2022 Graziher Boarding School Guide

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WOMEN ON THE LAND

BOARDING SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

LOOKING AHEAD

Planning your child’s future

MY BOARDING LIFE

“It taught me to want more for myself and to expect more from myself ”

LEADING the WAY THE POWER of education


Australia


W E L CO M E

EDITOR’S LETTER

PHOTOGRAPH ABBIE MELLÉ

MAKING A DECISION ABOUT your children’s education is a struggle — at least I found it to be a very difficult and emotional one. I remember lots of conversations with my family and friends about this big decision. When it came to school for me, I stayed home with my horses — although I did dream about the idea of going to a school and taking one of them with me; I thought that would be the ultimate — but my brother went away to boarding school. (I always remember the time he came home and gave me 24 hours to teach him to ride, after he was invited to stay at a friend’s property, but I don’t think I was too successful!) We have created this guide to help make that hard decision a little easier for those of you who are facing it — because that, of course, is the reality for many in rural and remote areas. Take Jane Smith, for example, who grew up on a sheep station 400 kilometres from the closest town. Our regular recipe writer knew as a young child that it was highly likely she would need to go away to school. “Other secondary school alternatives were never discussed, so it came as no surprise when I left home and the Broken Hill School of the Air, and found myself in a different world: a large, traditional private boarding school in Adelaide,” she explains on page 10. Now she is seeing boarding school through the eyes of her 12-year-old son George and daughter Annabelle, 15, and enjoying how confident and resilient they are both becoming. The Christensen family, whose story is on page 4, sent their three to The Rockhampton Grammar School, a decision made easier by the fact that “If I’m going to make mum Bronwyn had gone there herself. “I am really enjoying being back at RGS as a parent, possibly more so than as a student!” she says. the SACRIFICE I knew one of our regular writers Jayne C had three young children and of not having them would soon be facing the school question so I asked what she wanted for her kids. “We want them to be valued, but also disciplined,” she explains on around my dinner page 17. “If I’m going to make the sacrifice of not having them around my table, I need to dinner table, I need to know they will come out the other end as wellknow they will come rounded young adults.” I completely agree: we all want to make the best decision for our kids, and the place to start is to make sure you are as out the other end as informed as possible. I hope these pages and our digital guide (see below) WELL-ROUNDED help make the education journey a little smoother for you and your family. Enjoy the issue, ADULTS.”

VICTORIA CAREY victoria@graziher.com.au

Head to GRAZIHER.COM.AU for our digital Graziher Boarding Schools Guide, with extended stories on all the schools featured and direct links to all school websites.

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CO N T E N T S

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CONTENTS FEATURED SCHOOLS 6 22 26 28 32 36

BOARDING SCHOOLS GUIDE 6 LEADING THE WAY A student’s life at

THE ROCKHAMPTON GRAMMAR SCHOOL

The Rockhampton Grammar School.

WHITSUNDAY ANGLICAN SCHOOL

12 HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS The Shady Baker

THE GEELONG COLLEGE

reflects on boarding school life.

THE ARMIDALE SCHOOL

19 LOOKING BACK Which school? Jayne Cuddihy

ST PETERS LUTHERAN COLLEGE

on what to factor in when making the decision.

ANGLICAN CHURCH GRAMMAR SCHOOL

20 THE MORE YOU LEARN Our list of featured schools. 66 THE GIFT OF OPPORTUNITY Grace Quast’s school days.

(CHURCHIE)

40 42 46 50 52 54 56 58 62 64

ST MARGARET’S ANGLICAN GIRLS SCHOOL WENONA THE KING’S SCHOOL

WOMEN ON THE LAND

ST JOSEPH’S NUDGEE COLLEGE

COVER STORY Piper Christensen finished at The Rockhampton Grammar School in 2021 and remembers her time fondly. Read her story on page 6. Photography Jessica Turich. Words Ashleigh Harvey.

BOARDING SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

SOMERVILLE

LOOKING AHEAD

Planning your child’s future

STUARTHOLME SCHOOL

MY BOARDING LIFE

“It taught me to want more for myself and to expect more from myself ”

DALBY STATE HIGH SCHOOL SCOTCH COLLEGE MELBOURNE TUDOR HOUSE ST URSULA’S COLLEGE

LEADING the WAY THE POWER of education

GRZBOARD26_p000-p000_Cover_V2.indd 1

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Piper Christensen, a second-generation student who graduated in 2021, at the school’s demonstration farm, Port Curtis.


CO V E R S TO RY

LEADING THE WAY

Piper Christensen thrived during her time at The Rockhampton Grammar School — just like her mother did before her. Words Ashleigh Harvey Photography Jessica Turich

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T H E R O C K H A M P TO N G R A M M A R S C H O O L

The 2021 RGS show cattle team practise their skills. Facing page Showing cattle was just one of many co-curricular interests Piper was able to pursue while at RGS.

IT’S NOT UNCOMMON at The Rockhampton Grammar School (RGS) for a student to be the child or even the grandchild of a past student. Successive generations of RGSeducated students are particularly common among boarding families, some of whom have relatives who attended the school in the earliest days of its 140-year history. For boarders, school is much more than just timetabled lessons and sporting activities; friendships are forged for life and lasting memories are made. It is unsurprising, then, to learn that boarders whose experiences are so positive want to provide the same opportunities for their children. The Christensens, who hail from a property called Tatiara on the outskirts of Theodore, Queensland, 200 kilometres south-west of Rockhampton, are a good example of such a family. Bronwyn was a boarder at RGS in the 1980s and her three children — Piper, who graduated in 2021, Year 11 student Bridie and Mackenzie, who is in Year 9 — are now following in her footsteps. Bronwyn is happy to return to the school, although this time in a much different capacity. “I am really enjoying being back at RGS as a parent, possibly more so than as a student!” she says. “When I was at school here — my kids roll their eyes when they hear this — I remember fire alarms set off by thunder and walking up that blasted hill at two in the SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

morning wearing pyjamas; weekends lazing and sunbaking by the pool (albeit a much smaller one); and camping in dongas during weekend stays at Ritamada [the school’s beachfront outdoor education facility]. “But mostly I remember good friendships, lots of laughs — and possibly even a bit of school work!” As a past boarder, Bronwyn understands the challenges, complexities and opportunities involved in having a child attend boarding school. This insight led her to put her hand up for the role of Secretary on the RGS Boarder Parent Association, a role she will continue this year. “Boarding is such an integral part of a student’s life when they need to be away for schooling. If they are not comfortable in their home-away-from-home environment, there is no way they can do their best at their studies,” she explains. “I had confidence in RGS’s ability to provide a safe and supporting environment for our children and I was keen to be a part of ensuring that the needs of the boarders continue to be met and, in many cases, exceeded.” Bronwyn’s eldest child, Piper, completed Year 12 at RGS in 2021 — and she has some simple advice to help her younger sister and brother make the most of their time in boarding school. “Just put yourself out there,” Piper says. “Take advantage of all the opportunities the school offers and don’t worry >

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“Take advantage of all the OPPORTUNITIES the school offers and DON’T WORRY about what anyone thinks of you.”


A D V E R TO R I A L

about what anyone thinks of you. You quickly realise that, honestly, no-one cares, so do what makes you happy.” Piper, a prefect in her final year, certainly followed her own advice when she arrived at RGS in Year 10, wasting no time making the most of the dynamic environment of boarding school. Not only did she have to adapt to different studies, she was also exposed to a range of new activities at school. Musicals, oratory, volleyball, rowing and the show cattle team were all on Piper’s agenda — in fact, she was already looking into the latter before she even started. “I never had the opportunity to compete in show cattle at home,’’ says Piper, whose family home is a commercial cattle property with mostly Charbray and Charolais breeds. “Coming to RGS, I threw myself into show cattle. I loved it, and it soon became my preferred co-curricular interest. It was great being surrounded by families who show cattle regularly; you listen to them and learn how to do things better.” With more than 35 sports and other activities to choose from, the co-curricular program at RGS is all about providing extra opportunities. “I had a crack at rowing in Year 10 and… I’m not a rower,’’ Piper, who is always willing to give new things a go, explains.

“I don’t like the early mornings and I didn’t have the fitness, but it was good to experience the sport. I loved volleyball to pieces, but I couldn’t play it to save myself.” The Rockhampton Grammar School also provided Piper with subject opportunities that were not available to her at home. These included accounting and agricultural science, which were integral in Piper’s recent acceptance into a dual bachelor’s degree in Agribusiness and Agricultural Science at The University of Queensland’s Gatton campus. While thrilled to be offered her first preference for tertiary study, Piper admits she isn’t sure where the degree will take her and isn’t putting pressure on herself to figure it out any time soon. “Honestly, I don’t know what career I’ll end up in, but that’s what the next four years is for: to learn all that I can about the industry and see what interests me.” g Conveniently located in one of Queensland’s largest regional centres, The Rockhampton Grammar School is proud to be the school of choice for generations of families throughout Central and North Queensland, the Northern Territory and overseas. Talk to The Rockhampton Grammar School today about starting your family tradition: rgs.qld.edu.au

From left Shakeeta Yates, Zac Armstrong, Piper Christensen, Meg Ingram, Clay Goodwin, Jemma Lang and, in front, Tyler Hyden and Stetson McGhee.

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Home for the holidays: Annabelle and George drove sheep to the woolshed for shearing.


OPINION

Home is where the heart is Jane Smith (aka The Shady Baker) reveals how boarding school engenders stronger connections, both at school and at home. Words and photographs Jane Smith

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LIVING ON A SHEEP station almost 400 kilometres from the nearest major town, when I was a child it was always expected that I would attend boarding school. Other secondary school alternatives were never discussed, so it came as no surprise when I left home and the Broken Hill School of the Air, and found myself in a different world: a large, traditional private boarding school in Adelaide. My brother and I followed in the footsteps of our father and uncle, who had attended the same school. As a student, I embraced rowing, gymnastics and hockey and even attempted highland dancing and the bagpipes that were a big part of the school’s heritage. I learned a foreign language and spent time on the school’s island for outdoor education. These experiences were just not possible at home and, at the time, I possibly didn’t fully appreciate the privileged position I was in. In quiet moments I spent a lot of my time thinking about the wide-open paddocks and dusty roads of outback New South Wales, our animals and the familiar routines of home. Perhaps that is why as an adult I feel such a strong connection to where I live. Now, our children — Annabelle, 15, and George, 12 — are in the middle of their own boarding-school years. The school my children attend is quite different to the school I went to; however, some things never change. Their clothes and bed linen are tagged with the same red-and-white Cash’s name tapes that I had. I can remember the aroma of microwaved noodles cooking in the girls’ recreation room and I’ve learned they are still the snack food of choice when the school meal hasn’t quite satisfied that never-ending teenage hunger. For girls, the colour of their doona is quite important, as this sets the tone for their allocated dormitory area, regardless of how small it is. Girls also like to use photos, cushions and fairy lights to personalise their space and make it feel homely. In my experience, this is not a priority for most boys. Their space is purely functional: it is somewhere to sleep and store

Evening light near Ivanhoe, NSW. Opposite page Annabelle and George get reacquainted with the horses.

snacks, clothes and maybe a football. This difference becomes quite obvious once the packing starts and the luggage starts to pile up for the trip to school. One major change from my boarding days is the communication between parents and students. Weekly written letters to home and pay phone calls are mostly a thing of the past. Today we have text messages, mobile phone calls, email and social media to help us stay in touch. In the time our eldest has been at boarding school, she has been involved in stock showing, debating, various sporting and leadership roles and has had the opportunity to have her own horse at school. My daughter has learned to deal with a wide range of personalities and develop organisational skills and personal responsibility. Just as it was in my childhood, these experiences are not readily available at home. As parents it is a major decision to send our children out into the big wide world, in which boarding school is just the first step. I worry about the small things, from their socks to their hair. I worry they might have moments of loneliness or won’t be able to stand up for themselves when faced with difficult situations. The house feels silent and strange once they return to school, though their farm clothes are still in the laundry basket and their battered boots and hats are still at the door. Of course, it is not forever and the excitement of the holidays or a leave weekend arrives quickly. Then it is heartwarming to see those faces burst through the door and scan the house to check that everything is in order. I look forward to cooking a special welcome-home meal, often something comforting such as a roast chicken or lamb chops with gravy. For me, this is the best way to reset our family time. Best of all, I see how confident and resilient they are both becoming. I feel proud of the big and small achievements they make every day. I hear them tell funny stories and I know this is all part of them growing up and me gradually learning to embrace a new stage of life. g


OPINION

“The house feels SILENT AND STRANGE once they return to school, though their farm clothes are still in the laundry basket and their BATTERED BOOTS and hats are still at the door.”

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M Y S C H O O L DAY S

Looking back JAYNE CUDDIHY reflects on her boarding days as the time comes to decide where her three children will go to school. I HAD A DORM mistress who used to sneak chocolate milkshakes into our area after lights out, when she knew it had been a rough day. She also used to regularly fuss over girls who were homesick or low in confidence, with a quiet cup of tea and make-up demonstrations. She knew exactly where on the oval to shine her spotlight, and god help the about how the boys in his Year 12 dorm pulled together an students caught out of bounds. They copped her full wrath. informal boxing competition. The dorm master, lazily smokMiss V also had an intellect that left even the most ‘worldly’ ing a cigarette, looked on as they belted the stuffing out of of teachers blinking their eyes in delayed comprehension. each other. Gone are those days. It’s no longer the case that It’s the wonderful teachers, supervisors, connections and you are given your Homelink number and 10 weeks’ worth of friends that make boarding school. Although not for everytwo-minute noodles and a ‘see you at the end of term’ wave. one — I had some ups and downs, too — it’s more than just Today’s parents want principals to maintain eye contact the classroom theory that you take away from it. and have a firm handshake; they want trust. That means Where to send our children away to board is my current believing a group of strangers will take care of the educaconundrum. I catch myself thinking of that dorm mistress tional and emotional needs of your child. We want them to and wanting the same kind of empathy (and boundaries) for be valued but also disciplined. If I’m going to make the sacrimy kids. A rope that can be pulled on, but has a limit. fice of not having them around my dinner table, I need to At the moment I teach our three children through know they will come out the other end as well-rounded Distance Education and have three years to prepare for the young adults. There will be bullying, drugs, stealing and emotional fallout of leaving our eldest in a dormitory hunsneaking cigarettes into dorms no matter where you send dreds of kilometres away. Yet, already, our school gatherings them. We just have to equip our kids to make the best choices. are peppered with conversations about what schools are I want my three to be challenged; to have opinions that popular, how far we’re willing to travel and which friends will stay together. With more “It’s the wonderful teachers, supervisors, friends and pressure on waiting lists and fees to plan for, it’s CONNECTIONS that make boarding school.” something we’re forced to think about early. I grew up in an era when family tradition largely dictated where you were sent. If one of your parents aren’t mine. I know the clashes will be spectacular, but some attended a particular school, then it was likely you would of the greatest conversations I’ve had are when someone has too. They were also drought years and market slumps that challenged me on my beliefs, and I changed my mind. meant affordability played a big role in these decisions. There’s an art in that kind of discussion and it’s not often Thanks largely to the long-term dedication of organisalearned at home. When I reflect on my boarding school days, tions such as the Isolated Children’s Parents’ Association I don’t remember what marks I got. The value in my school(ICPA), governments have eased the burden on the hip ing was the relationships I built and lost and the ability to pocket for many rural and remote families, allowing decirelate to people outside my immediate circle. sions to be more based on personal and educational factors. In a conversation with my grandfather more than 20 years The questions aren’t so much around cost (though we are ago, he told me our generation needed to be worldly, aware, flagging schools offering sibling discounts); instead we want educated and kind. I think that sentiment is even more pertito know our children will be safe, valued, challenged and supnent for our kids. Now, more than ever, we depend on our ported. We want open lines of communication when things relationships to keep us afloat in today’s world. To mould the go wrong — whether our child was the perpetrator or the humans who appreciate the value in that, the boarding expevictim. Parents want to know about cybersecurity, phone polrience needs to be as well rounded as the graduates they hope g icies and how bullying is navigated. My husband tells a story to produce. I’d better start looking at some prospectuses! SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

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B O A R D I N G S C H O O L S D I R E C TO RY

The more you learn

Research is key to making the right decision about which school to choose for your children. The Graziher directory is a good starting point. GONE ARE THE DAYS when a boarding school was chosen solely on students’ academic achievements or sporting prowess, or just because their parents went there. These days the decision is a complicated one, because so much is riding on it. Extensive co-curricular programs cater to a wide array of interests and talents. Pastoral care, in both day school and boarding environments, is more important than ever as students navigate the tricky teenage years. Geographical distance and cost are also factors parents have to consider. With so much at stake, the pressure on you to choose the ‘right’ school has never been higher. Weighing up the pros and cons can be stressful and time-consuming, and there is rarely a perfect answer when parents are choosing a ‘home away from home’ for their children. ANGLICAN CHURCH GRAMMAR SCHOOL Located in Brisbane’s eastern suburbs, Anglican Church Grammar School (‘Churchie’) is for boys from Reception to Year 12. Boarding, offered from Year 7, has been at the heart of the school for more than 100 years. The transition to boarding is nurtured through support programs to give boys the strongest start possible. The school is a member of the Great Public Schools’ Association of Queensland (GPS) and offers a varied sports and activities program. Opportunities to participate in interstate and overseas tours include international music tours with performances at such places as Westminster Abbey, Vienna and Rome. Open Day is 4 May 2022.

Oaklands Parade, East Brisbane Qld 4169; churchie.com.au DALBY STATE HIGH SCHOOL Established in 1954, Dalby State High School is one of Queensland’s most innovative and progressive secondary

schools, located about an hour west of Toowoomba. “Our reputation comes from a stimulating, well-ordered and supportive environment, with a dynamic curriculum that produces quality student outcomes,” says Principal Dr Dean Russell. Dalby State High School has earned an enviable reputation for cultural pursuits and extracurricular programs. It boasts two campuses and more than 1000 students, including 60 boarders who live at the Bunya Campus about five kilometres from Dalby town centre. Set on 340 hectares, Bunya is the largest school farm in Queensland. 26 Nicholson Street, Dalby

Qld 4405; dalbyshs.eq.edu.au

SOMERVILLE HOUSE Somerville House is located in the inner-city suburb of South Brisbane, where boarders often run or walk the path around the South Bank parklands and the Kangaroo Point Cliffs. Established in 1899, Somerville House is a Prep to Year 12 school for girls, offering boarding from Year 6. Under the governance of the Presbyterian and Uniting Churches, Somerville House offers comprehensive education and co-curricular programs that recognise the importance of physical and spiritual wellbeing as well as academic excellence. Visit the website to book a tour. 17 Graham Street, South Brisbane

Qld 4101; somerville.qld.edu.au ST JOSEPH’S NUDGEE COLLEGE Established in 1891 in Brisbane’s north, St Joseph’s Nudgee College is a Catholic day and boarding school for boys in Years 5 to 12. The Bathersby Boarding Village, completed in 2015, is a home away from home where individual rooms provide a sanctuary for boys to call their own. The college’s co-curricular program includes sporting and cultural activities so everyone can nurture their passions and strengths. The College is also a member of the GPS Association of Queensland. Boarders are given every opportunity to thrive in the Reach for the Stars academic tutoring program. The on-campus health centre is staffed with nurses 24 hours a day. Open Day is 21 May 2022.

2199 Sandgate Road, Boondall Qld 4034; nudgee.com

ST MARGARET’S ANGLICAN GIRLS SCHOOL Founded by the Sisters of the Society of the Sacred Advent, who dedicated their lives to the education of women and children, St Margaret’s has been educating girls since 1895. Situated in the north Brisbane suburb of Ascot, it is a Prep to Year 12 Anglican school for girls, offering boarding from Year 5. The school is known for academic excellence and commitment to pastoral care. Its smaller size is a strength, allowing a focus on personalised learning. Extracurricular opportunities include sport, music, performance and visual arts. St Margaret’s has a global outlook, offering an extensive exchange program. Open day is 5 March 2022. 11 Petrie Street, Ascot

Qld 4007; stmargarets.qld.edu.au SCOTCH COLLEGE MELBOURNE Scotch College has been educating boys for more than 170 years at its 27 hectare Melbourne campus. Scotch has both a junior and senior school and is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church of Victoria. The senior school comprises 1460 boys, including about 160 boarders. The College has a proud history of providing regional students with a quality curriculum in a supportive environment. From science to creative arts, tech to foreign languages, students have every opportunity to work towards their maximum potential. Visit the website to book a tour. 1 Morrison

Street, Hawthorn Vic 3122; scotch.vic.edu.au SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

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ST PETERS LUTHERAN COLLEGE As the only co-educational boarding school in Brisbane, St Peters can cater for the whole family. Educating boys and girls from Prep to Year 12 across its two campuses, the school is renowned for its academic, sports, music and co-curricular programs. The school has a proud boarding history with state-of-the-art facilities, pastoral care programs, health services and more. There is an iconic outdoor education program for Year 9 students who spend five weeks living at the Ironbark Centre near Toowoomba, completing outdoor challenges,


A D V E R TO R I A L

maintaining the farm and experiencing community living. St Peters also boasts one of the nation’s leading music courses. Open day is 12 March 2022.

66 Harts Road, Indooroopilly Qld 4068; stpeters.qld.edu.au

and respect each other’s differences to create a positive and enriching living and learning environment,” says Director of Boarding David Drain. School tours are available every day: visit the website to book. 87 Douglas Street, Armidale

NSW 2350; as.edu.au ST URSULA’S COLLEGE “St Ursula’s College provides an innovative environment where girls are challenged to be critical thinkers, curious learners, confident communicators and leaders,” says Principal Tanya Appleby. Established in 1931, the Catholic College for girls in Years 7 to 12 offers an awardwinning boarding environment. In 2020 and 2021, the College was awarded a Boarding School of the Year Excellence Award in recognition of the caring and dedicated atmosphere provided for residential students. To accommodate the changing needs of modern families, St Ursula’s also allows weekly and casual boarding. Open day is 13 March 2022.

38 Taylor Street, Toowoomba Qld 4350; st-ursula.qld.edu.au STUARTHOLME SCHOOL With only 690 students, Stuartholme School is small enough for each girl to be personally known, yet large enough to offer an extensive range of opportunities in its heritage-listed buildings and picturesque bush setting. Six kilometres from the Brisbane CBD, Stuartholme is Brisbane’s only Catholic boarding school for girls in Years 7 to 12. The school offers tutoring and recreation programs for students, who can take advantage of the opportunities of city living while enjoying the school’s bush-like surroundings. “We are an academically successful school; however, this is not at the expense of our students’ wellbeing,” says Principal Kristen Sharpe. The first school tour of 2022 is on 10 June. 365 Birdwood Terrace,

Toowong Qld 4066; stuartholme.com THE ARMIDALE SCHOOL Academic excellence and outstanding boarding life are hallmarks of The Armidale School, a coeducational GPS school in the New England region of NSW. Students in Pre-kindy to Year 12 can become young people of courage and conviction, whether in sport, in the classroom, on the stage or abseiling down a cliff. Boarding is available from Year 6: students develop a sense of pride and togetherness in what is their home away from home. “They must appreciate

THE GEELONG COLLEGE Founded in 1861, The Geelong College is a Uniting Church co-educational school on two campuses in Geelong, south-west of Melbourne. With about 1500 students from Early Learning to Year 12, including 100 boarders, the College has strong links to the surrounding coastal and rural areas. Co-curricular programs are available in music, drama, public speaking, debating and sport. “The world is actively inclusive and diverse, just like the College — girls and boys together in learning, living, growing, working collaboratively, exchanging ideas and learning from each other,” says Principal Dr Peter Miller. Open days are 6 April, 4 May and 8 June 2022, with more to be announced. 20 Talbot Street, Newtown

Vic 3220; tgc.vic.edu.au

school from Early Learning to Year 12, with boarding offered from Year 6. In addition to outstanding academic results, the school offers a large range of extracurricular activities. “The holistic experience that our school provides reflects our core belief that a student’s achievements are much more than their academic results,” says Headmaster Dr Phillip Moulds. Every day is open day at RGS: book a tour online. Archer Street,

Rockhampton Qld 4700; rgs.qld.edu.au WENONA Wenona is a boarding school with warm, inclusive communities supported by a comprehensive pastoral care program. Established in 1886 in North Sydney, Wenona is an independent day and boarding school for girls from Kindergarten to Year 12. The balanced education program ensures that Wenona students gain skills in extracurricular areas, including sports, debating, creative arts, community service, teamwork and leadership. Tour dates for 2022 are 25 May and 11 August. 176 Walker Street, North

Sydney NSW 2060; wenona.nsw.edu.au

“We are an academically SUCCESSFUL school; however, this success is not at the expense of our students’ WELLBEING.” Stuartholme School Principal Kristen Sharpe THE KING’S SCHOOL

WHITSUNDAY ANGLICAN SCHOOL

Located in North Parramatta in Sydney’s western suburbs, The King’s School is an independent school that has been educating boys for more than 190 years. King’s offers boarding from Year 3 at Tudor House, its junior school at Moss Vale, moving to the North Parramatta campus in Year 7. Boys are encouraged to develop their talents and interests, in first-class facilities and inspiring surroundings. An immersive approach helps boys develop through exploring, learning, playing, competing, creating, performing and connecting. Senior campus tour dates are 15 June, 6 July, 17 August and 9 November 2022.

Located in Mackay on Queensland’s Whitsunday Coast, Whitsunday Anglican School is a leading regional co-educational school for students from Kindergarten to Year 12, with boarding offered from Year 5. The school prides itself on developing the intellectual, creative, physical, emotional and spiritual wellbeing of its students. “We provide our students with a holistic education, one that enables each and every student to realise their potential,” says Principal Andrew Wheaton. The school places great importance on helping boarders maintain connections with their lives and communities, providing a chartered bus service to surrounding areas each weekend. Visit the website to arrange a tour. 2–16 Celeber Drive, Beaconsfield

87–129 Pennant Hills Road, North Parramatta NSW 2151; kings.edu.au

g

THE ROCKHAMPTON GRAMMAR SCHOOL

Qld 4740; was.qld.edu.au

Established in 1881, Rockhampton Grammar School is an independent co-educational boarding and day

For more information about schools in this directory, visit Graziher’s digital Boarding Schools Guide using the QR code on p26.

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W H I T S U N DAY A N G L I C A N S C H O O L

Week in, week out The Semple kids are weekly boarders at the Whitsunday Anglican School — and it’s the perfect solution for this busy family. Photography Justine Semple

ASK JUSTINE AND ANDREW SEMPLE what’s important to them and their answer is easy to predict: keeping their four children connected to the land. Their children — Lauren, Lewis, Travis and Analise — are fourth-generation graziers and play an active role on the property. Cattle work, cropping, mustering, maintenance, water runs, swimming in the dam and enjoying family time — this is what you will find the Semple kids out doing each weekend… including during the school term. Justine says she was looking for something slightly different to the standard boarding model. “We are lucky to be in a position where the kids are able to be weekly boarders and can come home to family and the property each weekend,” she says.

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“Our children are all very connected to the farm and that is one of the major reasons we chose Whitsunday. I love that they can maintain their roots, but also have access to the opportunities that a major school provides. “I want our kids to grow up in the country, with the values and people of the bush that are so important to us, but I also want their world and horizons to expand.” It’s no small feat. The family runs up to 5000 head of cattle across three properties — two based near Dysart, west of Mackay, as well as Carlo Station, on the remote edge of the Simpson Desert near the Northern Territory border. The school runs a bus service west to Moranbah each weekend, and Justine travels the extra kilometres required to get her children home. >

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W H I T S U N DAY A N G L I C A N S C H O O L

“I see kids from the country alongside their peers and they have got something different. What I love is that the kids are grounded and practical.” “It is a commitment but seeing the kids thriving makes it worthwhile. I wouldn’t have it any other way. Time spent in the car has become invaluable to us, I hear about their week, they share funny stories and we catch up with what has been happening on the property,” she says. “Analise, our youngest, isn’t at boarding school yet so it also means they keep connected as siblings and know what is happening in each other’s lives. Because we are often at the school, Analise already knows many of the boarders, which makes the transition to boarding life so much easier.” Justine also shares a passion for, and background in, remote and rural healthcare with her family. Lauren, their eldest daughter, has just graduated as part of the Class of 2021. With her heart in the bush, she is set to study nursing, a career she hopes to follow in remote and rural communities. Justine says she is extremely proud of how her children have adapted to boarding life. “I see kids from the country alongside their peers and they have got something different. What I love is that the kids are grounded and practical. They know about hard work,” she explains. “They can work as part of a muster and be an asset to a working team — and they’ve got the skill set for that. And SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

they can also enjoy an active life at school with their peers.” Returning home regularly also gives the Semples the chance to learn from their grandparents, who bought and developed the land at Dysart 50 years ago. “Working alongside us and their grandparents means a lot — generational wisdom and learning is such a gift and privilege,” she says. A highlight of the year for the family is the annual muster at Carlo Station. “The kids are up at 4am every day and ready to go! I love to see them come back at the end of a long day with such a strong sense of accomplishment and achievement,” says Justine. Justine and Andrew are proud of their children’s ability to work as a team — both alongside one another and as part of a bigger working team. “I am completely and utterly proud of them. I’m proud of them as individuals, but also of the fact that they are proud of and respect each other. They are very different as individuals, but they are a tight team,” she says. “Life on the land can be hard, but it is a special childhood and there are incredibly rich and beautiful moments.” Visit the website to arrange a tour. 2–16 Celeber Drive, Beaconsfield Qld 4740; phone (07) 4969 2077; was.qld.edu.au

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Ellie Campbell, at far right, has loved boardng life.

Take the chance We ask student Ellie Campbell what she would say to someone thinking of going to boarding school at The Geelong College. Her answer? “Grab it with both hands!” WHAT ATTRACTED YOU TO THE GEELONG COLLEGE? Coming from a small rural school, Geelong was appealing to me because it had all the same facilities as many of the Melbourne-based schools but without the intensity of having to live in a big city. We looked at other places around Victoria, but I loved Geelong College’s boarding facilities. The smaller size of the boarding house means that we can make friends across the years. I also liked that the school is co-ed and, because the boarders are integrated into day houses, we have the opportunity to meet many different students. Geelong College offers an incredibly supportive learning environment, and a broad range of subjects and extracurricular activities. There is something for everyone, including musicals and plays, fashion and textiles, media, studio arts, debating, choir, music and sport, and everyone here is encouraged to get involved. I have especially loved the APS

ELLIE CAMPBELL STARTED boarding at The Geelong College in Year 9, following in the footsteps of her sister Lou and their father Lachlan. Now in Year 12, Ellie is from Byawatha, which is approximately 200 kilometres from Melbourne’s CBD and near Wangaratta. This keen sportswoman — Ellie rows, swims and also plays netball and water polo — has certainly embraced the opportunities on offer at The Geelong College. Today, she is Co-Captain of her day house and a leader in Mossgiel, the girls’ boarding house. Here we ask Ellie about her school life: WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO GO TO BOARDING SCHOOL? Although I enjoyed my school in Wangaratta, I wanted to expand my horizons and explore new experiences and opportunities further afield. I wanted to be in a different environment for my final years at school. SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

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[Associated Public Schools] sport program where we compete against other Melbourne and Geelong schools each weekend. Finally, the warmth and dedication provided by the tutors and staff in the boarding house was evident from the very first night I spent there. All of the staff clearly care about your individual wellbeing and support your academic studies, which is another huge benefit of being in a smaller boarding house. WHAT HAVE BEEN THE BEST EXPERIENCES YOU HAVE HAD HERE AT COLLEGE? Boarding as a whole has been such an incredible experience. I have formed friendships with the boarders that are far closer than a typical school friendship. There is no doubt that they will last a lifetime, so I am extremely grateful for that. I have gained so much independence, resilience, and have learned to be responsible for myself. Some of my favourite things to do as a boarder are the social aspects. On weekends we enjoy barbecue dinners, chatting around a fire pit, and there are also organised outings during the term where we do a range of different things, such as surfing at Lorne, a trip to the theatre, yum cha and shopping in Melbourne and tree surfing in the Otways.

WHAT ARE YOU MOST LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS YEAR? Although Year 12 is a bit daunting, I am looking forward to the excitement of completing my final year of school with all my friends and the support from my teachers. I am eager to work really hard on my schoolwork so I’m in a position to excel at the end of the year. The Head of the River rowing will be a big highlight for me, competing against all the other APS schools for the final time. WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO SOMEONE WHO IS CONSIDERING COMING TO THE GEELONG COLLEGE AS A BOARDER? Although moving away from home into a new environment is daunting, the opportunities the school provides are like no other. Boarding at Geelong College has such a great culture — it is really fun and welcoming to everyone, so the transition will be much easier than you think. I feel very fortunate to have had this opportunity and if you get the chance, you should grab it with both hands! The next open days are 6 April, 4 May and 8 June 2022, with more to be announced — contact admissions@geelongcollege.vic. edu.au for further details. 20 Talbot Street, Newtown Vic 3220; (03) 5226 3156; geelongcollege.vic.edu.au

Be of

COURAGE


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T H E A R M I DA L E S C H O O L

Relative values Isobel Pengilley has thrived at The Armidale School ­­— so much so that her parents decided to send her younger brothers as well.

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JUST HOURS AFTER TAKING to the stage in the final show of the school’s production of Sweeney Todd last March, Isobel Pengilley dived into the Dumaresq Dam for a one kilometre open-water swim with her younger brothers Archie and Hamish and 125 other students from The Armidale School (TAS). “It was bit chilly but it was great. When we couldn’t do the Coffs Ocean Swim because the roads were blocked from flooding, the whole TAS community came together to make it happen,” explains the Year 11 student who completed the swim with her brothers as part of a TAS challenge award called the Triple Crown. The fact the Tamworth siblings went on to complete a further three events — cycling 100 kilometres, running 19 kilometres and 40 hours of fitness challenges — was not just testament to their spirit of adventure, but to the programs on offer at the northern New South Wales school. “TAS gives you the opportunities to be involved in as much as you can, from music and arts to sport and adventure. You get to do it with all your friends and as a family,” says Isobel. “In cadets I’m in the signals platoon and enjoying learning the different ways of communicating that aren’t face to face. The academic program is also broad. I’m studying chemistry, but also loved designing and welding a fire pit at the school Trade Training Centre last year.” Isobel plays the cello; Archie, who is in Year 9, is a bagpiper and the cadet band’s pipe major; while Year 7 student Hamish has decided to learn both! “The things that I most like about TAS are boarding, cadets and the wide range of learning opportunities available both inside the classroom and out of it,” says Archie. SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

Hamish, who started boarding last year in Year 6, agrees. “I’m also enjoying getting to know all the new boarders who started this year,” he says. A comprehensive, co-educational boarding experience is what their parents Georgie and Keith Pengilley were looking for when enrolling their children, including their youngest child, Edward, when he is old enough. “Primarily it was being able to send them to a genuine boarding school in a co-educational setting, that understands the challenges faced by children living away from home,” explains Georgie. “So often now schools provide boarding, but it is not part of the fabric of the school as it is at TAS. When you are away from home, being with your siblings allows you to navigate some of the challenges of missing home.” How well the school kept her informed about her children’s progress was another key factor for Georgie. “Another reason for choosing the school was the exceptional communication that’s provided to us by boarding and educational staff, who keep us constantly updated on the children’s progress,” she says. “The open communication gives us comfort that the children are well and enjoying their time at school.” Isobel, Archie and Hamish all agree that boarding gives them the best of both worlds. “It really is a home away from home — except that here, we can look out for each other while doing our own things, but not be too close to be annoyed by each other,” Isobel says, with a laugh. School tours are available every day. For more information, visit the website to book a time. 87 Douglas Street, Armidale NSW 2350; phone (02) 6776 5880; as.edu.au

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DISCOVER THE PLACE WHERE EDUCATION MEETS ADVENTURE. Young people are craving adventure, exploration and new experiences. As the only fully co-educational GPS boarding school in NSW, TAS offers a unique education. Half of our Middle and Senior School students are boarders and living on campus offers a dynamic adventure. At TAS, we not only strive for academic excellence, but our students are engaged in a range of co-curricular activities, from the stage to the surf, from choir to cadets and from debating to robotics. With a breadth of life experience, our students become confident, resilient and independent young men and women. Discover a world of adventure for your child – you can also take a virtual tour of TAS or call our Enrolments Registrar Jo Neilson on (02) 6776 5800 to discover why TAS truly is the one for boarding. DISCOVER A WORLD OF ADVENTURE FOR YOUR CHILD

www.as.edu.au


Long distance St Peters Lutheran College offers a special scholarship for country kids living in remote areas.


S T P E T E R S L U T H E R A N CO L L E G E

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S T P E T E R S L U T H E R A N CO L L E G E

On expansive grounds in Brisbane’s west, students are encouraged to develop their strengths and learn new skills — they have access to numerous state-of-the-art facilities after school hours, plus a range of tutoring and extracurricular programs to ensure every success in their future lives. ST PETERS LUTHERAN COLLEGE Indooroopilly has been a leader in Christian co-education for 76 years. This Prep to Year 12 College has long held the title of Brisbane’s only co-educational day and boarding school and is inter­ nationally renowned for its academic, sport, music and extracurricular offerings. With boarding available from Year 6, St Peters is where rural, regional and overseas students come to thrive in their high school years. Being co-educational, male and female siblings can remain close, plus there are a range of initiatives in place to create family-like bonds and ensure peer-to-peer support within the boarding houses. The benefits of boarding at St Peters are endless. On expansive grounds in Brisbane’s west, students are encouraged to develop their strengths and learn new skills — they have access to numerous state-of-the-art facilities after school hours, plus a range of tutoring and extracurricular programs to ensure every success in their future lives. SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

St Peters strives to provide the very best learning environments for its students and, in 2022, that’s being taken to a whole new level. The College’s Centre for Learning & Innovation — designed as an answer to our rapidly changing world — is well on track to be completed in the new year. The four-storey building will reflect the best of how students learn and will encourage growth in both teaching and learning practices. Students from all Year levels will have access to the latest educational technologies and acquire invaluable skills to last a lifetime. To gain access to the Centre for Learning & Innovation, and to have your child take advantage of all that’s on offer through a St Peters education, apply for a Boarding Scholarship. Applications are open to students who live more than 200 kilometres from a centre with boarding school facilities. Open day is 12 March 2022. 66 Harts Road, Indooroopilly Qld 4068; phone (07) 3377 6236; stpeters.qld.edu.au

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WHERE IT’S YOUR HOME AWAY FROM HOME

Suppor�ng rural families for 75 years P - 12 Co-educa�on | Boarding Years 6 - 12 Boarding places available for 2023 and 2024 Contact Admissions on admissions@stpeters.qld.edu.au or +61 7 3377 6236

stpeters.qld.edu.au


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ANGLICAN CHURCH GRAMMAR SCHOOL

A strong start Beginning with the transition to boarding in Year 7, Churchie offers students excellent support and opportunities to grow and learn.

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ANGLICAN CHURCH GRAMMAR SCHOOL

Throughout the building, technology is future compatible, with power outlets and docking stations reflecting current and future needs for devices, plus additional wi-fi access points. BOARDING HAS BEEN at the heart of the Anglican Church Grammar School (Churchie) for more than 100 years. Accompanying this proud heritage is a dedication to providing the very best facilities and services a boarding school can offer. This commitment has resulted in the beautiful School House dining hall renovation, a dedicated Year 7 centre and, most recently, the stunning refurbishment of Goodwin House. The refurbishment includes common areas that are welcoming, light-filled and spacious, leading into residential wings that offer increased privacy. Senior boys will have larger beds (king singles), and all rooms have space for a small fridge. Throughout the building, technology is future compatible, with power outlets and docking stations reflecting current and future needs for devices, plus additional wi-fi access points. Director of Boarding, Jason Wynne-Markham says, “The driving force behind the Goodwin refurbishment is to SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

ensure Churchie offers the best facilities in the boarding school sector. In conjunction with the highly successful use of The Centenary Library by boarders for study, the Goodwin refurbishment will further support the academic life of Churchie boarders through study spaces for workshops, presentations and tutorials. It’s wonderful to see the boys enthused about the remarkable transformation.” A similar refurbishment is currently being undertaken in the school’s second boarding area, Gerald House, that is expected to be completed in the coming months. Starting at boarding school can be a challenging experience. However, for boarders at Anglican Church Grammar School in Brisbane, the transition to boarding is nurtured through support and environments designed especially for Year 7, providing a strong start to boarding life. Contact Churchie Admissions on (07) 3896 2200 or admissions@churchie.com.au to organise a personalised tour for your family of our world-class facilities. Open Day is 4 May 2022. Oaklands Parade, East Brisbane Qld 4169; phone: (07) 3896 2200; churchie.com.au

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ST MARGARET’S ANGLICAN GIRLS SCHOOL

A bright future Ruby Greenup’s love for the land is strong and, unlike many other teenagers, she already has a clear vision of her path home.

COUNTRY GIRL RUBY GREENUP moved to the big smoke five years ago to start her boarding school education at St Margaret’s Anglican Girls School. Ruby, who lives in Kumbia, a small town in the South Burnett Region, has come a long way since that first day at school. Having just embarked on her final year, Ruby is embracing her new role as School Captain alongside classmate Holly Marchant. “I am so excited to be able to lead the school. This leadership role tops off a long list of opportunities I have had access to at St Margaret’s,” Ruby says. ‘Opportunities’ is the word Ruby uses to describe the education she is receiving at the award-winning St Margaret’s (the school was judged to be the top boarding school in 2019 and 2020 at the prestigious Australian Education Awards). Ask Ruby to elaborate about those opportunities and she lists sport, friendships and broad subject choices as well as the enduring networks and connections she has SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

made within the boarding community. “There are so many supportive families within our community who really embrace the boarders as their own,” Ruby says. While living away from home has been challenging at times, Ruby has always felt supported. “The Head of Boarding, house mothers and pastoral care staff are always available to talk to, but I also find that keeping busy helps to take your mind off homesickness,” she says. Rowing is a huge part of Ruby’s life at school. She has loved every minute, even those before dawn, of this team sport, and coxing the First VIII to Head of the River victory last year is an experience she’s unlikely to forget. “Rowing at St Margaret’s is not just about the sport or fitness, it’s about teamwork, trust and dedication. It is so rewarding to be part of the rowing community which is so tight knit. I never would have had this opportunity at home,” Ruby explains. Reunited with her family on their property each school holidays, Ruby swaps her school panama for an Akubra, >

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rolls up her sleeves and gets straight back into the work that she loves — mustering the family’s 6000 head of cattle. In fact, Ruby loves working on the land so much she plans to return to the family cattle business or her own agricultural business one day. But before Ruby leaves the city behind her for good, she plans to study veterinary science followed by studies in business or agricultural science. What is one of her favourite things about St Margaret’s? “The wise people around me every day, whether that be my friends’ parents, teachers or the boarding house staff, have taught me so much about life,” she says. “I was inspired by our Head of Rowing and rowing coaches this year who not only mentored me through my coxing journey but also taught me about passion, humility and selflessness and serving something greater than yourself.” Open day is 26 March 2022. 11 Petrie Street, Ascot Qld 4007; phone (07) 3862 0762; stmargarets.qld.edu.au

PUPPY LOVE When an eight-week-old toy cavoodle puppy made her appearance at St Margaret’s last year, it was love at first sight for over 1000 students! Luna Peggy Fowler plays a very important role in the boarding house and has captured the hearts of all the boarders. Head of Boarding Lesa Fowler says that while the benefits of having a school dog is evident for all to see, it is backed by research. “It’s been shown that the presence of a dog in an educational setting can support concentration, attention, motivation, and relaxation,” explains Ms Fowler. “This can help reduce some of the inevitable stress of everyday life, which can impact effective learning and performance.”


WENONA

Taking care Established in 1886, Wenona is one of Sydney’s leading schools for girls.

CARING FOR BOARDERS is a 24/7 responsibility, requiring staff with a passion for pastoral care and student wellbeing. Each boarding staff member completes the Australian Boarding Schools Association Duty of Care training, which ensures they are equipped to meet the demands of their roles, including academic and wellbeing facets of students’ welfare. “The diversity of Wenona’s student population means that our boarders quickly learn to embrace difference, cooperate and compromise — all of which are invaluable life skills,” explains the school’s Head of Boarding, Ms Nonie Ayling. “The School’s unique city location enables us to offer a rich range of cultural and social learning experiences, so our boarders gain independence.” >

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Nonie Ayling is the head of boarding at the school. Below Wenona’s Deputy Principal, Beth Oakley.

WENONA

“The diversity of Wenona’s student population means that our boarders quickly learn to embrace difference... ”

Wenona’s Deputy Principal (Student Wellbeing), Ms Beth Oakley, oversees a structured Wellbeing program for our boarders, which focuses on the issues relevant to girls as they make the challenging transition to adulthood. “Everything we do at Wenona is underpinned by the School’s values of courage, strength, grace, wisdom and kindness, and this is something that is very evident in our boarding house community,” she says. “As a result of living independently from their parents, and in a community with others, our boarders quickly learn to navigate their way through a variety of life skills. They develop excellent organisational skills, increased self-awareness, empathy and respect for others, as well as a sense of responsibility for contributing to a harmonious living environment.” Ms Oakley leads wellbeing staff, including boarding staff, through the rigorous Mental Health First Aid course and accreditation, which along with Beyond Blue’s ‘Be You’ accreditation ensures that Wenona staff appreciate the needs of young people and their social and emotional development. “Leadership within the boarding house is something we encourage all our boarders to aspire to,” says Ms Oakley, “Led by our boarding house prefect, our Boarders’ Representative Committee works closely with the Head of Boarding, to ensure that boarders have a voice in the day-to-day running of the boarding house.” For Ms Ayling, the community of care that surrounds Wenona’s boarders is a key factor in helping them to be resilient and independent, seeking support when they need it. “The girls have a strong peer network that promotes supportive friendship, inclusivity and wellbeing. We also encourage them to be outward-looking and committed to service, by supporting a range of community organisations and charities, including Cook4Good and Share the Dignity. This encourages them to think more broadly about the world around them and their place in it.” Tour dates for 2022 are 25 May and 11 August. For further inquiries, please contact Belinda Stoneham, Director of Enrolments and Marketing, bstoneham@wenona.nsw.edu.au. Wenona School, 176 Walker Street North Sydney NSW 2060; phone (02) 9409 4440.

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THE KING’S SCHOOL


Learn, live and grow One of the oldest schools in Australia, King’s has a history of creating future leaders and independent thinkers.

BOARDING IS AT THE HEART of The King’s School, which specialises in creating the leaders of tomorrow. A strong residential focus places boarders at the centre of school life and gives boys an opportunity to live and learn, developing their independence and resilience and forming lifelong friendships. Founded in 1831, King’s is Australia’s oldest independent school, with a unique understanding of what makes board­ ing a successful and enjoyable experience. As a world leader in boys’ education, King’s acclaimed Pastoral Care Program supports the learning journey by ensuring young boarders experience a smooth transition through strong and accessible support networks. House­ masters are assisted by experienced staff who help boarders with pastoral care, health, academic support, social outings and supervision. The King’s School offers enviable boarding facilities across its campuses, with high-quality, purpose-built houses known for offering every home comfort and the support of boarding staff. At Tudor House, the School’s 65 hectare Southern Highlands campus, boarders can begin their journey in Year 3 before moving to the 130 hectares of The King’s >

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THE KING’S SCHOOL

King’s will be hitting the road on a regional tour later this year so don’t miss out on your chance to meet the staff... School Parramatta campus. Friendships formed along the way ease the transition to Year 7 boarding. Boarding is a home away from home where staff work to ensure a welcoming and safe space and a rewarding learning adventure. During their time at King’s, boarders participate in an extensive range of learning programs, leadership experi­ ences, sporting fixtures and excursions, thereby developing integrity, compassion and a true sense of humility and place. King’s will be hitting the road on a regional tour later this year, so don’t miss out on your chance to meet the staff of The King’s School and learn more about what adventures await your son. Senior campus tour dates are 15 June, 6 July, 17 August and 9 November 2022. For further information or to register to attend a tour or virtual information session, visit kings.edu.au; phone (02) 9683 8555; 87–129 Pennant Hills Road, North Parramatta NSW 2151.

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Friends for life St Joseph’s Nudgee College in Brisbane is all about creating a strong and safe community for your sons to thrive in. “WHERE ELSE DO YOU GET to live with your best mates, enjoy life’s ups and downs, and see each other grow along the journey?” asks Basil Nolan, the 2021 Year 12 Boarding Captain at St Joseph’s Nudgee College in Brisbane. Clearly, the boarding experience is one that stays with students long after graduation. Many past boarders will attest that the relationships built made while boarding at Nudgee College continue into lifelong friendships. Sending your son to boarding school can be daunting. With 130 years of experience, St Joseph’s Nudgee College knows about boarding. The Bathersby Boarding Village provides a safe, enjoyable and enriching boarding experience for boys from regional and remote communities. In 2022, the College’s boarding community is led by new Dean of Boarding Mr Casey Brealy, who considers boarding a way of life — a true vocation. “Nudgee College Boarding is hard to describe in a few short words,” he says. “Simply put, it is a truly special place; this bustling and inclusive community is at the heart of Nudgee College. “I am so pleased to say that each day I witness the young men of Nudgee College living out the five core values that we hold dear in our community: faith, brotherhood, trust, integrity and resilience.” SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

With the world still in the midst of a global pandemic, parents can be assured that boarders’ health and wellbeing is of the utmost importance to College staff. The on-campus Health Centre provides 24/7 care to students, ensuring that at any time, day or night, they can receive the care they need. Additionally, the kitchen is staffed with chefs who prepare nutritious, well-balanced meals. Academically, boarders are given every opportunity to thrive through the Reach for the Stars academic tutoring program. Teachers assist boys with homework, as well as preparation for exams. Every member of the Boarding team is dedicated to building a strong rapport with the boys, so they can support them during hard times, and celebrate with them during moments of success. The staff’s families are also embedded within the community — the village is often filled with pets, spouses and children, creating a feeling of a ‘home away from home’. Fellow 2021 Year 12 boarder Frank Bundock said he is eager to stay connected with those who made his time at Nudgee College so special. “Boarding is possibly the strongest example of community,” he says. “It is truly the ‘beating heart’ of Nudgee College.” Open Day is 21 May 2022. 2199 Sandgate Road, Boondall Qld 4034; phone (07) 3865 0422; nudgee.com

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SOMERVILLE HOUSE

School spirit The Year 12 farewell dinner at Somerville House is a much-loved tradition that symbolises the school’s strong community values. ONE OF THE most highly anticipated traditions of Somerville House boarding is Invite Night. This special celebration, held in Term 3, is when Year 11 students celebrate the boarding journey of their Year 12 sisters. On this night, the Year 11 boarders present Year 12 with a special invitation to the boarders’ farewell dinner, which is held on the last night that Year 12 are in residence in the boarding house. Head of Boarding, Mrs Frances Greene, shared a story from one of the boarding mothers, who completed her education as a boarder in 1996. “This old girl remembers Invite Night as the biggest night of the year and described the format in a way that tells us it is largely unchanged; the skits, songs, dances and format are still the same,” Frances explains. Now 25 years later, her two eldest daughters have particiSCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

pated in eleven Invite Nights between them and her youngest daughter, currently in Year 8, is looking forward to her first one this year. The girls work with staff support to plan the mystery theme, skits, set design and much more. Over many months, the boarders organise a range of activities to make this rite of passage possible. Movie nights, a ‘Manners Week’, which includes a program of fundraising activities and themed dinners, and then a few more weekends of painting, imagining and constructing, culminate in the much-loved event. “The girls really enjoy this celebration, and the details of Invite Night are a wonderful surprise for all,” Frances says. “The happy faces of the girls, when the theme is revealed year by year, upon their entry into the Bentley Dining Room says it all.”

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Year 11 students are involved in real-life experiences from managing credit and debit accounts reconciliation to designing a menu and seating plan, managing a project team and coordinating the event as smoothly as possible. “It is a great opportunity for the Year 11 boarders to develop their leadership skills,” Frances explains. “The girls are the custodians of this tradition and pass that responsibility from one year group to the next.” Invite Night is one example of the celebrated Somerville House sisterhood that is embraced by our boarding community. The friendships and sense of belonging plus a shared commitment to growing, living and learning make our boarding house a true home away from home. For further information or to book a tour, please visit the website. 17 Graham Street, South Brisbane Qld 4101; (07) 3248 9200; somerville.qld.edu.au

Where her story starts Through a Somerville House boarding experience, your daughter will gain the independence, motivation and ability to do well anywhere. History has proven that Somerville girls literally create their own story in whatever pathway they choose. Countless Old Girls have become trailblazers in business, arts, sport, philanthropy, science, medicine and more. Boarding at Somerville, a home away from home for trailblazers and changemakers.

Find out more via somerville.qld.edu.au

A school of the Presbyterian and Methodist Schools Association. CRICOS Provider Code: 00522G


A D V E R TO R I A L

Educational community At Brisbane’s Stuartholme School, the students are always encouraged to be the best they can be in all areas of their school life and beyond. STUARTHOLME SCHOOL has been an icon in the Brisbane landscape for just over 100 years — and boarders have been at the heart of the school since it opened in 1920. With only 690 students, Stuartholme is small enough for each girl to be personally known, yet large enough to offer a wide range of opportunities in our heritage-listed buildings which are nestled into a picturesque bush setting, just six kilometres from the Brisbane CBD. The Boarding House is a home-away-from-home for up to 130 boarders from regional Queensland, New South Wales, the Northern Territory and overseas. In many ways Stuartholme functions like a village — the school has an educational community where everyone knows and cares for one another. Students are empowered to make a profound difference to the communities they come from as well as the wider world. Stuartholme’s mantra is “to be the best she can be” and it’s something the staff and students live by. Its meaning is derived from the way each student is treated, not as a number, but as an individual person. There are many pathways to join the Stuartholme Boarding community from full-time, term-time, short-term and weekly boarding to our boarding programs such as SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

Senior Boarding and Rowing Boarding. Our Support and Succeed Senior Boarding is offered to students in Years 11 and 12 who are looking for a supportive environment to enhance their academic success and wellbeing. These students have access to set study times, academic support and dedicated senior subject tutoring. Stuartholme has a very successful rowing program with 60 per cent of the total rowing squad coming from the boarding house. During Terms 2 and 3, day students and new students can also join the boarding rowing program. Benefits of the program include set routines, structure around mealtimes, study and transport as well as additional wellbeing support. This program teaches discipline and independence beyond school and is a holistic approach to elite sport. To accommodate our dynamic and diverse boarding community, Stuartholme has begun a $6 million redevelopment of the Boarding House to provide leading accommodation facilities for each girl. You can see Stuartholme on the road this year or visit us on an upcoming school tour. The first school tour of 2022 is on 10 June. For more information, go to stuartholme.com/enrol/school-tours. 365 Birdwood Terrace, Toowong Qld 4066.

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STUARTHOLME SCHOOL


DA L B Y S TAT E H I G H S C H O O L

Going the distance ‘Close by’ is a relative concept when you’re used to vast outback distances, but near or far, Dalby High offers many opportunities. A NEW YEAR IS a new beginning and brings a new opportunity for students heading to boarding school. For many, a return to boarding will be met with excitement and enthusiasm, although, for others — particularly those new to boarding — perhaps a little hesitation and nervousness will be felt. All of this is, of course, natural for any student experiencing boarding school for the first time. The extension of the school holidays has allowed schools and their families more time to prepare for any challenges they may face, particularly with COVID-19. Grabbing those last-minute essential items and making the hundredth phone call to the boarding house are nothing new for any boarding family. It has also allowed students from our more rural and remote communities the opportunity to prepare themselves for a life away from home. For some students, the journey to the boarding house is not a short one. Cheyne, a new Year 7 student who comes from the remote Queensland town of Winton, has travelled SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

a long way to access greater opportunities at a larger high school. Some 1100 kilometres from home, at Dalby State High School – Bunya Campus, Cheyne took the chance to board knowing that there would be challenges, but that the opportunities were too good to pass up. “I wanted to go to boarding school so I could make more friends and I knew that I could do more extracurricular activities at Bunya Campus than I could in my home town. And I also knew there would be challenges. Being a new student in a new school can be tough but I was excited to make new friends and give it a try.” When asked what helped him make his decision to come to Dalby for boarding, Cheyne answered in classic country fashion: “Dalby is only a thousand kilometres from home, so it was close by, which made me happy knowing that Mum and Dad weren’t far away.” The opportunities that are afforded Cheyne at a larger high school such as Dalby High also helped him make his

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decision. “I wanted access to different subjects and I knew that if I can be successful at school then that would help me in the future. Dalby High has everything to offer and I just saw it as a fantastic school to build my future from.” New senior student Eboni, who comes from Inglewood, is a lot closer to home. Eboni is studying Dalby High’s Signature Agricultural Program, Innovate Ag, and is keen to gain a practical education. “Coming to boarding wasn’t too much of a difficult decision, as I had an older sibling who came through and completed the same program. He enjoyed his time here and took a lot away from it, so I wanted the same opportunity. Dalby is close to home, so I can get the best of both worlds knowing that I can be a weekly boarder and still have access to my home on weekends.” Like Cheyne, Eboni wanted to access opportunities that she wouldn’t normally be able to gain in her home town.

“The Innovate Ag program will really help set me up for the future, as there aren’t many schools around that are running a practical program like this with a Certificate III in Agriculture as a key focus. I’ll be able to make lifelong friends, enjoy my time at school and also obtain certificate qualifications that will help with my future employability.” With students across the country facing so much uncertainty at times, what is certain is that the students at Bunya Campus have given themselves the best chance at finding success, gaining an exceptional education and opening up opportunities that otherwise weren’t there.

“Dalby is only a thousand kilometres from home, which made me happy knowing that Mum and Dad weren’t far away.”

Dalby State High School – Bunya Campus, bringing boarding excellence to rural and remote students. 26 Nicholson Street, Dalby Qld 4405; Phone: (07) 4660 0333; dalbyshs.eq.edu.au

Dalby State High School Bringing boarding excellence to rural students

Have you made the right decision for your child’s academic future? Dalby State High Bunya Campus opens up a world of opportunities for students from rural areas. Boarding positions are available for 2022 and beyond for boys and girls, years 7 to 12 It is never too late to make the switch and enrol at Dalby’s leading academic secondary school, that also offers exceptional weekly or term based boarding opportunities.

For 2022 Dalby State High has reconceptualised their Academic Excellence Program with three Junior Secondary academies and reviewed their Senior Academic Program to ensure we are catering for all students across all year levels. Junior Secondary - STEM (Maths and Science) -

Aristotle (English)

- Aeschylus (Drama and Music)

Senior Secondary - Chronos (Years 10, 11, 12) -

New senior timetable structure to support ATAR students

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Signature Programs: Innovate Ag including Cert III in Agriculture and Trade Futures which includes Formula student program

Call now to book your enrolment interview and tour to secure your child’s place at Dalby State High School Bunya Campus.

Bringing boarding and state education excellence together, and to you.

Enquire today! (07) 4660 0333

admin@dalbyshsbunya.eq.edu.au

www.dalbyshs.eq.edu.au

463 Bunya Hwy Dalby QLD 4405


A D V E R TO R I A L


S CO T C H CO L L E G E M E L B O U R N E

The best of both worlds

Shared experiences enrich a boarder’s life, along with academic excellence, at Scotch College. OFFERING BOARDERS ACCESS to an outstanding academic education is a point of pride for Melbourne’s Scotch College. The non-selective school, which has been educating boys for more than 160 years, has a strong history of providing regional students with a high-quality curriculum and excellent teaching staff in a supportive environment. From science and technology to foreign languages and creative arts, Scotch College students have unparalleled opportunities in working towards achieving their maximum potential. But it’s not only the education that makes Scotch College an in-demand school for boarders from right across Australia. Tim Byrnes, Dean of Boarding, said the students have the ‘best of both worlds’. “As well as wonderful classroom teachers, boarders have access to extra tuition, with staff always at hand, facilities to practise sports on weekends, study sessions and a great sense of community,” Mr Byrnes says. “Boarding at Scotch is the extra on top of an outstanding school education.”

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S CO T C H CO L L E G E M E L B O U R N E

The school’s Vice-captain, Alex Meggitt, agrees, adding that as well as an excellent curriculum they have many opportunities to excel outside the classroom. “The school supports you in finding and pursuing your extracurricular passions such as debating,” says Alex, who is also a boarder. “This is something that will help me suc-­ ceed in my career as I plan to pursue law at the University of Melbourne.” Community is another huge benefit of boarding at Scotch College. Both Will and Alex credit Scotch College’s support network with helping them excel in the classroom. “Our shared experiences mean we are an extremely tightknit community and are always there for each other, socially, emotionally and academically,” Alex says. Over all, boarding at Scotch College provides the means for regional students to access the best education available. “We have a strong commitment to boarding and will continue this tradition into the future, ensuring regional families have access to a unique Scotch education,” explains Mr Tom Batty, the school’s Principal. Visit the website to book a tour. 1 Morrison Street, Hawthorn Vic 3122; phone 1800 622 912; scotch.vic.edu.au

Captain of Scotch College’s boarding community, Will MacKenzie, says being able to attend Scotch College means access to a high-quality education. “At Scotch I’m able to study subjects at a level I otherwise would not have had the chance to,” he explains. “The calibre of the physics department, for example, is just incredible. The teachers are very knowledgeable and offer so much support.”

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Stepping stone As Tudor House celebrates its 125th birthday this year, this Southern Highlands junior boarding school continues to strive to create the best learning environment for its students. IN 1897, TUDOR HOUSE opened its doors to six students under Headmaster Wilfred Inman. Since then, Tudor House has spent 125 years providing a holistic educational philosophy to the boys of the Southern Highlands, and in the past five years has transformed into a co-ed school, giving girls the opportunity to discover the adventure that The King’s School, Tudor House has to offer. As one of the few junior boarding schools in the state (boarding from Years 3 to 6) and the only International Baccalaureate school offering the Primary Years Programme in the Southern Highlands, Tudor House continues to provide a unique learning experience for students to be engaged in during their educational journey. Since the early days, Tudor House has integrated itself in the local Southern Highlands community and is a perfect stepping stone for parents to send their son onto King’s Parramatta campus. With a number of notable Old Boys and a huge number of second- and third-generation families continuing to attend the school, Tudor House makes meaningful moments SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

in the students’ lives, moments that they will want their future children to enjoy, too. One of the specialties of Tudor House is its renowned Kahiba program, thought to be one of the best outdoor primary education programs in the country. Children participate in activities ranging from canoeing, archery, climbing the low ropes course, riding their bikes on the BMX tracks and, for the Year 5 and 6 students, learning to cook their lunch around a campfire. Our new Head of School, Mr Adam Larby, wants this year to be a big celebration of the 125 years that Tudor House has been broadening student’s minds and encouraging a sense of adventure in a way that very few schools can. Our whole community, be it current, future or past — whether you are a Southern Highlands local, a Sydney boarder or a family from the country regions of New South Wales — should have the opportunity to enjoy what Tudor House has to offer. The King’s School, Tudor House, 6480 Illawarra Highway, Moss Vale NSW; (02) 4868 0000; tudorhouse.nsw.edu.au

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THE KING’S SCHOOL,TUDOR HOUSE


S T U R S U L A ’ S CO L L E G E TO OW O O M B A

Game plan Bridget Haynes hopes to score plenty of goals — both on and off the netball court — in the new year. THE NEWLY APPOINTED 2022 St Ursula’s College Boarding Captain was a member of the highly successful Darling Downs Panthers squad this year, and she’s been just as successful off the court. “Coming to boarding school has further developed my love for sport, especially netball. This year, I really enjoyed the experience of the Darling Downs Panthers squad,” Bridget Haynes says. “Netball is something I have always really enjoyed. I played it at home, and then coming to Toowoomba opened even more opportunities for me to gain experience and improve my playing skills. Heading into 2022 as Boarding Captain, Bridget will focus on community outreach programs as well as the relationships between students. “Our Country Heart Program is one I’m really passionate about,” explains the 16-year-old. “It’s run by the boarders with the aim to raise money for our community. “During the week, we are given the opportunity to bake homemade treats, which are sold to the broader community. Recently, we made toffee, fudge, coconut ice, and rocky road, which was sold at the Day of Change markets at school. “In 2022 I would like to continue to build the program, which raises funds for our community and will also provide more opportunities for the girls to be involved. “I would also like to extend and further develop the buddy program, which aims to build closer relationships with girls. Being a boarder for many years has allowed me to realise the importance and benefits of having close SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

connections with other boarders. Currently, girls sit with their buddy from a different grade at dinner to help build more connections. “The benefits are immense and have a great ripple effect on not only the boarding students, but the school as a whole.” Bridget, who is from Ballandean in Queensland’s Southern Downs region, has been a boarder at St Ursula’s since Year 7. What would she say to girls about to start at the school? “My advice to new boarding students is to make the most of the opportunities given to you,” she says. “I recommend giving everything a try. “You grow so much as a person by meeting different people and trying different things, and for me, this is how some of my best memories of school have been made.” Just as she does on the netball court, you can be assured that in 2022, one goal at a time, Bridget Haynes is sure to lead the St Ursula’s boarding community with respect, responsibility and great pride. * To meet the needs of busy families and to help establish strong study habits, we offer our families the opportunity to book their daughter into weekly or casual boarding. * Some students also like to try boarding before committing to coming to the school as a boarder. To support this, we offer a Boarding Sleepover. To enquire, contact our Registrar via enrolment@st-ursula.qld.edu.au Open day is 13 March 2022. 38 Taylor Street, Toowoomba Qld 4350; enrolment@st-ursula.qld.edu.au; phone (07) 4632 7611; st-ursula.qld.edu.au

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CRISCOS: 03033M

O P E N D AY SUN 13 MARCH 2022 10AM - 2PM

REGISTER T O D AY

S T- U R S U L A . Q L D . E D U . A U P: (07) 4632 7611


OPINION

THE GIFT of OPPORTUNITY

SOME CHILDREN TAKE to boarding school like fish to water, revelling in the boisterous noise, cameraderie and collegial mischief. That was my brother’s experience; it certainly wasn’t mine, yet boarding school is, without a doubt, one of the greatest formative experiences of my life. I didn’t want to go to boarding school: I didn’t like change. I was introverted, happy helping on our farm with a trail of Kelpies in my wake. I’ve always been happy in my own company, or in the company of animals and stories. For many years, boarding was merely a threat that Mum trotted out when I wasn’t doing my homework, or when I was being particularly combative, as is the wont of teenage daughters. When I finally went into boarding, it was a gift, the extent of which I only fully understand now. For the first time, I had structure and routine: having to be fully dressed before breakfast; having allotted prep time and a school bus that drove me to sports and classes so that I wasn’t asking Mum to add more to her plate; a salad and sandwich for lunch that I didn’t have to remember to pack. Before we started boarding, we travelled an hour and a half each way to attend as day students. I’d leave early and get home after dark, often with farm work still to be done under motorbike lights. As a boarder, my only responsibility was to be a student: to be in my uniform and in the dining hall by 7am; to attend classes; to study for three hours at night; to spend time with my friends; to learn how to live and work with people outside my family; to develop a routine. To this day, I thrive on routine. I loved the farm — the sweeping green hills, the animals and the space — and I hated to be away; however, with the gift of hindsight, I can see how the farm was full of distractions that would have hindered my senior years of study. SCHOOLS GUIDE 2022

All families are different, but despite parents’ best efforts, many farm children grow up taking on some of the stresses and responsibilities of farm life. No matter how hard parents try to shield their children from the devastation of floods, drought and loss, they seem to absorb that stress through a kind of osmosis. Boarding gives young rural minds the opportunity to be a child or teenager at school without worrying about the farm. Early on, they’ve learned the valuable lessons of work ethic and contribution. They have also witnessed many of the harsh and uncontrollable aspects of life. Well, that was my experience. Now is their time to learn, to figure out who they are and what they find interesting, what they might like to do as a career. Despite my hesitation, which in reality was more akin to a full-blown mutiny, I quickly grew to love boarding school and the consequent experience of independence: sinking into burgundy leather booths of a coffee shop for hot chips and mochas with my friends, sleeping in until just before swimming training, staying up watching McLeod’s Daughters and visiting friends’ homes in the outback and at the beach. My childhood world, which I loved and wouldn’t have changed for a second, was very small and insular. Boarding school offered an endless stream of opportunities. It taught me to want more for myself and to expect more from myself. Boarding will be a reality for my future children and I will raise them in the knowledge that it is a privilege: an opportunity to open their eyes to an exciting new world of people, places and experiences. g Grace Quast is a writer, photographer and farmer. She attended PLC Armidale, and loved every minute of it — once she got there.

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PHOTOGRAPH DAVID QUAST

Going away to boarding school showed GRACE QUAST how to widen her horizons.


T H E AU T U M N I S S U E IN THIS ISSUE The Graziher Boarding Schools Guide AUTUMN 2022

WOMEN ON THE LAND

FLYING HIGH

A pilot’s determination

NURSING IN THE BUSH

“Most first aid cases are helping someone you know”

ONE of a KIND AUS $14.95

Women on the land forging ahead AGAINST THE ODDS

MODERN MATRIARCH

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Leading by example

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