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RENOVATIONS

INTERIORS // ARCHITECTURE // FASHION // ART // DESIGN

PACIFIC NORTHWEST DESIGN

N O 42 :

OCT. / NOV. 2018

Young guns, historic renos, killer interiors. This changes everything.


diamond chair, 1952 by harry bertoia - womb chair, 1948 by eero saarinen - made in the usa by knoll

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WINNERS SAY “WHAT?” WHAT: Design’s biggest night WHEN: Nov. 29

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AUTHENTICALLY SPARK! Fires designed and engineered to be extraordinary. See our photo gallery at www.sparkfires.com or 203.791.2725 Where family and friends gather.

Occidental Winery Tasting Room Bodega, Sonoma Coast, CA Featuring the SPARK Linear Burner System Indoor Architect: Nielsen:Schuh Architects Amy Nielsen and Richard Schuh Photo: Bruce Damonte Photography

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Photo Michel Gibert. 1Conditions apply, ask your store for more details. 2Program available on selected items and subject to availability.

“This collection is a tribute to the adventurer we all dreamed of being. A journey is a transformative experience, and we wanted each piece to capture the feeling of bringing home worldly treasures from faraway places.”

Montgolfière, sofas. La Parisienne, Chess, cocktail tables. Up, lamps. Design Marcel Wanders.

French Art de Vivre

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Enjoy a shower that simulates the soaking deluge of a warm summer downpour. This contemporarystyle rainhead features innovative Katalyst air-induction technology, which efficiently mixes air and water to produce large water droplets and deliver a powerful, thoroughly drenching overhead shower experience. Let’s make your dream a reality. Visit your nearest showroom where our skilled consultants can help you recreate this look or design one of your own.

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cont 49

40

66

N O 42

THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING

18. hello

Ch-ch-changes.

NEWS 35. happenings

Design news and events.

PEOPLE

INTERIORS + ARCHITECTURE

66. interview

88. interiors

Jonathan Junker (cofounder of Graypants Lighting) and Londonbased designer Lee Broom talk shop about the fast-paced, rapidly changing lighting design industry.

72. studio GIVING 49. gift guide

Presents that show you’re in the know: our editors’ picks for the top trends to take home this holiday.

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Two designer BFFs create the ultimate friendship bracelet: a new BC-based interiors firm that’s breaking the Pacific Northwest design mold.

80. profile

Meet three individuals fighting to change design thinking and education paradigms through advocacy for inclusive design.

With a part haunted house, part Moulin Rouge vibe, this Seattle home renovation offers a spooky study in spectacular design.

96. hospitality

Inspired by eccentric Hollywood billionaire Howard Hughes, Vancouver’s H Tasting Lounge redefines the prosaic hotel lobby bar.

100. residential

Gold is back, and Vancouver designer Aleem Kassam makes 24-karat magic in a glamorous downtown condo.


tents 72

104. interiors

Seattle designer Stephen Dooley infuses a Savannah townhome with a balanced measure of Southern charm and PNW aesthetics.

112. hospitality

A local couple in Long Beach, Washington, tackles the refresh of the state’s oldest continuously running hotel, proving that not everything need be new to be well designed.

88

120. architecture

A Seattle architect creates a bespoke training space for a serious Vancouver cyclist.

124. workspace

For anyone who’s ever joked about spending the night at work, branding agency Latitude’s new Portland digs—complete with chic bedrooms and a home-worthy kitchen—are the ultimate office goals.

118. commercial

Coworking company WeWork transforms Portland’s historic Custom House with inspiring new design moves.

BACK OF BOOK 126. resources

Design professionals, furnishings, and suppliers featured in this issue.

96

On the Cover

Not your typical conference room in the Portland office of creative agency, Latitude, designed by Prospect Refuge Studio. SEE PAGE

124 Photographed by CARRIE VALENTINE

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| hello |

the millionaire club As of this issue, GRAY has published over 1 million copies of the magazine. We look forward to sharing many more with you in the years ahead.

Design House Northwest

THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING. In this issue, we focus on renovations and on change—something we at GRAY have never shied away from as long as it spurs growth and feeds our core mission to raise the profile of exceptional design. We know that change means living simultaneously in the past, present, and future, and regardless of the scope of a project (from historic hotels to minimal modern apartments), that’s a challenge. And that’s why we have the highest esteem for the game-changing moves of the individuals and firms featured in the following pages. The Northwest has always been a vanguard of innovation, the great driver of change. In keeping with this regional zeitgiest, we’ll introduce you to three powerhouse thought leaders who are fighting for meaningful change in inclusive design, then send you inside the time-honored Judge Ronald House, where you’ll see the genius new interiors that marry the home’s original splendor with modern panache. And because we believe that change comes on many levels (including our own pages), we’re introducing a new column in this issue that features one globally celebrated designer interviewing another. This time it’s Graypants’ Jonathan Junker and London-based Lee Broom discussing the evolution of their respective businesses and their experiences in the lighting design industry. Enjoy! Shawn Williams Publisher

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We are thrilled to announce Design House Northwest, a designer show house in Seattle benefiting Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center (pg 41). Follow our behind-the-scenes series launching in the next issue through the house’s grand opening next fall.


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N O 42

THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING ™

CEO/FOUNDER + PUBLISHER

Shawn Williams

CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER

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Solid Color, Surface-printed Wood Grain or Clear Blades

CONTRIBUTORS

Andrea Arias Hadani Ditmars The Fix Photo Group Andrew Latreille Aaron Leitz Ema Peter Melissa Righero Luis Valdizon Carrie Valentine Nate Watters Lauren D. Zbarsky INTERNS

Claire Butwinick Nohea Puulei Katy Totah

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California: Alan Braden alan@graymag.com Canada: Kyle Gray kyle@graymag.com

Oregon: Craig Allard Miller craig@graymag.com Oregon: Lisa House lisa@graymag.com ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

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No. 42. Copyright ©2018. Published bimonthly (DEC, FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT) by GRAY Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. While every attempt has been made, GRAY cannot guarantee the legality, completeness, or accuracy of the information presented and accepts no warranty or responsibility for such. GRAY is not responsible for loss, damage, or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, photography, art, or any other unsolicited material. Unsolicited material will not be returned. If submitting material, do not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by GRAY in writing. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GRAY, 5628 Airport Way S., Ste. 330 Seattle, WA 98108 Subscriptions $30 us for one year; $50 us for two years.

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M E TA L L O 1 0 0

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| contributors |

TO THE TRADE IN THE SEATTLE DESIGN CENTER dfgseattle.com

HADANI DITMARS hadaniditmars.com pg 96

RACHEL EGGERS pg 112

ANDREW LATREILLE andrewlatreille.com pg 100

AARON LEITZ aaronleitz.com pg 88

EMA PETER emapeter.com pg 96, 120

NATE WATTERS natewatters.com pg 80

AMANDA ZURITA amandazurita.com pg 88, 104

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Extremely Handmade. By Tufenkian.

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Graham Baba Architects

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this changes everything

NEWS

SALLY PAINTER PHOTOGRAPHY/ESI DESIGN

Written by CLAIRE BUTWINICK & KATY TOTAH

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| news |

Once Portland’s main power station, the newly renovated and renamed Power + Light building is now a modern workplace that boasts a spot on the National Register of Historic Places. Striving to preserve the building’s unique history during the remodel, New York City–based experience design studio ESI Design deployed a clever (but powerful) motif throughout the building’s interior: a pattern of connected electrical circuits appears on custom-designed carpets, light fixtures, and railings, as well as accent walls and wayfinding. At 265,000 square feet, the building offers plenty of office space, and tenants will have access to a conference center, fitness center, contemporary lounge, and large rooftop deck.

DIPLOMATIC DESIGN

The new Mexican consulate in Seattle—which opened its doors in July in the former Harvard Exit Theatre on Capitol Hill—presents a new take on a venerable classic. After its purchase by Eagle Rock Ventures in 2015, the 93-year-old structure underwent an extensive transformation at the hands of SHW Architects and Dovetail General Contractors. The firm not only reconstructed the building from the inside out, but also uncovered and reinstalled the previously boarded-up 10-foot-tall windows, installed an elevator, and turned a third-floor ballroom into office space. The team also incorporated interior glass partitions and several refurbished chandeliers, retaining touches of the building’s civic history. »

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: SALLY PAINTER PHOTOGRAPHY/ESI DESIGN; JILL HARDY, COURTESY DOVETAIL GENERAL CONTRACTORS

POWER PLAY


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| news |

Although he’s had numerous gallery shows over his career, Seattle artist Dylan Neuwirth is stepping into a new realm this fall with his first solo museum exhibition. Running October 12, 2018, through March 24, 2019, at the Bellevue Arts Museum, OMNIA depicts Neuwirth’s life journey via five interconnected installations set throughout the exterior and interior of the museum. Neuwirth uses neon, glass, sculpture, video, and virtual reality to demonstrate the impact of digital media on his life, from childhood to the current day.

hap pen ing s

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BEND OR BUST

Marking its fourth year, Bend Design 2018, presented by ScaleHouse (October 25–27), will offer three days of speakers, hands-on exhibitions, and interactive workshops celebrating design and its communal impact. Hosted at various Bend, Oregon, venues, the event will feature speakers April Greiman and Civilization’s Michael Ellsworth and Gabriel Stromberg, among others. Plus, Bend Design, along with Civilization and FISK Projects, is organizing Bend or Bust, a unique four-day road trip that starts in Seattle and includes design-related events, movies, and conversations (as well as a stop in Portland) as it winds its way to Bend.

AND THE WINNER IS... It’s awards season again, so get ready to party with GRAY! Join us November 9 for the 2018 AIA Portland Architecture Awards at Revolution Hall and November 5 for the 2018 AIA Seattle Honor Awards for Washington Architecture at Benaroya Hall. Each evening will recognize the diverse perspectives and types of work

from architects in each state. On November 29, celebrate the best of Northwest design at the second annual GRAY Awards at The Sanctuary. Assessed by our panel of all-star judges—including Jaime Hayon, Elaine Molinar of Snøhetta, and the design team at AvroKO— the winning designers will be honored for their innovative, intelligent, and striking work. »

FROM TOP: NATHANIEL WILLSON; APRIL GREIMAN

GOING SOLO


Š 2018 Design Within Reach, Inc.

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Discover works by these designers and others at our stores. Stop by today or book a complimentary design session in advance at dwr.com/studios. 825 NW 13TH AVE., PORTLAND | 503.220.0200 1918 FIRST AVE., SEATTLE | 206.443.9900

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MICHELLE DIRKSE

| news |

In June 2018, Seattle-based interior designer Michelle Dirkse teamed up with eight local artists to launch her first textile line. The vibrant collection features 23 patterns, all of which reflect Dirkse’s eclectic design style while highlighting the individuality of each artist. Collaborating artists, including Jeff Gerber, Mya Kerner, and Dana Mooney, each created a unique piece of art (from shapely geometrics to softly blended watercolors), which Dirkse then used to create designs fit for area rugs, fabrics, and wallpapers. “It’s really cool that I get to take something that was handmade and turn it into something that is accessible for all,” she says.

ALISON KENT

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CAROLINE CECIL

Acacia, the latest line from Portland’s Caroline Cecil Textiles, features three new patterns inspired by the Egyptian archives at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. Founder, CEO, and creative director Caroline Cecil says her connection with the artifacts in the exhibit led her to spend hours sketching the treasures and then transform them into neutral, patterned designs.

FILLING SPACES

Last year, when Deepali Kalia closed the physical location of Filling Spaces, her Portlandbased fabric and home goods company, and moved business to a to-the-trade and online-only platform, it wasn’t as much the end of an era as a step toward a new beginning. The brand’s Mud and Overdye collections are produced in Delhi using traditional Indian techniques, but their muted colors are intended to blend well in Western homes. h

FROM TOP LEFT: ALISON KENT; HARIS KENJAR; GEORGE BARBERIS; RACHELLE HACMAN OF NARRATIVE NORTHWEST

Any trip to the beach is enhanced by whimsical prints from Vancouverbased Alison Kent Home. In September 2017, Kent, former co-owner of Joue Design, stepped out on her own to launch her eponymous solo brand. Proffering a wide line of products, including coastal-inspired prints and fabrics, Kent’s designs are inspired by sights encountered during her international travels. Kent also draws upon her background in architecture and fashion as she creates each handmade, locally manufactured piece.


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this changes everything

giving

TARIK KIZILKAYA

From right angles to shades of gilded rose, this year’s home dÊcor trends span a wide breadth of styles. Our editors have rounded up their favorite finishes, fixtures, furniture, and more in the ultimate holiday sourcebook on what to give . . . and what they hope to get!

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP:

TREND:

GEOMETRIC SHAPES

GIFT IDEA:

“Sharp angles are a perfect anecdote to the soft curves we’ve been seeing recently, and bold shapes in neutral tones are making a ’70s-inspired statement this fall. This Dusen Dusen woven cotton throw adds that patterned punch to any sofa and is just the ticket for cozying up next to the fireplace.” —LAUREN MANG, DIGITAL EDITOR

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Alto Surface pendant, Cedar & Moss + Esque Studio, cedarandmoss.com, esque-studio.com; Who Goes There? candleholder, Blu Dot, bludot.com; Signal Collection, Clayhaus Tile, clayhaustile.com; Fluted island, Henrybuilt, henrybuilt.com .

Dusen Dusen fold throw blanket, $228, Woonwinkel, woonwinkelhome.com


Maybe it’s the beds?

Maybe it’s the coffee? Maybe it’s the signature amenities our guests find at all our hotels? In Portland, Seattle, Tacoma, Nashville and New Orleans, we make hotels places that people want to be. We create experiences that are memorable and unique. It’s why we do what we do. We also like to sleep in a bit, so we made them super comfortable. Maybe that’s it. Find out for yourself at provenanehotels.com.

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| giving | FROM LEFT: Sign Filo chair by MDF Italia, Livingspace, livingspace.com; Tara Collection by Dornbracht, Chown Hardware, chown.com; Cuba Libre 2 reversible ottoman, Roche Bobois, roche-bobois.com

TREND:

ROSE GOLD

Rose gold U-shaped earrings, $24 to $28, Baleen, shopbaleen.com

GIFT IDEA:

“I’m seeing rose gold everywhere, especially in lighting and accent pieces, so Seattle-based jeweler Baleen’s handformed U-shaped earrings are my go-to gift this year. Made out of a single 14-karat rose gold–plated wire, the chic, open-ended design allows the piece to be worn horizontally or vertically.” —ABBY BEACH, PRODUCTION + EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

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| giving |

FROM LEFT: Cloak pendant, Room &

Board, roomandboard.com; 36-inch Pro Series range by ILVE Appliances, ilveappliances.com; Barcelona 2 freestanding tub, Victoria + Albert Baths, vandabaths.com; Keller Supply Company, kellersupply.com

TREND:

MATTE BLACK

GIFT IDEA:

“I’m a minimalist at heart, so the recent embrace of matte black in faucets and fixtures is right up my alley (so sophisticated!), and this set of bowls captures everything I look for when giving a gift: simplicity, function, and beauty.” —RACHEL GALLAHER, SENIOR EDITOR Phase bowls (set of three), $165, Base Modern, base-modern.com

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| giving |

TREND:

STONE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Stoned: Architects, Designers, & Artists on the Rocks by Thijs Demeulemeester (Lannoo Publishers), Barnes & Noble, barnesandnoble.com; Neolith Calacatta Gold, FM Distributing, fmdistributing.com; Four Seasons Barstool, Knoll, Hive Modern, hivemodern.com; Sandstone II wool, silk, and linen carpet in light linen, Tufenkian Artisan Carpets, tufenkian.com

Michele Quan stoneware chain links, $255, Brian Paquette Interiors, shop.brian paquetteinteriors.com

GIFT IDEA:

“We’re seeing something of a new stone age with this prehistoric material made modern in diverse applications from surface treatments to finished objects. I’m loving these stoneware chain links from Brooklyn artist Michele Quan as a way to channel the paleo palette at home.” —JENNIFER MCCULLUM, MANAGING EDITOR

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Made. A collaboration with GRAY. Introducing the limited-edition MZ basket by Portland designer and artist Zach Matheson. Available now.

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MZ


| giving | TREND:

MARIGOLD

GIFT IDEA:

“Lustrous yellow accent pieces can brighten up any room, and when you’re feeling bold, a piece of furniture upholstered in a marigold hue makes a strong style statement. Cross anyone’s threshold with a magnum bottle of bubbles—a golden party essential—in your arms and you’ll win the night.” —STACY KENDALL, CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER

Gruet Blanc de Blancs magnum bottle (1.5L), $42, Gruet Winery, gruetwinery.com

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Yellow Gold

custom carpet, silk and cotton, Brunschwig & Fils, kravet.com; Currey & Company Moineaux lantern, Urban Interiors & Thomasville, urbaninteriors.com; Loft sofa by Bensen, Inform Interiors, informinteriors.com, informseattle.com


INSPIRATION

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CURATION

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this changes everything

PEOPLE

“When we were developing our plan for Studio Roslyn, we spent just as much time discussing the culture we wanted to create as we did the actual business side of things.”

LUIS VALDIZON

— KATE SNYDER, COFOUNDER AND DESIGNER, STUDIO ROSLYN

Kate Snyder (left) and Jessica MacDonald of Vancouver-based interiors firm Studio Roslyn

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Lee Broom (left) and Jonathan Junker at Inform Interiors Seattle, with Broom’s latest collection, Observatory, on view.

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lee broom INTERVIEWED BY JONATHAN JUNKER, GRAYPANTS Edited for length and clarity by STACY KENDALL Photographed by THE FIX PHOTO GROUP

On a recent West Coast tour, renowned London-based lighting, furniture, and accessories designer Lee Broom made stops at Inform Interiors in Seattle and Vancouver to debut his latest collection, Observatory—astral-inspired lighting that includes the Eclipse light, which won a Best of NYCxDesign award this past spring. In Seattle, GRAY introduced Broom to lighting designer Jonathan Junker, cofounder of Seattle- and Amsterdam-based Graypants studio (known best for its sustainable scraplights) and listened in on their conversation about the state of lighting and the business of design. —STACY KENDALL

JJ: One of the first things that came to my mind was to congratulate you on over 10 years in this business! But I also wanted to ask you to rewind and remember where you were when you started.

uncertainty about the skill set required to run a business, can be a good thing. I think it’s much more beneficial when you don’t have a point of reference or any peers doing the same thing.

LB: When you set out in this business, you want to make whatever you’re doing a success. Looking back, a kind of naïveté in what you’re doing, or an

JJ: I agree; it would be easy to intimidate yourself if you knew everything 100 percent right off the bat—you would treat things very differently. My background

as an architect had me at a computer all day long, and as much as I love to design and finish a house, it can take years. But with an object, you can make one every few weeks, get your hands dirty, and really perfect it. I’ve found a lot of joy in those aspects. Lee, I especially like the honesty in the materials you choose, and it seems that you try to embrace local craftsmanship. How do you turn a handmade craft into a production object? LB: A good way to start your business is to work with small manufacturers and craftspeople in your local area. Our crystal lightbulb was produced in one of the last remaining lead-crystal factories in the UK, which was struggling at the time. When that product became really successful, the factory got a lot of accolades. »

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“With Observatory, we want people to be able to create their own constellations. I’m looking forward to seeing how other designers utilize our products.” —LEE BROOM, DESIGNER

LEE BROOM

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Eventually it was too much for them to do, and they proposed we use one of their submanufacturers in the Czech Republic, where there were 30 [workers] cutting the crystal rather than three. It was really nice to build up a relationship with craftspeople, which we still have, but if something becomes really popular, you do have to industrialize yourself to meet the market. JJ: Right; one of our first projects was a recycled cardboard lamp. We literally used to dumpster-dive for stuff to make it ourselves. At some point, though, you have to move on. We ended up partnering with a large-scale corrugator who now makes custom pieces for us. LB: I do feel like lighting is having a bit of a renaissance with new and more

tiny pendant and a sconce to pieces up to 10 feet in diameter. We’ll never stop evolving those. LB: I feel like it’s quite different in Europe because there, traditionally, you design a product and you hope it becomes a classic that will never change. I’ve noticed that in North America, people want more custom work— different sizes or different finishes. Europe is now adjusting to that a bit more, stepping away from the idea that something has to be what it is. JJ: Exactly. Our latest line is much more technical; it was developed in Europe, and we partnered with a manufacturer in the Netherlands. You’re right, it’s quite the opposite there. We have requests here in the US to custom-

“Technology is changing so drastically and quickly. The market is constantly flooded with thousands of new designs, which brings up the possibility of getting knocked off. That’s more of a challenge now than it was 10 years ago.”

advanced LED technology. When they stopped selling incandescent bulbs in the UK, getting the temperature and luminosity designers wanted out of LEDs became a real problem. We eventually ended up producing our own LEDs for our own products, so at least if the technology changes, we can retain the color temperature, luminosity, and wattage as we need. JJ: That’s huge. LB: Yeah, exactly. How many products are you selling now through your company? JJ: We probably have five or six lines. Our Scraplights line includes about 60 to 70 different products, ranging from a

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—JONATHAN JUNKER, DESIGNER

ize, and we have to say no. There is a balancing act for sure. LB: Hospitality is such a huge, growing market, especially for lighting, and it’s in that arena that people want different options and variations. Lighting needs to specifically suit the environment, and also set it apart from others. With Observatory, we want people to be able to create their own constellations. I’m looking forward to seeing how other designers utilize our products. JJ: So for a hotel lobby or a project like that, for example, you can create a custom assembly of your own systems or products? LB: With Observatory, you can buy the

product in multiples and hang them in different directions to make the constellations. We have another chandelier, called Aurora, that we launched in Milan in April. It’s essentially simple rings with LED bulbs. It’s scalable because you choose the product by the size of the ring, and you can attach additional rings to create a custom-sized chandelier—almost like a totem. Do you work a lot with LED? JJ: We do now. Technology is changing so drastically and quickly. You’re seeing this race to newfound freedom and form. The market is constantly flooded with thousands of new designs, which brings up the possibility of getting knocked off. That’s more of a challenge now than it was 10 years ago. I’m interested if you’ve struggled with that at all. LB: Yes, certainly, we have a big problem with that. We do make a point of acting against some of it rather than just rolling over. As a designer, it’s great when you see people who are influenced by your work: you are providing a new outlook on style, and it’s kind of developing in people’s consciousness. But when someone carbon-copies something you’ve worked on for two years, it’s a bit rude! JJ: Right! It might be flattering for a second. Our approach is to not put any negative energy toward that and instead to focus on developing new things. LB: It’s a double-edged sword because nobody would copy your products if they weren’t successful in the first place. JJ: You’re right; it is a testament to the craft-based work. Mostly we make something ourselves first, under our own roof and many times before we find a partner to help manufacture it. Knowing what it takes to make a product, and knowing the effort that goes into it through somebody’s hands, is in direct relationship to its final beauty. h


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| people |

TWO OF A KIND

Vancouver’s Studio Roslyn is breaking the Pacific Northwest’s beige mold with striking color contrasts, one-of-a-kind design elements, and a creative language that only best friends could have invented. Written by ABBY BEACH : Portrait by LUIS VALDIZON Photographed by LAUREN D. ZBARSKY

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“We really try to get to the middle of the whys, not the aesthetics—we talk more about the narrative of the project and what everyone’s trying to achieve. Then our creative process happens organically from there.”

—KATE SNYDER, COFOUNDER AND DESIGNER, STUDIO ROSLYN graymag . com

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“PACIFIC NORTHWEST DESIGN IS NOT JUST WHITE WALLS AND OAK WOOD,” says Kate Snyder, half of the Vancouver-based design duo

who run boutique interiors firm Studio Roslyn. She and longtime bestie / business partner Jessica MacDonald have honed their fearless aesthetic over 11 years, supported by their combined degrees in architecture and industrial design and their earlier experience with Vancouver’s Ste. Marie Art + Design. They were also among the first hires for local ready-to-wear line Oak + Fort and helped develop racking systems for new spaces during the retailer’s initial expansion across Canada. Named after the apartment building Snyder and MacDonald once shared in Winnipeg (the two met as undergrads at the University of Winnipeg), the now two-year-old firm has put its indelible mark on projects ranging from Superbaba, a brightly colored Middle Eastern eatery in the heart of Victoria, BC’s business district, to the Ad Astra residence in downtown Vancouver. The firm’s signature look is, just as Snyder says, anything but white and wood. “There’s a time and a place to use that palette,” she continues, “but a lot of people are joining the conversation, asking, ‘Wait a minute, why does every brewery here look the same?’” Snyder and MacDonald pride themselves on creating a unique aesthetic for their clients’ spaces. Reluctant to fall into the regional stereotype of a neutral design palette, Studio Roslyn is not afraid to use vibrant color »

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In Victoria, BC’s Superbaba eatery, designed by Studio Roslyn, the owners made material decisions based on memories of their grandmother’s home in Lebanon. The designers brought in Viso globe fixtures of various sizes, both to visually lower the space’s vaulted ceiling and as a nod toward the midcentury aesthetic now prevalent in Middle Eastern design. Studio Roslyn also created the artwork, which riffs on both doner shops’ typically oversaturated food photos and images of the owners in their youth.

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combinations and bold design concepts to individuate its work. Yet the designers also acknowledge that working in a region with a neutralforward design heritage means that they can’t ignore the inevitable historic elements and influences in their projects. “If you claim to do unique, genuine work, it’s important to understand trends, both new and old, and how you can bring your own voice into them,” says Snyder. That voice can be heard—and seen—in Studio Roslyn’s daring design moves, such as the punchy neon pastels they chose for Superbaba and the nearly all-black palette they picked for two Vancouver restaurateurs’ 2,300-square-foot apartment. “We’ve had so many people tell us, ‘Okay, you guys, this dream of working together at every job is not realistic,’” says Snyder. “But we’ve always said, ‘We’ll prove everyone wrong.’” And they have—one audacious project at a time. »

The Ad Astra house was designed for two Vancouver restaurateurs who wanted to incorporate their love of cooking and hosting into their residence, which they use as both home base and an expandable office. Flowerpot Pendant light fixtures from &tradition and nero marquina marble from Margranite give the apartment a sense of functional luxury.

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Acknowledging the Ad Astra building’s 100-year history, Studio Roslyn chose to incorporate wood detailing throughout the home. While graphic black-and-white tile sets apart the apartment’s high-traffic areas, softer gray and blue tones are used in the couple’s home office and the house’s bedrooms. h

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| people |

KAT HOLMES

During her tenure as Principal Director of Inclusive Design, Kat Holmes helped Microsoft develop the inclusive design methodology that’s now become a core corporate tenet. After leaving the tech behemoth in the spring of 2017, Holmes started drafting Mismatch, the book that’s quickly becoming the primer on inclusive design. “Writing the book forced me to contend with the fact that inclusion happens in many different ways,” she says. “So many people were talking about inclusion through the lens of gender and race, and I had spent most of my time focused on disability.”

“Accessibility is the foundation of any inclusive design solution. It transcends every kind of diversity. If your company hasn’t started making progress toward accessibility, then you haven’t earned the right to talk about inclusion.”

—KAT HOLMES, DESIGNER, AUTHOR, AND UX DESIGN DIRECTOR AT GOOGLE

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open to all GRAY talks to three pioneering individuals who are changing both the way we approach design and who can approach it.

L

Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Portraits by NATE WATTERS

ast February, I took a tumble while skiing and tore a muscle in my left calf. It wasn’t anything major, but it put me on crutches for a few days. In an instant, I’d gone from being a stereotypically able-bodied individual to someone who needed help not only to get around but also to perform essential tasks. Suddenly everyday movements I’d taken for granted were significant challenges. A trip from the couch to get a glass of water: an ordeal. Getting in and out of my old-fashioned clawfoot tub: another ordeal. Both my office and my apartment are on the top floors of walk-up buildings. Luckily, my job is flexible and allows me to telework, so I didn’t need to negotiate a commute. Friends and family helped out with meals, as standing to cook was out of the question. Overall, I was very fortunate: my minor injury healed quickly and didn’t permanently disrupt my life. What it did disrupt was my way of thinking—in a few short days, my eyes were opened to the accessibility and exclusion challenges faced by millions around the globe on a daily basis. With each frustration I encountered, new questions arose: What if I had a job that required me to be onsite? What if I didn’t live near friends and family who were able to bring me food? How would I navigate trips to the grocery store, especially without an elevator in my building? What if I had small children to care for? During my days on crutches, I experienced what Seattlebased designer, author, and educator Kat Holmes calls a “mismatch” with my environment. In her new book, Mismatch: How Inclusion Shapes Design (MIT Press, 2018), she explores inclusive design, explaining basic concepts that bring into sharp focus the need for accessibility both for people with disabilities and for society as a whole. In short, inclusive design is a methodology in which one designs with people, not for them, Holmes explains. It requires including a diverse set of individuals—of many races, genders, abilities, and socioeconomic backgrounds—in the design process from start to finish to ensure that the widest possible range of people can use, or easily adapt, the end product. A mismatch happens when the features of an environment, product, or service don’t fit a person’s abilities or preferences.

Think of it like this: The people, objects, places, and tech we encounter each day generally help us to access and participate in the world. Mismatches occur when these access points become barriers to our interaction with the world and even exclude us from it. We can all name obvious physical mismatches—e.g., absence of the curb cuts that enable wheelchair users to cross streets; TV shows that lack closed captioning— but we tend to overlook thousands of other, less tangible mismatches, such as public announcements delivered only in a single language, or cupboards and counters built to a standard based on “average” height. Yet according to Holmes, rather than allowing mismatches to overwhelm us, we in the design community can reframe them as opportunities. “It isn’t about creating one perfect solution that works for every human at all times and in all circumstances,” she says. “It’s about who we include in the process of arriving at a solution, learning something we didn’t know, and letting that insight reshape how we design the solution.” I’ll admit that before my ski-slope fall, I’d had no idea what inclusive design was. I’d heard the term, and I vaguely knew it had something to do with accessibility (the two are related but different; more on that later). It turns out that my myopia on the subject is common, even in the design field. “Small numbers of people have been working on wider recognition of inclusive design over the past few decades,” says Holmes, “but as far as its becoming a common practice or a part of a design education curriculum, we’re still in the beginning stages.” Holmes is a whip-smart and empathetic mother of two with large, light-brown eyes, an easy laugh, and cropped platinumblonde hair. She’s worked in design for nearly two decades— serving as principal director of inclusive design for Microsoft from 2014 to 2017 and taking up a new helm as director of user experience at Google this past July—but when she was growing up in Oakland, California, she didn’t know anyone, let alone minorities such as herself, in the design field. Holmes enrolled at University of California, Berkeley, to study orthopedic biomechanics, planning to design prosthetic limbs. The first Bay Area tech boom imploded just as she graduated in 2000, so she pragmatically took a job at Tektronix, a stable, decades-old manufacturer of testing and »

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measurement devices. After eight years with the firm, Holmes and her husband found out they were expecting their first child. She left Tektronix, thinking she would stay at home with the baby. “I was at home maybe seven weeks,” she says with a laugh, “before I met Albert Shum” at an Industrial Design Society conference in San Francisco. Shum, now CVP of the design, experiences, and devices group at Microsoft, had just started at the company, and within two months of their meeting, he’d recruited Holmes to Microsoft’s Pioneer Studios, in downtown Seattle. An incubator for new business and design concepts, the studio was then led by J Allard, who was part of the company’s hugely successful push into video-game consoles. Pioneer Studios was shuttered after three years, but Holmes had made an impression. After jumping to the main campus in Redmond, Washington, to work on Windows Phone, including the inaugural design and engineering of Cortana, Microsoft’s digital personal assistant, Holmes experienced what she calls a “crystallizing moment.” “There were hundreds of engineers and designers working on Cortana,” she recalls, “but not a single one had ever had or been a personal assistant. I thought, ‘Why don’t we talk to people who do this for a living?’” It was a realization that launched a broad conversation about designing based on input from actual humans rather than an isolated group’s assumptions about human ability and behavior. “Suddenly we were asking ourselves, ‘What would be possible if our design process started to include the expertise of people who have been listening and talking to their computers for a very long time, like people who are blind or people who can’t use a keyboard?’” Holmes went on to spearhead development of the Microsoft Inclusive Design Toolkit, a free, downloadable 60-page guide that explains how firms can use human diversity as a resource in their design practices. In 2014, Satya Nadella became Microsoft’s first CEO ever to visit the design studio. “We had

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a conversation about inclusive design,” Holmes says, “and I was blown away by the quickness with which he understood that we were talking about an approach to innovation that could transform any of Microsoft’s products, and not just developing a checklist that could bolster accessibility.” Over the next six months, one of the largest, wealthiest, and most innovative companies on the planet started championing inclusive design as a crucial imperative across all its departments, an initiative that’s still in process today. The tide was turning, and Kat Holmes was on the crest of the wave. Holmes left Microsoft in early 2017 to found mismatch.design—a digital magazine and community that advances inclusive design—aiming to use her experience and knowledge to introduce inclusive practices to other tech companies and, eventually, other industries. But only a week after leaving Microsoft, MIT Press asked her to write a book on inclusive design. Mismatch is a powerful read that not only has the potential to change the way we approach design but also serves as a strong check to our ingrained assumptions about how and why people move, act, speak, and interact (or don’t). According to Holmes, you can’t talk about inclusion without first talking about exclusion. In the design world, exclusion happens when we solve problems using our own biases (examples include the assumption that everyone has the use of two arms, or is strong enough to lift a smartphone, or can perceive a wide range of colors). Usually such assumptions aren’t intentionally harmful; they’re made because of the all-too-human tendency to use our own experience of the world as our baseline. Often designers don’t even think about those who fall outside the range of the “average” person—that mythical consumer whom companies use as a benchmark in product design. Of course, there is no average person, and as a result companies end up crafting products that wide swathes of people can’t use. Thirty-two-year-old John Porter knows this sort of exclusion on a personal level. His spinal muscular atrophy leaves him

unable to walk or lift objects, so he uses a wheelchair to get around and an assistive technology called Dragon (a voicecommand software program) to interact with his computer. Holmes met Porter in 2016, and his experience looms large in Mismatch. Like Holmes, he advocates for inclusive design, and he’s adamant that listening to diverse human voices is key to advancing ideas. This August, he joined Microsoft’s Inclusive Design team as a UX designer (meanwhile, he’s also completing his PhD dissertation on video game accessibility and teaching at the University of Washington’s Human Centered Design and Engineering program). “What we have achieved over the past 100 years of design is now bumping up against a wall,” Porter says. “We’ve plateaued in innovation and fallen into a sort of apathy where innovation is driven by technological progress rather than by a creative design process. The only way to overcome that is to bring in new ideas and perspectives.” Porter notes that one of people’s biggest misconceptions about inclusive design is that it is synonymous with accessibility. It’s not. As noted above, inclusive design is a methodology in which you design a place or product that a diverse group of people can interact with or use. Accessibility, in contrast, is an attribute that makes an experience open to more people. Think about a playground; an accessible one might include ramps so that kids who use wheelchairs can reach all the levels of a play structure, and swing seats with back and arm supports for those who need it. An inclusively designed playground, on the other hand, has a distinct goal: to create a shared sense of belonging and an experience in which everyone can take part, in a variety of ways. The process of designing such a playground includes asking for ideas from children of all ages and abilities as well as experts in children’s health and development. The completed playground might offer a mix of physical, sensory, and social activities, as well as multiple challenge levels in each type of physical activity. It also might provide »


JOHN PORTER

John Porter, UX designer at Microsoft, focuses on seeking ways to better account for the diversity of human ability in the company’s designs. While pursuing a degree in materials science and engineering at the University of Washington, Porter discovered UW’s Department of Human Centered Design and Engineering, which explores the roles that tech plays in human activity and works with interdisciplinary researchers to build the technologies of the future. He was immediately hooked. Now he’s finishing up his PhD while teaching at HCDE, centering his work on video game accessibility. “I’ve been playing video games since I was three,” Porter says. “Around the time that the N64 came out, I was no longer able to use the controller. My gaming switched over to the computer, which is more inclusive because it allows me to use a wider and more flexible variety of input methods.”

“Opening up the design-table conversation to include everybody is a critical recognition of the inherent constraints of homogeneity. If everyone in the design space represents one certain demographic or one small set of people, then you’re cutting out the experience and life knowledge of people who could make your product objectively better.” —JOHN PORTER, UX DESIGNER, MICROSOFT

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comparable types of equipment in the same area, allowing users of all ages and abilities to play in their own unique ways. Accessibility features actually can cause issues if people see them as sufficient in themselves and they aren’t part of a holistic inclusive design plan. An elevator might be seen as the sole answer to the needs of those who can’t use stairs; while it certainly helps those with wheelchairs, strollers, or bags of groceries, what about a user who doesn’t have use of his or her arms? An inclusive design process would consider this issue from the beginning, consulting with individuals who can personally speak about such experiences and provide input on potential adaptations. When we design for and not with people, or when we view inclusive design as the “right thing to do” rather than as a necessity, we create an unequal power dynamic. “When people come from a place of sympathy and say, ‘We need to help these poor excluded communities,’ they automatically assume their knowledge is superior to people’s actual lived experiences,” says Holmes. “That benefactor mentality doesn’t serve the people it purports to serve.” Architectural designer Tiffany Brown understands the effects of this mentality firsthand. Born and raised in Detroit, Brown grew up in the Herman Gardens housing projects, in what she describes as one of the “rougher inner-city neighborhoods.” Just a few miles east was Brewster-Douglass, the first federally funded housing project in the United States. Built in the 1930s for workingclass African Americans, the Brewster Homes (as they were originally called) were family-oriented townhouse residences. In 1951, the Frederick Douglass towers were added to the development. Cramped and starkly designed in Brutalist style, the towers fell into disrepair and become a hotbed of crime over the next three decades as the US Congress steadily reduced funding for public-

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housing upkeep. Raised in comparable conditions, Brown attended public schools that were similarly run-down and cheaply designed and built. “It wasn’t until high school that I began to take interest in the built environment and pay attention to the types of spaces around me and how they affected my learning experiences,” she recalls. Like Porter, Brown is featured in Holmes’s book, but her story focuses on the importance of social inclusion, especially in the field of architecture. Despite extreme social and financial barriers, Brown worked her way through college and is now project manager at Detroit’s SmithGroup. In 2017, she founded 400 Forward, an organization focused not only on introducing young girls (especially girls of color) to architecture but also encouraging them to pursue it as a career. “Last year, the 400th African American woman was licensed to be an architect in the United States,” Brown says on the phone from Detroit. “We’re talking 400th of all time. 400 Forward is a way for me to seek out the next 400 women to become architects. I want these girls to understand that they have the power to change their cities and impact future generations.” Educating the next 400 is only the first step, however. A huge amount of responsibility rests with architecture firms themselves, historically dominated by affluent white males, to seek out, interview, and employ a diverse workforce. Purposeful moves such as these will give firms a leg up, opening design conversations to unheard voices and a broader range of problem-solving abilities, which in turn gives firms a real chance to make lasting changes to neighborhoods, cities, and the larger social fabric of our country. “A shift toward an inclusive workforce in the future of design can be a catalyst to end the cycle of socially unjust cities,” Brown says. “Inclusive design leads to

good social design, which in turn is a strong predictor of lower crime rates, better-performing schools, and gains in other measures of quality of life.” Inclusive design is not a new idea. People have practiced it for centuries. Some of the objects we use every day, from keyboards to reading glasses to curb cuts, are the results of people creating adaptations to products that allow the product to better serve their individual needs. What’s exciting today is seeing inclusive design formalized and adopted by designers as an integral part of their practices. Microsoft is a leader in championing inclusive design, but one company—no matter how big and influential—is not enough. We need architects, product designers, city planners, developers, and, most importantly, educators to embrace inclusivity as a core part of their businesses and curricula. Teaching the next generation about inclusive design will create a vanguard of thoughtful, open-minded individuals who can drive a paradigm shift in design and architecture that will benefit society as a whole. In Mismatch, Holmes writes about the Persona Spectrum, an inclusive design method that solves issues for one specific person or need and then extends that solution to many others. I experienced it first-hand when I was on crutches and used elevators instead of stairs. I experienced it again after I was off crutches when I followed a closed-caption TV program in a noisy airport. The point is that we will all benefit from inclusive design at some period in our lives. As we age, changes in our abilities—which might include loss of hearing, diminished eyesight, and limited mobility— are inevitable. We all will need adaptive measures to continue living comfortable, independent lives. As Holmes points out, when we use inclusive design to create new products and technologies, “we’re designing not only for others but also for our future selves.” h


TIFFANY BROWN

Architectural designer Tiffany Brown was born and raised in Detroit and currently works with SmithGroup, an international design and architecture firm with an office in her hometown. Brown wasn’t exposed to design or architecture as a child, but she loved to draw and dreamed of being an animator at Disney. When Brown was 17, she heard a speaker from Lawrence Technological University deliver a talk on architecture, a pivotal moment that sent her on a trajectory toward gaining her own degree in the field. In 2017, Brown won a Knight Arts Challenge grant for her project, 400 Forward, which strives to welcome more black girls and women into the fields of architecture and urban planning. “I want to be the face I was looking for when I was growing up,” Brown says.

“As architects, we can create spaces that empower and give people a sense of selfreliance through their built environment. Our communities will truly prosper as a result.”

—TIFFANY BROWN, ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER

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Architecture: John Fleming for Rohleder Borges Architecture; Interior Design: Christian Grevstad; Photography: Benjamin Benschneider


this changes everything

interiors + architecture “I feel fortunate that a client can say, ‘Haunted mansion!’ to me, and trust me to honor their intention.”

AARON LEITZ

—MICHELLE DIRKSE, INTERIOR DESIGNER

The homeowners chose to turn an existing bedroom into a sumptuous dressing room, with vintage furniture found online and at Pacific Galleries Antique Mall, surrounded by a regal wallpaper print from Harlequin. To replace the leaded-glass transom windows, the team turned to local building supply company Frank Lumber.

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super natural

A landmark Seattle property is returned to its golden era via a dramatic renovation filled with artistic gestures—and a few eerie touches. Written by AMANDA ZURITA : Photographed by AARON LEITZ

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Seattle interior designer Michelle Dirkse transformed the turn-of-the-century Judge Ronald House into a Victorianesque stunner, removing decades of renovations that camouflaged its grandeur. The parlor chairs—vintage finds from Pacific Galleries Antique Mall, reupholstered in an abstract Timorous Beasties fabric—set a cinematic and ghostly tone, along with the space’s black sideboard from Chairish. »


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“i

can’t imagine clients will ever ask for that again,” says designer Michelle Dirkse of a Seattle couple’s renovation inspiration for their recently purchased neoclassical home, the historic Judge Ronald House in Seattle’s Leschi neighborhood. The request? To turn the 4,800-square foot property into a bespoke estate featuring influences ranging from haunted mansions to the backstage boudoirs of the Moulin Rouge. Dirkse, owner and principal of her eponymous interior design firm, was ecstatic. The spooky request perfectly suited the home, which dates back to the turn of the 20th century. Its original owner, Judge J. T. Ronald, served on the King County Superior Court for 40 years before his retirement in 1949 at the age of 94. He sold the property during the Great Depression, and it later served— among other uses—as a boardinghouse, a daycare, and a drug rehabilitation center before it was named a historic landmark in 1976 and eventually passed into the hands of its current owners.

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Both artists, the home’s new stewards hoped to rescue the space from its banal ’80s alterations and return it to its original splendor—but with a bit of panache. Having previously worked with Dirkse while renovating their Snoqualmie Pass vacation cabin (in an equally moody and unexpected style), the couple knew she was right for the task. “Because of the home’s long history, the rooms were oddly divided,” says Dirkse. “Much of the house had been ignored, and where it wasn’t, there was a lot left over from decades of renovations.” Working with contractor Layne McIntosh of Building Momentum, Dirkse and her team drafted architectural drawings that converted the original five-bedroom, threebathroom mansion into a home that served the couple’s needs, leaving them with one bedroom, an art studio, a dressing room, three bathrooms, and a den on the main floor. Fashioning a suitable master bath was one of the project’s greatest challenges. “The original bathroom was tiny, so we »


OPPOSITE: Any exterior changes to the historic property had to gain the approval of the Landmarks Preservation Board. While most landmark buildings are nominated for that distinction by the community, the Judge Ronald House is unique in that its previous owner—who restored much of the exterior—submitted the designation proposal. THIS PAGE: Dirkse (pictured) turned the den into an intimate study in layered textures. “When you’re sourcing vintage and antique pieces, you must have some flexibility, focusing on the combination of materials more than individual items,” she says.

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| interiors + architecture | LEFT: “We balanced the bathroom by mixing materials,” says Dirkse. “The design of the shower is modern in function, but the tile pattern and subway tile, from Daltile, are quite classic.” RIGHT: Dirkse found an antique tub with a beautifully rusted exterior, from an online dealer in Louisiana. Combined with lace curtains (fabricated at Gallerie Franzhiska Upholstery from Pindler fabric) and lush greenery from the Plant Shop.

decided to create a formal bathing room and take over an adjacent bedroom to create a proper master bath,” says Dirkse. The design team ran plumbing into the room, and now the light-filled space features an oversized walk-in shower and a double sink made from a vintage console. The clients requested vintage and repurposed décor throughout the property. “We’re vegan, and we want to support sustainable design,” says the homeowner. “We also feel that items that have history and craftsmanship—just like the house itself—are so much more interesting than what you can get out of a catalog.” Their entreaty sent Dirkse on a treasure hunt of sorts; she scoured local thrift shops, antique malls, and resale sites such as 1stdibs and Chairish. Even the hardware on the home’s doors is secondhand, found at Earthwise Architectural Salvage and Second Use in Seattle’s Industrial District. “We didn’t include any leather or silk,” says Dirkse.

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“And we tried to utilize fabrics and materials that don’t hurt the environment.” Dirkse describes the spaces she creates for her clients with terms ranging from “minimal and modern” to “eclectic,” but of her clients’ eldritch new home, she confesses, “I don’t really know what to call this one. But I do feel fortunate that a client can say, ‘Haunted mansion!’ to me, and trust me to honor their intention." »


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Dirkse, who recently developed her own collection of wall coverings, lined the bedroom in Ralph Lauren’s Ashfield Floral wallpaper. “I don’t often get to use wallpaper on all four walls of a room,” she says. “Many people worry about the commitment and instead opt for one accent wall. But these clients wanted their home to feel inspired by its history.” h

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ART DECO TAKES THE STAGE Written by HADANI DITMARS : Photographed by EMA PETER

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At Vancouver’s H Tasting Lounge, lush velvet seating, gold-trimmed leather banquettes, and fine metal detailing channel Art Deco opulence, while evocative circular propeller- and plane-inspired motifs suggest ephemeral flight. Structural columns are clad in both royal blue velvet acoustic panels and long, vertical goldplated steel tubes that provide wall protection.

IN 1972, HOWARD HUGHES, THE INFAMOUSLY ECCENTRIC HOLLYWOOD BILLIONAIRE AND AVIATION PIONEER, rented the top four floors of

Vancouver’s Westin Bayshore hotel, stayed for six months, and left as suddenly as he’d arrived. Fortysix years later, his legacy lives on at the recently opened H Tasting Lounge, a sophisticated restaurant and bar inspired by Hughes’s global travels and luxurious lifestyle. Set in the hotel’s former lobby (the hotel is still operating) and designed by Vancouver’s Liv Interiors, H Tasting Lounge taps into the Art Deco glamour of the 1920s and ’30s. A true Renaissance man and a seminal figure in both the film and the aircraft industries, Hughes set multiple world air-speed records and also liked to fly seaplanes—a hobby that inspired Olivia Lam, founder of Liv Interiors and head designer on the renovated lounge. “I wanted to create a sense of takeoff,” she explains, “so there are a lot of circular and propellerlike elements.” These include brass dividers with radiating spokes, semicircular booths, and a glass ceiling installation co-designed by Liv Interiors and glassand-lighting company Lasvit that draws its motifs from airplane propellers and wind currents. Lam admits that it was a challenge to transform the cavernous former lobby into an intimate lounge, but meticulous attention to color and materials create an upscale, timeless ambience. “We wanted to evoke the opulence of the era,” says Lam, “but still make it feel current.” It’s rumored that Hughes never left his suite at the Bayshore, but we’re pretty sure he’d raise a glass to this luxurious lounge. » graymag . com

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| interiors + architecture | H Tasting Lounge, designed by Vancouver’s Liv Interiors, features a 21-foot-long marble bar. Three custom motorized roller shutters allow staff to close off the back bar. The lounge’s main area is floored in herringbonepatterned engineered oak, and the geometric porcelain tile surrounding the bar is from Stone Tile Pacific. h

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PENTHOUSE PIED-À-TERRE

Written by RENSKE WERNER : Photographed by ANDREW LATREILLE

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THIS PAGE: Designer Aleem Kassam highlighted the original staircase in this Vancouver penthouse with a contrasting wall papered in Len-Tex Chocolate Rain, sourced through Odyssey Wallcoverings. OPPOSITE: The custom Amantii fireplace holds pride of place in the living room. Two Viper sofas by Sunpan face each other, and the Ray dining table by Fiam Italia leaves city views unobstructed. Âť

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THIS PAGE: In a playful move, Kassam “landscaped� the narrow balcony with synthetic grass. Above the Tom Dixon Tube table in the kitchen hangs a chandelier by Avenue Lighting. The fridge is Miele, and the chairs are Tokyo Chairs by Bensen. OPPOSITE: The master bedroom is swathed in a mix of textured materials and sumptuous fabrics for a calm, restful setting. The B&B Italia Alys headboard (through Inform Interiors) adds structure; the bed linens are by Frette at Home; and the Rococo-style mirror is CB2.

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WHILE DESIGNERS OFTEN UNEARTH HIDDEN FEATURES DURING RENOVATION OF HISTORIC HOUSES, IT’S LESS COMMON FOR BRAND-NEW BUILDS TO YIELD UNFORESEEN SURPRISES.

But such was the case when Vancouver designer Aleem Kassam, a partner at Kalu Interiors, studied original floor plan drawings for a three-story penthouse atop a posh downtown development and noticed an additional 75 square feet hidden behind a second-floor wall. The project had come across Kassam’s desk in 2017, with a client directive granting him carte blanche. He and his business partner, Phyllis Lui, decided on a globally inspired aesthetic paired with foundational pieces that are both classic and resist categorization in any particular time or place. The newly discovered square footage was immediately claimed to allow the addition of an office adjoining the family room. “We gained the office early in the renovation,” says Kassam. “We also installed recessed lighting throughout the penthouse and a chandelier in the eating nook, and we built a custom 13-foot fireplace to give the living room, with its double-height ceilings, a focal point.” Elsewhere in the 2,000-square-foot space, Kassam opted for built-in features (including storage in the kitchen and nearly wall-to-wall shelving in the top floor sitting room) that customized the otherwise standard design. He also tweaked the

original layout—and the original functions of some rooms— on the upper two floors, which contain private living spaces and bedrooms, to carry that feeling of bespoke design deeper into the home. “The pitfall of a split-level space like this one is that you might end up compartmentalizing each area,” Kassam notes. “So, in order to create an open plan with a natural flow, we spent a good amount of time figuring out the purpose of each room.” On the main floor, which Kassam dubs the “crown jewel” of the project, the designers retained existing Italian millwork as an aesthetic enhancement, and metallic accents abound in light fixtures, throw pillows, side tables, and accessories. “It fits the direction for this space perfectly,” marvels Kassam, who took inspiration from old covers of Vogue Italia. “Gold is coming back with a vengeance,” he says, “and that became the jumping-off point for the style I had in mind.” In typical Kalu fashion, the designers layered the clean and timeless look of the penthouse interior, but pushed their aesthetic slightly by adding dramatic statements, including cladding the fireplace with porcelain tile from Ames Tile & Stone and a hand-knotted silk-and-wool area rug from East India Carpets. All are reminders, as Kassam notes, that “with the addition of shiny and soft materials, and a minimal palette of gold and orange tones, this space has the global feel that epitomizes how international a city Vancouver is.” h graymag . com

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swan song Written by AMANDA ZURITA : Photographed by ANDREA ARIAS

FOR A STYLISH SOUTHERN BELLE AND HER ART-LOVING HUSBAND, FINDING THE PERFECT PLACE TO SPEND THEIR RETIREMENT YEARS WASN’T EASY. Susan and Tom Colgrove wanted a home that could satisfy their diverse aesthetic yearnings: a touch of antiquity, a hint of glamour, and a mix of New York–style modernism and down-south charm to ground it all. In 2014, while in Savannah for their daughter’s wedding, the couple spotted their dream home: a

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2,000-square-foot 1868 Italianate-style townhome facing the quiet oasis of Pulaski Square. After purchasing the property that December, Susan enlisted longtime friend and interior designer Stephen Dooley, principal of Seattle firm Gradient Interior Design, to partner on the extensive renovation. Together they launched an 18-month redesign, first swapping ideas via Pinterest and photo-sharing services and then visiting Savannah together several times. »


A vintage 1930s swan-shaped lamp hovers on a lacquer console behind a Warren Platner armchair by Knoll from Inform Interiors. OPPOSITE: A Lee Industries velvet sofa from Savannah’s furniture haunt Arcanum is balanced by a playfully tiered Cristol chandelier by Aerin Lauder for Circa Lighting.

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| interiors + architecture | The entryway features Osborne and Little wallpaper in Nina Campbell’s swan and lotus print. A velvet settee is paired with a vintage side table.

Their shared goal: a star-quality home that would feel both intimate and modern, with a time-honored look incorporating both contemporary and antique décor. “I love New York townhomes that are mostly white, with a dramatic modern light fixture and a beautiful, tightly balanced seating group,” Dooley says of his inspiration for the living area. To give the room a personal feel, he drew upon Susan’s collection of antiques, including a vintage Persian rug and 19th-century portraits, mixing them with fresh finds. The Lee Industries sofa anchors the space and nods to both the current infatuation with velvet and golden-era Hollywood glam. The living room’s historical character continues with a 1970s Vladimir Kagan coffee table and 1960s Warren Platner armchairs. “Including furniture from different eras makes it feel like a real home, where the pieces speak to one another across time,” Dooley says. “I wanted the house to feel as if it were constantly occupied since it was built.” The home’s entryway, with its wallpaper motif of swimming

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swans and pink lotus flowers, served as the starting point for the project’s aesthetic. “I looked for something that had a bit of glamour, a bit of drama, but didn’t take itself too seriously,” says Dooley. The birds, when paired with a dramatic trim in Benjamin Moore’s deep-gray Secret, helped create a space that reads as the Colgroves’ own, not a precious antique. As for the kitchen, the most contemporary room in the house, the homeowners removed a central row of cabinets from a 1980s renovation and painted the remaining ones in Farrow & Ball’s semigloss Hague Blue. The texture on the far statement wall, however, was serendipitous. After brushing it white, the couple returned after Hurricane Matthew in the fall of 2016 to find the new paint bubbling and peeling off, exposing some of the original plaster underneath. Rather than repaint, they removed strategic sections to create the kitchen’s conversation piece. “It was something of a happy accident,” says Susan. “Everyone seemed to love it, so we just left it.” A fitting homage to old and new indeed. »


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Over the kitchen island hangs a Cliff Suspension light fixture from Lambert & Fils, sourced from Inform Interiors. Âť

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| interiors + architecture |

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: The upstairs bedroom skews moody and intimate, with a master bath featuring a custom-built sink and charcoal Cole and Sons Chinese Toile wallpaper from Kravet. The entryway’s swan wallpaper was the touchpoint of the home’s redesign. The kitchen’s textured feature wall was a serendipitous accident, left alone after paint peeled during Hurricane Matthew in 2016. h

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Contractor: Design Guild Homes


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STAYING INN

Written by RACHEL EGGERS : Photographed by MELISSA RIGHERO

“WHEN ARE YOU GOING TO TAKE OVER THIS PLACE?”

That was the question—posed in a joking but also serious spirit—that greeted Brady and Tiffany Turner whenever they stopped into the pub of the Shelburne Hotel, located in the coastal town of Seaview on Washington’s Long Beach Peninsula. The owners, Laurie Anderson and David Campiche, had run the historic inn with great care for 40 years, but they were ready for a break. The Turners were the ideal choice to carry on the legacy of the Shelburne, which opened in 1896 and is the oldest continuously running hotel in Washington State. High school sweethearts, Brady and Tiffany grew up on the peninsula and, naturally, held their wedding reception at the Shelburne. The

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couple also had a portfolio of coastal hotels under their belts. At one point the Turners moved to Seattle for school, but the pull of home eventually proved irresistible. “Many people stay here and many people leave and don’t come back, but I think it is becoming increasingly more appealing to come home,” Brady says. “It’s beautiful, of course, and there’s a wonderful small-town mentality. Everyone rises and falls together.” Over the years, the Turners had created an empire of boutique hotels, including Adrift Hotel and Spa and the Inn at Discovery Coast in Long Beach, as well as Ashore Hotel in Seaside, Oregon. One was a new building; two others were built in the 1970s or ’80s and required extensive renovations. The Turners weren’t new to construction projects, but the »


OPPOSITE: The turnof-the-century stained glass in the hotel’s pub was sourced in 1983 by the previous caretakers from an English church in Morecambe (another coastal town, fittingly). THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Antique

embossed brass plates hang over the original wood banquettes. The glass light fixtures are from Permo Vintage. Beeramisu­— ladyfingers soaked in stout as well as espresso—is a specialty of pastry chef Katie Witherbee-Allsup. In the parlor, richly walled in Douglas fir, the brick fireplace is painted white.

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THIS PAGE, TOP: The hotel’s rooms make the most of their slatted Douglas fir walls. A diamond-shaped mirror from CB2 hanging over the bed lends an Art Deco touch. RIGHT: Two of the Shelburne’s 15 guestrooms are in the attic; each has a trundle bed.

Shelburne was another matter entirely. Moved by horse and carriage in 1911 to its current site and substantially updated in the 1980s, the hotel now required a thoughtful refresh that would connect its past to the present. “The question was ‘How are we going to change this just enough to give it a fresh look?’ It has incredible bones, beautiful old wood, antique stained glass—we didn’t want to make it look too new,” Brady notes. The Turners got started by peeling back layers, beginning with the antiques collected over the years by previous caretakers. They kept pieces they liked (including historic blackand-white photographs), especially sturdy furniture with marble tops and brass accents. The couple added new furnishings in tones of marigold, gray, and pink, plus lots of velvet and metallic accents. The rest of the refresh included various repair work (doors and tiles), new carpeting throughout, and a fresh coat of paint. The result is elegant and timeless, steering well away from predictable retro or nautical themes. “It’s not something I’ve seen done on this coast,” Brady says.

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Renovations began in January 2018, and the first guests were welcomed in March. The Turners look forward to Halloween, when they’ll welcome the hotel’s rumored ghosts alongside their visitors for a party featuring tarot readings and specialty drinks (perhaps made with the cranberry liqueur from the couple’s latest venture, Adrift Distillers). But not to worry: a local “cleansed” the property before it reopened. The Turners are pretty sure that the only spirits found at the Shelburne are friendly ones. h


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The hotel’s bathroom floors display a mélange of tiles in an array of colors, an eclectic mix that the Turners opted to keep. The clawfoot tubs are original to the building.

“I definitely think there are still some friendly ghosts around.”

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—BRADY TURNER, CO-OWNER AND DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT, ADRIFT HOTELS

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FURNITURE. LIGHTING. RUGS. HOME DECOR. EWFMODERN.COM – T.503.295.7336 1122 NW GLISAN ST., PORTLAND, OR 97209

PrestigeCrafted.com

Architecture: DeForest Architects Photography: Benjamin Benschneider


| interiors + architecture | Housed in Portland’s historic US Custom House building, WeWork’s new coworking space offers a variety of settings for its members to work, collaborate, and gather, including this chair-dotted landing adjacent to the original grand staircase. Seating includes a denim-upholstered John Derian Brook sofa, sourced through Cisco Brothers, and low-slung woven-leather Padron lounge chairs by Roost.

SHARED HISTORY “THEY DON’T MAKE BUILDINGS LIKE THEY DID 100 YEARS AGO,” says Ilona Birnberg, interior design discipline

lead (US—West) for global shared workspace provider WeWork. “There is something special about preserving the character of older buildings. The alternative—losing them—is far worse than the challenges we might face when moving into them.” Embracing this philosophy, New York–based WeWork moved into Portland’s US Custom House building in 2015. A four-story Pearl District structure completed in 1901 in the Italian Renaissance Revival style, the former offices of the US Customs Service agency had sat empty for almost a decade, mostly due to developers’ unwillingness to shoulder the price of its necessary upgrades.

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Unfazed, WeWork undertook a massive multiphase renovation completed in 2017. The company’s internal global design team worked within rigid preservation parameters throughout the project, using only approved paint colors and retaining the original woodwork as well as the main entrance lobby and grand staircase. This October, WeWork begins accepting applications for its inaugural artists-in-residence program: three local artists will receive a Custom House workspace for up to three months, starting in January 2019. Notes Gina Phillips, WeWork’s general manager for the Northwest, “The artists-in-residence program will continue the thread of Custom House as a place for creative expression that brings the community together.” h

COURTESY WEWORK

Written by LAUREN MANG


Architectural Planters for Commercial and Residential Applications Full Design Services Available 517 E Pike Street Seattle WA 98122 206.329.4737 www.ragenassociates.com

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| interiors + architecture |

Architect Jeff Babienko used a pivoting wall in this downtown Vancouver condo to allow for a change of circulation when guests are visiting, as well as an increased sense of space. OPPOSITE: An existing low-channel window was framed out and refinished with a wooden countertop.

THINKING INSIDE THE BOX Written by RENSKE WERNER : Photographed by EMA PETER

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MORE OFTEN THAN NOT, FUNCTIONALITY DRIVES DESIGN DECISIONS.

Such was the case when Seattle-based architect Jeff Babienko, founder of Babienko Architects, turned a 1,500-square-foot downtown Vancouver apartment almost upside down through his remodel, which created new storage space and redirected passageways. But it was more than just extra shelves, rerouted hallways, and useful cupboards that gave the space a new sense of life—Babienko also designed a nook at the back of the home’s living room for one of the clients, an avid cyclist, to store and ride his stationary bike. The client wanted the remodel to hew to the apartment’s urban-minimalist, vintage Danish–inspired spirit, so Babienko uncovered and sandblasted four structural vertical concrete columns throughout the space to reveal the material’s inner beauty. “I don’t fight what is right in front of me,” he says. “I take advantage of the existing features, but that doesn’t mean I paint to cover things up. I like the look of rough concrete and the grain in wood.” Babienko used those wood details to bring warmth to the otherwise sleek palette (concrete and white paint easily can feel cold and sterile). At the south »

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| interiors + architecture |

Hidden storage, sliding doors, and pivoting walls: this trio of simple solutions, rooted in minimal design, transformed this Vancouver condo into a flexible-use space. The kitchen’s sleek white custom cabinetry is brightened by the homeowners’ original Eames chairs.

side of the unit, a powder room was taken out to make room for the 70-squarefoot bicycle training room, enclosed by locally sourced reclaimed fir beams. In a riff on an early decision to create a peekaboo wood detail in the kitchen island, the bike room has imperfectly stacked boards that hide deep drawers, a tactic chosen to meet the clients’ request for plenty of additional storage space. Despite its modest size, the customized home finds that practicality and moments of discovery and surprise make perfect roommates—and they’re both elements that, as Babienko notes, were here the whole time, just waiting for their big reveal. h

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Better than just trendsetting – timeless.

When an object of desire is iconic, its value is no longer about mere impressing, it’s about inspiring. And that’s what the new ILVE Majestic solid door range accomplishes. Available in 5 sizes and over 200 colors, rest assured the performance and the look will be uniquely yours.

VISIT

The most innovative designer-oriented lighting showroom in Western Canada

Made in Italy ~ 866-844-6566 www.ilveappliances.com Ranges ~ Ovens ~ Hoods ~ Cooktops

Unit 101 —15292 Croydon Drive, Surrey, BC V3Z 0Z5 Showroom Hours: M-F 8:30 am - 5 pm Saturday 9 am - 5 pm (604) 538-3511 oceanpacificlighting.com

Tri State Distributors, Inc. 20119 59th Place South, Suite 100 Kent, WA 98032 253-872-2900 www.TriStateDistributors.com


| interiors + architecture |

FLEX MARKS THE SPOT

Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by CARRIE VALENTINE

FROM LOOMING NEXT-DAY DEADLINES TO PROJECTS SO ENGAGING THEY’RE HARD TO PUT DOWN, WE’VE ALL HAD WORKDAYS THAT HAVE LED US TO JOKE ABOUT SLEEPING AT THE OFFICE. Realistically, we’ll stay only a few hours later than usual, then pack it up and head home, but at the Portland branch of Latitude—a creative and branding agency that works with clients such as Adidas, Puma, and REI—three sleeping spaces, a residential kitchen, and a rooftop bar (in addition to traditional workspace) make an overnight at the office an even more tempting option. Founded in Minneapolis in 2009, Latitude has expanded to include an office in New York and, as of last year, a four-story new build in northeastern Portland, built by Crescent Custom Homes. Each office is slightly different—selecting aesthetic touches that honor its respective city—but one thing always remains the same: the designers. Latitude hired fledgling Minneapolis design firm Prospect Refuge Studio to work on its first office in 2016. Latitude loved the results so much that

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with each new-state expansion, the duo at PRS has tackled the interiors. When Latitude came to Portland, its goal for its workspace was flexibility. In addition to traditional office space (the top floor has desks and a break-out work area), Latitude asked for swing spaces that can serve multiple functions. Because overnight clients are regulars at Latitude, PRS designers Victoria Sass and Carrie Valentine created three bedrooms rich in jewel tones—a palette that plays out elsewhere in the offices, too. The main level contains a residential-style kitchen with cabinetry fabricated and installed by Imperial Cabinets & Millwork, a 14-foot island, and two Blu Dot Strut tables that can be shifted together for a formal setting or broken apart for a casual gathering. “Flexibility was key for every part of this office,” Sass notes. “Latitude is the kind of company that will have a rooftop party one night, an open house for Portland Design Week the next, and a buttoned-up client meeting in the morning. Our design had to accommodate all that in an easy yet elegant way.” h


THIS PAGE: The kitchen at the new Portland office of branding agency Latitude skews residential with a Silestone quartz-topped island. OPPOSITE, FROM LEFT: Two Blu Dot Strut tables provide space for eating and meeting, flanked by dandelion-colored chairs from Moe’s Home Collection. In the living room, a Muuto Rest sofa is a burst of bold yellow. The third-floor bedroom has a Blu Dot Nook bed, Land of Nod nightstands, and light fixtures from Schoolhouse Electric.

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| resources |

35. NEWS AIA Portland aiaportland.org AIA Seattle aiaseattle.org Alison Kent Home Vancouver alisonkenthome.com April Greiman aprilgreiman.com AvroKO avroko.com Bellevue Arts Museum Bellevue, WA bellevuearts.org Bend Design Bend, OR benddesign.com Caroline Cecil Textiles Portland carolinececil textiles.com Civilization Seattle builtbycivilization.com Dana Mooney Vancouver danamooney.com Dovetail General Contractors Seattle dovetailgc.com Dylan Neuwirth Seattle dylanneuwirth.com Eagle Rock Ventures Seattle eaglerockventures.com ESI Design esidesign.com Filling Spaces Portland fillingspaces.com FISK Projects Portland fiskprojects.com GRAY Awards Seattle grayawards.com Hayon Studio hayonstudio.com

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Jeff Gerber Seattle instagram.com/ potentialdust Metropolitan Museum of Art metmuseum.org Michelle Dirkse Seattle michelledirkse.com Mya Kerner Seattle myakerner.com ScaleHouse Bend, OR scalehouse.org SHW Architects Seattle s-hw.com Snøhetta snohetta.com

Esque Studio Portland esque-studio.com

65. PEOPLE 400 Forward tiffanybrowndetroit.com

FM Distributing fmdistributing.com

Google google.com

Gruet Winery gruetwinery.com

Graypants Seattle and Amsterdam graypants.com

Henrybuilt Seattle henrybuilt.com Hive Modern Portland hivemodern.com ILVE Appliances ilveappliances.com Inform Interiors Seattle and Vancouver informseattle.com informinteriors.com Keller Supply kellersupply.com

Inform Interiors Seattle and Vancouver informseattle.com informinteriors.com John Porter Seattle jrp3.net Kat Holmes Seattle katholmesdesign.com Lee Broom leebroom.com

Kohler kohler.com

Margranite Burnaby, BC margranite.ceram stone.com

Knoll knoll.com

The MIT Press mitpressjournals.org

Base Modern Portland base-modern.com

Livingspace Vancouver livingspace.com

Mismatch Seattle mismatch.design

Bensen Vancouver bensen.com

MQuan Studio mquan.com

Oak + Fort Vancouver oakandfort.com

49. GIVING Baleen Seattle shopbaleen.com

Blu Dot Seattle bludot.com Brian Paquette Interiors Seattle shop.brianpaquette interiors.com Cedar & Moss Clackamas, OR cedarandmoss.com Chown Hardware Bellevue, WA and Portland chown.com

Neolith Neolith.com Roche Bobois Seattle and Portland roche-bobois.com Room & Board Seattle and Portland roomandboard.com Tufenkian Artisan Carpets Portland tufenkian.com Urban Interiors & Thomasville Bellevue, Tukwila, WA urbaninteriors.com

Clayhaus Tile Portland clayhaustile.com

Victoria + Albert vandabaths.com

Currey & Company curreyco.com

Woonwinkel Portland woonwinkelhome.com

Nike Beaverton, OR nike.com SmithGroup smithgroup.com Ste. Marie Art + Design Vancouver stemarieartdesign.com Studio Roslyn Vancouver studioroslyn.com Superbaba Victoria, BC eatsuperbaba.com Tektronix Beaverton, OR tek.com

87. INTERIORS + ARCHITECTURE 1stdibs 1stdibs.com

Crescent Custom Homes Portland crescentcustom homesor.com

Adrift Distillers Long Beach, WA adriftdistillers.com

Daltile daltile.com

Adrift Hotel and Inn Long Beach, WA adrifthotel.com Amantii amantii.com Ames Tile & Stone Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, BC amestile.com Arcanum arcanummarket.com

Dusen Dusen dusendusen.com Earthwise Architectural Salvage Seattle ewsalvage.com East India Carpets Vancouver eastindiacarpets.com Farrow & Ball us.farrow-ball.com

Ashore Hotel Seaside, OR ashorehotel.com

Fiam Italia fiamitalia.it

Avenue Lighting avenuelighting.com

Frank Lumber franklumber.com

B&B Italia bebitalia.com

Frette at Home Available through Bed Bath & Beyond bedbathandbeyond.com

Babienko Architects Seattle babienkoarchitects.com Benjamin Moore benjaminmoore.com Bensen Vancouver bensen.com Blu Dot Seattle bludot.com Building Momentum Seattle buildingmomentum seattle.com CB2 cb2.com Chairish chairish.com Circa Lighting circalighting.com Cisco Brothers Los Angeles ciscobrothers.com Cole and Son cole-and-son.com

Gallerie Franzhiska Upholstery Lake Forest Park, WA 206.417.6566 Gradient Interiors Seattle gradientinterior design.com H Tasting Lounge Vancouver htastinglounge.com Harlequin stylelibrary.com/ harlequin Imperial Cabinets & Millwork Oregon City, OR imperialcabinets.net Inform Interiors Seattle and Vancouver informseattle.com informinteriors.com Inn at Discovery Coast Long Beach, WA innatdiscovery coast.com


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| resources |

Kalu Interiors Vancouver kaluinteriors.com

Second Use Seattle seconduse.com

13. Sub-Zero Wolf subzero-wolf.com/ seattle

Kravet Seattle kravet.com

Shelburne Hotel Long Beach, WA shelburnehotelwa.com

14. Fleetwood Windows & Doors fleetwoodusa.com

Lasvit lasvit.com

Silestone silestoneusa.com

15. Keller Supply kellershowrooms.com

Latitude Portland, New York, and Minneapolis lat.co

Stone Tile Pacific Vancouver stone-tile.com

19. Room & Board Portland and Seattle roomandboard.com

Sunpan sunpan.com

20. The Modern Fan Co. modernfan.com

Lee Industries leeindustries.com Liv Interiors Vancouver liv.ca Michelle Dirkse Interior Design Seattle michelledirkse.com

Timorous Beasties timorousbeasties.com Available through Adorn Seattle adorn.house Tom Dixon tomdixon.net

Miele miele.com

West Elm westelm.com

Muuto muuto.com

Westin Bayshore Hotel Vancouver westinbayshore.com

Odyssey Wallcoverings Vancouver odysseywall coverings.com Osborne & Little osborneandlittle.com Pacific Galleries Antique Mall Seattle pacgal.com Pindler pindler.com The Plant Shop Seattle plantshopseattle.com Prospect Refuge Studio prospectrefuge studio.com Ralph Lauren ralphlaurenhome.com Roost roostco.com Schoolhouse Electric Portland schoolhouse.com

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WeWork wework.com

21. Victoria + Albert vandabaths.com 22. Designer Furniture Galleries Seattle dfgseattle.com 22. Division Road Seattle divisionroadinc.com 23. Tufenkian Portland tufenkianportland.com 28. Real Carriage Door & Sliding Hardware Gig Harbor, WA realcarriagedoors.com

AD INDEX 2. Westbank firstlightseattle.com

29. Schuchart/Dow Seattle schuchartdow.com

4. Hive Portland hivemodern.com

32. Ferguson ferguson.com

6. Montauk Sofa Multiple locations montauksofa.com 10. Spark Modern Fires sparkfires.com 11. Axor axor-design.com 12. Roche Bobois Portland and Seattle roche-bobois.com 13. Bradlee Distributors Seattle bradleedistributors.com

33. Kush Handmade Rugs Portland kushugs.com 34. FM Distributing fm-distributing.com

41. Design House Northwest Seattle designhousenw.org 42. Design Lecture Series Seattle designlectur.es 44. AIA Portland aiaportland.org 45. AIA Seattle aiaseattle.org 46. WestEdge Design Fair westedgedesign fair.com 47. Bend Design Bend, OR benddesign.org 48. The Sanctuary Seattle thesanctuary seattle.com 51. Provenance Hotels provenancehotels.com 53. Hyde Evans Design Seattle hydeevansdesign.com

61. SITTE / SMG Collective Portland sittemodern.com smgcollective.com 61. Steel Grape Co. Portland thesteelgrape.com 61. Clayhaus Portland clayhaustile.com 62. Alchemy Collections Seattle alchemycollections.com 62. 63. Moe’s Home Collections Seattle, Tukwila, WA, Vancouver moeshome.com 62. Sarah Alexandra Seattle sarahalexandra.com 63. Valerie Capewell Nanaimo, BC valeriecapewell.com 63. SwitzerCult Creative Vancouver switzercultcreative.com

55. Bedrooms & More Seattle bedroomsandmore.com

64. BoConcept Bellevue, WA and Vancouver boconcept.com

57. Zach Matheson Portland zachmatheson.com

71. Porcelanosa Seattle porcelanosa-usa.com

59. Chown Hardware Bellevue, WA, Portland chown.com

79. Urban Interiors & Thomasville Bellevue, Tukwila, WA urbaninteriors.com

60. 62. Fran’s Bellevue, WA, Seattle frans.com

34. Neolith Neolith.com

60. TREE Bellevue, WA tree.co

37. Spire Seattle spireseattle.com

60. Cisco Home Bellevue, WA ciscohome.net

39. Design Within Reach Portland and Seattle dwr.com

61. Christiane Millinger Portland christianemillinger.com

109. Royal Building Products royalbuilding products.com 111. Baylis Architects Bellevue, WA baylisarchitects.com 111. J Geiger Seattle jgeigershading.com 115. Seattle Interactive Conference seattleinteractive.com 115. Sun Valley Bronze Bellevue, ID sunvalleybronze.com 117. EWF Modern Portland ewfmodern.com 117. Prestige Residential Construction Seattle prestigecrafted.com 119. Maison Inc. Portland maisoninc.com 119. Ragen & Associates Seattle ragenassociates.com 123. Ocean Pacific Lighting Vancouver oceanpacific lighting.com 123. ILVE Appliances ilveappliances.com

86. Dovetail General Contractors Seattle dovetailgc.com

127. Mission Hill Family Estate Winery West Kelowna, BC missionhillwinery.com

99. Lundgren Enterprises Seattle lundgrenenterprises .com

131. Roberts Group Kirkland, WA robertsgroup.build

99. Milgard milgard.com 107. The Shade Store Bellevue, Portland, and Seattle theshadestore.com

132. Henrybuilt Seattle henrybuilt.com


| market | THE ULTIMATE BUYER’S GUIDE Alchemy Collections Located in downtown Seattle, Alchemy Collections is your Western Washington source for modern and contemporary furniture. Sensing a void in the Seattle furniture landscape, Alchemy Collections opened in 2004, bringing a modern yet accessible furniture venue to the everyday Seattleite. (206) 448-3309 alchemycollections.com

The Shade Store For more than 70 years The Shade Store has handcrafted the finest custom shades, blinds, and draperies available. With a wide selection of products, and over 1,300 exclusive materials, finding the perfect window treatments has never been easier. (800) 754-1455 theshadestore.com

Quake Furniture Quake Furniture celebrates the Pacific Northwest by designing functional and unique furniture for your home. Visit our collection at quakefurniture.com or providehome.com

William & Wayne Hunter Douglas at William & Wayne, where great design begins! Located in the Seattle Design Center. Open to the trade and public. (206) 762-2635 williamandwayne.com

Designer Furniture Galleries DFG is proudly celebrating 25 years serving the Pacific Northwest design community. Located in the Seattle Design Center, we offer a vast selection of furniture an lighting for every lifestyle and budget. dfgseattle.com

Urban Interiors & Thomasville

Porcelanosa

“Tailored to the Trade” is a program created specifically for industry design professionals, with discounts on Thomasville, Henredon, Drexel, Bernhardt, Broyhill and more. Call Ameena Malik for more information.

Porcelanosa is a leader in the in-novation, design, manufacture, and distribution of tile, kitchen, bath, and hardwood products. Visit the Porcelanosa showroom in downtown Seattle to see design inspiration and solutions through vignette installations and feature detailed product libraries.

(425) 615-3090 urbaninteriors.com

(206) 673-8395 porcelanosa-usa.com

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GRAY No. 42  

THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING Game-changing renovations, the latest in kitchen + bath, and the most becoming surfaces, finishes, fixtures, furnit...

GRAY No. 42  

THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING Game-changing renovations, the latest in kitchen + bath, and the most becoming surfaces, finishes, fixtures, furnit...