__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

INTERIORS // ARCHITECTURE // FASHION // LANDSCAPE // DESIGN

PACIFIC NORTHWEST DESIGN

N O 43 :

DEC. 2018 / JAN. 2019

Featuring the most inspired and clever designs to emerge from this year’s GRAY Awards Judges:

Adam Lippes AvroKO Jaime Hayon Ken Fulk Peter + David Walker Snøhetta

1

graymag . com


Architecture + Art

James KM Cheng, Architect John Hogan, Artist

Beautiful new homes coming to Third & Virginia FIRST LIGHT PRESENTATION GALLERY OPEN DAILY 11AM – 5PM 300 VIRGINIA STREET (206) 620-2568

FIRSTLIGHTSEATTLE.COM

A NEW DAWN

Integrating

It is the rumour of a new day, a metaphor for dawn and promise. At this time and in this place, it is a shimmering glint of Seattle’s future.


THE FIRST LIGHT PROJECT IS UNDER DEVELOPMENT AND ALL INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, PRICING, CONCEPT DR AWINGS, ILLUSTR ATIONS, RENDERINGS OF THE BUILDING, UNITS OR L ANDSCAPING, DESCRIPTION OR DEPICTIONS OF AMENITIES, UNIT SPECIFICATIONS, DEPICTIONS OF VIEWS, FLOOR PL ANS, COMMON AREAS, AND PROPOSED FINISHES OR OTHER DETAIL ARE FOR ILLUSTR ATIVE PURPOSES ONLY, AND ARE BASED ON CURRENT DEVELOPMENT PL ANS THAT ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. ANY STATED SQUARE FOOTAGES OR DIMENSIONS ARE APPROXIMATE AND WILL VARY WITH ACTUAL CONSTRUCTION. THE IMPROVEMENTS DEPICTED ARE PROPOSED AND NEED NOT BE BUILT. THIS DOCUMENT IS NOT AN OFFER TO SELL OR A SOLICITATION OF AN OFFER TO BUY A CONDOMINIUM UNIT. PROSPECTIVE BUYERS SHOULD NOT RELY ON ANY CONTENT CONTAINED HEREIN, AND ANY PURCHASE AND SALE OF FIRST LIGHT CONDOMINIUM UNITS WILL BE GOVERNED EXCLUSIVELY BY THE TERMS OF PURCHASE AND SALE DOCUMENTATION, PUBLIC OFFERING STATEMENT, CONDOMINIUM DECL AR ATION, AND OTHER DOCUMENTATION REQUIRED BY OWNER. CONSTRUCTION OF THE PROJECT AND THE SALE OF UNITS WILL FURTHER BE CONDITIONED UPON THE SATIS FACTION OF ALL REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE L AWS OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON AND ANY OTHER APPLICABLE L AW. REPRESENTED BY S&P REALT Y SERVICES WA CORP.


eamesÂŽ upholstered lcm, designed 1946 - made in the usa by herman miller

please inquire about our A&D trade program


herman miller vitra fritz hansen kartell bensen knoll flos artek artifort foscarini moooi moroso montis and more!


© 2018 Design Within Reach, Inc.


“Lína, which means ‘line’ in Icelandic, embraces you, with all the softness on the inside.” – HL Y NUR AT L AS O N

Hlynur Atlason

Designer of the DWR Lína Swivel Chair Experience the best in modern design at our stores. Stop by today or book a complimentary design session in advance at dwr.com/studios. 825 NW 13TH AVE., PORTLAND | 503.220.0200 1918 FIRST AVE., SEATTLE | 206.443.9900


ORDINARY SLIDES AWAY MARVIN SCENIC DOORS


MARVIN WINDOWS OF CANADA 1-800-263-6161 Vancouver - Calgary - Toronto Montreal - Halifax MarvinCanada.com

LUNDGREN ENTERPRISES 2425 NW Market Street Seattle, WA 98107 206-789-1122 LundgrenEnterprises.com


ARCHITECTURE / Olson Kundig PHOTOGRAPHY / Nic Lehoux


@SCHUCHARTDOW


French Art de Vivre

Photo Michel Gibert, for advertising purposes only. 1Conditions apply, contact store for details. 2Program available on select items, subject to availability.


Edito. Corner composition in fabric, design Sacha Lakic. Drop. Cocktail table, design Gaëtan Coulaud. Cactus. Floor lamp, design Fabrice Berrux. Manufactured in Europe.

SEATTLE - 1922 Fourth Avenue - Tel. (206) 332-9744 - seattle@roche-bobois.com PORTLAND - 1025 SW Washington Street - Tel. (503) 459-0020 - portland@roche-bobois.com

∙ Complimentary 3D Interior Design Service 1 ∙ Quick Ship program available 2

www.roche-bobois.com


39

86

18. hello

Congratulations.

EWS N 39. happenings

A Le Corbusier–inspired furniture collection, MUJI’s next PNW location, and an architectural icon’s “space” lift.

THE AWARDS

58. editors’ picks

Tour a selection of our favorite projects, objects, and spaces from the 2018 GRAY Awards submissions.

104

THE WINNERS

86. residential architecture

Hoedemaker Pfeiffer places a dramatic retreat on the sloping edge of an island in the San Juans.

96. commercial architecture

Seattle’s Perkins+Will builds the Water Institute of the Gulf, which will study the effects of climate change on the Mississippi.

104. landscape design

Amazon’s Spheres, the most innovative office space in the Northwest, is also home to more than 40,000 tropical plants.

112. commercial interior design

Housed in a historic Art Deco bank building, Expensify’s new office is full of quirky surprises.

16

graymag . com

120. residential interior design

California chic meets Northwest casual in an off-the-grid guesthouse on the Santa Barbara coast.

130. product design: lighting & furniture

Inspired by the natural phenomena that make fireflies and plankton glow, Graypants delivers a new astral-influenced lighting collection.

134. product design: other

A tile collaboration between Clayhaus and Kristine Morich embraces midcentury aesthetics with a modern edge.

138. fashion design

Bold patterns, playful shapes, and bright, popping colors—is this the new direction for the Northwest style scene?


112

130

164

✤ 144. wild card

A new dichroic glass façade reflects the groundbreaking work of one of the nation’s top nanotechnology research institutions.

150. student design

A minimal, space-saving travel kit is designed to help those living with type 1 diabetes.

154. design for good

Modern design thinking by three youth-focused nonprofits creates the ultimate learning environment.

THE JUDGES

earn more about the international L design-world visionaries who evaluated this year’s GRAY Awards submissions.

160. 162. 164. 166. 168. 170.

AvroKO Elaine Molinar, Snøhetta Jaime Hayon Peter + David Walker Ken Fulk Adam Lippes

BACK OF BOOK 178. last look

Glass artist John Hogan returns to design the 2018 GRAY Awards trophies.

On the Cover

The hardware: GRAY Awards winners took home these stunning custom trophies designed and fabricated by globally acclaimed glass artist John Hogan. SEE PAGE

178 Photographed by HANK DREW

graymag . com

17


| hello |

Hooray for GRAY! We took home three trophies this year: • Our founder and CEO, Shawn Williams, was named one of Folio’s Top Women Entrepreneurs in Media. • The “Design Dynasties” feature from our April/ May issue earned an Eddie award from Folio.

“Whether you succeed or not is irrelevant, there is no such thing. Making your unknown known is the important to all the risk takers— thing—and Congratulations to designers and leaders who make a difference. keeping the This issue is dedicated to you. —Shawn unknown always beyond you.” • And the design of our entire ad campaign for the 2017 GRAY Awards was lauded by GD USA.

—GEORGIA O’KEEFFE

18

graymag . com


roomandboard.com


IC/Air3

| 2 or 3 Blades

: designed by Guto Indio da Costa

modernfan.com

Ultra-efficient DC Motor

N O 43

THE GRAY AWARDS ISSUE

CEO/FOUNDER + PUBLISHER

Shawn Williams CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER

Stacy Kendall

|

SENIOR EDITOR

Nickel, White or Dark Bronze Finish

Rachel Gallaher

ADVERTISING ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Dixie Duncan dixie@graymag.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

MANAGING EDITOR

Jennifer McCullum DIGITAL CONTENT / SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS

California: Alan Braden alan@graymag.com Oregon: Craig Allard Miller craig@graymag.com

Lauren Mang COPY EDITOR

Laura Harger PRODUCTION + EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Abby Beach CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

| Solid Color, Surface-printed Wood Grain or Clear Blades

Rachel Eggers Brian Libby Nessa Pullman Renske Werner Amanda Zurita

ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

Tracey Bjerke tracey@graymag.com NEWSSTAND MANAGER

Bob Moenster PUBLIC RELATIONS

US & Canada: Paxson Fay P.A. TO THE PUBLISHER

Tally Williams

CONTRIBUTORS

Hank Drew Kevin Scott Elizabeth Varnell INTERNS

Amy Broska Claire Butwinick Tamar Leveson @gray_magazine FB/graymag #graymagazine

INQUIRIES info@graymag.com editors@graymag.com advertising@graymag.com events@graymag.com subscriptions@graymag.com To stock GRAY, contact: distribution@graymag.com

No. 43. Copyright ©2018. Published bimonthly (DEC, FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT) by GRAY Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. While every attempt has been made, GRAY cannot guarantee the legality, completeness, or accuracy of the information presented and accepts no warranty or responsibility for such. GRAY is not responsible for loss, damage, or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, photography, art, or any other unsolicited material. Unsolicited material will not be returned. If submitting material, do not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by GRAY in writing.

| Optional LED Lighting

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GRAY, 5628 Airport Way S., Ste. 330 Seattle, WA 98108 Subscriptions $30 us for one year; $50 us for two years.

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE AT GRAYMAG.COM


D E S I G N P O R T R A I T.

Ray, seat system designed by Antonio Citterio. www.bebitalia.com B&B Italia and Maxalto Store Seattle by DIVA Group: 1300 Western Avenue Seattle, WA 98101 - t. 206.287.9992 www.divafurnitureseattle.com - seattle@divafurniture.com


© 2018 Kolbe & Kolbe Millwork Co., Inc.

“My vision was to create a calming environment integrated with nature.” Manny Trinca

I

Architect AIBC, Principal, Trinca Architecture, Inc.

I

Vancouver, BC

Kolbe Windows & Doors leads the industry with innovative products that push the boundaries and defy the limits of function, performance and style. The clean lines of the award-winning VistaLuxe® Collection offer a streamlined, contemporary look, for maximum views with minimal interruptions.

Contact the experts at your nearest Kolbe Gallery to schedule a personal design consultation today.

101-185 Forester St. | North Vancouver, BC kolbegallerybc.ca | 604.988.8683

3931-B First Ave. South | Seattle, WA kolbegalleryseattle.com | 206.456.5113


Windows to Wellness

A Home Focused on Air, Water, Light, Comfort and Mind. This dramatic contemporary home is perched on a precipice with views of Howe Sound, near Vancouver, BC. Overlooking the ocean, it is completely surrounded by the beauty and calming effects of nature. “Being out of doors instantly instills relaxation and feelings of health and wellness,” states architect Manny Trinca. The landscape guides the flow of the home, creating an environment that is fluid and open. Interior and exterior spaces blend together, with sweeping vistas from every vantage point. “We required many customized doors and windows, and Kolbe [Windows & Doors] was able to find solutions and integrate its products seamlessly,” Trinca adds. Chosen for its versatility to achieve large expanses of glass and enhanced energy efficiency, the VistaLuxe® Collection direct set windows frame uninterrupted views of the landscape. A TerraSpan® lift & slide door opens up a corner of the home, while folding windows promote pass-through convenience, reinforcing the home’s roots with nature. Find your vision at kolbewindows.com or stop by one of our extensive Kolbe Gallery showrooms and the expert staff will help you select the right products for your home.


NOW SELLING: 347 Sky-High Condominium Homes NOW SELLING: 347 Sky-High Condominium Homes Offered from Below $500,000 to More than $5 Million. Occupancy Late 2020. Offered from Below $500,000 to More than $5 Million. Occupancy Late 2020. Now under construction at 600 Wall Street in Belltown. Now under construction at 600 Wall Street in Belltown.

ON POINT ON POINT SPIRE is a brilliant architectural prism at the intersection of downtown

SPIRE ismost a brilliant architectural prism at the intersection of downtown Seattle’s preferred urban neighborhoods. Tall and slender, front Seattle’s most preferred urban neighborhoods. Tall and slender, front and center, reaching fantastically into the sky, SPIRE is a cosmopolitan

and center, fantastically into the sky, SPIRE a cosmopolitan haven that reaching is quintessentially, Seattle. Make it isyours in 2020. haven that is quintessentially, Seattle. Make it yours in 2020. OPEN DAILY (11 AM - 6 PM): SPIRE Sales Center | 2218 5th Avenue, Seattle | 206.494.0094 | SPIRESEATTLE.COM OPEN (11 One, AMLLC. - 6Seller PM): SPIRE Center 2218 5th Avenue, Seattle | 206.494.0094 | SPIRESEATTLE.COM Offered by DAILY Seattle Realty reserves the Sales right to change the|product offering without notice. E&OE. Offered by Seattle Realty One, LLC. Seller reserves the right to change the product offering without notice. E&OE.


graymag.com Beyond the printed page: GRAY reports on the best of design, industry news, events, and resources.

With awards season in full swing, we’ve rounded up a showcase of award winners from both GRAY and the region’s industry organizations. These Pacific Northwest firms will ring in the new year knowing they’ve made the region proud.

DESIGN WITH THE 90%

In September of this year, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Discovery Center debuted Design with the 90%, an exhibition highlighting design initiatives that help marginalized communities around the globe. Find out more about the show, featuring 25-plus innovative projects.

GRAY, weekly. Each email offers a snapshot of what’s happening in the world of design. We feature news, stories on leading designers, thinkers, trends, events, invitations, and more.

HAY OPENS FIRST NORTH AMERICAN STORE IN PORTLAND

Danish furniture and accessories brand HAY has chosen Portland’s Pearl District as the site of its first-ever North American outpost.

26

graymag . com

Subscribe to the weekly newsletter at graymag.com

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: THE FIX PHOTO GROUP, MARTIN KNOWLES, COURTESY BURN MANUFACTURING, COURTESY HAY

AND THE WINNERS ARE . . .


I

10 YEARS OF AN ICON. C E L E B R AT E T H E I M O L A C H A I R W I T H O U R A N N I V E R S A R Y L I M I T E D E D I T I O N This year, we honour the classic design by Henrik Pedersen. TTo celebrate, we will make six hundred all-black limited editions, with numbered plaque, brochure and certificate of authenticity. Imola is also available in more than a hundred, high-quality fabrics and leathers. Order from a choice of bases, and finish with optional footstool. Try T Imola at your local store.

BOC ONCEPT.COM | BOCONCEPT BELLEVUE I 10400 NE 8th St, Bellevue, WA 98004 BOC ONCEPT.CA

| BOCONCEPT VANCOUVER I 1275 W 6th Ave, Vancouver, BC V6H 1A6

BOC ONCEPT.CA

| BOCONCEPT COQUITLAM I 1348 United Blvd, Coquitlam, BC V3K 6Y2


4D Architects

4darchitects.com

AKJ Architects LLC akjarchitects.com

pacific northwest architects

Artisans Group

artisansgroup.com

BC&J Architecture bcandj.com

The following architecture and design firms are among the best in the region. They also support GRAY’s effort to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. We’re proud to call them our partners. Look to them first for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more.

Board & Vellum

boardandvellum.com

Eerkes Architects

eerkesarchitects.com

Eggleston | Farkas Architects eggfarkarch.com

Emerick Architects

emerick-architects.com


Atelier Drome

babienko ARCHITECTS pllc

Baylis Architects

Ben Trogdon | Architects

Best Practice

BjarkoSerra Architects

COLAB Architecture + Urban Design

David Coleman Architecture

Designs Northwest Architects

FINNE Architects

First Lamp

Giulietti | Schouten AIA Architects

atelierdrome.com

bentrogdonarchitects.com

colabarchitecture.com

finne.com

babienkoarchitects.com

bestpracticearchitecture.com

davidcoleman.com

firstlamp.net

baylisarchitects.com

bjarkoserra.com

designsnw.com

gsarchitects.net


Graham Baba Architects

Guggenheim Architecture + Design Studio

H2D Architecture + Design

Johnston Architects

JW Architects

KASA Architecture

Risa Boyer Architecture

RUF Project

Scott | Edwards Architecture

Stephenson Design Collective

Studio Zerbey Architecture

Sturman Architects

grahambabaarchitects.com

johnstonarchitects.com

risaboyer.com

stephensoncollective.com

guggenheimstudio.com

jwaseattle.com

rufproject.com

studiozerbey.com

h2darchitects.com

kasaarchitecture.com

seallp.com

sturmanarchitects.com


Hacker

Hoshide Wanzer Architects

Janof Architecture

Lane Williams Architects

Openspace Architecture

Richard Brown Architect, AIA

SHKS Architects

Stark Architecture

Steelhead Architecture

Tyler Engle Architects

William Kaven Architecture

Workshop AD

hackerarchitects.com

lanewilliams.com

shksarchitects.com

tylerengle.com

hw-architects.com

openspacearchitecture.com

starkarchitecture.com

williamkaven.com

janofarchitecture.com

rbarch.com

steelheadarchitecture.com

workshopad.com


pacific northwest interior design The following design firms are among the best in the region. They also support GRAY’s effort to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. We’re proud to call them our partners. Look to them first for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more.


CAITLIN JONES DESIGN caitlinjonesdesign.com

CAROL WILLIAMSON + ASSOCIATES

Curated Home by Chrissy & Co.

GATH INTERIOR DESIGN

HYDE EVANS DESIGN

cwainteriors.com

chrissyco.com

interior design

Finley Grace Design

MAISON INC finleygracedesign.com

Award-winning interior design.

gathinteriordesign.com

Full service kitchen/bath design.

Custom furnishings and cabinetry.

Maison Inc

maisoninc.com

S i nce 2 0 0 1

1 611 NW No r t h r u p

Michelle Dirkse Interior Design

Penny Black Interiors

Van Sickle Design Consultants

Weedman Design Partners

michelledirkse.com

Po r tl a n d

503.29 5.01 51

Tammara Stroud Design tammarastroud.com

hydeevansdesign.com

pennyblackinteriors.com

m aiso n in c.co m

vansickledesign.com

weedmandesignpartners.com


WALL TILE AURA GOLD POLISHED FLOOR TILE MOON WHITE NATURE FREESTANDING SINK ARQUITECT FREESTANDING FAUCET ROUND

TILE

MOSAICS

WWW.PORCELANOSA-USA.COM

KITCHEN

BATH

LAMINATE & HARDWOOD

PORCELANOSA SEATTLE 88 SPRING STREET, SUITE 120 SEATTLE, WA 98104 206.673.8395


PEOPLE + VISION + CRAFTSMANSHIP

BELLAN.COM 5319 1st Ave. S | Seattle, WA 98108 T (206) 329-3121 | F (206) 329-9867


DESIGN/ /BUILD BUILDREMODELING REMODELING DESIGN HOMEIMPROVEMENT IMPROVEMENT HOME CUSTOMHOMES HOMES CUSTOM

Everything fits perfectly in this kitchen. Even two chefs. Neil Kelly designs not only to make each home more beautiful, but also to heighten its functionality. Both owners of this home love to cook. Both are tall. And both wanted a roomy work space with higher counters that they could enjoy together. Certainly, the results are beautiful, but it’s the smiles of the hosts and their guests that tell the whole story. Whether you’re seeking to perfect your kitchen, a bath, or your whole home, Neil Kelly can help you make it yours in every way.

WE TAKE PRIDE IN BEING A CERTIFIED B CORPORATION

866.691.2719 www.neilkelly.com

Visit Our Design Centers: Seattle | Portland Bend | Eugene OR CCB#1663 | WA L&I #NEILKCI187O2


Extremely Handmade. By Tufenkian.

CITY LIGHTS CINNABAR DETAIL Portland Showroom 515 NW 10th Avenue Portland, OR 97209

Tufenkian.com

503.212.4569

hello@Tufenkian.com


NORTHERN CALIFORNIA - CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS 1313 Armstrong Avenue. San Francisco, CA 94124 info@fmdistributing.com www.fmdistributing.com


NEWS “Totokaelo is a special place, and it’s wonderful to have the opportunity to hang special things in it . . . to contribute to the feeling of being transported to another world.” —OMER ARBEL, CREATIVE DIRECTOR, BOCCI

57.191 Written by TAMAR LEVESON Photographed by FAHIM KASSAM

EARLIER THIS FALL, Totokaelo—Seattle’s ultimate destination for modern apparel and homegoods— debuted the newest addition to its interiors: an in-store lighting collaboration with Vancouver- and Berlin-based design and manufacturing company Bocci. Designed by Bocci creative director Omer Arbel, the installation, titled 57.191, is composed of asymmetrical glass spheres connected via a flexible suspension system, and it celebrates both brands’ philosophies of great design achieved through a mix of innovation and tradition. Revealed during the Seattle Design Festival in September, the installation was perfectly timed. As Arbel notes, “Each glass sphere sits in its place the way a leaf sits in relation to other leaves at the base of a tree in the fall.” h

graymag . com

39


| news |

MUJI MOVES

hap pen in 40

graymag . com

NEW CONSTRUCTION

For Vancouver jewelry designer Erica Leal, the philosophies of the early-20th-century Russian Constructivist movement still resonate today. Much as Constructivist artists used modern industrial materials in their works, Leal employs contemporary 3D printing technology to create her sterling silver and bronze designs. The geometric textiles of artist Varvara Stepanova influenced the recent collection, which is based around patterns of circles, squares, and triangles.

SMOOTH MOVES

Vancouver furniture designer Kate Duncan is making midcentury modern again with her new collection, inspired by the Brutalist architecture movement. Dubbed Maya, it previewed at ADDRESS Assembly (a design showcase Duncan founded six years ago) in September and includes dense wooden headboards, stools, and tables with vertically striped carvings that recall the concrete structures of Le Corbusier. h —CLAIRE BUTWINICK

FROM TOP: DAVID PAPAZIAN, IAN LANTERMAN, BRITTNEY KWASNEY

After opening a wildly successful pop-up shop in Portland this past September, Japanese lifestyle brand MUJI has announced that it’s in the PNW to stay. In late November, the design-focused company opened a permanent 11,000-square-foot location in downtown Portland. Aside from its standard offerings (everything from office supplies to clothing), the store boasts re-MUJI, the brand’s initiative to recycle and repurpose garments from old collections. A MUJI Seattle is in the works and will open in early 2019.


Obsidian Columns by JennAir

B E S T. D E C I S I O N . E V E R . When it comes to your dream home – making sure it is perfect means tons of tough decisions. Let our knowledgeable product experts relieve the stress and restore the fun while introducing you and your design team to our extensive collection of products from the most sought after brands.

S E AT T L E | B E L L E V U E | B U R L I N G TO N | P O R T O R C H A R D SPOK ANE | PORTLAND | EUGENE | MEDFORD F E RGUSON S H OWROOM S .COM

©2018 Ferguson Enterprises, Inc. 1018 989546

Request your appointment today at fergusonshowrooms.com


| news |

ONE HOUSE. DOZENS OF DESIGNERS. ONE GRAND TRANSFORMATION. Introducing the 2019 Design House Northwest Written by LAUREN MANG

42

graymag . com

designers and tastemakers, including GRAY founder and publisher Shawn Williams—will transform more than 20 rooms inside a historic English Tudor estate that was featured as a Designer Show House in 1986. The house also had a cameo in several films, including 10 Things I Hate About You. Built in 1929, the stately structure, which clocks in at more than 12,000 square feet, was designed by architect George Stoddard and spans 2 acres along the Lake Washington waterfront in Seattle’s Seward Park. The final reveal happens in 2019, allowing the public a chance to tour the freshly revamped rooms and experience each designer’s unique vision. All proceeds from the 2019 Design House Northwest benefit cancer research at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Tickets will go on sale in early spring 2019. For more information, visit designhousenw.org. Follow our Design House Northwest series in each issue of GRAY leading up to the event. h

FROM TOP: CORY HOLLAND, HOLLAND PHOTOGRAPHY; BRAD VANCOUR, TEAM VANCOUR

OVER THE NEXT YEAR, THE TOP INTERIOR ARCHITECTS AND DESIGNERS IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST—selected by a jury of influential


FASHION IS WHAT YOU’RE OFFERED

STYLE IS WHAT YOU CHOOSE

Interior design by @pennyblackinteriors

SHOW YOUR STYLE

Oregon Showroom 333 NW 16th Avenue Portland, OR 97209 (800) 452-7634 salesresidential@chown.com

Washington Showroom 12001 NE 12th Street Bellevue, WA 98005 (800) 574-4312 chown.com

Instagram @chownhardware / Facebook @chown.hardware


ADVERTISEMENT

JAMES KM CHENG DESIGNS THE NEXT ICON OF SEATTLE’S SKYLINE It’s a new dawn as visionary developer and culture company Westbank brings together a collaboration of great artistic minds to create one of the most stunning towers in Seattle’s skyline. IMAGINE WELCOMING THE DAY 47 stories aboveground.

The sunrise reflects off the rooftop pool water’s surface, and a one-of-a-kind glass art installation surrounding this upper deck oasis bathes you in the shimmering rays of early sunlight. This is no design-lover’s daydream. Breaking ground in mid-2019, the First Light residential tower, a collaboration between Vancouver development firm Westbank and worldrenowned architect James KM Cheng, represents a variety of new dawns in the evolution of the Emerald City skyline. The 500-foot-skyscraper is a unique fusion of architecture, amenities, and the creative arts. The tripartite tower will house 7 stories of retail and office space at its base, followed by 38 floors of high-end condo units (459 in total), all topped with resident amenity floors complete with a 25-meter cantilevered swimming pool. Concern for proportion and beauty informs all exterior details of the project, including a series of glass-disc “veils”

created by Seattle artist John Hogan. Suspended on steel cables, Hogan’s installations adorn First Light’s base and uppermost floors, adding luminous sculptural details to the tower and testing the application of glass art at the building scale. “This is definitely a big-picture approach to art making,” the artist says. Seattle-based firm MG2 was given the task of executing Cheng’s vision for First Light and has worked in tandem with his offices for the past year to shepherd the construction process stateside. “Westbank doesn’t do anything conventional,” says MG2 principal Elik Grin. “Their innovation is evident in every part of this project, from the structure to the interiors to its sustainability and art. It really is going to be a landmark, and it’s exciting for any architect to work on something with this kind of scale and visibility in your own town.” —GRAY firstlightseattle.com


Floating off the edge of the 47th floor, First Light’s Sky Pool commands unobstructed views of Puget Sound and the Space Needle on one side and John Hogan’s glittering glass veil on the other.


| news |

21STCENTURY TOKEN Written by RACHEL GALLAHER Photographed by KEVIN SCOTT

46

graymag . com


COURTESY OF SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY [SPL_GG_72750012]

a

nyone who knows me knows that I am exceedingly proud to be a third-generation Seattleite, with deep roots in Washington State. My dad spent a handful of years as a fisherman, taking boats to Alaska to catch halibut in the spring; my mom worked at the erstwhile Frederick & Nelson (a downtown Seattle staple) for more than two decades, and my grandfather Charles Wesley Scott helped build the city’s iconic Space Needle for the 1962 World’s Fair. He passed away five years ago, so it’s my 87-year-old grandmother who now relays the stories of his ironworking days. “The men would be up there on the top levels, walking around with no harnesses, no straps, no safety nets,” she says. “Inching out there on iron beams less than 2 feet wide, sometimes after a beer or two at lunch.” But for my grandfather, who also happened to be blind in one eye, risk was just another part of the job. When the Space Needle opened, it was a modern marvel. A symbol of Seattle’s eventual rise to become a global city, its bold design captured the mod aesthetic of the era while also reaching toward the future with its architectural and technological advances. Designed by Edward E. Carlson and John Graham Jr., the 605-foot-tall Needle was not only an ode to the futuristic zeitgeist of the era, it also held the world’s first freestanding rotating restaurant. » graymag . com

47


| news |

“Olson Kundig is working on projects all over the world, but we’ve been in so to have the opportunity to work on the symbol of

48

graymag . com


Seattle for more than 50 years. Our heart is in the Pacific Northwest, this city was both a huge challenge and an honor.”

—ALAN MASKIN, ARCHITECT

West-facing views from the Loupe level of the newly renovated Space Needle. Olson Kundig replaced the original rotating floor on this level with the world’s first and only revolving glass floor, that reveals a never-before-seen view 500 feet to the ground. Throughout all three floors, the design team added nearly 200 percent more glass, allowing for panoramic views of the city, Puget Sound, and the mountains. »

graymag . com

49


| news |

The Oculus Staircase connects the Space Needle’s three public levels, from the Loupe level to the observation deck. At their base, a large section of glass gives visitors another new view: the elevators carrying people up and down the structure’s stem.

50

graymag . com


The observation deck’s old view-impeding security cages and protective pony walls were replaced with open-air glass walls and two dozen benches. The geometric angles update the deck with a modern minimalst aesthetic.

Fifty-six years and 60 million visitors later, Seattle’s most notable building has unveiled an extensive 11-month renovation led by local architecture firm Olson Kundig and Hoffman Construction Company. The tower still boasts its waspwaisted, saucer-topped silhouette, but the renovation vastly changed the interiors. Throughout the upper three floors, the team demolished walls, small strip windows, and security cages, and wherever possible, replaced opaque materials with transparent ones, adding almost 200 percent more glass. The original rotating floor on the lower level was replaced with the Loupe: the world’s first and only revolving glass floor. Stepping onto the 37-ton glass feature (located on the level that used to, and will once again, house the restaurant, which will be announced by early 2019) allows guests never-beforeseen views 500 feet downward onto the plazas and rooftops of Seattle—a dizzying perspective similar to, albeit more protected than, the one my grandfather saw while building the Needle. Also new are the Oculus Stairs: two half moon–shaped steel and glass staircases that connect the tower’s three

public levels, from the Loupe to the observation deck. At their base, a section of 19-by-11-foot glass reveals another new view: the elevators and their counterweights zipping up and down the Space Needle’s neck. According to design principal and firm principal/owner Alan Maskin, who worked in tandem with Olson Kundig principal and project architect Blair Payson on the redesign, “Much of the renovation was about subtraction rather than addition. We replaced almost everything we deleted with glass, which actually, when you look back at the sketches and plans, matches up with some elements of the architects’ original intent.” Innovations in glass manufacturing impossible six decades ago allowed the design team to replace the observation deck’s old pony walls and security cages with canted 11-by-7-foot glass walls and 24 glass benches to create an open-air deck. The result: unobstructed 360-degree views of Seattle and the water and mountains beyond. The revised Space Needle is a fitting blend of nature, technology, and design that embodies the city’s history and reminds us that even the wildest-seeming ideas might someday take us to the top. h graymag . com

51


USE COUPON CODE FARM10 FOR 10% OFF YOUR ORDER! If something is worth making, it is worth making right. We use the best

USECOUPON COUPON FARM10 FOR 10% OFF ORDER! USE CODE GRAY10 FOR 10% OFF YOUR ORDER! wood outCODE there, and build our doors solid all the way YOUR through. USE COUPON CODE FARM10 FOR 10% OFF YOUR ORDER!

If something is worth making, it is gorgeous, worth making We use the best Our hardware is durable, and right. of unmatched wood outisthere, and build our doors solid all the way If something worth making, it is worth making right. Wethrough. use the best quality. Everything we build is built to last. wood out there, and build our doors solid all the way through. Our hardware is durable, gorgeous, and of unmatched We invite you to Build Real with us. quality. Everything build is and builtof tounmatched last. Our hardware is durable, we gorgeous, quality. Everything we build is built to last. We invite you to Build Real with us. REALSLIDINGHARDWARE.COM | REALCARRIAGEDOORS.COM | 1.800.694.5977 We invite you to Build Real with us.

REALSLIDINGHARDWARE.COM | REALCARRIAGEDOORS.COM | 1.800.694.5977 REALSLIDINGHARDWARE.COM | REALCARRIAGEDOORS.COM | 1.800.694.5977


Designed to be Designed. Choose the spout, handles and finish from this curated collection to create your signature look. The Components bathroom faucet and accessory collection. Created by Kohler. Designed by you. ™

Visit our showroom. Auburn WA • Beaverton OR • Bellingham WA • Bend OR • Bremerton WA • Burlington WA Clackamas OR • Eugene OR • Everett WA • Kennewick WA • Lacey WA • Lynnwood WA Redmond WA • Seattle WA • Spokane WA • Tacoma WA • Vancouver WA also visit KOHLER Signature Store by Keller Supply in Bellevue WA & Portland OR www.kellershowrooms.com


Celebrating 25 years of Design Innovation Craftsmanship Sustainability Customer Service Visit one of our retailers or contact us for more information or questions regarding our products or customization. Tel: 847-680-9043 Email: cs@matthewsfanco.com www.matthewsfanco.com


Architecture: Coates Design Architects; Photography: Lara Swimmer


56

graymag . com


Thank you to our sponsors and partners:

S PA R K L I N G S O DA

CHARITABLE PARTNER

graymag . com

57


|

editors’ picks

|

BEST SURPRISE SOLUTIONS Photographed by MICHAEL MANCHAKOWSKI

Nearly 750 miles north of Vancouver, the small town of Fort St. John, British Columbia, is characterized by strip malls and long stretches of parking lot. It wasn’t known as a standout design destination until, in February 2018, the Birch Building went up. Designed by Burgers Architecture and offering 15,000 square feet of commercial and office space, the two-story structure not only introduces an eye-catching beacon into an industrial area but also cleverly resolves problems of space and material. By putting the parking lot underneath the offices, Burgers utilized the site to the max. When precast concrete and cross-laminated timber proved too heavy and expensive, the firm returned to square one and found a solution that used lightweight wood framing supported by concrete grade beams and inexpensive screwjack piles rather than driven ones—which turned out to work magnificently with the marshy earth below. To make the building stand out amid the gray tones of its locale, Burgers drew inspiration from the thin white trunks and blazing yellow fall foliage of the area’s sizeable birch forest, adorning the building with white steel columns and a lemon-colored façade. h

58

graymag . com


love coming home.

1225 NW Everett St. | Portland, OR | www.kushrugs.com


|

editors’ picks

|

BEST FLEX

Photographed by JEREMY BITTERMANN

Usually constructed as simple industrial structures with metal roll-up doors and interior mezzanines, flex buildings aren’t known for their beauty or high design. Instead they’re workhorses, often holding storage spaces or bare-bones rental offices. Portland-based firm Lever Architecture is aiming to change the reputation of the flex space with its self-titled Flex project, which features mass-timber structural elements and a distinctive angular form. Inside, the 200-by-95-foot open floor plan is divisible into eight 24-foot structural bays so the building can be partitioned for various tenants, from a restaurant to small maker spaces. Eighty-foot triangular clerestory windows and glass garage-style doors allow daylight to penetrate the building, and light-toned glulam columns and beams prevent the space from seeming cold or nondescript. This high-level thinking, paired with cost-effective building solutions such as off-the-shelf and prefabricated materials and systems, is proof that good design doesn’t have to be expensive or complicated—with the right methodologies, even a warehouse can be beautiful. h

60

graymag . com


|

editors’ picks

|

BEST OUTOF-THE-BOX DESIGN Photographed by JEREMY BITTERMANN

62

graymag . com

Rising above the peaceful sidewalks of Portland’s Northwest neighborhood, this modern home, designed by Skylab Architecture, is as an imposing neighbor, all sharp angles and dark geometric forms. But, according to architect Jeff Kovel, design director and principal at Skylab, the project’s goal was to inspire an “openness to learn and find the unlimited curiosity you had when you were a kid.” In fact, the heart of this stately home is creativity, music, and play. Inspired by artist Gordon Matta Clark’s Building Cuts (a method of dissecting existing buildings, opening them up, and converting them into disorienting walk-through sculptures), Kovel combined the site’s two structures by peeling back the roof of one and slicing into the other, then fusing them together through a new central core building with a music studio as its foundation. The first floor features an open layout with spaces to make art, record music, and even hone kickflips in a large indoor skate bowl. On the second level, artist-in-residence living spaces overlook the main floor. Embracing both the built and the natural environment, this one-of-a-kind live/ work space captures the spirit and creativity of youth in a sophisticated structure that upholds Skylab’s holistic design approach. h


graymag . com

63


|

editors’ picks

64

graymag . com

|


graymag . com

65


|

editors’ picks

|

BEST ASCENT

Photographed by EMA PETER

66

graymag . com

Without question, the defining element of this Vancouver condominium renovation is the bilevel space’s new sculptural staircase. Tasked with joining two adjacent floorplates in the 27-year-old post-tension building in the West End, Aaron Mackenzie-Moore Design’s team presented more than 20 iterations of the stairs to the client and the project engineers before the double-helix structure of steel, leather, and marble-lime plaster was approved. To fashion the staircase, the team first rolled a half-inch-thick plate steel sheet into a pair of helixes. Between the helixes, Mackenzie-Moore fitted leather treads outlined with laterally flexible LED strip lighting that creates the illusion that each riser is floating. The stair was assembled offsite, then cut into pieces small enough to be craned through a window onto a custom “landing pad” before it was installed. The result is a structure that is both grounded and ethereal, a highly engineered feature that also encourages viewers’ dreams to take flight. h


2 0 2 9 2 N D AV E . SEAT T L E , WA 9 8 1 2 1 T. 2 0 6 . 4 48 .3 3 0 9 WWW. C AM E R I C H SE AT T LE.C OM 2 1 1 1 1 ST AVE. SE AT T L E, WA 9 8 1 2 1 T. 2 0 6 . 4 4 1 .2 3 5 0 WWW. AL C H EM Y C O L L EC T I O N S .C OM


|

editors’ picks

|

BEST DRAMATIC ENTRANCE Photographed by HARIS KENJAR

68

graymag . com

Every element of this Seattle penthouse condo is top-level—including the space itself. Located atop one of the first luxury high-rises in the city, the penthouse, designed by architecture firm Suyama Peterson Deguchi with interiors by NB Design Group, embraces a moody luxury not often seen in a region obsessed with minimalist décor. The dramatic entryway, complete with an intricately adorned folding screen and bold twin light fixtures, serves as a gatekeeper to the opulent interiors, where a palette of wood and bronze modernizes traditional Northwest materials and herringbone floors add visual texture. h


PENDLETON® BY SUNBRELLA® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF GLEN RAVEN, INC. PENDLETON® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF PENDLETON WOOLEN MILLS.

CUSTOM SHADES BLINDS & DRAPERY

The Pendleton® by Sunbrella® Collection of high-performance fabrics is available exclusively at The Shade Store®. Handcrafted in the USA since 1946. All products ship free in 10 days or less. Visit us locally in Seattle: 2004 1st Avenue | Bellevue: Venn at Main, 13 Bellevue Way NE, Suite J | Portland: 1117 NW Everett Street 65+ SHOWROOMS NATIONWIDE | THESHADESTORE.COM/PENDLETON | 800.754.1455


|

editors’ picks

|

BEST ELEMENTAL PROGRESSION Photographed by BENJAMIN BENSCHNEIDER

When architect Garret Cord Werner’s clients told him they wanted a tranquil home informed by natural elements such as water and sky, he needed to look no further than their Mercer Island property for inspiration. To capitalize on the site’s sweeping views of Lake Washington, Werner designed a modern concrete-and-steel house organized around an architectural spine of water. A rectangular channel running through the center of the home reveals a dramatic lake vista, beginning with a reflection pond at the entrance and transitioning, via an interior boardwalk-like bridge, to a propulsion lap pool. Accessed by another bridge is an infinity-edge spa that appears to spill into the lake. Above the pool, a large opening cut into the ceiling allows stargazing at night. As a bonus, the water reflects the everchanging sky during daylight hours. Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass walls allow the homeowners to further maximize the space in warm weather and create a truly integrated indoor-outdoor experience. h

70

graymag . com


L I K E T H E M O S T G R A T I F Y I N G M E A L S, T H E S U B - Z E R O , W O L F A N D C O V E S H O W R O O M A P P E A L S T O A L L O F T H E S E N S E S.

Taste, touch, and see the true potential for your kitchen. From appliance test-drives to chef-led demos, we invite you to explore our products with all of your senses engaged.

bradleedistributors.com Seattle Showroom

1400 Elliott Avenue West, Seattle, WA 98119 I 206.284.8400


|

editors’ picks

|

BEST HISTORIC INTEGRATION Photographed by MATT GLAC

Few design projects that the University of Washington has undertaken in its 157-year history were as tricky as the addition of a Starbucks to its historic Suzzallo Library. The architectural crown jewel of the campus, Suzzallo boasts striking Gothic architecture, grand stained glass panels, sweeping staircases, and a 250-foot long reading room. The new addition needed to respect the existing building but also provide a comfortable gathering space for students and visitors. Senior designer Bret Lewis headed up the Starbucks team, which was tasked with

72

graymag . com

combining the UW and Starbucks brands, melding new elements with old, and introducing a busy café into a space made for silence via a design that is both inviting and capacious. The team took inspiration from a vintage photograph of the library’s original structural frame, translating it into a metal ceiling framework and a one-of-a-kind artwork by local artist and UW alum Matthew Olds that pays tribute to both campus history and a coffee bean’s journey from field to cup. Now, as students fuel up for class, they can also absorb a lesson in art and design. h


western window systems

Meet our new line of simulated steel moving glass walls and windows. Affordable. Energy-smart. Beautiful. westernwindowsystems.com


|

editors’ picks

|

BEST BUILDABLE STATEMENT LIGHTING

74

graymag . com

MATTHEW MCCORMICK

A study of balance between two simple volumes, the MILA light, by Vancouver designer Matthew McCormick, takes a minimalist approach to geometric shapes. Emitting a light that is meant to mimic the soft reflection from organic pearls, the pendant is composed of a metal oval frame (tonal options include brass, copper, satin black, and textured white) and a hand-blown, warm-toned glass sphere balanced delicately at its center. Pendants can be suspended at different lengths, either individually or in clusters, making them a versatile addition to any space. “MILA is a labor of love,” says McCormick. “I wanted to celebrate life through a piece that allowed me to be experimental and bold while conveying the poetry and beauty of geometry and order.” h


Sin c e 2 0 01

1 61 1 N W No r t h r u p

Awa rd-W in n ing Int e r i o r D e s i g n

Po r t la nd

5 03. 29 5 .015 1

Se e a f ull p ortf oli o at Mai son In c. c om

Full-S e r vi ce Ki tch e n / Bath De si g n

Custom Fur n i sh i n g s an d Cab i netr y

M A I SOinc. N


|

editors’ picks

|

BEST BIG IMPACT IN A SMALL SPACE Photographed by MICHELLE JOHNSON

76

graymag . com

Most wine enthusiasts would agree that it’s not the size of a bar that counts but what’s on offer inside. With that in mind, Vancouver-based McKinley Burkart Architects had to make every inch count when designing what may be the world’s smallest wine bar last year. Clocking in at approximately 700 square feet, Bar Annabelle, in Calgary, might be pint-sized, but it makes a big, bold design statement. The Vancouver design team first explored tiny bars around the world, from tapas spots in Barcelona to Parisian brasseries, to seek inspiration for a project that would stand out in a global milieu of petite casual eateries. Thinking about ambitious, social women (the bar’s ultimate customers, if you will), McKinley Burkart gave the interiors a retro feminine aesthetic enlivened with Art Deco flair. Moody wall colors and the onyx-backed bar create an intimate backdrop, allowing the rose-hued globe pendant lighting, brass detailing, and velvet-upholstered stools to take center stage. h


|

editors’ picks

|

BEST PATTERN PLAY Photographed by JANIS NICOLAY

78

graymag . com

When one Vancouver couple first looked inside the townhouse that would become their future home, they saw cramped quarters, closed-in walls, and dated 1970s décor, far from the luxurious oasis they’d imagined. Hired to create light and open interiors, Janie Hungerford of Hungerford Interior Design updated the house’s confined layout and passé décor, transforming the space into a modern, sophisticated abode inspired in part by the couple’s European travels. Vibrant hues, derived from the landscape of southern France, flow throughout the home, with the entryway making the strongest style statement thanks to its bright multicolored staircase runner, which Hungerford designed and commissioned especially for this project. h


GIVE THE GIFT OF GOOD DESIGN FURNITURE. LIGHTING. RUGS. HOME DECOR. EWFMODERN.COM – T.503.295.7336 1122 NW GLISAN ST., PORTLAND, OR 97209

ULTRA SERIES ™

Milgard Ultra™ Series: A Fiberglass Frame Designed for Complete Peace of Mind. Beautiful to look at and low maintenance, Ultra™ Series fiberglass windows and doors are built to last. Through a careful design process, Milgard introduces a window more resistant to heat, insects and water damage to help withstand the harsher sides of Mother Nature. Available in 7 tough, durable exterior finishes, Milgard Ultra features a Full Lifetime Warranty with glass breakage coverage for complete peace of mind.

Open the door to new possibilities with Milgard

Create an impressive entrance to your home with beautiful, high quality patio doors from Milgard in your choice of styles Open the doorand toframes. the pos

Create an impressive entrance to yo quality patio doors from Milgard in y 2425 NW Market Street, Seattle WA 98107 Showroom hours are M-F 8 AM to 5 PM and by appointment. (206)789-1122 • lundgrenenterprises.com

All our patio door products feature a hardware options so you can custom your home’s architectural style. Ava Lundgren Enterprises 2425 NW Market Street Seattle WA 98107 (206) 789-1122 lundgrenenterprises.com


|

editors’ picks

|

BEST INTERIOR /EXTERIOR COLLABORATION Photographed by EMA PETER

For a couple looking to update their family home in North Vancouver, finding the right team was key to unlocking their design dreams. To transform the faded house they loved and create a modern addition that spoke to their current lifestyle, the family hired interior designer Sahra Samnani of SMD Interiors and architect Michael Green. The team’s approach was to “complement rather than compete with” the existing building’s scale and form. In addition to raising the original house a few feet to allow for a full basement remodel, the team added a new second floor to a modern addition at the back

80

graymag . com

of the house, creating room for a master bedroom and a deck with views of the mountains and ocean. They also removed interior walls, opening up the main floor into a gallery-like living, dining, and kitchen space. The new deck blends inside and outside, providing the family with extensivegarden and entertaining space. The house was ultimately awarded Passive House Plus certification, making the project one that combines striking architecture, a thoughtful renovation, and energy efficiency—a triple win in our book. h


Designer features without the designer price.

Introducing the ILVE Pro — not only is it the perfect fit for the perfect kitchen, it conveniently happens to fit your budget… perfectly. And while imitation may be the greatest form of flattery, we believe you deserve the original. Handmade in Italy and available in 36", 40" and 48", it’s all about performance, quality and craftsmanship. After all, the only thing you’ll be sacrificing — is nothing.

Made in Italy 866-844-6566 ~ www.ilveappliances.com Ranges ~ Ovens ~ Hoods ~ Cooktops

Tri State Distributors, Inc. 20119 59th Place South, Suite 100 Kent, WA 98032 253-872-2900 • www.TriStateDistributors.com

Fine Solid Bronze Architectural Hardware 866.788.3631 • www.sunvalleybronze.com Made in the USA


|

editors’ picks

|

Launched by Karice Enterprises at this year’s Vancouver Buildex show, the Olah sconce is a shining example of contemporary lighting design. Evolving Karice’s earlier codesigned Halo pendant into a wall sconce may seem like an easy task, but the refined result—with no visible fasteners—took more to pull off than meets the eye. The circular fluorescent bulb can be mounted in four different ways, and the mount sports four unique finishes: light gold, silver, black, and gold plate. Walking the line between minimalist design and bold geometry, the Olah sconce is a refreshingly versatile lighting choice that complements any number of styles. h

82

graymag . com

J.N. DERY

BEST ELEVATED SHAPE


VISIT OUR SHOWROOM FOR PREMIUM LIGHTING Unit 101 - 15292 Croydon Drive Surrey, BC V3Z 0Z5

©2018 SWAROVSKI LIGHTING, LTD

604.538.3511 SALES@OPLIGHTING.COM W W W.OCEANPACIFICLIGHTING.COM

CHRYSALITA | SWAROVSKI-LIGHTING.COM

Design Fabrication Collaboration Glass mosaic signage Murals Thresholds

tietonmosaic.com

graymag . com

83


|

editors’ picks

|

BEST OF THE PACK Photographed by ANNA HOYCHUCK

The crowd of ’90s sartorial trends shows no signs of exiting the global fashion stage, and this miniature backpack, by Seattle accessories line Feral, brings the obsession home to the Pacific Northwest. The style may be a throwback, but brand designer Shannon Fisher’s commitment to sustainable local production exemplifies the contemporary tenets of PNW fashion. Each bag is produced in the US and combines luxe leathers with domestically sourced componentry, including zippers, hardware, lining, and labels. “It took almost two full years to source our materials and build a network of relationships with capable domestic partners to manufacture our line,” the designer says. “We persisted and are proud that today we’re working with some of the best artisans in the US to make each modern piece.”

Inspired by the sheepherder’s classic curved staff, the Shepherd’s chair, from Vancouver-based Hinterland Design, is leading the design flock. Created by Riley McFerrin, the chair’s legs, arms, and seat frame are each crafted from identical white ash wooden arcs, an exercise in the simplicity of form that beautifully combines a modern aesthetic and traditional craft—both exemplary characteristics of PNW design. h

84

graymag . com

RILEY MCFERRIN

BEST RETRO REMIX


AFTER 46 YEARS, WHAT’S OLD IS NEW AGAIN. BEDROOMS & MORE’S NEW BUILDING IS HERE!

300 NE 45th St, Seattle, WA 98105 bedr oomsandmor e.com ( 206) 633- 4494

TO THE TRADE IN THE SEATTLE DESIGN CENTER dfgseattle.com

graymag . com

85


Carbon12 PATH Architecture

Hillside Sanctuary Hoedemaker Pfeiffer

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ANDREW POGUE, EMA PETER, JEREMY BITTERMANN, JIM CANZIAN, KEVIN SCOTT


Combo House Measured Architecture

ARCHITECTURE RESIDENTIAL FINALISTS

SINBIN Skylab Architecture

Okada Marshall House D’Arcy Jones Architecture

graymag . com

87


S T O N E V O L U M E

H I L L S I D E S A N C T U A R Y

WINNER

H O E D E M A K E R P F E I F F E R

Written by RACHEL EGGERS Photographed by KEVIN SCOTT


graymag . com

89


90

graymag . com


graymag . com

91


“THIS IS A DESIGN THAT BOTH STANDS OUT AND BEAUTIFULLY DISAPPEARS, ALLOWING THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE TO COME INSIDE.” —ELAINE MOLINAR, SNØHETTA GRAY AWARDS 2018 JUDGE

92

graymag . com


graymag . com

93


94

graymag . com


SOMETIMES, ESPECIALLY IN ARCHITECTURE, THE ACT OF CREATION IS ACTUALLY ONE OF RE-CREATION. Such was the case

for Seattle-based studio Hoedemaker Pfeiffer when it designed a pair of dwellings set atop a plunging hillside in Washington State’s San Juan Islands. The client, who had lost a beloved wood-and-stone cabin in the Appalachians to fire, didn’t ask the firm to reproduce the old structure, but they did hope to give its spirit a new form in the Pacific Northwest. Todd Beyerlein, principal architect at Hoedemaker Pfeiffer, set out to tackle the abstract request by harmonizing the home’s design with the rocky inclines of its poetic regional setting. The resulting design is composed of two stone structures—the main house and guesthouse—that seem to grow out of their untamed surroundings. Stone was used in the back wall of the main house to echo the landscape and grant the resident privacy from the road approach. A pair of massive stone walls, punctuated by fireplaces, runs through the center of the

main home alongside a central stone staircase, separating the public and private rooms. The heavy stonework is balanced by an elegant network of wood and glass that encloses the front of the house like a nest, allowing maximum light and views to flow into the interior. Inspired by the idea of a stone tower, the guesthouse makes the most of its dramatically precipitous siting, with various architectural elements jutting out from the compact building into the surrounding wilderness. A deck extends from the main living space, reaching toward Puget Sound; the glassenclosed dining room floats out into the trees. (Two steel beams carry its entire weight and extend deep into the interior floor system to allow the room to cantilever.) At night, the dining room beams like a lantern above the concrete patio. The two-structure concept means that the client, along with friends and family, enjoys solitude and togetherness in equal measure. A home once lost now tells twice as many tales. h

DATE OF COMPLETION May 2017 COLLABORATORS Contractor: Schuchart/Dow Landscape architect: Allworth Design Structural engineer: Malsam Tsang Civil engineer: LPD Engineering Geotechnical engineer: Nelson Geotechnical Associates Arborist: Island Tree Doctor graymag . com

95


CoorsTek Center for Applied Science and Engineering Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

ARCHITECTURE COMMERCIAL FINALISTS

The Mark ZGF Architects

96

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: NIC LEHOUX, CONNIE ZHOU, graymag . com ANDREW POGUE, TIM GRIFFITH, HALL MERRICK PHOTOGRAPHERS


LA & NYC Garages SRG Partnership, Inc.

Voxman Music Building, University of Iowa LMN Architects

The Water Institute of the Gulf Perkins+Will

graymag . com

97


MISSISSIP The Water Institute of the Gulf Perkins+Will Written by BRIAN LIBBY Photographed by HALL MERRICK PHOTOGRAPHERS

WINNER

98

graymag . com


PI RISING

graymag . com

99


100

graymag . com


IT’S NO NEWSFLASH THAT CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ECOSYSTEMS WORLDWIDE, but in the United States,

few places have suffered more than the Delta region of Louisiana, where coastal wetlands are eroding away at an estimated rate of one football field every 100 minutes. To combat this loss, the state of Louisiana, Senator Mary Landrieu, and the nonprofit Baton Rouge Area Foundation collaborated in 2011 to found the Water Institute of the Gulf, an organization that brings together scientists and academics to research resiliency strategies for waterfront communities. Although the institute was founded seven years ago, its 34,000-square-foot headquarters, located in Baton Rouge, wasn’t completed until 2017. Designed by the Seattle office of Perkins+Will, the building was erected atop the circa 1926 Baton Rouge Municipal Dock as a way

to protect it from Mississippi River flooding, which can rise 30 feet above the banks and submerge the shoreline. The building’s angular form pays homage to surrounding industrial structures along the river, and an extended overhang at the entry creates a welcoming porte cochère. The first floor is wrapped in an outdoor promenade, its glass façade recessed behind a series of V-shaped columns that form a continuous loggia around the building. Large windows along the first-floor dock make the institute’s wet lab visible to the public, and open, flexible office areas and coworking spaces encourage discussion and collaboration among researchers. A standout along the waterway, the Water Institute thoughtfully combines contemporary architecture and an altruistic cause in the ultimate expression of designing with place in mind. h

DATE OF COMPLETION December 2017 COLLABORATORS Associate architect: Coleman Partners Construction: Lemoine Company Structural engineer: Wardlaw & Lasseigne Mechanical, electrical, and plumbing: AST Civil engineering: Stantec

graymag . com

101


102

graymag . com


“This is an iconic structure that boldly highlights the significance of its mission.”

—ELAINE MOLINAR, SNØHETTA GRAY AWARDS 2018 JUDGE

graymag . com

103


Rivรกge Apartment & Willamette Greenway Trail Shapiro Didway Landscape Architecture

104 FROM LEFT: DAVID. PAPAZIAN, EMA PETER, STUART ISETT graymag com

West Nineteenth Residence Andrea McLean Studio Inc.


The Spheres Site Workshop Landscape Architecture

LANDSCAPE FINALISTS

graymag . com

105


WINNER

The Spheres Site Workshop Landscape Architecture Written by RACHEL EGGERS Photographed by STUART ISETT

106

graymag . com


URBAN JUNGLE graymag . com

107


108

graymag . com


“The Victorians saw the glass houses, the palm houses, as pure fantasy, which they still are. But the Spheres bring this fantasy up to date, increasing the drama and intensity through verticality. It’s a really interesting scheme.”—PETER WALKER, PWP

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

GRAY AWARDS 2018 JUDGE

graymag . com

109


THE RISE OF VICTORIAN GARDEN CONSERVATORIES COINCIDED WITH THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION, so it’s fitting that the Spheres, Amazon’s biophilic workspace in downtown Seattle, should accompany the digital revolution. Composed of three connected glass-and-steel domes, like a burst of bubbles gathered in nets, the Spheres hosts a complex natural environment living in harmony with local Amazonians—the 21st-century kind. Seattle-based landscape architecture firm Site Workshop, brought on to create the Spheres’ interior landscape, namechecked the Palm House, at London’s famed Kew Gardens, as a major inspiration for the new space, designed for use by Amazon employees (with limited public access). The immersive four-floor ecosystem houses more than 40,000 plants across 400 species. The first level holds a plant collection

110

graymag . com

from the mid- to high-elevation forests of Central and South America. More than 68 tons of natural stone were incorporated into the landscape, used in stairs, planter walls, and the stream that cascades over a waterfall to a pool at the ground-level entry below. Level two focuses on plants from Asian cloud forests and features raised architectural planters clad in marine-grade aluminum. The lush standout is a 67-foot core wall that rises through all four levels and is clad in 3,200 square feet of plants representing more than 60 species. Living walls burst with plants and vines, and employees can cosplay as birdlife in a human-sized nest in the south conservatory. With space for 800 employees, the Spheres is an inversion of the usual narrative of the Emerald City: instead of leaving work behind to recharge in green spaces outside, you can stay inside and do both. h

DATE OF COMPLETION February 2018 COLLABORATORS Horticultural partners: Amazon Horticulture, Atlanta Botanical Garden, Windcliff

Lighting and mechanical engineer: WSP

Architect: NBBJ

General contractor: Sellen Construction

Structural engineer: Magnusson Klemencic Associates

Water feature: Waterline Studios, Cost of Wisconsin

Landscape contractor: Teufel


SEAN AIRHART

graymag . com

111


Cortina Restaurant Heliotrope Architects

Botanist Ste. Marie Art + Design

INTERIOR DESIGN COMMERCIAL FINALISTS

FROM LEFT: HARIS. KENJAR, EMA PETER, 112 GARRETT ROWLAND, MICHELLE JOHNSON, JEREMY BITTERMANN graymag com


The Wednesday Room McKinley Burkart Architects Inc.

Expensify Portland Office ZGF Architects

Wild Ginger SkB Architects

graymag . com

113


“It’s grand and elegant while being playful and forward thinking at the same time. Great design is when utility dovetails perfectly with beauty and innovation. This project does just that.” —KRISTINA O’NEAL, AVROKO GRAY AWARDS 2018 JUDGE

114

graymag . com


CAPITAL DESIGN Expensify Portland Office ZGF Architects Written by RENSKE WERNER Photographed by GARRETT ROWLAND

WINNER

graymag . com

115


116

graymag . com


AROUND THIS TIME LAST YEAR, A TIME CLASH OF SORTS OCCURRED IN PORTLAND. Tech company Expensify

(developers of a leading application for expense management, receipt scanning, and business travel) was growing rapidly and needed a new home. In a poetic convergence, the space the company chose for its new location was downtown Portland’s century-old First National Bank building. Old economy collided with new, however, and internationally acclaimed ZGF Architects was brought in to find the balance. The firm’s Portland office worked with the building’s many vintage and Art Deco details (patterned walls, soaring multistory columns) and created an aesthetic-bending entryway atrium that features modernist glass-and-steel staircases. Original architectural features, including giant

bank vaults, were preserved during the extensive remodel. Expensify’s request for a wide range of workspaces on each of the building’s four floors led ZGF to design a mix of ubiquitous and out-of-the-box results, including a secluded spot several levels up where small wooden A-frame private booths offer an environment for focused, heads-down work. On the second floor, two custom-built floating brass-and-glassclad conference rooms are set opposite and above the bank’s main staircase, and a speakeasy-style salon with mirrored walls is accessed through a set of hidden doors. A harmonious blend of new and old, Expensify’s offices show the results of banking on good design. h

DATE OF COMPLETION December 2017 COLLABORATORS General contractor: Swinerton Builders Structural engineer: KPFF Consulting Engineers MEP engineer: Glumac Code consultant: Code Unlimited Broker: Melvin Mark

graymag . com

117


118

graymag . com


“We loved the creative intervention of the floating conference rooms, which minimally affects the grandeur of the historic building while creating high function and high impact.” —WILLIAM HARRIS, AVROKO

GRAY AWARDS 2018 JUDGE

graymag . com

119


Estacada House Jessica Helgerson Interior Design Sun Valley Susan Marinello Interiors

FROM LEFT: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN (PROJECT 1), . 120 AARON LEITZ (PROJECTS 2–4) graymag com


INTERIOR DESIGN RESIDENTIAL FINALISTS

Santa Barbara Coast House Jessica Helgerson Interior Design

Southwest Hills Victorian Jessica Helgerson Interior Design

graymag . com

121


WEST COAST BLEND

122

graymag . com


WINNER

Santa Barbara Coast House Jessica Helgerson Interior Design Written by RENSKE WERNER Photographed by AARON LEITZ

graymag . com

123


WHEN A WEATHER-DEPENDENT, EVERCHANGING VIEW OF THE PACIFIC OCEAN AND A HILLY COASTLINE SERVES AS BOTH THE BACKDROP TO A HOME AND ITS MAIN FOCAL POINT, THE INTERIORS MUST ALSO WALK THE LINE BETWEEN BOLD STATEMENT AND BLENDING IN.

Such was the case with a minimalist Santa Barbara guesthouse designed by Anacapa Architecture and Willson Design, with interiors by Mira EngGoetz and Jessica Helgerson of Portland-based Jessica Helgerson Interior Design. Set perpendicular to the coast and about 300 yards from the client’s main house, the 800-square-foot dwelling is completely off the grid and intimately connected to its setting; the long, narrow structure, with an L-shaped patio, closely follows the natural contours of the ridge on which it sits. Built over the course of six years, the guesthouse was created with a deep respect for the land; the design team used understated materials such as boardformed concrete, unfinished steel, and glass. A green roof hides the structure from plain sight, keeping the visual impact on the natural landscape minimal. Tapped to work on the interior layout (including sourcing its lighting, fixtures, and furnishings), the team chose a restrained yet rich palette of earthy hues, including dark brown leathers, striated walnut, and fresh cream-colored linens. She punctuated the single-bedroom abode with all-star pieces such as a chandelier by New York lighting queen Lindsey Adelman, handmade leather chairs from Jayson Home, and a Chieftain chair by Finn Juhl. The guesthouse’s open layout—the kitchen, dining, and living areas occupy a majority of the space—and floor-to-ceiling glass doors running along each side mean that the views are as much a part of the interiors as the furniture. Helgerson’s use of natural materials and handwoven textiles enhance (and are enhanced by) the surrounding landscape. Brass and bronze accents, including Waterworks taps and a Rejuvenation mirror in the bathroom, provide glimpses of glamour amid the laid-back California cool style. h

124

graymag . com


graymag . com

125


DATE OF COMPLETION May 2018 COLLABORATORS Architecture: Anacapa Architecture, Willson Design

126

graymag . com


graymag . com

127


“The restrained approach to the palette and the furnishings magically turned board-formed concrete and steel into a warm and welcoming hideaway overlooking the dramatic coastline of the Pacific.”

—KEN FULK, INTERIOR DESIGNER

128

graymag . com

GRAY AWARDS 2018 JUDGE


graymag . com

129


The Acoustic Collection LightArt

PRODUCT

LIGHTING / FURNITURE FINALISTS

Chrona Graypants

FROM LEFT: LIGHTART, WARREN SCHESKE, . 130 JONATHAN JUNKER, DANIEL BERNAUER, BRIAN ROACH graymag com


Cross Laminated Table MIZA Architects

Fluted Island Henrybuilt

Executive Desk - Return + Straight Urban Hardwoods graymag . com

131


LUMINESCENT WINNER

Chrona Graypants

COURTESY GRAYPANTS

Written by RENSKE WERNER

132

graymag . com


DATE OF COMPLETION June 2017

MANIFESTATION “THE CHRONA LIGHTS ARE BOLD YET ELEGANT, AND I THINK THEY CAN FIND A HOME IN MANY DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS FROM RESIDENTIAL TO COMMERCIAL. I LIKE THEIR SIMPLICITY, AND THAT THEY MAINTAIN A MYSTERIOUS QUALITY AT THE SAME TIME.” —JAIME HAYON, DESIGNER GRAY AWARDS 2018 JUDGE

INTERNATIONAL LIGHTING AND DESIGN FIRM, GRAYPANTS, BELIEVES IF A DESIGNED SPACE OR PRODUCT CAN’T TELL A STORY, IT ISN’T GOOD DESIGN.

What may seem like an overly bold statement is the philosophy that underpins most of the company’s work. The Seattle- and Amsterdam-based studio searches for—and finds—both story and beauty in its latest product line, a lighting series called Chrona. Celebrating the company’s 10 years in business, Chrona’s story is rooted in its designers’ fascination with shape-shifting reflections and bouncing light. It draws deeper inspiration from natural phenomena such as the bioluminescence of fireflies and plankton and the phosphorescent envelopes around stars, themselves an unmistakable influence on the form of the new lights.

Discs crafted from brass or stainless steel feature rings of light along their outer edges and use LED technology to mimic the almost hazy glow of phosphorescence. The lights are available in a range of sizes, from 6 to 17 inches, and can be suspended in a vertical or horizontal orientation or clustered for a chandelier look. Chrona also holds up as a daytime statement piece with its reflective and geometric qualities. In typical Graypants fashion, the series is in ongoing transition and expansion. Using Chrona’s core components and existing style as a base, the company may explore future designs such as wall sconces and floor lamps. It’s that continual search for deeper beauty, and a fascination with how we can return to nature through innovative design approaches, that makes this story worth telling. h

graymag . com

133


PRODUCT OTHER FINALISTS

1911 Noir | Oxidized Kush Rugs

134

FROM LEFT:graymag MAXWELL . com PLUENNEKE, TODD HOLLOWAY, ALEX HAYDEN, KEVIN DOTOLO, IAN STOUT

Carlo, Nido, Strato Planters Pot Incorporated


Signal Tile Collection Kristine Morich x Clayhaus Modern Tile

Textiles Line Michelle Dirkse Kismet Lounge Collection Pulp Design Studios

graymag . com

135


GEOMETRIC SLIDE “These tiles are elegant yet playful. I love any design that can be customized and I’m intrigued by the possibilities of 100 different glazes.”

—KEN FULK, INTERIOR DESIGNER

WINNER

GRAY AWARDS 2018 JUDGE

Signal Tile Collection Kristine Morich x Clayhaus Modern Tile Written by RENSKE WERNER Photographed by IAN STOUT

136

graymag . com


C

DATE OF COMPLETION July 2018

COLOR. TEXTURE. PATTERN. This was the trifecta that

informed the recently released collaboration between Portlandbased designer Kristine Morich and artisan tile maker Clayhaus Modern Tile. Morich, a multidisciplinary designer and ceramics enthusiast, had worked with the medium before, but her work with Clayhaus, a studio known for its handcrafted, made-to-order tiles inspired by 1950s Pop art and midcentury modernism, resulted in a timeless product with a playful bespoke pattern.

The Signal Tile collection features minimalist geometric shapes and complementary colors (including retro aqua, millennial pink, and charcoal). With six different shapes, designers and consumers alike can compose their own custom patterns, demonstrating the collection’s core concept: wall covering can be a vehicle for personal expression. Morich carefully designed and modeled each pattern in both large- and small-format motifs—an option that sets the line apart from many decorative tiles with patterns limited in size and scale. h graymag . com

137


FASHION FINALISTS

The Near Field Communication Experience DYNE

138

. com FROM LEFT:graymag RYAN BEVANS, MYLES KATHERINE, JESSA CARTER


Fall 2018 Print Collection Sarah Donofrio, One Imaginary Girl

Soh-Lee KACY YOM graymag . com

139


o u t r ag e o u WINNER

Fall 2018 Print Collection Sarah Donofrio, One Imaginary Girl Written by CLAIRE BUTWINICK Photographed by MYLES KATHERINE

140

graymag . com


“Her work is full of color, full of charm, and full of intellect.”

—ADAM LIPPES, FASHION DESIGNER

GRAY AWARDS 2018 JUDGE

graymag . com

141


PORTLAND DESIGNER SARAH DONOFRIO IS NOT ONE TO PLAY BY THE RULES. Bespoke print designs and bold colorways animate her pieces, which work as statement separates on their own and pair up into appealingly eclectic ensembles. While her ready-to-wear designs are playful, her structured jackets and cascading maxi gowns incorporate elements of high-end tailoring that reveal their deep roots in the serious art of hand-sewing. Donofrio’s latest 2018 collection features wearable, easy-to-layer pieces (cropped pants; all lengths of dresses; blouses with pussy bows) in four new and reimagined prints, ranging from block letters to jumbo shrimp paired with colorful stripes in an unlikely marriage of structure and whimsy. Although her Portland-based company, One Imaginary Girl, was founded just two

142

graymag . com

years ago, Donofrio has been involved in the fashion industry for more than a decade. She studied fashion design at George Brown College in Toronto before working as a textile developer, buyer, and designer, launching her eponymous label—which has been featured in British Vogue and Marie Claire— in 2010. Her designs were showcased on season 15 of Project Runway and at New York’s Spring 2018 Fashion Week, and now One Imaginary Girl is making a splash in the Northwest region, where Donofrio’s unique prints and silhouettes are mischievously pushing back against the monochrome-loving masses. “Being a designer in the Pacific Northwest, it is important to me to bring an elevated, high-quality, fashion-forward collection to my clients,” she says. “[I also want to] continue to promote the West Coast as a high-end fashion destination.” h

DATE OF COMPLETION August 2018


graymag . com

143


Doumen Exhibition & Culture Center Ellumus LLC

Broadway Corridor Master Plan William Kaven Architecture

CLOCKWISE FROM. BOTTOM LEFT: DANIEL KAVEN, ELLUMUS LLC, 144 JEREMY BITTERMANN, KEVIN SCOTT, FRASER + FOGEL ARCHITECTS, MINH VU graymag com

Ephemeral Light Dichroic Glass Installation Office 52 Architecture


Train Station LMN Architects

US Fraser + Fogle Architects

WILD CARD FINALISTS

West Edge Green Jewel Box Ankrom Moisan

graymag . com

145


WINNER

Ephemeral Light Dichroic Glass Installation Office 52 Architecture Written by AMANDA ZURITA Photographed by JEREMY BITTERMANN

146

graymag . com


D R A M A T I C

C H R O M A T I C graymag . com

147


“The colors and glass are an inspiration to anyone who would see this building; it stands out from the crowd.”

—JAIME HAYON, DESIGNER

148

graymag . com

GRAY AWARDS 2018 JUDGE


DATE OF COMPLETION July 2017 COLLABORATORS Architect of record: Stantec Structural engineer: ARUP General contractor: Jendoco Construction Corporation LEED consultant: evolveEA Narima dichroic glass supplier: Schott AG Dichroic glass fin assembly fabrication and lamination: Triview Glass California Unitized curtain wall fabricator: United Architectural Metals Additional fabrication: Viracon

WHEN THE TEAM AT OFFICE 52 ARCHITECTURE BEGAN CREATING A NEW FAÇADE FOR ONE OF THE NATION’S TOP NANOTECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING-SYSTEMS RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS, they quickly

realized that a static design simply wouldn’t do. So, for the curtain wall that fronts Scott Hall at Carnegie Mellon University, the Portland-based firm took a scientific approach that combined art with a cutting-edge material to literally reflect the building’s purpose. Utilizing dichroic glass, which displays different colors in certain lighting conditions, Office 52 juxtaposed two colorful combinations set at different angles to make the building come alive. Dichroic glass is made up of microlayers, each infused with metal oxides that reflect varying hues depending on the angle of the viewer and the quality of the light passing through the glass. The technology was originally developed by NASA as a way to filter light at a micro level, and the resulting product was first used in satellite mirrors and spacesuit visors.

Office 52 also incorporated a customdesigned ceramic glass frit with a geometric dot-matrix pattern that represents photonic quasicrystal structures, which influence optical transmission and reflectivity—another nod to the nanoscience research underway inside Scott Hall. As one moves closer or father away from the glass, the dot-matrix design seems to shift. Aside from merely looking good, the curtain wall meets important functional requirements. Fin panels on the building’s south and west sides serve as sun shades and result in interior opacity of 40 percent, helping to cut down on energy consumption and making the lab one of the most energy efficient in the country, an achievement recognized when Scott Hall earned LEED Gold certification. Together the glass panels achieve Office 52’s goal: to create constantly changing colors and optics that shift not only with the observer’s angle, but also with the seasons and positions of the sun. In effect, Scott Hall blinds you with science—in the best way possible. h graymag . com

149


Souq - Marketplace Fatuma Ali, Bellevue College

Tyl Josh Pehrson, Senior Industrial Design, Western Washington University

150

CLOCKWISEgraymag FROM TOP . com LEFT: FATUMA ALI, WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY INDUSTRIAL DESIGN, DANIEL CRUZ, PERRY BURKE, JOSH PEHRSON

The Future of Connected Tools Western Washington University Industrial Design

T1 Traveler Grace Budgett, Perry Burke,and Andie Neib University of Washington Industrial Design


A Spontaneous Playce Daniel Cruz, Bellevue College

STUDENT FINALISTS

bling, n

graymag . com

151


“This project is brilliant! Anyone who has had to travel with bulky medical supplies—especially ones that need climate control—will welcome this new clever design. It’s compact, intelligent, and fun which is something you don’t often see with medical packaging.” —KRISTINA O’NEAL, AVROKO

TRAVEL CAN INVOLVE A LARGE AMOUNT OF UNNECESSARY STRESS FOR THOSE WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES, as they must carry

an assortment of cumbersome supplies to manage their condition. Insulin must be kept temperature controlled so it will remain stable over time, and tools for administering it must be kept sterilized. Each component comes in its own packaging, none of it compact in design. As a result, diabetic travelers sometimes either overpack (and overworry) or remove oversized protective packaging to make more room in their luggage. For University of Washington students Perry Burke, Grace Budgett, and Andie Neibling, watching a diabetic friend go through the hassle of packing for a long trip sparked the idea for the T1 Traveler: a compact kit that includes everything an individual needs to manage type 1 diabetes (once known as juvenile diabetes) on

152

graymag . com

GRAY AWARDS 2018 JUDGE

the road. Fitting into a backpack or large purse, the T1 Traveler includes a redesigned Medtronic Diabetes insulin-pump supply package, a case to hold supplies, a temperature-controlled insulin chamber, and a companion app. Created in June 2018 as part of a studio class in UW’s School of Design, with input from type 1 diabetic people aged 18 to 27 as well as suppliers, the T1 Traveler reduces necessary packaging by 75 percent, and its parts are color-coded for ease of use. The case includes a double-walled, vacuum-insulated chamber that can hold up to three vials of insulin. The embodiment of a less-is-more design methodology, the T1 Traveler is a smart, problem-solving design that not only provides its users with dignity and peace of mind, but also gives them the opportunity to explore the world without anxiety over managing their condition on the go. h


DATE OF COMPLETION June 2018 COLLABORATORS Grace Budgett, Perry Burke, Andie Neibling

T1 Traveler University of Washington Industrial Design WINNER

Written by BRIAN LIBBY Photographed by GRACE BUDGETT & PERRY BURKE

graymag . com

153


DATA 1 Weber Thompson

154

. comMONTGOMERY, BLACKMOUTH DESIGN, ANDREW POGUE FROM LEFT:graymag MEGHAN

Geodesic Dome Modified Blackmouth Design


DESIGN FOR GOOD FINALISTS

Rockwood Youth Campus Holst Architecture

graymag graymag..com com

155


Written by AMANDA ZURITA

TOP: LARA SWIMMER; BOTTOM: ANDREW POGUE

WINNER

Rockwood Youth Campus Holst Architecture

156

graymag . com


DATE OF COMPLETION February 2018 COLLABORATORS Construction manager: P&C Construction Civil/structural engineering: TM Rippey Mechanical, electrical, and plumbing: MFIA Landscape architecture: Greenworks Transportation engineering: Kittelson & Associates

ABOUT 30 MINUTES EAST OF DOWNTOWN PORTLAND SITS ROCKWOOD—ONE OF THE CITY’S MOST DIVERSE YET LOWEST-INCOME AREAS. In Rockwood, 25 percent of families live at or below the poverty level, with graduation rates and academic performance evaluations ranking among Oregon’s lowest. Hoping to help reverse these trends and create a safe haven for the community’s underserved youth, three organizations—the Open School, the Boys & Girls Club of Portland, and New Avenues for Youth—banded together to build the Rockwood Youth Campus. The nonprofits enlisted Holst Architecture to construct the mixed-use 3.5-acre campus. The first phase, Open School East, launched in the fall of 2016. A college-prep academy focused on students who have struggled in public school, it features buildings laid out to

mimic a university campus rather than a traditional high school so that students will transition more easily to a college setting. The second phase was the Boys & Girls Club, which incorporates a gym, a café, and multipurpose community rooms, as well as an existing 7,000-square-foot former garden center building that Holst transformed into a dedicated teen center. Throughout, the campus design is focused on providing safe outdoor spaces and inclusive interior ones, harmonized through their shared palette of green and yellow. Holst utilized sustainable features, such as reclaimed wood and locally sourced brick, across the campus, and the entire project features a 20 percent window-to-wall ratio. The result? A lightfilled building that goes far beyond the traditional definition of a community center, offering a space for learning, growth, and support for generations to come. h

graymag . com

157


158

graymag . com

THIS PAGE: ANDREW POGUE; OPPOSITE: LARA SWIMMER


graymag . com

159


| judges |

AVROKO Written by RENSKE WERNER

SOME SAY THREE IS A LUCKY NUMBER, BUT FOR NEW YORK– BASED DESIGN FIRM AVROKO, FOUR IS WHERE THE MAGIC’S AT.

That’s how many partners head up the critically acclaimed firm. With more than 40 commercial projects under their belts and current work happening in 14 different countries, you could say that the numbers are in their favor. Working with an approach they’ve dubbed “hospitable thinking”—a combination of scientific rigor and philosophical core truths about what makes people feel good in environments—AvroKO starts each project with concept stories that then guide every facet of the design process, from the initial rough sketches to the furniture and silverware and all the way to the polished branding. Take Genuine Liquorette, a NYC-based cocktail bar conceived as a California bodega-style liquor store. “We each bring unique abilities to the table,” says William Harris, who heads up the firm alongside Kristina O’Neal, Adam Farmerie, and Greg

160

graymag . com

Bradshaw. “This convergence of personalities and talents has kept us nimble.” Stepping into an AvroKO project is a transformative experience. Whether it’s Beauty & Essex, the delightful New York speakeasy built behind a faux thrift shop, or the laid-back luxury of L.A.’s Faith & Flower, each of the firm’s projects carefully mixes playful elements with expert balance, cohesion, and meaningful details. Less skilled designers might stumble over the thousands of minutiae in each space (in addition to restaurants and bars, their lengthy portfolio includes hotels, food halls, and corporate offices), but the AvroKO partners have a strong history rooted in trust and years of creative collaboration. The foursome met in their formative years at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh and formally banded together in 2001 to design the erstwhile PUBLIC restaurant in Nolita. Seventeen years and more than double that many commercial projects later, AvroKO has established outpost offices in San Francisco, London, and Bangkok and is still

pushing the design industry forward with an embrace of maximalism at a time when most others are touting a less-is-more aesthetic. Today the partners attribute part of their success to their shared commitment to personal happiness: they meet regularly as a group to ensure that each person is pursuing projects that please them. It’s a move that not only keeps firm members invested in their work but also churns out commercial successes. From luxe finishes (leather, marble, gold accents) to over-the-top custom lighting and delightful details (the bathroom walls at Momotaro in Chicago are decorated with 991,000 individual blue-ink pen strokes), AvroKO’s projects transport customers to unexpected places with decadent, sense-encompassing design. With their New York home base and worldwide portfolio, the AvroKO team took something of an outsider’s standpoint on the GRAY Awards submissions, noting that the projects seemed both contemporary and global rather than stuck in a stereotypical woodsy aesthetic. “We were most excited to see that the work submitted didn’t necessarily feel regional in any particular way,” Harris notes. “It was the fresh materials, new building techniques, and humanistic integration of technology that resonated with us.” Adds O’Neal: “Modernism seems to still be a strong driver in many of the projects and pieces.” h


THIS PAGE: ANTHONY TAHLIER; OPPOSITE: GARRETT ROWLAND

OPPOSITE: The four partners of AvroKO (from left): William Harris, Kristina O’Neal, Adam Farmerie, and Greg Bradshaw. Single Thread restaurant in Healdsburg, California. THIS PAGE: Somerset restaurant, housed in the Viceroy Hotel Chicago.

graymag . com

161


| judges |

ELAINE MOLINAR Written by BRIAN LIBBY

IN AN INDUSTRY WHERE SINGULAR TALENTS OFTEN GET THE MOST PRAISE, ARCHITECTURE AND BRAND DESIGN FIRM SNØHETTA STANDS OUT FOR ITS COLLABORATIVE APPROACH TO WORK. Though it competes for major

commissions with the profession’s other top names, the Oslo- and New York–based firm (with additional studios in San Francisco, Paris, Hong Kong, Adelaide, and Innsbruck) celebrates collaboration over top-down talent. Now in its third decade, Snøhetta is made up of a carefully culled team of multidisciplinary architects, landscape designers, and engineers. In addition to its acclaimed portfolio—which boasts landmark projects including the National September 11 Memorial & Museum Pavilion at the World Trade Center in New York, the Norwegian National Opera and Ballet in Oslo, and the expanded San

162

graymag . com

Francisco Museum of Modern Art— Snøhetta fosters a progressive creative culture under Elaine Molinar, partner and managing director of the firm’s New York and San Francisco offices. In 2019, Molinar will celebrate 30 years with the organization. “We try hard to cultivate a diversity of viewpoints,” explains Molinar, who trained in ballet before earning an architecture degree at the University of Texas. “You can be a student or someone very young in their career. We encourage ideas to come from anybody and everybody. It keeps us nimble.” Since moving from Oslo to New York in 2005 to set up the firm’s second office, Molinar has shown she’s not only an innovative designer but a skilled team builder. Every member of Snøhetta’s team, she says—including her husband, founding partner Craig Dykers—is

committed to enriching the public realm. “Buildings don’t exist in a vacuum. We want our work to be a good citizen and participate in society,” she says. “Even if it’s a private development, there can be aspects that invite the public in.” Invited to judge the 2018 GRAY Awards, Molinar embraced the diversity of entries. “I’ve really enjoyed the fact that the awards are not limited to just architecture,” she says. “There are very different disciplines outside of my expertise, such as fashion and product design. It’s fun, it’s exciting, and I’ve continually asked myself if I’m able to apply the same criteria to what I’m judging. Am I being a fair critic of the work? If it’s not your area of expertise, you approach it almost as a potential user.” With Snøhetta’s first Pacific Northwest project, the Willamette Falls Riverwalk in Oregon City, now in the works, does Molinar see a regional style at play? Not exactly. “I was pleased about that,” she says. “It’s not a predictable kit of identifiable elements put together in familiar ways.” Yet Molinar does believe that landscape and materials make the Northwest distinct, and she sees an unmistakable trend in the region’s embrace of mass-timber buildings and technologies such as cross-laminated timber. “I think the tradition [of innovation] is very strong,” she says, “and this region is leading the world.” h


THIS PAGE: HENRIK KAM; OPPOSITE: COURTESY SNØHETTA

OPPOSITE: Elaine Molinar; Calgary’s Central Library, a design collaboration between Snøhetta and Dialog. THIS PAGE: Snøhetta’s expansion of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art nearly tripled the museum’s exhibition space and expanded the unticketed gallery areas and outdoor environments, allowing the museum to better engage with its local communities.

graymag . com

163


| judges |

JAIME HAYON Written by RACHEL GALLAHER

ALTHOUGH HE’S SERIOUS ABOUT DESIGN, SPANISH DESIGNER AND ARTIST JAIME HAYON DOESN’T TAKE THE DESIGN INDUSTRY TOO SERIOUSLY. Based in the coastal city of Valencia, the 44-year-old has a prodigious creative portfolio that includes furniture, clothing, accessories, interiors, and art. In the same vein as the work of Marcel Wanders and Philippe Starck, much of Hayon’s design is shot through with wit and irreverence. From a purple metallic hot dog–shaped rocking bench (codesigned with Nienke Klunder) to a concrete table in the form of a cartoon monkey holding a tray, his pieces consistently push the boundaries of design and offer a wink and a nod to 20th-century Surrealism. “When I think about humor and whimsy in my designs, I think of a concept I like to call ‘serious

164

graymag . com

fun,’” Hayon explains. “It’s not humor for humor’s sake but the idea that I can bring comfort and enjoyment. The idea of fun and being open to new ideas is part of the enjoyment to me: I can impact someone’s life in a delightful, thoughtful way.” Aside from frequent museum visits as a child, Hayon’s initial exposure to art and design happened in his teenage years, when he was deeply entrenched in skateboard culture. In 1998, after studying industrial design in Madrid and Paris, he joined Fabrica—the Benetton-funded design and communication academy in Italy—and ran its design department until 2003. That year, his color-packed, highly detailed Mediterranean Digital Baroque exhibition opened at London’s David Gill Gallery. A meditation on creativity, origins, and his personal history, the

work launched Hayon into the sphere of must-watch brilliant new talent. Since that exhibition, he has collaborated with Baccarat and Bosa Ceramiche and created furniture for the likes of Fritz Hansen, Established & Sons, and Moooi. In 2017, he launched menswear company Jijibaba with lauded furniture and product designer Jasper Morrison. As busy as he is jetting around the world to promote his work, Hayon returns to the basics when it comes to hands-on creation. “I feel a responsibility to keep crafts alive for future generations to appreciate,” he says. “Craftsmanship is about our heritage. Using craftsmanship in our designs is a way to preserve that heritage and modernize it for the future. Instead of just pushing a button to make a piece, touching the material directly and working with the extraordinary knowhow of craftspeople can raise the level of creations.” Perhaps that’s why he felt an affinity for many of the designs submitted to this year’s GRAY Awards. Reflecting on regional style, Hayon notes: “Pacific Northwest design is a blend of contemporary design and an embrace of nature and sustainability. I see a lot of the natural environment reflected in the designs, along with new technologies, building materials, and methods.” h


KLUNDERBIE

OPPOSITE: Spanish designer Jaime Hayon; reception area of the Hayon-designed Barcelรณ Torre de Madrid. THIS PAGE: The interiors at La Terraza del Casino restaurant in Madrid.

graymag . com

165


| judges |

PETER + DAVID WALKER Written by BRIAN LIBBY

JUDGING THE 2018 GRAY AWARDS WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR FOR LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT PETER WALKER AND HIS SON AND DESIGN PARTNER, DAVID WALKER. The two have more

than three decades of experience working together as partners at PWP Landscape Architecture, which Peter founded in 1983 after a quarter-century spent working in partnership with his former Harvard professor Hideo Sasaki. “There is no denying that he has been the most influential person in my career,” David says of his father. “I have had the opportunity to bridge the gap from the time that my father began his career, in the early 1960s, well into the information age, and I love to help our younger staff understand how we got here and the precedents that came before.” While their firm is based in Berkeley, California, neither Walker is a stranger to the Pacific Northwest. PWP’s regional projects include

166

graymag . com

Portland’s Jamison Square Park (2002) and landscaping for Seattle’s US Federal Courthouse, designed by global architecture firm NBBJ (2004).David notes that the Jamison project, located in the Pearl District, brought out the best in father and son alike: “While Pete is such a brilliant designer and a political force advocating for design, my greatest interests are in the manipulation of materials, construction techniques, and design execution. That project called for both.” Working in a region outside your own, David notes, requires humility. “We try to give an interpretation of a place wherever we go,” he says. “It’s a question of understanding the regional constraints and qualities that exist there. That’s why the first thing I always do [in a new area] is walk around and see what’s working.” But, with a portfolio that includes projects ranging from the

Constitution Gardens on the National Mall in Washington, DC, to the landscape design of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum (in collaboration with architect Michael Arad) in New York, David and Peter see similar challenges across regions. “It’s clear that designers in the Northwest are dealing with the same issues—climate; extending people’s connection to the outside—that we see in our work across the country,” David says. For all these points of similarity, though, Peter observes the distinct diversity of landscape designs entered into this year’s GRAY Awards, representing the various approaches being taken in garden design today. He succinctly notes that “the winning projects demonstrate conceptual rigor, fine detailing, and equally fine craftsmanship in their construction.” h


THIS PAGE: COURTESY PWP LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE; OPPOSITE: COURTESY GLENSTONE MUSEUM

OPPOSITE: David and Peter Walker; the Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Maryland. THIS PAGE: The National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York City.

graymag . com

167


| judges |

KEN FULK Written by ELIZABETH VARNELL

LAVISHLY LAYERED INTERIORS MAY BE KEN FULK’S CALLING CARD, BUT THE DESIGNER IS ALSO A CONJURER OF OUTRÉ EXPERIENCES, A MODERNDAY MAGICIAN WHO HARNESSES THE EPHEMERA OF DREAMS IN HIS DAILY WORK. For the Virginia-born designer—now based in San Francisco and New York—furniture is just a starting point for his considered spaces and elaborate parties that leave no detail—including music, scents, and signature cocktails—to chance. For the past decade, imaginative Bay Area social and tech titans alike have looked to Fulk to create homes, vacation retreats, private jet interiors, restaurants, and even dramatic wedding settings. Napster cofounder Sean Parker,

168

graymag . com

whose Tolkien- and Game of Thrones–inspired 2013 Big Sur nuptials were among Fulk’s most widely admired projects, has called the designer “the Frank Lloyd Wright of our generation.” The 53-year-old interior designer studied literature and history in college and, with no formal design training, relocated to San Francisco in the mid-’90s, where he cofounded a textile company and ultimately launched his eponymous interior design firm in 1997. His team of 70 architects, designers, art consultants, gallerists, and branding and event maestros are all housed between the firm’s Tribeca loft and its 15,000-square-foot SoMa space called the Magic Factory. The site

is also home to Fulk’s Peep Show art studio and atelier, launched in 2011 as an in-house event space for the designer’s highly anticipated creative affairs. As part of the 2018 GRAY Awards judging panel, Fulk was immediately struck by the variety of breathtaking views surrounding the built spaces he reviewed. “I love the elegant way these projects are designed and their reverence for the natural world,” he says. Looking forward, Fulk sees the design zeitgeist moving in a more decorative direction and is curious to see how the Northwest will embrace it. “Nature and organic design are clearly the root of inspiration for many designers here, so I wonder if we’ll see a trend toward more embellishment, with floral and botanical motifs, or more whimsical, woodsy elements.” Of course, Fulk can’t resist envisioning the future. “I’m imagining that classic Bavarian folk art or Black Forest style,” he says. Clearly, the Magic Factory’s gears and cogs are already spinning, both in Fulk’s mind and in those of the PNW design community. h


DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN

OPPOSITE: Ken Fulk; the kitchen of the designer’s Tribeca loft. THIS PAGE: Legacy Records restaurant in New York.

graymag . com

169


| judges |

ADAM LIPPES Written by AMANDA ZURITA

IF, BY THE AGE OF 26, YOUR RÉSUMÉ ALREADY SAYS THAT YOU’RE GLOBAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR FOR ONE OF AMERICA’S MOST CELEBRATED LUXURY READY-TO-WEAR LINES, WHERE DO YOU GO FROM THERE?

If you’re Adam Lippes, you’re just getting started. After joining Oscar de la Renta in 1996 and working alongside the house’s namesake couturier for seven years, the New York–based Lippes went on to create two consecutive lines, Adam + Eve and ADAM. He garnered industry praise as well as a 2007 induction into the Council of Fashion Designers of America before he eventually launched his own, eponymous line in 2013. Even Oprah’s a fan. Adam Lippes the brand was conceived with a commitment to creating elegant, easy sportswear

170

graymag . com

that endures from season to season. “The most important thing we do as a brand is make clothing that people do not throw away,” the designer says. This ethos is apparent not only in the clothing’s quality (high) and styling (timeless), but also in Lippes’s exhaustive understanding of the type of woman who wears his collections: she is a refined, confident consumer whose wardrobe choices are determined by her pursuit and appreciation of quality design. In judging the GRAY Awards, Lippes reviewed the fashion entries with an eye toward craftsmanship, style, and consideration of the customer. “The underlying theme I saw throughout all categories was a move toward sustainability,” he observes. “Many designers from the Pacific Northwest really embrace

nature and show a profound respect for it in their designs.” That dedication—one that’s surging throughout the industry as consumers’ consciousness of clothing’s origins and manufacturing process grows—has been a pillar of Lippes’s brand since its inception. As much as possible, the designer’s collections are produced in the US. It’s a move that reduces an item’s overall carbon footprint by limiting the number of times materials are globally shipped back and forth. As far as what the future holds for fashion design in our region, Lippes notes a crossover with the tech sector as a defining element. “The aesthetic of the competition designs were universal in their appeal,” he says. “The region is a leader in utilizing technology and functionality, so I believe that local designers can continue to integrate [these themes] into their work and stand apart from the rest of American fashion designers.” Color this New Yorker impressed. “I was surprised,” he says. “I had no idea that the Pacific Northwest had such a burgeoning fashion scene.” h


KATHY LO

OPPOSITE: Adam Lippes; a fringeaccented trench coat from the designer’s Resort 2019 collection. THIS PAGE: The muse who inspired Lippes’ Resort 2019 collection was philanthropist, Deeda Blair. The designer channeled her elegance into a luxurious material palette, including the bronze panne velvet seen in this gown.

graymag . com

171


SEE WHAT’S HOT!

Hundreds of leading brands, thousands of new products – experience what’s cooking in kitchen and bath design.

Register now at kbis.com.

LAS VEGAS FEBRUARY 19 -21 2019


Marije Volzengang Presented by Caesarstone

Photo: Lucas Hardonk

New This Year 2 Professional Trade days including IDS Contract and IDS Conference

IDS Pro A supercharged experience for professionals Interior Jan 17-20 Design 2019 Show Toronto Metro Toronto Convention Centre South Building InteriorDesignShow.com

Sponsors

Media Partner

Produced by


Maybe it’s the beds?

Maybe it’s the coffee? Maybe it’s the signature amenities our guests find at all our hotels? In Portland, Seattle, Tacoma, Nashville and New Orleans, we make hotels places that people want to be. We create experiences that are memorable and unique. It’s why we do what we do. We also like to sleep in a bit, so we made them super comfortable. Maybe that’s it. Find out for yourself at provenanehotels.com.

provenancehotels.com


| the trophy |

ARTIST JOHN HOGAN HAS DONE IT AGAIN—this year’s “raindrop” GRAY award sculptures

emit both a golden glow from within and a paler radiance from the silver leaf that Hogan used on their surface. Each of the 11 award winners will take home one of these custom works of art for pride of place on the office shelf. Hogan, an acclaimed designer in the contemporary glass world, has already had high-profile collaborations with Ladies & Gentleman Studio, retailer Future Perfect, and NYC’s MOS Architects for the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennale. Hogan’s work perfectly captures the combination of innovation and imagination that all of the GRAY Award winners share. h

SHINE 178

graymag . com

COLLABORATORS Engraving: National Etching Photography: Hank Drew


“

ZACH ROBERTS Vice President WITH ROBERTS GROUP FOR 23 YEARS


Founded, designed and built in Seattle. henrybuilt.com

Profile for GRAY

GRAY No. 43  

THE AWARDS ISSUE Collector’s Edition. Brimming with design excellence, not to mention serious name-dropping, this is the who’s who of desig...

GRAY No. 43  

THE AWARDS ISSUE Collector’s Edition. Brimming with design excellence, not to mention serious name-dropping, this is the who’s who of desig...

Profile for graymag