 14,545 College, No Diploma 7,272 Associate Degree 2,917 Bachelor’s Degree 3,636 Graduate or Professional School Degree 1,776

28.7% 34.4% 17.2% 6.9% 8.6% 4.2%

Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

INCOME Year

Per U.S. Census Block Group

Total

$17,461-$25,262

2000 Median Household $34,740 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,887 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $45,101 2005 Per Capita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,289

$25,263-$36,644 $36,645-$44,812 $44,813-$50,685

ESRI 2005 © ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$50,686-$58,164

59


LINCOLN COUNTY

N

L I N C O L N C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

estled in the foothills of Piedmont North Carolina, close to Charlotte, Lincoln County is thriving and easily accessible via Interstates 85, 40, and 77. The county is rapidly being recognized as a manufacturing and distribution hub with a growing automotive sector, benefiting from domestic and international investments. ESRI demographic data reveals that Lincoln County’s 2000 population of 63,780 people in 24,041 households increased to 71,623 in 27,334 households in 2005. Lincolnton, the county’s largest city, has a population of 10,958. In 2010, county population figures are expected to increase to 79,600 people and 30,546 households. The 2005-2010 annual population growth rate of 2.13 percent is more than the national growth rate of 1.2 percent. Age ranges are fairly evenly distributed from between 5 and 7 percent, rising to a high of 8.9 percent for those aged 40 to 44 years. Senior ranges drop to 3.85 percent for those aged 65 to 69 years down to a low of 1.25 percent for those aged 85+ years. The county’s racial composition is homogeneous with a nearly average diversity index of 30 percent. Eighty-nine percent of the residents are white; 6.51 percent are black; 6.93 percent are Hispanic.

Per U.S. Census Block Group 631-1,073

Nearly 34,000 people are employed, working primarily in the construction, manufacturing, retail, and healthcare/social assistance industry sectors. According to NC ESC data, Lincoln County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 5 percent, as of December 2005.

1,074-1,434 1,435-1,847 1,848-2,265 2,266-4,017

© ESRI 2005

L I N C O L N CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

Income figures have steadily increased. The per capita income figure for 2000 was $18,877; the current figure is $21,672, and $24,808 is the projected figure for 2010. Median household income rose from $41,659 in 2000 to the current figure of $46,326, and is expected to increase to $51,529 in 2010. Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that 31 percent of county residents are high school graduates; 19.6 percent have attended more than one year of college, and nearly 13 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. Residents of Lincoln County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for the groups found in Lincoln County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • High Society: Affluent, well educated, married couple homeowner families • High Hopes: Young, striving households seeking the “American Dream” • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms American Quilt Upscale Avenues Senior Styles High Society High Hopes Traditional Living

60

© ESRI 2005

ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provides a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Lincoln County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are not meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant leakages occur in the Gasoline Stations; Electronics & Appliance Stores; and Food Services and Drinking Places sectors.

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NC

Lincoln Economic Development Association Barry I. Matherly, Executive Director P.O. Box 2050 • Lincolnton, NC 28093-2050 704-732-1511 phone • 704-736-8451 fax leda@lincolneda.org www.lincolneda.org

L I N C O L N CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Lincolnton • Population: 10,958 • Total County Population: 71,623 % Total Population

Food Services & Drinking Places

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.3% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31.8% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.5%

Nonstore Retailers

Age

ESRI 2005

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,469 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,457 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,380 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,513 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,761 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .839 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .380 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,194 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .326 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,042 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,219 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,222 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,226 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .385 ESRI 2005

$6,890,247

-10

$22,320,925

General Merchandise Store

$99,101,411

7

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$5,131,871

12

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$7,803,735

-3

Gasoline Stations Health & Personal Care Stores

$33,908,355

35

54

$14,728,896 $29,824,014

-8

Food & Beverage Stores

-1

$117,085,485

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$13,694,846

42

Electronics & Appliance Stores

51

$1,911,668

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

36

$5,960,997

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

29

$100,116,955

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S Company (non-governmental)

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

Retail Sales 46

© ESRI 2005

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

RSI Home Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 988 The Timken Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 790 Robert Bosch Tool Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512 Blum, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410 Cochrane Furniture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400

L I N C O L N C O U N T Y MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD I N C O M E

Lincoln Economic Development Association 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,975 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,800 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.0% NC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number

% Total Work Force

Population Age 25 Plus 46,515 Less Than High School, No Diploma 12,001 High School Graduate 14,420 College, No Diploma 9,117 Associate Degree 3,117 Bachelor’s Degree 5,861 Graduate or Professional School Degree 2,047

25.8% 31.0% 19.6% 6.7% 12.6% 4.4%

Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME Year

Total

$24,706-$33,064

2000 Median Household $41,659 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $46,326 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $51,529 2005 Per Capita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,672

$33,065-$39,044 $39,045-$49,627 $49,628-$69,134

ESRI 2005

© ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$69,135-$97,987

61


MECKLENBURG COUNTY M E C K L E N B U R G C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

A

nchored by the City of Charlotte, North Carolina’s largest city, Mecklenburg County offers companies and residents the business opportunities and amenities of big-city life while maintaining its small-town charm. Communities such as Mint Hill, Huntersville, Davidson, Matthews, and Pineville attract many people who prefer a more suburban lifestyle, but like being close to a city’s advantages. ESRI demographic data for 2005 reveals that Mecklenburg County’s 2000 population of 695,454 people in 273,416 households increased to 813,852 in 325,716 households in 2005. In 2010, this figure is expected to increase to 946,370 people living in 381,571 households. The 2005 population of Charlotte, Mecklenburg County’s largest city, is 622,711. The annual population growth rate of 3.06 percent is more than twice that of the national rate of 1.2 percent. Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that county residents are considered to be well educated: nearly 28 percent have graduated from high school; 16.6 percent have attended college for more than one year; and 20.1 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. According to NC ESC data, the county’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 4.1 percent, as of December 2005. Income figures show progressively healthy increases. The per capita income figure for 2000 was $27,352; 2005 shows an increase to $32,825; and the projected number for 2010 is $39,681. Median household income figures include $50,638 in 2000, $58,263 in 2005, and a projection of $67,657 in 2010.

Per U.S. Census Block Group 0-1275 1,276-2,166 2,167-3,298 3,299-5,050 5,051-9,565

© ESRI 2005

M E C K L E N B U R G CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™ © ESRI 2005

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group

62

Factories & Farms

Global Roots

Family Portrait

Scholars & Patriots

High Hopes

Upscale Avenues

American Quilt

Traditional Living

Metropolis

Senior Styles

Solo Acts

High Society

Residents of Mecklenburg County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for group found in Mecklenburg County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • Scholars & Patriots: Military, college environments • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • Global Roots: Ethnic diversity, age and median income • High Hopes: Young, striving households seeking the “American Dream” • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families • Solo Acts: Singles who prefer city life • Family Portrait: Youth, family life and children • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • High Society: Affluent, well educated, married couple homeowner families ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provides a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Mecklenburg County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are not meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. These leakages appear in the Food Services & Drinking Places; Nonstore Retailers; Gasoline Stations; Building Materials, Garden Equipment, & Supply Stores; Electronics & Appliance Stores; Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers sectors. Surpluses (current retail offerings are meeting consumer demand) are found in the Miscellaneous Store Retailers, General Merchandise Stores, Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores, Health & Personal Care Stores sectors.

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Tom Flynn, Economic Development Director 600 East 4th St. • Charlotte, NC 28202-2244 704-432-1396 phone 704-336-6644 fax tflynn@ci.charlotte.nc.us

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Charlotte • Population: 622,711 • Total County Population: 813,852 Age

% Total Population

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16.1% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31.4% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.8% ESRI 2005

M E C K L E N B U R G CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .598 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31,438 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31,362 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22,061 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41,024 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,645 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,365 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,113 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48,797 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,409 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29,186 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .375 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17,867 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27,240 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41,581 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,387 ESRI 2005

6

Wachovia Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18,967 Carolinas HealthCare System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15,257 Bank of America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,000 US Airways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,749 Duke Energy Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,400 Lowe’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,062

$304,033,253

-14

$282,776,431

General Merchandise Store

-7

$1,243,418,271

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

-2

$201,775,799

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$705,368,271

-25

Gasoline Stations Health & Personal Care Stores

22

$601,798,615

Food & Beverage Stores

1

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$1,806,227,473 $319,068,196

19

Electronics & Appliance Stores

4

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$226,066,683 $343,860,311

-1

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$566,040,593

-19

$2,260,947,380

7

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

Employees

$1,205,479,791

16

Nonstore Retailers

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S Company (non-governmental)

Retail Sales

Food Services & Drinking Places

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

NC

City of Charlotte

Charlotte Chamber of Commerce Jeff Edge, Senior Vice President Business Development P.O. Box 32785 • Charlotte, NC 28232 704-378-1300 phone • 704-374-1903 fax jedge@charlottechamber.com www.charlottechamber.com

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

MECKLENBURG COUNTY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Charlotte Chamber of Commerce 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 439,064 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18,214 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1% NC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Population Age 25 Plus Less Than High School, No Diploma High School Graduate College, No Diploma Associate Degree Bachelor’s Degree Graduate or Professional School Degree

Number

% Total Work Force

513,681 90,408 141,776 85,271 45,204 103,250 48,286

17.6% 27.6% 16.6% 8.8% 20.1% 9.4%

Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME Year

Total

$0-$39,730 $39,731-$62,445

2000 Median Household $50,638 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $58,263 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $67,567 2005 Per Capita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,825 ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$62,446-$90,542 $90,543-$148,802 © ESRI 2005

$148,803-$269,269

63


ROWAN COUNTY

S

R O W A N C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

trategically centered between the vibrant commercial activity of the Charlotte region and North Carolina’s Piedmont Triangle, Rowan County is an ideal location for business. Interstate highway systems run through the county, providing easy access to national and international airports, ports, and rail traffic. ESRI demographic data reveals that Rowan County’s 2000 population of 130,340 in 49,940 households rose to 135,305 people in 52,263 households in 2005; 27,362 people live in Salisbury, the county’s largest city. In 2010, county population figures are expected to increase to 138,271 people and 53,582 households. The 2005-2010 annual population growth rate of .43 percent is below the national growth rate of 1.2 percent. Age ranges are fairly evenly distributed from 0 to 4 years at 6.69 percent, jumping to a high of 8.24 percent for those aged 40 to 44 years. Senior ranges drop to 3.7 percent for those aged 65 to 69 years down to a low of 1.95 percent for those aged 85+ years. The county’s racial composition is homogeneous with a nearly average diversity index of 41.4 percent. Seventy-nine percent of the residents are white; 15.94 percent are black; 5.06 percent are Hispanic.

Per U.S. Census Block Group

More than 63,000 people are employed, working primarily in the construction, manufacturing, retail, and healthcare/social assistance industry sectors. According to NC ESC data, Rowan County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 4.7 percent, as of December 2005.

588-971 972-1,315 1,316-1,706 1,707-2,402 2,403-3,397

© ESRI 2005

ROWA N CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

Income figures have steadily increased. The per capita income figure for 2000 was $18,071; the current figure is $20,713, and $23,740 is the projected figure for 2010. Median household income rose from $37,541 in 2000 to the current figure of $42,295 and is expected to increase to $47,431 in 2010. Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that 32.4 percent of county residents are high school graduates; 18.6 percent have attended college for more than one year, and more than 13 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. Residents of Rowan County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for the summary groups found in Rowan County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • High Hopes: Young, striving households seeking the “American Dream” • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing • Family Portrait: Youth, family life and children • Solo Acts: Singles who prefer city life

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms American Quilt Traditional Living

ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provide a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Rowan County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are not meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant leakages occur in the Building Materials, Garden Equipment, and Supply Stores; and Electronics & Appliance Stores sectors.

Senior Styles High Hopes Metropolis Upscale Avenues Family Portrait Solo Acts

64

© ESRI 2005

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


NC

Salisbury-Rowan Economic Development Commission Randy Harrell, Executive Director 204 East Innes St. • Salisbury, NC 28144 704-637-5526 phone • 704-637-0173 fax harrellr@rowanedc.com www.rowanedc.com

ROWA N CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Salisbury • Population: 27,362 • Total County Population: 135,305

Retail Sales

% Total Population

Food Services & Drinking Places

26

$97,764,989

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.2% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19.6% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.5%

Nonstore Retailers

25

$13,623,609

Age

ESRI 2005

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .280 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,161 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13,675 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,291 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,424 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,504 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .644 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .636 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,736 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .645 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,488 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,041 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,976 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,030 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,112 ESRI 2005

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

-5

General Merchandise Store Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

Company (non-governmental)

$113,733,976

4

$12,466,055

16

$42,010,272

-6

Gasoline Stations

9

$92,036,686

Health & Personal Care Stores

-9

$56,802,984

Food & Beverage Stores

-9

$268,805,376

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$22,432,521

42

Electronics & Appliance Stores

38

$7,329,037

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

24

$17,428,065

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

24

$190,926,878

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

$30,786,034

© ESRI 2005

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

Freightliner, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,700 Food Lion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,200 Invista . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,200 Meridian Automotive Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440 Oakwood Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400

R O W A N C O U N T Y MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD I N C O M E

Salisbury-Rowan Economic Development Commission 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69,311 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,229 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.7% NC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Population Age 25 Plus Less Than High School, No Diploma High School Graduate College, No Diploma Associate Degree Bachelor’s Degree Graduate or Professional School Degree

Number

% Total Work Force

90,387 21,060 29,285 16,812 6,598 12,112 4,519

23.3% 32.4% 18.6% 7.3% 13.4% 5.0%

Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

Per U.S. Census Block Group

INCOME Year

Total

$16,489-$27,759

2000 Median Household $37,541 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $42,295 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $47,431 2005 Per Capita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,713

$27,760-$39,348 $39,349-$46,643 $46,644-$55,316

ESRI 2005

© ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$55,317-$70,073

65


S TA N LY COUNTY

O

S T A N LY C O U N T Y P O P U L A T I O N

n the edge of North Carolina’s industrial Piedmont crescent, Stanly County is a major producer of agricultural products from the approximately 689 farms located throughout the county. Charlotte is an hour’s drive away, enabling county residents to take advantage of activities at Charlotte’s Independence Arena, Charlotte Coliseum, Lowe’s Motor Speedway, and other venues. ESRI demographic data reveals that Stanly County’s 2000 population of 58,100 people in 23,223 households increased to 59,915 people in 23,118 households in 2005; 16,406 people live in Albemarle, the county’s largest city. In 2010, county population figures are expected to increase to 60,860 people and 23,601 households. The 2005-2010 annual population growth rate of .31 percent is below the national growth rate of 1.2 percent. Age ranges are fairly evenly distributed from 0 to 4 years at 6.43 percent to a high of 8.25 percent for those aged 40 to 44 years. Senior ranges drop to 3.98 percent for those aged 65 to 69 years to a low of 1.85 percent for those aged 85+ years. The county’s racial composition is homogeneous with a nearly average diversity index of 32.3 percent. Eighty-four percent of the residents are white; 11.62 percent are black; 2.63 percent are Hispanic.

Per U.S. Census Block Group 475-839 840-1,105 1,106-1,384 1,385-1,803 1,804-2,533

© ESRI 2005

S T A N LY CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

More than 25,000 people are employed, working primarily in the construction, manufacturing, retail, and healthcare/social assistance industry sectors. According to NC ESC data, Stanly County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 4.6 percent, as of December 2005. Income figures have steadily increased. The per capita income figure for 2000 was $17,825; the current figure is $20,636, and $23,954 is the projected figure for 2010. Median household income rose from $36,941 in 2000 to the current figure of $41,329 and is expected to increase to $46,486 in 2010. Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that 34.8 percent of county residents are high school graduates; 16.4 percent have attended college, and more than 11.9 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. Residents of Stanly County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for the groups found in Stanly County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families • Global Roots: Ethnic diversity, age and median income • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms

ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provides a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Stanly County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are not meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant leakages occur in the Gasoline Stations and Electronics & Appliance Stores sectors.

Senior Styles American Quilt Traditional Living Global Roots Metropolis Upscale Avenues

66

© ESRI 2005

ChooseCharlotteUSA

www.charlotteUSA.com


NC

Stanly County Economic Development Commission Robert M. Van Geons, Executive Director 1000 N. First Street • Suite 11 • Albemarle, NC 28001 704-986-3683 phone • 704-986-3685 fax stanedc@vnet.net www.stanlyedc.org

S T A N LY CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Albemarle • Population: 16,406 • Total County Population: 59,915 Age

% Total Population

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.8% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29.4% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.2% ESRI 2005

Industry (NAICS)

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,772 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,461 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .927 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,998 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .714 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .731 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .571 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .709 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,042 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,447 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .280 ESRI 2005

$29,938,273 $46,514,863

4

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$9,092,598

-3

Gasoline Stations

31

$24,303,733 $40,086,139

-24 -19

$158,712,211

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$28,308,909

6

Electronics & Appliance Stores

39

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$5,820,193

15

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

Food & Beverage Stores

$5,935,852

-24

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S Company (non-governmental)

14

General Merchandise Store

Health & Personal Care Stores

$44,653,648

24

Nonstore Retailers Miscellaneous Store Retailers

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY

Retail Sales

Food Services & Drinking Places

0

$2,342,788

9

$9,878,129

11

$114,730,315

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

Collins & Aikman Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475 Wal-Mart Associates, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 Michelin Aircraft Tire Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Food Lion, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 Schult Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282

S T A N LY C O U N T Y M E D I A N H O U S E H O L D I N C O M E

Stanly County Economic Development Commission 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29,422 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,168 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.6% NC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Number

% Total Work Force

Population Age 25 Plus 39,273 Less Than High School, No Diploma 9,456 High School Graduate 13,654 College, No Diploma 6,435 Associate Degree 3,217 Bachelor’s Degree 4,669 Graduate or Professional School Degree 1,805

24.1% 34.8% 16.4% 8.2% 11.9% 4.6%

Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

INCOME Year

Per U.S. Census Block Group

Total

$18,423-$29,111

2000 Median Household $36,941 2005 Median Household . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,329 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $46,486 2005 Per Capita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,636

$29,112-$39,232 $39,233-$44,954 $44,955-$51,394

ESRI 2005 © ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$51,395-$62,037

67


UNION COUNTY

I

U N I O N C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

n North Carolina’s south central Piedmont region, Union County borders the Charlotte-Mecklenburg County line. Union County, North Carolina’s 12th most populous, provides a unique blend of rural and metropolitan lifestyles. Vast acreage untouched by development is contrasted with flourishing areas of suburban and industrial growth. Primary contributors to Union County’s successful economic growth include agriculture, business, and industry. ESRI demographic data reveals that Union County’s 2000 population of 123,677 in 48,390 households jumped to 155,736 people living in 55,212 households in 2005; 31,976 people live in Monroe, the county’s largest city. In 2010, county population figures are expected to increase to 193,017 people and 68,762 households. The 2005-2010 annual population growth rate of 4.39 percent is nearly 4 times that of the national growth rate of 1.2 percent. Age ranges are fairly evenly distributed from 0 to 4 years at 8.12 percent, with a high of 9.18 percent for those aged 40 to 44 years. Senior ranges drop to 3.1 percent for those aged 65 to 69 years to a low of .94 percent for those aged 85+ years. Nearly 70,000 people are employed, working primarily in the construction, manufacturing, wholesale, retail, finance/insurance, education services, and healthcare/social assistance industry sectors. According to NC ESC data, Union County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 3.5 percent, as of December 2005.

Per U.S. Census Block Group 755-1,485 1,486-2,007 2,008-2,716 2,717-4,156 4,157-7,037

© ESRI 2005

U N I O N C O U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

Income figures have steadily increased. The per capita income figure for 2000 was $21,978; the current figure is $23,356, and $29,509 is the projected figure for 2010. Median household income rose from $50,622 in 2000 to the current figure of $56,587 and is expected to increase to $63,796 in 2010. Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that 29.1 percent of county residents are high school graduates; 18.6 percent have attended college for more than one year, and 19.7 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. Residents of Union County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for the groups found in Union County. • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Family Portrait: Youth, family life and children • Global Roots: Ethnic diversity, age and median income • High Society: Affluent, well educated, married couple homeowner families • High Hopes: Young, striving households seeking the “American Dream” • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group Factories & Farms

High Society

Upscale Avenues

High Hopes

American Quilt

Metropolis

Family Portrait

Traditional Living

Global Roots

68

© ESRI 2005

ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provides a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for Union County, this data concludes that current retail offerings are not meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant leakages occur in the Food Services & Drinking Places; Furniture and Home Furnishings Stores; and Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book, and Music Stores sectors.

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Union County Partnership for Progress

Monroe Economic Development

Maurice Ewing, President & CEO P.O. Box 292 • Monroe, NC 28111-0292 704-283-3592 phone • 704-283-3861 fax mdewing1@ctc.net www.developmonroe.com

R. Christopher Platé, Director P.O. Box 69 • Monroe, NC 28111-0069 704-282-5780 phone 704-282-5788 fax cplate@monroenc.org

NC

U N I O N CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Monroe • Population: 31,976 • Total County Population: 155,736 Age

% Total Population

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.4% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31.5% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.6% ESRI 2005

Retail Sales

Food Services & Drinking Places Nonstore Retailers

30

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .725 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,923 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,426 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,969 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,748 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,172 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .592 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,251 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,075 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,075 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,783 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,616 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,559 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,323 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .814 ESRI 2005

Company (non-governmental)

$45,853,211

14

General Merchandise Store

$19,580,578 $93,350,192

30

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$7,135,065

42

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$21,853,456

32

Gasoline Stations

40

$58,907,593

Health & Personal Care Stores

19

$38,114,950

Food & Beverage Stores

18

$194,626,637

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores Electronics & Appliance Stores

39

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$13,460,417 $16,836,162

44

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$39,976,341

37

$218,896,342

30

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

$92,950,788

44

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

Tyson Foods, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,236 Allvac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,150 Pilgrim’s Pride, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 923 Charlotte Pipe & Foundry Plastics Division. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 680 Tyco/Scott Health and Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585

U N I O N C O U N T Y MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD I N C O M E

Union County Partnership for Progress 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80,261 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,840 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5% NC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Population Age 25 Plus Less Than High School, No Diploma High School Graduate College, No Diploma Associate Degree Bachelor’s Degree Graduate or Professional School Degree

Number

% Total Work Force

100,147 17,426 28,143 18,627 8,212 19,729 6,910

17.4% 29.1% 18.6% 8.2% 19.7% 6.9%

Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

INCOME Year

Per U.S. Census Block Group

Total

$25,080-$32,005

2000 Median Household $50,622 2005 Median Household. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $56,587 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $63,796 2005 Per Capita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,356

$32,006-$49,948 $49,949-$60,709 $60,710-$74,400

ESRI 2005 © ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$74,401-$108,019

69


YORK COUNTY

S

Y O R K C O U N T Y P O P U L AT I O N

econd only to Beaufort County as South Carolina’s most rapidly growing county and the 7th most populous, York County is strategically located on the expanding outskirts of Charlotte, N.C. Combining the advantages of charming small-town communities with easy access to big-city opportunities, York County has much to offer businesses, residents, and visitors. ESRI demographic data reveals that York County’s 2000 population of 164,614 in 61,051 households jumped to 190,743 in 72,184 households in 2005; 56,254 people live in Rock Hill, the county’s largest city. In 2010, county population figures are expected to increase to 219,403 people and 83,966 households. The 2005-2010 annual population growth rate of 2.8 percent is more than twice that of the national growth rate of 1.2 percent. Age ranges are fairly evenly distributed from 0 to 4 years at 6.81 percent to a high of 8.49 percent for those aged 40 to 44 years. Senior ranges drop to 3.4 percent for those aged 65 to 69 years down to a low of 1.2 percent for those aged 85+ years. More than 90,000 people are employed, working primarily in the construction, manufacturing, retail, healthcare/social assistance, and educational services industry sectors. According to SC ESC data, York County’s unemployment rate for those aged 16+ years is 6.8 percent, as of December 2005.

Per U.S. Census Block Group

Income figures have steadily increased. The per capita income figure for 2000 was $20,536; the current figure is $24,635, and $29,590 is the projected figure for 2010. Median household income rose from $44,564 in 2000 to the current figure of $51,718 and is expected to increase to $59,931 in 2010.

716-1,253 1,254-1,910 1,911-2,647 2,648-3,489 3,490-7,042

© ESRI 2005

YO R K CO U N T Y CO M M U N I T Y ™ TA P E ST RY ™

Applied Geographic Solutions data shows that 26.7 percent of county residents are high school graduates; nearly 20 percent have attended college for more than one year, and more than 17.2 percent hold a bachelor’s degree. Residents of York County can also be viewed by ESRI segmentation data. Here is a list and descriptive phrase for the groups found in York County. • American Quilt: Households in small towns and rural areas • Factories & Farms: Small settled communities near jobs • Metropolis: Varied ages and household types in America’s large and small cities • Traditional Living: Hard working, settled families • Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couple homeowner families in different housing • Senior Styles: Seniors vary by income, age, housing type • High Hopes: Young, striving households seeking the “American Dream” • High Society: Affluent, well educated, married couple homeowner families • Family Portrait: Youth, family life and children • Scholars & Patriots: Military, college environments • Global Roots: Ethnic diversity, age and median income • Solo Acts: Singles who prefer city life

Dominant LifeMode by U.S. Census Block Group

70

American Quilt

High Hopes

Factories & Farms

High Society

Metropolis

Family Portrait

Traditional Living

Scholars & Patriots

Upscale Avenues

Global Roots

Senior Styles

Solo Acts

© ESRI 2005

ESRI Retail MarketPlace data provide a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry for York County. This data concludes that current retail offerings are not meeting the consumer demand across most of the surveyed industry sectors. The most significant leakages occur in the Electronics & Appliance Stores; Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book, and Music Stores; Gasoline Stations; and Furniture and Home Furnishing Stores sectors.

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Rock Hill Economic Development Corporation

York County Economic Development Board

Stephen Turner, Executive Director P.O. Box 11706 • Rock Hill, SC 29731 803-329-7090 phone 803-329-7007 fax stephenturner@rhedc.org

J. Mark Farris, Director 1830 Second Baxter Crossing • Fort Mill, SC 29708 803-02-4300 phone • 803-802-4299 fax mark.farris@yorkcountygov.com www.ycedb.com

SC

YO R K CO U N T Y LEAKAGE/SURPLUS FACTOR BY INDUSTRY SUBSECTOR

P O P U L AT I O N Largest city: Rock Hill • Population: 56,254 • Total County Population: 190,743 % Total Population

Food Services & Drinking Places

25 - 34 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.0% 35 - 54 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.7% 55 - 64 Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.7%

Nonstore Retailers

Age

ESRI 2005

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry (NAICS)

2005 Employees

Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .516 Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,967 Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15,125 Wholesale Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,622 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,328 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,134 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,277 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,454 Financial/Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,806 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,148 Prof/Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,220 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 Admin/Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,548 Educational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,615 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,089 Arts/Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,013 ESRI 2005

Retail Sales

25

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

Company (non-governmental)

General Merchandise Store

$37,632,329 $88,487,620

20

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book & Music Stores

$20,149,815

28

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

$57,603,153

14

Gasoline Stations

26

Health & Personal Care Stores

$97,285,098 $66,984,358

8

Food & Beverage Stores

4

$353,044,419

Bldg. Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$77,893,673

16

Electronics & Appliance Stores

49

Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$11,868,393 $32,691,065

26

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

© ESRI 2005

$23,919,182

14

$433,207,119

8

-100 -80 -60 -40 -20

L ARGEST EMPLOYER S

$194,459,298

20

0

20

40

<--Surplus—Leakage-->

60

80 100

L/S Factor

Employees

Wells Fargo Home Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,500 Duke Power - Catawba Nuclear Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,071 Bowater Coated and Specialty Papers Division. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,039 Ross Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 852 Stacy’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800

Y O R K C O U N T Y MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD I N C O M E

York County Economic Development Board 2005

L A B O R PA RT I C I PAT I O N 2005 (Dec.) Labor Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99,390 Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,780 Percentage Unemployed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.8% SC ESC 2005

WO R K F O R C E E D U C AT I O N Population Age 25 Plus Less Than High School, No Diploma High School Graduate College, No Diploma Associate Degree Bachelor’s Degree Graduate or Professional School Degree Applied Geographic Solutions 2005

Number

% Total Work Force

121,569 25,651 32,459 23,949 8,996 20,910 9604

21.1% 26.7% 19.7% 7.4% 17.2% 7.9%

INCOME Year

Per U.S. Census Block Group

Total

$24,206-$33,937

2000 Median Household $44,564 2005 Median Household . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $51,718 2010 Median Household (Projected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59,931 2005 Per Capita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,635

$33,938-$42,580 $42,581-$49,423 $49,424-$64,742

ESRI 2005 © ESRI 2005

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

$64,743-$93,813

71


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E CO N O M I C D E V E LO PM E N T CO N TAC TS

ALEXANDER COUNTY Alexander County David A. Icenhour Economic Development Director 621 Liledoun Rd. Taylorsville, NC 28681 828-632-1161 phone; 828-632-0059 fax dicenhour@co.alexander.nc.us www.alexandercountync.gov ANSON COUNTY Anson County Economic Development Kevin Gullette Director of Economic Development P.O. Drawer 339 Wadesboro, NC 28170 704-694-9513 phone; 704-694-7015 fax kgullette@co.anson.nc.us www.ansoncounty.org CABARRUS COUNTY Cabarrus Regional Partnership Ryan McDaniels Director of Economic Development 3003 Dale Earnhardt Blvd. Kannapolis, NC 28083 704-782-4000 phone; 704-892-4050 fax rlmcdaniels@cabarrus.biz www.cabarrusedc.com CATAWBA COUNTY Catawba County Economic Development Corporation Scott L. Millar, President 1960-B 13th Ave. Dr., SE Hickory, NC 28602 828-267-1564 phone; 828-267-1884 fax smillar@catawbacountync.gov www.catawbaedc.org CHESTER COUNTY Chester County Economic Development Karlisa Parker Economic Development Director P.O. Drawer 580, Chester, SC 29706 803-377-1216 phone; 803-377-2102 fax kparker@choosechester.com www.chestercounty.org CHESTERFIELD COUNTY Chesterfield County Economic Development Board Cherry G. McCoy Executive Director P.O. Box 192, Chesterfield, SC 29709 843-623-6500 phone; 843-623-3167 fax cherryatcc@shtc.net www.chesterfieldcountysc.org CLEVELAND COUNTY Cleveland County Chamber of Commerce Stuart C. Gilbert President P.O. Box 879, Shelby, NC 28151 704-487-8521 phone; 704-487-7458 fax stuart@clevelandchamber.org www.clevelandchamber.org

76

GASTON COUNTY Gaston County Economic Development Commission Donny Hicks Executive Director P.O. Box 2339 Gastonia, NC 28023-2339 704-825-4046 phone; 704-825-4066 fax dhicks@co.gaston.nc.us www.gaston.org

ROWAN COUNTY Salisbury-Rowan Economic Development Commission Randy Harrell Executive Director 204 East Innes St. Salisbury, NC 28144 704-637-5526 phone; 704-637-0173 fax harrellr@rowanedc.com www.rowanedc.com

IREDELL COUNTY Greater Statesville Development Corporation C. Michael Smith Director of Economic Development 115 E. Front St. Statesville, NC 28677 704-871-0062 phone; 704-871-0223 fax info@gsdc.org www.gsdc.org

STANLY COUNTY Stanly County Economic Development Commission Robert M. Van Geons Executive Director 1000 North First St., Ste. 11 Albemarle, NC 28001 704-986-3683 phone; 704-986-3685 fax stanedc@vnet.net www.stanlyedc.org

Mooresville-South Iredell Chamber Melanie O’Connell Underwood Executive Vice President P.O. Box 628 Mooresville, NC 28115 704-664-6922 phone; 704-664-2549 fax mou@mooresvillenc.org www.mooresvillenc.org

UNION COUNTY Monroe Economic Development R. Christopher Platé Director P.O. Box 69, Monroe, NC 28111-0069 704-282-5780 phone; 704-282-5788 fax cplate@monroenc.org www.developmonroe.com

LANCASTER COUNTY Lancaster County Economic Development Commission Keith Tunnell, President P.O. Box 973 Lancaster, SC 29721 803-285-9471 phone; 803-285-9472 fax keith.tunnell@lancastersc-edc.com www.lancastersc-edc.com

Union County Partnership for Progress Maurice Ewing President & CEO PO Box 292, Monroe, NC 28111-0292 704-283-3592 phone; 704-283-3861 fax mdewing1@ctc.net www.unioncpp.com

LINCOLN COUNTY Lincoln Economic Development Association Barry I. Matherly Executive Director P.O. Box 2050 Lincolnton, NC 28093-2050 704-732-1511 phone; 704-736-8451 fax leda@lincolneda.org www.lincolneda.org MECKLENBURG COUNTY Charlotte Chamber of Commerce Jeff Edge Senior Vice President Business Development P.O. Box 32785 Charlotte, NC 28232 704-378-1300 phone; 704-374-1903 fax jedge@charlottechamber.com www.charlottechamber.org City of Charlotte Tom Flynn Economic Development Director 600 East 4th St., Charlotte, NC 28202-2244 704-432-1396 phone; 704-336-6644 fax tflynn@ci.charlotte.nc.us www.charmeck.nc.us

YORK COUNTY Rock Hill Economic Development Corporation Stephen Turner Executive Director P.O. Box 11706, Rock Hill, SC 29731 803-329-7090 phone; 803-329-7007 fax stephenturner@rhedc.org www.rhedc.org York County Economic Development Board J. Mark Farris Director 1830 Second Baxter Crossing Fort Mill, SC 29708 803-802-4300 phone; 803-802-4299 fax mark.farris@yorkcountygov.com www.ycedb.com

Charlotte Region Charlotte Regional Partnership Kenny McDonald Sr. Vice President 1001 Morehead Square Dr., Ste. 200 Charlotte, NC 28203 800-554-4373 toll free 704-347-8942 phone; 704-347-8981 fax kmcdonald@charlotteusa.com www.charlotteusa.com

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C H A R LOT TE R E G I O N A L PA RT N E R S H I P

TYPES OF ACTIVITIES Business Missions:

Regional Information and Services Available for Relocating Businesses

The CRP creates and builds upon business relationships with industry executives and their advisory firms around the world by visiting them directly to discuss the Charlotte region as a business location alternative.

WHO WE ARE

The Charlotte Regional Partnership is an independent, non-profit, regional economic development organization representing 16 counties (12 in N.C., 4 in S.C.). Our organization works closely with both states, local communities, utilities, as well as private companies to recruit new businesses, new investments, and new jobs to the Charlotte region, to raise the standard of living for everyone in our area. OUR SERVICES We assist companies free of charge in a variety of ways: • Site/Location Search • Workforce Demographics • Transportation Analysis • Customized Research • Tax and Project Incentive Analysis • Introduction to Service Providers PROGRAM OF WORK Goal #1: To market and promote Charlotte USA to the world as a superior business location. Goal #2: To allocate and leverage regional and organizational resources to sustain and enhance the economic growth, prosperity, and global competitiveness of the Charlotte region. Goal #3: To initiate and participate in strategic organizational and regional planning to identify, assess, and develop assets required to provide sustained and sustainable economic growth, prosperity, and superior quality of life in the Charlotte region. ATTRACTING NEW AND EXPANDING COMPANIES Targeted types of business: • Headquarters and back office operations • Advanced manufacturing and distribution operations • U.S. subsidiary operations of foreign based multinational companies Targeted industry clusters: • Automotive • Machine Manufacturing • Medical Equipment Manufacturing • Pharmaceutical Manufacturing

• • • •

Financial Services and Insurance Motorsports Metalworking Plastics

Targeted geographic areas: • North America: Northeast, Mid-West, California, Canada • Europe: Western Europe, Scandinavia • Asia: Japan, Korea, China CHARLOTTE REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP 1001 MOREHEAD SQUARE DR., STE. 200 CHARLOTTE, NC 28203 USA 800-554-4373 TOLL FREE 704-347-8942 PHONE • 704-347-8981 FAX WWW.CHARLOTTEUSA.COM

2005 Charlotte Charlotte Regional Regional Economic Economic Development Development GuideGuide 2006

Industry Conferences: The CRP identifies a small number of industry conferences to target for business development purposes. Hosted Events: The CRP hosts business executives throughout the year at various events in the region in order to review specific regional assets and to build familiarity with the region. Such events include NFL Carolina Panthers games and the Wachovia Championship golf tournament. Business Development Research: The CRP conducts and procures research within industry clusters and other baseline databases to create target lists of companies and business executives to whom high-level, informational messages about Charlotte USA are sent. Public Relations & Advertising: The Charlotte USA campaign has had a dramatic impact on the ability of the CRP to “brand” the region. Building upon that work with targeted public relations messages in target industry and regional publications is essential. Editorial content about growing businesses and economic issues in the Charlotte region are a proven way to increase awareness of the area. Limited advertising to procure editorial content for reprint is also warranted to provide material that can be used for select industries. Web Site Development & Marketing: The Web site is a critical asset for the region. It is used both as a business development tool to reach companies around the world and as a research tool for companies and economic developers across the region. Consistent investment in this asset is important so that it remains relevant and can be found by those searching for business locations. 77


R E G I O N A L E CO N O M I C D E V E LO PM E N T PA RT N E R S

T

Thanks to the generosity of companies in the Charlotte Region that support regional economic development...

ACCOUNTING FIRMS

HOSPITALITY

BDO Siedman, LLP Cherry, Bekaert & Holland, LLP Deloitte & Touche Greer & Walker LLP KPMG, LLP Langford de Kock LLP PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Hilton Charlotte Center City The Westin Charlotte

CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES Choate Construction Company Matthews Construction Company R.T. Dooley Construction Company

CONSULTING FIRMS Luquire George Andrews Pioneer Recruiting Sherpa LLC Sockwell Partners The McAulay Firm Tribble Creative Group

DISTRIBUTORS Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated Cummins Atlantic, Inc. KlingmanWilliams

EDUCATION Central Piedmont Community College UNC Charlotte Winthrop University

ENGINEERING FIRMS Arcadis Engineering Consulting Services Ltd. PARSONS STEWART

ENTERTAINMENT Charlotte Regional Visitors Authority Carolina Panthers Speedway Motorsports, Inc.

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS Bank of America BB&T Deutsche Bank EJB World Trade Founders Federal Credit Union United Community Bancorp Wachovia Corporation 78

INSURANCE FIRMS Glauerdt GmbH Glauerdt U.S.A. Watson Insurance Company

LAW FIRMS Alston & Bird LLP Kilpatrick Stockton LLP Littler Mendelson, PC Mayer Brown Rowe & Maw, LLP Nexsen Pruet Adams & Kleemeier, LLC Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice

MANUFACTURING Goodrich Corporation National Gypsum Company Pharr Yarns Philip Morris U.S.A. SPX Corporation Steel Fab, Inc. The Springs Company The Wurth Group Verbatim Corporation

MEDIA Galles Communications Group, Inc. Peak 10 The Charlotte Observer Time Warner Cable WSOC-TV

REAL ESTATE COMMERICAL & INDUSTRIAL Bissell Companies Castle & Cooke Childress Klein Properties Crescent Resources Koll Development Lauth Property Group MarkPiercePoole Properties Matrix Real Estate Services Merrifield Partners The Keith Corporation The Knox Group The Staubach Company

REAL ESTATE - RESIDENTIAL Allen Tate Company, Inc. Prudential Carolinas Realty

RETAIL Belk, Inc. Mama Ricotta's

TRANSPORTATION Enterprise Rent-A-Car Lancaster & Chester Railway Company Lufthansa German Airlines US Airways

UTILITIES BellSouth Chester County Natural Gas Authority Duke Energy - Carolinas Lancaster County Natural Gas Authority Palmetto Economic Development Corp. Piedmont Natural Gas PSNC Energy TruVista Communications ChooseCharlotteUSA

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Not everyone has access to a nationally recognized hospital. After all, not everyone lives here. If you’ve always envied the people who live near a respected, nationally recognized hospital, then congratulations. You’re one of them. Gaston Memorial Hospital was recently named one of the Top 100 Hospitals® in the United States. This recognition comes after a national study conducted by one of the healthcare industry’s most respected research firms, Total Benchmarking Solution. The study analyzes data from every hospital in the country to recognize a select few who are setting the standard for the rest. You may already know that we perform the same advanced procedures as the major teaching hospitals, keep up with the very latest medical technology, and employ some of the finest staff in the country. Now, we’re earning a national reputation as well. To learn more, please call us at 704-834-2226, visit us online at www.caromont.org, or ask your doctor.

Charlotte Regional Economic Development Guide 2006

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Charlotte Regional Economical Development Guide 2006