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DESIGN HUNT

INTERIORS // ARCHITECTURE // FASHION // ART // DESIGN

PACIFIC NORTHWEST DESIGN

N O 33 : APRIL / MAY. 2017


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36

86

april–may.17

8. hello

Quest for the best.

SCENE 19. retail

Design Within Reach unveils its biggest showroom to date—a 26,000-square-foot converted Portland warehouse that’s a handsome high temple to fine design.

20. happenings

This spring, we’re painting the town GRAY. From design festivals in Portland and Vancouver to a pair of high-impact furniture fairs in New York City, GRAY previews the season’s most dynamic design events.

STYLE 29. design hunt

GRAY charts a treasure map of design discoveries. Follow our A-to-Z index to dig up the newest and best Pacific Northwest gems, from sculptural lamps crafted from paper-thin aspen to geometric black diamond–studded jewelry.

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IN-DEPTH 78. he saw the signs

Olson Kundig principal Alan Maskin takes his cues from the (super)natural in designing his own Olympic Peninsula home.

86. out with the old

A complete renovation and expansion of a 1920s Portland home does away with the old (buh-bye, servants’ bells) to make room for a modern family of five (hello, custom bunkbeds!).

& MORE 94. resources

Design professionals, furnishings, and suppliers in this issue.

98. obsession

A design curator sees the world through rose-colored, wire-framed, and ombré shades, among other finds in her globally procured glasses collection.

✤ On the Cover

Highlights from “The Hunt”— GRAY editors’ compilation of the latest and greatest PNW design finds. SEE PAGE

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Š 2017 Design Within Reach, Inc.

Egg Collective Designers of the Morrison Credenza graymag . com

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| hello |

ANDREW VANASSE

I FONDLY REMEMBER MY FIRST FREAK-OUT AS A WORKING JOURNALIST. I was a new college graduate

QUEST FOR THE BEST

on the staff of a prestigious travel magazine in New York City, and I’d just been assigned to write a roundup of “the best ice cream shops in America.” I was psyched. And overwhelmed. The best? In the whole country? I liked ice cream as much as the next person, but I felt totally unqualified to make this call. Weren’t there any polls I could consult, or perhaps an esteemed ice cream expert who could weigh in? My savvier, more experienced colleagues soon clued me in. “The best,” in magazine-speak, isn’t an absolute. Instead it’s often shorthand for “the coolest stuff we could find before deadline.” Or sometimes (as in the case of the ice cream roundup) it means “cute places with photogenic owners scattered across the right geographic range.” Behind the scenes, you frantically Google, image search, and call up trusted contributors to glean their opinions. And in the end, if you’re a good reporter and editor, you’ve compiled a respectable list of interesting places that you feel confident recommending to readers. But are they the best? Well, after 15 years in the publishing world, I greet any such superlatives with raised eyebrows. It’s a different story at GRAY. Our research process derives from authenticity—never random Google keyword searches. We focus exclusively on the Pacific Northwest, and our editors know this region’s evolving design landscape like it’s our own backyard. Because it is. When we sound breathless about a story, person, or project, it’s because we actually saw it, experienced it, and think it’s exceedingly cool. So here I am, along with the other editors at GRAY, proffering another cleverly packaged roundup of the most awesome stuff you absolutely need to see right now. But really, you do! We arranged it all in an A-to-Z index we’ve called “The Hunt” (pg 29). That alphabetical concept was a useful organizing principle and made for fun headline writing (“B Is for Bling!”)—as well as some late-night, semidelirious copy gymnastics (for a while, our working headline for Y and Z was “You Bet Your Aspen It’s a Ziggurat!”). We can’t wait to share our best discoveries with you.

Jaime Gillin, Director of Editorial + Content Strategy jaime@graymag.com

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Pratt table, $949; Pratt benches, $799 each; Riviera chaise, $599. University Village 2675 NE University Village Street, Seattle roomandboard.com

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IC/Air2

| 2 or 3 Blades

: designed by Guto Indio da Costa

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Ultra-efficient DC Motor

CEO/FOUNDER + PUBLISHER Shawn Williams DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL + CONTENT STRATEGY Jaime Gillin jaime@graymag.com

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SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR Stacy Kendall

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Dixie Duncan dixie@graymag.com

Nickel, White or Dark Bronze Finish

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Craig Allard Miller Mary Ellen Kennedy

SENIOR EDITOR Rachel Gallaher

ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER Tracey Bjerke

EDITOR Jennifer McCullum

NEWSSTAND MANAGER Bob Moenster

COPY EDITOR Laura Harger

PUBLIC RELATIONS U.S. & Canada: Paxson Fay

| Solid Color, Surface-printed Wood Grain or Clear Blades

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Courtney Ferris Brian Libby Nessa Pullman

P.A. TO THE PUBLISHER Tally Williams

CONTRIBUTORS George Barberis Jeremy Bittermann Carly Diaz Aaron Leitz Brian Libby Lauren Mang Josh Partee Ema Peter Jason Tam Kaity Teer Andrew Vanasse Amanda Zurita

ADVERTISING dixie@graymag.com EVENTS + NEWS events@graymag.com SUBMISSIONS submissions@graymag.com SUBSCRIPTIONS subscriptions@graymag.com GENERAL INQUIRIES info@graymag.com

INTERN Lani Noya

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No. 33 Copyright ©2017. Published bimonthly (DEC, FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT) by GRAY Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. While every attempt has been made, GRAY cannot guarantee the legality, completeness, or accuracy of the information presented and accepts no warranty or responsibility for such. GRAY is not responsible for loss, damage, or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, photography, art, or any other unsolicited material. Unsolicited material will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. If submitting material, do not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by GRAY in writing.

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POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GRAY, 5628 Airport Way S., Ste. 330 Seattle, WA 98108 Subscriptions $30 us for one year; $50 us for two years.

Subscribe online at graymag.com

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custom

SHADES, BLINDS & DRAPERY Handcrafted in the USA since 1946. Ships free in 10 days or less. Shop Online, By Phone, or in one of our 50+ showrooms nationwide. Visit us at Portland: 1117 NW Everett Street | Seattle: 2004 1st Avenue | theshadestore.com | 800.820.7817 graymag . com

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| contributors | Sail Chair Kazutera Murasawa

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GEORGE BARBERIS pg 32, 40 georgebarberis.com

JEREMY BITTERMANN pg 52, 86 bittermannphotography.com

AARON LEITZ pg 60, 68 aaronleitz.com

BRIAN LIBBY pg 60 brianlibby.com

LAUREN MANG pg 86 clippings.me/laurenmang

EMA PETER pg 44, 46 emapeter.com

NESSA PULLMAN pg 44

KAITY TEER pg 56 kaitlynteer.com

ANDREW VANASSE pg 19, 76 andrewvanasse.com

AMANDA ZURITA pg 40 amandazurita.com


ARCHITECTURE / Olson Kundig PHOTOGRAPHY / Benjamin Benschneider graymag . com

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AKJ Architects LLC akjarchitects.com

babienko ARCHITECTS pllc studiobarc.com

pacific northwest architects

BattersbyHowat Architects battersbyhowat.com

Best Practice

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The following architecture and design firms are among the best in the region. They also support GRAY’s effort to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. We’re proud to call them our partners. Look to them first for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more.

David Hopkins Design

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Giulietti | Schouten AIA Architects gsarchitects.net

Graham Baba Architects grahambabaarchitects.com

Guggenheim Architecture + Design Studio guggenheimstudio.com


Baylis Architects

BC&J Architecture

BUILD llc

Chesmore Buck

David Coleman Architecture

David Pool Architecture pllc

Emerick Architects

First Lamp

Hacker

HELLIWELL + SMITH Blue Sky Architecture Inc

Hinge Build Group

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Ben Trogdon | Architects bentrogdonarchitects.com

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firstlamp.net

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HOEDEMAKER PFEIFFER LLC

Hoshide Wanzer Architects

Integrate Architecture & Planning

KASA Architecture

Lane Williams Architects

Lanefab Design / Build

Measured Architecture

One SEED Architecture + Interiors

prentiss + balance + wickline ARCHITECTS

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measured.ca

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lanewilliams.com

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Scott | Edwards Architecture seallp.com

Skylab Architecture

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Stephenson Design Collective stephensoncollective.com


Iredale Architecture

Janof Architecture

Johnston Architects

Lucio Picciano I DLP Architecture

Lyons Hunter Williams : architecture

Malboeuf Bowie Architecture

rho ARCHITECTS

Richard Brown Architect, AIA

RUF Project

Tyler Engle Architects

William Kaven Architecture

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1225 NW Everett Portland, OR

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scene

ANDREW VANASSE

New York–based architect Laith Sayigh of DFA designed Portland’s new 26,000-square-foot Design Within Reach, the company’s biggest showroom to date. The space features 44 room vignettes and (pictured behind Sayigh) a 300-pendant “light cloud.”

INSIDE JOB

In January 2017, Design Within Reach’s largest North American showroom opened in Portland’s Pearl District, set in a sprawling former warehouse a few blocks from its previous location. The space was designed by architect Laith Sayigh, founder of the New York–based firm DFA, who’s shaped every one of DWR’s new shops since 2013: 24 in all. Though the Portland space shares elements common to all DWRs—rainbow-hued swatch walls, carefully detailed room vignettes—it has evolved the retail language with a curving, oval-shaped “dining test

lab” where shoppers can get handsy with chair options and a slatted wooden “elevated house” installation, co-designed and fabricated by Portland’s Fieldwork Design and Architecture. In conceiving the showroom’s fine detailing, “I wanted to do something that would meet the level of work being done in Portland today,” says Sayigh. “There’s something so lovely about the Pacific Northwest: the pace of life is such that designers can really take the time to get it right. That comes across in the work: it’s well metered and beautifully executed.” h graymag . com

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scene

happenings |

SPRING FORWARD

A TIDAL WAVE OF GRAY-SPONSORED EVENTS IS ABOUT TO HIT VANCOUVER, PORTLAND, & NEW YORK. KEEP YOUR EYE ON OUR SOCIAL CHANNELS FOR NEWS AND DISPATCHES FROM THESE MAJOR DESIGN AFFAIRS!

For nine days in April, design will overtake the Rose City. Celebrating its fifth year, Design Week Portland (April 21–29) kicks off with a two-day Main Stage event featuring 24 electrifying visionaries from diverse industry disciplines. DWP Headquarters (located in the Redd Building) will host an interactive exhibition from Untitled Studio, the winner of last year’s LoopPDX competition, which helps visitors envision its design for Portland’s proposed 6-mile Green Loop pedestrian/bike greenway. Highlights also include GRAY’s activism-focused “Design Minds” panel at Hotel Lucia on April 24, Coroflot’s “Office on Wheels” talk and tour at Hand-Eye Supply on April 25, and the League of Women Designers’ Periphery exhibition and discussion in the Olympic Mills Building lobby on April 28. designweekportland.com

VANCOUVER DESIGN WEEK

After a successful debut in 2014, Vancouver Design Week is returning—this time in an abridged twoday version on Saturday and Sunday, May 13 to 14, featuring open studios, building tours, tastings, and pop-up design events across the city. Call it Vancouver Design Weekend. vancouverdesignwk.com

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COURTESY UNTITLED STUDIO; ARTHUR HITCHCOCK ; COURTESY VANCOUVER DESIGN WEEK

DESIGN WEEK PORTLAND


CONGRATULATIONS TO THE WINNERS OF THE 17TH ANNUAL

FIRST PLACE WINNERS: AMY BAKER INTERIOR DESIGN ATELIER DROME ARCHITECTURE + INTERIOR DESIGN BAUER / CLIFTON INTERIORS BEYOND BEIGE INTERIOR DESIGN DAVID COLEMAN ARCHITECTURE / STRETCH DESIGN GREENPOINT TECHNOLOGIES, INC. GRETCHEN EVANS DESIGN

Bauer/Clifton Interiors

Susan Marinello Interiors

JPC ARCHITECTS MICHELLE DIRKSE INTERIOR DESIGN MITCHELL FREEDLAND DESIGN SUSAN MARINELLO INTERIORS TYLER ENGLE ARCHITECTS WEBER THOMPSON

SECOND PLACE WINNERS: DYNA CONTRACTING HILARY YOUNG DESIGN ASSOCIATES LINDA SALE INTERIOR DESIGN LTD. NB DESIGN GROUP REBECCA WEST INTERIORS SPACE HARMONY INTERIOR, INC. SUSAN MARINELLO INTERIORS TDSWANSBURG DESIGN STUDIO TAMMARA STROUD DESIGN, LLC WESTPORT YACHTS

STUDENT AWARDS: ALEXA WILLIAMS

JPC Architects

BRITTANY SOLER

C ELE B RAT I NG N O R T H W E ST D E S I G N AT THE CORE OF OUR DESI G N COMMUNITY

Seattle Design Center is proud to host the Northwest Design Awards, as well as house 16 showrooms and hundreds of designer home lines from around the world. Looking for inspiration? Look no further. Visit seattledesigncenter.com/nwda. graymag . com

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scene

happenings |

WANTEDDESIGN: NYC

In its usual chic fashion, WantedDesign—a yearlong international platform for the creative community—will culminate with exhibitions, talks, and installations in Manhattan (May 20–23 in Chelsea) and Brooklyn (May 17–23 at Industry City). For 2017, Wanted has named Eugene, Oregon–based Studio Gorm the recipient of the American Design Honors, presented with Bernhardt Design. We always come away inspired. wanteddesignnyc.com

Featuring more than 700 companies exhibiting their newest products, ICFF (May 21–24) is the anchor expo during NYCxDesign. This year, GRAY is a show media partner and sponsor of a bevy of PNW-centric booths, including Portland Design (Revolution Design House, Jefdesigns Studio, and Fix Studio); B.C. Wood and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry; and Seattle Design Section (Graypants, Urbancase, Urban Hardwoods, LightArt, LUMA Design Workshop, and JOIN Design). icff.com

ADDRESS: VANCOUVER

ADDRESS (May 24–28), produced by designer-maker Kate Duncan and curated by MaK Interiors designer Amber Kingsnorth, is now in its fourth year of elevating the maker market, with goods from more than 30 high-end designers and artisans on display and for sale in the historic 1907 Ellis Building. The annual opening party (mark your calendars for May 25) draws a teeming crowd of design-world cool kids—and this year, Duncan’s adding a preview event on May 24, featuring the GRAY “Design Minds” panel discussion on entrepreneurship, product design, and the creative hustle. addressassembly.com

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ICFF TALKS: NYC

On May 23, GRAY senior editor Rachel Gallaher will moderate “You Are Here: Regional Design on the Map,” a panel discussion presented on the ICFF main stage with Global Affairs Canada. How does the place you’re from influence the design you create? Gallaher will explore the topic with Vancouver artist-designer Brent Comber; Peter Coolican of Toronto’s Coolican and Company; Darren Montgomery of Seattle’s Urbancase and Standard Socket; and Joe Gibson of Portland’s Revolution Design House. icff.com/conference/icff-talks h

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ADZIO © FONDATION D’ENTREPRISE HERMÈS/DH MCNABB; LA MANUFACTURE COGOLIN/JASON MILLER; JENNA BASCOM; ANDREW QUERNER; BRIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

ICFF: NYC


Explore Marvin’s contemporary windows and doors at marvinwindows.com/contemporary ©2017 Marvin Windows and Doors. All rights reserved. ®Registered trademark of Marvin Windows and Doors. ®

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WHY ATTEND ICFF? - New for 2017: ICFF Gallery

featuring curated custom collectibles

- The Best of International Design Weeks

- Luxe Interiors + Design pavilion

- 10 major international exhibitions - NYC borough design districts presented by ICFF

- Collaboration with over 35,000+ industry professionals

- Captivating ICFF Talks panels

- NYCxDesign Awards presented by ICFF and Interior Design

Registration is Open 24

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www.icff.com

May 21-24, 2017 • Jacob K. Javits Center

Official Media Partner


Experience Canadian Design Booth 221 at ICFF New York May 21 - 24

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May 13-14

Vancouver Design Week is back ...for the weekend! A spring fling with the best and brightest of Vancouver design. VDWknd. Find out more at VancouverDesignwk.com

EXPLORE. DISCOVER. DREAM. MA+DS Modern Home Tours

SEATTLE: Saturday, April 29 PORTLAND: Saturday, June 3

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Architect: Best Practice Architecture Photographer: Rafael Soldi


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Seattle’s three-year-long SODO Track project brings street art to one of the city’s busiest transportation corridors, including this mural by L.A.–based creative studio Cyrcle. Turn the page for more.

E G R AY

GRAY LOVES THE THRILL OF THE CHASE.

to

SO WE’VE BROUGHT YOU AN A-TO-Z INDEX OF FASCINATING DESIGN TREASURES YOU NEED TO DISCOVER TODAY. AN UNASSUMING PORT-

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style

LAND GARAGE THAT’S REALLY A MICRO–TEXTILE AND POTTERY SHOP?

A KENGO KUMA–DESIGNED TEA HOUSE IN THE SKY? YOU’LL FIND ALL YOUR NEXT GREAT PACIFIC NORTHWEST DISCOVERIES HERE, READY TO SPELL OUT YOUR SPRING AND SUMMER DESIGN ADVENTURES.

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TOP: In November 2016, artists Spencer Keeton Cunningham and Josh Keyes painted a 200-foot wall in support of the Standing Rock protests. MIDDLE: Vancouver’s Ola Volo and Portland’s David Rice collaborated on a first round of SODO Track murals in the summer of 2016. BOTTOM: Seattle artist Mary Iverson combined geometric lines and shapes to create a 3-D effect.

ART ACTIVATION

during the past six months, you likely got quite an eyeful while whizzing to your destination. From a hyperrealistic herd of forest creatures taking over a city street to bright-pink cats raining down on an equally rosy mountaintop, nine murals have sprouted up on three blocks of formerly graffiti-splattered building backs. By 2018, the three-year-long project, dubbed SODO Track, will stretch 2 miles—an open-air urban art gallery lining one of the city’s busiest transportation corridors. Launched last summer by King County’s cultural service agency, 4Culture, in partnership with the SODO Business Improvement Area, Sound Transit, and Urban ArtWorks, SODO Track boasts work from local, national, and international talent, all of it organized and curated by Portland artist Gage Hamilton, founder of the public-art nonprofit Forest for the Trees. “Public access to art is important,” says Hamilton, who helped inventory the buildings, map out the murals, and shape

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SODO Track’s overarching theme, “Movement”—apt for a sector that sees more than 50,000 commuters every day. “Our visual surroundings affect how we feel about our lives, and so much of them are mundane and expected. Art brings new life to a place in the most creative ways.” Phase two of the project ramps up this summer and will include 8 murals by 25 artists hailing from nine countries around the world. Tamar Benzikry, senior public art project manager for 4Culture, sees SODO Track as a unique opportunity to transform the transit experience by giving commuters a reason to look up from their phones, out at their environment, and toward one another. “A lot of people get their first impression of Seattle along this route,” she says. “This project offers people an invitation to enjoy an experience where before there was nothing but blandness.” h

COURTESY SODO TRACK AND WISEKNAVE

IF YOU’VE RIDDEN THE BUS OR COMMUTER TRAIN THROUGH SEATTLE’S INDUSTRIAL SODO NEIGHBORHOOD


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White/Space’s latest jewelry collection was inspired in part by the Italian Modernist architecture of Carlo Scarpa. The new Brion earrings (named after the renowned Scarpadesigned cemetery) “explore the delicate interplay of straight lines with minimal curves,” says designer Khadijah Fulton.


SEATTLE-BASED WHITE/SPACE’S ETHICALLY SOURCED JEWELRY IS BLING WITH BENEFITS. Crafting her minimalist adornments entirely

GEORGE BARBERIS; STYLED BY CUNIFORM; PORTRAIT: STEVEN DANGERFIELD

out of reclaimed precious metals and conflict-free stones, founder and designer Khadijah Fulton makes each piece herself and releases only a select handful of new designs each year, in addition to custom work. Her latest collection, Linea, is “based around the elegant simplicity of line, and in particular the use of line in Italian midcentury modernism.” Symmetry and asymmetry, right angles, and interlocking circles in White/ Space’s latest rings, necklaces, and earrings all recall the work of Italian Modernist architect Carlo Scarpa—specifically his designs for the landscape and structures of Brion Cemetery near Treviso, a major source of inspiration for Fulton. Planned for 2018 is a new line of wedding rings featuring colored stones and diamonds, a collection that will “definitely fall into the alternative/modern bridal category,” says Fulton. h

Fulton’s designs are sophisticated with a modern edge. She uses materials such as recycled gold and conflict-free diamonds to craft new classics including, from left, Veritti Pearl Hook earrings; Vita Pavé studs; Continuity ring; and Pavé Linea Threader earrings.

“Linea is based around the elegant simplicity of line, and in particular the use of line in Italian midcentury modernism.” —KHADIJAH FULTON, JEWELRY DESIGNER

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This past winter, Seattle encaustic and print artist Jennifer Ament created a series of politically charged works for “Artists for Progress,” a group exhibition and auction she arranged to spotlight 28 artists and provide financial aid to organizations currently in jeopardy. “Art today serves a different purpose than it did before the election,” says Ament, who plans to hold another auction later this year. “I will continue to make political prints, and [Seattle artists] will continue to create work for the resistance against this administration until it no longer holds power,” she says. jenniferament.com

BRIGHT VOLUMES

Portland-based womenswear line Bright Volumes debuted in 2016 with a goal to release two collections a year, both made with its signature cotton-poly knitwear fabricated in Japan. But its apparel aspirations shifted toward political advocacy in the wake of the U.S. election. Since last November, the brand has committed to donating 100 percent of its profits to organizations resisting the Trump administration. brightvolumes.com

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THE YEAR 2017 HAS WITNESSED RECORD-SETTING PROTESTS AND TURMOIL IN RESPONSE TO THE VITAL ISSUES FACING OUR WORLD. THROUGH ACTIONS, ADVOCACY, AND ARTWORK, THE INTERNATIONAL ART AND DESIGN COMMUNITIES ARE ADDING THEIR VOICES TO THE DEBATE.

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“Designers and creatives aren’t afraid to make a statement and upset people, which aligns well with politics,” says Emma McIlroy, CEO of Portland-based lifestyle brand Wildfang. Its Wild Feminist apparel collection, launched in 2016, has taken on new resonance in 2017, and the company recently pledged to donate 10 percent of all its profits to Planned Parenthood and the ACLU. “Wild Feminist is more than just a slogan emblazoned on a shirt,” McIlroy says. “It sends a message and shows a united front in the face of hateful rhetoric and discrimination.” wildfang.com

REST IN POWER

Vancouver-based artist Sandeep Johal’s drawings and paintings explore themes of gender justice through iterative, mandalainspired patterns influenced by South Asian textile design. Each ink drawing in her latest collection, “Rest in Power,” immortalizes a female victim of gender-based violence, and the series will be shown in a solo exhibition at the Gam Gallery in downtown Vancouver in September 2017. sandeepjohal.com h See more at graymag.com/ dissent

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LYNAE COOK; CHARISE ASH; DAVID GREENHILL; COURTESY SANDEEP JOHAL

WILDFANG


Architecture: Mithun; Photography: Lara Swimmer

DOVETAILGC.COM

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A custom rift-cut oak communal table designed by Jasmine Vaughan—formerly of Made & State and founder of Maxwell Gray Interiors—and built by Jewell Hardwoods of Oregon City takes center stage in Dame’s private dining room. To create a “jewelbox effect,” Vaughan painted the ceiling and wainscotted walls Oasis Blue by Benjamin Moore, a rich peacock hue.

EAT ALONE

designer Jasmine Vaughan’s first hospitality project since she launched her new firm, Maxwell Gray Interiors, this past summer—is a beaut. Though its early reputation was built largely on co-owner/sommelier Dana Frank’s 140-strong list of natural wines, it’s the design that slays us—all moody blues, matte blacks, antique glass accents, and watery Eskayel wallpaper. To escape the dinner-service din, book the private dining room, which can host up to 14 at its custom oak dining table, built extra wide to accommodate the crush of wine bottles that inevitably accumulates in the middle. h

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CARLY DIAZ

NORTHEAST PORTLAND’S DAME RESTAURANT—


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2425 NW Market Street, Seattle WA 98107 Showroom hours are M-F 8 AM to 5 PM and by appointment. (206)789-1122 • lundgrenenterprises.com


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annual Upstream Music Fest + Summit—a series of concerts and talks that will overtake Seattle’s Pioneer Square neighborhood from May 11 to 13—design took a leading role. Vulcan Inc., Allen’s investment and philanthropy juggernaut, selected SkB Architects to help design a spatial plan and facilities that are uniquely responsive to the site: approximately 20 urban blocks around Occidental Park. In addition to the main stage, just north of the stadium, and the smaller free stage in Occidental Park, more than 24 local businesses will host live performances. SkB designed metal rectangular structures for the Summit breakout sessions, to be held in WaMu Theater (speakers will include hip-hop artist Macklemore and record producer Quincy Jones) and will transform a stadium parking lot into a beer garden and food truck stop. As a subtle nod to Pioneer Square’s gritty aesthetic and its history as one of Seattle’s oldest neighborhoods, the designers will utilize metal trussing and plywood as construction materials throughout the project. “A lot of artists at Upstream are new and local,” says SkB principal Steve Olson. “We avoided a super-sleek aesthetic because we wanted to capture the rugged feeling of both the neighborhood and the quintessential emerging artist. We wanted it to feel real.” h

GARAGISTES

GREAT DESIGN CAN BE FOUND IN THE MOST UNLIKELY OF PLACES— even in an unassuming garage in a residential neighborhood. After moving to Northeast Portland in 2014, after years of living in New York and L.A., Thomas Renaud and Noel Hennessy decided to pursue their individual loves of ceramics and textiles by turning their basement into a studio. There Renaud creates earthenware “with a ’70s vibe,” and Hennessy handdyes and screen-prints fabric goods such as napkins, dog beds, and pillows. As their inventory grew, they moved their finished products into their garage. What had begun as storage space eventually turned into an informal monthly sales event—which garnered a more enthusiastic response than the duo anticipated. “People were generally surprised by discovering this tiny garage,” explains Renaud. “From there, Little Garage Shop was born.” Since they first rolled up their garage door to the public in December 2015, their enterprise has gotten a bit more formal, with monthly studio sales held every third Saturday through the summer and thoughts of opening actual city retail space and bringing in additional makers. But for the moment, they’re happy in their live/work/ shop space, and the clients who visit them (see updates on Instagram at @little garage_shop) are delighted to discover the most glamorous garage in town. h

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SKB ARCHITECTS

MOST FESTIVALS RELY SOLELY ON EVENT PLANNERS AND PRODUCTION COMPANIES TO SORT OUT LOGISTICS. But when Paul Allen conceived the first


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LEFT: San Fermo restaurant, which opened in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood in May 2016, is carved out of two 1880s houses that were relocated here from the International District and joined into a single L-shaped unit in 1976. BELOW: A year-long gut remodel by (from left) co-owners Wade Weigel and Tim Baker and designer-builder Eric Hentz of Mallet preserved as many original details as possible.

SUZI PRATT

OUSE SPECIAL

Written by AMANDA ZURITA : Photographed by GEORGE BARBERIS

WHEN WADE WEIGEL BOUGHT THE BALLARD PROPERTY IN 2014—A PAIR OF DILAPIDATED, PIONEER-ERA HOUSES DATING BACK TO THE 1880S and thought by

Historic Seattle to be the oldest intact residential buildings in the city—he and his partners (Jeff Ofelt, Tim Baker, and Scott Shapiro) weren’t expecting a cakewalk. Between them, the four entrepreneurs already had tackled the tricky build-outs and transformations of various local mainstays such as the Ace Hotel, Percy’s, the Cha Cha Lounge, and Melrose Market. Still, the obstacles the team uncovered as they transformed the onetime residences—which were moved intact from the International District to Ballard more than 40 years ago—into San Fermo restaurant challenged both their expectations and their timeline. “Each house had three different rooms on the first floor and a stairway that went up to the attic, and the two were connected by a narrow hallway,” says Baker, who

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oversaw the technical aspects of the year-long renovation, along with designer-builder Eric Hentz of Mallet Incorporated. “It was such a weird space.” The buildings’ all-wood construction (a rare example of the pioneer-era practice known as plank framing) and interior shear walls prevented the team from remodeling in a typical fashion. Without modern framing, the walls bore much of the buildings’ weight, so the crew couldn’t open up the cramped rooms without risking a collapse. To solve this puzzle, they installed steel moment frames before knocking down existing walls and loosening up the floor plan. They also had to tear up the floors and pour a new concrete foundation. “It’s these type of things that add layers of cost but aren’t very much fun,” Hentz acknowledges. Due to stringent historic preservation rules, the exterior had to remain largely untouched, so the team retained some elements such as an original window, its panes »


The design team painted the original plank walls a creamy white to brighten up the dining rooms, adding found-object accents, a Serge Mouille–style chandelier snagged from Weigel’s home, and custom built-in bench seating by Mallet.

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LEFT: The attic space was originally unfinished, and the crew even discovered a squatter there when they began renovation. After cleaning and framing out the space, they added custom benches and an oversized sink that doubles as an ice bucket during wine tastings. BELOW: Baker, who dabbles in woodworking and also serves as San Fermo’s operating partner, hand-crafted the cutting boards that decorate the restaurant’s southwest wall.

now painted black, that is integrated into one of the bathrooms. “It’s as if a new house was built within the old house,” says Baker. “The building still looks historic and original, but now it will last another 140 years.” As for decor, Weigel, the project’s creative visionary, imagined San Fermo as a quasi-Scandinavian farmhouse, all creamy whites, semimatte blacks, and honeyed oak flooring. “I really pushed for this, like, bright hippie commune in the Danish countryside where everyone would gather for big Italian dinners,” he says. The result isn’t far off. The restaurant is minimalist but not sterile, historic but not old-fashioned, quaint without kitsch. Throughout the 1,800-square-foot building, vestiges of the original structure remain (look closely and you can still see rough saw-mill marks on the lumber), and vintage items that Weigel dug out of storage in his own home’s basement (delicate French lace curtains, for example, and the stained-glass lights above the four-seat bar) give the restaurant a cozy, lived-in quality. “Wade has a rare skill set that allows him to move from just making sense logistically to having a soul,” says Hentz. “It’s a transition that you can make only if you are operating on an intuitive level where you really feel the space and what it wants to be.” h

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Walk in with Walk out with

Try out Sub-Zero and Wolf products in full-scale kitchens. Talk details with resident experts. Get a taste of all that your new kitchen can be.

Bradlee Distributors - Seattle Showroom 1400 Elliott Avenue West, Seattle, WA 98119 I 206.284.8400 I bradleedistributors.com/showrooms graymag . com

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THE ITALIAN JOB

Written by NESSA PULLMAN : Photographed by EMA PETER

WHEN IT COMES TO LUSH FOOD MARKETS, THE ITALIANS HAVE IT ON LOCK. A case in point: Dalina,

Blending Italian traditions and contemporary design, Vancouver’s new café and grocery, Dalina, features porcelain counters and LEDilluminated shelving. A light fixture made from vintage copper pots and an installation of fresh bouquets pop against the minimalist backdrop.

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the café-and-grocery hot spot that opened its doors in Vancouver’s Chinatown in December 2016. The Bosa family, founders of Bosa Properties and Dalina’s developerowners, have deep roots in northern Italy and longed to create a neighborhood space reflecting their love of good food, good coffee, and fresh groceries. Lending her expertise as they shaped the space was interior designer Andrea Greenway, who explains, “We wanted to keep it restrained, timeless, and reminiscent of traditional Italian materiality.” Working with Scott Landon Antiques, she sourced about 150 vintage copper pots from around the world (mostly via eBay) and then had local lighting designer Matthew McCormick wire them with LEDs to create a dramatic hanging installation that casts geometric patterns of shadow on the ceiling. The clean, crisp Laminam porcelain tile–clad counter appears to hover above the terrazzo floors thanks to LED lighting illuminating its toe kick. The minimalist, all-white palette keeps the focus right where Greenway and her clients want it. “We purposefully created a blank canvas,” says the designer. “The real ‘art’—the food and people—adds movement and liveliness to the space.” h


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KENGO KUMA’S LUMINOUS TEA HOUSE 46

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IN WHAT IS PERHAPS ONE OF THE MOST CURIOUS— AND DEFINITELY THE COOLEST—JUXTAPOSITIONS IN VANCOUVER, a little-known private tea house is perched

EMA PETER

on the 19th floor of the Shaw Tower in Coal Harbour. The 320-square-foot refuge, completed in late 2016, was designed by legendary Japanese architect Kengo Kuma as a marketing venue for a new Alberni Street residential development upon which he’s collaborating with Westbank and Peterson Group. Since the mid-15th century, the tea house has been an integral symbol of Japanese culture. Figurative and literal temples of tranquility, they employ intentionally simple and rustic building materials. Kuma’s design stays true to traditional tea house vernacular but gives it a subtle modern spin, using steel, glass, and local Douglas fir instead of the customary Japanese cedar. Whereas typical tea houses exclusively use shoji screens to separate the interior from the outside world, Kuma deploys strategic glazing that offers views of the surrounding mountains and water. And instead of a sunken hearth, used for heat in the cold months, radiant heating lies beneath handmade tatami mats. This one-room gem in the sky eventually will become a private retreat for an adjoining residence, a serene sanctuary in an increasingly busy city. h

OPPOSITE: Appearing to float above a rock landscape by Toko Garden Design, this Kengo Kuma–designed tea house cuts a humble yet wondrous profile on top of Vancouver’s Shaw Tower. THIS PAGE: The shelter, built by Hart + Tipton Construction, doubles as a marketing venue for Alberni by Kengo Kuma, the Japanese architect’s first major tower in North America. Breaking from traditional tea house design, floor-to-ceiling glazing offers breathtaking views.

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MODERN NORDIC

Designer Kate Schreiner (above), founder of Vancouver fashion brand Hetki / A Moment. Schreiner’s latest pieces include the Siirtää dress (top), made with angled print matches, and the Vekki blouse (left), its pattern based on a painting Schreiner scanned into Photoshop. OPPOSITE: The recycled wool Laatikko coat and slouchy Löysä sweater.

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TOP, BOTTOM LEFT, AND OPPOSITE: JASON TAM; MODEL: DOROTHY YEUNG; MIDDLE: STACY HAWKINS/THE GROVE PHOTOGRAPHY

AT JUST 22 YEARS OLD, Kate Schreiner is a fresh face in the landscape of Vancouver slow fashion. She launched her brand, Hetki / A Moment, in fall 2016 at Vancouver Fashion Week and has been single-handedly making clothing for its collections since, gaining customers mostly via word of mouth and Instagram. As a visiting fashion student in Helsinki in 2015, Schreiner was inspired by “the simple and meaningful lifestyle that the Nordic cultures foster, and their appreciation for quality—of life and of things.” Her designs for Hetki—rendered in natural fibers and neutral palettes that carry over season to season—reflect the “calming peace and effortless beauty” Schreiner believes characterize the region. The pieces, stitched one by one in her home studio, align with the environmental ideals of slow fashion, but we think she’s on the fast track to fashion fame. h


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City Home: Portland

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In December 2016, City Home opened its second Portland shop, in a 1906 building in the Pearl District. With local designer Max Humphrey behind the interior restoration and merchandising, the new space spotlights reclaimed finds as well as midcentury and industrialinspired lines, such as Joanna Gaines’s new rug designs for Magnolia Home and bright boho chairs and pendants from Justina Blakeney’s debut collaboration with Selamat Designs. cityhomepdx.com

Big Daddy’s Antiques: Seattle

OLD STUFF Dive into the ultimate treasure hunt at the Pacific Northwest’s newest antique and vintage shops.

Asia America Riverplace: Portland

Between them, Dan Barbato and Nick Louthan have spent 40 years shopping the globe. In January 2017, they opened a new showroom at Riverplace Marina to showcase exclusive pieces and rustic antiques sourced from India, China, Taiwan, Southeast Asia, and the Middle East. In coming months, the pair will host multisensory experiences—Japanese tea ceremonies, Tibetan prayer rituals—on the boardwalk outside the shop. asiaamericafurniture.com

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The Birdcage: Kirkland, WA

Fine furniture is a family affair at the Birdcage, a chic Eastside space opened by Terry Millson, a PNW native who moved to the Middle East in 1980 and ran a furniture store in Bahrain for more than 30 years. Now back in the Northwest, she and her daughter, Nadia Alireza, have filled their nearly 7,000-squarefoot shop with creative vignettes featuring Persian carpets, custom furniture, and original artwork. birdcagehome.com h

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: HARIS KENJAR; CHRISTOPHER DIBBLE; NATE WATTERS; REN STEIN

After bringing his eclectic aesthetic to four U.S. cities, selfidentified “Big Daddy” Shane Brown opened his fifth showroom last year, in Seattle’s SODO. The soaring space offers the Emerald City the fruits of Brown’s buying trips, ranging from Louis Philippe mirrors from the South of France to original midcentury pieces by Bruno Mathsson snagged in Round Top, Texas. The company’s team of welders, woodworkers, and refinishers can also create custom furnishings. bdantiques.com


SEATTLE SAN FRANCISCO BUILT BY HAND FROM SALVAGED TREES

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PRESENTING Q RESTAURANT

FOR 45 YEARS, HUNGRY PORTLANDERS FLOCKED TO VERITABLE QUANDARY, a seasonal Northwest restaurant in

a downtown brick building known for its cozy solarium and outdoor patio. When the beloved eatery announced in January 2016 that it would close at the end of the year to make way for a new courthouse, two regulars hatched an idea to keep the spirit of the place alive. They bankrolled a new restaurant, Q, four blocks away from the original, keeping much of the same menu and team—chef, waitstaff, general manager—intact. For the interior, the new owners sought a fresh look, but one that was inspired by the old space. “We wanted to capture Veritable Quandary’s intimate feeling but also stand out as a new restaurant, not just a continuation of what was,” says Andee Hess, founder of Osmose Design, who was charged with turning the empty corner unit into

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a welcoming bar and eatery—one with visual punch but no trendy gimmicks. Richly hued wood and minimal lighting in the bar area offer a subtle paean to Veritable Quandary’s dark mahogany bar, while the lighter color palette in the compact dining room recalls VQ’s solarium. Even the new embellishments come from old inspirations. “Some detailing on the wood-clad columns in the bar area is a riff on an antique Deco cabinet I saw years ago,” says Hess. “I like to take historic or vintage details and twist them a bit to make them new.” Dark, curve-backed chairs are another hint at the restaurant’s former incarnation—they’re practical and subtle but also a visual cue to longtime customers. “Certain stylized elements have a nostalgic feel, but you can’t quite put a label on them,” Hess notes. “This abstraction leads to an environment that is comfortable and inviting while still evocative and full of energy.” »

JEREMY BITTERMANN

Do you believe in restaurant reincarnation? Interior designer Andee Hess makes her case with a fresh spin on a beloved classic.


DESIGN TEAM

interiors: Osmose Design architecture: Hennebery Eddy Architects construction: R&H Construction millwork: Uncommon Cabinetry

The waiting area in the entryway (opposite) of Q Restaurant in Portland gives way to an Art Deco–inspired bar area (this page) with a terrazzo floor and a coffered rosewood ceiling. Osmose Design dropped the ceiling above the bar counter and wrapped it in bronze-toned mirror, a trick deployed to give the illusion of more height in the rest of the room.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Columns around the perimeter of the bar are embellished with white oak trim and custom stained-glass sconces from LightLite. The dining room features two custom chandeliers by Hilliard Lamps composed of 2,000 individually hand-cut pieces of stained glass. Room-bisecting back-to-back banquettes maximize space. Above the open kitchen, backlit onyx glows in a grid pattern. In the bathroom, the geometric lines of a custom cherry-framed mirror complement the tone and shape of the Rosso Verona marble-tiled wall. h

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JEREMY BITTERMANN

“Q’S DESIGN IS A BALANCE OF OLD ESTABLISHMENT AND NEW SENSIBILITY. OUR DESIGN CHALLENGE WAS TO EXPLORE HOW CLOSE WE COULD GET TO CLASSIC WHILE INFUSING THAT BASE WITH FRESH BLOOD AND VIBRANCY.” —ANDEE HESS, INTERIOR DESIGNER


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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT:

Shoemaker Renée Macdonald at work in Parker Street Studios. Every design from Westerly, the company she founded, is totally customizable, from the leather color and type to the seam finish, sole, and edging. Selections from her collection of vintage equestrian boot trees are shown here.

SOLE SEARCHING

Written by KAITY TEER : Photographed by ILIJC ALBANESE

AT THE FINAL FITTING FOR THEIR BESPOKE, HANDMADE WESTERLY SHOES,

customers are often confounded by the sensation of walking in footwear that’s been constructed to fit the exact measurements of their feet. “There’s no discomfort, no pressure—they don’t know how to interpret that,” explains Westerly’s founder, Renée Macdonald. “When something is handmade, part of the maker’s essence goes into the product, and the customer feels a deeper connection to it.” The daughter of a carpenter and a seamstress, Macdonald felt the familial pull of craftsmanship in her 30s when, dissatisfied with a desk job in business administration, she began to experiment with shoemaking. Initially her dining table doubled as a workbench and she tinkered in the evenings and on weekends, but eventually the »

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R E A L I Z I NG YOU R V I S I ON O F H OM E

For over 35 years, our promise has remained unchanged. We’re dedicated to superior craftsmanship, open collaboration, and, above all, unmatched client service. This is what makes us the finest homebuilder in the Northwest.

S E E O U R N E W W E B S I T E AT S C H U LT Z M I LLE R .C O M

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SYLVAIN GATTI

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Westerly’s Suite

04 line is structured and traditional. Macdonald prefers to work with oil-tanned leather due to its durability and natural character; she even makes leather reinforcements such as eyelets by hand. A vintage cast-iron cobbler’s nail caddy is in the studio. Macdonald uses a vintage doctor’s X-ray light box for patternmaking. Macdonald in her studio’s stairwell.

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creative freedom and hands-on nature of the work cemented the desire she’d long harbored for a new career path. Macdonald officially founded Westerly in 2012 and now works in a private space in East Vancouver’s Parker Street Studios, a four-story warehouse filled with the ateliers of dozens of local artists and makers. Although mostly self-taught, Macdonald worked in shoe repair shops for five years and picked up tricks by visiting cobblers’ shops and machine manufacturers in Montreal, the Netherlands, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. Today her customers can commission one-of-a-kind, bespoke footwear or choose from a selection of existing unisex designs, including midcalf and ankle boots, oxfords, and sandals. From the first measurement to final polish, it takes Macdonald 20 to 45 hours to shape, sew, and build each pair. Although the shoes are made primarily from vegetable and oil-tanned leather, the heels and soles are fitted with a rubber overlay for added longevity in the wet PNW climate. Macdonald is currently at work on a new collection inspired by vintage athletic wear; the first design, a leather boxing boot, is set to drop later this year. Although her waitlist is booked through mid-2018, inspiration’s not in short supply. “Most of the time,” says Macdonald, “it’s hard to pull myself away at the end of the day.” h


TEAM SPIRIT

Design is the X factor in the University of Oregon’s playbook for its new state-of-the-art football facility. Written by BRIAN LIBBY : Photographed by AARON LEITZ

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OPPOSITE: The Marcus Mariota Sports Performance Center in Eugene, Oregon, designed by SRG Partnership, is both a celebration of the Ducks—college football’s sartorially flashiest team—and partly a lab for honing state-of-the-art training techniques. Shown here is the high-drama trophy room. THIS PAGE: The center’s sleek equipment room, stocked with thousands of helmets and jerseys, is flanked by medical-treatment and training facilities. »

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THIS PAGE: Two and a half miles of movable shelving on two levels of floor-mounted tracks give equipment managers easy access to the Ducks’ thousands of helmet, jersey, and pants combinations. When the shelves roll closed, they merge into a mural of Oregon football players. OPPOSITE: In the movement room, a shadowboxing ring allows athletes to cross-train. The entire facility is equipped with LED lighting that changes throughout the day to mimic natural light. 

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“THE DUCKS BRAND REPRESENTS A CULTURE THAT IS ABOUT BLAZING NEW TRAILS. ANYONE DEALING WITH ATHLETES AND HEALTH WILL BE PAYING ATTENTION TO THIS FACILITY.” —JEFF YRAZABAL, ARCHITECT


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OPPOSITE TOP: The walnut-clad “Haberdashery,” where student-athletes and recruits try out footwear and other Nike apparel from the equipment room, features an oversized custom armchair with web-foot legs and carvings honoring the Nike founder, “Uncle Phil” Knight, and his wife, “Aunt Penny.” Architect Josh Orona of SRG notes that “there’s all kinds of little things to discover in the space. Each coffer piece in the ceiling, for example, is a laser-cut image of a Duck conquering another Pac 12 school.” OPPOSITE BOTTOM: The equipment room mirror is embedded with an LED display, designed by Los Angeles firm Space 150, that allows recruits to see images of themselves in different Ducks uniform combinations.

f

or most of the 20th century, the Oregon Ducks paddled sadly around in the basement of college football. But in the new millennium, their fortunes have soared, with two national championship appearances and college football’s best record for the first half of the 2010s. The game changer was billionaire Nike founder and University of Oregon alum Phil Knight and his wife, Penny, who helped underwrite a complex of designforward, recruitment-friendly facilities in the Ducks’ hometown, Eugene, Oregon, while spearheading a rebranding that has raised the team’s profile and attracted top talent. Between its updated logo, a near-infinite array of uniform combinations, and a luxurious new sports center, today’s Ducks are the NCAA’s flashiest team— and a compelling case for the impact of good design. The Marcus Mariota Sports Performance Center— named for the Ducks’ Heisman Trophy–winning quarterback and near-patron saint—is a 30,000-square-foot renovation of a building outside Autzen Stadium, the Ducks’ home field. Todd Van Horne and other Nike executives led the development of the sleek new facility. SRG Partnership—including Jeff Yrazabal, Walker Templeton, and Josh Orona—helmed the design, collaborating with creative agency Gallagher on unique storytelling opportunities throughout the project. Unveiled in August 2016, it’s an immaculate glass-and-wood complex (picture 2001: A Space Odyssey crossed with the inside of a BMW) with a dual purpose: to store and display equipment and to train and treat athletes.

In the equipment area, recruits can try out literally thousands of helmet and jersey combinations arranged on 2 1/2 miles of movable shelves (all accessible from a touch screen), gawk at Mariota’s many awards, or perch on a tricked-out 450-pound wooden throne to try on a pair of shoes. “The team had a functional need, and probably one of the more complex equipment programs of any sports team in the world,” explains SRG principal Jeff Yrazabal. But the overarching idea, he adds, is to celebrate the Oregon football brand through interior architecture and excite potential recruits by helping them to visualize themselves in a Ducks uniform. The designers doubled down on team spirit through a host of custom details, from laser-cut wing patterns in the rubberized training floor to a photographic image of Mariota in the lobby ceiling that emerges from a mosaic of backlit flying Duck logos. Yet the Mariota project is equally about optimizing athletes’ performance, so Nike and UO’s athletic department combined an array of treatment and recovery facilities with state-of-the-art technologies that capture and analyze the athletes’ performance data. A physiology room allows technicians to measure vital signs during aerobic activity, while a shadow-boxing ring encourages athletes to cross-train and improve agility. And before or after games, players can snooze in a fanciful sleeping room outfitted with reclining lounges capped with oversized helmets arrayed beneath a ceiling that’s festooned with glowing stars. “The Ducks brand represents a culture that is about results and blazing new trails for others to follow,” Yrazabal says. “Anyone dealing with athletes and health will be paying attention to this facility and learning from it.” »

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ABOVE: In the movement room, motion-capture cameras, plus sensors embedded in stretches of artificial turf and rubber flooring, help specialists study athletes’ form and agility. BELOW: The resting room, equipped with five reclining pods for players to nap in before or after practice, testifies to sports science’s burgeoning emphasis on quality sleep. The custom rug (manufactured by New York’s Designtex) was designed by Nike’s Todd Van Horne, as were the felt-clad walls that abstract the Oregon logo. The perforated ceiling (manufactured by Los Angeles–based Ceilings Plus) is backlit with LEDs to mimic the stars of a clear sky. h

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A LANDMARK IS REBORN IN DOWNTOWN SEATTLE J U LY 2 0 17


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Travelers entering Business Air’s newly renovated private terminal in Seattle are greeted by a vintage wing stabilizer from a 1930s Douglas DC-3 emblazoned with the charter airline’s logo. “We didn’t want an ‘airplane-themed’ space,” says Jason Dallas, the designer who shaped the interiors. “But I love this piece because it’s not brand new and shiny. It makes the terminal feel a little more timeless.”

UPGRADED TRAVEL

charter airline terminals are, to put it mildly, underwhelming. “We were kind of amazed when we did research on the competition,” says architect Paul Wanzer of Hoshide Wanzer Architects, the firm tasked with renovating Business Air’s Seattle terminal, in the heart of Boeing Field. “The lounges were really, really bad. Basically just a stuffed couch and a Coke machine in a corner.” Business Air, a North Texas–based aviation company, sought to distinguish itself with a serious upgrade of its 85,000-square-foot terminal, which included a lobby, offices, and two gigantic hangars, all saddled with dim lighting, poor circulation, and a dated beige-and-concrete color scheme. “They wanted it to be first-class, to use the industry term,” says Wanzer. »

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AARON LEITZ

DESPITE THE PRESTIGE ASSOCIATED WITH PRIVATE AIR TRAVEL, in reality most


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AARON LEITZ

Working with Jason Dallas Design and Velotta Construction Co., Wanzer and his team removed the existing dropped ceiling, exposing the building’s structure, and commissioned a vinyl wall graphic by Image Mill that spans the length of the reception area; its pixelated cloud pattern extends passengers’ views of the Northwest skies outside and suggests the lofty vistas enjoyed by an airborne traveler. A nearly all-white interior palette, layered with chrome, stainless steel, glass, and aluminum, recalls the textures and finishes of an aircraft and visually unifies the terminal. And a glossy white epoxy floor serves as a fluid “runway” connecting the reception area to the airplane hangars. A Zamboni keeps its sparkling surface free of tire scuffs and fuel stains from the multiple jets that are towed in and out daily. “The clean lines of our terminal reflect the way that we think about our business,” says Gene Buccola, president of Business Air. “Straightforward and clear, directing you without distraction so you can focus on where you’re going.” Though the effect is futuristic, the inspiration came from aviation’s past, “when travel used to be fun,” explains Wanzer. “When you travel nowadays, you take for granted that you’re getting in a machine and flying across the country. But back in the day, getting on a plane was prestigious, even exciting. We wanted to get back to that sense of wonder.” h

The design team selected furnishings and materials for their durability as well as their style, including the FLOR carpet tiles and white vinyl-and-chrome Thayer Coggin sofa and lounge chairs. Windows obscured by a pixelated pattern offer a glimpse into the Business Air offices next door.


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“Made in Mexico” takes on fresh appeal with Vía Raíz’s quality handmade goods tweaked for modern tastes. “I’m collaborating with a new generation of designers who are embracing their roots and weaving a sophisticated and minimalist aesthetic from centuries-old traditions,” says founder Jennifer Bolanos.

ES

IGN

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VIVA LA MEXICO!

AT FIRST BLUSH, PAIRING TRADITIONAL MEXICAN ART WITH A NORTHWEST PALETTE SEEMS TO BE AN AESTHETIC OXYMORON. How to square the bright colors and bold patterns

CARLY DIAZ

often found in blankets, pottery, and carvings south of the border with our region’s subdued grays and tans? Portlander Jennifer Bolanos tinkered with the elements of this design equation to launch, in November 2016, Vía Raíz (“via the roots” in Spanish). Though it started as a successful pop-up shop, the company is more than just another flash-in-the-pan gift source. With its modern take on imported textiles, furniture, ceramics, and jewelry, Vía Raíz is dedicated to debunking long-held stereotypes about Mexican craft. “We represent a new, modern style in Mexico that is still rooted in tradition and culture,” notes Bolanos, who grew up visiting her parents’ home state of Michoacán. Eschewing flashy oranges and reds, Bolanos works closely with Mexican designers, who in turn work with local artisans to create functional and decorative pieces that bridge the divide between ancestral craft and contemporary design. Bolanos recently launched a webshop and hopes to open a brick-and-mortar space in Portland later this year. She envisions it as more than just a store: “I picture a communal space where people can take part in tequila, mescal, and coffee tastings and explore this new burgeoning movement.” h

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Architectural Planters for Commercial and Residential Applications Full Design Services Available 517 E Pike Street Seattle WA 98122 206.329.4737 , www.ragenassociates.com

PrestigeCrafted.com

Architecture: DeForest Architects Photography: Benjamin Benschneider

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JOIN COROFLOT AND GRAY ON APRIL 25 DURING DESIGN WEEK PORTLAND FOR A TALK AND TOUR OF THE MOBILE WORK UNIT.

“MODULARITY IS CATNIP TO DESIGNERS,” says Laurence Sarrazin, founder of Portland design firm Los Osos. “I often systematize projects; it lets you keep your options open and frees you up to make decisions based solely on what works now.” She doubled down on that approach in her latest project, a new office for Coroflot, the design recruitment website. Coroflot was expanding and wanted a creative and flexible workspace that could evolve along with its needs. Sarrazin answered that need with the Mobile Work Unit—a 28-foot-long wheeled trailer topped with a post-andbeam Douglas-fir structure and clad with translucent polycarbonate panels. Inside, all furnishings except the office chairs are part of the innovative kit-of-parts framework that Sarrazin has dubbed STIX: a system

X-RAY VISION

THE APPEAL IS CLEAR.

Roche Bobois’s new Diapo dining table, created by Parisian designer René Bouchara, pairs a transparent glass top with a customizable base of intersecting planes of clear, laminated, and reflective glass whose colors and compositions shift as you view them from different angles. Each table is a visible exercise in contemporary elegance. Available at Roche Bobois, Seattle and Portland, roche-bobois.com h

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of poles, brackets, hooks, pegs, and accessories that allows its occupants endless opportunities for interior rearranging. The whole shebang resides—for now—inside a cavernous, “raw, and inspiring” former ambulance garage owned by Sarrazin and Coroflot cofounder Eric Ludlum (who is also her husband, co-founder of the industrial design website Core77, and owner of Portland retailer Hand-Eye Supply). “It’s a box-within-a-box approach— the bigger space communicates positive associations for Coroflot’s creative potential, and the smaller space expresses common design values such as attention to detail and quality fabrication,” says Sarrazin. “The MWU really changes the idea of an office cubicle; activity is confined, but imagination isn’t.” h

JOSH PARTEE

WORKSPACE ON WHEELS

Get tickets and see more at graymag.com/mobileoffice


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Stellar Collection

Diamond dust-and-concrete jewelry konzukshop.com/stellar

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Ninety-year-old lighting designer Harry Weitzer exudes energy and enthusiasm, especially when he’s working in his shop. His new collection includes pendants and table lamps featuring zigguratshaped pendants made of pliable aspen wood.

GOOD DESIGN KNOWS NO AGE, AND NEITHER, APPARENTLY, DOES 90-YEAR-OLD LIGHTING AND FURNITURE DESIGNER HARRY WEITZER, who just

rebooted his career, and his Bend, Oregon–based company, in March 2017 after 23 years of retirement. Weitzer ran a thriving company from the 1960s through the ’90s that created custom wooden furniture for major office and civic building projects; he outfitted the entire 27-story headquarters of Sunoco (then called the Sun Company) as well as many big East Coast libraries and universities. In 1994, Weitzer shuttered his 100-person firm. “I decided then that I would not do anything else for money—just for family and friends,” he recalls of his decision to keep producing on his own terms. That could have been the whole story of Weitzer’s design career, but in late 2016, after encouragement from his

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youngest daughter, Julia Pfeifer, he’s back in business. Together they launched Wood Lighting Design in March 2017; Weitzer helms the design and production, crafting each light from scratch in his home studio, and Pfeifer runs operations and marketing. Their first pieces include paperthin aspen wood and sanded acrylic combined in zigguratshaped shades for table lamps and a hanging pendant fixture, as well as a simple curved sconce. “My lamps don’t hide their construction. It’s part of their decoration,” explains Weitzer, who favors aspen for its translucency, low cost, workability, and longevity (it keeps its straw color even as it ages). The designer, who’s always prototyping—next in the works is a floor lamp—describes future pieces as “a moving target,” but he’s sure about one thing: “Retirement has been one of the most creative periods of my life.” h

ANDREW VANASSE

YOUTHFUL ZEAL


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Located in Seattle’s Northeast Capitol Hill, family-owned Tirto Furniture uses salvaged teak wood to produce contemporary furniture blending traditional Indonesian sensibilities with modern influences. 1908 E. Mercer St., Seattle, WA 98112 www.tirtofurniture.com graymag . com

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he saw the signs Acclaimed architect Alan Maskin’s rustic Olympic Peninsula retreat—presciently imagined, unconventionally purchased, and then patiently remodeled—gives new meaning to “dream house.” Written by RACHEL GALLAHER

DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Alan Maskin (Olson Kundig) and John Kennedy (Sundberg Kennedy Ly-Au Young Architects) interiors: Alan Maskin construction: Krekow Jennings


KEVIN SCOTT/OLSON KUNDIG

Architect Alan Maskin’s tiny renovated cabin on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula is tucked amid foliage. The former front porch now houses an office and dining room punctuated by a row of windows. “This cabin serves as the ideal antidote to my daily life, where I am constantly working on intense projects, going to meetings, and traveling,” says Maskin. “Out here there are no streetlights, very little noise. It’s monastic in a way that I really love.” graymag . com

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Seattle-based construction company Krekow Jennings created a new structural steel moment frame that secures all levels of the house to the foundation. A perforated zinc screen acts as a translucent curtain across the upstairs master bedroom. OPPOSITE: Throughout the cabin, art and thoughtful objets abound, including antique taxidermy, a 1970s Rais wood stove, and vintage furniture such as a curved leather sofa designed by Ueli Berger for De Sede.

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KEVIN SCOTT/OLSON KUNDIG

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his is a story about a house, but the story doesn’t start with the house. Instead it starts with a man on a blind date. The year was 2000, and the man was architect Alan Maskin, who lived in Seattle’s dynamic Capitol Hill neighborhood, sketching and designing by day (and night) at Olson Kundig’s Pioneer Square office. “I was in my own little orbit,” Maskin, now a principal at the firm, admits with a sheepish smile. “At the time, I couldn’t imagine living anywhere else. But then, all of a sudden, I was dating a marine biologist who lived in Port Townsend, this little town that took hours to get to every Friday night.”

After a year of frequent ferry trips—and a growing relationship that’s still going strong today—Maskin’s Capitol Hill–trumps–all mentality had atrophied, and he began to consider shifting his home base. “I had a really vivid dream about a tiny cottage with a view of the water,” he recalls. “I told my boyfriend and his brother about the dream and described the house. And his brother looked at me and said, ‘I think I know that house. It’s in my neighborhood.’” The cabin, a 750-square-foot 1938 structure on the Olympic Peninsula, wasn’t for sale, and its less-thanpristine state (a kitchen in need of refurbishing; outdated electrical, heating, and plumbing systems) would frighten away most people. Maskin, however, was intrigued. »

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: KEVIN SCOTT/OLSON KUNDIG; KEVIN SCOTT/OLSON KUNDIG; AARON LEITZ; ALAN MASKIN. OPPOSITE: KEVIN SCOTT/OLSON KUNDIG

THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Les Arcs seating designed by Charlotte Perriand mingles with Goodwill-sourced Honduran mahogany chairs in the dining room and office area. The original 1930s Dutch door still has scratches from a former resident’s dog. A simple glulam desk designed by Maskin takes up real estate at the front of the house. Finn, a portrait by artist Leiv Fagereng, hangs above the stairwell. OPPOSITE: Maskin designed the daybed in the corner of the living room. Throughout the cabin, lines of differentiation between new and old remain boldly visible; the original brown-stained cedar panels starkly contrast with the new plywood ceilings, walls, and stairs.


“I knew I could remodel it, and remodels are my favorite projects,” he says. Months of discussions ensued with the resident, a woman in her 50s who studied mysticism and astrology. Once she’d come around to the idea of moving—and after she’d checked the stars to determine the most promising closing date—Maskin hired an inspector. At one point during the inspector’s visit, a neighbor suddenly appeared, pointing to a dark mass hovering about 20 feet over the roof. It was a convocation of bald eagles, around a dozen in all. “You don’t see that every day,” drawled the neighbor. “Well,” Maskin replied with a laugh, “I might as well cancel the inspection. This seems to be a sign that I’m supposed to buy the house no matter what.” But instead of an immediate renovation, he opted for a meditative, decade-long design process, during which time he slept on a mattress in the attic. “I wanted to live in the house in order to study it,” he recalls now. “I wanted to observe how the sun moved through it, how the home worked acoustically and in the neighborhood, and how it could be transformed while still maintaining its character.” After a solid 10 years of daily study—“drawing and redrawing the house over and over again on my ferry ride to work each morning,” he recalls—Maskin was finally ready to remodel.

Joining forces with former Olson Kundig colleague John Kennedy of Sundberg Kennedy Ly-Au Young Architects and contractor Krekow Jennings, Maskin opted for several structural changes, but he was limited to interior and vertical moves due to zoning restrictions and health codes on the tiny lot. Together, the team revamped the former porch to serve as an office and dining area, transformed the upstairs into a bedroom with large west-facing windows, and installed a custom perforated zinc wall that filters light from the bedroom into the downstairs living area while maintaining privacy. While the cottage is largely a personal project, Maskin reveals that hints of Olson Kundig’s design ethos permeate every room. The skylights he punched into the new butterfly roof, as well as the material palette, were “influenced by Jim [Olson]’s use of verticality and views of nature in his Pioneer Square home, and by Tom Kundig’s ability to craft buildings from simple materials that you can buy at the lumberyard or hardware store,” he points out. And although the process of buying and designing the cabin was, in most ways, unconventional, Maskin’s commitment never wavered. Many with less fortitude would have quit after the first few hurdles, but for this architect, the signs always pointed toward home. »

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The upstairs bedroom offers views of Agate Passage, and double doors open to the newly added deck. Above the bed hangs sculptor Scott Fife’s Big Ed, a three-dimensional bust of the artist Edward Kienholz made out of sheetrock, screws, and cardboard. A Jib light, designed by Olson Kundig principal Jamie Slagel, provides illumination, and the 1960s Eames lounger offers an additional surface for repose. h

To see more of this home, head to graymag.com/maskin

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BEHIND THE BUILD

Q+A WITH CONTRACTOR KREKOW JENNINGS How long did this project last? Six months for construction, followed by additional custom furniture. What was the most interesting construction challenge? Preserving most of the existing house while adding on to it and remodeling within it. Much of the interior and exterior appear untouched, but they were. We built an intricate jewel box of a space within the original structure.

KEVIN SCOTT/OLSON KUNDIG

How did you tailor the use of specific materials to express the project’s vision? Alan was very focused on sustainability and following healthy building processes. He pushed us to find materials—such as flooring made from reclaimed glulam—that aligned with this goal. Is it different building a home for an architect versus a regular client? Absolutely. The development of the entire project, from design through construction, was more of an artistic endeavor. Alan had a unique passion, as well as immense respect for his building team. He truly inspired us to work with him in creating solutions to constructability challenges.

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out with the old A sweeping remodel of a 1930s Portland home leaves no stone (or ceiling or light switch) unturned. Written by LAUREN MANG

Photographed by JEREMY BITTERMANN

DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Yianni Doulis Architecture Studio interiors: Jessica Helgerson Interior Design construction: The Works

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“This house didn’t have a ton of its own character when we arrived, so we reimagined it,” says designer Jessica Helgerson. The only original architectural element the design team retained was the white marble fireplace in the living room. Lindsey Adelman’s Branching Bubble light, a Heritage chair by Frits Henningsen, a George Nakashima coffee table, and Fency side chairs by Marco Corti lend the space a decidedly modern feel, while new moldings, a plaster ceiling rosette, and a vintage oushak rug nod to the traditional.

E

verything had to go—everything but the marble fireplace in the living room, that is. After snapping up this 2,500-square-foot 1930s abode in Portland’s West Hills, the homeowners rang interior designer Jessica Helgerson, principal of her eponymous firm, to take their space down to the studs and reimagine it for their family of five. “The home had never been occupied by a family with small children until we moved in,” the homeowner recalls. The original layout—a master bedroom, a guest bedroom, and servants’ quarters—didn’t work for their needs. They needed more rooms—and new ceilings, walls, and floors while they were at it.

Along with architect Yianni Doulis, Helgerson and JHID senior designer Chelsie Lee devised a layout that yielded the additional space needed. They carved a room for the owners’ twin boys out of the square footage of the former office and guest bedroom, flipped the kitchen to the back of the house to improve access to the backyard, finished the basement to accommodate a family room and guest room, and added a flight of stairs to the newly finished attic. After stripping away outdated elements, the designers went to work, layering in interior details that feel both timeless and contemporary. Goodbye, servants’ bells and kitchen cupboards custom designed to store potatoes. Hello, modern furniture and chic herringbone floors. » graymag . com

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The expanded kitchen features charcoal-gray Caesarstone countertops, marble-tiled walls, a Neo Double Bar chandelier from O’lampia, and a center island with a base from Portland’s AD Busch that’s been topped with a glazed volcanic-stone slab from French manufacturer Pyrolave. “We wanted something that would contrast with the counters and feel light on the delicate base,” Helgerson notes. “It’s a beautiful material that’s a little bit crackly.” The countertops were expanded to a 36-inch depth to make room for the homeowners’ heaps of plants. The fireplace—a remnant of the original ground-floor study—was raised and rebuilt. Leaded-glass cabinets were designed from scratch to mimic the classic look of the home’s era. A plank ceiling contributes texture and helps disguise can lights. » graymag . com

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Another Lindsey Adelman light fixture illuminates the dining room, where built-ins with leaded-glass doors contain all manner of curios. On the walls, a delicate hand-drawn, hand-printed botanical wallcovering from the British wallpaper designer Marthe Armitage adds soft, muted patterning. A sturdy wood table from BDDW pairs well with slim-spindled, Windsorinspired chairs by Rhode Island’s O&G Studio. The colorful painting is by artist Britt Bass Turner.

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ABOVE: In the master bedroom, a vintage oushak rug from Atlanta’s Oriental Designer Rugs lies underfoot, while the chandelier, from London-based Ochre, imparts glamour. Vintage Edward Wormley Janus lounge chairs flank the coral-accented Float table. BELOW LEFT: In the twin boys’ room, construction firm The Works built custom bunk beds and petite storage nooks into the wall to maximize floor space for playtime. BELOW RIGHT: During the renovation, the home grew from two stories to four, thanks to the newly finished basement and attic. A staircase with a custom railing by Bill Lutes and pickets by Aaron Busch leads to the attic, an open space for work or play whose soft gray wooden slats make you “feel like you’re inside a ship,” as Helgerson says. »

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This narrow slice of a powder room— just 5 feet wide—didn’t exist in the original layout, but Helgerson’s team carved it out of real estate previously occupied by the kitchen. Despite its diminutive size, Helgerson maxed out the detailing, wrapping the walls and ceiling in coffered wood paneling. “The mirrors open it up a lot,” she notes. “And being in this carefully crafted little jewel box feels great.” The design team opted for brass fixtures from Waterworks—Helgerson deployed both brass and nickel fixtures in the home to help it feel fancier—and selected the Ball Light fixture in polished brass by designer Michael Anastassiades for its modern yet delicate shape. h

BEHIND THE BUILD

Q+A WITH CONTRACTOR THE WORKS How long did this project last? 18 months. What was the most interesting construction challenge? Raising the house and digging out the basement to create a full-height living space. We were able to add a dramatic sunken family room with high ceilings, as well as a lovely guest suite and wine cellar. How did you use materials to express the project’s vision? In addition to a number of custommilled moldings, we milled special stair newels and balusters from steel and had white oak milled for the herringbone floors. We also commissioned custom leaded-glass cabinet doors. What’s the secret to good collaboration with a designer? Mutual respect and an appreciation and understanding of the designer’s vision—as well as lots of conversations about expectations and details! As a builder, it’s an exciting challenge to rise to the occasion and accomplish the desired outcome.

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WORK. LIVE. PLAY. REASON TO SUBSCRIBE NO. 34:

Issue releases June 2017. We’ll deliver it to your mailbox. Subscribe online by May 1. graymag.com

#GRAYMAGAZINE graymag . com

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| resources |

30. Ola Volo Vancouver olavolo.com

38. Little Garage Shop Portland littlegarageshop.com

DFA d-f-a.com

30. Sodo Track Seattle sodotrack.com

Fieldwork Design and Architecture Portland fieldworkdesign.net

30. Spencer Keeton Cunningham spencerkeetoncunningham.tumblr.com

40. Eagle Rock Ventures Seattle eaglerockventures.com

19. SCENE: RETAIL Design Within Reach Portland and Seattle dwr.com

20. HAPPENINGS ADDRESS Vancouver addressassembly.com Design Week Portland Portland designweekportland.com ICFF New York, NY icff.com

30. Urban Artworks Seattle urbanartworks.org 32. Cuniform Seattle wearecuniform.com 32. White/Space Seattle whitespacejewelry.com 34. WILDFANG Portland wildfang.com

40. Mallet Incorporated Seattle malletinc.com 40. San Fermo Restaurant Seattle sanfermoseattle.com 44. Andrea Greenway Interior Design Vancouver agreenwaydesign.com 44. Bosa Properties Vancouver bosaproperties.com 44. Dalina Vancouver dalina.ca

Vancouver Design Week Vancouver vancouverdesignwk.com

34. Bright Volumes Portland brightvolumes.com

WantedDesign New York, NY wanteddesignnyc.com

34. Jennifer Ament Seattle jenniferament.com

44. Matthew McCormick Vancouver matthewmccormick.ca

34. Sandeep Johal Vancouver sandeepjohal.com

44. Pretty Things Richmond, B.C. prettythingsvancouver.ca

36. Dame Portland damerestaurant.com

44. Scott Landon Antiques Vancouver scottlandonantiques.com

STYLE: THE HUNT 30. 4Culture Seattle 4culture.org 30. Cyrcle cyrcle.com 30. David Rice Portland xplrstudios.com 30. Forest For The Trees Portland forestforthetreesnw.com 30. Josh Keyes Portland joshkeyes.net 30. Mary Iverson Seattle maryiverson.com

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36. Maxwell Gray Interiors Portland maxwellgray interiors.com

46. Hart+Tipton Construction Vancouver harttipton.com

38. SkB Architects Seattle skbarchitects.com

46. Kengo Kuma & Associates kkaa.co.jp

38. Upstream Music Fest + Summit Seattle upstreammusicfest.com

46. Merrick Architecture Vancouver and Victoria, B.C. merrickarch.com

38. Vulcan Inc. Seattle vulcan.com

46. Toko Garden Design Vancouver tokogarden.ca 48. Hetki / A Moment Vancouver hetkiamoment.com 50. Asia America Portland asiaamericafurniture.com 50. Big Daddy’s Antiques Seattle bdantiques.com 50. The Birdcage Kirkland, WA birdcagehome.com

60. Designtex designtex.com 60. Gallagher Portland glgr.com 60. Hoffman Construction Company Portland hoffmancorp.com 60. Nike Beaverton, OR nike.com 60. SRG Partnership Portland srgpartnership.com

50. City Home Portland cityhomepdx.com

68. Fisher Marantz Stone Seattle fmsp.com

52. Hennebery Eddy Architects Portland henneberyeddy.com

68. Hoshide Wanzer Architects Seattle hw-architects.com

52. Hilliard Lamps hilliardlamps.com

68. Image Mill Monroe, WA imagemill.com

52. LightLite Portland lightlite.com 52. Osmose Design Portland osmosedesign.com 52. Q Restaurant & Bar Portland q-portland.com 52. R&H Construction Portland rhconst.com 52. Uncommon Cabinetry Portland and Corvallis, OR uncommoncabinetry.com 56. Westerly Handmade Shoes Vancouver westerlyhandmade shoes.com 60. Ceilings Plus ceilingsplus.com

68. Jason Dallas Design Seattle jasondallasdesign.com 68. Northwest Woodworks, Inc. Woodinville, WA nwwi.biz 68. Velotta Construction Co. Fall City, WA velottaconstruction.com 72. Vía Raíz Portland viaraiz.com 74. Core77 core77.com 74. Coroflot coroflot.com 74. Hand-Eye Supply Portland handeyesupply.com


| market | THE ULTIMATE BUYER’S GUIDE Alchemy Collections

Kat & Maouche

Located in downtown Seattle, Alchemy Collections is your Western Washington source for modern and contemporary furniture. Sensing a void in the Seattle furniture landscape, Alchemy Collections opened in 2004, bringing a modern yet accessible furniture venue to the everyday Seattleite.

Traditional Techniques + Modern Design Specializing in authentic vintage Moroccan rugs. Each is carefully sourced and chosen for its expressive modern style and cultural significance. 33 N.W. 4th Ave., Portland, OR katandmaouche.com Instagram @katandmaouche

(206) 448-3309 alchemycollections.com

The Shade Store

Porcelanosa

The Shade Store is an American custom window treatments company, specializing in handcrafted shades, blinds, and draperies. An exclusive designer collection of more than 1,000 materials makes it easier than ever to customize something you love for your windows.

Porcelanosa is one of the leading manufacturers and distributors of tiles, bathroom collections, kitchen cabinetry, mosaics, and hardwood in the industry. Porcelanosa is known for making its advanced design innovations readily available to both consumers and the A&D community.

(800) 820-7817 theshadestore.com

(206) 673-8395 porcelanosa-usa.com

Lapchi Rug Design Studio Look into the heart of Lapchi and you’ll find a rug maker with a wealth of experience in custom rugs. Lapchi produces handmade rugs in custom colors and sizes at no additional cost. Make your next rug a custom rug by Lapchi. (503) 719-6589 Pearl District, Portland lapchi.com

Driftwood Modern Driftwood Modern offers a carefully curated collection of authentic midcentury modern fine art and furniture. Located just 15 minutes north of Seattle in charming waterfront Edmonds, we provide pieces of interest, quality, and integrity. Beauty in our lives! (360) 298-1246 driftwoodmodern.com

not2big® React. Reduce. Rethink. Recycle. Relax. At not2big, we build modern artisan furniture and accessories one piece at a time. Handcrafted and individually numbered, no two pieces are exactly alike. Our designs combine the warmth of wood with a creative mix of other materials to produce timeless furniture that is functional and beautiful. Whether you choose an in-house design or a custom piece, it will be a true original. Our goal is to inspire, delight, and surprise, bringing our clients a personalized experience and providing them with a unique product not available anywhere else. We’re rethinking how furniture is made. (425) 503-0710 | not2big.com

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| resources |

74. Los Osos Portland los-osos.com 74. Roche Bobois Seattle and Portland roche-bobois.com 76. Wood Lighting Design Bend, OR woodlightingdesign.com

78. FEATURE Krekow Jennings Seattle krekowjennings.com Leiv Fagereng Portland leivfagereng.com Olson Kundig Seattle olsonkundig architects.com Rais Stoves raisstoves.com Sundberg Kennedy Ly-Au Young Architects Seattle sklarchitects.com

86. FEATURE AD Busch Portland adbusch.com

Lindsey Adelman lindseyadelman.com Marthe Armitage via Hamilton Weston hamiltonweston.com Michael Anastassiades michael anastassiades.com Ochre ochre.net O&G Studio oandgstudio.com Pinch Design pinchdesign.com Pyrolave pyrolave.com The Works Portland theworkspdx.com Waterworks waterworks.com Yianni Doulis Architecture Studio Portland 503-467-4826

98. OBSESSION Bellevue Arts Museum Bellevue, WA bellevuearts.org

BDDW bddw.com

Electric Coffin Seattle electriccoffin.com

Caesarstone caesarstone.com

Interalia Projects interaliaprojects.com

Carl Hansen & Son carlhansen.com George Nakashima Woodworker nakashima woodworker.com Jessica Helgerson Interior Design Portland jhinteriordesign.com

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AD INDEX 77. Ben Trogdon Architects Seattle bentrogdon architects.com

43. Bradlee Distributors Seattle subzero.com/seattle 27. Design Week Portland Portland designweekportland.com 7. Design Within Reach Seattle and Portland dwr.com 35. Dovetail General Contractors Seattle dovetailgc.com 75. EWF Modern Portland ewfmodern.com 25. Global Affairs Canada, Ontario Canada, BC Wood international.gc.ca ontario.ca bcwood.com 45. Hammer & Hand Seattle and Portland hammerandhand.com 67. Hotel Theodore Seattle hoteltheodore.com 24. ICFF New York icff.com 77. Kartners kartners.com 75. Konzuk konzukshop.com 12. Kozai Modern Vancouver kozaimoderntrade.com 18. Kush Handmade Rugs Portland kushrugs.com 12. Madera Furniture Company Tacoma, WA maderafurnitureco.com

69. Maison Inc. Portland maisoninc.com

100. Royal Building Products expressionofwow.com

59. Mallet Seattle malletinc.com

21. Seattle Design Center seattledesigncenter.com

23. Marvin Windows and Doors marvin.com

13. Schuchart/Dow Seattle schuchartdow.com

37. Milgard Windows & Doors milgard.com Available through: Lundgren Enterprises Seattle lundgrenenterprises.com

57. Schultz Miller Seattle schultzmiller.com

26. Modern Architecture + Design Society mads.media/hometours

11. The Shade Store Seattle and Portland theshadestore.com 31. Spark Modern Fires sparkfires.com 28. Sun Valley Bronze sunvalleybronze.com

10. The Modern Fan Co. modernfan.com

77. Tirto Furniture Seattle tirtofurniture.com

71. OPUS Vancouver Vancouver opusvancouver.com

2. Turgeon Raine Jewelers Seattle turgeonraine.com

55. Porcelanosa Seattle porcelanosa-usa.com 99. Portland Japanese Garden Portland japanesegarden.com 73. Prestige Residential Construction Seattle prestigecrafted.com 73. Ragen & Associates Seattle ragenassociates.com 3. Roche Bobois Seattle and Portland roche-bobois.com 9. Room & Board Seattle roomandboard.com

39. Tufenkian Portland tufenkianportland.com 51. Urban Hardwoods Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles urbanhardwoods.com 26. Vancouver Design Week Vancouver vancouverdesignwk.com 75. William & Wayne Seattle williamandwayne.com


| market | THE ULTIMATE BUYER’S GUIDE

Greenstems

Stillwater Dwellings

CUSTOM PLANT ART | CUSTOM INTERIOR PLANTSCAPING Vancouver, B.C.–based company Greenstems produces a variety of specialized interior plantscapes, locally sourced and unique to each space and to each individual. Founder and designer Heather March expresses a truly West Coast feel with her preserved moss and fern art pieces, producing a snapshot of the lush green temperate rainforest.

Rooted in contemporary Pacific Northwest design, Stillwater Dwellings’ homes are built using a systems-based sustainable construction method that provides design flexibility and cost predictability. The Stillwater team is with you every step of the way, from determining building site feasibility to personalizing finish options. Start with one of over 20 floor plans available, or have us design a custom home just for you.

(604) 568-1314 | @greenstems greenstems.ca

3950 6th Avenue N.W., Seattle, WA 98107 | (206) 547-0565 stillwaterdwellings.com

ILVE Offers Custom Color Program for its Italian Majestic and Nostalgie Ranges With over 220 colors on offer— resulting in more personalized options than ever before—ILVE ranges are available in 60”, 48”, 40”, 36” and 30” sizes. Options include single and double ovens, as well as dual fuel and all-gas connections. ilveappliances.com

WildCraft Studio WildCraft offers immersive adult education in craft, textiles and Native art, with regionally-focused expeditions exploring the wild foods, plant medicines and geologies of the Pacific Northwest. Locations in Portland and White Salmon, WA Register for 2017 classes wildcraftstudioschool.com

Fran’s Chocolates Considered one of the best chocolatiers in the U.S., Fran’s Chocolates offers elegant presentations of award-winning chocolates for every occasion. Each confection is handmade in small batches with the finest local and organic ingredients to reflect a passion for exquisite flavors and the pure taste of chocolate. Visit us online or at one of our four Seattle-area retail stores: Downtown, Georgetown, University Village, and Bellevue. franschocolates.com

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| obsession |

WHY I COLLECT COOL FRAMES By JENNIFER NAVVA MILLIKEN, DESIGN CURATOR Photographed by HANK DREW

“Eyeglasses have been in use since Italian glassblowers developed the ability to grind lenses 800 years ago; the fact that this simple device is still our go-to solution for imperfect eyesight demonstrates that their power extends beyond remedy. Two lenses and a structure to hold them on the face: those very simple constraints continue to inspire designers. The first interesting frames I discovered were a men’s pair from the late ’50s or early ’60s— I was 19, a student at Western Washington University, and at the time I was hugely influenced by Morrissey. I thought it was great to go around looking like him. Now I have about a dozen in my collection, which I’ve picked up everywhere from Israel to South Korea. Right now I’m looking for a particularly rare pair: a Christian Dior design from the late 1970s that was customized with graduated rose-toviolet lenses. I can’t find them anywhere! But I’ll keep looking.” h

FROM TOP: Purchased in Jerusalem, 2000; purchased in New York City, 2015; ca. 1960s men’s vintage, purchased in New York City; ca. 1980s Ray-Ban, purchased in Jaffa, Israel, 2006; Tesi Art, purchased in Tel Aviv, 2012; Tokio Kumagai, purchased in Seoul, 1997; self-designed and commissioned, purchased in Seattle, 2003; Fendi, purchased in Rome, 2005.

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SEE IT NOW: “FUTURE MACHINE”

GRAY is proud to be the media sponsor of “Electric Coffin: The Future Machine,” guest curated by Jennifer Navva Milliken at the Bellevue Arts Museum through September 10, 2017. Mark your calendars for bimonthly panel discussions with the collaborators. bellevuearts.org


The Portland Japanese Garden thanks its generous Grand Opening Year sponsors

Welcome

Opens to the public on April 2, 2017

After decades of dreaming and years of doing, the Portland Japanese Garden is unveiling our new Cultural Village. Explore new Gardens, galleries, and more.

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There’s building. Then there’s transforming.

Zuri® Premium Decking and Celect® Cellular Composite Siding were created for homeowners and building professionals who embrace and demand seamless beauty, effortless longevity and unlimited possibilities. Make your exterior project a great one. Give your exterior an upgrade. Call Brannan Olsen at 855-734-3668. Explore Celect and Zuri at ExpressionOfWow.com. © 2017 Royal Building Products

GRAY No. 33  

Pacific Northwest Design: The Hunt

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