Page 1

HOT NEW NEXT

INTERIORS // ARCHITECTURE // FASHION // ART // DESIGN

PACIFIC NORTHWEST DESIGN

N O 35 : AUG. / SEPT. 2017

THE

BIG IDEAS

The skyscraper that brought

PHILIPPE STARCK

to Seattle

SHAPING OUR FUTURE URBAN DESIGN:

Laneways reimagined as vibrant public spaces Flat-packed backcountry huts, assembled virtually anywhere, by anyone

C1 0817.indd 2

7/14/17 12:27 AM


2

graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 2

7/13/17 11:58 AM


graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 3

3 7/13/17 7:00 PM


Gray_Aug-Sept2016_Hive.pdf

1

6/29/16

9:16 AM

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

ch24 wishbone chair, 1949 by hans wegner - made in denmark by carl hansen & son

please inquire about our A&D trade program

4

graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 4

7/13/17 7:00 PM


carl hansen & son bensen knoll artek vitra kartell herman miller flos artifort foscarini moooi moroso and more!

graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 5

5 7/13/17 7:01 PM


6

graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 6

7/13/17 7:01 PM


graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 7

7 7/13/17 7:01 PM


Design For Industry

IDSVancouver.com #IDSLetsExplore Sponsors

8

graymag . com

IDSvan17_Gray02_AD_Final.indd All Pages 1 FRONT 0817.indd 8

7/13/17 7:01 PM


An exhibition of invited product designers from Tokyo who are at the forefront of design. In collaboration with

We+

FSOARK

Vancouver Convention Centre West

Thurs Sept 28 Opening Night Party

Fri Sept 29 Miele Trade Day

Sat Sept 30 General Admission

Sun Oct 1 General Admission Produced by

graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 9

9

2017-06-22 9:24 AM 7/13/17 7:01 PM


Interior Sept. 28–Oct 1 Design 2017 Show Vancouver

ast!

n e v e e g a t s y a gr a n g i s e d t i b i h ex e d i u g d l e i f the a x e l a : s e t o n key i n n e f n o s w a &l o i s s u c s i d l e pan n g i s e d l a n o i g re k n a t h c t i p r a p r e t f a y a d i fr d n a b r e n g i des terior

est in g r la e h t t a s u Join

gray ads_ids_about I.indd 10

west co e h t n o w o h s design

7/14/17 8:54 AM


e nts s d r a aw s d i o et n o t p m a h xa n ing h t i w i ons s r e n g y t r a p d

s!

trophie t u o g in iv g e ’r We -designed by Design

lass Illuminata Art G

Custom

Presented by

STAGE Presented by

owroom h s H T A K N A J t A rs. and of designe rb with an all-sta ’s playing! Come see who

gray ads_ids_about I.indd 11

Designed by

graymag.com/idsv #GRAYatIDSV

7/14/17 9:54 AM


Photo Michel Gibert, for advertising purposes only. Special thanks: Architect : Elisabete Saldanha. Sculptures : www.laurenceaguerre.paris.

Modern Bedding and Bath essentials for a more comfortable home. Visit our Portland store: 820 NW 23rd Avenue | parachutehome.com

12

graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 12

7/13/17 7:04 PM


Photo Michel Gibert, for advertising purposes only. Special thanks: Architect : Elisabete Saldanha. Sculptures : www.laurenceaguerre.paris. 1Conditions apply, ask your store for more details. 2Program available on selected items and subject to availability.

French Art de Vivre

Diapo. Dining table, design René Bouchara. Miki. Chairs, design Difo Design Studio. Palis. Sideboard, design Marco Fumagalli. Manufactured in Europe.

SEATTLE - 1922 Fourth Avenue - Tel. (206) 332-9744 - seattle@roche-bobois.com - PORTLAND - 1025 SW Washington Street - Tel. (503) 459-0020 - portland@roche-bobois.com

∙ Complimentary 3D Interior Design Service 1 ∙ Quick Ship program available 2

1 FRONT 0817.indd 13

13 www.roche-bobois.com graymag . com

7/13/17 7:04 PM


graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 14

DOVETAILGC.COM

Rohleder Borges Architecture; Benjamin Benschneider Photography

14

7/13/17 7:05 PM


SEATTLE SAN FRANCISCO BUILT BY HAND FROM SALVAGED TREES

URBANHARDWOODS.COM

graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 15

15 7/13/17 7:05 PM


conte 50

58

70

august– september.17

20. Hello

“I have an idea . . .”

HOT NEW NEXT 33. Urban Design

Reimagined laneways sprout up as vibrant public spaces throughout downtown Vancouver.

38. Scene

The new F5 Tower is both an ode to Seattle’s past and the ultimate new addition for its future.

46. Scene

News, events, and openings.

58. Made Here

A Portland furniture maker leads the way in scaling up production without giving up handmade quality.

16

60. Emerging

74. Art

62. Profile

76. Art

64. Big Idea

78. Art

68. Big Idea

80. Ask

A designer-maker since teenhood, Henry Norris debuts his first furniture line.

The gradual but steady rise of a young interior design firm, and how it turned the corner to success. Stackable homes of tomorrow, built faster, cheaper, and with greater precision. Can this startup change the future by bringing large-scale 3D printing to the masses?

70. Big Idea

Major corporations from Starbucks to Hermès are getting inked by tattoo artist Kyler Martz. A Vietnam veteran’s wooden sculptures express his wartime experiences in the round. Meet Seattle’s “art matchmaker,” a dealer focused on finding local art for interior designers. Waking up design academia: insights from the founder of the new Interior Architecture Department at Cornish College of the Arts.

Prefab backcountry huts, flat-packed and assembled virtually anywhere, by anyone.

graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 16

7/13/17 7:18 PM


tents 108

90

82. Architecture

Shigeru Ban unveils designs for the world’s tallest hybrid timber tower.

84. Profile

Ryan Stephenson traces his past from childhood guerrilla treehouse builder to accomplished architect.

90. Fashion

GRAY takes a close look at key players of the PNW style scene.

96. Interiors

Fueled by their crackling design chemistry, partners of newly minted firm Barnett Lewis share their latest PNW project.

104. Architecture

Self-described as the “tripod of awesomeness,” design firm Mutuus Studio is one to watch.

108. People

Drawing from thousands of years of human instinct, Hannes Wingate is crafting a neoteric approach to the field of design.

118. Architecture

Canada’s most innovative design firm is changing the way we interact with communal space.

122. Resources

Design professionals, furnishings, and suppliers in this issue.

128. Obsession

Designer Kirk van Ludwig has a hang-up about cell phones.

118

On the Cover

Alley Oop, the first collaborative result of a laneway project developed by HCMA Architecture + Design and the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association. SEE PAGE

33 Photographed by KIM BELLAVANCE

graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 17

17 7/13/17 7:18 PM


NORTHERN LIGHT Adelaide Chair

THE CLASSY

THE PURIST

THE MINIMALIST

BELLEVUE 10400 NE 8TH ST BELLEVUE WA USA +1.425.735.3333 | INFO@BOCONCEPTNW.COM VANCOUVER 1275 W 6TH AVE VANCOUVER BC CANADA +1.604.730.8111 | INFO@BOCONCEPT-VANCOUVER.CA BOCONCEPT.COM

18

GRAYMAG . COM

1 FRONT 0817.indd 18

7/13/17 7:19 PM


graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 19

19 7/13/17 7:19 PM


HOT NEW NEXT

hello

“I have an idea...” We’ve all been there—those four words that push you toward your notebook, laptop, or a chunk of paper torn off a bag of dog food... whatever is nearest to jot down your next big idea, getting it out of your head and into action. I’m often huddled in the corner of a coffee shop somewhere in the Pacific Northwest, engrossed in conversation with a design entrepreneur about their newest ideas or next projects. Regardless of scope, envisioning possibilities is always invigorating. Vancouverite and serial entrepreneur Neil Patel recently shared with me the details of his latest venture, Print the Future (pg 68). The concept: furnishingsfocused, custom 3D printing on demand. It’s a bold, even controversial move that declares anyone can be a designer. But, consider the big picture: if done well—and I suspect it will be—we’ll see a firestorm of innovation. PTF is as much a resource for the pros as anyone, affordable, short-run manufacture, prototypes at any scale... what else? The wheels are already turning and only time will tell how Patel’s vision will change the world. Ever wonder what makes these über-creatives tick? I got to know Seattle-based Mutuus Studio (pg 104) while sharing umbrellas and jumping puddles on our way to dinner one rainy night in Portland. Designer Kristen Becker, architect Jim Friesz (both Olson Kundig ex-pats), and fine artist Saul Becker make for quite the badass creative brain trust. Each has had exceptional life experiences that forged rock-solid personal determination, an appetite for risk-taking, and a penchant for creative expression (fun facts: Friesz is a rocker, having played guitar in no less than four bands, and when the Beckers were dating, they were hired onto

20

the design team for an Earthship-inspired house in the wilds of Colorado). Together their innovative studio is driven not by hopes of global domination or massive wealth, but by generating and realizing otherwise impossible creative solutions. Developer Kevin Daniels is another driven individual. Earlier this year, he led our team on a hard-hat tour of the new SLS Seattle hotel (pg 38), designed by Philippe Starck and ZGF Architects. His grand vision, 15 years in the works, not only saved Seattle’s historic First United Methodist Church after a monumental battle with the state, but included the adjacent F5 Tower and luxury hotel, raising Seattle’s profile twofold. We’re so impressed with the project that we’re debuting GRAY Awards at the hotel and Sanctuary later this fall! Come celebrate with us, and check out the game-changing building in person (grayawards.com). We proudly dub these, and all of the idea generators profiled in this issue, 2017’s HOT NEW NEXT.

Shawn

Shawn Williams,

CEO/Founder + Publisher

P.S. Jim Friesz is playing in our Band of Designers. Don’t miss it! Details: graymag.com/idsv

GRAYMAG . COM

1 FRONT 0817.indd 20

7/13/17 7:22 PM

rnb_gra


Steen dining cabinet, $2399; Corbett dining table, $2699; Lira chairs, $699 each. University Village 2675 NE University Village Street, Seattle 380 Northwest 13th Avenue, Portland roomandboard.com

graymag . com

rnb_graymag_augsept17.indd 1 1 FRONT 0817.indd 21

21 6/8/17 4:00 PM 7/13/17 7:22 PM


IC/Air2

modernfan.com

| 2 or 3 Blades

: designed by Guto Indio da Costa

Ultra-efficient DC Motor

CEO/FOUNDER + PUBLISHER Shawn Williams DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL + CONTENT STRATEGY Jaime Gillin jaime@graymag.com

| Nickel, White or Dark Bronze Finish

SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR StacyK endall SENIOR EDITOR Rachel Gallaher EDITOR JenniferM cCullum COPY EDITOR Laura Harger

|

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Rachel Eggers Courtney Ferris Brian Libby Lauren Mang Nessa Pullman

Solid Color, Surface-printed Wood Grain or Clear Blades

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Jeff Gough

|

CONTRIBUTORS Akira Ament Megumi Arai Kim Bellavance Jeremy Bittermann Gabe Border Jennifer Croll Cuniform Hank Drew Alex Hayden Krista Jahnke Jeremy Jude Lee Melissa Korn Nic Lehoux Stephanie MacDonald Andrew Pogue Julie Row Kevin Scott Bent René Synnevåg Kaity Teer Martin Tessler Andrew Vanasse Nate Watters Andy Wright

Optional LED Lighting

INTERNS Abby Beach Jocelyn Beausire Abby DeTuerk Hannah Micallef

22

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Dixie Duncan dixie@graymag.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Craig Allard Miller ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER Tracey Bjerke NEWSSTAND MANAGER Bob Moenster PUBLIC RELATIONS U.S. & Canada: Paxson Fay P.A. TO THE PUBLISHER Tally Williams

ADVERTISING dixie@graymag.com EVENTS + NEWS events@graymag.com SUBMISSIONS submissions@graymag.com SUBSCRIPTIONS subscriptions@graymag.com GENERAL INQUIRIES info@graymag.com

No. 35 Copyright ©2017. Published bimonthly (DEC, FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT) by GRAY Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. While every attempt has been made, GRAY cannot guarantee the legality, completeness, or accuracy of the information presented and accepts no warranty or responsibility for such. GRAY is not responsible for loss, damage, or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, photography, art, or any other unsolicited material. Unsolicited material will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. If submitting material, do not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by GRAY in writing. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GRAY, 5628 Airport Way S., Ste. 330 Seattle, WA 98108 Subscriptions $30 US for one year; $50 US for two years.

Subscribe online at graymag.com

GRAYMAG . COM

1 FRONT 0817.indd 22

7/13/17 7:23 PM


LIFE IS FULL OF

Beautiful Moments LET THEM IN

There are times that you cherish; they deserve the perfect frame. Marvin windows and doors elevate every space to enhance the lives within. Made-to-order, with innovative design and industry-leading energy efficiency. For generations, we’ve honed our craft to create products you will enjoy for years to come. E N V I S I O N YO U R M A RV I N H O M E AT M A RV I N .CO M

Marvin Windows of Canada

Lundgren Enterprises

1-800-263-6161

2425 NW Market Street

Vancouver - Calgary - Toronto

Seattle, WA 98107

Montreal - Halifax

206-789-1122

MarvinCanada.com

LundgrenEnterprises.com

©2017 Marvin® Windows and Doors. All rights reserved. ®Registered trademark of Marvin Windows and Doors.

1 FRONT 0817.indd 23

GRAYMAG . COM

23 7/13/17 7:23 PM


look. touch. feel.

| contributors |

MEGUMI ARAI megumiarai.com pg 90

HANK DREW hankdrew.com pg 128

RACHEL EGGERS pg 96

ALEX HAYDEN alexhayden.com pg 38, 50, 96

JEREMY JUDE LEE jeremyjudelee.com pg 60

BRIAN LIBBY brianlibby.com pg 64

KAITY TEER kaitlynteer.com pg 84

ANDREW VANASSE andrewvanasse.com pg 76, 108

NATE WATTERS natewatters.com pg 38, 80

ANDY WRIGHT pg 118

EXPERIENCE INSPIRATION FIRST-HAND AT

5701 Sixth Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98108 | (206) 762-1200

Plan at seattledesigncenter.com/visit-sdc . 24your visit graymag com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 24

7/13/17 7:23 PM

17867-


Design + Performance™ and Legendary Performance Fabrics™ are trademarks and Sunbrella® is a registered trademark of Glen Raven, Inc.

L E G E N DA R Y P E R F O R M A N C E FA B R I C S S U N B R E L L A .C O M

FA D E P R O O F / E A S Y C A R E / B L E AC H C L E A N A B L E graymag . com

17867-1 Macrame & Bench FP_Core_8.375x10.875_Gray.indd 1 1 FRONT 0817.indd 25

25 7/11/17 8:45 AM 7/13/17 7:23 PM


Finley Grace Design

finleygracedesign.com

Garrison Hullinger Interior Design garrisonhullinger.com

PACIFIC NORTHWEST INTERIOR DESIGN

GATH INTERIOR DESIGN gathinteriordesign.com

Lisa Staton Design lisastaton.com

The following design firms are among the best in the region. They also support GRAY’s effort to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. We’re proud to call them our partners. Look to them first for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more.

Michelle Dirkse Interior Design michelledirkse.com

Pulp Design Studios

pulpdesignstudios.com

PNW INTERIOR DESIGN.indd 2

Vanillawood

vanillawood.com

West Highland Design

westhighlanddesign.com

7/14/17 1:10 PM


ARCHITECTURE / Olson Kundig PHOTOGRAPHY / Benjamin Benschneider

graymag . com

1 FRONT 0817.indd 27

27 7/13/17 7:24 PM


AKJ Architects LLC akjarchitects.com

Artisans Group

artisansgroup.com

PACIFIC NORTHWEST ARCHITECTS

babienko ARCHITECTS pllc studiobarc.com

Ben Trogdon | Architects bentrogdonarchitects.com

The following architecture and design firms are among the best in the region. They also support GRAY’s effort to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. We’re proud to call them our partners. Look to them first for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more.

David Coleman Architecture davidcoleman.com

Emerick Architects

emerick-architects.com

PNW ARCH SPONSORS.indd 2

First Lamp

firstlamp.net

Giulietti | Schouten AIA Architects gsarchitects.net

7/14/17 1:07 AM


BattersbyHowat Architects

Baylis Architects

BC&J Architecture

Best Practice

BjarkoSerra Architects

BUILD llc

David Hopkins Design

David Pool Architecture pllc

DeForest Architects

Graham Baba Architects

Guggenheim Architecture + Design Studio

Hacker

battersbyhowat.com

bestpracticearchitecture.com

davidhopkinsdesign.com

grahambabaarchitects.com

baylisarchitects.com

bjarkoserra.com

davidpoolarchitecture.com

bcandj.com

buildllc.com

deforestarchitects.com

hackerarchitects.com

guggenheimstudio.com

PNW ARCH SPONSORS.indd 3

7/14/17 9:12 AM


Hinge Build Group

HOEDEMAKER PFEIFFER LLC

Hoshide Wanzer Architects

Johnston Architects

KASA Architecture

Lane Williams Architects

hinge-build.com

johnstonarchitects.com

hoedemakerpfeiffer.com

kasaarchitecture.com

hw-architects.com

lanewilliams.com

Lyons Hunter Williams : architecture Measured Architecture lhwarchitecture.com

measured.ca

Nathan Good Architects

Scott | Edwards Architecture

SkB Architects

Skylab Architecture

seallp.com

PNW ARCH SPONSORS.indd 4

skbarchitects.com

nathangoodarchitects.com

skylabarchitecture.com

7/14/17 1:07 AM


James Dixon Architect

Janof Architecture

Lanefab Design / Build

Leckie Studio Architecture + Design

Lucio Picciano I DLP Architecture

One SEED Architecture + Interiors

Richard Brown Architect, AIA

RUF Project

Tyler Engle Architects

William Kaven Architecture

Workshop AD

Integrate Architecture & Planning integratearch.com

lanefab.com

oneseed.ca

tylerengle.com

PNW ARCH SPONSORS.indd 5

jdixonarchitect.com

leckiestudio.com

rbarch.com

williamkaven.com

janofarchitecture.com

dlpdesigns.com

rufproject.com

workshopad.com

7/14/17 1:07 AM


2 Untitled-5 2

graymag . com

7/14/17 10:06 AM


hot new next The Pacific Northwest’s people, places, & things to know now

RENDERING COURTESY HCMA ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

The average Vancouver laneway can be as narrow as 20 feet, but HCMA Architecture + Design is making every inch count with its transformation of these utilitarian spaces into lively, active urban experiences. HCMA’s newest design proposal (shown here) will make over the downtown laneway adjacent to the Orpheum theater.

RADICALLY REENVISIONED LANEWAYS Written by COURTNEY FERRIS Photographed by KIM BELLAVANCE

IN MOST PLACES AROUND THE NORTHWEST, ALLEYWAYS AREN’T NEIGHBORHOOD GATHERING SPOTS. Often dirty, lined with dumpsters, and tagged

by graffiti artists, these back-of-building spaces are beloved mostly by garbage trucks. In Vancouver, however, alleys—called laneways here—are starting to emerge as properties with potential, thanks to HCMA Architecture + Design. The laneway project has its roots in an HCMA team-building exercise in 2015 that sent dozens of staff members running around downtown Vancouver to reimagine neglected pockets through temporary interventions. They created colorful tangrams that the public could stick on the sides of buildings to create impromptu works of art, and hung allegorical posters on an Eastside corner to forge a symbolic link across the street. Blossoming client relationships followed, and HCMA is now elbow-deep in projects intended to transform overlooked downtown areas into vibrant public spaces. graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 33

33 7/13/17 6:37 PM


HOT NEW NEXT

urban design

“We saw an opportunity in Vancouver’s underutilized laneways. All the spaces in the city are for people.” PAUL FAST, ARCHITECT AND PRINCIPAL, HCMA

34

GRAYMAG . COM

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 34

7/13/17 6:38 PM


A bright palette transforms the Alley Oop laneway into a colorful oasis of whimsy and play. The strategic use of color attracts curious passersby and delineates a series of play courts that anchor the space. On the edges, movable bistro furniture and waste containers support the utilitarian functions of the laneway, and spherical mood lighting strung above creates a soft, relaxed vibe in the evenings. Âť graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 35

35 7/13/17 6:38 PM


hot new next

Although inspired by the vibrant pedestrian-only alleyways of Tokyo and Melbourne, Alley Oop does not close its space to cars. During the day, the laneway maintains its service functions (waste removal, parking, and delivery), but in off-hours, people gravitate here for a quick game of basketball or to take a break after dancing at a nearby club.

36

Several weeks after that 2015 HCMA Day, HCMA recreated this same design exercise as part of Simon Fraser University’s annual community summit and attracted the attention of the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association (DVBIA). The organization now works closely with HCMA to develop select city laneways into public-friendly thoroughfares. Alley Oop, the playfully named first collaborative result, is a colorful installation at the edge of Vancouver’s Financial District. Set between Granville and Seymour and West Hastings and Pender, it includes a basketball court, hopscotch, and movable seating that encourages pedestrians to interact with the space rather than rush through it. “What makes Alley Oop unique,” explains HCMA principal architect Paul Fast, “is that it taps into a space that people previously haven’t considered for public use.” With ambitions larger than simple beautification, HCMA is radically reenvisioning both the ways a dense city can use public space and approaches to the ever-present issue of land availability. “Being surrounded by water and mountains has limited the amount of land available for development in Vancouver,” Fast notes, “and that’s driven up the cost, making it difficult to free up areas for public space.” Given Vancouver’s rapidly growing population, and its more than 240 laneways, HCMA is leading the charge to enrich civic life through previously unexplored development opportunities. More activations are currently in the works, including Ackery’s Alley, slated to open late summer/early fall east of Granville Street next to the Orpheum theater. To reflect the vintage glamour of this local landmark (each laneway will echo the unique character of its neighborhood), the project will include a “red carpet” (painted down the length of the lane) and an interactive light and sound installation by Alex Beim. When asked why HCMA, a firm known for its large institutional projects, decided to take on small-scale design with a socially driven bent, Fast answers with succinct conviction, “It’s the right thing to do for our city.” ❈

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 36

7/13/17 6:38 PM

© 2017 Design Within Reach, Inc.

urban design


© 2017 Design Within Reach, Inc.

Matthew Hilton Designer of the Kelston Sofa www.dwr.com graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 37

37 7/13/17 6:38 PM


hot new next

scene

The F5 Tower (rendered in center of this image), will house its namesake tech company in early 2019, and the new SLS Seattle hotel with interiors by Philippe Starck opening fall 2017. OPPOSITE: The renowned designer also envisioned the hotel’s Sanctuary event space, set within the historic First United Methodist Church building adjacent to the tower.

sky high design Written by JENNIFER MCCULLUM Portrait by NATE WATTERS Hotel room interiors photographed by ALEX HAYDEN

38

COURTESY ZGF

A new hotel with interiors by Philippe Starck, raises the profile of Seattle’s skyline.

g r ay m a g . c o m

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 38

7/13/17 6:39 PM


COURTESY SLS SEATTLE

DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects LLP hotel and restaurant design: Philippe Starck developer: Daniels Real Estate general contractor: JTM Construction structural engineering: Arup and Coughlin Porter Lundeen environmental engineering: EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc. graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 39

39

7/13/17 6:39 PM


hot new next

scene

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 40

COURTESY ZGF

40

COURTESY SLS SEATTLE

“THE FRUSTRATING THING IS THAT EVERYONE IN SEATTLE TAKES THEIR MONEY SOMEWHERE ELSE TO SPEND: PARIS, SAN FRANCISCO, NEW YORK, VEGAS. THE GOAL OF SLS SEATTLE IS TO KEEP THAT MONEY HERE AND RAISE THE GAME.” —KEVIN DANIELS, DEVELOPER

7/13/17 11:02 PM


“We had a great challenge because we’re in a very dense piece of real estate. So the building has a dialogue with other buildings. Its reflective panes pick up images of the city and the drum of the First United Methodist Church. Glass is a medium that makes all the buildings around it a bit better.” —ALLYN STELLMACHER, ARCHITECT, ZGF ARCHITECTS

I

t started with the church. In 2004, Seattle’s First United Methodist Church—built in 1908 and one of the country’s oldest Beaux Arts–style sanctuaries—was watching its congregation dwindle. Church leaders agreed to sell their 801 Fifth Avenue site and move their flock elsewhere. In the church’s place, a multistory office tower would be built. When developer Kevin Daniels, then the chairman of nonprofit Historic Seattle, caught wind of the demolition plans, he leapt into a nearly 15-year-long struggle to save the historic house of worship. “It’s been the challenge of my career,” says Daniels. Yet thoughts of Henry Yesler, Arthur Denny, and other founders of Seattle, who all attended services in the church, drove him onward. “The first time I walked through the space, knowing its history, I thought, ‘Wow, we have to save this,’” he recalls. Historic Seattle, along with both the Washington and the National Trusts for Historic Preservation, sponsored a design charrette for the site and appealed to the Washington State Supreme Court to reconsider demolition plans, and ultimately it took Daniels partnering with Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels and King County Councilman Dow Constantine to spearhead a cash-and-land proposal that the congregation couldn’t pass up. The sanctuary would remain standing, the congregation would relocate, and a new office tower would rise immediately south of the building. That tower is now a 48-story glass-steel-and-concrete edifice that gleams in the Seattle skyline from its Fifth Avenue site. Designed by Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects (ZGF), the F5 Tower—named for the tech company that will occupy its 28 floors of office space in early 2019—will house a tenant the Pacific Northwest design community is delighted to welcome: the new SLS hotel. The latest member of the SBE luxury hotel

portfolio, the SLS Seattle will flaunt interiors designed by Philippe Starck and a jaw-dropping event space, set within the old church and named the Sanctuary in honor of its venerable forebear. Daniels knew a hospitality element had to be at the project’s core. “Since the ’60s in this part of town,” he notes, “you come, you work, and you leave. In a true cosmopolitan downtown, people work and play. We’ve always had the work. Now we have the play.” The new hotel and event space required a chic after-hours aesthetic, and Starck, the renowned creator, designer, and architect, was the man for the job. Starck’s 15 year partnership with the SBE Hotel Group and its chairman, Sam Nazarian, also made him the natural choice. With U.S. locations in South Beach, Beverly Hills, and Las Vegas, the boutique SLS hotel chain brings a sleek urbanity to downtown that might surprise some Seattleites. “Seattle has been on the edge of civilization a bit,” jokes Allyn Stellmacher, ZGF design partner and lead project architect. “It’s been a very pragmatic city for decades, but this is also a place where big ideas happen. Take Microsoft, Boeing, and UPS—their ideas helped build the culture that’s now taking shape here.” The project was not an easy one to shape for its creators. How should a century-old sanctuary relate to a contemporary 660-foot skyscraper? How should the architects reconcile the F5’s sleek industrial exterior with Starck’s nature-inspired interiors? “I’ve seen a lot of bad examples of how historic buildings are encapsulated by modern buildings,” says Daniels, now trustee emeritus of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. “I didn’t want that to happen here.” To maintain an optical connection between the tower and adjacent historic buildings, a cantilevered base, clad in Roman travertine, allows a visual throughway to the church and neighboring Rainier Club. »

OPPOSITE TOP: Seattle developer Kevin Daniels describes his fight to save the century-old Seattle church as “the challenge of my career.” After a years-long struggle, a resolution was reached to protect the sanctuary and raise the new office tower just south of the church. OPPOSITE BOTTOM: The Starck-designed—and aptly named—Halo bar hovers over the Sanctuary event space. graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 41

41 7/13/17 6:39 PM


hot new next

scene

“THE MAIN GOAL OF A HOTEL IS NOT JUST TO BE BEAUTIFUL, ELEGANT, AND CHIC, BUT TO BRING LIFE TO A PLACE WHERE PEOPLE WHO ARE FAR FROM THEIR FAMILY AND FRIENDS CAN FIND A HOME.” —PHILIPPE STARCK, DESIGNER

42

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 42

7/13/17 6:40 PM


Travertine stone from Italian manufacturer Mariotti Carlo cloaks almost every surface of the SLS Seattle’s guest bathrooms in a glamorous interpretation of the Pacific Northwest’s rugged natural environment. OPPOSITE: “Because the Pacific Northwest can get quite cold, we wanted these rooms to feel warm for both the body and the heart,” says Starck of the interiors he created for the SLS Seattle’s 189 guest rooms. »

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 43

43 7/13/17 6:40 PM


hot new next

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE LEFT: A midcenturyinspired chair and custom coral pleated lampshade are just two of the deliberate design choices Starck (seated at right) made in creating the aesthetic of each room. “I care about the people who will be staying in this place. I want them to feel at their best. More sexy, more beautiful, more creative… to go back home and say, ‘I went to the SLS, and it’s astonishing.’”

Inside the hotel, 9 ½ feet tall floor-to-ceiling windows, ensure the unobstructed passage of elusive Pacific Northwest sunlight into the interiors. “We’re gray most of the year,” says Daniels. “Philippe wanted these spaces to be a warm cocoon that transforms the overcast light into something energetic and buoyant.” Inspired by the region’s natural landscape, the rooms feature live-edge stone and wood accent tables. This environmental consciousness extends to all aspects of the tower, which is seeking LEED Gold rating from the U.S. Green Building Council. The glass wrapping the building’s exterior has a “low-E” coating that permits light to pass through the panes but blocks the solar radiation that could overheat rooms. Vertical steel beams offer superior structural efficiency, eliminating the need for approximately 2,000 tons of steel and yielding a 20 percent savings over the cost of a

44

JUMBO TSUI

scene

typical office building. “The tower works hard to be a good partner, to have a dialogue with the surrounding buildings and its environment,” Stellmacher says. “It has no columns in its corners, so you get the spaciousness of the footprint and a sense of connection to the outdoors. The architecture steps out of the way of the inhabitants’ experience.” In fall 2017, those inhabitants will be invited to stay in one of SLS Seattle’s 189 guest rooms, dine in its restaurant (helmed by a James Beard Award–winning chef), and socialize at the appropriately titled Halo bar, also designed by Starck, which floats above the 21,000-square-foot event space in the restored church. “In the first six months we’re open, more people will be in the church than in the past 100 years combined,” says Daniels. “Finally getting to share it with the public is amazing.” ❈

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 44

7/13/17 10:48 PM


“Seattle is the city of intelligence. The SLS Seattle is not some trendy hotel where everything will get changed in two years because it will be out of style. Stupidity is the contrary of Seattle.” —PHILIPPE STARCK, DESIGNER

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 45

45 7/13/17 6:40 PM


hot new next

scene

EDITOR PICKS

SHOP

This spring, Vancouver upped its style game with the opening of Swedish ready-to-wear retailer Collection of Style (COS) in Gastown. In expanding the Canadian presence of the brand’s clean-lined, contemporary men’s and women’s wear essentials, the company’s creative director, Karin Gustafsson, has honored the history of the B.C. retail space, a historic 19th-century building, with a thoughtful restoration and furnishings from midcentury designers. cosstores.com

A pioneer of the Northwest Regional style, architect John Yeon also amassed a diverse collection of Asian and European decorative arts. View examples of Yeon’s building and landscape work, as well as a selection of his art, furniture, and objects, through September 3 at the Portland Art Museum’s exhibition Quest for Beauty: The Architecture, Landscapes, and Collections of John Yeon. portlandartmuseum.org

STAY

Known for its eclectic modern aesthetic, W Hotels opened its second Washington location in June 2017 in the rapidly growing city of Bellevue. The W’s design team wanted to create the vibe of a modern family lake house with features that include a fireplaceaccented interior reading room and an outdoor terrace lounge complete with porch swings and a pool table. wbellevue.com

46

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 46

TOP TO BOTTOM: PORTLAND VISITORS INFORMATION CENTER, 1948, ROGER STURTEVANT COLLECTION, OAKLAND MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA, PHOTOGRAPH BY ROGER STURTEVANT; COURTESY COS; COURTESY KEMPER DEVELOPMENT COMPANY

SEE

7/13/17 6:40 PM


NEW FIRE WINDOW

Enjoy this Spark Modern Fire from INSIDE and OUTSIDE. Gathering spot, focal point, conversation starter. In 3’, 4’, 5’, and a fabulous 6’ viewable width! Designed and engineered to be extraordinary. See our photo gallery at www.sparkfires.com or 203.791.2725

modern fires

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 47

47 7/13/17 6:41 PM


hot new next

scene

SHOP

Tucked under Pioneer Square boutique Clementines, Swan Dive Seattle is the new holy grail of your consignment-shop dreams. Opened in April 2017, the shop features eclectic, vintage home décor and one-of-a-kind fashion finds organized into “edits”: collections focused on various guiding concepts such as citywide ArtWalks. All edits offer treasures gleaned from both local estate sales and flea markets abroad.

STAY

Opened in February 2017, the AC Hotel Portland Downtown blends modern influences with Portland’s creative culture. The interior palette, a sleek mix of neutral marble, glass, and wood, evokes the look of a tailored men’s suit: sharp, masculine, and impeccably detailed. The spaces are enlivened with the work of Stumptown artists, including Damien Gilley and photorealist Jason Prouty. ❈ achotels.marriott.com

48

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ANNA HOYCHUK PHOTOGRAPHY; CHELSEA MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY; BENJAMIN BENSCHNEIDER

@shopswandive

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 48

7/13/17 6:42 PM


SERVING PORTLAND FOR OVER 30 YEARS SHOP HUNDREDS OF IN-STOCK DESIGNS OR

SPECIFY A CUSTOM

RUG IN OUR PEARL DISTRICT SHOWROOM V I S I T O U R N E I G H B O R I N G O U T L E T L O C AT I O N F O R D A I LY S A V I N G S ON CLOSEOUT AND ONE-OF-A-KIND RUGS

515 NW 10TH AVE, 97209

TUFENKIANPO RTLAND.CO M

5 0 3 . 2 1 2 . 4 5 6 9 graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 49

49 7/13/17 6:42 PM


hot new next

scene

MAKER’S MART Written by STACY KENDALL : Photographed by ALEX HAYDEN

DEEP IN THE HEART OF AMAZON-LAND (a.k.a. Seattle’s South

Lake Union neighborhood), a new space is distinguishing itself from the fast-paced, mass-production ethos of surrounding tech outfits. Opened in May 2017 in SKB Architects’ award-winning 400 Fairview building, JOIN Shop is designed, curated, and owned by Sallyann Corn and Joe Kent, co-creators of local design studio Fruitsuper. The couple, partners in life and work, saw the shop as the next step in the evolution of JOIN Design collective, founded in 2008 by then-new design studios Iacoli & McAllister, Ladies & Gentlemen Studio, and Grain. Fast-forward to 2017: Seattle is now an undisputed hub of innovation, and JOIN Shop—along with the collective, which now includes more than 60 designers—is positioned at its epicenter. The store features the work of more than 40 independent designers, makers, and artists (more than half of them based in the Pacific Northwest).

50

Sallyann Corn and Joe Kent, cofounders of design studio Fruitsuper, in their recently opened boutique. JOIN Shop stocks items from more than 40 independent designers.

“We knew we would be more powerful together. The shop brings us full circle; it’s a physical representation of what we’ve done for years.” —SALLYANN CORN, DESIGNER “We believe that the stories behind objects are as interesting as the objects themselves,” explains Corn. “In the same way that nothing will ever replace the weight, feel, and smell of the pages of a good book, a brick-and-mortar shop filled with hand-selected treasures waiting to be discovered will always be timeless and personal.” Beginning this August, JOIN will host trunk shows, book launches, workshops, and art shows. Says Corn, “We believe events build community, connect us to the objects we own, and further our collective appreciation of quality and craft.” ❈

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 50

7/13/17 6:42 PM


custom

SHADES, BLINDS & DRAPERY Handcrafted in the USA since 1946. Ships free in 10 days or less. Shop online, by phone, or in one of our 55+ showrooms nationwide. Visit us locally in Portland: 1117 NW Everett Street | Seattle: 2004 1st Avenue | theshadestore.com | 800.820.7817 graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 51

51 7/13/17 6:43 PM


hot new next

scene

THE HEADLINERS At the top of his game, artist-designer Jaime Hayon (pictured) brings his whimsical yet groundbreaking design ethos to the Caesarstone stage at IDSV on Friday, September 29. Later that day, Italian designer and creative director Matteo Cibic does the same; on Saturday, see textile designer and graphic artist Camille Walala; on Sunday come hear Wit & Delight blog founder Kate Arends. On the GRAY Stage (presented by DXV Canada and The Mine), L.A. designers Glenn Lawson and Grant Fenning, of Lawson-Fenning, share their unique design sensibilities and reveal what it takes to create a revered brand. Plus, celebrated NYC interior designer Alexa Hampton (presented by The Mine), brings her unequivocal style.

I.D.-YES VANCOUVER Interior Design Show Vancouver is the spot for inspiring design on the West Coast. Bringing together cutting-edge exhibitors, some of the biggest names in the business, and parties that won’t quit, IDSV is the epicenter of the design world in September. Explore a total design experience with us! 

S F

B

S

B

Written by STACY KENDALL

A

52

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 52

7/13/17 6:43 PM

Untitled

BLANCO


Beauty, Strength, Durability. Beauty, Strength, Durability.

The legacy continues - BLANCO SILGRANIT®® sinks The legacy continues - BLANCO SILGRANIT sinks

Sink: Metallic Gray Gray Sink: BLANCO BLANCO IKON IKON®®, SILGRANIT®®, Metallic Faucet: Steel Faucet: BLANCOCULINA BLANCOCULINATM, Classic Steel

BLANCO IKON IKON®® - the first apron front BLANCO front of of its its kind kind with withthe thebeauty, beauty,strength strengthand anddurability durabilityofofour our SILGRANIT®® sink material. SILGRANIT BLANCO IKON IKON®® - now available in BLANCO in seven seven SILGRANIT SILGRANIT®®colours: colours:

Anthracite Anthracite

Café Café

Cinder Cinder

Made in in Canada Canada Made Engineered in in Germany Engineered Germany

Untitled-2 2 HNN PART 5 1 0817.indd 53

BLANCO_Azure_JulAug2017.indd 1

Metallic Metallic Gray Gray

Truffle Truffle

Biscuit Biscuit

White White

blancocanada.com blancocanada.com

graymag graymag . com . com

53 5

7/13/17 7/13/17 12:46 6:43 PM

2017-05-15 2:26 PM


FOR Q

hot new next

scene

ABOVE: Get ready to freak out: this year, Inform Interiors presents a pop-up shop from white-hot Danish brand HAY, whose contemporary furniture and accessories marry function with an ultracool aesthetic (pictured: their Kaleido trays). LEFT: Among the exhibitors is Vancouverbased furniture and design studio Hinterland. The new Pillowy Bench is on trend with its delightful use of chunky, curved-edge Canadian white ash. Âť

54

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 54

7/13/17 6:43 PM


FOR QUESTIONS CALL: Kollette Greene 214-891-2947

I T’S M O R E T H A N A S H O W R O O M. I T’S A F E A S T F O R T H E S E N S E S.

From cooking demos to appliance test-drives, you’re invited to taste, touch, and see the potential for your kitchen in a dynamic space free of sales pressure but full of inspiration.

Seattle • 1400 Elliott Avenue West, Seattle, WA 98119 • 206-284-8400 • subzero-wolf.com /seattle graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 55

55 7/13/17 6:44 PM


hot new next

scene

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Vancouver’s Livingspace brings the newest collections from German furniture company e15 (pictured: Elbe III collection bench). This year’s Exchange shines a light on design-forward Tokyo. The installation, designed by Vancouver-based FSOARK Architect Inc., will feature cutting-edge studios we+ (pictured: we+ Disguise flower vases) and Design for Industry. In the popular Clay & Glaze installation, contemporary ceramic designers (pictured: Matteo Cibic) show their newest work. INTRO/LA is curated by L.A.-based Paul Valentine of design agency Small Office and features multiple contemporary brands (pictured: Point Tables by Swedish studio Massproductions). Storied French furniture maker Moissonnier, which now has a showroom in Vancouver, debuts as an exhibitor this year. ❈

56

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 56

7/13/17 6:44 PM

015308


Cheshire in Stone Gray

Redefine the classics The full range of Victoria + Albert’s bathtubs and basins are now available in seven external paint finishes. Explore the full collection online: www.vandabaths.com

Visit us at IDS Vancouver September 28 – October 1 Bathtubs | Basins | Furniture | Faucets | Accessories graymag . com

015308B5_V&A_GreyMag_AD_IDS_Vancouver_June17_.indd 1 2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 57

57 12/07/2017 11:31 7/13/17 6:44 PM


hot new next

made here

FROM LOWER LEFT: Folk bench with Pendleton wool cushion. Richard Koehler, founder of Folk. Tripod floor lamp with handmade wool shade. Folk’s new ceramic lighting, made in collaboration with Mudshark Studios, available through Rejuvenation.

TIPPING THE SCALE Written by STACY KENDALL

individual artisans single-handedly creating a limited number of objects, but talk has turned to studios scaling up production without giving up handmade quality. Few makers start out with the requisite know-how (or even desire) to incorporate manufacturing partners, but in the spring of 2015, Richard Koehler founded Portland’s Folk furniture to lead the way. His hypothesis? Manufactured can still mean quality, and it can be done in the U.S. “There’s this idea that manufactured items are cheap,” explains Koehler, whose background is in commercial design/build. “But in the Pacific Northwest, some factories have been working with one material for 100 years—that’s an amazing wealth of knowledge.” Using a small-run manufacturing model, Folk has already partnered with metal, upholstery, blown-glass, machine, woodmilling, and CNC shops. Its most recent partnership, with Portland ceramic makers Mudshark Studios, produced a line of ceramic pendant lights sold through Rejuvenation. “We’re at the crossroads of precision manufacturing and traditional woodworking,” Koehler says. “We are still handcrafting and using quality materials like Pendleton wool, FSC-certified lumber, and raw ceramic, but we’re also leveraging manufacturing technology to get the efficiencies where they need to be.” Folk’s Xfactor may be factory production, but handmade is still in its DNA. “It’s the best of both worlds.” ❈

58

PORTRAIT: VANCE WALSTRA; ALL OTHERS: COURTESY REJUVENATION

A SEA CHANGE IS UNDERWAY IN THE CURRENT CONVERSATION ABOUT MAKERS—the focus used to be on

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 58

7/13/17 6:44 PM


Award-Winning Interior Design • Full-Service Kitchen/Bath Design

Custom Furnishings & Cabinetry

MAISON INC Since 20 0 1

16 11 N W No r t h r up

Po r t l a n d

50 3 . 2 95.0 1 51

Ma i so nInc.co m graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 59

59 7/13/17 6:45 PM


hot new next

emerging

The new Connect collection (left to right): interior of the Connect credenza, lacquered chair, exterior of credenza, round table in charred maple. BELOW: Designermaker Henry Norris with the Connect credenza.

“There’s all this fancy joinery that’s completely unseen. It’s nerdy, but it creates value in a way that’s not flashy.” —HENRY NORRIS, DESIGNER

MODERN PRIMITIVE

Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Portrait by JEREMY JUDE LEE

out of scavenged scraps. The now-29-year-old’s work has since become considerably more polished, but his fascination with raw material remains. In 2013, he launched the Vancouver-based firm New Format, collaborating with local designers on custom metalwork and architectural details. Two years later, an extensive commission by Simcic Uhrich Architects—creating oiled black steel walls, floors, table bases, and a staircase for Juniper restaurant—sparked Norris’s desire to stretch his own wings as a designer. After prototyping in his East Vancouver studio, Norris debuted his first furniture collection in late 2016. The four pieces— a lacquered black aluminum chair, a black steel credenza with copper doors, a wooden tabletop pierced by its bronze legs, and a Frank Lloyd Wright–inspired screen—are now available by special order and bespeak Norris’s attraction to “interweaving modern manufacturing and traditional joinery techniques,” he says. The credenza, for example, is held together with mortise and tenon joints, a woodworking technique that creates cleaner connections than welding. Similarly, the table’s legs connect to its trestle via “a very Bronze Age way of putting things together,” as Norris explains. “You heat up the two pieces of metal and then hit them with a hammer till they stick together.” The method sounds primitive, but the result is refined. ❈

60

KRISTA JAHNKE

HENRY NORRIS BEGAN DABBLING IN FURNITURE MAKING AS A TEENAGER, crafting rudimentary pieces

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 60

7/13/17 6:45 PM


FLOOR TILES PAR-KER® HERITAGE NATURAL

info@porcelanosa-usa.com | www.porcelanosa-usa.com

PORCELANOSA SEATTLE 88 Spring Street, Suite 120 Seattle, WA 98104 206.673.8395 graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 61

61 7/13/17 6:45 PM


hot new next

profile

DECKED OUT

Written by NESSA PULLMAN : Photographed by JULIE ROW

GOOD THINGS COME TO THOSE WHO WAIT. Case in point: the gradual but steady rise of designers Aleem Kassam and Phyllis Lui, copartners in Vancouver firm Kalu Interiors. They launched Kalu in 2007 and grew it thoughtfully as they completed design-education projects and worked for other firms. “We knew our success wasn’t going to happen overnight, and we also didn’t want to pretend to know it all right at the start,” explains Kassam. In a brilliant profile-raising move, over the past few years they’ve immersed themselves in the design community by creating installations for Interior Design Show Vancouver and Dinner by Design and sponsoring and collaborating on charitable events such as the Little Black Dress Gala. It worked. Since the end of 2016, the pair has at last been devoted full-time to Kalu projects, and there’s a slew of them happening in and near Vancouver. The roster includes eight condo interiors, five home renovations, four new builds, two spec homes, and one multifamily dwelling consisting of six abodes. Displaying a keen eye for dramatic moments and sleek, tonal layers, the team that’s long been on our radar is now firmly on the map. ❈

62

graymag . com

LAW

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 62

7/13/17 6:45 PM


Š2017 Wood-Mode, Inc.

Edison Heights by Wood-Mode Bellevue Henredon & Schoener 425.454.9000 www.henredonschoener.com

Portland Eastbank Interiors 503.233.1502 www.eastbankinteriors.com

Seattle Rainier Cabinetry & Design 206.632.7929 www.rainiercabinetry.com

Bellingham Bellingham Millwork Supply 360.734.5700 www.bellinghammillwork.com

Seattle Neil Kelly 206.343.2822 www.neilkelly.com

Seattle Savvy Cabinetry by Design 206.860.7600 www.savvycd.com

Seattle William & Wayne 206.762.2635 www.williamandwayne.com

graymag . com

LAW_1004.indd 1

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 63

63 6/21/17 8:52 AM

7/13/17 6:45 PM


hot new next

big idea

Blokable units, like this model Micro-Blok in Vancouver, Washington, can be stacked together to create multiunit, multistory buildings. Bloks come in two lengths, 28 and 33 feet, and two levels of interior finishes. Glass panes connect the Micro-Blok interior to the exterior landscape.

BUILDING BLOKS

Written by BRIAN LIBBY : Photographed by ANDREW POGUE

IF THE FOUNDERS OF BLOKABLE HAVE ANYTHING TO SAY ABOUT THE MATTER, TOMORROW’S HOMES WILL BE BUILT FASTER, MORE AFFORDABLY, AND WITH GREATER PRECISION THAN HOUSES OF TODAY. And

although the new Seattle and Vancouver, Washington–based company is still cutting its teeth, its tight-knit creative team is earnest in its mission to design and manufacture high-quality, configurable modular housing units that can be ordered with a click and delivered within weeks. “We’re not doing architecture,” says Blokable co-founder and vice president of design Timothy Miller. “We’re building a product that enables faster and eventually more cost-efficient construction.” Blokable was founded in the fall of 2015 by former Amazon executive Aaron Holm, evolving out of his frustrations with the inefficiencies of traditional construction. While overseeing

64

initiatives that led to Amazon’s first brick-and-mortar stores, he realized that each component of a new building is generally custom-constructed outdoors and that projects can take months, if not years, to complete. Starting with a modular concept, Blokable’s steel-framed units, or Bloks, are also embedded with smart technology for app-controlled heating, energy, and security. While most modular housing companies focus on single-family homes, Blokable is seeking to build higher-density housing by stacking its units—buildings up to five stories tall can be assembled onsite in days instead of weeks. Company executives hope their approach to housing will extend beyond the confines of a successful business model to eventually help address cities’ backlogs of affordable-housing construction. “We want to change the conversation about what it takes to build buildings,” Miller says. “We want to make an impact.” »

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 64

7/13/17 6:46 PM


Block Party September 9-10 Community Programs September 9-22 PARK(ing) Day September 15 Design Discussions September 13 & 19 Closing Party September 22

GRAYMAG . COM

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 65

65 7/13/17 6:46 PM


hot new next

big idea

Concealed LED lighting and varying window configurations create a greater sense of interior space. Bloks are LEEDready to be integrated into with sustainable projects attempting certification, and they are equipped with smart-home technology including Nest Thermostats and Schlage Keyless Entry Systems as well as premium pre-manufactured kitchens. Porcelanosa Krion surfaces are used throughout the ADA-accessible bathroom, complete with roll-in shower, to offer a cleanable, durable environment. ❈

“We want to change the conversation about what it takes to build buildings.” —TIMOTHY MILLER, BLOKABLE

66

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 66

7/13/17 6:47 PM


Visit our new showroom 1225 NW Everett St. Portland, OR 97209

Visit us online www.kushrugs.com graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 67

67 7/13/17 6:47 PM


HOT NEW NEXT

big idea

CTRL +P

Written by JENNIFER CROLL

“THE IDEA THAT YOU CAN UPLOAD A DESIGN AND HAVE IT MATERIALIZE AS A COMPLETE PRODUCT HALFWAY ACROSS THE WORLD IS INCREDIBLY POWERFUL,” says Neil Patel, CEO of Print the

“With access to Print the Future, everyone can unleash their inner designer and bring their ideas to life through 3D printing.” NEIL PATEL, CEO, PRINT THE FUTURE

68

Future, the Vancouver-based design company he founded in February 2017. 3D printing is a booming industry, expected to reach $35 billion within the next three years, and Patel sees PTF as the way furniture designers will share in that growth. PTF’s driving concept is simple: it provides designers with membership access to stateof-the-art, large-scale 3D printing technology that turns their ideas into ready-to-sell objects. “There’s no longer the barrier of time-consuming, expensive processes to produce a custom piece,” Patel says. “This is life-changing.” PTF debuted its first U.S. pop-up shop in New York City last March to showcase 3D-printed furniture such as geometric stools, armchairs, and desks, which visitors could watch being printed onsite. Global media coverage and a consumer survey response topping 90 percent indicated the shop should remain a permanent fixture, and those results spurred Patel onward. Also championing PTF is the celebrated L.A. interior designer Lori Dennis, who became a believer when the New York shop printed a tray for one of her presentations. It printed and posted the product to California in less than 24 hours, and a super-fan was born. Now Dennis is on the PTF board and designing a signature line of 3D-printed furniture, expected to launch later this year. Currently in the funding phase, PTF plans to open its first permanent brick-and-mortar shop in Vancouver, followed by four more North American locations, within a year. Patel plans for PTF to have a global presence, with 200 shops in major cities around the world by 2027. That ambitious expansion will be matched by a correspondingly small carbon footprint, as local 3D printing significantly reduces shipping and its attendant waste. Patel is also setting his sights on new R&D investment to enable clients to return products and recycle them into new objects. With Print the Future just around the corner, the chair of your dreams may be only a short walk—and one button—away. ❈

GRAYMAG . COM

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 68

7/13/17 6:47 PM


PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY PRINT THE FUTURE

The BigRep ONE printer, one of several cutting-edge pieces of equipment Print the Future plans to include in its shops, can print objects over a cubic meter in size, and its open format allows users to monitor their projects as they print. OPPOSITE: A plastic chair 3D printed by Swedish design company BLB. While its New York pop-up shop ran only through March 2017, Print the Future will open its first permanent shop in Vancouver within the year and plans to double the number of its stores annually until it hits the goal of 200 across North America by 2027. GRAYMAG . COM

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 69

69 7/13/17 6:47 PM


hot new next

big idea

Digital images created by Leckie Studios’ in-house visualization lab, Plus Visual, depict a model Frontcountry cabin that Leckie calls the Surf Hut; it’s slated to be built in summer 2018 on Vancouver Island.

LEADER OF THE PACK AFTER AN INTENSE DAY OF BACKWOODS ADVENTURING, NOTHING BEATS THE SIGHT OF A COZY CABIN IN THE DISTANCE, and no one knows this better than Wilson Edgar,

president of the Vancouver-based BC Mountaineering Club. Two years ago, Edgar, who spends much of his time “out and about in the mountains,” started to consider how to create backcountry buildings that could be flat-packed and assembled virtually anywhere, by anyone. Edgar knew just who to ask for help: architect Michael Leckie, his friend of four decades and a fellow outdoor enthusiast. And so the Backcountry Hut Company was born.

70

The result of two creative minds melding their shared passions—sustainable building and wilderness adventure—Backcountry Hut Company buildings are prefabricated, modular, scaleable, mass-customizable, and flat-packed. “We really like the concept of the community barn-raising process,” explains Leckie. The company’s easy-to-construct prefab dwellings are made from FSC-certified wood and 100% recyclable materials. They can be used as all sorts of shelters, from mountaineering huts to simple rural cottages and even summer homes. “The form recognizes the traditional cabin aesthetic,” says Leckie, “while inside it feels almost chapel-like, with open vertical »

RENDERING COURTESY PLUS VISUAL

Written by STEPHANIE MACDONALD

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 70

7/13/17 6:48 PM


©2017 WATERWORKS IS A REGIST ER ED TRA DEMAR K OF WATERWOR KS IP COMPANY, LLC

EXCLUSIVELY AVAILABLE AT CHOWN HARDWARE 333 NW 16TH AVE | PORTLAND, OR | 800.452.7634 12001 NE 12TH ST | BELLEVUE, WA | 800.574.4312 WWW.CHOWN.COM graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 71

71 7/13/17 6:48 PM


hot new next

big idea

“The form recognizes the traditional cabin aesthetic, while inside it feels almost chapel-like, with open vertical spaces and skylights.” —MICHAEL LECKIE, ARCHITECT

72

spaces and skylights.” Each 250-square-foot module consists of a timber frame and prefabricated wall and ceiling panels. The structures can function both on- and off-grid. No heavy machinery is required for construction or site preparation, and because all building materials are flat-packed, they can be transported via off-road vehicle or helicopter. “Frontcountry” huts, the model intended for vehicle-accessible sites, can be equipped with all the conveniences of a home and work in laneways or as backyard studios and offices. The hut prototype earned the company a 2016 Canadian Architect Award of Merit before the first hut was even built. “We are inspired by [German industrial designer] Dieter Rams’s 10 principles of good design,” says Leckie. At their core, the huts illustrate Rams’s concept that good design is as little design as possible. “Less but better,” says Leckie. ❈

RENDERINGS COURTESY PLUS VISUAL

The hut interiors and the glulam post-and-beam structure are both made out of cedar. The eclectic décor is inspired by the homes of actual surfers Leckie read about on wave-culture blog Indoek.

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 72

7/13/17 6:48 PM


5th Avenue | Seattle

Diamond bracelets and necklace by Casato Roma • Detachable diamond tassel

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 73

Tu r g e o n R a i n e . c o m

20.02 carat unheated Pink Sapphire and diamond ring • Pavé diamond ring graymag . com

73

7/13/17 6:48 PM


hot new next

art

YOUNG GUN

Written by JENNIFER MCCULLUM

Self-taught illustrator and tattoo artist Kyler Martz’s work has captured the attention of—and major commissions from—corporations including Starbucks, Hermès, and Levi’s. His 2016 designs for a multidimensional painted mural in a Chicago Starbucks drew from the city’s nautical history.

74

tattoo clients eager for a chance to emblazon their skin with his art. His signature style, mostly monochromatic sketches exploring nautical themes and inspired by illustrations from 1930s children’s books, has garnered a devoted nationwide following—and not just permanent-ink aficionados, but major corporations as well. Since teaching himself to draw (and shortly thereafter to tattoo) five years ago, Martz, a former graphic designer for an ad agency, has created onsite murals for Starbucks’ Global Art program, designed window displays for luxury French fashion house Hermès, and sketched prints for a capsule T-shirt collection with Levi’s—almost all commissions he gained as a result of his followers eagerly sharing his work on Instagram. If that sounds hard to believe, Martz feels the same way. When a Starbucks creative manager first asked him to design a mural for the company’s San Francisco Fisherman’s Wharf location, the artist thought the emails were fake. “I didn’t respond to the first few. I was sure they were spam,” Martz says. “Finally, since they persisted, I met them at this shitty pizza place near my house. Once I realized they were serious and learned what they wanted me to do, I told them, ‘I’m really sorry I had you come to this place.’” When he’s not traveling the country for design projects—next up is a mural for Paul Allen’s latest renovation project in Seattle’s University District— Martz’s home base is Jackson Street Tattoo Company in Pioneer Square. But, as you can guess, you’ll need to make an appointment. h

COURTESY STARBUCKS; PORTRAIT: TRAVIS GILLETT

SEATTLE ARTIST KYLER MARTZ COULD WAKE UP TOMORROW, BOOK A FLIGHT TO NEW YORK, AND LIVE THERE FOR MONTHS WITH ALL EXPENSES PAID by a steady stream of waitlisted

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 74

7/13/17 6:49 PM


graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 75

75 7/13/17 6:50 PM


hot new next

art

CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: Portland artist

FULL CIRCLE Written by JENNIFER MCCULLUM : Portrait by ANDREW VANASSE

“I’VE NEVER CALLED MYSELF AN ARTIST,” SAYS 74-YEAR-OLD CHARLIE HAUGHEY when he’s asked about

the wooden spheres he hand-shapes in his workshop at Art Design Portland (ADX Portland), the creative incubator that has provided workspace for thousands of designers, builders, and artists in its SE Portland warehouse. “I just pick up where the wood leaves off.” Created entirely out of pieces salvaged from the design collaborative’s communal scrap bin, his largescale patchwork spheres can take almost 750 hours to construct and are up to 4 feet in diameter. “I don’t know what it will look like when I start—it depends on what’s in the scrap bin.” Haughey began creating his sculptures six years ago as a retirement folly following a 40-year career in commercial millwork and cabinetmaking. “I needed to make something a little more useless,” he jokes when explaining his leap from furniture to art. Their end results might be different, but the spirit of creation clearly links the two endeavors. Standing before a woodworker’s vice, Haughey grinds, sands, coopers, and bevels each 3- to 8-inch piece of scrap. Next he glues a series of pieces into small tiles, clamping the arrangement for 24 hours to ensure a consistent surface before joining the larger sphere. “Sometimes

76

the pieces suggest a shape or something unique, but I include anything that’s visually interesting. It’s an expression of doing the best I can with what I have.” Haughey is no stranger to making do under difficult circumstances. A former U.S. Army rifleman during the Vietnam War, and a self-trained photographer, Haughey was tasked with “boosting morale” by taking pictures for both military publications and to send back to soldiers’ hometown newspapers. In 1968 and 1969, he snapped more than 2,000 images capturing how soldiers dealt with what he refers to as “the time in between”—that period of calm in the wake of a firefight. “A lot of the war was personal, fought during those quiet times between combat events,” Haughey says. “When daylight came, everybody dealt with their own set of emotions: the hard work, the sweat, the fear, the separation from home,” he says. “It seemed every face I saw was a potential portrait with a story.” Almost 50 years later, it turns out that Haughey wasn’t the only one interested in these liminal moments. His poignant photographs, 28 of which were exhibited at the ADX Gallery in May 2017, captured the attention of Ken Burns and will be featured in the noted documentary filmmaker’s series The Vietnam War, airing in September 2017 on PBS. When asked how he feels about his newfound fame, Haughey pauses, overcome. “I thought I’d developed a narrative about my experience [in Vietnam], but when I talk to vets at events . . . every time, a new question just explodes in me. The spheres are the counterbalance. They’re my escape.” ❈

INSET IMAGES COURTESY CHARLIE HAUGHEY

Charlie Haughey. A rifleman and photographer during the Vietnam War, Haughey’s images, including this black and white portrait, will be featured in The Vietnam War docuseries from filmmaker Ken Burns, debuting this fall on PBS. Haughey circa 1968.

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 76

7/13/17 10:47 PM


Ultra™ Series Milgard Ultra™ Series: A Fiberglass Frame Designed for Complete Peace of Mind. Beautiful to look at and low maintenance, Ultra™ Series fiberglass windows are built to last. Through a careful design process, Milgard introduces a window more resistant to heat, insects and water damage to help withstand the harsher sides of Mother Natue. Available in seven tough, durable exterior finishes, Milgard Ultra features a Full Lifetime Warranty with glass breakage coverage for complete peace of mind. AVAILABLE FROM THESE FINE DEALERS Suburban Door Co. 12365 SW Herman Rd Tualatin, OR 97062 (503) 692-0180

Portland Millwork 29600 SW Seely Ave Wilsonville, OR 97070 (503) 612-6828

WestPac 2805 NW 31st Ave Portland, OR 97210 (503) 224-9142

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 77

77 7/13/17 6:50 PM


hot new next

art

TOP: Smoke No.5, Paul Edmondson, archival print on paper. BELOW: Sarah Hurt, founder of Seattle Art Source. OPPOSITE: Night Library, Greg Boudreau, spray paint on reclaimed wood.

THE MATCHMAKER Forging perfect connections in the world of design.

Written by STACY KENDALL

AN ART DEALER WHO FOCUSES ON FINDING LOCAL ART FOR INTERIOR DESIGNERS?

That resource didn’t exist until October 2016, when Sarah Hurt launched Seattle Art Source, an online showcase of local artists’ work aimed at the design trade. The gallerist had often heard artists say they had no time to update their websites, while designers bemoaned the lack of a central marketplace to source work for their clients. Enter Hurt’s platform. “I’m an art matchmaker,” she explains. Fresh inventory is constantly added to Art Source, which designers search to select works that are sent to their project sites for consideration. Representing about 35 regional artists, Hurt supplies pieces running the gamut from $200 to $10,000 for projects ranging from first homes to the houses of serious collectors, and she’s also an adept facilitator of commissions. In June, Hurt opened a shared retail space with furniture maker Plank & Grain in the International District. As Seattle booms, she observes, “The only way to support the vibrancy that artists create in our city is to buy their art.” Both her virtual and her brick-andmortar galleries are doing precisely that. ❈

78

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 78

7/13/17 10:45 PM


BROOKE FITTS 2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 79

graymag . com

79 7/13/17 6:51 PM


hot new next

ask

Julie Myers, the chair of the new Interior Architecture (IA) Department at Cornish College of the Arts. Only a handful of IA programs exist in the country, and Myers proposes that IA’s holistic approach represents design’s future.

DESIGN SCHOOLED Written by STACY KENDALL : Portrait by NATE WATTERS

80

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 80

7/13/17 6:51 PM


A Seattle interior designer at the top of her game founds the new Interior Architecture Department at Cornish College of the Arts to shape the future of design.

T

raditional design academia, some say, has been (metaphorically) falling asleep in class. Meanwhile, Seattle is emerging at the forefront of the industry’s education sector, with Cornish College of the Arts taking a seat in the first row. In 2016, the school introduced the new BFA program in Interior Architecture (IA), one of only a few such programs on the West Coast and the brainchild of interior designer Julie Myers, the new department’s chair. Pre-Cornish, a typical day for the seasoned Seattle designer included sketching plans for uber-luxe private jets, homes, and hotels. But now she spends her time envisioning a curriculum for the freshest faces in design.

Myers walks the walk. I was first intrigued by her approach to her classroom, which she named the Experience Studio. Here sophomores, juniors, and seniors work side by side, mentoring one another, collaborating on projects, and honing their skills, as they would in a professional design firm. Myers believes faculty should be active in the industry, so her professors include some of Seattle’s top working designers and architects, including Jeffrey B. Miller, managing principal of IA Interior Architects, and the duos behind design studios Fruitsuper and Piano Nobile. Even specialists outside design, such as scientists, entrepreneurs, and city planners, visit the program to share their perspectives. The more I learned by talking to Myers, the more it became clear that the future of design is expressed in her vision of a multifaceted educational approach. I caught up with her again to get the full story.

Why the term “interior architecture”? Interior design’s strength is that it teaches about surface materiality and space. IA is the next layer: object design, structural objects, and the overall well-being of a space. The idea is to think about design holistically, from the people to the materials and then to the structure.

where firms are moving. Education should inspire the industry, too. I see interior design and architecture as evolving together, and unifying to elevate the entire design profession. It may take time, but I’d like to see our organizations [such as the American Institute of Architects and the American Society of Interior Designers] merge into one.

How do you explain the value of interior design? When people call me a decorator, I say, “Great!” At least they get part of what I’m doing. It’s very important that the curriculum value décor, as it relates to the momentum of human activity. We love spaces that entice us to stay. That’s the emotional side of design, and we’re never going to run from it.

What is in design’s near future? We no longer stay in one place for 30 years. This compels us to design with inclusivity and diverse populations in mind; our spaces have to reflect mobility and flexibility. Biophilic practices [the embrace of nature’s crucial role in the built environment], one example of future-thinking design, address overall wellness and the notion that we are part of a living system. How is a building responding to our biological needs, such as air, water, and heat?

What challenges currently face design academia? We no longer see young, energized professionals come back to teach like we used to; that needs to happen again. It’s important for faculty to consistently work in the profession in order to understand

What’s the dynamic in the classroom? What do students work on? We have both local and international students, so our focus is on creating a

global citizen who thinks about how to make a difference as a designer. One student designed a birthing clinic for his country, Indonesia, that won a national scholarship from Donghia. We tackle projects in the community on the hypothetical level, and I’d love to see them have actual outcomes someday. To value what we do as interior designers and architects, we need community leaders, design resources, and comradery. What are your goals for the program? I’d like to explore the notions of robotic interiors and responsive objects—which include everything from how a space reacts to humans via sensory adaptation like lighting to screens that connect you with activity in your home. We’ve had geology and biology as annual curriculum themes, and next fall I’m excited to focus on climate change and migration. As we’ve seen in the news, we’re on a path of not acknowledging science. How are we as designers going to work with that? How can science and art be partners? Being proactive versus reactive—that’s designing. ❈ graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 81

81 7/13/17 6:56 PM


hot new next

architecture

Shigeru Ban Architects designed the distinctive triangular profile of the Terrace House—which will be the world’s tallest hybrid timber building upon completion in 2019— to keep nearby Coal Harbour Park free of its shadow.

STRAIGHT TO THE TOP Written by RACHEL GALLAHER

THEY SAY IMITATION IS THE SINCEREST FORM OF FLATTERY, but how can architects

MARTIN TESSLER

salute their predecessors without infringing on their designs? Japanese firm Shigeru Ban Architects gracefully undertakes that challenge with the Terrace House in Vancouver’s Coal Harbour. The 19-story residential tower, developed by PortLiving and slated for completion in late 2019, is the newest neighbor to the 1980 Arthur Erickson–designed Evergreen Building. Rather than ignore that landmark structure (known for its bold sawtooth silhouette and landscape design by Cornelia Oberlander, who will also handle Terrace House’s grounds), Shigeru Ban drew inspiration from it, mirroring its use of concrete and natural materials and its triangular motifs while introducing modern elements. “The upper levels of Terrace House are a visible mass-timber element in counterpoint to its concrete base,” says Shigeru Ban architect Benjamin Albertson. “It’s a prominent and visible gesture to Vancouver’s commitment to forward-thinking sustainable design.” ❈

82

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 82

7/13/17 6:56 PM


N E W

LOCATION

NOW O P E N

! 2 0 2 9 2 N D AV E . SEAT T LE, WA 9 8 1 2 1 T. 2 0 6 .4 4 8 .3 3 0 9

NOW OPEN!

2 1 1 1 1 ST AVE, SE AT T LE, WA 9 8 1 2 1 WWW. AL C H E M Y C O LLEC T I ON S .C OM

graymag . com

Gray Full Page Template New.indd 1

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 83

83

7/12/2017 10:45:23 AM

7/13/17 6:57 PM


hot new next

profile

A rendering of an industrial loft-style home currently under construction on Mercer Island, Washington. The main living areas are designed around a central courtyard. Above the brick-clad garage, a rooftop deck offers additional outdoor living space. OPPOSITE: Architect Ryan Stephenson takes in the sights of Seattle’s Lake Union from his office.

84

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 84

7/13/17 6:57 PM


RENDERING: COURTESY STEPHENSON DESIGN COLLECTIVE ; PORTRAIT: KEVIN SCOTT

PROCEED AND BE BOLD Written by KAITY TEER

A SPRAWLING MULTILEVEL TREEHOUSE—SPANNING NINE TREES TOTAL—WAS RYAN STEPHENSON’S FIRST BREAK-THE-RULES DESIGN PROJECT. He was 12 years old

at the time. “I stole scrap wood and lumber from local construction sites, as much as I could carry,” he recalls, to support his obsession with building in the woods behind his Georgia home. When he wasn’t constructing, he was drawing, and that treehouse—raised with help from his brothers and friends— taught him the satisfaction of watching ideas become reality board by board, and it steered him into a life in architecture. First he tempered his childhood guerrilla building skills at Auburn University’s Rural Studio, a design-build architecture program that tasks students with constructing affordable

homes and buildings in the Alabama countryside. “I trace everything I do today back to what I learned there,” says Stephenson, now 34 and the founder of Stephenson Design Collective (formerly Elemental Design), a burgeoning Seattle firm with 19 projects currently in the works, from a nine-unit townhouse development on Tacoma, Washington’s forthcoming light-rail corridor to a pair of minimalist passive houses in Seattle. The experience—working with a real client, a modest budget, and professors interrogating every design decision—was formative, and it taught him the virtues of resourcefulness and a client-first attitude. “I always say, ‘This is your home, not my portfolio,’” he notes. “Figuring out how to create something beautiful within clients’ budget—so they can still afford to fill »

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 85

85 7/13/17 10:43 PM


hot new next

the fridge and keep the lights on after it’s built—is my most important job as an architect.” Today, whether he’s working on a $185-per-square-foot first home or a richly funded dream house, he’s inspired by the phrase Rural Studio founder Samuel Mockbee painted above the door

“Architecture should be willing to offend. Otherwise it’s boring.” —RYAN STEPHENSON, ARCHITECT

of his classroom: “Proceed and Be Bold.” For Stephenson, boldness is expressed not only through nonconformist design choices—an outdoor kids’ swing suspended from a cantilevered second floor; unexpected cladding materials—but

86

through the architectural act itself. “As designers, we’ve been given an opportunity to do amazing things, so we should be bold and do them for other people, not for ourselves,” he says. To that end, regardless of a project’s scale or budget, he’s onsite throughout the construction process, “talking to builders and trying to figure out how to do things better and, honestly, more cheaply for my clients. There is no reason that simple and affordable solutions can’t be as beautiful as complex and expensive ones.” Mockbee’s motto also inspired Stephenson’s thick-skinned, bring-it-on attitude toward criticism, in which you can still glimpse that kid with the nine-trunk treehouse. “I want my work to evoke emotion both good and bad,” he says. “If you don’t have equal numbers of people saying, ‘That’s wrong’ and ‘That’s beautiful,’ then you’re not really pushing anything. I’m okay with people telling me they don’t like what I do. Architecture should be willing to offend. Otherwise it’s boring.” ❈

ANDREW POGUE

profile

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 86

7/13/17 6:57 PM


ANDREW POGUE

OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: This entryway features a black steel staircase that sweeps along an eye-catching curved wall. A steel fireplace and a tongue-and-groove cedar ceiling add warmth to a Mazama, Washington getaway, while fuss-free concrete flooring withstands wear from four-legged companions. A home in Issaquah, Washington delivers dramatic skyline views from its formal living room, visible even from the street. THIS PAGE: Situated on a secluded two-acre lot surrounded by ponderosa pines, this vacation home in Washington’s Methow Valley sports a metal roof and Cor-ten steel cladding.

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 87

87 7/13/17 6:58 PM


88

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 88

7/13/17 6:58 PM


Welcome to your new hotel. Your new home base. Your new sanctuary. Your perfect new stepping-off point for inspired meetings or awe-inspiring encounters with nature. Or both, if you’re so inclined. Because it is, in fact, your personal inclinations that will drive us at Dossier. Your preferences will be our policies and procedures, your experience our only measure of success. And we have every intention of being successful.

Coming to Portland August 1 dossierhotel.com

graymag . com

2 HNN PART 1 0817.indd 89

89 7/13/17 6:58 PM


hot new next

fashion

generation next: gray trains a lens on the new vanguard of pnw style

FOR THIS FEATURE, we brought together next generation creatives whose impact on the Pacific Northwest style scene is just getting started. Model Akira Ament fronts our story as well as former Seattle alt-rock band The Sneaks, and is the daughter of encaustic painting and print artist Jennifer Ament and graphic designer Barry Ament. Stylists Colton Dixon Winger and Christine Tran, both veterans of high fashion retailer Totokaelo, launched their personal styling agency, Cuniform, last year. Our photographer, Megumi Arai, debuted her first museum exhibition, Women in Photography, at the Bainbridge Island Museum of Art this past June.

Written and produced by RACHEL GALLAHER and JENNIFER MCCULLUM Photographed by MEGUMI ARAI Styled by CUNIFORM Modeled by AKIRA AMENT, HEFFNER MANAGEMENT Hair and makeup by MELISSA KORN FOR R + CO

90

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 90

7/13/17 7:26 PM


OPPOSITE: Earrings, Wasted Effort; bell-sleeve shirt, Alexa Stark, available through Rizom; blue wide-leg pants, Maiden Noir; sterling silver TULA ring, Faris, available through Rizom. THIS PAGE: Sweatshirt and pants, Olderbrother; chain wallet, Alice Noon. RINGS ON RIGHT HAND, RIGHT TO LEFT: silver AS-Key ring, Anita Sikma; gold vermeil Side Solitaire, Molly Debiak; white gold Continuity ring with diamond accent, White/Space Jewelry; bronze Ring 10, Minoux; gold Cosima ring with black and white diamonds (available in September), White/Space Jewelry; sterling silver Crown Ring No. 03, Molly Debiak; sterling silver Cuff Ring No. 01, Molly Debiak. RINGS ON LEFT HAND, RIGHT TO LEFT: bronze Ring 05, Minoux; bronze band, Minoux; princess-cut black diamond Celesta ring, White/Space Jewelry; gold Ruffle ring (available in September), White/Space Jewelry; gold vermeil Whisper band, gold vermeil Scallop Eternity band with white topaz, and two-stone sterling silver Whisper Reflection ring, all Molly Debiak; gold Perch ring with diamond, White/Space Jewelry; gold vermeil Hills Band ring, Molly Debiak.

T

he style industry barrels along at breakneck speed, pushing designers to crank out retail record-smashing, see-now-buy-now collections each season. But here in the Pacific Northwest, we do things differently. GRAY is excited to slow things down by giving you a close look at local lines that celebrate methodical fashion, quality materials, sustainable production, and the unique spirit of our region. Âť

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 91

91 7/13/17 7:26 PM


hot new next

fashion

92

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 92

7/13/17 7:28 PM


OPPOSITE: Madrona jumpsuit, Silvae, available through Rizom; Atomic earrings, Wasted Effort; white porcelain and brass Lux necklace, Tiro Tiro; NICA collar with onyx pendant, pearl, and bronze charm, Faris, available through Rizom. THIS PAGE: Oversized sweater and wide striped trouser, Maiden Noir; bronze and white porcelain Occa cuff, Tiro Tiro; bronze bangle, Minoux; black leather bag, Erin Templeton; Maison Margiela black calfskin mules, available through Totokaelo. »

“Seattle has been known for an outdoors or grunge-era look, but given the amount of people moving to the city, its current and future style perspectives are open to evolution.” —CHRISTINE TRAN, STYLIST, CUNIFORM

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 93

93 7/13/17 7:28 PM


hot new next

fashion

“Style in the Northwest has to be functional, that’s what sets apart designers here.There’s a no-nonsense attitude that we love.” —COLTON DIXON WINGER, STYLIST, CUNIFORM

94

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 94

7/13/17 7:31 PM


OPPOSITE: Metal hairpin, Lane Walkup; beige wool overcoat, Maiden Noir. THIS PAGE: Bronze earrings and bracelet, Minoux; bronze bracelet, Oru; brass Shapes bangle, Molly Debiak; gold-plated Original Sin ring, Wasted Effort; white poplin top, Priory; velvet crop trouser, Maiden Noir. â?ˆ

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 95

95 7/13/17 7:31 PM


hot new next

interiors

Bradley Barnett and Rachael Lewis, of new Seattle design firm Barnett Lewis, curl up on the vintage Thonet bench they sourced for the entryway of a rigorous yet soulful Mercer Island, Washington, home they created for friends. In the corner is a whimsical Fornasetti umbrella stand.

DESIGN TEAM

architecture and interiors: Barnett Lewis (formerly Guild 13) construction: King Construction

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 96

7/13/17 7:32 PM


double vision

A crackling design chemistry brought two designers, and friends, into partnership. Here, they share their latest Pacific Northwest project. Written by RACHEL EGGERS : Photographed by ALEX HAYDEN

“S

he freaked out,” he says. “No, he freaked out,” she responds. Together, laughing: “We both freaked out!” Over aperitifs at a trendy Seattle bar, Bradley Barnett and Rachael Lewis are reminiscing about their recently completed residential project at the firm the pair launched in May 2017, the aptly named Barnett Lewis. They’re friends as well as colleagues, and their conversation reveals the essential comedic moments present in all great partnerships. As part of former Seattle firm Guild 13, they had worked together for four years on dozens of major hospitality and residential projects, most located abroad or on the East Coast. Fueled by their crackling design chemistry, the duo (Barnett trained as an architect, Lewis in interior design) ventured out, expanding their focus to include more work in the fertile environment of the Pacific Northwest. Their mutual freak-out—over their online discovery of a mint-condition Cesare Lacca vintage bar cart—happened during their initial planning stages for a house for their close friends Rachael and Dodi Nov. Rachael and Lewis were once roommates, and a decade back, Lewis designed La Ree, Rachael’s designer boutique in Bellevue, Washington. While Guild 13 started the Nov project, the newly minted Barnett Lewis completed the design of the couple’s home, located on a plot overlooking the water on Washington’s Mercer Island. The Novs needed a versatile space—it had to work as a cozy retreat for the couple, a playful setting for their two young sons, and a lively spot for entertaining. Barnett Lewis rose to the challenge, envisioning a disciplined design punctuated with touches of color, texture, and mood. A network of custom wall paneling, cabinetry, columns, and staircase railings throughout the home provides structure and gravitas. “We set up

the home’s ‘melody,’” explains Barnett, “and then added in unexpected moments.” The melody opens with a grand entryway wrapped by a staircase and paneled walls, glamorously furnished with a vintage Thonet bench reupholstered in Pavoni ostrich-textured cowhide (“So badass,” notes Barnett) and a Kyle Bunting geometric rug in luscious cream and black cowhide. The space flows onward to a formal but vivaciously colored living room where three sets of French doors are surrounded by mathematically crisp windows and panels. Warm, luxuriant furnishings and 1950s- and ’60s-era pieces pop against the serene backdrop. In the nearby kitchen, grounded in rich grays, black, and bronze, Carrera marble cloaks the counter and backsplash, and custom dove-gray cabinets sport handsome bronze pulls. On the ceiling, a Cole & Son wall covering in a trompe l’oeil lattice pattern cleverly aligns with the room’s natural shadows. Two dramatic Roll & Hill Modo globe pendant lamps cap the epic soapstone island. An expansive hallway gallery running the length of the home is its main refrain, revealing the family’s life through a selection of books, photos, and mementos. “The memories that stick are those that connect with more than one sense,” says Barnett of the home’s décor. “We try to create spaces that suggest curiosity and exploration.” That they’ve succeeded in crafting the multifunctional home the family desired—as well as forging an effective partnership— was proved by a text that Dodi Nov recently sent to them. “He was sitting in the living room, taking it all in,” says Barnett. “He said, ‘I didn’t really get how good you guys were until now.’” The partners laugh. “That’s why we bring such passion to every detail,” says Lewis, and Barnett adds, “It’s the last 10 percent of the project that makes up 50 percent of the experience.” »

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 97

97 7/13/17 7:33 PM


“We design with the expe r It should be fun and uniq u and details—but we a

98

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 98

7/13/17 7:37 PM


e rience of a space in mind. q ue, with a sense of history e also break those rules.” —BRADLEY BARNETT, DESIGNER

Color and texture make the living room: Barnett and Lewis selected a blue-green Dedar brocade for two Victoria Hagen James wing chairs, a peacockblue velvet for the A. Rudin tufted sofa, and an orange-and-pink ikat for the vintage Charles Hollis Jones brass and Lucite table. Additional vintage pieces include the Cesare Lacca bar cart and the Franco Albini rattan ottoman, whose design dates to 1951. Barnett says that streamlined rattan works like these are the next big thing. »

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 99

99 7/13/17 7:37 PM


hot new next

interiors

ABOVE: Classic Drucker bistro chairs flank a bookmatched soapstone island from Meta Marble & Granite. Though the material requires upkeep, Lewis says, “It’s nice to have things that will acquire a patina.” LEFT: The homeowners, who love all things Fornasetti, chose its taupe and silver malachite wallpaper as a backdrop for their growing collection of Fornasetti’s annual plates. OPPOSITE: A glossy white Barclay fireclay farmhouse sink from Chown Hardware contrasts with soft black custom cabinetry on the kitchen island; gold fillet gleams from the moldings. »

100

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 100

7/13/17 7:37 PM


graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 101

101 7/13/17 7:37 PM


hot new next

interiors

102

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 102

7/13/17 7:38 PM


Instead of the ubiquitous double sink, the homeowners have their own spaces on opposite sides of the master bathroom: Rachael’s side features the RH Pivot Mirror and Schoolhouse Electric sconces. Above the custom-painted dark charcoal Victoria + Albert bathtub purchased from Chown Hardware, a brass Tom Dixon Etch pendant illuminates Carrera marble tile from Statements Tile. BELOW: A powder room introduces a hint of mystery with a midnight-blue Fornasetti Nuvolette wall covering, anchored by an elegant RH mirror and vanity and Thomas O’Brien Bryant sconces. ❈

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 103

103 7/13/17 7:38 PM


hot new next

architecture

Kristen Becker (left), Saul Becker (middle), and Jim Friesz (right), the dynamic trio behind the new Seattle design and concept firm Mutuus Studio. OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Aship, Aground, Anew, Saul’s forthcoming installation for the new addition to the Snug Harbor Music Hall in Staten Island. The state-ofthe-art Altius Institute of Biomedical Sciences in downtown Seattle. Mutuus’s winning proposal for the Acid Ball project, named Waypoint, in Bellingham, Washington.

Three Spirit

An architect, designer, and artist set out to shape a creative studio that defies labels. Written by STACY KENDALL : Portrait by KEVIN SCOTT

104

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 104

7/13/17 7:43 PM


RENDERINGS: MUTUUS STUDIO

“I

love our ‘tripod of awesomeness,’” says designer Kristen Becker with a laugh that fills the office of Mutuus Studio, the design and architecture studio she first founded nearly a decade ago in Brooklyn. Mutuus now includes artist Saul Becker (her husband) and architect Jim Friesz, whom Kristen met while working at Olson Kundig. Kristen spent nine years at the storied firm and Friesz spent 23, but following a period of reflection last July, she left corporate life for good, and Mutuus 2.0 was born. Choosing a studio name that effectively means “exchange” in Latin, the three see collaboration as vital to their process, and each brings plenty to the table. It’s almost unheard of to find an architecture firm with a professional artist among its principals, but Mutuus sees it as a boon. As Kristen

points out, “Architecture is usually problem-solving with constraints, but Saul’s self-directed experience as an artist allows us to be more playful in our investigations.” For a newly established company, Mutuus has lots on the boards. From a state-of- the-art research facility underway for the Altius Institute of Biomedical Sciences in downtown Seattle to an industrial structure remade into a public artwork, each brief draws on the partners’ unique skills. For the Altius project, Mutuus deconstructed the processes behind scientific discoveries (hint: epiphanies rarely happen at desks). Last year, Saul was one of five artists invited by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs to submit a concept (later accepted, after a rigorous design review process) for the new addition to the historic Snug Harbor Music Hall in Staten Island. The nautically themed » graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 105

105 7/13/17 7:43 PM


hot new next

painting, printed on 162-by- 186-foot aluminum panels, will l ook as if it is in a fogbank when it’s viewed through the building’s exterior fritted-glass panel. On the other coast, Kristen, with design mentor Tom Kundig, is designing the L.A. home of actress Mia Sara (Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, Timecop) and her husband, producer and director Brian Henson (son of Muppets master Jim). Kristen designed the couple’s luxurious Tribeca loft for the first iteration of Mutuus when she lived in Brooklyn. “We’re dreamers with sketchbooks who have never been able to make these ideas before, and now that we’re self-directed, they are ideas that we get to finish,” she says. Although architecture is characterized as a precise trade, Kristen’s exceptionally right-brained. “I’ve always been a bit of a misfit,” the 43-year- old muses as she reflects on the extensive dance and theater experience she interspersed with her study for her master’s in architecture. It included training at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet School and the School of Toronto Dance Theatre as well as set design for Bertolt Brecht plays with the Irondale Ensemble Project in Nova Scotia. As a designer, she’s always found it especially —JIM FRIESZ, ARCHITECT fulfilling to collaborate with artists. For 2009’s Art Basel, public art installation juggernaut Creative Time asked her to do technical drawings and project management for Pae White’s large-scale, interactive cityscape Self Roaming. The next year, she reprised that role with artist Stephen Vitiello for

“We’re kind of jacks-of-all-trades. Why would a firm put an artist in charge of the bookkeeping? Talk about breaking stereotypes. I like that we get to do everything.”

106

his acclaimed High Line sound installation A Bell for Every Minute, later acquired by MoMA. Meanwhile, Saul was enjoying sold-out gallery shows in New York; a 2009 New York Times review invoked Whistler, Monet, and Rothko in describing his ethereal painted landscapes. Saul, who grew up in Tacoma, Washington, rebuilding cars and motorcycles and later worked as a shipwright, is amused by the perceived ambiguity of his Mutuus role. “People ask me, ‘What do you do in an architecture firm?’ I relish that bit of confusion: art at its core conveys the inexplicable.” Friesz draws upon decades spent honing his technical and management acumen, yet it’s being on the front lines of design that draws out his passion these days. With an impressive breadth of architectural experience in his 30-plusyear career, including the design of the Tacoma Art Museum and many educational institutions, he says of his Mutuus work: “I love getting back to the actual craft. Putting something together in a beautiful way is super-addictive.” The studio’s next project as a trio—set to be completed in the early fall of 2018—embodies the unconventional essence at the heart of Mutuus. Their winning concept in a Bellingham, Washington, design competition for a public park will transform a large defunct acid accumulator at the former Georgia Pacific paper mill on the site into an art installation they’ve named Waypoint. Their concept keeps the steel sphere intact but clads its exterior in the reflective coating typically used for airport runways and freeway fog lines. Covered with millions of tiny translucent beads, the new surface will seem to glow from within. Kristen ticks off what each partner brings to the table: “Jim’s been working on major projects in Bellingham for over 10 years, so he has knowledge of the area. I’m interested in creating a public artwork. And Saul? He just wants to clad that crazy steel sphere.” It’s this freedom to explore that fuels the firm’s every project. “The day we get labeled is the day we shut the door,” Kristen says. “Mutuus is an umbrella that lets us work on whatever project feels true to us.” Labels be damned. ❈

MUTUUS STUDIO; OPPOSITE: KEVIN SCOTT; GABE BORDER

architecture

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 106

7/13/17 7:43 PM


ABOVE: The Tribeca loft of puppeteer and producer Brian Henson and his wife, actress Mia Sara, which Kristen designed for Mutuus 1.0. LEFT: Prototype pendant lights made of Micarta, brass, and knurled anodized aluminum and copper, which Mutuus has crafted to use in projects and as an experiment. OPPOSITE: Basecamp, a residential project with a main cabin and art studio, in Ronald, Washington, designed by Mutuus for an artist and entrepreneur.

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 107

107 7/13/17 7:43 PM


hot new next

people

Swedish designer, artist, and survivalist Hannes Wingate holding a handmade bow and arrows in his Portland home. “The power of stories is much greater than the power of objects,” he says when talking about his work. “We have proof of stories that have survived more than 7,000 years. They are still alive, still here to be heard. Buildings and objects do not do that.”

the graffiti architect Drawing from thousands of years of human instinct, Hannes Wingate is crafting a neoteric approach to the field of design. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER Portraits by ANDREW VANASSE

108

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 108

7/13/17 7:49 PM


B

y the late 1990s, London’s financial district was booming, and, after a decades-long string of bombings by the Irish Republican Army, it was also becoming one of the most heavily surveilled areas on the globe. Two years into the new millennium, in the midst of this tumultuous time, a mild-mannered 27-year-old Swedish design student was quietly crafting his magnum opus: a 15-by10-foot nest-like sculpture sandwiched between two large towers on an elevated set of abandoned railroad tracks. Composed of sticks and branches woven into a sphere, the nest was large enough to hold several people—a brash insertion of nature and whimsy into the exacting heart of capitalism, with the underscoring of socially conscious art twisted into its form. For three weeks in the spring of 2002, Hannes Wingate would leave the abandoned 19th-century dress factory where he lived with several friends and ride his bike south to his project site between Shoreditch and Liverpool Street Station. Keeping a sporadic schedule to avoid arrest, Wingate hoisted himself over a cement wall, with little more than a knife, an axe, some food, a camera, and a bundle of recently collected branches to add to the orb. More than just a zeitgeisty guerrilla art installation, the nest was Wingate’s thesis project, the capstone to his four years at London’s prestigious Central Saint Martins art school. Within weeks of its completion, word started to spread about the financial district’s mysterious sphere. Friends told Wingate about acquaintances and family members who had glimpsed the nest from office windows, and rumors emerged about the alleged artist: Was it Banksy? Or upstart punks raising a metaphorical middle finger to the rich? Nearly three years later, when Wingate attended a gallery party in Stockholm, a random woman brought up the nest in conversation, imbuing her description with hints of mystery. Rather than reveal his involvement, Wingate chatted for a few minutes, smiled at her excitement, and moved on with his night. An expatriate resident of the Pacific Northwest for the past nine years, Wingate is mercurially unclassifiable, an artist, designer, and vagabond creator all at once. He’s not a trained architect, but people call him the “land whisperer”; development companies, architecture firms, and private clients often have him consult on projects to coax out the underlying story of a site and how it could influence materials, structure, design, and placement. He’s furnished dozens of residences around the globe (including architect Todd Saunders’s home in Bergen, Norway), yet he claims to “not give a shit about interior design.” His sculptures have popped up in places as scattered as Eglwys

Fach, Wales, and Eden, Utah. A survivalist, Wingate has trained himself and others how to subsist in the wilderness with little more than a knife and a wool blanket. He founded his one-man Portland design firm, Foreign Service, in 2007, drawing on his seemingly disparate paths and practices, which have provided him with a multilensed viewpoint on storytelling and the critical interface between people and nature. Growing up in western Sweden, the second of three children, Wingate and his siblings had near-total freedom to roam 100 square miles of land full of lakes, streams, and forests. Their TV picked up only two channels, and the kids spent most of their time outdoors. “My parents came from intellectually rigorous and culturally rich backgrounds,” he says of his photographer mother and chemical-engineer-turned-writer father. “They were essentially part of the ‘back-to-the-land’ movement. It was a bit like a sheltered commune. For all of the things you could say we lacked, that period had a huge creative impact on my life.” Riding bikes and exploring the surrounding woods, Wingate would spend hours building shelters and whittling wooden sculptures. “I often felt like whatever people presented as a reality wasn’t true,” he muses. “Even as a child, I could sense that there was something deeper and more exciting, more mystical in building landscapes and shelters than just creating physical objects. I was interested in exploring that. I still am.” After high school, Wingate eschewed the usual jump into higher education, moving to Gothenburg and organizing underground clubs and parties with a group of creative friends. “It was pretty outlandish,” he recalls. “We built these crazy art installations that took up multiple rooms. We wanted to fuck with people’s expectations and make it an adventure.” At one party, he met the owner and founder of budding creative firm Stylt Trampoli AB, whose pioneering embrace of storytelling as a driving design force fully aligned with Wingate’s personal ethos. He was hired as an independent contractor for the firm in 1994 and spent three years working on various projects, including the interiors of the Stora Hotellet in Umeå, Sweden. (After staying at the hotel, the travel editor of the London Evening Standard contacted Wingate, and in 2001, he designed the interiors of her home.) By the end of this period, he says, “I was looking for something else. I had answered a lot of my own questions: ‘Do I have talent?’ ‘How does this business work?’ ‘How do I operate in these roles?’ And I decided that I wanted to go to school to give myself time to see what lay beyond [those answers].” After a vagabond year in Spain, where Wingate met his wife, Jessica, he enrolled at Central Saint Martins in the fall of 1998. Here he encountered “a very Darwinian environment,” with overworked, underequipped staff and competitive peers. During his last two years at the university, Wingate dug in his heels. » graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 109

109 7/13/17 7:50 PM


hot new next

people

HANNES WINGATE; LOWER LEFT: BENT RENÉ SYNNEVÅG

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE LEFT: Wingate built a vacation home out of a geodesic dome, shipped to Sweden from the United States, on a stretch of secluded property on the country’s western coast, where he, his wife, and their daughter have spent long stretches of summer. Using just $200 in building materials, Wingate transformed an agricultural utility building into a 1,500-square-foot live/work space. Using traditional basket studies, Wingate weaves with materials he finds on trips and hikes. Wingate designed the interiors of architect Todd Saunders’s house in Bergen, Norway. »

110

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 110

7/14/17 6:59 AM


You’ve

Earned

this.

Visit our website to learn more about our Master Builder Program

Architectural Design/Build | Log & Timber Frame | Glass Forest®

edgewoodlog .com

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 111

111 7/14/17 12:07 AM


hot new next

people

“Artists act as commentators and storytellers who shine light on important issues. They help us understand who and where we are in this space and time.”

Wingate atop the Burnside Nest, constructed from branches found onsite and around Portland. »

JEREMY BITTERMANN

—HANNES WINGATE, ARTIST AND DESIGNER

112

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 112

7/14/17 6:51 AM


INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES + ORGANIC MODERN HOME FURNISHINGS - T.503.295.7336 - EWFMODERN.COM - 1122 NW GLISAN ST. PORTLAND, OR 97209

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 113

7/14/17 12:08 AM


hot new next

people

“Rather than waiting or wishing for the structure and support that weren’t there, I took matters into my own hands.” He began using objects that interested him—including tree branches, animal nests, and traditional dwelling forms—as a platform to explore social issues and his own engagement with nature, the rise of human apathy, and the power of consumerism. At the end of his final year, while his classmates were busy with paintings and studio sculptures, Wingate was stealthily constructing the nest in London. It was graffiti in the form of architecture—a subversive message hidden in the most unexpected of places.

Post-graduation, Wingate moved to Portland, Jessica’s hometown, while he was squaring away his work permits. But in 2004, Jessica was tasked with opening the first Design Within Reach studio in the Midwest, so the couple relocated once again, this time to Chicago. A few weeks after the move, Wingate attended a lecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology by architect Jeanne Gang, founder of Studio Gang, who presented her plans for the Ford Calumet Environmental Center. She cited the nest-making process as the inspiration for her model; her plans integrated discarded materials sourced near the site into the building’s design. “After my lecture, this man comes up to me looking very serious,” Gang recently recalled, “and he just says, ‘I think we really need to talk.’” Gang invited Wingate to her office, where he showed her his portfolio, which included pictures of the London nest, and they bonded over their mutual outside-the-box thinking and devotion to work. “There is something very strong inside Hannes,” she says, “something rather uncompromising about him. He will stand up for the integrity of design until the end.” Gang hired Wingate at Studio Gang, where he set up and ran the interior design department of the firm and worked on projects including Studio Gang’s contribution to the 2004

114

Venice Biennale and a 15,000-square-foot residential project in Aspen with a $28 million construction budget. “After that, I felt I had maxed out my creative potential with the firm,” Wingate admits. “I had done all of these things in my life— moved to the States, gotten a proper job—but I was experiencing this yearning to be back in nature. My curiosity was once again pulling me in a new direction.” Using part of his generous severance from Studio Gang, Wingate enrolled in the Boulder Outdoor Survival School in Utah. In operation since 1968, BOSS is the oldest school of its kind in the world. The flagship course put Wingate out in the desert and mountains for 28 days with limited gear (a wool blanket, a rain poncho, a couple of pieces of string, and a knife) and rations that yielded only about 1,000 calories a day. “The course is meant to push you to your absolute limit, both mentally and physically,” he says. “You’re stripped of almost everything and taken down to the baseline experience of what it means to be human. It recalibrated my set of values.” After that first trip, Wingate was recruited to the BOSS instructor staff, and he returns to Utah at least once a year to take new seekers into the desert. But the trainees aren’t the only ones honing their skills. “I’ve come to realize that what I do as an artist building sculptures and what I do as a survival guide are the same thing,” Wingate reflects. “They use the same set of creative critical thinking skills. Looking for food, water, and shelter—the things we need to live—forces us to really see and understand the land and integrate ourselves into it.” Danish designer Søren Rose agrees, and he sees the value in Wingate’s integrated approach. “Hannes is a few steps in front of all of us, since his fascination for design goes all the way back to the evolution of mankind,” he says. “A lot of creatives in this industry produce a lot of results, but very few architects and designers really think about why and how like Hannes does.” In 2016, Rose recruited Wingate to teach a workshop in the Catskill Mountains that looked at the cross-disciplinary use of survival and design skills. In the current cultural zeitgeist, people are again “returning” to the land, going off the grid, and even embracing the way our ancestors ate millions of years ago. But for Wingate, environmental considerations aren’t a fad. “I wanted this crowd to really understand that it was their huntergatherer ancestors who developed these creative powers, and that they did so in deep collaboration with nature.” Although he is no longer in a traditional firm, Wingate’s artistic docket is full. He constructed the much-photographed Burnside Nest three years ago, and he recently received a commission from the city of Portland for a public sculpture in the Multnomah Village neighborhood. He’s also working with architect Todd Saunders on a high-end hospitality project on the Norwegian coast 250 miles north of the Arctic Circle. “In all the things I do, I’m trying to create an authentic, meaningful narrative,” Wingate says. “I used to think that the object was the most important thing, but I’ve come to understand that the act of creation is the critical factor. The stories people tell have a much greater power than the object itself.” »

A R

F

5 w

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 114

7/14/17 6:37 AM


Architectural Planters for Commercial and Residential Applications Full Design Services Available 517 E Pike Street Seattle WA 98122 206.329.4737 www.ragenassociates.com

PrestigeCrafted.com

Architecture:

DeForest Architects Interior Design:

NB Design Group Photography:

Benjamin Benschneider

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 115

graymag . com

115 7/14/17 12:08 AM


hot new next

people

A rendering of a Norwegian hospitality project designed by architect Todd Saunders. Wingate has been tapped to help design the interiors. Located 250 miles north of the Arctic Circle and comprising a number of buildings, the compound includes the Northern Light Pavilion, which allows guests to comfortably view its namesake. ❈

“Artists and designers are merchants of desire who create things that people buy. That drives the market. They have a huge responsibility that most aren’t taking seriously enough.”

116

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 116

COURTESY SAUNDERS ARCHITECTURE

—HANNES WINGATE, ARTIST AND DESIGNER

7/13/17 7:58 PM


PORTLAND'S BEST KEPT SECRET

ASIA

IS Sofa Inoda + Sveje

AMERICA

www.asiaamericafurniture.com

Asia_America_PDFX1_11JULY2017

Award Winning Design

Featuring Wood Mode Fine Custom Cabinetry 5701 6th Avenue South, Suite 203 Seattle, WA 98108

(206) 762-2635

www.WilliamandWayne.com

1908 E. Mercer Street Seattle, WA 98112 www.tirtofurniture.com

GRAYMAG . COM

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 117

117 7/14/17 12:09 AM


hot new next

architecture

public access

Written by ANDY WRIGHT

118

MARTIN TESSLER

Canada’s most innovative design firm is changing the way we interact with communal space.

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 118

7/14/17 12:09 AM


Public Design took Adler University’s commitment to social justice and community to heart when designing its Vancouver campus, using the building itself is a communication tool. From the street, the university’s brand colors and common spaces are displayed to the world at large. » graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 119

119 7/14/17 12:09 AM


hot new next

architecture

architect at Vancouver-based Public, it was a “terrifying time.” Yet he and his co-founders—communications designer Susan Mavor and architect John Wall—didn’t quail from the challenge. They’d spotted a niche for a unique kind of firm, one that embraces the potential of small-scale public projects and fuses the disciplines of architecture, branding, communication, interior design, and more. Their gamble has paid off: Public has won numerous laurels, including Canada’s Professional Prix de Rome in 2015, and it continues to make an indelible mark on Vancouver’s landscape. For the University of British Columbia in 2016, Public crafted a forest-like assemblage of glowing, motion-activated blue pillars that display the names of school benefactors, reinventing the notion of the staid donor wall, reinforcing the school’s azure theme color, and embodying the “Start an Evolution” theme of UBC fundraising. For the new Adler University campus in Vancouver, which opened in February 2017, they threaded together the floors of a staid office building with a noodle of stairways, splashed murals throughout the interiors, and crafted community spaces before windows to offer views outside and within, a move Mavor calls a “grand gesture to the street.” “We look for opportunities in a project that other designers don’t,” says Mavor, who previously worked in theater design, a discipline that taught her how “stories become evident through

120

space.” Public infuses narrative—as well as a keen awareness of how branding can lend a place a “strong identity and a sense of spirit”—into its space-making in a diverse array of work. For instance, when the team designed a reflecting pool for UBC in 2011, they made it a campus gathering spot by asking faculty and students to submit quotes about their disciplines and inscribing their words in concentric rings on the pool bottom, where they extend outward and draw in passersby to stop and contemplate the still water. Public’s ancillary products (Tshirts, stationery, coffee cups, and bookmarks with the pool design) furthered project awareness. Tying together branding, verbal communication, and physical design allows Public to create what Wakelin calls a “breadcrumb trail to a physical space”—those seemingly mundane coffee cups, for example, act as “crumbs” leading students to think of the pool as a central campus spot, and larger design gestures such as the quotes further the effect. “It’s a geographically small project,” he says, “but in another way, it’s very large.” Its impact transcends its scale, as Public has proven in many projects since its first nerve-wracking year. As Mavor puts it now, “Tiny interventions in big spaces can make real change.” ❈

TOP LEFT AND LOWER RIGHT: MARTIN TESSLER; TOP RIGHT: KRISTA JAHNKE; OPPOSITEOPPOSITE: NIC LEHOUX

THE MIDST OF THE HISTORIC ECONOMIC CRASH OF 2008 WAS NOT THE MOST AUSPICIOUS MOMENT TO START A NEW BUSINESS. In fact, says Brian Wakelin, principal

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 120

7/14/17 12:09 AM


OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: At Vancouver’s Adler University

campus, Public blends architecture, interior, and communication design. A wooden honeycomb–topped transit shelter was another UBC undertaking. For an athletic field facility in Surrey, B.C., the designers drew inspiration from an unraveled soccer ball; the result is a single, undulating, redpainted concrete block wall made of interlocking parts. THIS PAGE: For the University of British Columbia, the firm developed a unique motionactivated donor tribute–cum–art installation. graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 121

121 7/14/17 12:09 AM


| resources |

33. URBAN DESIGN DVBIA Vancouver downtownvancouver.net HCMA Architecture + Design Vancouver and Victoria, BC hcma.ca 38. SCENE Arup arup.com Coughlin Porter Lundeen Seattle cpiinc.com Daniels Real Estate Seattle danielsdevelopment company.com EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc. Seattle eaest.com F5 Networks Seattle f5.com JTM Construction Seattle jtm-construction.com Mariotti Carlo & Figli S.p.A. mariotticarlo.it Philippe Starck Paris, France starck.com SLS Seattle Seattle sbe.com ZGF Architects Seattle, Portland, and Vancouver zgf.com 46. SCENE AC Hotel Portland Downtown Portland marriott.com Clementines Seattle clementines.com

122

COS Vancouver cosstores.com Damien Gilley Portland damiengilley.com HKS Architects Multiple offices hksinc.com Jason Prouty Portland garage31.com

Jaime Hayon hayonstudio.com Kate Arends witanddelight.com Lawson-Fenning lawsonfenning.com Livingspace Vancouver livingspace.com Massproductions massproductions.se

John Yeon Center for Architecture and the Landscape, University of Oregon Portland yeoncenter.uoregon.edu

Matteo Cibic Studio matteocibicstudio.com

Portland Art Museum Portland portlandartmuseum.org

Small Office smalloffice.info

Sera Architects Portland seradesign.com W Bellevue Bellevue, WA wbellevue.com 50. SCENE JOIN Design Seattle join-design.com 52. SCENE Camille Walala camillewalala.com Design for Industry designforindustry.jp e15 e15.com FSOARK Architect Inc. Vancouver fsoark.com HAY hay.dk Hinterland Vancouver hinterlanddesign.com Inform Interiors Vancouver informinteriors.com

Moissonnier Vancouver moissonnier.com

68. BIG IDEA Print the Future Vancouver printthefuture.today 70. BIG IDEA Backcountry Hut Company Vancouver thebackcountryhut company.com cascadianwoodtech Comox, BC cascadianwoodtech.com Leckie Studio Architecture + Design Vancouver leckiestudio.com

we+ weplus.jp

74. ART Kyler Martz Seattle kylermartz.com

58. MADE HERE Folk Portland folkbuilt.com

76. ART ADX Portland Portland adxportland.com

Mudshark Studios Portland mudsharkstudios.com Rejuvenation Portland rejuvenation.com 60. EMERGING New Format Vancouver newformatstudio.com Simcic Uhrich Architects Vancouver simcicuhrich.com 62. PROFILE Kalu Interiors Vancouver kaluinteriors.com 64. BIG IDEA Blokable Vancouver, WA blokable.com

78. ART Plank & Grain Seattle plankandgrain.com Seattle Art Source Seattle seattleartsource.com 80. ASK Cornish College of the Arts Seattle cornish.edu 82. ARCHITECTURE Cornelia Oberlander Architects Vancouver PortLiving Vancouver portliving.com Shigeru Ban Architects Multiple offices shigerubanarchitects.com

84. PROFILE Stephenson Design Collective Seattle stephensoncollective.com 90. FASHION Alexa Stark Portland alexastark.com Alice Noon Seattle alicenoon.com Anita Sikma Vancouver anitasikma.com Cuniform Seattle wearecuniform.com Erin Templeton Vancouver erintempleton.com Faris Seattle farisfaris.com Lane Walkup Portland lanewalkup.com Maiden Noir Seattle maidennoir.com Maison Margiela maisonmargiela.com/us Megumi Arai Seattle megumiarai.com Melissa Korn Seattle melissakornmakeup.com Minoux Jewelry Portland minouxjewelry.com Molly Debiak Seattle mollydebiak.com Olderbrother Portland olderbrother.us Oru Portland loveoru.com

GRAYMAG . COM

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 122

7/14/17 12:01 AM


Live, Work, Play on the Oregon Coast $289,900 2 beds, 2 baths, 1,102 sqft This sweet beach cottage in Seaside, Oregon is just a couple of blocks off the prom—an easy walk to dining, golfing, surfing, beachcombing, and bonfires. Updated kitchen, master bedroom, bunk room, garden shed. Make it your own. MLS 17396805 Melissa Eddy, (503) 440-3258 MelissaEddy@Windermere.com

GRAYMAG . COM

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 123

123 7/14/17 12:01 AM


| resources | Priory Vancouver priorypriory.com Rizom Seattle rizom.us Silvae Seattle silvae.co Tiro Tiro Portland tirotiro.com

Roll & Hill rollandhill.com Schoolhouse Electric schoolhouse.com Statements Tile Seattle statementstile.com Thomas O’Brien aerostudios.com Tom Dixon tomdixon.net

Totokaelo Seattle totokaelo.com

Victoria Hagen vhcollections.com

Wasted Effort Vancouver wastedeffort.ca

104. PROFILE Mutuus Studio Burien, WA mutuus-studio.com

White/Space Jewelry Seattle whitespacejewelry.com 96. INTERIORS A. Rudin arudin.com Barnett Lewis Seattle 206.498.7404 Cole & Son cole-and-son.com Dedar dedar.com Drucker drucker.fr Fornasetti fornasetti.com King Construction Mercer Island, WA kingcon.co Kyle Bunting kylebunting.com Meta Marble & Granite Seattle metamarbleand granite.com Pavoni pavoni.com RH restorationhardware.com

124

108. PEOPLE Boulder Outdoor Survival School Boulder, UT boss-inc.com

AD INDEX 83. Alchemy Collections Seattle alchemycollections.com 88. American Indian College Fund americanindian collegefund.org 117. Asia America Portland asaiamericafurniture.com 18. BoConcept Bellevue, WA, and Vancouver boconcept.com 53. BLANCO blancocanada.com 71. Chown Hardware Portland and Bellevue, WA chown.com 37. Design Within Reach Seattle and Portland dwr.com

Foreign Service LLC Portland foreignservice.se

89. Dossier Portland dossierhotel.com

Saunders Architecture Bergen, Norway saunders.no

14. Dovetail General Contractors Seattle dovetailgc.com

Søren Rose Studio New York, NY sorenrose.com

111. Edgewood Log Homes edgewoodlog.com

132. Ligne Roset Seattle ligne-roset-usa.com Available through: Livingspace Vancouver livingspace.com

65. Seattle Design Festival designinpublic.org

59. Maison Inc. Portland maisoninc.com

47. Spark Modern Fires sparkfires.com

23. Marvin Windows and Doors marvin.com Available through: Lundgren Enterprises Seattle lundgrenenterprises.com 77. Milgard Windows & Doors milgard.com 6. The Mine themine.com 22. The Modern Fan Co. modernfan.com 75. OPUS Hotel Vancouver opushotel.com 12. Parachute Portland parachutehome.com 61. Porcelanosa Seattle porcelanosa-usa.com

113. EWF Modern Portland ewfmodern.com

115. Prestige Residential Construction Seattle prestigecrafted.com

19. Fleetwood Windows & Doors fleetwoodusa.com

115. Ragen & Associates Seattle ragenassociates.com

118. ARCHITECTURE Public: Architecture + Communication Vancouver publicdesign.ca

4. Hive Portland hivemodern.com

13. Roche Bobois Seattle and Portland roche-bobois.com

8. IDS Vancouver idsvancouver.com

21. Room & Board Seattle and Portland roomandboard.com

128. OBSESSION Autonomous Furniture Victoria, BC autonomousfurniture.com

117. Kozai Modern Vancouver kozaimoderntrade.com

Studio Gang Chicago, IL studiogang.com Stylt Trampoli AB Gothenburg, Sweden stylt.se

67. Kush Handmade Rugs Portland kushrugs.com

27. Schuchart/Dow Seattle schuchartdow.com 24. Seattle Design Center Seattle seattledesigncenter.com

51. The Shade Store Seattle and Portland theshadestore.com

113. Strathcona Beer Company Vancouver strathconabeer.com 55. Sub-Zero and Wolf Seattle subzero-wolf.com/seattle 25. Sunbrella sunbrella.com 117. Tirto Furniture Seattle tirtofurniture.com 49. Tufenkian Portland tufenkianportland.com 73. Turgeon Raine Jewelers Seattle turgeonraine.com 15. Urban Hardwoods Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles urbanhardwoods.com 2. Urban Interiors & Thomasville Bellevue, WA, and Tukwila, WA urbaninteriors.com 57. Victoria + Albert vandabaths.com 129. W Bellevue Bellevue, WA wbellevue.com 117. William & Wayne Seattle williamandwayne.com 122. Windemere Stellar Melissa Eddy Gearhart, OR windermere.com/agents/ melissa-eddy-1 63. Wood-Mode Multiple locations wood-mode.com

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 124

7/14/17 12:01 AM


| market | THE ULTIMATE BUYER’S GUIDE Urban Interiors & Thomasville At Urban Interiors & Thomasville, Tommy Bahama offers designs across a diverse range of styles— choose from 175 all-weather performance fabrics with the same soft hand, rich colors and vibrant patterns as our indoor upholstery, complete with trims, fringes and designer options. Every item is hand crafted and features artisan finishes. urbaninteriors.com

Dinihanian Furniture Dinihanian Furniture isn’t messing around. A custom furniture studio in Portland, Oregon, Dinihanian Furniture uses traditional methods alongside modern techniques to craft heirloom quality furniture. One piece at a time. dinihanianfurniture.com

Sunbrella Textiles are the most important ingredient for extraordinary design. Bring soft, luxurious décor to your home with high-end Sunbrella® fabrics for your indoor and outdoor upholstery. Available in a variety of globally-inspired designs, colors and textures, Sunbrella is easy to care for, fade proof, and bleach cleanable, so you don’t have to sacrifice beauty for performance. sunbrella.com

Kat & Maouche Traditional Techniques + Modern Design Specializing in authentic vintage Moroccan rugs. Each is carefully sourced and chosen for its expressive modern style and cultural significance. 33 N.W. 4th Ave., Portland katandmaouche.com Instagram @katandmaouche

Porcelanosa Porcelanosa is a leader in the innovation, design, manufacture, and distribution of tile, kitchen, bath, and hardwood products. Visit the Porcelanosa showroom in downtown Seattle to see design inspiration and solutions through vignette installations and feature detailed product libraries. (206) 673-8395 porcelanosa-usa.com

The Shade Store For more than 70 years The Shade Store has handcrafted the finest custom shades, blinds, and draperies available. With a wide selection of products, and over 1,300 exclusive materials, finding the perfect window treatments has never been easier. (800) 820-7817 theshadestore.com

LIOE Design We create simple, elegant goods for everyday living. From straight minimalist lines to elegant curves, every item was designed with the desire to make life more interesting through the everyday products we use. Proudly designed in the Pacific Northwest. Featured product: Stealth pen in black

lioedesign.com

Lapchi Rug Design Studio Look into the heart of Lapchi and you’ll find a rug maker with a wealth of experience in custom rugs. Lapchi produces handmade rugs in custom colors and sizes at no additional cost. Make your next rug a custom rug by Lapchi. (503) 719-6589 Pearl District, Portland lapchi.com

GRAYMAG . COM

MARKET 0817.indd 125

125 7/14/17 1:22 PM


RENOVATIONS REASON TO SUBSCRIBE NO. 36:

Issue releases October 2017. We’ll deliver it to your mailbox. Subscribe online by September 1. graymag.com

#GRAYMAGAZINE

126

graymag . com

GRAY 3 HNN ADS.indd PART 2 0817.indd 3 126

7/13/17 7/6/17 6:47 7:59 PM

GRAY


JOIN US FOR DYNAMIC DISCOURSE WITH THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST’S TOP DESIGN TALENT. A MONTHLY SERIES OF PANEL DISCUSSIONS, DEBATES, AND INTERVIEWS, EACH KICKING OFF WITH A COCKTAIL HOUR FOLLOWED BY FRANK AND INSPIRING CONVERSATIONS ON A VARIETY OF ESSENTIAL DESIGN TOPICS.

HOTEL LUCIA Portland

HOTEL DELUXE Portland

SENTINEL Portland

AUGUST: SEATTLE

BRAVE NEW BUILDINGS SEPTEMBER: SEATTLE

DESIGN ACTIVISM HOTEL MURANO Tacoma

HOTEL MAX Seattle

HOTEL THEODORE Seattle - Summer 2017

WALL TILES LUSH WHITE NATURE AND LISTON OXFORD NATURAL FLOOR TILES LUSH WHITE NATURE SINKS PURE LINE

provenancehotels.com

FAUCETS NK LOGIC MIRRORS FORMA

PORCELANOSA SEATTLE 88 Spring Street, Suite 120 Seattle, WA 98104 info@porcelanosa-usa.com | www.porcelanosa-usa.com

206.673.8395

DETAILS + TICKET INFO: graymag.com/ design-minds

graymag . com

6:47 PM

GRAY 3 HNN ADS.indd PART 2 0817.indd 2 127

127 7/12/17 8:00 7/13/17 5:15 PM


| obsession |

WHY I COLLECT MOBILE PHONES KIRK VAN LUDWIG, DESIGNER, AUTONOMOUS FURNITURE As told to STACY KENDALL Photographed by HANK DREW

“SINCE PURCHASING MY FIRST CELL PHONE IN 1993, when I was 23 years old,

“I LIKED NOTHING BETTER THAN THE WAY THE ILLUMINATED KEYPAD ON MY CAR PHONE CAST A WARM GLOW DURING AN EVENING DRIVE.” 128

I’ve always been fascinated with mobile phones. I geeked out on their infrastructure, followed the brand wars, and liked nothing better than the way the illuminated keypad on my car phone cast a warm glow during an evening drive. Early on, the designs were purely utilitarian, with very little form. But, unlike furniture, the designs evolved at almost the same rate as the technology into what we have today. Phones now are borderline pieces of art in their use of metal, glass, and plastic; how they feel and function; and the statement they can make. I try to look at furniture design in the same way. How can we take a common piece, expand its use, and create an object with both beauty and endless function?” ❈

—KIRK VAN LUDWIG, DESIGNER, AUTONOMOUS FURNITURE

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 128

7/13/17 8:04 PM


W Bellevue. Where green meets global glamour. Where rugged and relaxed are reimagined and redefined. Open the door to one of our 220 guest rooms or 25 suites and be transported to yesterday’s weekender lake house where nature and new urban design beautifully collide. Relax on The Porch by cozying up next to our lodge-style fireplace or in The Library, a pulp pleasure paradise of old-style gaming and cheeky fun. W Bellevue, for the seekers of the bold and beautiful looking to redefine their edge. Situated between Lake Washington and the Cascade Mountains, Bellevue - the “beautiful view” - is on the edge of wilderness while remaining only 10 short miles from downtown Seattle. At W Bellevue the possibilities are endless. Come explore at wbellevue.com.

10455 NE 5th Pl

.

Bellevue, WA 98004

.

425 709 9000 graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 129

129 7/13/17 8:05 PM


2017 DESIGN COMPETITION

PARTY LIKE A CHAMPION AT THE PNW’S MOST ANTICIPATED DESIGN CELEBRATION ON NOVEMBER 29, 2017, THE DESIGN COMMUNITY WILL COME TOGETHER F O R T H E E P I C U N V E I L I N G O F T H I S Y E A R ’ S AWA R D W I N N E R S . C O A L E S C I N G W I T H T H E R E L E A S E O F G R AY ’ S D E C E M B E R I S S U E , F E AT U R I N G A L L T H E W I N N I N G P R O J E C T S A L O N G W I T H G R AY ’ S “ B E S T O F ” S E L E C T I O N . YES, THE PUNCH WILL BE SPIKED.

DETAILS + TICKET INFO

G R AYAWA R D S . C O M TICKET PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE BLOCK PROJECT

FOR ADVERTISING & SPONSOR INFO

6

A D V E R T I S I N G @ G R AY M A G . C O M GRAYMAG . COM

GRAY AWARDS.indd 6

7/14/17 10:20 AM


7

PORTRAIT: JAMES GRAYMAG . COM BORT

GRAY AWARDS.indd 7

7/13/17 5:34 PM


PLOUM sofa by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec www.ligne-roset.com

VANCOUVER 1706 West 1st Ave Vancouver, BC V6J 0E4 Tel. (604) 683-1116 www.livingspace.com

132

SEATTLE 112 Westlake Avenue North Seattle, WA 98109 Tel. (206) 341-9990 www.facebook/lignerosetseattle.com

graymag . com

3 HNN PART 2 0817.indd 132

7/13/17 2:13 PM

GRAY No. 35  

The DESIGN Magazine of the Pacific Northwest