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Economic Round Table Report

2019


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

The Greater Antelope Valley is Ready for Growth! Working with and representing the businesses in the Antelope Valley as a board member and the chair is an honor and a privilege. Your board of directors strives to make the work of GAVEA meaningful to our Investors and sponsors. Two of the most visible efforts of GAVEA are the quarterly events and the Economic Round Table Report. From Housing to Economic Forecasts, the quarterly events are a good source of information as well as a great place to network with community business leaders. The Round Table Report is relied on to recruit employees to the Antelope Valley as well as to showcase our area to new businesses. Available both in hard copy and electronically, the Report has been the single source for current data in our region. Each year the Report is stronger and adds meaningful data that can be used to recruit new businesses to the region.

Officers Veronica Knudson

Steve Radford

Chair

Immediate Past Chair

Palmdale Regional Medical Center

Antelope Valley High School District

Rob Duchow

Harvey Holloway

Vice Chair

Director at Large

The Gas Company

Coldwell Banker Commercial Valley Realty

Laurel Shockley Secretary

Laura Gallegos

Southern California Edison

Director at Large

Peter Wolters

Palmdale Water District

Treasurer Kaiser Permanente

George Atkinson Director at Large Atkinson and Associates

Directors Martha Molina-Aviles

Teresa Hitchcock

LA County Workforce Development Board

Kern County

In addition, the GAVEA staff, led by Kimberly Maevers, is visible in the local community, as well as the development community to showcase and answer questions about the Antelope Valley.

Tom Barnes

Learn 4 Life

The Board would like to thank our Investors and sponsors for your support in the past year. Your investment of time and resources supports the work that is done by GAVEA and contributes to the growth of the Antelope Valley.

Greg Garrett

We look forward to another year of collaboration and success! Veronica Knudson, GAVEA Chairwoman SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Board Members

Antelope Valley East Kern Water Agency

Chenin Dow City of Lancaster

Bernie Longjohn Raymond McCaslin Wells Fargo

Bob Stockwell City of California City

City of Tehachapi

Donna Termeer

Mary Beth Garrison Rio Tinto Borates

LA County, 5th District Supervisor, Kathryn Barger

Cathy Hart

Cheri Bryant -

Antelope Valley College

Retired Antelope Valley Press, Ex-Officio

Norm Hickling

Dixie Eliopulos

Antelope Valley Transit Authority

Honorary Founding Member


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Table of Contents Board of Directors ................................. Inside Cover

Staff Kimberly Maevers President / CEO

Table of Contents / Staff...........................................1 Introduction................................................................2 GAVEA Ad.....................................................................3 Demographics Regional Profile / Aerospace Ad...........................4 Population Detail....................................................5 County Employment by Sector.............................6 County of Los Angeles Profile...............................7 City of Lancaster.................................................8-9 City of Palmdale............................................. 10-11 Kern County Profile.............................................. 12 Mojave / Rosamond............................................ 13 California City................................................ 14-15 Greater Tehachapi......................................... 16-17 City of Ridgecrest.......................................... 18-19

Keira Richardson Executive Assistant

Andrea Aroche CSUB Intern, Special Projects Coordinator

Xavier Williams

SOAR High School Intern

Mailing Address PO Box 5477 Lancaster, CA 93539-5477 Phone: 661.722.6566 Email: info@socalleadingedge.org Web: SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Economic Development Permit Data / Cost of Living / FTZ ................... 20 Economic Development Contacts .................... 21 Dare to Compare Fact Sheet ........................ 22-23 Reg. Employment by Industry/Retail sales ..... 24 Aerospace Valley Assets...................................... 25

Center Gatefold Aerospace Valley Aviation and History ......... 26-30 Aviation / Airports.................................................. 31 Industry Aerospace ....................................................... 32-33 LAEDC Smart Match............................................ 34 Agriculture............................................................ 35 Creative Economy/Film ...................................... 36 Mining................................................................... 37 Renewable Energy ............................................... 38 Quality of Life Air / Utilities ......................................................... 39 STEM/STEAM Education............................... 40-41 CTE/Higher Education................................... 42-43 K-12 Public/Private/Charter Schools................ 44 Water..................................................................... 45 Hospitals & Healthcare ...................................... 46 Transportation..................................................... 47 Real Estate/Housing Market ....................... 48-49 Entertainment & Things To Do ................... 50-53

For permission requests, write to the publisher, addressed “Attention: Copyright Permission” at the address provided.

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Chamber of Commerce / Business Support.... 54 Investor Information........................................... 55 Investor Member Application............................ 56

COPYRIGHT © 2019 by Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance – All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law.


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Welcome to our 19th Year

of regional data collection and storytelling

A

s the regional economic developer for the 3000 sq. miles of North Los Angeles and Southeast Kern County, GAVEA has been conducting research, collecting data and demographics and packaging the information into an annual Economic Round Table Report. For nearly twenty years we’ve done this so that our Investors and Allies may have a better understanding of the growth trends and shifts in our economy so that all of us can make more informed choices about our future and the business decisions we face.

W

hile the demographic data collection is specific to the 25 zip codes that make up the region, the storytelling is more personal and purposeful. Five years ago, I started reaching out to all of you and asked for your contribution to the Report. It started out with my friends Bob Johnstone and Diane Walker offering to submit a story about STEM, then I asked you for your stories about aerospace, healthcare, education, water, transportation, and agriculture. We made this annual Report a story about OUR home, OUR businesses and OUR quality of life. I’ve given you the opportunity to brag about our assets and opportunities and to share your vision and the promise of the future of this place – OUR Greater Antelope Valley.

I

nside this Report you will find tools to help your business thrive and grow, with data and information that promotes investment and opportunities for new business prospects. I hope that this Report is the tool that helps you get that next grant or win that new contract because of the information we provided you. I hope this Report helps you recruit talent, and helps your workforce enjoy the quality of life many of us take for granted. If nothing else, I hope you learn something new from what’s inside this Report – it is a wealth of information that you will find nowhere else.

I

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

’m excited to share our centerfold story with you, the DNA of Aerospace Valley. For it is these stories that have shaped our past and have propelled us into the future of space. It is because of the mavericks and mavens of the skies that our economy grew at warp speed so many times before. And, it will be because of the pioneers and visionaries that we continue to celebrate more “firsts” in aviation and space travel. This Valley is rich with talent and opportunity and the sky truly is the limit to what we can accomplish here!

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A

s we prepare to put this 2019 Report to print, I can’t help but be proud of the team that has been working tirelessly behind the scenes at GAVEA. My executive assistant, Keira and my two interns (working for FREE), Andrea and Xavier. These three have been my rock throughout the Report process. They’ve been my extra eyes and ears for proofreading and edits. They’ve been the cattle-prod when someone needed to stop procrastinating. And, they’ve been the voice on the phone calling you for your stories, sponsorships and support. I cannot thank you three enough for your help in getting this project started early and keeping it moving forward.

T

o the team at South Street Digital in Tehachapi, Audrey, Lydia and the others…what a pleasure it has been to work with you! I was a little nervous when we decided to contract with a new team for the 2019 Report, but those fears quickly vanished after our first design team meeting. Your professionalism and confidence set me at ease and your attention to detail is appreciated. I am so pleased to work with you on this project.

F

inally, this Report could not be possible without the generous support of our Investors and sponsors. We are a small but mighty non-profit whose mission is to improve the regional economy through strategic efforts of business retention, expansion and attraction. I am grateful to you for allowing us to continue this work. Thanks to all that have shared their stories and knowledge. I apologize we didn’t have room for everything you shared. This Report truly is a labor of love for me, a native of OUR Antelope Valley Respectfully, Kimberly Maevers, GAVEA President / CEO


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Demographics

2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Regional Profile REGIONAL POPULATION.............541,726

2024 Projected..........................................569,860 2019 Estimate............................................541,726 2010 Census...............................................495,848

AEROSPACE is in our DNA

Population by Ethnicity Not Hispanic or Latino..............................295,607 Hispanic or Latino.....................................246,119 Population by Race White...........................................................282,542 Black/African American............................. 78,934 American Indian/Alaskan Native................ 5,292 Asian.............................................................. 20,905 Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander............ 1,262 Other...........................................................122,182 Two or more Boeing Races...................................... 30,609 Median Age..................................... 33.6

China Lake Naval Regional Housing Average Household Income.Station ....................$76,482 Air Weapons (NAWS) Housing Units............................................164,761 Persons per Household...................................... 3.1 Edwards Air Force Base

Owner Occupied......................................... 66.20% Lockheed Martin Average Length of Residence (yrs)*Owner occupied............... 14.28

Economy Mojave Air and Space Port Cost of Doing Business............. Low to Moderate

Source: Kosmont (property tax not included)

National Test Pilot School

Ethnicity (Language) 2019 Est % Primarily Speak English......... 360,093 71.67% Northrop Grumman Primarily Speak Spanish....... 120,885 24.06% Speak Other Language...............3,293 0.66% *Pop. Age 5+........................... 484,271 U.S. Air Force Plant 42 Age Specific 2019 Est % 0-17.......................................... 140,737 25.97% 18-54........................................ 269,778 49.80% 55-64.......................................... 66,390 12.26% Over 65....................................... 64,821 11.97% 541,726 Education 2019 Est % HS Graduate/GED.....................Ridgecrest 94,999 27.68% Some College/ TEHACHAPI MTNS Randsburg Associate’sBakersfield Degree................... 37,320 27.07% Bachelor’s Degree..................... 38,570 11.24% California City Master’s Degree........................ 15,241 4.44% Professional or Tehachapi Mojave Doctorate Degree........................4,355 1.27% Edwards Boron EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE *Pop Age 25+..........................190,395 Rosamond SOURCE: Claritas via Environics Analytics https://en.enviornicsanalytics.ca.Spotlight

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Valencia

Every day, more than 30,000 people go to work here pushing the envelope in aerospace specialties like jet propulsion, flight test, engineering and precision manufacturing. It’s no wonder we’re home to a world-class space port, or that Northrop Grumman will be developing the next-generation stealth B-21 bomber here. So, come shoot for the stars with us and be part of the exceptional aerospace synergy in the Greater Antelope Valley. Barstow

Lancaster

Lake Elizabeth

Palmdale Littlerock

Santa Clarita

In the Greater Antelope Valley, we don’t just talk about space travel— we make it happen.

Acton

Lake Los Angeles

Pearblossom

Newhall

Burbank

Los Angeles

Pomona

PACIFIC OCEAN

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Anaheim

SoCalLeadingEdge.org info@SoCalLeadingEdge.org | 661.722.6566


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Lancaster 201,369

Palmdale 181,517

Ridgecrest 33,811

200,000

35,000

180,000

34,000 33,000

150,000

160,000 140,000 120,000

31,000

100,000

100,000 80,000

State Population Ranking (size)........................................ 35 Population Growth from 2010 Census to 2019 estimate.......................................... 18,996 Population Growth % from 2010................................... 9.43

27,000

126,105 166,044 181,517 191,672

State Population Ranking (size)............................. 34 Population Growth from 2010 Census to 2019 estimate............................... 17,473 Population Growth % from 2010........................9.63

Antelope Valley 5-year Population Forecast* 2019 Est 2024 Proj. City of Lancaster 201,369 212,276

0

15,000 10,000 5,000 0

8,664 13,778 15,193 16,102

State Population Ranking (size)...................................... 334 Population Growth from 2010 Census to 2019 estimate.............................................1,415 Population Growth % from 2010................................... 9.31

City of Palmdale

10,874 14,414 14,638 37,776 15,119 39,645

State Population Ranking (size)................................... 353 Population Growth from 2010 Census to 2019 estimate............................................. 224 Population Growth % from 2010................................ 1.53

State Population Ranking Source: www.cacities.org/Resources-Documents/.../2017-City-Population-Rank.aspx Source: Claritas via Environics Analytics: https://en.environicsanalytics.ca/Spotlight

181,517

(93550, 93551, 93552) (Greater Tehachapi)

2024 Estimate (City only)

(greater regioin)

(93534, 93535, 93536)

2019 Estimate

2,000

20,000

2024 Projected

4,000

2019 Estimate

6,000

2010 Census

2000 Census

8,000

2019 Estimate

25,000

10,000

2019 Estimate

12,000

(City Only)

30,000

2010 Census

35,000

14,000

(City Only)

16,000

2000 Census

40,000

(City Only)

(greater region)* city data only

18,000

30,049 32,934 33,811 34,598

State Population Ranking (size)...........................251 Population Growth from 2010 Census to 2019 estimate.....................................877 Population Growth % from 2010........................2.59

Tehachapi 14,638 California City 15,193

2024 Projected

28,000

2019 Estimate

29,000

2010 Census

30,000

2000 Census

0

143,059 182,373 201,369 212,276

2024 Projected

20,000

2019 Estimate

60,000 40,000

32,000

2010 Census

2024 Projected

0

2019 Estimate

50,000

2010 Census

2000 Census

200,000

2000 Census

250,000

Demographics

Population Detail

191,672

*Unincorporated - LA County (93510, 93532, 93543, 37,078 38,654 93544, 93553, 93563, 93591)

California City

15,193

16,102

Greater Tehachapi

38,197

40,087

City of Ridgecrest

33,811

34,598

(93505)

(93531, 93561) (93555)

*Unincorporated - Kern County (93501, 93516, 93519, 34,982 36,471 93523, 93524, 93527, 93554, 93560)

Greater Antelope Valley Region 542,147 569,860 *Areas Defined by Zip Codes Source: Claritas via Environics Analytics

Population by Zip Code Zip

City

2010 Census

(Includes 93531)

5,613 13,778 2,333 116 3,268 160 2,447 387 24 32,934 18,868 35,196

2019 Est. 2024 Proj.

6,104 15,193 2,522 105 3,091 150 2,513 421 22 33,811 20,475 37,776

6,417 16,102 2,641 105 3,080 149 2,571 442 22 34,598 21,486 39,645

Source: Claritas via Environics Analytics: https://en.environicsanalytics.ca/Spotlight

Zip

City

2010 Census

93510 Acton 93532 Lake Huges 93534 Lancaster 93535 Lancaster 93536 Lancaster 93543 Littlerock 93544 Llano 93550 Palmdale 93551 Palmdale 93552 Palmdale 93553 Pearblossom 93563 Valyermo 93591 Lake L.A. (Palmdale) Overall Total

7,801 2,787 39,727 71,752 70,894 13,319 1,384 74,645 51,126 38,273 1,819 282 7,302

2019 Est. 2024 Proj.

8,146 3,039 42,653 79,537 79,179 14,455 1,576 79,555 58,361 43,601 1,979 287 7,596

8,409 3,190 44,536 84,019 83,721 15,165 1,685 82,842 62,269 46,561 2,080 291 7,834

496,235 542,147

569,860

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93501 Mojave 93505 California City 93516 Boron 93519 Cantil 93523 Edwards 93524 Edwards 93527 Inyokern 93531 Keene 93554 Randsburg 93555 Ridgecrest 93560 Rosamond 93561 Greater Tehachapi


Demographics

2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Employment in

Los Angeles County 2017 2017 2016 2016 2015 2015 INDUSTRY NAICS AAE TP AAE TP AAE TP Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting......................... 11 Mining....................................................................................... 21 Utilities...................................................................................... 22 Construction............................................................................ 23 Manufacturing................................................................... 31-33 Wholesale Trade...................................................................... 42 Retail Trade........................................................................ 44-45 Transportation and Warehousing.................................. 48-49 Information.............................................................................. 51 Finance and Insurance............................................................ 52 Real Estate and Rental and Leasing..................................... 53 Prof., Scientific, and Technical Services............................... 54 Management of Companies and Enterprises..................... 55 Admin. & Support and Waste Management ...................... 56 Educational Services............................................................... 61 Health Care and Social Assistance....................................... 62 Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation................................... 71 Accommodation and Food Services.................................... 72 Other Services (except Public Admin.)................................. 81 Federal Government............................................................92-F State Government................................................................92-S Local Government................................................................92-L Not Elsewhere Classified (N/A)............................................. 99

140 32 287 3,340 7,145 959 11,653 2,366 790 1,272 894 2,344 90 3,523 1,289 17,236 856 8,968 1,971 2,352 2,096 14,999 264

$5,337,288 $2,852,324 $36,977,915 $168,219,782 $649,865,507 $44,245,074 $323,720,899 $99,881,345 $41,259,888 $71,209,164 $36,027,907 $155,886,455 $4,840,240 $99,131,494 $48,092,704 $651,384,189 $16,945,253 $166,799,666 $50,905,201 $244,752,528 $113,398,898 $784,590,370 $8,603,083

139 854 223 571 2,060 460 2,635 1,569 209 265 300 2,618 *** 834 200 2,035 306 2,420 713 8,342 2,373 3,482 ***

$8,005,078 $68,341,842 $21,808,983 $24,446,659 $159,120,978 $20,864,791 $68,522,878 $103,127,334 $9,996,502 $11,470,417 $9,358,077 $195,433,945 *** $35,584,884 $7,029,939 $79,315,459 $6,018,621 $46,237,064 $24,481,061 $744,806,995 $115,941,663 $158,643,381 ***

87 794 212 550 2,152 235 2,578 1,549 158 264 268 2,562 *** 733 193 2,014 304 2,494 619 8,080 2,339 3,325 ***

$3,463,236 $66,515,290 $19,114,882 $23,176,101 $155,216,252 $16,010,288 $63,818,249 $89,794,046 $7,082,268 $11,178,485 $7,730,932 $194,839,628 *** $28,697,917 $7,023,337 $78,300,538 $5,930,045 $39,427,600 $19,985,587 $663,530,052 $115,336,506 $149,949,736 ***

Total, All Industries..............................................

84,867

$3,824,927,174

32,837

$1,928,628,628

31,789

$1,780,202,849

AAE - Annual Average Employment, TP - Total Payroll *** Data are confidential if there are fewer than 3 businesses in a category or one employer makes up 80 percent or more of the employment in a category

LA County Zip Codes: 93510 Acton, 93532 Lake Hughes, 93534 Lancaster, 93535 Lancaster, 93536 Lancaster, 93543 Littlerock, 93544 Llano, 93550 Palmdale, 93551 Palmdale, 93552 Palmdale, 93553 Pearblossom, 93563 Valyermo, 93591 Lake LA

Kern County

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

2017 2017 2016 2016 2015 2015 INDUSTRY NAICS AAE TP AAE TP AAE TP Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting......................... 11 Mining....................................................................................... 21 Utilities...................................................................................... 22 Construction............................................................................ 23 Manufacturing................................................................... 31-33 Wholesale Trade...................................................................... 42 Retail Trade........................................................................ 44-45 Transportation and Warehousing.................................. 48-49 Information.............................................................................. 51 Finance and Insurance............................................................ 52 Real Estate and Rental and Leasing..................................... 53 Prof., Scientific, and Technical Services............................... 54 Management of Companies and Enterprises..................... 55 Admin. & Support and Waste Management....................... 56 Educational Services............................................................... 61 Health Care and Social Assistance....................................... 62 Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation................................... 71 Accommodation and Food Services.................................... 72 Other Services (except Public Admin.)................................. 81 Federal Government (CONFIDENTIAL)..............................92-F State Government................................................................92-S Local Government................................................................92-L Not Elsewhere Classified (CONFIDENTIAL)......................... 99

102 898 330 618 1,964 537 2,808 1,755 229 250 296 2,679 *** 901 212 2,221 302 2,573 824 *** 2,305 3,564 ***

$3,865,878 $74,907,275 $32,990,093 $27,766,991 $151,992,747 $21,371,689 $72,021,660 $122,927,226 $11,639,554 $11,744,245 $9,264,831 $205,216,100 *** $43,669,232 $7,417,780 $85,878,138 $6,326,256 $46,815,997 $30,056,318 *** $115,898,185 $167,385,469 ***

160 32 297 3,152 6,845 943 11,581 2,372 813 1,288 974 2,315 78 3,273 1,272 15,572 805 8,718 1,840 2,058 14,474 284 2,260

$5,795,307 $2,690,491 $36,907,442 $153,312,783 $608,311,060 $43,450,321 $310,060,363 $98,373,184 $40,150,239 $69,101,622 $40,061,087 $150,132,805 $4,605,421 $90,626,527 $49,394,121 $589,132,646 $15,443,423 $156,514,050 $47,516,682 $109,900,749 $757,296,566 $9,515,404 $228,759,895

206 33 291 2,921 6,875 956 11,358 2,508 857 1,257 968 2,256 134 2,403 1,061 15,126 710 8,363 1,901 350 1,991 14,051 321

$6,666,185 $2,907,145 $35,741,387 $144,886,546 $623,451,957 $42,555,920 $294,956,688 $103,114,728 $41,464,603 $62,865,660 $38,440,005 $138,240,486 $9,043,274 $67,721,065 $34,555,692 $537,163,455 $12,460,348 $141,965,859 $45,498,551 $20,426,136 $102,630,279 $700,384,742 $9,720,679

Total, All Industries........................................................

34,074

$2,037,297,517

81,406

$3,617,052,188

78,439

$3,409,542,198

AAE - Annual Average Employment, TP - Total Payroll

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Source: EDD

Southeast Kern Zip Codes: 93501 Mojave, 93505 Cal. City, 93516 Boron, 93519 Cantil, 93523 Edwards, 93524 Edwards, 93527 Inyokern, 93531 Keene, 93554 Randsburg, 93555 Ridgecrest, 93560 Rosamond, 93561 Tehachapi


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Kathryn Barger, Supervisor, Fifth District, Los Angeles County AV FIELD OFFICE 42455 10th St. West, Suite 104 Lancaster, CA 93534 661.726.3600 Donna Termeer Senior Field Deputy, Antelope Valley Charles Bostwick Assistant Field Deputy, Antelope Valley

Elected Officials

Hilda L. Solis - Supervisor, First District Mark Ridley-Thomas - Supervisor, Second District Sheila Kuehl - Supervisor, Third District Janice Hahn - Supervisor, Fourth District Kathryn Barger - Supervisor, Fifth District Sheriff: Alex Villanueva District Attorney: Jackie Lacey

Assessor: Jeffrey Prang

Business Community Quote:

- Supervisor Kathryn Barger, Los Angeles County Supervisor

Antelope Valley Freeway improvements start - Construction started in November on the first of more than $200 million worth of projects to widen the Antelope Valley Freeway and improve nine frequently congested interchanges in Lancaster and Palmdale. The work is financed by Los Angeles County’s Measure R and Measure M. Probation camp to become vocational training center Challenger Memorial Youth Center is proposed to become a pilot residential vocational training center for young adults ages 18 to 25. Community partners are to include Antelope Valley College, Northrop Grumman, the Antelope Valley Youth Build charter school, the Los Angeles County Building and Construction Trades Council, the Los Angeles auto careertraining program, and the University of Antelope Valley. Effort aims to deter PTSD and suicide among first responders The Board of Supervisors unanimously passed a motion by Supervisor Kathryn Barger in September to review current policies, programs and services that address suicide prevention, PTSD, secondary trauma and mental health care, as well as education and outreach for first responders, emergency room personnel and crime scene personnel. A recent report published by the Ruderman Family Foundation said not enough agencies have programs and policies in place to address suicide prevention.

ABOVE: Officials ceremoniously break ground for widening the Antelope Valley Freeway.

DCFS system provides critical information to social workers The Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), in partnership with the County’s Chief Information Office, has developed a ground-breaking new system called the Emergency Response Investigation Service. Implemented at the Palmdale DCFS office in July 2018, ERIS gives emergency response children’s social workers access to information including arrest and conviction records, warrant information, detailed physical descriptors and aliases of adults living in the homes of children referred to the agency.

More than 65% of the county’s territory and more than 1 million of its 10 million residents are in unincorporated territory, which lies outside the limits of any city. For those residents, the Board of Supervisors serves as the “city council” and “mayor.” County departments provide municipal services such as law enforcement, firefighting, road maintenance, parks, zoning, building permits and animal control. The Antelope Valley contains the most unincorporated territory of any region in Los Angeles County. Home to some 76,000 residents, unincorporated Antelope Valley contains more than 600 businesses, with the largest numbers in Acton and Quartz Hill.

ABOVE: Supervisor Kathryn Barger, left, talks to students at The Palmdale Aerospace Academy with Headmaster Laura Herman.

ABOVE: Supervisor Kathryn Barger inspects a Granite Construction quarry in Palmdale.

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SoCalLeadingEdge.org

“A skilled workforce is essential to support cutting-edge manufacturing on aerospace programs like SpaceShipTwo, the Air Force B-21 bomber and F-35 fighter, plus BYD electric buses and Kinkisharyo Metro rail cars. Los Angeles County is preparing to convert the soonto-be-closed juvenile probation camp, Challenger Memorial Youth Center, into a pilot residential vocational training center and will target those youth with a high risk of homelessness to receive training prioritized to Antelope Valley employers’ needs. We appreciate the efforts of others, including Antelope Valley College, which leads a partnership training for workers in composites fabrication, airframe and power plant work; California State University, Long Beach, which offers engineering degrees in Lancaster; the University of Antelope Valley, which teaches diverse career skills; and trade unions, which offer apprenticeship programs. We have both challenges and opportunities ahead, and I am excited and honored to work on them together.”

2018 Milestones:

Demographics

County of Los Angeles


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

CityofLancasterCA.org

Demographics

Lancaster City of Lancaster 44933 Fern Avenue Lancaster, CA 93534 661.723.6128

Elected Officials Mayor: R. Rex Parris

Vice Mayor: Marvin Crist

Council Members:

Ken Mann Angela Underwood-Jacobs Raj Malhi

City Manager:

Jason Caudle 661.723.6133

Assistant to the City Manager: Chenin Dow 661.723.6165

Community Trends: With the success of large corporate and smaller homegrown companies alike, the industrial market is booming. The need for speculative development is greater than ever, as most business owners are looking for move-in-ready facilities for their businesses. With an industrial vacancy rate well below 2%, the demand is only continuing to grow. It is anticipated that even more industrial businesses will be relocating to or expanding in Lancaster.

ABOVE: Welder at Lance Camper.

2018 Milestones: Lance Camper: Following a major expansion, RV manufacturer and longtime Lancaster success story Lance Camper was acquired in January 2018 by industry-leading specialty vehicle manufacturer REV Group. The acquisition enables Lance to take advantage of REV Group’s extensive nationwide distribution network. BYD: Global electric vehicle, battery, and renewable energy titan BYD expanded its electric bus manufacturing facility yet again in 2018 with the addition of a 100,000-square-foot warehouse. The addition brings the plant’s total footprint to 550,000 square feet, employing 830. Hotel Stimulus Program: Recognizing the urgent demand generated by the thriving local economy, the City Council approved a program to encourage high-density, high-quality hotels. Incentives include a TOT rebate, fee deferrals and waivers for those with qualifying projects.

“We are building a city for the future. By anticipating the integration of emerging technologies and employing cutting-edge innovation across all city services, we are creating a community that will become more resilient and better poised for more strategic growth than ever before.” SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Toyota of Lancaster: Toyota of Lancaster saw explosive growth, more than doubling sales and earning recognition as the number-one Toyota dealership for growth in the LA region. The dealership acquired an additional 8 acres from the City in preparation for further expansion. Honda Lancaster/Subaru Antelope Valley: With plans for expansive growth, the new owners of Honda Lancaster and Subaru Antelope Valley embarked on extensive renovations of the Subaru showroom and have leased an additional 6 acres from the City. Lancaster Auto Mall: To support the ongoing growth in the Lancaster Auto Mall and further enhance the visitor experience, the City engaged in extensive public improvements including traffic calming, pedestrian amenities, road right-sizing, bike lanes, and safety measures.

RAM of the West: Brothers and thirdgeneration dealership owners Tom and Tim Fuller opened RAM of the West, North America’s largest truck center, in the Lancaster Auto Mall. The BELOW: Aerospace fasteners are fabricated at Morton dealership has yielded substantially Manufacturing. increased sales and attracted countless out-of-area buyers.

Business/Community Quote

-Mayor R. Rex Parris

8

Paloma Lane West: The new familyoriented commercial center on 60th Street West just north of Avenue L-8 has attracted local merchants to help serve the growing west side neighborhoods. The development is fully leased with tenants including restaurants, a jiu-jitsu studio, and a salon.

ABOVE: Mayor R. Rex Parris was the keynote speaker at the inaugural Cities Power Partnership Summit held in Kiama, Australia. He shared Lancaster’s journey to becoming the alternative energy capital of the world and a zero net energy city.


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

LANCASTER

POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Median Age........................................................32.9 Spanish Speaking........................................ 18.66% POPULATION BY ORIGIN Not Hispanic or Latino................................ 56.78% Hispanic........................................................ 43.22%

ABOVE: Iconic BYD bus on the factory floor.

Business / Industrial Parks: The Oasis at 10K: This 20,000-square-foot commercial center, located at one of Lancaster’s key intersections, opened its doors. Tenants include The Habit, Blaze Pizza, Dunkin’ Donuts, and Jimmy John’s, with plans for expansion in the near future. The BLVD: The BLVD in downtown Lancaster attracted a number of new businesses, including Regency Theaters; Starbucks; Don Sal, a high-end Mexican cantina; and country western bar Buckle & Boots. Construction is underway on a Marriott Residence Inn. Opportunity Zones: As part of the federal tax package, Opportunity Zones aim to stimulate investment by deferring and eliminating capital gains taxes. The City collaborated with regional and state officials to designate six Census tracts in Lancaster, encompassing approximately 4,000 acres. Avenue I Corridor Improvements: Avenue I between 15th Street West and 10th Street West underwent a comprehensive redesign and reconstruction. Improvements include streetscape right-sized traffic lanes, a landscaped median, safety improvements, bike lanes, pedestrian amenities, and improved sidewalks.

POPULATION BY ORIGIN White Alone.................................................. 44.67% Black or African American......................... 20.90% American Indian / Alaska Native.................0.94% Asian Alone.....................................................4.29% Native Hawaiian / other Pac. Islander........0.21% Some Other Race......................................... 23.32% Two or More Races.........................................5.67%

Antelope Valley Medical Main Street Location: Avenue J & 15th Street West Total Acreage: 340 acres Zoning: Specific Plan

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME......$73,576 93534........................................................$53,684 93535........................................................$61,023 93536........................................................$98,731

Centerpoint Business Park Location: Avenue J & Lowtree Avenue Total Acreage: 9.5 acres Zoning: Office Professional

HOUSING - (Dec. 2018) Median Housing (Core Logic/www.RealQuest.com) 93534..................................................... $245,000 93535..................................................... $250,000 93536..................................................... $350,000 Housing Units (2019 estimate).................60,447 Person per Household (avg.)...........................3.19 Homeowners (avg.).................................... 61.88%

Enterprise Business Park

Location: Sierra Highway & Avenue L-4 Total Acreage: 75 acres Zoning: Office/Light Industrial

Fox Field Industrial Corridor Location: Avenue H West of SR-14 Total Acreage: 8,236 acres Zoning: Specific Plan

Lancaster Business Park

Location: Business Center Parkway & Avenue K-8 Total Acreage: 240 acres Zoning: Specific Plan

North Valley Industrial Center

Location: Avenue H & Division Street Total Acreage: 270 acres Zoning: Heavy Industrial

Southern Amargosa Industrial Location: Avenues L & M East of SR-14 Total Acreage: 1,400 acres Zoning: Light Industrial

The BLVD

LEFT: Expansions in the Auto Mall included the

EDUCATION (age 25+)...................126,532 No High School Diploma..............................9.62% High School Graduate................................ 30.04% Some College, no degree........................... 27.33% Associate’s Degree.........................................9.05% Bachelor’s Degree........................................ 10.41% Master’s Degree..............................................4.62% Professional School Degree..........................0.78% Doctoral Degree..............................................0.45% WORKFORCE (age 16+ by occupation)................ 75,761 Architect/Engineer.........................................3.08% Arts/Entertain/Sports....................................1.88% Building Grounds Maint................................4.24% Business Financial Ops..................................2.82% Community Soc Svcs.....................................2.35% Computer/Mathematical..............................1.53% Construction/Extraction...............................6.93% Edu/Training/Library......................................5.88% Farm/Fish/Forestry.........................................0.43% Food Prep/Serving.........................................4.91% Health Practitioner/Tech...............................6.53% Healthcare Support........................................2.98% Maintenance Repair.......................................3.98% Legal.................................................................0.47% Life/Phys/Soc Sociology................................0.36% Management...................................................8.85% Office/Admin Support................................ 12.98% Production......................................................4.33% Protective Services.........................................3.06% Sales/Related............................................... 10.19% Personal Care/Service....................................4.89% Transportation/Moving.................................7.32% SOURCE: Claritas via Environics Analytics https://en.environicsanalytics.ca/Spotlight

**Included zip codes are: 93534, 93535, & 93536 ***Dept. of Finance estimate of 1/1/18 DoF.CA.gov

CityofLancasterCA.org

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SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Location: Lancaster Blvd & 10th Street West to Sierra Highway Total Acreage: 9.5 acres Zoning: Commercial/Office Professional/Specific Plan

addition of RAM of the West, the largest truck center in North America.

Demographics

2019 POPULATION ESTIMATE (combined zip codes**)................201,369 2010 Census Population...........................182,373 2024 Projection .........................................212,276 2018 Dept. of Finance estimate (in City limits)***.......................................161,485


Demographics

2019Greater GreaterAntelope AntelopeValley ValleyEconomic EconomicAlliance Alliance 2019

Palmdale City of Palmdale 38300 Sierra Hwy., Suite A Palmdale, CA 93550 661.267.5100

Elected Officials

Mayor: Steven D. Hofbauer Mayor Pro Tem: Austin Bishop

Council Members: Laura Bettencourt Juan Carrillo Richard Loa

City Manager:

James Purtee 661.267.5100

Director of Economic & Community Development: Mark Oyler 661.267.5200

Economic Development Manager Curtis Cannon 661.267.5125

Community Trends: Sir Richard Branson, whose family of companies include Virgin Galactic and Virgin Trains USA, is bringing his new brand, Virgin Trains USA to Palmdale with the recent partnership with Brightline, the nation’s first new major private intercity passenger railroad in over a century. This includes Xpress West, the high-speed rail project that Brightline acquired in September, which has a federally approved corridor between Las Vegas and Victorville, with plans to continue the line to Palmdale where it will connect with other transportation services. Construction is expected to begin in 2019 and the company plans to begin initial service in 2022, according to a company statement.

Business/Community Quote

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

CityofPalmdale.org

“We transformed domestic air travel with Virgin America. Tens of millions of Americans travel on the railways every day, and we have tried for over a decade to find an opportunity to provide them with that same excellent service experience. Brightline is at the forefront of innovation in this market, and the ideal partner for Virgin to work with to alter perceptions and traveling habits across the United States.” – Sir Richard Branson, 10 Virgin Trains USA

ABOVE: Skunkworks assets at Plant 42.

2018 Milestones: Palmdale Welcomed: • Home2 Suites by Hilton • HomeSmart NCG • Olives Mediterranean Restaurant • By Grace Boutique • First City Credit Union • Imagine City • Ni Hao Sushi & Dining Poke Food Court • Intero Real Estate • Inspire Charter School • Bionicos and Juices Rios • Only Escrow • California Fish Grill • Pink Fish Poke • Turner’s Outdoorsman • La Vicentina Bakery • Don Chato Restaurant • Crackin’ Chicken Waffles • Waffle Kitchen Additions to the “Miracle on 47th Street” lineup include O’Reilly’s Auto Parts, America’s Tire Center, John Smith’s Subs, IHop, Yoshinoya, Waffle Kitchen. Home2 Suites, by Hilton, part of Hilton’s industry-first all-suites portfolio, opened. The 93-room, four-story unit is the second of its brand in California.

Amargosa Creek Recharge Project, a collaborative effort between the City of Palmdale, Palmdale Water District, Antelope Valley-East Kern Water Agency and the Los Angeles County Waterworks District, will pipe State Water Project water from the California Aqueduct to a series of recharge ponds near Elizabeth Lake Road and 25th Street West. The water will percolate through the ground into the aquifer beneath. In addition to improving the regional water supply, it will promote further preservation of the Amargosa Creek corridor and will create a nature park for recreation while encouraging citizens to conserve precious water resources. Northrop Grumman partnered with the City of Palmdale, America’s Job Centers of California, County of Los Angeles Community and Senior Services, and Antelope Valley College in a job training consortium. The new, innovative aerospace manufacturing job training partnership is geared to screen, train and prepare applicants for aerospace/manufacturing positions available locally, including jobs Northrop Grumman is looking to fill over the next 5+ years. Northrop requires applicants without prior experience to graduate specifically from Antelope Valley College’s Aircraft Fabrication and Assembly (AFAB) program in order to be considered for an entry-level position.

Major construction improvements began on the State Route 138/Antelope Valley 14 freeway improvement project. Funded by $200 million in Measure R Equity Grant funds to help design and improve State Route 138 (SR 138) within Los Angeles County. This is the first of 11 projects along the 138/14 corridor, five of which are in Palmdale. This specific project BELOW: Lazy River at Drytown. proposes to improve traffic flow on the southbound 14 and increase the capacity of the north bound off-ramp to Rancho Vista Blvd.

LEFT: Sir Richard Branson on Brightline.


2019 GreaterAntelope Antelope Valley Valley Economic Alliance 2019 Greater Economic Alliance

POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Median Age........................................................32.1 Spanish Speaking........................................ 34.90% POPULATION BY ORIGIN Not Hispanic or Latino................................ 41.44% Hispanic........................................................ 58.56%

ABOVE: Gateway monument sign at Plant 42.

Antelope Valley College has leased the vacant Palmdale Regional Airport Terminal as a temporary classroom and laboratory facility to train entrylevel mechanics for the aerospace industry. The facility will help the college accelerate the training of local people to get them hired by aerospace/ manufacturing companies such as Northrop Grumman, which is expected to generate thousands of high-quality, high-tech, and well-paying jobs in Antelope Valley community with the Long Range Strike Bomber (B-21) contract.

Business / Industrial Parks:

Lockheed Martin landed its first contract for the LMH1 hybrid airship, which it created inside its top-secret Skunk Works division in Palmdale. The hybrid airship is a project more than a decade in the making and looks a bit like a flying can of Pillsbury Biscuits after it’s been popped, and it can best be described as part blimp, part airplane and part helicopter. The airship is to deliver cargo to remote areas without roads, whether it’s oil and gas exploration, mining projects or villages needing UPS deliveries from Amazon.

Palmdale Industrial Park

POPULATION BY ORIGIN White Alone.................................................. 46.43% Black or African American......................... 14.37% American Indian / Alaska Native.................0.76% Asian Alone.....................................................4.43% Native Hawaiian / other Pac. Islander........0.21% Some Other Race......................................... 28.31% Two or More Races.........................................5.58% AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME......$80,047 93550........................................................$58,285 93551..................................................... $113,765 93552........................................................$69,130

Challenger Business Park

Location: Palmdale Blvd. and 5th St. West Total Acreage: 10 acres Zoning: Commercial

HOUSING - (Dec. 2018) Median Housing (CoreLogic / www.RealQuest.com) 93550..................................................... $265,000 93551..................................................... $390,000 93552..................................................... $300,000 Housing Units (2019 estimate).................50,481 Person per Household (avg.)...........................3.59 Homeowners (avg.).................................... 69.03%

Fairway Business Park

Location: Avenue O and Division St. Total Acreage: 115 acres Zoning: Business Park/Mixed

Freeway Business Center

Location: State Highway 14 & Avenue N Total Acreage: 115 acres Zoning: Commercial

EDUCATION (age 25+)...................111,089 No High School Diploma........................... 12.03% High School Graduate................................ 25.63% Some College, no degree........................... 26.19% Associate’s Degree.........................................7.74% Bachelor’s Degree........................................ 10.92% Master’s Degree..............................................4.12% Professional School Degree..........................0.80% Doctoral Degree..............................................0.44%

Location: Sierra Hwy. and Avenue M Total Acreage: 400 acres Zoning: Industrial

Palmdale Trade & Commerce Center

Location: 10th St. West and Rancho Vista Blvd. Total Acreage: 746 acres Zoning: Industrial and Commercial

Park One Industrial Park

Location: Rancho Vista Blvd. and 10th St. East Total Acreage: 10 acres Zoning: Industrial and Commercial

Sierra Business Park

Location: 10th St. West and Avenue M-4 Total Acreage: 30 acres Zoning: Commercial Location: Avenue O-8 and Sierra Hwy. Total Acreage: 133 acres Zoning: Commercial

WORKFORCE (16+ by Occupation)... 71,398 Architect/Engineer.........................................2.31% Arts/Entertain/Sports....................................1.36% Building Grounds Maint................................4.98% Business Financial Ops..................................2.90% Community Soc Svcs.....................................1.74% Computer/Mathematical..............................1.91% Construction/Extraction...............................6.92% Edu/Training/Library......................................4.62% Farm/Fish/Forestry.........................................0.35% Food Prep/Serving.........................................5.32% Health Practitioner/Tech...............................4.56% Healthcare Support........................................2.55% Maintenance Repair.......................................4.42% Legal.................................................................0.63% Life/Phys/Soc Sociology................................0.46% Management...................................................7.67% Office/Admin Support................................ 12.03% Production......................................................7.14% Protective Services.........................................3.13% Sales/Related............................................... 11.37% Personal Care/Service....................................5.57% Transportation/Moving.................................8.06% Source: Claritas via Environics Analytics https://en.environicsanalytics.ca/Spotlight/ **Included Zip codes are: 93550, 93551, 93552 ^ Dept of Finance estimate of 1/1/18 DoF.CA.gov

CityofPalmdale.org

11

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Sierra Gateway Park

Demographics

PALMDALE 2019 POPULATION ESTIMATE .........181,517 (combined zip codes**) 2010 Census Population...........................164,044 2024 Projection .........................................191,672 2018 Dept of Finance estimate (in City limits)^..........................................158,905


KernCounty.com

Demographics

2019Greater GreaterAntelope AntelopeValley ValleyEconomic EconomicAlliance Alliance 2019

Kern County

Kern County Administrative Office 1115 Truxtan Ave., 5th Floor Bakersfield, CA 93301 661.868.3161

Elected Officials:

Mick Gleason – Supervisor–First District Zack Scrivner – Supervisor–Second District Mike Maggard – Supervisor–Third District & Chair David Couch – Supervisor–Fourth District Leticia Perez – Supervisor–Fifth District

Assistant County Administrative Officer:

Teresa Hitchcock 661.822.2200 x105

Community Trends: Kern County’s population continues to grow. It is projected that the total population will reach nearly 1.8 million by 2060. The State of California Employment Development Department projected Kern County’s industry employment to reach 391,800 by 2024, with educational services, health care, and social assistance contributing to the largest projected nonfarm job growth. Two other growing industries in Kern County include professional and business services, as well as leisure and hospitality.

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Business/Community Quote “We are proud to collaborate with an organization that does an exceptional job in promoting our East Kern communities like California City, Tehachapi, Ridgecrest, the entire Indian Wells Valley, Mojave, and Rosamond. The partnership between Kern County and the Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance is critical in advancing our economic development strategy in a region that is so innovative and business-friendly.” – Mick Gleason, 1st District Supervisor 12

2018 Milestones: OEA Grant: Kern County was awarded a grant from Department of Defense Office of Economic Adjustment to implement the East Kern Economic Diversification Plan. Wind Capital: According to the US Geological Survey, Kern County is not only the highest ranked County in the US for turbine density, but it is also ranked the highest in the world. Industrial Expansion: Tejon Ranch Co. announced an agreement with Majestic Realty Co. to build a 580,000 square foot Class-A industrial facility addition to the Tejon Ranch Commerce Center. Along with Tejon Ranch’s announcement, Ross Stores, Inc. will lease an additional 1,003,071 square foot industrial space at the Wonderful Industrial Park. AdvanceKern: With a new economic development policy aimed to assist, grow, and diversify the County’s economic base, Kern County is attracting businesses and jobs to the region. The Kern County Board of Supervisors has approved two incentive packages, which includes one for an Amazon fulfillment center and one for L’Oreal USA’s distribution center.


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Mojave Chamber of Commerce 661.824.2481

VisitMojave.org

Mojave Air and Spaceport 661.824.2433

Demographics

Mojave

MojaveAirport.com

Info@MojaveAirport.com

Manufacturing and Industry – over 70 companies land here The Spaceship Company builds spaceships for Virgin Galactic that will carry tourists to the dark skies of space. Scaled Composites is the aerospace pioneer at the Spaceport, continuing its history of innovation by building Stratolaunch, the world’s largest aircraft. PPG Aerospace manufactures many of the coatings and sealants 2019 POPULATION ESTIMATE** ............................................6,104 2010 Census Population................... 5,613 2024 Projection ................................. 6,417

Asian Alone.........................................1.39% Native Hawaiian / other Islander.....0.33% Some Other Race............................. 21.33% Two or More Races.............................5.68%

POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Median Age............................................33.6 Spanish Speaking............................ 30.23%

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME 93501...............................................$51.968

POPULATION BY ORIGIN Not Hispanic or Latino.................... 58.17% Hispanic............................................ 41.83% POPULATION BY ORIGIN White Alone...................................... 53.57% Black or African American............. 16.37% American Indian / Alaska Native.....1.33%

HOUSING - 2019 Estimate Median Housing (Dec. 2018 CoreLogic/RealQuest.com)....... $128,000 Housing Units..................................... 2,178 Person per Household (avg.)...............2.69 Homeowners (avg.)........................ 53.99% EDUCATION (age 25+)..............3,867 No High School Diploma............... 17.02%

used worldwide by airlines including NASA’s Space Shuttles, now retired. TriCal manufactures chemicals for the agricultural industry, and Kemira Water Solutions manufactures chemicals used in processing municipal water supplies. All companies based at Mojave Air & Spaceport, are rail-served by Union Pacific Railroad. High School Graduate.................... 30.85% Some College, no degree............... 27.39% Associate’s Degree.............................5.66% Bachelor’s Degree...............................7.34% Master’s Degree..................................2.22% Professional School Degree..............0.36% Doctoral Degree..................................0.15% WORKFORCE (16+ by Occupation)................1,673 Architect/Engineer.............................0.72% Arts/Entertain/Sports........................0.96% Building Grounds Maint................. 10.76% Business Financial Ops......................2.03% Community Soc Svcs.........................2.09% Computer/Mathematical..................5.26%

Construction/Extraction................ 11.71% Edu/Training/Library..........................1.55% Farm/Fish/Forestry.............................0.72% Food Prep/Serving.............................4.60% Health Practitioner/Tech...................1.49% Healthcare Support............................3.17% Maintenance Repair...........................6.04% Legal.....................................................0.18% Life/Phys/Soc Sociology....................0.54% Management.......................................5.62% Office/Admin Support.......................9.38% Production..........................................6.75% Protective Services.............................2.51% Sales/Related................................... 10.40% Personal Care/Service........................6.46% Transportation/Moving.....................7.05%

** Zip Code for Mojave is 93501; SOURCE: Claritas via Environics Analytics https://en.environicsanalytics.ca/Spotlight

Rosamond Representative Organizations: Rosamond Community Services District: 661.256.3411

RosamondCSD.com

Rosamond Municipal Advisory Council:

KernCounty.com/bos/boards/Rosamond_mac.aspx Rosamond Chamber of Commerce: 661.256.3248 RosamondChamber.org

2019 POPULATION ESTIMATE ** .......................................... 20,475 2010 Census Population..................18,868 2024 Projection ................................21,486 POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Median Age............................................ 33.8 Spanish Speaking.............................22.57% POPULATION BY ETHNICITY Not Hispanic or Latino.....................60.24% Hispanic.............................................39.76%

American Indian / Alaska Native..... 1.16% Asian Alone......................................... 3.93% Native Hawaiian/other Islander...........0.36% Some Other Race..............................23.56% Two or More Races............................. 7.64% AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME 93560............................................ $77,627 HOUSING - 2019 Estimate Median Housing (Dec. 2018) (CoreLogic/ RealQuest.com)......$252,000 Housing Units......................................6,919 Person per Household (avg.)............... 2.96 Owner-Occupied .............................68.13% EDUCATION (age 25+)....................12,962 No High School Diploma................13.29%

High School Graduate.....................26.90% Some College, no degree................27.51% Associate’s Degree...........................11.18% Bachelor’s Degree............................... 9.42% Master’s Degree.................................. 4.16% Professional School Degree.............. 0.96% Doctoral Degree.................................. 0.26% WORKFORCE (16+ by Occupation)................ 7,976 Architect/Engineer............................. 3.69% Arts/Entertain/Sports........................ 0.93% Building Grounds Maint.................... 5.40% Business Financial Ops...................... 3.41% Community Soc Svcs......................... 0.96% Computer/Mathematical.................. 3.21%

Construction/Extraction................... 8.56% Edu/Training/Library.......................... 4.44% Farm/Fish/Forestry............................. 0.68% Food Prep/Serving............................. 6.77% Health Practitioner/Tech................... 6.28% Healthcare Support............................ 1.35% Maintenance Repair........................... 8.44% Legal..................................................... 0.15% Life/Phys/Soc Sociology.................... 0.01% Management.....................................10.36% Office/Admin Support.....................13.65% Production.......................................... 5.12% Protective Services............................. 2.66% Sales/Related...................................... 6.06% Personal Care/Service........................ 2.01% Transportation/Moving..................... 5.87%

** Rosamond Zip Code is 93560; SOURCE: Claritas via Environics Analytics https://en.environicsanalytics.ca/Spotlight

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SoCalLeadingEdge.org

POPULATION BY SINGLE CLASSIFICATION White Alone.......................................54.68% Black or African American................ 8.67%

Rosamond, CA. is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kern County, California, USA, near the Los Angeles county line. 20 miles north of Palmdale, 13 miles south of Mojave and rests at an elevation of 2,342 feet. Rosamond is the western gateway to Edwards Air Force base. According to the Census Bureau, the CDP has a total of 52.3 square miles. Two unique assets of Rosamond are the Rosamond Skypark airport, featuring a 3,600’ paved runway and Willow Springs Raceway, host to a variety of motor racing events year-round.


Demographics

2019Greater GreaterAntelope AntelopeValley ValleyEconomic EconomicAlliance Alliance 2019

CaliforniaCity-CA.gov/CC/

California City California City 21000 Hacienda Blvd. California City, CA 93505 760.373.8661

ABOVE: California City Boulevard.

Six Unique Things About California City:

Extraordinary Quality of Life Assets:

Elected Officials

1. 350 plus days of sunshine, with low humidity.

Clean air and water.

Mayor Pro Tem: Gene Stump

2. Easy access from Hwy’s 14, 58, and 395.

“Backyard” access to boundless nature.

3. Within 100 miles of 4 million consumers.

World class birding.

Council Members:

Butte Bagging.

OHV haven.

Miles of roads for wildflower viewing.

Red Rock Canyon State Park just minutes away.

Mayor: Charles McGuire

Councilwoman - Tami Johnson Councilman - Don Parris Councilman - Dr. Nicholas Lessenevitch

City Manager: Bob Stockwell

Community Trend

4. Full service, business friendly City, open five days a week. 5. The 3rd largest city in the State, 17th largest in the U.S. with 203 square miles within the City boundaries (there is a space for everyone)! 6. Home to the semi-pro baseball team the California City Whiptails.

Embracing the Cannabis Industry - After months of community input, well-crafted cannabis ordinances were added to the City’s Municipal Code. This new, legalized, industry will bring cultivation and manufacturing, processing, transportation, security, research labs and other support businesses to the City. In turn, this new industry will be creating jobs, driving infrastructure improvements and expansion as well is generating significant tax revenue that will be recirculated throughout the City again and again.

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

The influx of business and industry moving to California City is spurring millions of dollars of new investment. New housing is being permitted, groundbreakings for several cultivation and manufacturing facilities, and a new shopping center is being built. This growth trend is expected to continue well into 2019 and beyond. Grants and business growth are contributing to robust infrastructure upgrades and expansion.

14

Business/Community Quote “We are within a two hour drive of world class museums, entertainment, shopping and beaches to the south, or the incredible High Sierras to the north. One of the gems of the state park system is just twenty minutes to the north. California City, with its clean air and water, low traffic, low cost of living and endless vistas, recreation and nature outside the backdoor, is an amazing place to live and conduct business in.” - Alexia Svejda, President California City Chamber of Commerce

ABOVE: Pigmy Blue. BELOW: Beavertail Cactus blossoms.


2019 GreaterAntelope Antelope Valley Valley Economic Alliance 2019 Greater Economic Alliance

CALIFORNIA CITY

POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Median Age..................................................... 34.33 Spanish Speaking........................................ 16.06% POPULATION BY ORIGIN Not Hispanic or Latino................................ 61.09% Hispanic..............................................................39% POPULATION BY ORIGIN White Alone.................................................. 55.50% Black or African American......................... 18.94% American Indian / Alaska Native.................0.94% Asian Alone.....................................................2.44% Native Hawaiian / other Pac. Islander........0.41% Some Other Race......................................... 15.14% Two or More Races.........................................6.63% ABOVE: Ribbon cutting of new headquarters for a local home builder/contractor, High Desert Development.

Milestones: 1. Nearly a $1M upgrade all airport taxiways. 2. $1.5mil upgrades to municipal water system. 3. 2.298MW Solar farm and power purchase agreement for the City. 4. Quarter million-dollar improvements to Blasitis Park. 5. Over $1.5 million in road and sidewalk improvements.

BELOW: Red Rock Canyon State Park in full bloom.

6. Development of the Fremont Valley Integrated Water Management Plan (FVIWMP). 7. New $2.4 million Fire Station is completed. 8. City’s Visitor’s Center open 24/7 via CaliforniaCityChamber.com/tourism. 9. Partnership with EAFB for submittal of the Defense Access Roads Grant to connect State Highway 58 interchange to California City Blvd.

Demographics

2019 POPULATION ESTIMATE**........ 15,193 2010 Census Population.............................13,778 2024 Projection ...........................................16,102 2018 Dept. of Finance estimate (in City limits)^............................................14,875

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME 93505........................................................$57,436 HOUSING - (Dec. 2018) Median Housing (CoreLogic / www.RealQuest.com) 93505..................................................... $150,000 Housing Units (2019 estimate)................... 4,787 Person per Household (avg.)...........................2.79 Homeowners (avg.).................................... 60.79% EDUCATION (age 25+)...................... 9,946 No High School Diploma........................... 13.76% High School Graduate................................ 31.34% Some College, no degree........................... 29.56% Associate’s Degree.........................................7.55% Bachelor’s Degree...........................................8.34% Master’s Degree..............................................2.47% Professional School Degree..........................0.15% Doctoral Degree..............................................0.16% WORKFORCE (16+ by Occupation)..... 4,043 Architect/Engineer.........................................2.30% Arts/Entertain/Sports....................................2.52% Building Grounds Maint................................6.36% Business Financial Ops..................................1.88% Community Soc Svcs.....................................0.00% Computer/Mathematical..............................3.93% Construction/Extraction...............................5.22% Edu/Training/Library......................................6.73% Farm/Fish/Forestry.........................................0.45% Food Prep/Serving.........................................5.86% Health Practitioner/Tech...............................2.37% Healthcare Support........................................1.53% Maintenance Repair.......................................5.66% Legal.................................................................0.27% Life/Phys/Soc Sociology................................0.37% Management................................................ 10.76% Office/Admin Support................................ 10.88% Production......................................................4.75% Protective Services.........................................5.34% Sales/Related............................................... 11.08% Personal Care/Service....................................4.35% Transportation/Moving.................................7.37% SOURCE: Claritas via Environics Analytics https://en.environicsanalytics.ca/Spotlight **California City Zip code is 93505 ^ Dept. of Finance estimate 1/1/19 DoF.CA.gov

CaliforniaCity-CA.gov/CC/

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

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Demographics

2019Greater GreaterAntelope AntelopeValley ValleyEconomic EconomicAlliance Alliance 2019

Tehachapi Tehachapi City Hall 115 S. Robinson Street Tehachapi, CA 93561 661.822.2200

Elected Officials

Mayor: Susan Wiggins Mayor Pro Tem: Phil Smith

Council Members:

City Council At-Large: Michael Davies City Council At-Large: Kenneth Hetge City Council District 4: Joan Pogon-Cord

City Manager

Greg Garrett 661.822.2200 x105

Assistant to the City Manager: Corey Costelloe 661.822.2200 x121

Community Trends: Tehachapi continues to play a supportive role for many larger surrounding communities. As the quality of life leader in Kern County, Tehachapi is home for many of those serving in nearby military operations, mining, aerospace and agricultural industries. With an influx of regional job growth, Tehachapi is supporting new residents that prefer the smalltown life. Our smart growth initiatives continue to be at the forefront of our community planning efforts. New residents means maturity in the area of health care, retail and new business. With new additions such as Walmart in 2019, there are other retailers and new businesses soon to follow and preparation for that growth is well underway.

Business/Community Quote

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

LiveUpTehachapi.com

“I already serviced a lot of the customers and I love, love, love the area,” Collins said. “We would have been here sooner but we needed to have the right location, it needed to be right for the customer….This is my baby, this is something that I have a passion for and, I’m going to make it work.” -Don Collins, Owner, DC’s RV Center 16

ABOVE: Ribbon Cutting of Adventist Health Tehachapi Hospital.

Adventist Health Tehachapi Valley: The new critical-access 25-bed hospital opened on November 7, 2018! This 70,000 sq. foot hospital was the result of two financing bonds with the Tehachapi Valley Healthcare District and a private-partnership with Adventist Health. Walmart: Construction of the long-awaited Walmart Supercenter started in July. The project has had an immediate impact on the local economy with Eleven Western Builders, bringing a labor force that is utilizing local hotels and restaurants during the workweek. The 158,000 sq. foot store is scheduled to open in summer 2019. Downtown Reinvestment: Over a decade after public improvements revitalized Downtown Tehachapi, four buildings, purchased by investors, are in the process of rehabilitation. World Wind and Solar purchased the oldest commercial building and are renovating the historic site into their new headquarters. Stray Leaves Vineyard started remodeling a longvacant, former bank building for their new wine tasting room while across the street the former St. Vincent de Paul thrift store was purchased after being vacant for six months. Plans for leasable office space and a café are in the works. The former Moose Lodge is being converted into an event hall and restaurant while the renovation and architectural overhaul of a small historic building on E Street will bring the Tehachapi Academy of Dramatic Arts to Downtown. Record Festival Attendance: Tehachapi continues to be a major tourist destination, our festivals and events attracted record crowds in 2018.

Wine Growers Close in on AVA Distinction: The growers of the Tehachapi Wine Grower’s Commission are approaching the final steps of an American Viticulture Area appellation of origin label for all wine grown in Tehachapi. The “Tehachapi Mountains” added to the bottle will join others in California such as Paso Robles, Napa Valley and Lodi with AVA distinction. Downtown Park-N-Ride Project: The $1.9 Million project, funded by a California Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) grant, revitalized a vacant strip of land at the edge of Downtown creating a 100-space parking lot and bus transit center. This allows for public parking for commuters and eases the path of travel for eastbound and westbound bus traffic for operators such as Amtrak, Greyhound and Kern Regional Transit. Urban Greening Grant: The City of Tehachapi was awarded $889,300 for a citywide tree planting and storm water capture project from the California Natural Resources Agency. The grant will fund over 400 new trees and landscaping. The project will also work to capture storm water for landscaping purposes.

ABOVE: Downtown Reinvestment and renovation.


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

2019 POPULATION ESTIMATE**........ 37,776 2019 Population estimate (City Only).....14,638 2010 Census Population.............................35,196 2024 Projection............................................39,645 2018 Dept. of Finance estimate (in City limits)^............................................12,999 POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Median Age..................................................... 38.88 Spanish Speaking........................................ 15.92%

ABOVE: Ribbon cutting for RACE Communications.

New Healthcare Options: The City of Tehachapi has attracted new and expanding health care providers. Kaiser Permanente expanded services to include walk-in lab draws while Dignity Health established their first clinic in Tehachapi. Omni Family Health has also established Tehachapi as their base of operations and expansion in East Kern. Technology Boom: Tehachapi attracted three new telecommunications and internet technology companies in 2018. Race Communications moved their operations center to Tehachapi where it serves as the home for all projects in Northern L.A., Kern, Inyo, Mono and San Bernardino Counties. Advance Network Solutions expanded their operations from Bakersfield, while Global Communications 2000 expanded their operations to bring fiber optic service to businesses in our area.

Business-Friendly Climate: The City of Tehachapi issued 156 new business licenses in 2018, marking the second straight year that over 150 new business licenses were issued. This brings the total business licenses in the City to 1,060.

Business / Industrial Parks: Bailey Court Industrial Park

Location: Tehachapi Blvd./Bailey Court Total Acreage: 25 Acres Zoned: M-1

Tehachapi Airport Industrial Park Location: 411 N. Green Street Total Acreage: 2 Acres Zoned: M-1

Enterprise Way/Industrial Parkway

Location: Enterprise Way and Industrial Parkway Total Acreage: 3 Acres Zoned: M-1

Goodrick Business Park (County)

Location: Dennison Road/Goodrick Road Total Acreage: 110 Acres Zoned: Light Industrial/Mixed

LEFT: Don Collins of DC’s RV Center built one of the most successful, independent RV service centers in Bakersfield. Collins was astounded at the reception received from Tehachapi and has quickly become a thriving service business.

POPULATION BY ORIGIN Not Hispanic or Latino................................ 74.38% Hispanic........................................................ 25.17% POPULATION BY ORIGIN White Alone.................................................. 79.43% Black or African American............................3.10% American Indian / Alaska Native.................1.46% Asian Alone.....................................................1.77% Native Hawaiian / other Pac. Islander........0.15% Some Other Race......................................... 10.57% Two or More Races.........................................3.53%

Demographics

GREATER TEHACHAPI REGION

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME......$77,822 93531........................................................$87,094 93561........................................................$67,961 HOUSING - (Dec. 2018) Median Housing (CoreLogic / www.RealQuest.com) 93531..................................................... $475,000 93561..................................................... $275,000 Housing Units (2019 estimate).................12,139 Person per Household (avg.)...........................2.67 Homeowners (avg.).................................... 73.68% EDUCATION (age 25+).................... 26,536 No High School Diploma........................... 10.21% High School Graduate................................ 29.76% Some College, no degree........................... 29.38% Associate’s Degree.........................................9.16% Bachelor’s Degree........................................ 10.43% Master’s Degree..............................................4.19% Professional School Degree..........................1.23% Doctoral Degree..............................................0.78% WORKFORCE (16+ by Occupation)... 15,673 Architect/Engineer.........................................2.05% Arts/Entertain/Sports....................................0.81% Building Grounds Maint................................5.21% Business Financial Ops..................................2.79% Community Soc Svcs.....................................2.35% Computer/Mathematical..............................1.84% Construction/Extraction...............................5.63% Edu/Training/Library......................................6.16% Farm/Fish/Forestry.........................................3.58% Food Prep/Serving.........................................6.71% Health Practitioner/Tech...............................4.82% Healthcare Support........................................2.78% Maintenance Repair.......................................5.64% Legal.................................................................0.49% Life/Phys/Soc Sociology................................1.21% Management...................................................8.00% Office/Admin Support................................ 10.55% Production......................................................4.93% Protective Services.........................................7.04% Sales/Related..................................................8.78% Personal Care/Service....................................3.73% Transportation/Moving.................................4.90%

**Zip Codes of Greater Tehachapi include: 93531, 93561 ^ Dept. of Finance estimate of 1/1/18 DoF.CA.gov

17 LiveUpTehachapi.com

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

SOURCE: Claritas via Environics Analytics https://en.environicsanalytics.ca/Spotlight


Demographics

2019Greater GreaterAntelope AntelopeValley ValleyEconomic EconomicAlliance Alliance 2019

Ridgecrest-CA.gov

Ridgecrest City of Ridgecrest 100 W. California Ave. Ridgecrest, CA 93555 760.499.5000

Elected Officials:

Mayor: Margaret ‘Peggy’ Breeden Mayor Pro Tem: Lindsey Stevens Vice Mayor: Wallace Martin Councilmember: Mike Mower Councilmember: Scott Hayman

City Manager:

Ronald Strand 760.499.5001

Administrative Analyst:

Mr. Ashlin Mattos 760.499.5061

Community Trends: Aviation is and will always be a part of Ridgecrest’s DNA! Due to the professional and economic impact of Naval Weapons Station – China Lake, as well the educational impact of both Sierra Sands Unified School District and Cerro Coso Community College, Ridgecrest continues to support the warfighter; build new multi-family apartment complexes and single family housing tracks to address housing needs; create and maintain a strong local economy; expand and recruit business projects; and improve the quality of life for those who call Ridgecrest home.

ABOVE: FA-18A Hornet flies over Indian Wells Valley.

2018 Milestones: City’s Major Employer: Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake, added a net growth of 200 new employees in 2018. Total hiring was at 640; 225 were new professionals. NAWS Workforce Plan: Involves hiring another 700 people, 525 total and 190 new professionals at China Lake (goal of 33% new college graduates). Total direct employment: at NAWS reached 9,906 people bringing in $1.2 billion in regional economic activity. Cerro Coso Community College: With its main campus in Ridgecrest, continues to inspire student success, educational opportunities and professional advancement to those living in Ridgecrest, in its vast service area, and globally through its access to online education. Housing Demand: The City is currently assisting two builders who are planning to build two (2) new multi-family apartment complexes totaling 403 new housing units. BELOW: CTE Welding class at Cerro Coso.

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Business/Community Quote Through a broad approach that addresses opportunities; services; industry; and quality of life, Ridgecrest is committed to promoting smart and responsible growth within our city that respects our rich history of aviation superiority, economic innovation, our cultural diversity, and the unique character of our community.

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Land Development: The City is not only working with builders to build multi-family apartment complexes but is also working with developers to design single family housing tracts, with two (2) new tracts currently in the development process. Hospitality Services: 5% of all business in Ridgecrest are hospitality and Food Services. As a result, the City is looking to expand hospitality services and is currently finalizing plans with two new hotel chains, Towne Home Suites by Marriott and Holiday Inn Express.

BELOW: Springtime fun at the park.


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

2019 POPULATION ESTIMATE**........ 33,811 2010 Census Population.............................32,934 2024 Projection............................................34,598 2018 Dept. of Finance estimate (in City limits)^............................................28,822 POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Median Age..................................................... 36.51 Spanish Speaking........................................ 11.14% ABOVE: Ribbon cutting at the new China Lake Museum.

POPULATION BY ORIGIN Not Hispanic or Latino................................ 79.92% Hispanic........................................................ 20.08%

ABOVE: Jets over China Lake.

Retail Attraction: The City continues to attract future retail development by presenting the significant economic/ recruitment opportunities available and assisting with large-scale development opportunities.

Business / Industrial Parks:

Dining Options: We are currently working with a handful of national fast-food casual restaurants including Chipotle, Panda Express, and Panera Bread.

Ridgecrest Industrial Park

Ridgecrest Business Park Location: China Lake and Ward Avenue Total Acreage: 63 acres Zoning: Professional/Light Industrial

POPULATION BY ORIGIN White Alone.................................................. 75.49% Black or African American............................3.84% American Indian / Alaska Native.................1.33% Asian Alone.....................................................4.10% Native Hawaiian / other Pac. Islander........0.43% Some Other Race............................................8.04% Two or More Races.........................................6.77%

Demographics

RIDGECREST

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME 93555........................................................$77,947

Location: West Ridgecrest Total Acreage: 81 acres Zoning: Light Industrial/Mixed

Inyokern:

Location: Inyokern Airport Industrial District Total Acreage: 40 acres Zoning: Light Industrial/Mixed

LEFT: Parade of a 1000 Flags China Lake Blvd.

The region is growing in every way and that growth is underpinned by the expansion of our regional employers, most notably Naval Air Weapons Station – China Lake, Ridgecrest Regional Hospital, Sierra Sands Unified School District and Cerro Coso Community College.

HOUSING - (Dec. 2018) Median Housing (CoreLogic / www.RealQuest.com) 93555..................................................... $190,000 Housing Units (2019 estimate).................13,318 Person per Household (avg.)...........................2.53 Homeowners (avg.).................................... 64.37% EDUCATION (age 25+).................... 22,004 No High School Diploma..............................7.54% High School Graduate................................ 22.58% Some College, no degree........................... 28.49% Associate’s Degree.........................................9.81% Bachelor’s Degree........................................ 20.23% Master’s Degree..............................................7.10% Professional School Degree..........................0.81% Doctoral Degree..............................................0.65% WORKFORCE (16+ by Occupation)... 13,835 Architect/Engineer.........................................8.70% Arts/Entertain/Sports....................................2.70% Building Grounds Maint................................4.29% Business Financial Ops..................................4.76% Community Soc Svcs.....................................0.78% Computer/Mathematical..............................8.04% Construction/Extraction...............................5.83% Edu/Training/Library......................................3.79% Farm/Fish/Forestry.........................................0.38% Food Prep/Serving.........................................5.15% Health Practitioner/Tech...............................4.29% Healthcare Support........................................1.50% Maintenance Repair.......................................6.14% Legal.................................................................0.22% Life/Phys/Soc Sociology................................0.93% Management................................................ 10.68% Office/Admin Support................................ 10.48% Production......................................................4.21% Protective Services.........................................1.71% Sales/Related..................................................7.06% Personal Care/Service....................................4.05% Transportation/Moving.................................4.31% SOURCE: Claritas via Environics Analytics https://en.environicsanalytics.ca/Spotlight **Zip code of Ridgecrest is 93555 ^ Dept. of Finance estimate 1/1/18 DoF.CA.gov

Monument sign at Cerro Coso.

Ridgecrest-CA.gov

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

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2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Cost of Living Index REGIONAL COST COMPARISONS ACROSS THE STATE Lancaster is 153.7% less expensive than San Francisco. Lancaster housing costs are 387.9% less than San Francisco housing costs. Health related expenses are 9.2% less in Lancaster.

Cost Of Living Index/Comparison*

Economy

Lancaster Irvine Los Angeles

Overall 120 212 195 Food 100.4 100.4 100.4 Housing 146 465 358 Utilities 116 98 94 Transportation 126 120 191 Health 85 89 85 Violent Crime 48.1 20.8 43.7 Property Crime 33.8 21.1 34.2 Miscellaneous 105 105 105

Riverside San Diego San Francisco San Jose Santa Clarita Santa Monica

147 178 100.4 103.7 212 333 106 103 167 134 84 85 38.2 34.9 45 34.4 106 106

305 110.8 712 98 177 93 66.7 56.5 121

260 165 110.8 100.4 579 293 97 106 171 131 94 85 28.5 14.5 35.4 23.4 105 105

* US National Average = 100

368 100.4 940 81 182 85 34.7 47.5 104

Source: www.bestplaces.net

1000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

Lancaster Overall

Irvine Food

Los Angeles Housing

Utilities

Riverside

San Diego

Transportation

San Francisco

Health

San Jose

Violent Crime

Santa Clarita Santa Monica

Property Crime

Miscellaneous

FOREIGN TRADE ZONE

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Federally-designated Foreign Trade Zones are U.S. Customs and Border Protection-approved locations where companies can engage in special procedures to help encourage U.S. activity by delaying or reducing duty payments on foreign merchandise.

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• Duty Deferral: May avoid paying duties on imported merchandise. • Inverted Tariffs/Duty Reduction: Users may lower duty rates on goods produced. • Weekly Entries: Customs and Border Protection allows the user to file weekly. • No Time Constraints: Merchandise may remain in the FTZ indefinitely. • Customs Compliance: Customs & Border Protection are deterrents against theft. • Close proximity to the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. • Outstanding transportation facilities including rail and highway connections. • A large, skilled and educated workforce. • Affordable land and building costs. • A one-stop, fast-track process for development.

City of Palmdale FTZ 191 CityOfPalmdale.org/Businesses/BusinessAdvantages/FTZ-Advantages Kern County FTZ 276 KEDC.com/site-selection/incentives


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Regional Economic Development Contacts GREATER ANTELOPE VALLEY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE SoCalLeadingEdge.org Kimberly Maevers, President/CEO info@SoCalLeadingEdge.org 661.722.6566 CITY OF LANCASTER

CityofLancasterca.org Chenin Dow, Economic Development Director cdow@CityOfLancasterca.org 661.723.6165

CITY OF PALMDALE

Curtis Cannon, Economic Development Manager ccannon@cityofpalmdale.org 661.267.5162

COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES 5TH DISTRICT SUPERVISOR KATHRYN BARGER

BOS.lacounty.gov Donna Termeer, Field Representative, 5th District dtermeer@bos.lacounty.org 661.726.3600

LOS ANGELES COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION LAEDC.org David Gevorkyan, District Manager, Business Assistance & Development David.gevorkyan@laedc.org 213.320.9020

Carrie Rogers, Senior Vice President, Business Assistance & Development carrie.rogers@laedc.org 213.236.4824

CaliforniaCity-CA.gov/CC Bob Stockwell, City Manager 760.373.7170 Anna Linn, Assistant to the City Manager alinn@californiacity-ca.gov 760.373.7482

Economy

CityOfPalmdale.org Mark Oyler, Director of Economic and Community Development moyler@cityofpalmdale.org 661.267.5125

CALIFORNIA CITY

CITY OF RIDGECREST

Ridgecrest-CA.gov Ashlin E. Mattos, Administrative Analyst amattos@ridgecrest-ca.gov 760.499.5061

CITY OF TEHACHAPI

LiveUpTehachapi.com Corey Costelloe, Assistant to the City Manager ccostelloe@tehachapicityhall.com 661.822.2200 ext. 121

GREATER TEHACHAPI ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL TehachapiEDC.com Lydia Chaney, President info@tehachapiedc.com

KERN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. KEDC.com Richard Chapman, President /CEO Richard@kedc.com 661.862.5150

KERN COUNTY

KernCounty.com Teresa Hitchcock, Assistant County Administrative Officer hitchcockt@kerncounty.com 661.868.3161

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

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2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Dare to Compare

Seven Important Regions of California

Overall Advantage Doing business on SoCal’s Leading Edge has distinct advantages. Stat/Area

Low Very High Greater Los Angeles Antelope Valley County

Very High San Francisco

Very High High High Average Silicon Orange San Diego Inland Valley County County Empire

Facility Costs $ 1.20 2.24 3.34 3.04 2.09 2.11 1.52 Room to Grow <12,500 >2,000 >3,200 >2,700 >700 <10,000 <38,000 Available Acreage Housing Costs $ Cost of Living Labor Costs $ Available Workers

298,750 616,200 953,788 1,375,000 725,300 592,800 59,750 114% 184% 230% 271% 191% 173% 136% 1,036 1,177 1,444 2,573 1,157 1,137 868 7.9% 4.6% 2.5% 2.8% 2.8% 3.2% 3.9%

Economy

Source: Cumulative comparisons of selected California regions, January 2019

Facility Costs Setting up shop along the Leading Edge simply costs less. Stat/Area

Greater Los Angeles Antelope Valley County

San Francisco

Silicon Valley

Orange County

San Diego County

Inland Empire

Retail $ Office $

1.41% 2.48 2.46 2.96 2.40 2.44 2.05 1.38% 3.42 5.11 5.00 2.94 2.96 1.96

Industrial $

0.81% 0.83 2.45 1.16 0.92 0.94 0.56 Source: Based on average monthly cost per square foot according to CBRE MarketStats, Q4 2018, and LoopNet survey of available properties.

Room to Grow With over 3,000 square miles of open space, you’ll find room to grow. Stat/Area

Greater Los Angeles Antelope Valley County

Available Acreage Available Parcels

San Francisco

Silicon Valley

Orange County

San Diego County

Inland Empire

<12,500 >2,000 >3,200 >2,700 >700 >10,000 <38,000 <200 >200 >150 >75 >50 >200 <1,100

Vacancy Rate

8.0% 5.1% 3.3% 2.6% 3.3% 4.4% 8.5% Source: LoopNet survey of available commercial/industrial land, Jan. 2019, and CBRE MarketStats, Q4 2018.

Housing Costs Homes are more affordable here – 50% lower than nearly all SoCal markets.

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Low

Very High Very High Very High High High Average

Greater Los San Silicon Orange San Inland Stat/Area Antelope Angeles Francisco Valley County Diego Empire Valley County County

CA US

Monthly Rent $

2,517

Med. Sales Price $ Homeownership

1,987

2,668

3,417

3,521

3,055

2,573

2,025

1,449

298,750 616,200 953,788 1,375,000 725,300 592,800 359,750 547,900 222,800 58.5% 45.9% 37.3% 56.9% 57.4% 53.0% 62.1% 54.5% 63.8% Source: U.S. Census, American Fact Finder and California Association of Realtors, 2018.

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2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

To Learn More... Call Or Visit

661.722.6566

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Cost of Living Dollars go further here. The Bay Area’s Cost of Living is 2x greater than ours. Greater Los San San Silicon Orange Inland Stat/Area Antelope Angeles Diego Francisco Valley County Valley County County Empire

Cost of Living Index

67% 48% 34%

27% 37% 42% 61% 45% 69%

49% 22% 21%

15% 20% 23% 43% 27% 53%

114%

184%

230%

271%

191%

173%

136%

168%

Economy

Housing Affordability 1st Time Buyer Housing Affordability Traditional

CA US

100%

Source: California Association of Realtors and Sperling’s Best Places COLI, 2018.

Labor Costs Thanks to lower cost of living, wages can be lower too. Greater Los San San Silicon Orange Inland Stat/Area Antelope Angeles Diego Francisco Valley County Valley County County Empire

CA US

Weekly Wages $

1,561

1,036

1,177

Annual Mean Salary $ 49,122 55,820 Management $

1,444 9,700

114,576 130,200 151,760

Business/Finance $

2,573

1,157

1,137

868

854

77,180 56,620 56,410 47,350 57,190 50,620 163,380 135,380 125,240 110,160 132,220 119,910

71,359 81,090 96,890 100,310 81,010 80,020 67,190 83,500 76,330

Computer, Science 82,359 93,590 119,370 122,900 95,160 96,710 77,540 105,380 89,810 & Math $ Health & Life 70,127 79,690 93,830 93,920 81,700 84,100 76,740 89,320 77,565 Sciences $ Manufacturing/ 31,926 36,280 44,150 43,710 36,420 39,000 36,010 38,430 38,070 Production $ Union Membership

7.0% 7.9% 8.9%

5.3% 7.9% 7.2% 12.1% 8.3% 6.5% Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018, and California Employment Development Department

Available Workers A significant Jobs/Housing imbalance creates a very eager workforce for employers. Greater Los San San Silicon Orange Inland Stat/Area Antelope Angeles Diego Francisco Valley County Empire Valley County County Total Workforce

CA US

179,100 5,201,300 2,446,500 1,694,800 1,643,800 1,623,300 2,095,000 19,517,000 162,770,000

Available 7.9% 4.6% 2.5% 2.8% 2.8% 3.2% 3.9% 4.1% 3.7% Workers 33 31 32 28 27 26 32 29 26 Source: California Association of Realtors and Sperling’s Best Places COLI, 2018.

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SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Commute Times (Min)


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Largest Regional Employers by Industry Company.....................Approx. # of Employees

AEROSPACE / AVIATION

Economy

Edwards Air Force Base*.........................11,149 Naval Weapons Air Station China Lake*.............................................. 9,906 Northop Grumman................................... 4,200 Lockheed Martin....................................... 3,700 NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center......................................... 1,370 General Atomics..........................^1,000-4,999 Scaled Composites*...........................^100-249 The Spaceship Company............................. 449 Virgin Galactic.............................................. 400 PPG Aerospace....................................^250-499 Stratolaunch................................................. 250 BAE.................................................................. 145

AUTOMOBILE RETAIL / TESTING

Lancaster Auto Mall..................................... 590 Rally Hyundai......................................^100-249 Robertson’s Palmdale Honda.............^100-249 Carmax Auto Superstore...................^100-249 American Honda Motor Co...............^100-249

GOVERNMENT / CORRECTIONS

County of Los Angeles (AV Region)........ 4,211 CA State Prison (LA County).................... 1,476 CA Correctional Institute (Tehachapi).............................................. 1,119 California City State Prison........................ 683 US FAA..................................................^500-999 City of Lancaster~*...................................... 656 City of Palmdale~*....................................... 582 City of California City.................................. 116 City of Ridgecrest~*..................................... 124 County of Kern (AV Region)....................... 100

EDUCATION / LEARNING

AV Union High School District**............ 2,500 Lancaster School District**..................... 2,200 Palmdale School District**...................... 1,792 Antelope Valley College~*....................... 1,118 Westside School District**......................... 587 Tehachapi Unified School District**........................................ 464 Mojave Unified School District **.............. 456 Southern Kern School District**................ 436

All workforce estimates as reported by the EDD/LMI, the employer, or the City. *includes contract personnel; **includes substitutes; ~includes part-time personnel; ^ all sites combined per EDD/LMI estimates.

Sierra Sands School District**................... 600 Cerro Coso Community College~*............ 271 Desert Haven Center~*......................^100-249

HEALTHCARE / HOSPITALS/ TRANSPORT

Antelope Valley Hospital Medical Ctr.~*.......................................... 2,425 Palmdale Regional Medical Center~*.................................... 1,103 Kaiser Permanente~*...................................TBD Ridgecrest Regional Hospital~*................. 800 High Desert Health Systems*.............^500-999 High Desert Medical Group........................ 358 Adventist Health Tehachapi Valley*...................................... 310 Liberty Ambulance.............................^100-249 Rose-Jenkins Memorial Clinic.............^100-249 Mental Health America~*........................... 140

MANUFACTURING / MINING / TRANSPORTATION

Rio Tinto Borates....................................... 1,200 Robertson’s Ready Mix...............^1,000-4,999 BYD................................................................. 750 Lance Camper............................................... 650 Granite Construction................................... 400 Sun Select Produce~.................................... 310 Sygma..................................................^100-249 US Pole.................................................^100-249 Kinkisharyo International, L.L.C................. 258 Incotec............................................................ 250 Deluxe Corp.........................................^250-499 AVTA / Trans Dev.~*..................................... 220 Morton Manufacturing~............................. 241 Delta Scientific....................................^100-249 Golden Queen Mining, Co........................... 170 Progress Rail................................................. 140 Lehigh Southwest Cement, Co................... 120 Cal Portland Cement.........................^100-249

RENEWABLE ENERGY / WASTE RECLAMATION

Southern California Edison........................ 244 Waste Management...........................^100-249

Mojave Sanitation..............................^100-249 Benz Propane Co., Inc........................^100-249 Tehachapi Recycling..........................^100-249 Tehachapi Sanitation........................^100-249 GE Energy....................................................... 150 World Wind & Solar~*................................. 130

RESTAURANTS / FOOD SERVICE

Bj’s Restaurant & Brewhouse~............. ^100-249 Claim Jumper Restaurant~................^100-249 Olive Garden Italian Kitchen~..............^100-249

RETAIL

Wal-Mart (5)^~......................................... 1,922 Antelope Valley Mall (All Stores)~............. 1,800 Albertson’s (All Stores)^~........................... 750 Rite-Aid Distribution Center....................... 560 Home Depot (4)^~....................................... 550 Michael’s Distribution Center.................... 550 Vallarta (4)^~............................................... 435 Stater Bros (3)^~................................^250-499 Lowe’s (3)^~................................................. 350 Target (3)^~.................................................. 345 Costco~.......................................................... 336 Sam’s Club~.................................................. 190 Smart & Final (2)~.............................^100-249 K-Mart (2)~.........................................^100-249 Vons (3)~.............................................^100-249 Best Buy~.............................................^100-249

OTHER BUSINESSES

Ginger’s Maid in America..................^240-499 Keller-Williams Realty.......................^250-499 Booz Allen Hamilton..........................^100-249 RND Enterprises..................................^100-249 Spectrum.............................................^100-249 Western Digital Corp.........................^100-249 New Directions Technologies.............^100-249 Pre-Con Industries, Inc......................^100-249 Coso Operating Co.............................^100-249 Continental Labor Resources.............^100-249 Acl Testing Laboratories....................^100-249 Lantz Security.....................................^100-249 Opsec Specialized Protection.............^100-249 Lancaster Jethawks Baseball.............^100-249

Retail Sales*

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

CITY

2014

2015

2016*

2017*

Lancaster $1,621,577,900 Palmdale $1,508,768,200 Ridgecrest $260,000,000 Tehachapi $259,842,700 California City $32,748,969

$1,648,958,000 $1,574,385,800 $260,000,000 $268,942,400 $32,342,939

$1,727,009,200 $1,606,795,600 $260,000,000 $241,090,100 $32,423,100

$1,779,679,500 $1,650,196,400 $283,000,000 $232,438,300 $34,418,222

Total $3,682,937,769 % of Increase/Decrease

$3,784,629,139 $3,859,172,200 $3,979,732,422 $4,583,680,157 2.76% 1.97% 3.12% 15.18%

City Websites

CityOfLancasterCA.org CityOfPalmdale.org Ridgecrest-CA.gov

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2018* % of change 2017/2018 $1,961,513,600 $2,021,984,530 $299,000,000 $264,874,500 $36,307,527

10.2% 22.5% 5.7% 14.0% 5.5%

*Last 4 quarters reported. LiveUpTehachapi.com CaliforniaCity-CA.gov


What makes the greater Antelope Valley “Aerospace Valley” California City

City of Ridgecrest

Situated in between Edwards Air Force Base and China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS), California City is the perfect place for aerospace junkies and the industry workforce. With Mojave Air and Spaceport just 15 minutes south of town the proximity to all things old and new in the aerospace and aviation industry meet. California City boasts its own municipal airport where enthusiasts work and play.

Surrounded by majestic mountains and nearly perfect flying weather, the City of Ridgecrest, strives to support the continued successful operations of Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake. With over 1.1 million acres of land space and 20,000 square miles of controlled airspace that provides the U.S. Navy with large, secure, fully instrumented air and ground test environments, aviation has always been a part of Ridgecrest’s DNA! In addition to the City’s support of the warfighter, Ridgecrest seeks to create and maintain a strong local economy with the goal of improving the quality of life for those who live here.

City of Lancaster Lancaster’s long history with aerospace innovation stretches back nearly 100 years to the 1930s, when the first airplane was brought to the region and the United States Air Force began conducting flight tests at Muroc Air Base. Our skies have played host to such aviation feats as Chuck Yeager’s breaking of the sound barrier as well as the testing of aircraft including the B-1b, the B-2 stealth bomber, the F117A stealth fighter, the SR71 “Blackbird,” and the U-2. Renowned pioneering aviatrix Pancho Barnes called Lancaster home, and no fewer than 100 aviators and aerospace professionals are prominently recognized in the heart of downtown Lancaster through the City’s Aerospace Walk of Honor. Today, Lancaster is home to approximately three-fourths of the personnel at Edwards Air Force Base, as well as a host of cutting-edge engineers and professionals working for the likes of Northrop Grumman, Boeing and Lockheed Martin at U.S. Air Force Plant 42. The City works closely with both public and private representatives of these two key sites to ensure that the needs of our aerospace and defense community are met. In 2018 alone, this collaboration included initiatives to welcome key personnel to Edwards Air Force Base; talent attraction efforts for Northrop Grumman; outreach efforts to help relocating employees adjust to their new home; and much more. As the first-ever two-time winner of the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation’s Most Business-Friendly City Award, Lancaster takes great pride in facilitating business success, be it a new location, expansion, or support for ongoing operations.

City of Palmdale Palmdale is home to United States Air Force Plant 42, where major aerospace contractors such as Northrop Grumman, Boeing, and Lockheed Martin with its famed Skunk Works operate. NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center, with SOFIA, U-2 and Global Hawk science platforms, is also part of Palmdale’s aerospace community. The latest additions to the long line of projects coming out of Palmdale are Northrop’s B-21 Raider ($100 Billion contract), Lockheed’s LMH-1 hybrid airship and Lockheed’s low boom ultrasonic aircraft ($247.5 million contract) for NASA. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) center is operating the Los Angeles Air Route Traffic Control Center here in Palmdale, controlling air traffic over most of the southwestern United States. They handled 2,255,026 aircraft operations in 2017 from their Palmdale facility

City of Tehachapi The City of Tehachapi and the Greater Tehachapi Area plays a critical support role for the neighboring aerospace and aviation industries in the Greater Antelope Valley. A reprieve from the desert landscape of many of our neighbors, Tehachapi’s mountain scenery and small-community-living proves to be a viable option for the area work force. As a home to aerospace professionals and aviation enthusiasts, Tehachapi’s support of the industry is based around small businesses and training programs based out two local airports. At the Tehachapi Municipal Airport, businesses like Sierra Technical Services, one of the largest employers within the City limits, have been awarded contracts by the Department of Defense for military target and composite drone projects. Tehachapi Municipal Airport is also home to pilots and aviation enthusiasts, some of which work in the aerospace industry but choose to house their personal aircraft in Tehachapi. With room to grow with additional hangar space, the City of Tehachapi continues to work on projects and airport layouts that will lead to potential expansion as the need arises. Mountain Valley Airport, located just south of the City, is home to a sailplane industry that supports the flight training of military personnel in the Antelope Valley. The thermals ridges and waves over the Tehachapi Mountains make it an ideal place for soaring. Skylark North, is a full-service glider flight school, located on Mountain Valley Airport. The school has on-going flight training contracts with the US Air Force test Pilot School, the National Test Pilot School and the US Army Quality Test Directorate. Skylark North also works closely with NASA on various aviation projects.


Marine Corps Air Station by Cathy Hansen Mojave Airport was built in 1935 by Kern County as part of the county’s airport system to support the gold and silver mining industry south of town. What is known today as Mojave Air and Spaceport began as a small dirt landing strip and has grown into a major aerospace flight test facility and has played many important parts in America’s aviation history! Gen. William J. Fox chose the Mojave airstrip as one of five auxiliary air stations for the United States Marine Corps in May 1942. The site included a little over 1,546 acres. The Marines increased the number of runways, added taxiways, constructed large wooden hangars and the tower. In the spring of 1944, the runways were upgraded, widened from 50-feet to 150-feet and the east-west runway was extended from 5,000-feet to 5,900feet. Two of the original hangars and the tower building still stand today. The Mojave Elementary School was used by the Marines as administrative offices until permanent office space was built. Mojave Marine Corps Air Station was formally commissioned on January 1, 1943 and the first squadron to arrive was VMSB-236, (Marine Scout Bombing Squadron) flying the Douglas SBD Dauntless, Dive Bomber. VMSB-236 moved to Hawaii in April 1943 and joined the war landing at Guadalcanal in Sept. 1943. They were the first squadron to take part in bombing strikes against Bougainville. As a training base, the clear skies and desert visibility at Mojave MCAS made possible more training flights and far exceeded flight accomplished at El Toro or Santa Barbara, despite the persistent wind conditions! Other aircraft to fly at Mojave MCAS was the Chance-Vought F4U Corsair fighter, the Grumman TBM, torpedo bomber, various light trainers and the Douglas R4D (Navy and Marine designation of the DC-3). Every Marine Ace of World War II trained at MCAS Mojave, including Gregory ‘Pappy’ Boyington. A total of one thousand fifty-six enlisted man and one hundred fifteen officers reported for training at Mojave MCAS in the fall of 1944. Women Marines operated the control tower.

On February 7, 1946, Mojave MCAS was disestablished and in its place a U.S. Naval Air Station was established on the same day. Some of the first pilotless aircraft, called UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) today, were flown by the U.S. Navy at Mojave. Guided missiles were also test flown here from 1946 until 1951. The Marines returned to Mojave in 1951 to provide aviation facilities supporting regular operations of Fleet Marine Force aircraft performing rocket, gunnery, bombing and field carrier-landing practice. They stayed until 1959 and then transferred to Yuma, AZ.


The initial XP-59A Airacomet design team.

X-216.

THE FIRST QUARTER CENTURY… 1929 X216H Flying Wing - The first predecessor to the B-2/B-21 “Flying Wing” was the X216H flying wing prototype, designed by Jack Northrop (then Chief Engineer for Lockheed) which arrived at Muroc (now Edwards AFB) in early September 1929. On September 26, 1929, Lockheed Test Pilot Eddie Belland flew the first flight of the X216H at Rogers Dry Lake bed, Muroc. 1929-1930 Lockheed Vega - Lockheed Test Pilots were conducting flight tests off Rogers Dry Lake bed as early as 1929 in the Lockheed Vega. The lakebed was used for flight testing by several other aerospace companies besides the military in those early years. 1947-1951 Rocket Sleds - Rocket sled pioneer Colonel John Paul Stapp M.D., Ph.D. USAF (Retired) conducted his early acceleration/deceleration tests in Northrop rocket sleds on the North Base Sled Track at Edwards. His ground-breaking research led to seat belts being required on all aircraft and automobiles, saving millions of lives. Also leading the way to prove that humans could survive the acceleration speeds required for space travel. From December 1947 to August 1948, he made sixteen rocket sled runs there, enduring up to 35 Gs and suffering a host of painful injuries that he felt were a small price to pay for the invaluable data he was gathering. After making more sled runs, Dr. Stapp, now an Air Force Major, was sent to Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico in 1953, to direct further deceleration projects. Edwards Air Force Base - Until the Southern Pacific Railroad arrived in 1876, the desert was populated mostly by occasional prospectors seeking elusive mineral wealth.

B2 SPIRIT.

Sky Rocket.

In 1882, the Santa Fe Railroad ran a line westward out of Barstow toward Mojave and built a water stop at the edge of an immense dry lake bed, roughly 20 miles southeast of Mojave. The lonely water stop was known simply as “Rod,” and the lakebed was then called Rodriguez Dry Lake. By the early 1900s, “Rodriguez” had been Anglicized into “Rodgers,” which was then shortened to “Rogers.” Featuring an extremely flat, smooth and concrete-like surface, Rogers Dry Lakebed is a playa — or pluvial lake — that spreads out over about 44 square miles, making it the largest such geological formation in the world. Its parched clay and silt surface undergoes a timeless cycle of renewal each year as water from winter rains is swept back and forth by desert winds, smoothing it out to an almost glass-like flatness. Homesteaders - In 1910, the Corum family settled at the edge of this lake bed. In addition to raising alfalfa and turkeys, they located other homesteaders to the area. As the other settlers moved in, the Corum brothers earned contracts for drilling water wells and clearing land. They also opened a general store and post office. Their request to have the post office stop named “Corum” was disallowed because there was already a Coram, California. So, they simply reversed the spelling of their name and named it “Muroc.” Small, isolated homesteads dotted the land for the next 20 years. In December 1949, Muroc was renamed Edwards Air Force Base in honor of Capt. Glen W. Edwards, who was killed a year earlier in the crash of the YB-49 Flying Wing. Airman Arrive - A visionary Airman commanding March Field, Lt. Col. Henry “Hap” Arnold, saw Rogers Dry Lakebed as a one-of-a-kind

Enlisted Men’s Bowling Alley (1944).

Muroc Air Base circa late 1930’s.


“natural aerodrome” — one that could be acquired at virtually no cost to the taxpayer. In September 1933, he established Muroc Bombing and Gunnery Range. This remote training site served the Army Air Corps’ bombers and fighters for several years. During World War II, a permanent base sprang up for the training of combat flight crews. In July 1942, it was activated as a F-104, F-15A and YF-17 in formation (1976). B1 Lancer separate post and designated Muroc Army Air Base. Throughout the war years, B-24s aeronautical concepts — to probe the most challenging thundered through the Muroc skies, and P-38s strafed the unknowns of flight and solve its mysteries. On Oct. 14, 1947, targets on the range as bomber crews and fighter pilots Capt. Charles E. “Chuck” Yeager flew the small, bullet-shaped prepared for combat deployments overseas. airplane to become the first human to exceed the speed of In the meantime, wartime development of military aviation overwhelmed Wright Field in Ohio with flight test activity. It was necessary to find a remote location with good flying weather where a new top-secret airplane could safely undergo tests. In the spring of 1942, a site was chosen alongside the north shore of Rogers Dry Lakebed, about 6 miles away from the training base at Muroc. A wooden hangar and rudimentary facilities were built and on Oct. 1, 1942, Bell test pilot Bob Stanley lifted the wheels of the jet-powered Bell XP 59A Airacomet off the enormous, flat surface of the dry lakebed. The turbojet revolution had arrived. Golden Age of Flight Test - The decades of the 1940s and 1950s were a remarkable period in the history of aviation, and there was no better evidence of this than what transpired at Edwards Air Force Base. If a new concept seemed feasible, the Air Force evaluated it in the skies above the sprawling 308,000-acre base. The experimental rocket planes, for example, continued to expand the boundaries of the high-speed and stratospheric frontiers. The success of these programs attracted a new type of research activity to the base in late 1946. The rocket-powered Bell X-1 was the first in a long series of experimental airplanes designed to prove or disprove

X-15A with Test Pilot Pete Knight (1965).

sound in level flight.

By that time, the base had already become the center of Air Force flight research, and on June 25, 1951, this fact was officially recognized when its test community was designated the U.S. Air Force Flight Test Center, or AFFTC. That same year, the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School moved to Edwards from Wright Field, Ohio. On Nov. 20, 1951, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics’ Scott Crossfield became the first man to reach Mach 2 as he piloted the Skyrocket to a speed of Mach 2.005 (1,291 mph). Meanwhile, the turbojet revolution had reached a high plateau at Edwards AFB, as aircraft such as the famed “Century Series” of fighters — the F-100 Super Sabre, F-102 Delta Dagger, Mach 2 F-104 Starfighter, F-105 Thunderchief, F-106 Delta Dart and F-107A — made supersonic flight seem almost commonplace, defining the basic speed and altitude envelopes for fighters still in effect to this day. Space Race - The 1960s ushered in a new emphasis on space flight. The Test Pilot School, for example, was redesignated the Aerospace Research Pilot School as it began to train future astronauts.

F16 at Edwards Air Force Base.


ultimately reached a top speed of Mach 6.72 (4,520 mph). While space-related activities captured the public’s imagination, test pilots at Edwards were also continuing to expand the frontiers of atmospheric flight in airbreathing, jet-powered aircraft such as the XB-70 Valkyrie and SR-71 Blackbird. F-15A in Flight over Mojave (1978).

High above the flightline, the X-15 was beginning to explore hypersonic and exoatmospheric flight. In July 1962, the X-15 became the first airplane to fly in near space as it soared above 314,000 feet, winning astronaut wings for its pilot, Maj. Robert M. White. With Maj. William J. “Pete” Knight at the controls on Oct. 3, 1967, the highly modified X-15A-2

The late billionaire Paul G. Allen founded Stratolaunch to get game-changing ideas off the ground by making space launch more reliable, affordable and accessible than ever before. From uncovering better climate data to protecting endangered species to solving humanitarian challenges, the potential benefits of data collected from satellites are world-altering. It’s these possibilities that drove us to develop the world’s largest plane, which acts as a launch pad in the sky, bypassing many of the hazards that cause ground-launch delays here on Earth. From our base of operations at Mojave Air & Space Port, we’re creating a world where booking a satellite launch is as routine and convenient as booking a plane ticket. So, more people — across more industries — can see their big ideas take flight. Stratolaunch.com

First landing at EAFB April 14, 1981

With the decline of the military manned space mission in the early ‘70s, the Aerospace Research Pilot School was once again redesignated the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School. This change was more than symbolic. The school replaced its space-oriented phase of curriculum with a whole new battery of courses focusing on systems and test management.

Stratolaunch on the flight line (2018).

Modern Sophistication and Space Shuttles - New aircraft types arrived in the 1970s including the F-15 Eagle with its advanced engine and fire-control system; the single-engine F-16 Fighting Falcon with its revolutionary “fly-by-wire” flight control system; and the B-1 Lancer with its multitude of highly sophisticated offensive and defensive systems. These planes demonstrated the importance of systems testing and integration. At a remote location in 1978 and 1979, an AFFTC test pilot and a pair of flight test engineers were engaged in proofof-concept testing with Lockheed’s “low-observable” technology demonstrator, dubbed “Have Blue.” The successful conduct of these tests led immediately to the development of a new subsonic attack aircraft designated the F-117A Nighthawk. The 1980s opened with one of the most dramatic episodes in all of Edwards’ history. At 10:20 a.m. April 14, 1981, the wheels of the Space Shuttle Columbia touched down on Rogers Dry Lakebed. Astronauts John Young and Robert Crippen had successfully landed the first orbiting space vehicle ever to leave the Earth under rocket power and return on the wings of an aircraft.

Ryan X-13 Vertijet

XB-70 Valkrie


X-35 JSF Lockheed Martin.

NASA rocket sled.

The late 1980s also witnessed the arrival of the first giant flying wing to soar over the base in nearly 40 years. The thin silhouette, compound curves and other low-observable characteristics of the B-2 Spirit bomber represented thirdgeneration stealth technology, following the SR-71 and F-117. 21st Century Progress Continues - The new bomber was soon followed in the early ‘90s by the arrival of the YF-22A and the YF-23A, prototype fighters for the F-22 Raptor, the first aircraft to blend stealth with agility, high speed and supersonic cruise capability. A new group of research projects came to Edwards in the 1990s. Global Hawk, an unmanned aerial vehicle that has been used extensively in Afghanistan and Iraq, made its first flight at Edwards in February 1998 and has gone on to fill a critical role in America’s war on terrorism. Followed by Predator and Reaper counterparts tested at Edwards, these systems proved effective in combat against terrorist groups.

flight test activities at Edwards. Revolutionary changes in technology have imposed seemingly insurmountable obstacles. Each barrier, however, has been overcome through a combination of technical aptitude, ingenuity and leadership. The Air Force Test Center’s unique blend of natural, technical and human resources has transformed it into an irreplaceable national asset.

Air Force Test Museum - Edwards AFB is the center of excellence for research and developmental flight test and evaluation of aerospace systems from concept to combat. It operates the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School and hosts the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) - Rocket Lab, NASA’s Armstrong Research Center and considerable test activities conducted by America’s commercial aerospace industry.

The new millennium brought new projects with worldwide impact. The X-35A and X-32A, competing prototypes for the Joint Strike Fighter Program, made their first flights in September and October 2000. The resulting F-35 Lightning II was built in three versions for the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps, as well as multiple foreign military partners, and is currently the largest test program at Edwards.

The inventory of the Air Force Flight Test Museum includes over 80 historic aircraft. Exhibits cover such diverse subjects as the formation of the ancient lakebeds, early homesteading, the first military use of Edwards, breaking the sound barrier and flight test from WWII to today. Museum visitors can learn how Science, Technology, Engineering and Math are important to the past, present, and future of flight test.

In 2012, the Air Force Flight Test Center became the Air Force Test Center, part of a new organization across Air Force Material Command. The new name reflected AFTC’s expanded mission, which now included test activities at Eglin AFB and Arnold Engineering Development Complex as well as

With the ground breaking of the new museum in Dec 2018 and construction soon to start, the public will finally get the opportunity to view these one of a kind aircraft.

Allies in the Sky

AFFTCmuseum.org/edwards-afb-flight-test-history

Endeavor atop aircraft carrier in Mojave.

USAF Test Pilot School.


REGIONAL AIRPORTS and AVIATION ASSETS CALIFORNIA CITY MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

PALMDALE REGIONAL AIRPORT

California City Municipal Airport (L 71), 6,045’ x75’ main runway offers opportunity to aviation enthusiasts and businesses within 100 miles with ease of access via air, three major highways, a stand-alone air quality district and a 40-acre industrial park. Located within the Edwards 2508 Military Operating Area makes it a prime location for Flight Test Development. CaliforniaCityAirport.com

Located just 60 miles from downtown Los Angeles, the airport will play a central role in Palmdale’s future transportation plans. Positioning itself to be an intermodal center unlike any other in the world, plans are underway to bring the airport, rail systems and bus / commuter service converging and connecting in Palmdale.

FOX AIRFIELD Located in the City of Lancaster, General William J. Fox Airfield facilitates • 58,000 general aviation takeoffs and landings each year. • Publicly available to general aviation aircraft 24/7. • Over 200 based aircraft, a restaurant, and several aviation related businesses. • Home to the U.S. Department of Forestry’s local air tanker base as well as an aviation museum. • Host to the LA County Air Show LAcountyAirshow.com The airport has an operating Air Traffic Control Tower, a single 7,201’ by 150’ runway equipped with runway end identifier lights (REILs), pilot controlled medium-intensity runway lighting (MIRLs) and a precision approach path indicator (PAPIs), full- and self-service fueling services (JetA and 100LL), and an Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) reporting weather conditions 24-hours a day. DPW.LAcounty.gov/avi/airports/GeneralWMJFox.aspx

INYOKERN AIRPORT Inyokern Airport is a public use airport serving the northeastern communities of Kern County, CA. The airport covers 1,640 acres at an elevation of 2,457 feet, with three asphalt paved runways that can accommodate almost any class of civilian, commercial or military aircraft. • The largest contiguous block of unrestricted airspace in the nation (22,000 miles or 12% of California’s total airspace). • 350 clear flying days a year. • Desert, mountain and maritime environments. • One million acres of California desert. Inyokern Airport provides a playground to intrepid aviators, film crews, military and high-tech testing operations, and supporting some of the greatest milestones in manned and unmanned flight. InyoKernAirport.com

MOJAVE AIR & SPACE PORT - The World’s Premiere Flight Test Facility The 3,300 acre Mojave Air and Space Port has amassed more first flights and significant newsworthy flight activity than any other airport in the world over the past ten years. • Home to over 70 companies. • 3,300 feet of runway and integrated a new commercial development taxiway system. • Rail infrastructure and switch engine moving approx. 34 daily rail car shipments through a license agreement with Union Pacific Railroad. • Home to the National Test Pilot School, where more test pilots are educated than any other site in the world. MojaveAirport.com

ROSAMOND SKYPARK AIRPORT A privately-owned and operated residential skypark. Our FAA designator is L00 (Lima-Zero-Zero), is open for public use, and features a paved 3,600-foot (1,100 m) runway. Skypark.org

SKYLARK NORTH - MOUNTAIN VALLEY AIRPORT Skylark North is a full-service glider flight school, located on Mountain Valley Airport in the beautiful Tehachapi Valley. SN – MVA also has on-going flight training contracts with the US Air Force Test Pilot School, the National Test Pilot School, and the US Army Quality Test Directorate as well as NASA. • Sailplane rides, instruction, and rentals. • Pilot services, including rides, rentals, instruction, and tows. • Designated by the FAA to administer FAA flight test. • Maintenance facilities located on the field include Skylark North Maintenance for annual inspections, sheet metal, and fabric work, and Soarcraft for fiberglass repairs. • The Raven’s Nest Sandwich Shop features a warm, cozy atmosphere with an excellent view of the runway and flight-line activities. • RV parking (with water and electrical hookups, a large restroom, showers, and laundry facility), is available at Mountain Valley RV Park, RV Park information call 661.822.1213. SkylarkNorth.com/index.html

TEHACHAPI MUNICIPAL AIRPORT At an elevation of 4,001 feet, Tehachapi’s Municipal Airport is known as the corridor to northern and southern California. Located at the southern end of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, Tehachapi is an ideal spot to stop for some of the most affordable fuel in California, and as a place to relocate your business. Next door to the renowned Mojave Air and Space Port, we’re aviation friendly with over 100 acres of developable land in a prime location for light industrial manufacturing. LiveUpTehachapi.com/26/Airport


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Industry

Aerospace In The Antelope Valley 412th Test Wing And Air Force Plant 42

MOJAVE AIR & SPACE PORT

The 412th Test Wing is the host wing for Edwards Air Force Base and Air Force Plant 42. Edwards AFB is 308,000-acres, or 481-square miles in the Mojave Desert in Kern, Los Angeles, and San Bernardino counties. Plant 42 consists of 4,500 acres, or seven square miles in Palmdale, Calif. where over 7,500 highly-skilled contract mission partners (including Boeing, Lockheed Martin, and Northrop Grumman) deliver combat capability to the Department of Defense.

Aerospace in Mojave has seen dramatic growth due to increased demand within both the private and government sectors. The trajectory will continue upward, and Mojave Air & Space Port is poised to accommodate this growth. Our workforce boasts over 2,500 full and part-time employees at over 70 companies across the airport. •

Experienced a 15% increase in aviation operations and, supported developmental milestones in support of the commercial space companies that call us home. The increased operations served as a catalyst for an approximately $500,000 modernization effort focusing on safety, security, and communications;

The Wing also oversees the base’s day-to-day operations and provides support for more than 9,200 military, federal civilian, and contract personnel, in addition to almost 2,000 military family members who live on the base. Edwards • We added another Oshkosh T-3000 Aircraft Rescue and AFB is also home to the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School. Fire Fighting vehicle to our fleet, initiated a Wildlife Major tenants include Air Force Test Center (AFTC), NASA Hazard Assessment evaluation to include a followArmstrong Flight Research on Wildlife Hazard Center and Air Force Management Plan; Research Laboratory’s QUICK FACTS: Edwards Air Force Base • Began the first part of a Aerospace Systems two-phase air traffic 2017 Impact Analysis Report Directorate. control tower TOTAL Personnel (including dependents) ................ 11,149 Edwards.af.mil modernization effort including a new Military...............................................................................2,246 BOEING COMPANY communications Civilian...............................................................................6,983 In the Antelope Valley, system; on-going flight test Military Family Members.................................................1,920 • Received a $1.4 millionprograms for the US Air Total Payroll........................................................$694,969,345 dollar FAA grant to Force include the C-17 extend Taxiway Bravo. Local Contracts..................................................$566,016,777 Globemaster III airlifter, Mojave will continue to see B-1 Lancer and B-52 Estimated total value of jobs created............$560,571,220 increased operations in Stratofortress bombers, TOTAL Economic Impact FY2017*.............. $1,821,557,342 the areas of rocket engine and F-22 Raptor fighter on testing, UAS testing and Edwards AFB. At Air Force continued development Plant 42, we conduct the in commercial space launch platforms. flight test program for the F-15SA. We continue to support flight testing of the F/A-18 Hornet and Super Hornet models MojaveAirport.com and EA-18G Growler as well as other Navy airframes and NASA ARMSTRONG FLIGHT RESEARCH weapons systems at NAWS China Lake. Boeing.com

CENTER

Lockheed Martin

NASA Armstrong is the agency’s lead center for atmospheric flight research, operations, and testing and continues to accelerate advances in science, technology and exploration to enhance knowledge, education, innovation, economic vitality and stewardship of Earth.

The Antelope Valley location is home to the iconic Skunk Works® known for solutions that push the state of the art in support of the nation’s most pressing needs. Working advanced development projects, the Skunk Works team is focused on innovative design, development, rapid prototyping, advanced manufacture, integration and sustainment of both manned and unmanned aircraft systems. LockheedMartin.com

NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base supported the agency by advancing flight, Earth and space research. As the agency works to integrate NASA technology into commercial airspace, Armstrong is leading the development of various technologies.

SoCalLeadingEdge.org SoCalLeadingEdge.org

NASA.gov/centers/armstrong

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2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

QUICK FACTS: NAWS 2017 IMPACT ANALYSIS REPORT* TOTAL ECONOMIC IMPACT...................................... $1.2 Billion Total Direct Employment at NAWS......................................................... 5,057 Military 613...................................................................................... $39 Million Civilian 4,444.................................................................................$464 Million Total Payroll........................................................ $503 Million Total Industry Output, Spending in Region of Influence....... $679 Million From Payroll...................................................................................$173 Million From Operations...........................................................................$475 Million From Visitor Spending.................................................................... $31 Million Operations & Maintenance Contracts.......................................$352 Million Purchase Card Expenditures............................................................ $6 Million *NAWS China Lake Economic Impact Assessment, Sept. 2018 (data FY 2017)

NAVAL AIR WEAPONS STATION CHINA LAKE (NAWS)

Infrastructure, Land and Air 2,132 buildings and facilities; 329 miles of paved roads; 1,801 miles of unpaved roads; Replacement value for the infrastructure is roughly $3 billion; China Lake represents 85 percent of the Navy’s land for RDT&E use and 38 percent of the Navy’s land holdings worldwide with more than 1.1 million acres. The 19,600 square miles of restricted and controlled airspace at China Lake makes up 12 percent of California’s total airspace and provides an unprecedented venue for integrated testing and training NavAir.Navy.mil/nawcwd

The largest private aerospace employer in the Antelope Valley, the Northrop Grumman Aircraft Integration Center of Excellence celebrated its fifth anniversary. The site provides assembly, integration, testing and long-term maintenance capabilities for some of the world’s most advanced aircraft systems including the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, B 2 Spirit bomber, and the RQ-4 Global Hawk and MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft.

Milestones: • Acquired the Orbital ATK Inc., a global leader in aerospace and defense technologies. Orbital ATK is now Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems, a new, fourth business sector. • Delivered Battlefield Airborne Communications Node (BACN) to the U.S. Air Force fleet. NGC delivered a Global Hawk autonomous aircraft carrying the BACN -- a high-altitude, airborne gateway that translates and distributes voice communications, and other battlespace information.

• Celebrated 20th Anniversary of Global Hawk’s First Flight. The Global Hawk System remains on duty around the world and is one of the premier providers of persistent intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance information supporting the United States and its allies. • The Australian Department of Defense announced its plan to purchase the NGC-built Triton aircraft system. Built for maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, Triton is the first NGC built aircraft system Australia has purchased. The system will be operated by the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF).

Industry

Located 150 miles north of Los Angeles, NAWS China Lake’s remoteness, near perfect flying weather and practically unlimited visibility proved an ideal location, not only for testing and evaluation activities, but also for a complete research and development establishment.

NORTHROP GRUMMAN

• Northrop Grumman Begins FullRate Production of F-35 Lightning II Center Fuselage. This milestone marks the beginning of a 1.5-day production interval (PI) meaning a center fuselage will be produced every day and a half.

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SoCalLeadingEdge.org

“This pace of military aircraft production has not been seen in decades,” said Kevin Mickey, sector vice president and general manager, military aircraft systems, Northrop Grumman. “Our revolutionary approach on the integrated assembly line pairs advanced technology with data-driven analytics to manufacture advanced aircraft while delivering top quality products on time, and often ahead of schedule.”


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

California SmartMatch:

Helping Aerospace OEMs Find L.A.-based Suppliers LAEDC’s SoCal Aerospace Council has launched a new supplier matchmaking service to connect aerospace OEMs with small businesses. By prescreening small businesses for one-on-one meetings with OEMs, SmartMatch is helping OEMs with their goals of acquiring technology partners and meeting supplier diversity mandates. The process is shaped by OEMs that engage with LAEDC, specific to their requirements, and then LAEDC performs a “call-out” email blast followed by pre-screenings to down-select to a short list of matchmaking interviews. This helps OEMs add minority-owned, veteran-owned, disadvantaged businesses and other small business categories to their supplier network. This assists with OEM’s with DoD compliance for supplier small business targets, and assists OEMs not involved with DOD contracts to achieve their small business goals.

Event featuring Northrop Grumman, where 12 preselected small businesses met to discuss contracting opportunities.

In some cases, these OEMs are requesting the entire list of businesses that responded to the call-out, so even those who weren’t down-selected will still be visible to the OEMs, which may lead to opportunities down the road as OEM requirements evolve. SmartMatch is driven by the needs of local OEMs who seek better costs, quality, and timeliness from their suppliers. As LAEDC works to grow our local key industries, we realize that many local small businesses hope to bid on future aircraft or new space technologies, and SmartMatch helps businesses enter the discussion as proposals for those platforms are being developed. SmartMatch helps the OEM, increases local procurement, strengthens our local industry cluster and creates more well-paid jobs in LA County and the greater region.

Industry

To participate and receive the call-out emails for SmartMatch events, please join the SoCal Aerospace Council via LAEDC.org/our-services/socal-aerospacecouncil

FUN FACT!

SoCalLeadingEdge.org SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Thus far, SmartMatch has provided the following matchmaking sessions:

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Ten preselected small businesses met with Boeing small business liaison officers.

Seven preselected small businesses met with Jet Propulsion Lab’s small business partnerships.

Event featuring Aerospace Corporation, where seven preselected small businesses met to discuss R&D opportunities.

According to the San Fernando Valley Business Journal’s 2019 Book of Lists the Antelope Valley is home to three of the ten largest manufacturers in north Los Angeles County, including the two largest. Those three firms – Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, and BYD – employ 56% of total employees at the top 10 manufacturers.


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Agriculture Los Angeles County 2017 Top 5 Crop Commodities* Crop Value Woody Ornamentals................ $57,000,000 Root Vegetables....................... $16,000,000 Bedding Plants......................... $15,300,000 Alfalfa Hay................................. $10,500,000 Dairy & Livestock...................... $10,000,000 Total: $108,800,000 Total Value of Agricultural Production: $135,795,470

Kern County 2017 Top 5 Crop Commodities* Crop................................................... Value Grapes.............................$1,747,529,000 Almonds.........................$1,261,738,000 Citrus.................................. $942,926,000 Milk..................................... $618,845,000 Cattle.................................. $318,019,000 Total:.................... $4,889,057,000 Total Value of Agricultural Production: $7,254,168,000

* 2017 data is most recent avaialable at press time. L.A. County Agricultural Commission LACFB.org/crop-reports-2 Kern County Agricultural Commissioner KernAG.com.

Tehachapi’s Unique Climate Tehachapi is unique in that it is warmer than expected for its altitude. At about 4,500 feet, with Bakersfield on the west and Mojave in the east, Tehachapi has the perfect growing climate. Being higher and warmer, the region is reminiscent of the wine growing regions of Chile and Argentina. Warm days and cooler evenings add to the longer growing season. The area has spring and fall frosts but not the extreme cold that causes winter kill. Increased UV radiation has been proven to produce a thicker skin on the grapes. Because of all this, the tradition of growing wine grapes only on south-facing slopes does not apply here. The ancient soils of the valley also make Tehachapi a unique growing region.

Tehachapi Area Wine Growers Association

Tehachapi Wine and Cattle Company at Souza Vineyard They bottled their Zinfandel under the name Tehachapi Wine and Cattle Company and since then Souza Primitivo has accumulated 10 medals. Their 2011 Primitivo took a silver and their 2010 a bronze award. In 2018 12 great red and white wines are being bottled under the TWCC label. TehachapiWineAndCattleCompany.com

Triassic Vineyard In the last four years the wines of Triassic have earned 14 awards at the San Francisco Chronicle International Wine Competitions alone and even more from other competitions. In 2018 Triassic bottled 500 cases of their 2015 wines which includes their estate grown Zinfandel and Syrah, Triassic Rocks (a blend of Zinfandel and Syrah), Cabernet Sauvignon from Stray Leaves grapes and Tempranillo (from Paso Robles). TriassicVineyards.com

Stray Leaves Stray Leaves Vineyard produces award winning Riesling, Syrah, Cabernet, Zinfandel and Primitivo. At the 2018 San Francisco Chronicle International Wine Competition Stray Leaves received a Double Gold for 2015 SL Dry Riesling, Gold for 2015 Stray Primitivo, Silver for SL 2015 Cabernet (Kate’s Reserve) and Bronze for 2015 Syrah and 2015 Riesling (semi-sweet). The new tasting room is set to open in 2019!

Dorner Family Vineyard

Rancho de los Viajeros Vineyards Tehachapi’s newest vineyard is Rancho de los Viajeros. The ranch’s first crush was in 2014 and that wine brought home a bronze medal. LosViaJerosVineyard.com

With the governor’s signature on my bill, Senate Bill 1409 (SB 1409), California law will now be updated to allow our state’s farmers to grow and produce nonintoxicating hemp for commercial and industrial uses. California is the largest commercial consumer of industrial hemp. Opening our fields and manufacturing interests to industrial hemp means more money stays here. Economically speaking, with this change we could enjoy a sizable expansion of California’s agricultural and manufacturing influence. It also represents an important step in our continued efforts to protect and conserve our most precious resource – water. Industrial hemp represents the kind of forward thinking that California has prided itself on for decades. Senator Scott Wilk represents CA’s 21st Senate District 35

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Tehachapi’s first and only “winery” is Dorner Family Vineyard. They are currently the only Tehachapi vineyard licensed to make wine on their property. Now, in addition to the Riesling and Zinfandel, the Dorners purchase grapes from other vineyards so that they can have a larger variety at their tasting room. DornerFamilyVineyard.com

Industrial hemp production means opportunity for the AV. Industrial hemp is grown and processed throughout the world for thousands of consumer and food products. It is not cannabis. It cannot get you high, but it can be used to manufacture a variety of products – batteries, clothing, rope, concrete, biomass energy that replaces fossil fuel use, and pulp that replaces wood products, just to name a few. It is also a natural fit for California’s arid climate. In the Antelope Valley, for example, where alfalfa currently is the top agricultural crop, farmers could save five acre-feet of water per acre by switching from alfalfa to hemp.

Industry

In 2017 the local growers formed the Tehachapi Area Wine Growers Association. One of their goals is to have the Tehachapi area designated an American Viticultural Area (AVA). In 2018 the Tehachapi Area Wine Growers Association, with the assistance of Julie Bell, submitted an AVA application. The proposed AVA will be called the Tehachapi AVA and includes approximately 48,000 acres. The creation of an AVA is an amendment to a code of Federal regulations and must be voted on, with a process that could take 2-4 years.

Senator Scott Wilk:


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Creative Economy / Film

Antelope Valley Film Office (AVFO):

Kern Film Office

The AVFO each year tracks well over 400 Film/TV Productions generating an estimated 660 production days and average estimated economic impact of ten million dollars. With forecasted growth, we developed a future-plan that added “direct-connect” City Film Liaisons to work under guidelines of the North LA County Regional Film Commissioner, Pauline East.

Commercial: ...................................................... 4 Audi, Dodge, Toyota, BMW

2018 Projects:

Music Videos: PINK, Russo, Lost Boys, Yorina

Industry

Commercials: Lexus, Duralast, Toyota, Kia, Southwest, Honda, Stubhub, Chase, 47 Brand and Coors TV: Unsolved, Law & Order, Legions, Shooter, Get Shorty, Animal Kingdom, Mayans, NCIS Features: Bumblebee, Destroyer, Black Top Road “With more and more film/TV productions heading this way, there will undoubtedly be more & more opportunities for businesses to grow becoming Vendors and Service Providers to the Film Industry in the future….” David Halver

AVFO Contacts:

Pauline East, Film Commissioner, Antelope Valley Film Office, 661.510.4231 pauline@filmantelopevalley.org David Halver, City of Palmdale Film Liaison, 310.463.1911 dhalver@cityofpalmdale.org Joshua Thomas, City of Lancaster Film Liaison, 661.317.8027 jthomas@cityoflancasterca.org Web Sites: AVFilm.com g FilmLA.com g Film.CA.gov

SoCalLeadingEdge.org SoCalLeadingEdge.org

*Photo credits: David Halver

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148 Film Permits in 2018!

Corporate Video: .............................................. 9 Documentary: ..................................................10 Tesla X Feature Film:.....................................................16 Captain Marvel, Top Gun 2, Ford vs Ferrari, 6 Underground Music Video:.....................................................17 Crystal Fighters, Django Django Still Photography:...........................................33 H&M, Estee Lauder Television:..........................................................20 Goliath, SWAT, Jay Leno’s Garage, Orville Websites: VisitKern.com; FilmKern.com

Ridgecrest Film Commission Ridgecrest Film Commission, along with The Ridgecrest Area Convention & Visitors Bureau (RACVB), promotes its unique filming locations in our “breath taking” region! 2018 Film Permits:

Still Photo Shoot.............................................. 2 2019 SUV/Pickup Truck of the Year, Four Wheeler Magazine and “FLP 18102” Clothing Car Commercials ............................................. 5 KIA Sportage “SUV Out of No Where”, Jeep “Dirt Every Day”, Acura “Look Up” and Toyota Other ................................................................... 4 “Long Distance Face Recognition” ARMY Project and 3 undisclosed productions. FilmDeserts.com

California Film & Tax Credit Program: The CFTCP – AB 1839 enacted in 2014 as a jobs retention and promotion act Film.CA.gov/tax-credit/other-ca-filmincentives

515 Productions

As filmmaking and cinema move further into the 21st century, the manner in which stories and content are delivered will become more and more sophisticated, yet personal. 2018 Milestones for 515, Inc dba 515 Productions

• Completion of a literary novel, docudrama - publishing early 2019;

Feature Films..................................................... 2 “Top Gun 2”, starring Tom Cruise, “Project X” Sci-Fi Independent;

• Editing on 2nd literary novel, publishing Summer 2019, then, preparation on Screenplay;

Short Films......................................................... 4 “Moonwalk with Me”, “Apparat”, “Fenced” College Student, “The New King” College Student Production;

• Pre-Production - 2 feature films, releases slated for FY 2019-2020.

T.V. & Cable Series........................................... 4 “Alien Runner” AMAZON, “Explorers Academy” National Geographic Kids, “Westworld” HBO; Music Videos..................................................... 2 Artist “LAYKE” and “DLM”; T.V. Commercials............................................. 2 “Bud Light” and “Nature Valley” Korean;

515 Contacts: Barbara Simmons, 515 INC/CEO 515 PRODUCTIONS/CEO Vernita Scott-Flanton, 515 INC/CFO 515 PRODUCTIONS/CFO 515.vernita@gmail.com 661.400.5668


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Mining Rio Tinto Borates - Boron Rio Tinto Borates, part of the Rio Tinto Group, operates the largest open pit mine in California. In operation for more than 90 years, the mine holds one of the world’s richest borate deposits. Today, we are 800 people strong - serving 600 customers with over 1,000 global delivery locations. We supply 30% of the world’s need for refined borates from our world-class mine in Boron, California – 100 miles northeast of Los Angeles. Borates are an integral part of the natural world. Plants need borates to grow and people need them, too – as an essential ingredient in an array of everyday products including: Insulation and textile fiberglass.

Heat-resistant glass for mobile phones and tablets (43% of world demand).

Detergents, soaps, personal care products (3% of world demand).

Ceramic and enamel frits and glazes, ceramic tile (19% of world demand).

Agricultural micronutrients (10% of world demand).

Wood treatments, polymer additives and pest control products.

The mine at Boron measures 2 miles long, 1.75 miles wide and 900 feet deep. We excavate about 3 million tons of ore per year and produce 1 million tons of refined products – shipped to customers via truck, rail, barge and other ocean-going vessels.

BELOW: Rio Tinto haul truck.

Workforce and Talent: Our local mining operation employs approximately 700 people. We are the world’s leader in the use of refined borates and, as such, we continue to seek out the best and brightest in a variety of fields - technical, supervisor and operational positions. Engineers, millwrights, electricians, operators and heavy diesel mechanics are in high demand. We encourage applications at RioTinto.com/careers. Investment in the region: We are proud to contribute more than $150 million to the local economy annually. Borax.com

CalCIMA 2018 Aggregate Industry Executive Summary The aggregate and construction industry is a major economic engine for the economy. This analysis performed by Applied Development Economics (ADE) examines the industry output • California’s 5th largest industry – larger than hospitality, agriculture, utilities and even retail.

by the industry spins off an additional $13 in other sectors. • At $76,500, the aggregate industry pays some of the highest wages and compensation in the State. • Compared to other California industries, aggregate worker income ranks 6th overall. • $111 billion in value-added benefit. CalCima.org

Other Mining Assets In The Region Cal Portland Cement – Mojave Calportland.com/locations/california/ mojave-plant

Industry

ABOVE: Rio Tinto operations at night.

Golden Queen Mine at Soledad Mountain – Mojave GoldenQueen.com Granite Construction – Littlerock, Palmdale, Arvin & Inyokern GraniteConstruction.com Searles Valley Minerals – Trona SVMinerals.com

• $210 billion industry output ($483 billion total economic impact on the California economy). • $26.6 billion contributed to other California industries annually.

BELOW: Night sky at Rio Tinto.

• 1.16 million California jobs (2.8 million total jobs supported).

• Every $10 in labor income generated

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• $75.4 billion labor income ($178 billion total labor income).


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Renewable Energy Introducing World Wind and Solar WorldWindSolar.com Renewable energy continues to be a fascinating and fastmoving industry. A decade ago, about 12% of California’s electricity came from a renewable energy source – wind, solar, geothermal, biomass and small hydroelectric facilities. In 2017, it was up to 32%, with solar becoming the number one resource, providing 36% of California’s renewable energy. Wind was a close second at 31%. The industry continues to make strides towards the statewide goal of 50% by 2030. The Department of Labor Statistics ranks solar and wind technicians as the top two occupations with growth potential, through 2026, of 105% and 96%, respectively. (SOURCES: California Energy Commission, Department of Labor, Deloitte Insights, “Global renewable energy trends”.)

Industry

2018 Milestones: In 2018, WWS saw a 57% employee growth, adding over 125 positions for an approximate workforce of 400 including technicians, laborers and administrative positions. WWS designed, and developed a patented mower used to maintain vegetation on some of the nation’s largest utility scale solar projects. Additionally, WWS developed a comprehensive technical training program for our wind & solar technicians covering all aspects of wind and solar O&M services. We are leading the way in how companies should hire, train and retain proven technicians with the skills to operate these renewable assets. An example is the brand new Mobile Training University we built so we could provide on-demand or just in time training on site or for specific scopes of work. This also allows us to adjust this training per the client, OEM or equipment model number.

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON Leading the Deployment of Battery Storage As more and more renewable resources such as solar and wind come online, batteries can help smooth out the fluctuations in these resources by storing the energy they generate and supplying it to the grid later when the sun isn’t shining or the wind isn’t blowing. Energy storage can also support local distribution circuits impacted by the high penetration of renewable resources and improve power quality. Tehachapi Energy Storage Project SCE experiments with new uses of battery technology to evaluate how the technology might best serve its customers. The facility is located near one of the largest wind generation hubs in the U.S. — the Tehachapi Wind Resource Area. It is capable of supplying 32 megawatt-hours of electricity — eight megawatts of power for four continuous hours, which is enough to power 6,000 homes. With the demonstration concluded, plans are underway to use the facility as a distribution-level resource supporting SCE’s Monolith substation near Tehachapi, CA. Edison.com/home.html

WorldWindSolar.com/training/mobile-universitytechnician-training Contributed by Susan Showler SShowler@worldwindsolar.com 661.822.4877

SoCalLeadingEdge.org SoCalLeadingEdge.org

LANCASTER CHOICE ENERGY (LCE) The locally run power program created by the city of Lancaster has long been at the forefront of creating a new sustainable approach to modern living. The City has been proactive in promoting solar power alternatives, conservation and smart energy consumption. With a lofty goal of becoming the nation’s first net-zero city, Lancaster is determined to generate more clean energy than it consumes. Lancaster Choice Energy is the next logical step. Lancaster Choice Energy is not only helping our environment, but our economy as well. 38

LancasterChoiceEnergy.com


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Air Quality

Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District 661.723.8070 AVaqmd.ca.gov

Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District: The Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District (AVAQMD) is located just a short distance from the Los Angeles Metropolitan Area. The AVAQMD is business friendly, a good partner in the community and always willing to work with businesses looking to make a new home in the beautiful High Desert of Los Angeles County.

to locate in the Valley. This includes aerospace and solar operators and the nation’s largest electric bus manufacturing company.

The AVAQMD’s ability to find common ground with those organizations allows them to thrive, and it is one of the main reasons major industry players and new unique local establishments continue

With nearly half a million residents, the AVAQMD has managed to attract new industry and maintain terrific air quality through a comprehensive and common-sense program of planning, regulation, compliance assistance,

In comparison with other state air management districts, the AVAQMD is able to offer businesses located within its boundaries more operational flexibility and significantly lower fees.

Kern County Air Pollution Control District:

enforcement, monitoring and public education. The continued proactive partnership between the AVAQMD and the industries it regulates will go on to create a strong local and growing economy while maintaining the air quality that Antelope Valley residents hold dear. To learn more about the Antelope Valley’s air quality, or to register for EnviroFlash, the AVAQMD’s air quality notification system, visit AVaqmd.ca.gov or call 661.723.8070

Kern County Air Pollution Control District 661.862.5250

The Board of Directors acts as the governing body of the East Kern Air Pollution Control District, a special district on east Kern County. The board consists of five members; three city council members and two county supervisors. Board meetings are open to the public. Board of Directors are Don Parris, Councilman of California City; Eddie Thomas, Vice-Mayor of Ridgecrest; Mick Gleason, Kern County Supervisor 1st District and Zack Scrivner, Kern County Supervisor 2nd District. www.KernAir.org

Utilities Provider

Phone Web

Electricity

Southern California Edison

800.655.4555

SCE.com

Natural Gas

SoCal Gas Sempra Energy

800.427.2200

SOCalGas.com

Water Conservation

Mojave Public Utility District

661.824.4161

Wakc.com

Quality of Life

Utility

Trash 661.947.7197

WM.com

Benz Sanitation

661.822.5273

BenzBlue.com

Kern County Waste Management

661.862.8900

KernCountyWaste.com

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Waste Management


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

STEM Education and Schools that Work

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Quality of Life

Antelope Valley Union High School District Schools throughout the region continue to concentrate on STEM education, providing both in-school and extra-curricular opportunities for students to join this burgeoning workforce. Among these is the Knight High Digital Design and Engineering Academy, winner of the national Advance CTE Excellence in Action Award in 2017. To complement its Aerospace Engineering course, the school will be the first of three high schools within the Antelope Valley Union High School District to open and use a fully-functioning composites lab. In this new facility, students will be able to create parts from carbon fiber, fiberglass and Kevlar, as well as to design and build drones. Composites labs are also scheduled for installation at Lancaster and Palmdale High. The success of KHS Drone program has led to the creation of a district after-school program and an inter-district drone competition league. First year students from Palmdale High School’s Engineering Academy recently participated in the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Invention Challenge. This competition required students follow rigorous constraints to design and build an apparatus that would stand a piece of pipe upright, in the shortest time possible. In addition, students on the Palmdale High Solar Falcon Race Team are rebuilding its solar car for the 2019 race season and are also working on a new “e-car” design. 40

Lancaster High School Engineering and Multimedia Academy, the first to be recognized with Linked Learning’s prestigious Silver Certification, continues its multi-year project with NASA Armstrong on Unmanned Aerial Systems. Crossing both the engineering and multimedia pathways, Academy students are completing an Alexander Calder project to design and fabricate a large-scale build of a free-standing art installation. Students in the nationally recognized and award-winning Eagle Robotics Team 399 program work to garner additional engineering credits in an after-school course. Not to be outdone, the Biomedical Sciences Academy at Eastside High School (also Linked Learning Silver Certified) is implementing a zSpace lab allowing students to experience 3D virtual reality immersion in organs and cells. Similar makerspace and lab renovations are also underway at the Antelope Valley High School Engineering Academy, where students are designing and building miniature, sustainable greenhouses. A major focus of the Littlerock High School Sustainable Agriculture Academy, whose FFA Chapter is a 2-Star National Chapter Awardee, is to educate students on “green” practices and careers in the agriculture industry. Students learn about “green” practices that involve soil science, land use, renewable energy, up-cycling, product manufacturing, safety, construction, landscape installation, water conservation, regulation compliance, and naturally sustainable product production.

Community service is at the heart of efforts by the Palmdale High School Health Careers Academy. Students are working with SaddleUp to assist children with disabilities improve their coordination skills, as well as with Vets for Veterans to assist Veterans in need. Students also took part in the recent state disaster drill at Antelope Valley Hospital, acting as victims to be triaged. Others volunteered at Desert Willow School to teach 7th and 8th graders CPR and basic first aid. The HOSA Chapter at Palmdale High School perennially receives both state and national recognition for their skills and service.

Aerospace Valley Regional – Robotics The Antelope Valley will host its 2nd FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC) with 39 high school robotics teams from California, Nevada, Florida, Switzerland and Columbia and will compete for an opportunity to attend championships in Houston. The teams will compete in a space themed game with six weeks to design, manufacture, test, and deploy their robots. Destination Lancaster estimated the 2018 competition had a positive impact of about $500,000 locally. 2018 sponsors of AVR were NASA, Lockheed, Northrop, and Boeing. David Voracek AVR Logistics Manager AVRegional.org


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

The Public Service Academy at Highland High School is working on a project simulating a vehicle collision to integrate academic content and careertechnical subjects of fire technology and emergency medicine. Students also recently completed an auto extrication exercise, with the assistance of firefighters and automobiles donated by a local tow yard. Students in the Info Tech pathway of the Academies of the Antelope Valley are learning how virtual reality (VR) can be used for professional skills training such as public speaking, teamwork, and leadership to enhance traditional industry tools. Another group of SkillsUSA students have partnered with the Sports Medicine program at Palmdale High as joint awardees of an AFRL ENSPIRE grant. Their project will use VR to enhance physical therapy techniques. The Info Tech pathway is working towards offering certifications from Cisco and CompTIA to prepare the next generation of IT workforce, targeting the cybersecurity sector. This program is in collaboration with Antelope Valley College and agencies at Plant 42, including both workbased learning and potential employment components. AVDistrict.org/academics/careeracademies-pathways

Palmdale Aerospace Academy

2018 Milestones: •

Over $25,000 in scholarships to TPAA students.

Added sixth grade.

Graduation of third class of seniors.

Began construction on the new Elementary Campus opening Fall 2019.

We employ a wholistic approach to education using a Trauma Informed Career and Community School (TICCS) Model. Because many of our students are at-risk, we strive to meet the basic wellness needs of our students and address their trauma before experiencing success with core subjects. TICCS is a wholechild learning environment that offers individual services and support to all students, particularly those suffering from trauma. It does this by integrating personalized learning with traumainformed practices based on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) science to develop social-emotional skills, resiliency, and career and college readiness. Community partnerships provide students with wrap-around services and much-needed resources to help address challenges outside of the classroom.

CTE engages every student in highquality, rigorous, and relevant educational pathways and programs, developed in partnership with business and industry, promoting creativity, innovation, leadership, community service, and lifelong learning. JAG (Jobs for America’s Graduates) is a school-to-work transition program focused on helping at-risk youth graduate from high school and provides work-based learning experiences that will lead to a career or enrollment in a post-secondary institution. WIOA (Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act) is a federally funded program that provides employment and training services, and job placement support services to students from ages 14 to 24. LearnFourLife.org

Palmdale School District Introducing five Middle School Magnet Academies. A 2017 grant application was awarded for $15 million dollars over five years. We were able to convert five middle schools to Magnet Academies, each with a unique focus. Our federally recognized Magnet Academies are Cactus Medical, Health & Technology; David G. Millen Law & Government; Desert Willow Fine Arts, Science & Technology; SAGE Aeronautical & Space; and Shadow Hills Engineering & Design. As we begin year two of our grant, we challenge our students to think, consider and create. We are providing them CHOICE to attend any middle school of interest to them. PalmdaleSD.org

Soar High School In partnership with Antelope Valley College and the AV High School District, an early college high school program, Students on the Academic Rise (Soar) High School students have among the highest achievement scores in California. In 2018, SOAR High School graduated 99 students with 65 concurrently receiving degrees from AVC. AVC.edu/academics/AVSoar

Other School Links for STEM/STEAM Programs:

Quality of Life

Preparing graduates for college and careers in the 21st century, aligned with current workforce needs. The educational program emphasizes science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) skills and views academics through the lens of aerospace.

Learn4Life

See our complete list of regional schools for more links.

TPAA.org

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2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Career Tech and Higher ED ANTELOPE VALLEY COLLEGE Corporate and Community Services is committed to providing lifelong learning experiences to our community through a variety of courses which provides short-term, not-for-credit programs that offer the basic, technical and professional business courses designed to develop skills that can lead to employment, job advancement, enhancement and/ or certification. AVC.edu Cathy Hart, Dean, Palmdale Center and Extended Learning 661.722.6300 EXT. 6412 Director of Job Placement 661.722.6358 AVC.edu/studentservices/jpc ANTELOPE VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT • College and Career Readiness Diane Walker, Director of Industry Liaison and Post-Secondary Partnerships, AVUHSD 661.575.1025 AVDistrict.org/academics/collegereadiness-and-preperation

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Quality of Life

Steve Radford, PhD, Regional Director for College & Career Prep 661.942.3042 AVAdultEd.org/programs/careertechnical-education-programs

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY Bakersfield/Antelope Valley Campus - Located on the Antelope Valley College campus, CSUB Antelope Valley offers accredited Bachelor’s Degree including Business Administration, Child, Adolescent & Family Studies, Criminal Justice, English, Liberal Studies (IB EST), Nursing (RN to BSN on-line only) and Sociology (Human Services). CSUB Antelope Valley offers teaching credentials, and three Master’s Degrees in Business Administration (MBA), Educational Administration (MA) and Special Education (MA). Two Master’s Degrees, Educational Curriculum & Instruction (MA) and Administration (MSA) are completely online. 661.952.5000 csub.edu/AV

CERRO COSO COMMUNITY COLLEGE The East Kern Center (formerly South Kern) serves the communities of Edwards Air Force Base, Mojave, Boron, California City and Tehachapi as well as other locations from facilities centered at Edwards Air Force Base and Tehachapi. Cerro Coso offers a wide range of classes, both on campus and online, enabling area students to reach their educational and personal enrichment goals. 760.384.6123 CerroCoso.edu CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY Long Beach - AV Engineering Program - is a full time, highly structured, 2 ½ year program for transfer students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree in either Mechanical or Electrical Engineering. The program is located at the Lancaster University Center Satellite Campus. 661.723.6429 CSULB.edu/college-of-engineering/ antelope-valley-program MOJAVE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Adult Education partners: The Mojave Unified School District, California Community College Chancellors Office, Cerro Coso Community College and America’s Job Center. Susan Clipperton, 661.824.4088 Dr. Aaron Haughton, Superintendent 661.824.4001 Mojave.k12.ca.us

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2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

COMMUNITY COLLEGE BUSINESS TOOLS California Community Colleges Sector Navigator - The Community Colleges’ Deputy Sector Navigators help coordinate industry- specific workforce training programs, providing highly specialized industry training, technical consulting and business development. CCCEWD.net Division of Apprenticeship Standards provides employers with a highly skilled and experienced workforce. DIR.CA.gov/das/das.html California Corporate College Training That Improves Employee Performance CACorpcollege.com SCHOOL PROGRAMS FOR JOB TRAINING ANTELOPE VALLEY UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT (AVHSD) Employer Partner QuickStart Guide to Work-Based Learning Experiences AVDistrict.org/community/businesspartners LEARN 4 LIFE - The Antelope Valley is home to five educational centers that provide innovative opportunities to create pathways to the workforce. As a Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) partner, Learn4Life offers courses in observable work readiness skills. Our CTE

programs give students a jump start on a promising future right out of high school with the mastery of realworld, technical skills. Our corporate partnerships and workforce readiness programs are the keys to success inside and outside of the classroom for Learn4Life students. Valerie J. Chase, Vice President, School Development & Support Learn4Life Concept Charter Schools 661.618.7727 LearnFourLife.com LOS ANGELES COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION (LACOE) Career Technical Education (CTE) is a program of study that prepares students for college and careers. A variety of CTE curriculum and instruction resources are available including: •

Arts, media and entertainment • Building and construction trades • Business and finance

Food service and hospitality • Education, child development, and family services

Engineering and design • Health science and medical technology

Information and communication technologies • Marketing, sales and services • Transportation

APPRENTICESHIPS The Los Angeles County Office of Education - Career Technical Education (LACOE-CTE) cooperates with trade program sponsors to assist in offering the related classroom instruction component of seven apprenticeship training programs: Air Conditioning and Refrigeration - Cosmetology – Electrical Roofers - Studio Electrician Sound and Intercommunication LACOE.edu/Curriculum-Instruction/ Career-Technical-Education/ Apprenticeships

661.265.0124 LACOE.edu/Curriculum-Instruction/ Career-Technical-Education/CTECurriculum

Quality of Life SoCalLeadingEdge.org

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2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

K-12 PUBLIC / PRIVATE SCHOOLS Public Schools Acton-Agua Dulce Unified School District (K-12) AADUSD.k12.ca.us Antelope Valley High School District AVDistrict.org Eastside Union School District (K-8) EastsideUSD.org Gorman School District (K-8) Gorman.k12.ca.us Hughes-Elizabeth Lake Union School District (K-8) Heluesd-k12-pt.schoolloop.com Keppel Union School District (K-8) Keppel.k12.ca.us

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Quality of Life

Kern County Schools/Mojave Unified School District (K-12) Mojave.k12.ca.us

Lancaster School District (K-8) LancSD.org Muroc Joint Unified School District (K-12) Muroc.k12.ca.us Palmdale School District (K-8) PalmdaleSD.org Southern Kern Unified (K-Adult) SKUSD.k12.ca.us Sierra Sands Unified School District SSUSD.org Tehachapi Unified School District TEH.k12.ca.us Westside Union Elementary School District (K-8) Westside.k12.ca.us Wilsona School District (K-8) WilsonaSD.net

Private Schools Antelope Valley Adventist School LancasterAdventist.com

Lancaster Baptist School LancasterBaptistSchool.org

Bethel Christian School BethelChristian.net

Paraclete High School ParacleteHS.org

Desert Christian School DesertChristian.com

Pearblossom Private School PearblossomSchool.com

Desert Vineyard Christian School GrowWithVCS.org

Pinecrest School PinecrestSchools.com

Grace Lutheran School GraceLancaster.org

Sacred Heart School Shsav.org

Heritage Oak School HeritageOakSchool.info

St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s School STmarysPalmdale.org

Immanuel Christian School Icsk12.org

Westside Christian School DesertHighlandswcs.com

Charter Schools AV Learning Academy AVLearning.org AV Youthbuild Charter YouthBuildCharter.org Desert Sands Charter High School Dschs.org iLEAD Lancaster Charter School Ileadlancaster.org

Learn4Life Concept Charter Schools Learn4life.org Life Source Charter School LifesourceCharterSchool.org The Guidance Charter School Thegcs.org The Palmdale Aerospace Academy Tpaa.org Valley Oaks Charter School ValleyOaksCharterSchool.org

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2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Water Antelope Valley East Kern Water Agency (AVEK) In 2018, AVEK cut the ribbon on a new Operations Center, which houses their Administration Building and a state-of-the-art laboratory equipped with the latest technologies for testing water quality samples. The new structure is LEED Certified. New Solar facilities near the Westside and Eastside Water Banks are generating energy credits for the Agency increasing sustainability while reducing costs and dependency on fossil fuels. The Agency consistently provided optimal quality water to their customers, achieving record-low THM levels utilizing their award-winning geopurification methods, a natural, cost-effective water treatment process. Trihalomethanes (THMs) are a regulated byproduct of the water treatment process.

Our proudest moment in 2018 was celebrating our100th anniversary with hundreds of community members and civic leaders. The centennial celebration highlighted PWD’s accomplishments through years of forward transformation. What began as an irrigation district in 1918 serving about 200 people, PWD has grown exponentially into a vital agency that supplies water to more than 115,000 individuals within its service area.

Water Resources and Links: Association of California Water Agencies – ACWA.com Antelope Valley Integrated Regional Water Management Plan AVWaterPlan.org

Two other milestones that occurred in 2018 were the start of the Littlerock Sediment Removal Project and the Upper Amargosa Creek Recharge Project. At the Littlerock Dam, construction began for the gradecontrol structure at Rocky Point. The $9.275 million grade-control project was needed to protect the endangered Arroyo Toad from sediment removal that will take places. The removal of sediment is required for the restoration of the dam to its full water capacity of 3,500 acre-feet.

Antelope Valley State Water Contractors Assn. - AVSWCA.org

In an unprecedented partnership, PWD joined the City of Palmdale, AVEK and L.A. County Waterworks Districts in the groundbreaking of the Upper Amargosa Creek Recharge Project. The $17 million project will divert water from the California Aqueduct to recharge basins where it will percolate underground. The recharge basin project will include a nature park with a walkway bridge. For PWD, the recharge project will increase groundwater supply to its existing wells, allowing greater flexibility in its water delivery system. The recharge capacity is expected to be in the range of 1,600 to 2,300 acre-feet of water per year. PalmdaleWater.org

Water Assn. of Kern County WAKC.com

Indian Wells Valley Water District IWVWD.com Kern County Water Agency KCWA.com Kern County Integrated Regional Water Management Plan KernIRWMP.com Tehachapi-Cummings County Water District - TCCWD.com

acre-foot 325,850 gallons,

is or roughly the amount of water used annually by a single-family Antelope Valley household in the pre-drought years.

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SoCalLeadingEdge.org

An

California Department of Water Resources – Water.CA.gov

Quality of Life

Through diligence in developing innovative water resource management strategies and a steadfast focus on water banking - a top priority, the Agency was able to meet all 2018 customer demands despite a record-breaking seven-year drought that began in 2010. The Westside Water Bank has a storage capacity of 150,000 acre-feet; the Eastside Water Bank can store about 6,700 acre-feet; and the High Desert Water Bank will hold an estimated 280,000 acre-feet once completed. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons, enough to furnish the average singlefamily Valley household for one year. AVEK.org

Palmdale Water District


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Hospitals & Healthcare Adventist Health Tehachapi Valley “The opening of our new hospital is truly a historic moment for Tehachapi,” AHTV President Jeff Lingerfelt said. The new hospital 79,000 sq-ft facility includes a 13-room emergency department equipped with trauma, fast track and triage rooms; ICU, 2 operating rooms; and 2 GI lab rooms. Other features include imaging, diagnostic services, occupational and physical therapy, a chapel and cafeteria. AHTehachapi.org

Antelope Valley Hospital The overriding healthcare challenge includes expanding mental health services and improving access to care. As the area’s only hospital with a mental health unit, Antelope Valley Hospital is actively expanding its programs. •

Re-certified as a Chest Pain Center and continues fastest treatment time of all STEMI Centers in L.A. County.

Increased capability in the emergency department.

Launched the “No One Dies Alone” program.

Earned Blue Distinction recognition for Maternity Care from Blue Shield of California and Anthem Blue Cross. AVHospital.org

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Quality of Life

High Desert Regional Health Center High Desert Regional Health Center, operated by the L.A. County Department of Health Services Ambulatory Care Network, provides a wide range of outpatient medical services, including adult and pediatric primary care, urgent care, specialty services and outpatient surgery. In

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addition to diagnostic and treatment services, the health center also offers a pediatric dental clinic, an HIV/AIDS Clinic and a Pediatric HUB Clinic designed for the special needs of children in foster care. DHS.LACounty.gov/wps/portal/dhs/ highdesert

as Leapfrog and Women’s Choice Award. PRMC operates the only acute rehabilitation unit in the high desert. The Rehabilitation Institute helps people suffering from strokes, spinal cord and traumatic brain injuries, as well as other debilitating diseases and conditions.

Kaiser Permanente

Certified as an Advanced Primary Stroke Center.

Opened an urgent care center in Rosamond.

Added an intensivist program to its ICU.

With more than 170 physicians and 1,000 employees, Kaiser Permanente provides high quality care to more than 134,000 patients at five convenient locations. Primary care services—pediatrics, internal medicine and family medicine—are available in Lancaster and Palmdale. Each location houses diagnostic imaging, pharmacy, and laboratory with extended hours to accommodate members’ busy schedules. More than 25 specialty care services, as well as an outpatient procedure suite, diagnostic imaging, pharmacy, and laboratory are available at our state-of-the-art Antelope Valley Medical Office in Lancaster. This modern, eco-friendly building is designed to be home to up to 70 clinicians. KP.org/AntelopeValley

Mental Health America Antelope Valley Enrichment Services 2018 marks 30 years that MHA has served the Antelope Valley with comprehensive mental health and homeless services, including veterans and their families. We currently employ 142 people across 3 program sites. MHALA.org

Palmdale Regional Medical Center: Palmdale Regional Medical Center (PRMC) continues to be rated as the highest hospital for quality in the region by outside agencies such

Discover the Difference at Palmdale Regional Medical Center. PalmdaleRegional.com

Ridgecrest Regional Hospital At the heart of RRH healthcare is the balance of two qualities: Clinical excellence and the sense of belonging. Technology and integrity, professional expertise and thoughtful understanding, are our gift to you. RRH.org

East Kern Health Care District Provides property management for four medical facilities in California City. The District continues to explore expansion of medical services to meet the medical needs of the East Kern communities. AdventistHealth.org/locations/ adventist-health-community-carecalifornia-city

Other Healthcare Providers In The Region: City of Hope – CityofHope.org/location/antelopevalley High Desert Medical Group (HDMG) and Heritage Health Care HDMG.net


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Transportation Antelope Valley Transit Authority In 2015, the Antelope Valley Transit Authority (AVTA) in Lancaster, California, made history by committing to the first all-electric zero emissions bus fleet in the nation. In 2019, the transit agency has set its sights on a new goal: increasing ridership through an enhanced customer experience. AVTA will be introducing new commuter routes to Edwards Air Force Base, Mojave Air and Space Port, and aerospace centered destinations in and around the Antelope Valley. They hope to encourage aerospace-based workers to make the positive change to using public transit. With AVTA’s recent addition of free Wi-Fi service on all of its new electric buses and all existing commuter buses, workers can use their time more productively while enjoying the ride.

Milestones: Awarded a 3rd Transit & Intercity Rail Capital Program (TIRCP) grant in the amount of $13,156,000 from State of California – will fund seven new buses, charging equipment & three new transit centers. Awarded a Sustainable Communities Strategies grant in the amount of $239,961 from Caltrans – will fund a regional transit plan.

Awarded a Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) grant in the amount of $169,222 – will use funds toward a commuter bus; Received five new support/ utility vehicles.

AVTA employs 42 people in administration, Transdev employs 185, primarily bus operators and maintenance workers AVTA RIDERSHIP

FY 2018

Commuter

275,629

Local Transit

2,166,653

Dial-A-Ride

46,610

Learn more at AVTA.com

California High Speed Rail Authority State funding of $4.4 billion for Southern California Rail transit projects in 2018 enables the delivery of more than $16.8 billion in regional mobility improvements. Almost $900 million of this State funding came directly from the California High-Speed Rail Authority and was instrumental in closing the funding gap on many significant regional projects, some of which are already completed. The Authority currently has 119 miles under construction in the Central Valley, around the City of Fresno, and Madera and Kings Counties, and has created over 2400 jobs. HSR.ca.gov

Kern Regional Transit: Provides scheduled bus service throughout the Antelope Valley from California City to Lancaster and Metrolink plus destinations throughout Kern County. A new transit center will begin service in Mojave to serve five bus lines serving East Kern, Eastern California, Mojave and the Antelope Valley with connections to Metrolink and Amtrak. KernTransit.org/routesandschedules/100-bakersfieldlancaster

Other Regional Transportation Assets: CALTRANS - Hwy 14 planning DOT.CA.gov/d9 METRO: High Desert Corridor - Metro.net/ projects/high-desert-corridor Northwest Hwy 138 Expansion Metro.net/projects/nw138 METROLINK: Antelope Valley Line Metrolinktrains.com/schedules

Quality of Life

Awarded a FTA 5310 grant in the amount of $129,351 from LA County MTA – will fund DAR type service for medical purposes.

Employees:

Construction Progress at: BuildHSR.com

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

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2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Real Estate Antelope Valley Home Sales 2018 vs 2017

NUMBER OF UNITS SOLD AVERAGE PRICE PER SQ FT

AVERAGE SALES PRICE

Area % of % of 2017 2018 Change 2017 2018 Change 2017 2018 Cal City, Mojave 436 453 Ridgecrest 670 658 Rosamond Area 387 405 Tehachapi Area 781 802 Antelope Acres 84 82 Lake Los Angeles 226 228 East Lancaster 976 911 West Lancaster 1,645 1,458 West Palmdale 963 913 East Palmdale 1,468 1,309 Littlerock 243 255 Leona Valley 75 86

All Areas

7,954 7,560

4% -2% 5% 3% -2% 1% -7% -11% -5% -11% 5% 15%

-5%

% of Change

$76 $89 $110 $124 $141 $154 $150 $156 $155 $155 $127 $156 $143 $160 $158 $175 $169 $182 $161 $180 $162 $186 $208 $221

17% 12% 9% 4% 0% 23% 12% 10% 8% 12% 15% 6%

$120,727 $136,925 $181,754 $200,574 $231,607 $251,052 $271,098 $283,093 $272,327 $310,243 $172,737 $206,130 $230,894 $256,631 $283,905 $305,935 $356,487 $382,831 $256,962 $281,122 $254,104 $272,818 $340,367 $359,341

$147 $161

10%

$247,747 $270,558

13% 10% 8% 4% 14% 19% 11% 8% 7% 9% 7% 6%

9%

The chart below demonstrates the considerable disparity in housing values when comparing the nearby Santa Clarita Valley with the Antelope Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2 major cities, Lancaster and Palmdale!

Average Price/SF

Average SalesPrice

$350

$650,000

$325

$625,000 $600,000

$300

$575,000

$275

$550,000

$250

$525,000 $500,000

$225

$475,000

$200

$450,000

$175

$425,000

$150

$400,000 $375,000

$125

$350,000

$100

$325,000 $300,000

$75

$275,000

$50

$250,000

Quality of Life

$25

$225,000

$0

$175,000 Lancaster Palmdale Santa Clarita Valencia Avg Price/SF $285,975 $322,932 $543,095 $629,696

Lancaster Palmdale Santa Clarita Valencia Avg Price/SF $169.27 $180.62 $318.61 $321.75

New home sales activity jumped 29% in 2018 and the average sales price increased to $418,796, a 4% bump over 2017!

Antelope Valley Home Sales 2018 vs 2017

UNITS SOLD

AVERAGE SALES PRICE

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Area % of 2017 2018 Change 2017 East Lancaster West Lancaster East Palmdale West Palmdale

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Total

0 38 0 92

33 73 34 17

130 168

92% -82%

29%

% of 2018 Change

$0 $345,364 $413,461 $468,118 13% $0 $459,144 $395,098 $402,559 2%

$404,279 $418,796 4%


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Housing Market $462 / sq. ft.

This Santa Clarita 920 square foot, 3 bedroom, 1 bath home, built in 1962 sold in May 2017 for $425,000.

$112 / sq. ft.

This west Lancaster 3,783 square foot, 5 bedroom, 3 bath home, built in 2011 sold in March 2017 for $425,000.

The Antelope Valley continues to offer residents some of the most affordable housing in the state of California. Far from the typical perception of affordable housing, the Antelope Valley offers a large variety of spacious homes in an assortment of settings including gated communities and country club sites. Not to mention equestrian estates and low density developments with lot sizes ranging from 1/2 to 2 1/2 acres. All this at some of the most affordable prices in Southern California! Our housing market is not just about price, it is about value!

Centennial at Tejon Ranch Approved by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors in December 2018, Centennial at Tejon Ranch is a mixed-use, planned community located in northwest LA County that will include 19,333 homes with 18% set aside as affordable housing.

Centennial will provide many amenities and services for the community and surrounding areas. Public Services will include up to four fire stations, a sheriff station, a public library and numerous neighborhoods, community and regional parks totaling over 300 acres. Centennial will open several schools composed of one K-5, five K-8, and one high school. Also included is a County Civic Administration Facility, an animal care facility, and land and incentives to attract medical facilities. CentennialAtTejonRanch.com

In 2008, Tejon Ranch reached an historic agreement with Audubon California, Endangered

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A recent study by the Los Angeles Economic Development Corporation projects Centennial as a strong, new economic engine for LA County generating $3.1 Billion in annual total output, approximately $1.4 Billion in annual labor income, and provide $1.8 Billion in annual federal, state, and local taxes.

Quality of Life

Along with providing housing opportunities, the project will include 10.1 million square feet of commercial land use for retail, office and business park development. At buildout, Centennial will create over 25,000 well-paying construction jobs and over 23,000 permanent jobs. Centennial has agreed to one of the largest Local Hire Programs by a private developer in LA County, agreeing to hire at least 30% local residents, minority- owned, women owned and disadvantaged businesses.

Habitats League, Natural Resources Defense Council, Planning and Conservation League, and the Sierra Club to preserve and protect 90% of the ranch. The Ranchwide Agreement ensures the preservation of 240,000 acres as permanent open space.


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Entertainment, Recreation, Parks, Events and 3,000 sq miles of open With

space and opportunity, the Fun Never Stops!

Within a quick drive in any direction the options are endless - the mountains, the beach, the City, or a desert oasis...This region is not the middle of no-where, we’re at the center of everywhere. Closer to home, here are just a few things you might want to do:

Regional Community Events CALIFORNIA CITY

CaliforniaCityChamber.com • Desert Tortoise Naturalist Season (Mar - Jun) • Desert Tortoise Days (Apr) • Whiptails Pro/Indy-baseball (May-Jul) • Fireworks Gala (July 4) • Wasteland Weekend (Sept) • Cancer Walk (Oct) • Renaissance Festival & Model Train show (Oct) • Christmas tree lighting/Parade, Holiday Village (Dec)

KERNVILLE

GoToKernville.com/whiskeyflatdays • Whiskey Flat Days and Fall Festival (Oct)

LANCASTER

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Quality of Life

DestinationLancasterCA.org/events • The BLVD Market (Year-Round) • Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service (Jan) • Egg Hunt Extravaganza, California Poppy Festival (Apr) • Lancaster MOAH Mother’s Day Tea & Exhibition (May) • LPAC Foundation Gala, Celebrate America (Jun) • 4th of July Extravaganza (Jul) • Antelope Valley Fair, Fair Parade (Aug) • Streets of Lancaster Grand Prix (Sept) • Bark @ the Park, BOOLVD Halloween & Harvest Festival (Oct) • CA Finals Rodeo, MOAH Gala, Los Angeles Co. Airshow (Oct) • Field of Drafts Beer Festival (Nov) • A Magical BLVD Christmas, Santa and Parade (Dec)

MOJAVE

VisitMojave.com/mojave-chamber-of-commerce • Plane Crazy Saturdays @ MASP (Year round) • Gold Rush Days (Oct) • Salute to Veterans (Nov) • Christmas Trees lighting (Dec)

QUARTZ HILL

QuartzHillChamber.com • Almond Blossom Festival (Mar) • Easter Sunrise Service (Mar/April) • Fishing Derby (Mar, May & Nov) • Juneteenth (Jun) • Summer Concert and Movie (June - Sept)

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FUN!

PALMDALE

CityOfPalmdale.org/Residents/Recreation-and-Culture • Springfest – Egg Hunt (Mar) • Children’s Springfest (Apr) • Planet Fitness 5 K Run (Jun) • AV Taco Festival (Jun) • Freedom Celebration & Fireworks (Jun) • Palmdale Amphitheater Concert Series (Summer) • Music in the Park (Summer) • Family Movie Nights, National Night Out (Summer) • Sundown in Dry Town (Summer) • Palmdale Amphitheater Concert Series (Summer) • Music in the park (Summer) • Kiwanis Club of the AV Duck Race (Sept) • 9/11 Ceremony – Fallen Heroes (Sept) • Grace fest – Christian Music Festival (Sept) • Taste of Palmdale (Sept) • Making Strides Against Cancer Walk (Oct) • Kaleidoscope Music and Art Festival (Oct) • AV Wall- the Mobile Vietnam Wall (Nov) • Heart Walk (Nov) • Santa’s Wonderland at Palmdale Playhouse (Nov/Dec) • Playhouse Singalong with Santa (Dec) • Jingle Bell Run (Dec) • Palmdale Chamber Christmas Parade (Dec) • Bus Excursions (Year-Round) • Joe Davis Heritage Air Park Guided Tours (Year-Round)

RIDGECREST

VisitDeserts.com • Economic Outlook Conference (Feb) • Petroglyph Tours (Spring and Fall) • Wildflower Exhibit (Apr) • Star Follies (May) • Desert Empire Fair (Oct) • Ridgecrest Petroglyph Festival (Nov) • Ridgecrest Desert Classic-High Sierra Cyclists (Nov) • High Desert Ultra Marathon 50K/30K-OTHTC (Dec) • Farmers Markets (Weekly)

TEHACHAPI

TVRPD.org and TehachapiGranFondo.com • Main Street Valentine’s Wine Walk (Feb) • Spring Festival (May) • Hotdog Festival (Jul) • Tehachapi Mountain Beer & Wine Fest (Jul) • Cheers to Charity, Tehachapi Mountain Festival (Aug) • Tehachapi GranFondo (Sept) • Tehachapi Apple Festival (Oct) • Ugly Christmas Sweater Wine Walk (Nov)


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Performing Arts AV Symphony Orchestra & Master Chorale AVSOMC.avc.edu Community Light Opera & Theater Ridgecrest-Arts.org Lancaster Performing Arts LPAC.org Palmdale Amphitheater PalmdaleAmphitheater.com

Libraries Book Mobile - LAcountyLibrary.org/antelope-valley-bookmobile Kern County Libraries - KernCountyLibrary.org Los Angeles County Libraries - CoLAPubLib.org Quartz Hill Library - LAcountyLibrary.org/quartz-hill-library Palmdale City Library - CityofPalmdale.org/library

Palmdale Playhouse PalmdalePlayhouse.com

Museums 20 Mule Team Museum 20MuleTeamMuseum.com Antelope Valley Indian Museum AVIM.Parks.ca.gov Blackbird Air Park @ Edwards Air Force Base AFFTCMuseum.org/blackbird-airpark China Lake Museum ChinaLakeMuseum.org Colonel Vernon P. Saxon, Jr. Aerospace Museum SaxonAerospaceMuseum.com East Kern Historical Museum Society EKHMS.weebly.com Edwards Air Force Flight Test Museum AFFTCMuseum.org Historical Society of the Upper Mojave Desert HSUMD.org Joe Davies Heritage Airpark@ Palmdale CityOfPalmdale.org/Airpark Kern Valley Museum KernValleyMuseum.org

Maturango Museum @ Ridgecrest Maturango.org Mojave Desert Heritage and Cultural Assn. MDHCA.org Mojave Transportation Museum MojaveMuseum.org Rand Desert Museum RandDesertMuseum.com Tehachapi Railroad Museum TehachapiDepot.com

US Naval Museum of Armament & Technology ChinaLakeMuseum.org Western Hotel Museum LancasterMoah.org/western-hotel-museum

Lancaster

DestinationLancasterCA.org/things-to-do/things-to-dobreweries-and-wineries Antelope Valley Winery AVWinery.com Bravery Brewing Company BraveryBrewing.com

Greater Tehachapi Wineries and Vineyards: Dorner Family Vineyard DornerFamilyVineyard.com Tehachapi Wine & Cattle Co TehachapiWineAndCattleCompany.com Triassic Legacy Vineyards TriassicVineyards.com

Acton / Agua Dulce Area Wineries: Agua Dulce Winery AguaDulceWinery.com Reyes Winery ReyesWinery.com Acton Wine & Spirt Co. ActonWine.com

Palmdale:

Transplants Brewing Company TransplantsBrewing.com Lucky Luke Brewing LuckyLukeBrewing.com

Mojave:

High Desert Cellars HighDesertCellars.com

InyoKern:

Indian Wells Valley Brewing Company MojaveRed.com

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SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Trona History House and Old Guest House Museum www1.iwvisp.com/svhs

With a growing reputation as a great wine producing region, some 35 vineyards make the most of the area’s warm days and cool nights to produce award-winning wines. We’ve listed a few to help you get started:

Quality of Life

Lancaster Museum/Art Gallery MOAH LancasterMOAH.org

Craft Brews and Award Winning Wine:


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Retail Therapy Antelope Valley Mall AV-Mall.com

Main Street Tehachapi MainStreetTehachapi.org

THE BLVD: TheBLVDLancaster.com

Palmdale Restaurants & Shopping CityOfPalmdale.org/ Visitors

Destination Lancaster DestinationLancasterCA.org

Movie Theaters Movie Theaters Check your local listings.

Sports Venues / Parks Balsitis Park - Rio Tinto Field (Cal City) Best of the West® Softball Complex (Palmdale) Eight world-class, year-round softball fields CityOfPalmdale.org/BOTW Big 8 Softball Complex (Lancaster) Big8.org

High Desert Wildflower and Wildlife Sanctuaries: Acton Wash Wildlife Sanctuary Alpine Butte Wildlife Sanctuary Big Rock Creek Wash Wildlife Sanctuary Blalock Wildlife Sanctuary

Cal City Central Park - 80 acres with 22 acre lake CaliforniaCity-CA.gov

KERN COUNTY PARKS and RECREATION

Cal City Motocross Park CalCityMXPark.com

Desert Tortoise Preserve - DTRNA - BLM

DryTown Water Park (Palmdale) DryTownWaterPark.com Herman Cooper Ball Park (Cal City) The Lancaster JetHawks, Our hometown minor league affiliate of the Colorado Rockies. MILB.com/lancaster

KernCountyParks.org

Tortoise-Tracks.org/wptortoisetracks/visiting-the-dtrna

Public Use Buildings:

Boron Recreation Bldg. g Hummel Hall g Mojave Recreation Bldg. g Mojave Veterans and Seniors Bldg. g Rosamond Recreation Bldg. g Tehachapi Veterans Memorial Bldg.

Lancaster National Soccer Center

35 premium fields, 11 fields fully lighted LancasterSoccerCenter.com

PALMDALE PARKS & RECREATION

Los Angeles County Raceway Motocross Palmdale (Palmdale) LACRMX.net

Special Use Parks

MotoCross at the AV Fairgrounds

CaliforniaMotoCrossTrack.com/AV-Motocross-Park.php

Scout Island - Lodge and Campground (Cal City) Willow Springs International Raceway (Rosamond)

WillowSpringsRaceway.com

Quality of Life

Orion Dog Park (Cal City) Pelona Vista Park Soccer Complex - Palmdale

10 Soccer Fields, lights available PlayPalmdale.com

Yellen Dog Park

Palmdale’s newest park Facebook.com/YellenDogPark

Public Parks Los Angeles County Department of Parks and Recreation Parks.LACounty.gov

Local L.A. County Parks:

Acton Park g Apollo Park g Everett Martin Park g George Lane Park g Jackie Robinson Park g Pearblossom Park g Stephen Sorensen Park

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Natural Areas/Nature Centers:

Devil’s Punchbowl Natural Area and Nature Center Vasquez Rocks Natural Area and Nature Center

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CityOfPalmdale.org/Residents/Recreation-and-Culture American Indian Little League, Joe Davies Heritage Airpark, Palmdale Pony League Baseball Fields, Tejon Park

Greenways and Special Use Trails

Dr. Robert C. St. Clair Parkway g Legacy Park g Poncitlan Square Barrell Springs Trail g Joshua Ranch Trail

Recreation Facilities

Chris O’Leary Skatepark g Desert Sands Recreation Building g Domenic Massari Building g Larry Chimbole Cultural Center g Legacy Commons g Marie Kerr Park Skatepark and Swimming Pool g Melville J. Courson Park Swimming Pool g Palmdale Amphitheater g Palmdale Oasis Park Recreation Center and Swimming Pool g Richard B. Hammack Activity Center g William J. McAdam Park Swimming Pool

Regional Camping / Hiking / Fishing / Boating / Hunting Angeles National Forest FS.usda.gov/angeles CA State Parks Parks.ca.gov California City Butte Bagging CaliforniaCityChamber.com/ butte-bagging


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Devils Punchbowl Parks.LAcounty.gov/devils-punchbowl-natural-area-andnature-center High Desert Camping Info TotalEscape.com LA County Trails Website Trails.LACounty.gov Lake Isabella / Kernville LakeIsabella.net Littlerock Reservoir and Dam DBW.CA.gov/BoatingFacilities/Details/131 Pacific Crest Trail PCTA.org Red Rock State Park Parks.CA.gov/?page_id=631 Saddleback Butte State Park Parks.CA.gov/?page_id=618

Robbers Roost Digital-Desert.com/robbers-roost

Other Points of Interest

California Poppy Reserve DestinationLancasterCA.org/visitor/onlyinav/poppyreserve Aerospace Walk of Honor - Lancaster DestinationLancasterCA.org/visitor/onlyinav/walkofhonor Exotic Feline Conservation Center CatHouse-FCC.org Indian Point Ostrich Ranch IndianPointRanch.com Musical Road DestinationLancasterCA.org/visitor/onlyinav/musicalroad Prime Desert Woodland Preserve CityOfLancasterCA.org/about-us/departments-services/parksrecreation-arts/parks/prime-desert-woodland-preserve

Sequoia & Kings Cyn. National Forest NPS.gov/seki/index.htm

Windswept Ranch - Tehachapi VisitTehachapi.com/play/586-windswept-ranch.html#. VqkTkPkrKUk

Tehachapi Loop - For Train Enthusiasts VisitTehachapi.com/play/555-tehachapi-loop.html

The Living Ghost Town RandDesertMuseum.com

Trona Pinnacles DesertUSA.com/thingstodo/ttdtrails/du_ttd_trona.html

Tomo Kahni Resource Center VisitTehachapi.com/play/563-tomo-kahni-state-historicparkresource-center.html

US Forest Service Recreation.gov Vasquez Rocks Natural Area Parks.LACounty.gov/vasquez-rocks-natural-area-andnature-center Borax Bill - OHV central CaliforniaCityChamber.com/ohv

Community Resource Centers

South Antelope Valley Emergency Services (SAVES) CityOfPalmdale.org/Residents/SAVES

Neighborhood Houses

LANCASTER:

OHV Riding OHV.Parks.CA.gov

Nine Neighborhood Impact homes; Seven Wellness Homes CityOfLancasterca.org/residents/local-resources/wellnessneighborhood-impact-homes

CA Trail Users Coalition CTUC.info/ctuc

PALMDALE:

Jawbone Canyon OHV Park Jawbone.org

Neighborhood Homes and Community Gardens: CityOfPalmdale.org/Residents/Neighborhood-Services/ Neighborhood-Houses

Quality of Life SoCalLeadingEdge.org

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2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Regional Chambers of Commerce Acton Chamber of Commerce 661.269.5785 Aadcoc.com Antelope Valley African American Chamber of Commerce 661.272.5807 AVaacc.org AV Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 661.538.0607 AVhispanicchamber.org AV Holistic Chamber of Commerce 661.998.8009 AVHolisticChamberOfCommerce.org Boron Chamber of Commerce 760.762.5810 BoronChamber.com California City Chamber of Commerce 760.373.8676 CaliforniaCityChamber.com

Chamber of Commerce of the Greater Antelope Valley 661.361.8254 Cocgav.com Greater Tehachapi EDC 661.748.3327 TehachapiEDC.com Indian Wells Valley EDC/China Lake Alliance 760.382.6013 ChinaLakeAlliance.org Lake Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce 661.264.2786 Lancaster Chamber of Commerce 661.948.4518 LancasterChamber.org Littlerock Chamber of Commerce LittleRock.ca.us Mojave Chamber of Commerce 661.824.2481 VisitMojave.com

Palmdale Chamber of Commerce 661.273.3232 PalmdaleChamber.org Pearblossom Chamber of Commerce 661.305.6519 Quartz Hill Chamber of Commerce 661.722.4811 QuartzHillChamber.com Ridgecrest Chamber of Commerce 760.375.8331 RidgecrestChamber.com Rosamond Chamber of Commerce 661.256.3248 RosamondChamber.org Sun Village Chamber of Commerce 661.400.1026 Tehachapi Chamber of Commerce 661.822.4180 Tehachapi.com

Small Business Support Business Retention & Expansion Resources SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER (SBDC) - Our region is served by two extraordinary SBDC teams. The SBDC is the Small Business Administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (SBA) largest service program and provides high-quality business and economic development assistance to small businesses owners and entrepreneurs. SBDC one-on-one professional business consulting is at no cost. Los Angeles County 661.362.5900 Cocsbdc.org Kern County 661.654.2856 Csub.edu/sbdc SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - SBA provides small businesses with an array of financing for small businesses from the smallest needs in microlending â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to substantial debt and equity investment capital (venture capital). SBA triples Surety Bond Guarantee Ceiling; helping small business secure larger contracts and grow. For more information on SBA programs visit: SBA.gov US TREASURY - Home to a number of initiatives to help small businesses grow. Treasury.gov

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

State Small Business Credit Initiative (SSBCI) - SSBCI supports state programs that, in turn, use the funds to support private sector loans and investments to small businesses and small manufacturers that are creditworthy but are not able to access the capital they need to expand and create jobs. Small Business Lending Fund (SBLF) - The Small Business Lending Fund (SBLF) provided capital to qualified community banks and community development loan funds (CDLFs) to encourage these institutions and Main Street businesses to work together to promote economic growth and create new jobs.

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EMPLOYMENT TRAINING PANEL (ETP) - A business and labor supported state initiative that assists employers in strengthening their competitive edge by providing funds to off-set the costs of job skills training necessary to maintain high-performance workplaces. ETP.ca.gov Department of Consumer and Business Affairs (DCBA) DCBA has programs to assist existing small businesses and can also provide advice to individuals starting small businesses. To contact DCBA, call 800.593.8222 or DCBA.lacounty.gov LA County Community Development Commission (LACDC) The LACDC supports local economies in Los Angeles County, including the Antelope Valley, by promoting business growth, and encouraging job creation and retention through programs such as neighborhood revitalization, business incubators, economic incentives, and commercial lending. Lacdc.org/for-businesses or call 626.586.1795.


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Become an ally for enterprise on

SoCal’s Leading Edge Since 1999, GAVEA has been a major force in helping businesspeople create, maintain and expand their companies and the wealth-creating local jobs that they provide. Our mission is to enhance our regional economy with job creation by engaging in strategic efforts of business retention, expansion and attraction. The Alliance is the only region-wide Economic Developer and promoter of business opportunity for jobs expansion and attraction for our dynamic high-tech triangle, which reaches from Acton to Ridgecrest, Boron to Tehachapi. Through outreach, education and collaboration, we are making known our 3,000 square miles of opportunity — accessible, affordable and available. As an elite investor of the Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance, you will have access to industry experts, sage advice from experienced colleagues and referrals to key business resources throughout the region. These invaluable tools provide both existing business owners, as well as prospective CEO’s with timely, accurate and insightful information you will find nowhere else. We invite you to become part of this important voice for Southern California’s Leading Edge. You will gain new perspective and intelligence only GAVEA can deliver. By making a small monthly investment, your organization will benefit from the opportunity to improve and sustain the economic vitality of our region. If finding allies for enterprise is important to you, join us in our quest to create a more vibrant and healthy regional economy.

Join the Alliance today. For more information or to obtain an Investor’s packet, please contact:

661.722.6566 g www.SoCalLeadingEdge.org g info@SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Join These Elite Investors Today g Antelope Valley College g Antelope Valley Hospital g Antelope Valley Transit Authority g g Atkinson and Associates g A.V. Air Quality Management District g g A.V. East Kern Water Agency g BYD Motors Inc. g City of California City g g City of Lancaster g City of Tehachapi g Coldwell Banker Commercial Valley Realty g g County of Los Angeles 5th District Supervisor Kathryn Barger g JVS SoCal g g Kaiser Permanente g Kern County g Learn 4 Life g Lockheed Martin g g Los Angeles County Workforce Development Board g Mojave Air and Space Port g g Northrop Grumman g Palmdale Regional Medical Center g Palmdale Water District g g VINSA Insurance Associates g Wells Fargo Bank g Western Pacific Roofing g 55

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

g Rio Tinto Borates g Southern California Edison g The Gas Company g


Investor Member Application www.SoCalLeadingEdge.org • info@SoCalLeadingEdge.org

661.722.6566 Date

Name of Business Street Address City Phone

State

(

)

Fax

Zip

(

)

Mobile

(

)

Primary Mailing Address (if different than above)

Name of Primary Contact

Title

Email Address (primary contact) Preferred method of communication (check one)

 Email

 U.S. Mail

 Fax

Name of Secondary Contact

 Other Title

(

Phone Number (secondary contact)

)

Email Address (secondary contact)

Desired Investment Level (please check one)

  

Introductory Investor

$1,000 (First Timers Only)

Atlantis Investor

$2,500

Endeavor Investor

$5,000

 

Discover Investor

$10,000

Regional Investor

$15,000

Annual payment in the amount of $

paid on

Quarterly installments of $

to begin on

Monthly installments of $

to begin on

Please make check payable to the Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance. Invoices will be emailed 60 days before due date. The Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance is a 501c6 non-profit economic development corporation working to improve the quality of life for those who live and work in the Antelope Valley.

Your Investment and support is greatly appreciated!

Preferred billing schedule for your Investment (please check one):


2019 Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

Investor Packages

GAVEA

Introductory Investor (First Timers) $1,000

Atlantis Investor $2,500

Endeavor Investor $5,000

Discovery Investor $10,000

Regional Investor $15,000

N/A

N/A

Business to Business marketing opportunities Investor listing on GAVEA website and printed materials Opportunity to purchase an ad in Quarterly E-Newsletter Invitation to Investor ONLY events Opportunity to serve on the GAVEA Board Priority access to research and reports 100 Economic Round Table Reports (annually) Property Showcase list on website for all investor owned properties or listings Opportunity to submit stories for the Quarterly E-Newsletter Special Recognition at the Annual Event Access to LEADS (Municipalities, Brokers and Developers only) Access to reduced exhibitor rates at Trade/Industry Shows (Team CA) Sponsor of annual Economic Round Table Report (Logo on the back cover) Program Sponsor for GAVEA events (Business card ad in the event program) Meal Sponsor for GAVEA events (4 tickets to event and logo in program)

N/A

Investor provided handouts at GAVEA Events

If your organization is unable to join GAVEA at this time, consider offering your tax-deductible contribution in any amount to our affiliated Antelope Valley Economic Research and Education Foundation. This 501(c)(3) organization is dedicated to furthering the research and education critical to the retention, expansion and attraction of wealth-creating jobs and opportunities within our region.

SoCalLeadingEdge.org

Event Sponsor for two GAVEA events annually (4 tickets to events, full page ad in program)


With Appreciation & Thanks to Our Sponsors for Making This Report Possible

South Street Digital, Inc. Digital & Wide Format Printing 661-823-4908

SouthStreetDigital.com

South Street Digital, Inc.

Tehachapi, CA 661-823-4908

Special Thanks to Our Non-Profit Allies

Profile for Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance

GAVEA 2019 Round Table Report  

GAVEA 2019 Round Table Report  

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