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BOLD DESIGN

INTERIORS // ARCHITECTURE // FASHION // ART // DESIGN

PACIFIC NORTHWEST DESIGN

N O 39 : APRIL / MAY 2018

THE NOT NEUTRAL PROJECT


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Architect | Frank Gehry

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EC3 • Eddie Jones Studio • EHDD • Ehrlich Yanai Rhee Chaney • Esque Glass Facebook • the Felt Hat • Fennie Mehl • Fieldwork • Frederick Fisher & Partners Firm 151 • FX Fowle • GBD • Gensler • Graphite • Hacker • Hannes Wingate Hart Howerton

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Williams Sonoma • Woofter Architecture • WRNS • XTen • YB-A • YGH • ZGF

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cont 33

40

48

april–may.18

16. hello

48. interiors

NOT NEUTRAL 33. hospitality

56. workspace

The GRAY way.

Portland’s reigning hospitality design king raises another bar.

38. happenings

Design news and events.

42. architecture

Landmark-status buildings and tricky environmental hurdles shaped a new “superblock” in Seattle’s tech epicenter.

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Chromatic adventure abounds in a renovated condo.

Candy-colored accents mean a super cool design for ice cream juggernaut Molly Moon’s Seattle headquarters.

60. gray scale

Mixing a little goth with a lot of glam, a revived Victorian turns to the dark side.

68. coming into play

A spirited firm reimagines a stately century-old home as a cozy, clean-lined playhouse.

78. hobby house

Industrialism and custom craft make powerful partners in a metalworking hobbyist’s live-work residence.

86. workspace

A Vancouver animation studio sparks creativity with its colorful and democratic office.


tents 86

92. architecture

Combine the seemingly incompatible ideas of “RV” and “luxury vacation compound” and you get the Camps at Coos Bay Lagoon.

96. interiors

Layered arabesque details help a home avoid minimalist Pacific Northwest design clichés.

104. hospitality

A vegan restaurant’s interiors break with pizzeria design paradigms.

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112. profile

Finding common threads among the Northwest’s design family dynasties.

127. resources

Design professionals, furnishings, and suppliers featured in this issue.

130. obsession

Sub Pop Records’ Jeff Kleinsmith is poster-crazy.

112

On the Cover

Boldly upholstered seating in this Portland living room is an extension of interior design firm Penny Black’s audacious style. SEE PAGE

60 Photographed by CHRISTOPHER DIBBLE

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| hello |

“WHAT’S THE MEANING BEHIND THE NAME GRAY?”

the gray way.

In my four and a half years with GRAY, that’s one of the questions I’ve been asked most frequently. For the record, the name was an early contender in a magazine-title brainstorming session held back in 2011 in founder-publisher Shawn Williams’s dining room. At one point, aiming to gauge raw reactions from the founding editors, Shawn literally pulled the word out of a hat, and it resonated for the team. It’s a tongue-in-cheek reference to both the Northwest’s prevalent weather and the sophisticated “color” palette popular in our region’s notoriously subdued interiors. Generally, whoever’s asking gets it right away, flashing a knowing grin. (Except once, when a sweet but dotty gentleman repeatedly pressed, “But is it a magazine for seniors?”) Over time, however, I’ve come to think of the name GRAY as a kind of in-joke, since our team is the brightest, most sparkly group of talent I’ve ever had the privilege to work with, and our approach to everything—from our events to the magazine you hold in your hands—is to be bold and stand out in a big way. Shawn’s recurring refrain is “How can GRAY do things differently?”—and it’s just that out-of-the-box, sometimes off-the-wall questioning that has been GRAY’s secret sauce since day one. “Not Neutral,” the theme of this issue, is a natural topic for GRAY editors to explore. Although every issue we publish highlights exciting design work, this time we dug deep to search out audacious projects that represent a true departure from the expected—whether through innovative use of color or, in the case of one Victorian-gone-goth house in Portland, through a tantalizing embrace of design’s dark side. The Northwest’s reputation for earthtoned interiors is well deserved—but when it comes to taking creative risks, our region is anything but neutral. Speaking of departures, soon I’ll be making my own. This is my 27th issue of GRAY—and my last. It’s been my honor to lead the GRAY editorial team and to be entrusted with surfacing the amazing work emerging from this dynamic region. Though I’m shifting my career’s focus, I will always be an advocate and supporter of the Pacific Northwest’s inimitable design community. I hope we’ll cross paths at GRAY’s anything-but-expected events this year. See you there! Jaime Gillin,

Director of Editorial + Content Strategy

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Teal Chinn Jamie Reed Lauren Wilcox

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No. 39 Copyright ©2018. Published bimonthly (DEC, FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT) by GRAY Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. While every attempt has been made, GRAY cannot guarantee the legality, completeness, or accuracy of the information presented and accepts no warranty or responsibility for such. GRAY is not responsible for loss, damage, or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, photography, art, or any other unsolicited material. Unsolicited material will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. If submitting material, do not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by GRAY in writing. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GRAY, 5628 Airport Way S., Ste. 330 Seattle, WA 98108 Subscriptions $30 us for one year; $50 us for two years.

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AFTER 45 YEARS, WE LOOK GOOD. new building coming soon!

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pacific northwest architects The following architecture and design firms are among the best in the region. They also support GRAY’s effort to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. We’re proud to call them our partners. Look to them first for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more.


4D Architects

AKJ Architects LLC

Artisans Group

babienko ARCHITECTS pllc

Baylis Architects

BC&J Architecture

Ben Trogdon | Architects

Best Practice

BjarkoSerra Architects

Board & Vellum

COLAB Architecture + Urban Design

David Coleman Architecture

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David Hopkins Design

DeForest Architects

Designs Northwest Architects

FINNE Architects

First Lamp

Giulietti | Schouten AIA Architects

Hacker

Hoshide Wanzer Architects

Integrate Architecture & Planning

JW Architects

KASA Architecture

Lane Williams Architects

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Eerkes Architects

Eggleston | Farkas Architects

Emerick Architects

Graham Baba Architects

Guggenheim Architecture + Design Studio

H2D Architects

James Dixon Architect

Janof Architecture

Johnston Architects

Lanefab Design / Build

Leckie Studio Architecture + Design

Lyons Hunter Williams : architecture

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johnstonarchitects.com

lhwarchitecture.com


Nathan Good Architects

Openspace Architecture

Richard Brown Architect, AIA

Risa Boyer Architecture

RUF Project

Scott | Edwards Architecture

SkB Architects

Steelhead Architecture

Stephenson Design Collective

Tyler Engle Architects

William Kaven Architecture

Workshop AD

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ARCHITECTURE / Olson Kundig PHOTOGRAPHY / Aaron Leitz


pacific northwest interior design The following design firms are among the best in the region. They also support GRAY’s effort to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. We’re proud to call them our partners. Look to them first for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more.

Michelle Dirkse Interior Design michelledirkse.com

Pulp Design Studios

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SMD

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CAITLIN JONES DESIGN caitlinjonesdesign.com

Curated Home by Chrissy & Co. chrissyco.com

Finley Grace Design

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Visit their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more.


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STYLISH DESIGN MEETS LEGENDARY PERFORMANCE

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not neutral The back wall at Portland’s Capitol Bar, created by local design firm Lightning Bar Collective, is swathed in Flavor Paper wallpaper, whose overlapping hexagons add to the room’s geometric theme. PentalQuartz tabletops are durable, and turquoise HK3 shell chairs echo the wallpaper’s blue hues.

PORTLAND’S REIGNING HOSPITALITY DESIGN KING RAISES ANOTHER BAR. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by DINA AVILA

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| hospitality |

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT:

The ceiling’s octagonal cupola inspired the shape of both the bar and the shelving behind it. LBC designer John Janulis and his crew also installed oak flooring in a half-octagon pattern, making the cozy seating area a lesson in geometry. Janulis explains that because the team lacked a way to hang lighting from the ceiling around the vaulted cupola, “we made fixtures from brass tubing and slapped on old bike head badges to give them a vintage feel.”

“EVERY SINGLE PROJECT WE DO IS INSPIRED BY THE BUILDING IT’S IN,” says John Janulis, co-founder of the

prolific Portland hospitality and design/build consortium Lightning Bar Collective (which also runs Century, the Bye and Bye, and Jackknife Bar). He’s in Palm Springs, darting between meetings about a hotel he’s designing there, and I’ve wrangled him for a phone chat about Capitol Bar, the company’s 11th hospitality project in the City of Roses. “With Capitol, it was easy to tease out the design. The building is shaped like an octagon, so we used that shape as a touchstone throughout the interiors.” Located in Portland’s Northeast neighborhood, the 2,000square-foot space (which also includes a private karaoke room) is set inside a 1930s-era building purchased three years ago by David LaChapelle, the iconic pop photographer who’s snapped images of everyone from Tupac in a bathtub to Eminem gripping a suggestively placed firecracker. After the LBC crew met with LaChapelle’s team, the photographer researched their previous projects, liked what he saw, and gave the designers the go-ahead (and free rein) to work on a modern saloon.

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Janulis and his team gutted the space and then installed a series of crucial elements—the flooring, the oak bar, the geometric bar back—each of which is shaped like a half-octagon to play off the eight-sided cupola overhead. They laid the 5-inchwide oak floorboards by hand, built the bar and topped it with PentalQuartz (“That stuff is bulletproof,” Janulis enthuses), and worked with LBC member and local fabricator Ian Davis to design and construct the custom bar lighting and draft tower. “We used to search out vintage items like lighting and then rewire them,” Janulis notes, “but we’ve gotten to the point where our collective skills and knowledge allow us to not only do everything ourselves, but also get exactly what we want.” Opened last October, Capitol eschews the usual dark and moody Portland vibe and incorporates cool colors with natural wood (warm oak everywhere; blue-toned seating; moss-green Benjamin Moore ceiling paint) to offset the room’s signature eye-crossing wallpaper, a version of Flavor Paper’s multicolored Cuben pattern. Is the pattern a nod to LaChapelle’s brazenly colorful shots? Janulis laughs before answering: “Our style is constantly evolving, but we always stay true to good design.” h


© 2018 Design Within Reach, Inc.

The best in modern design.

Shop our stores today or schedule a complimentary design session in advance at dwr.com/studios. 825 NW 13TH AVE., PORTLAND | 503.220.0200 1918 FIRST AVE., SEATTLE | 206.443.9900

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HOT NEW NEXT COMPETITION

PORTLAND / SEATTLE / VANCOUVER

THE NEXT BIG THING IN DESIGN

HOT NEW NEXT is a dynamic competition celebrating the innovative ideas moving Pacific Northwest design forward. This Shark Tank–style program will offer contestants in each city the chance to present a rapid-fire pitch for a compelling new design-related concept or product to an expert panel and live audience. Regional winners will receive: - coverage in GRAY magazine - offsite mentorship by the judges - advancement to our championship round— held on the GRAY Stage at IDS Vancouver (winner at IDS will receive a $1,000 prize) Entry guidelines + sponsorship and event information

graymag.com/hot-new-next #graymagazine #hotnewnext

Tickets now available April 16 | Design Within Reach, Portland 5:30–8pm | Design Week Portland

Submit your idea + attend May 9 | 5:30–8pm | Vancouver Design Week June 14 | 5:30–8pm | Hotel Max, Seattle

Presented by

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| happenings |

PARTY TIME

Read more online at graymag.com/henry-gala

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On April 21, the University of Washington’s Henry Art Gallery will celebrate its 91st anniversary by throwing the ultimate night at the museum. Designed by Seattle interdisciplinary firm Mutuus Studio, the black-tie event draws inspiration from a traditional 90th-anniversary gemstone: the emerald. “The emerald and its facets suggest the ways that a museum is a place for different perspectives,”says artist and Mutuus partner Saul Becker. A 30-by-30-foot kaleidoscopic space will house the evening’s epic dance party. Tickets are available to the public, and proceeds will support the gallery’s exhibitions and programming. henryart.org

For eight days in April, design will overtake the Rose City. Celebrating its sixth year, Design Week Portland (April 14–21) kicks off with the Opening Party at the Custom Blocks, SE Portland’s newest creative space. Programs offer something for everyone across design disciplines, so don’t miss open houses from your favorite firms, how-to workshops from companies such as Adidas, the AIA Portland Homes Tour (April 21), and GRAY’s own HOT NEW NEXT competition on April 16 at Design Within Reach. Vancouver Design Week returns May 7–13 for its third annual citywide design event. This year’s theme is “Impact,” which emphasizes the ways that design can be a tool for positive change and innovation. Explore every facet of Vancouver design through tours, tastings, and talks led by the very creatives shaping the city’s new scene. GRAY’s HOT NEW NEXT competition will be held May 9, venue to be announced. Featuring more than 800 companies exhibiting their newest products, New York City’s ICFF (May 20–23) is the anchor expo of NYCxDESIGN. Look for the Design Seattle Coffee Bar, organized by Seattle-based lighting company Graypants, as well as exhibit spaces from PNW-based companies Grand Image, LightArt, Luma Design Workshop, Urban Hardwoods, Jujupapers, Blanche Jelly, Molo, Martha Sturdy, and Bensen. In its usual chic fashion, WantedDesign— a yearlong international platform for the creative community—will culminate with exhibitions, talks, and installations in Brooklyn (May 17–21) and Manhattan (May 19–22). In addition to its numerous cuttingedge exhibitors and events, the 2018 Outside the Box exhibition, a collaboration with the Toronto Design Offsite Festival, will spotlight groups of Pacific Northwest designers, led by Darin Montgomery (Urbancase and Fin Design), Riley McFerrin (Hinterland Design), and John and Wonhee Arndt (Studio Gorm). designweekportland.com vancouverdesignwk.com graymag.com/hot-new-next icff.com wanteddesignnyc.com

INSPIRATION IMAGE FROM MUTUUS STUDIO’S MOOD BOARD (BELOW) FOR THE 2018 HENRY GALA.

THE DESIGN GRAND TOUR


APR 14–21 2018

HUNDREDS OF INDEPENDENT EVENTS AND OPEN HOUSES designweekportland.com


| happenings |

NOW OPEN

EMA PETER

TOM ARBAN

This past fall, Emily Carr University of Art and Design relocated to its new purpose-built campus in East Vancouver. Designed by Diamond Schmitt Architects in a joint venture with Chernoff Thompson Architects, the 290,000square-foot building’s open and interconnected spaces reflect the 92-yearold university’s interdisciplinary approach to its creative arts program. With a central light-filled atrium, gallerylike walls that display student work, and communal areas configured for impromptu installations and performances— not to mention views of Vancouver’s coastal and mountainous landscape from many studios and terraces—this is a campus built to inspire. ecuad.ca

RISING STARS

CHELSEA MACKAY & CORA HALL

For the fifth year in a row, BoConcept has partnered with Emily Carr University on a design competition. Over the course of a semester, third-year furniture design students develop new prototypes and present the results, via short videos, to the BoConcept team in Denmark, who have the option of selecting one or more for production. This year’s challenge? To rethink the concept of a table-top by creating a piece that’s lightweight and portable and offers storage. The winner, a convertible tote/lap desk designed by Cora Hall, Chelsea MacKay, and Åsa Johansson,was deemed “a very functional design that could challenge all existing bags on the market” by Claus Ditlev Jensen, BoConcept’s collection director. ❈ boconcept.com

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| architecture |

BUILDING BLOCKS

Written by JENNIFER MCCULLUM Photographed by BENJAMIN BENSCHNEIDER

THE CORNER OF THOMAS STREET AND FAIRVIEW AVENUE HAS BECOME A SYMBOLIC CROSSROADS FOR THE CHANGING FACE OF BUSINESS–DRIVING SEATTLE DEVELOPMENT. On one side stand the Troy Laundry and

TOP RIGHT: Back-painted glass in hues of tan and rust scale the new Troy Block towers in South Lake Union; the striated pattern references the original landmark brick buildings at their base. ABOVE AND BELOW: In the central courtyard, thousands of tiny stainless-steel rods and LED lights compose City Fragment, a sculpture by Seattle-based Lead Pencil Studio.

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Boren Investment buildings, both 1920s-era structures that have been remediated as monuments to the industrial spirit that characterized the time. Extending off these buildings are glassy towers housing legions of Amazon employees. “You think about the [second] industrial revolution, and what businesses were occupying these warehouses then . . . the two landmarked buildings embody that,” says architect Andrew Clinch, the Perkins+Will associate principal who led South Lake Union’s unique restoration and expansion project. “Now a lot of the country’s jobs, especially in Seattle, are in the tech world,” he says, gesturing up to the two towers. All four structures make up the Troy Block Project. One of only three superblocks (a full city block not bisected by a public alley) in Seattle, the LEED Gold–certified 800,000-square-foot complex is the result of two years of discussion with the City of Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board and Design Review Board. The site, which formerly housed a fur-cleaning operation, hadn’t been occupied in more than 45 years due to soil contamination. Before construction could even begin, contractor Lease Crutcher Lewis had to excavate 90 feet below ground to meet EPA site standards. The design process held specific challenges of its own: Perkins+Will was tasked with creating dynamic »


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Contemporary Residence, Atlanta, Georgia Architect: Edward J. Alshut, AIA Designer: Shawn C. Alshut, ASID, RA Photo: Brian Gassel


| architecture |

retail and office spaces inside all four buildings and, outside, a cross-block pedestrian connection among them, all while paying homage to the area’s historic roots. “We asked ourselves: ‘How can the new towers have their own identity but not impose upon the landmark buildings?’” Clinch says. The architects’ answer lay in transforming what was once the Troy Laundry’s garage into a pedestrian concourse. A former utility corridor for laundry trucks, the entryway escorts visitors toward the complex’s central courtyard through a sloping portal. Board-formed concrete walls provide a materiality reminiscent of early-20th-century construction. “We were thinking about authenticity,” Clinch says. “We could have touched the landmark structures with modern materials, but the board form speaks to the building technology that was used then.” Clinch’s mention of technology nods to the goal driving developer Touchstone/Urban Renaissance Group: to secure a big tech tenant. This meant that every design decision, from the towers’ electrical and mechanical capacity to the large, flexible floor plates, was made to maximize office space. Soon Amazon came knocking—the ultimate tech tenant coup, and one that opened up further design considerations. “With Amazon’s global employee base, you’re also thinking about employees’ varied cultural experiences,” Clinch says. “For example, in the U.S., restroom stalls often have a gap under the door. But this can be jarring for people from other countries who are not used to seeing people’s feet in the stalls. So we spec’d bathroom doors that go to the floor.” Such intimate details about what’s inside Amazon feel especially relevant as GRAY toured Troy Block the morning after the list of finalist cities vying to house the company’s next headquarters was made public. The timing wasn’t lost on Clinch, either. “Whoever gets the next headquarters will hopefully take a look at what Amazon has done here,” he says. “It’s changed Seattle, but developments like Troy Block show how old buildings can reflect an area’s new energy and diversity while still maintaining their distinct identity.” h

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FROM TOP: Pedestrians enter the complex through what was originally the Troy Laundry garage. An aerial view of the central courtyard reveals the cross-block connection required by Seattle land use codes to better engage pedestrians with urban spaces in South Lake Union. Inside the lobbies of both towers, a geometric micro-pattern on painted aluminum panels designed by Perkins+Will echoes the stacked brick façades of the site’s historic buildings.


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| interiors |

BROAD SPECTRUM

Written by JAIME GILLIN : Photographed by HARIS KENJAR

BOLD IS IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER. Where

you might see screamingly vibrant splashes of color, another might see soothing swaths of neutrals. That’s an insight interior designer Kenna Stout has gleaned while building the reputation of her Seattle-based firm, Brio Interior Design. Acclaim for her work rests not only on her versatile and eclectic design eye, but also on her ability to gently steer beige- and griege-loving Northwesterners toward a friendly rapport with richly hued colors. It’s all in the reframing, says Stout. “Green can feel really bold, but, when you imagine yourself in the wilderness, green actually is a neutral. Same with blue—just picture standing by the ocean. If you contextualize color for clients by bringing it back to nature, you help them get to a place where they’re not afraid of stronger hues.” »

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Brio Interior Design founder Kenna Stout and staff designer Jen Rowland (opposite) brought bold color into a two-bedroom condo in Seattle. A custom curved sofa by Gallerie Franzhiska complements Milo Baughman chairs from Thayer Coggin, sourced from Designer Furniture Galleries. To add dimension, Stout swathed the concrete ceiling with a white glass–beaded wallcovering from Schumacher.

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| interiors |

Such coaching, however, wasn’t necessary when Stout remade a two-bedroom condo in Seattle’s Insignia Towers, purchased by an older couple who sought a pied-à-terre—and a hands-off design process. “They own several other homes and previously had worked with designers who’d bring them 50 fabrics to choose from. They didn’t want to do that again,” says Stout. The freedom they granted Stout meant she could unleash her chromatic wizardry—washing walls, built-ins, and upholstered furniture with kelly green, bright yellow, deep teal, and minty pastels. Yet because the hues are complementary and thoughtfully grounded against natural woods and tones of white, the space doesn’t feel like a full-spectrum assault. Broad latitude brought another bonus for Brio: the opportunity to commission custom pieces for every room of the house. Seeking a curved sofa to soften the living room’s many right

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angles, Stout collaborated with local furniture makers Gallerie Franzhiska on a one-of-a-kind piece, providing rough sketches, drawing her desired radius on a piece of wood, and then refining the design along the way. She hired Gabe Strand, a local woodworker, to fabricate built-ins for the living room and guest room; the latter includes a nifty wall bed that folds down to accommodate guests and folds up to reveal a walnut desk that is lowered and held in place with leather straps and brass buckles. Custom work is a boon for any designer. “It’s ideal,” says Stout, clicking through sample sketches and mood boards on her laptop. “The more often you can try out different ways to express your creativity, the more you’ll learn and grow. By working with artisans to build things from scratch—exploring the mechanics, materials, and scale and proportion of a piece— you hone your design skills. Each time, you can do it better.” »


THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE: To fulfill her clients’ request for local art, Stout turned to artists she’d long admired, “who I felt would bring the right amount of life and movement into the space.” A print by landscape photographer Paul Edmondson plays well with the dark wood-and-leather sideboard by Blu Dot and the yellow leather-upholstered vintage chairs. A Wireflow pendant light by Vibia is an eye-catching sculptural moment that doesn’t overwhelm the compact space.

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| interiors |

LEFT AND OPPOSITE: An office doubles as a guest room thanks to a thoughtfully engineered Murphy bed built into a wall of dark teal bookshelves by Gabe Strand (the color is Mount Etna by SherwinWilliams). When the bed is up, a walnut desk folds down. The photograph is by Diego Gomez; the window treatments are from The Shade Store. BELOW: Stout made the most of the small master bedroom by choosing a custom king-size storage bed with built-in nightstands. h

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“Green can feel really bold, but, when you imagine yourself in the wilderness, green actually is a neutral. Same with blue—just picture standing by the ocean. If you contextualize color for clients by bringing it back to nature, you help them get to a place where they’re not afraid of stronger hues.” —KENNA STOUT, INTERIOR DESIGNER

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who to know

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BRENDA ARIANPOUR AN EMERALD CITY DESIGN LEGACY GETS MORE THAN A FACELIFT­—THE NEW AND IMPROVED SEATTLE DESIGN CENTER LOOKS AHEAD.


Seattle Design Center opened its doors in 1973 to serve the region’s growing interest in and appreciation for quality design. Nearly 45 years later, SDC is an unrivaled resource for the Pacific Northwest design community. With to-the-trade showrooms showcasing more than 500 manufacturers and a broad range of aesthetic styles, the legacy and expertise contained within is unparalelled in the region. SDC director of operations Brenda Arianpour discusses the 156,000-square-foot marketplace’s evolution and what’s next for the Northwest’s biggest design center.

from creating a new exterior, entrance, and lobby to adding Italian porcelain floors, a floating staircase, and a glass elevator. At the same time, we’ve added more design events and forums, including Trade Talks, CEUs, our Sample Sale, our first annual Market Day, a Student Career Day, and more—many of them open to the public.

Seattle Design Center has carved out a reputation as not just a retail destination but also as a hub for the PNW design community. Tell us more. SDC’s mission is to be the nucleus of design in the Pacific Northwest—a place where designers and visitors go to cultivate new ideas and draw inspiration. Designers have access to all the trade events we host—32 in the past year alone—to learn about the latest trends, collections, and best business practices from industry leaders such as Leatrice Eiseman, Jack Lenor Larsen, and Barclay Butera. SDC is not just a place to shop but also a space for growth and education.

What’s next for SDC? We’re welcoming two new showrooms this year—the German Kitchen Center, which opened in February, and Sierra Pacific Windows, opening later this spring. SDC also continues to support interior designers by educating the public about the value of their work. Earlier this year, we helped launch Decorative Furnishing Association’s “Do It For” campaign, which promotes working with expert interior designers and connects homeowners to the industry. Working with an interior designer is the best way to ensure that your vision for your space is brought to life. h

Why should interior designers choose SDC? SDC is ideal for those who are passionate about quality—those who care not just about the façade of the piece but intricate details like how it was crafted and where it was produced. We have fabrics, furniture, and accessories that you cannot find in a retail store, and it’s all here at your fingertips. Tell us about SDC’s 2016 renovation. When Greenbridge Investment Partners purchased SDC in 2014, they embarked on an $8 million transformation to make the building more elegant and modern,

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| workspace |

The Capitol Hill headquarters of Molly Moon’s Homemade Ice Cream, dreamed up in tandem with Marabou Design, is a modern, light-filled haven. Two glassed-in meeting rooms anchor one end of the space, and the central living room encourages team members to socialize and collaborate. The rug is from The Mine and the two chairs are vintage finds from Guesthouse.

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“I LOVE GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY AND CONNECTING WITH OUR CUSTOMERS. THIS BIG, WELCOMING SPACE REALLY HELPS BOTH THINGS HAPPEN.” —MOLLY MOON NEITZEL, FOUNDER

ICE CREAM SOCIAL

Written by RACHEL GALLAHER Photographed by STANTON STEPHENS

OVER THE PAST 10 YEARS, MOLLY MOON’S HOMEMADE ICE CREAM, SEATTLE’S HOMEGROWN SWEET-TREAT EMPIRE, HAS EXPANDED FROM A SINGLE, TINY STOREFRONT TO EIGHT SCOOP SHOPS AROUND THE REGION. More stores, more staff, and more

production meant that by 2016, founder Molly Moon Neitzel and her team needed a new corporate home base. Their first office, a 600-square-foot space crammed with nine desks and delivery overflow, was directly next door to their Capitol Hill shop. “We sat shoulder to shoulder, and some people even shared desks,” Neitzel recalls. “After I had my first daughter, I was pumping behind a curtain in the room, and during the summer we’d have pallets of stone fruit and berries in every open space.” In July 2016, a 900-square-foot unit became available just one floor up from the cramped headquarters, and Neitzel scooped up the opportunity: it could be transformed into not only a roomier office but also a space that could host panels, parties, tastings, and other public events—fulfilling Neitzel’s dream of forging closer ties to the neighborhood. »

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| workspace |

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:

“Our colored stairs can’t help but make you happy,” says founder Molly Moon Neitzel. The kitchen area plays variations on the pastel palette with West Elm and Anthropologie dishes and a dandelion-yellow Smeg fridge. Lacquered white desks support the Molly Moon’s corporate team, and whimsical artwork from Minted adds a playful touch. A tricolor macramé wall hanging is by local artisan Jordan Goetz.

The previous tenants had painted the entire unit white, a neutral background Neitzel wanted to keep, but she enlisted Brandy Brown, the creative director of Marabou Design, to help pull together the rest of the space, including installing a kitchen and a private pumping room for breastfeeding mothers (and private phone calls). When it came to adding color, Brown and Neitzel were in complete aesthetic alignment, applying feel-good pastels on the risers of the staircase leading from the main room to a mezzanine that formerly served as Neitzel’s workspace but is now rented out to a marketing firm. “We used colors sparingly,” Brown notes, “because we didn’t want it to feel too childish.” Other bright spots include furniture from The Mine, a sunny yellow Smeg fridge, and two vibrantly striped vintage chairs Neitzel unearthed at local boutique Guesthouse. More than a pragmatic office for the nine-to-five staff, the chic new space provides the flexibility and room to foster community engagement and social interaction— communal tables on casters (custom designed by Brown) are easily rearranged for new seasonal flavor tastings, product launches, and ice cream–making classes. These events are the ultimate cherries on top of Molly Moon’s delicious design. h

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Visit us online for more information and complimentary product catalogs


GRAY SCALE After rescuing this rundown Victorian from the wrecking ball, a Portland design firm played with bold accents to revive the home’s original splendor—and unlock its dark side.

Written by LAUREN MANG : Photographed by CHRISTOPHER DIBBLE

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DESIGN TEAM

interiors: Penny Black Interiors construction: Look Construction LLC foundation: Emmert International plumbing: Watermark

The parlor of a Portland Victorian artfully renovated by Penny Black Interiors balances darks and lights. Designers Stewart Horner and Lauren Reynolds popped the ceiling with Cole & Son’s cloudy sky–inspired Nuvolette wallcovering, which is reflected in Roche Bobois’s Cuba Libre glass-topped cocktail tables. The Soho Chesterfield sofa is from custom furniture manufacturer Cococo Home and is flanked by two leather Cisco Brothers Colin chairs, purchased at Portland’s Manor Fine Wares & Curious Goods. The Maarten Baas Smoke chair was designed to look as if its wood were burned. »

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O

ver the past 122 years, this magnificent Italianate Victorian home, perched high on a hill in the Portland Heights neighborhood, has seen it all. Families have come and gone. College students have moved in and out. Elaborate period details were ripped out and replaced with generic flat-stock trim and hollow-core doors. By November 2016, the house was old, neglected, in need of a new foundation, and in danger of being demolished. Daunting, yes. But for UK native Stewart Horner and his wife, Lauren Reynolds, the duo behind Portland’s newly launched Penny Black Interiors, restoring this 4,265-squarefoot gem to its Victorian-era glory, a task that included lifting it to repair the foundation and stripping the interior down to the studs, was a challenge they couldn’t resist. They took on the project, renovating the house as a 3D calling card for their firm and selling it to new owners in January 2018. “Early on, I thought the design would be more vintagefeeling,” Horner says, “but it quickly made sense for it to be more contemporary and edgy. People aren’t into Victorians at the moment—midcentury and modernism have become more the norm. So we thought we’d take a risk and try to balance the characteristics of the property while adding our flair for modern, slightly left-of-center concepts.” The home’s quirkiness comes to life in its dramatic new interiors. A moody mix of monochromatic gray tones flows through each room on the first floor, from the custom dark hue

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in the kitchen, to the dining room’s midtone (Manor House Gray by Farrow & Ball), to the softer gray in the adjoining library (Plummett by Farrow & Ball), where a portion of the new casework swings open to reveal a small, secret room the designers dubbed the “panic office.” “The drama created by a darker palette is so refreshing,” says Horner. “The house doesn’t feel gloomy; it feels romantic, even sultry. Keeping the floors light and accenting the ceilings with wallpaper forces the eye to look at the space in a new way.” A circa-1890s fireplace, sourced from Old Portland Hardware & Architectural, was added as a nod to the home’s history. In front of the fireplace sit antique king and queen high-back armchairs upholstered in a wildly vivid velvet by Scottish design studio Timorous Beasties. “I wanted these chairs to stand out, but when I got them in here, I felt we needed something that worked with them,” says Horner. In a happy accident, he soon stumbled upon a photograph by Dana Kae that features Seattle burlesque performer Waxie Moon, which nicely echoes both the fabric’s color palette and its eccentricity. Upstairs in the master bedroom, Horner continued the leaden palette, punctuated with a wall of dense, dark blooms behind the bed—wallpaper by artist Ellie Cashman. Other details— spherical faux fur pillows by Evelyne Prélonge, vintage crystal bedside lamps—lend the space a true boudoir vibe. Such flair for drama underpins Penny Black’s approach to both the design of this home and its work in general. “There’s a risk involved in what we do,” Horner says. But in design, as in life, with great risk comes great reward. »


THIS PAGE: Thonet Bentwood Era chairs surround a walnut table from Design Within Reach. Above the table is a chandelier from Globe Lighting. OPPOSITE: Armchairs upholstered in an eye-popping velvet by Scottish design studio Timorous Beasties sit atop a thumbprint-inspired rug from Parker Furniture in Portland. The coffee table is from West Elm.

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“When we decided to do the kitchen in gray, our contractor said, ‘Why don’t you just stick to white?’” Horner says. Instead, the designers coated the cabinetry, walls, and ceiling with a custom dark hue. Copper accents include hardware from Rejuvenation, a Bend Goods wired animal head from Portland’s Woonwinkel, and a Watermark faucet and pot filler. A honed Carrara marble backsplash provides a textured contrast. Lyon bar stools from Rejuvenation feature custom walnut seats and sit atop patterned cement tile from Clé Tile. A circa-1890s china cabinet was sourced from Aurora Mills. »

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THIS PAGE: A classic Cheshire clawfoot bathtub by Victoria + Albert, sourced from Chown Hardware, is the star in the black-and-white master bathroom, accented with polished copper plumbing by Watermark and patterned tile from ClÊ Tile. OPPOSITE: In the boudoir, Ellie Cashman’s large-scale floral wallpaper adorns the wall behind the low-slung Crate & Barrel Tate bed. Victorian-era details, such as an antique dressing table scored on 1stdibs and vintage crystal lamps, lend a romantic vibe. The Ro armchair and ottoman in a blush shade is by Jaime Hayon for Fritz Hansen. h

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COMING INTO PLAY A spirited Seattle design firm reimagines a stately century-old home as a cozy, clean-lined playhouse. Written by RACHEL EGGERS : Photographed by RAFAEL SOLDI

THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE: In the living room of a century-old Seattle home, a giant picture window cinematically frames views of mountains and water. But it’s also an opportunity for another kind of theatricality: the homeowners’ sons often stage shows in the front yard for their parents to watch from the other side. The chairs are vintage and reupholstered with fabric from Thomas Paul. A custom sectional from Couch offers ample seating.

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DESIGN TEAM

architecture + interiors: Best Practice Architecture construction: Kable Design Build

“Y

ou got the door to work!” That’s the first thing the previous resident of Heather and Kevin Bauer’s newly remodeled Seattle home said when he recently stopped by for a visit. The Bauers, only the third family to live in the house since it was built in 1909, were anxious to hear his opinion of the major renovations they’d made. But after his enthusiastic reaction, they relaxed, knowing they’d done right by the venerable home. Set on a hill in the leafy Roanoke Park neighborhood, the lofty American Foursquare reflects the area’s historic character with its gabled porch, picture windows, wood beams, and spacious, boxy rooms. For the Bauers, retaining that charm was important. The couple, who previously lived just three blocks away, had been seeking out a spacious home for more than a year, one that could accommodate themselves, their two young sons, and Maggie, their black-and-white Boston terrier. They loved the neighborhood, so when their real estate agent told them about a nearby home that had been listed but wasn’t being advertised, the Bauers hurried to check it out.

During their first walkthrough, it was clear that the house would need a major remodel—the ’80s-era powder-blue carpet and the outdated appliances had to go—but, anachronistic fixtures aside, the three-story structure was roomy, well kept, and bursting with original details. The Bauers were smitten, and they wrote a letter to the owner that stated their case for becoming the home’s new residents. That thoughtful touch gave them the edge—in 2015, the family purchased the house and geared up for a thorough renovation. The Bauers turned to a close friend, architect Ian Butcher of Seattle-based firm Best Practice Architecture, who sketched out a remarkably on-target plan after only one walkthrough of the house. “Ian came up with a design, we saw it over dinner, and it was perfect,” says Heather. When they expressed surprise, Butcher replied, “Well, I have been doing this for a long time.” Later, he recalled, “I know them well and knew what they were looking for: more space, more flexibility, more style. A house for grown-ups.” For Butcher, whose firm often creates very modern houses, remodeling a turn-of-the-century building was an opportunity »

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THIS PAGE: In the dining room, architect Ian Butcher added Floyd table legs to a custom wood tabletop and chose classic chrome Bertoia chairs from Design Within Reach. The light fixture is an Orbit chandelier by Townsend Design. OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Both Butcher and the Bauers agreed that an atrium, added to the kitchen by a previous resident, should stay. Butcher added a coat of Benjamin Moore Caribbean Cool and a Boos Block butcher-block countertop from Crosscut Hardwoods. The central island is topped with a dolomite marble counter from Meta Marble. An existing powder room off the kitchen had its layout reconfigured to better suit the space. Âť

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FROM TOP: “Kevin likes supermodern; Heather prefers cozy,” says Butcher, so the couple’s master bedroom balances the two styles. Super Rural’s For Like Ever print hangs over a bed from Design Within Reach, flanked by tangerine-hued swing lamps by onefortythree. The master bathroom features a gradient of circular gray and white tiles by Daltile that seem to cascade from wall to floor. OPPOSITE: The boys’ rooms are separated by a shared bathroom. The artwork is by Bruce Yan; and a sunny yellow stripe— Bold Yellow by Benjamin Moore—lends son Henry’s room zip. »

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THIS PAGE: The spirit of the Bauer house encourages play. Sam’s and Henry’s bedrooms are connected via a Jack-and-Jill bathroom so they can share space but maintain privacy as they grow into teens. Henry’s Land of Nod bunkbed means easy sleepovers, too. OPPOSITE: Butcher carefully preserved original fir doors and brass door pulls throughout the home and repurposed them whenever possible, as in the door leading to the reading nook on the staircase landing.

to respond organically to an existing space. The original white oak floors were freed from the old carpet, patched, and refinished. Layers of flowery wallpaper above the dining room wainscoting were replaced with a contemporary yet folkish Hygge & West pattern. The kitchen, likely last updated in the ’80s, was fully remodeled; Butcher mixed custom and retrofitted IKEA cabinetry and open shelving around a new central island. After much discussion, Butcher convinced the Bauers to let him paint one kitchen wall a mod teal, which glows when sunlight enters the sloping windows on the far end of the room.

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In addition to that quirky splash of color, Butcher found other ways to weave in whimsy: he raised the floor of a closet on the stairway landing, turning it into a reading nook with a cutout in its wall that permits peek-a-boo glimpses of the kitchen below. In the basement, unevenly placed shelves along one wall give the room a crafty look: “I wanted them to look like something Grandpa would have made.” A Wrangler denim pocket, hammered into a beam to hold tools during construction, was left in place, one of many small decisions that together form a home that’s equal parts spirited and elegant. h


“I KNOW THE CLIENTS WELL AND KNEW WHAT THEY WERE LOOKING FOR: MORE SPACE, MORE FLEXIBILITY, MORE STYLE. A HOUSE FOR GROWN-UPS.” —IAN BUTCHER, ARCHITECT

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| live/work |

hobby house

Industrialism and custom craft make powerful partners, as evidenced in a Seattle home constructed to the exact specifications of a metalworking hobbyist.

Written by AMANDA ZURITA : Photographed by AARON LEITZ

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A metalworking hobbyist teamed up with Seattlebased RHO Architects to create this residence and studio in ascetic concrete and raw steel, enhanced by a vast Florian Baudrexel wood-andcardboard installation that ascends an interior wall like animate origami. A sectional sofa and an area rug by Minotti from Inform Interiors are complemented with ottomans designed by Spaces and built by Village Interiors. Pendant lights are Lumen Max by Spectrum. Âť

DESIGN TEAM

architecture: RHO Architects interiors: Spaces construction: Lockhart|Suver custom metalwork: Decorative Metal Arts; Pivot Metal; T-Tech Welding and Fabrication; Custom Steel Fabricators landscape: GCH Planning & Landscape Architecture

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ELIZABETH LOCKHART

The owner’s massive milling machine (above) and his Porsche can be rolled through the pivoting 14-by-10-foot door into the groundlevel studio space that forms the heart of the home. Steel shelves present the owner’s industrial metalworking tools as if they were artworks themselves. Twelve-foot-long Holland & Sherry wool curtains custom made by Penthouse Drapery glide along tracks inset into the ceiling to provide privacy for the residents.

a

home’s aesthetics can express far more than a simple style—they can embody and enable the artistic goals of its residents. Exhibit A: When the owner of a south Seattle property hired RHO Architects to design his house, he explained that he was not only commissioning a primary residence for himself but also for his high-tech milling machine. The metalworking hobbyist required a studio space large enough to house both the 12foot-wide machine, which he uses to make metal knives and other objects, and loftlike living quarters. The result: a lightfilled 4,873-square-foot home fashioned from concrete, raw steel, and glass, wrapped around a two-story studio space capacious enough to fulfill the owner’s fondest fabrication dreams. Reflecting the owner’s love of metalwork, the one-bedroom, one and three-quarter-bath house “uses a steel structure more typical in larger construction projects,” says Christopher Osolin, partner at RHO Architects. But unlike a skyscraper, which can accommodate greater variances in its building materials, this project required a high level of precision not » graymag . com

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OPPOSITE: Interior architect Maryika Byskiniewicz of Spaces was tasked with furnishing the home’s mezzanine-level living quarters. She custom-designed the dining room’s resin-topped table and the 360degree steel, walnut, and cast-resin bookshelf that doubles as a standing desk; Pivot Metal built both pieces. BELOW: The living room’s modular couch, custom-designed by Byskiniewicz and built by Village Interiors, supplies ample seating overlooking the studio space below.

generally used in heavy steel construction, largely due to its 14-by-10-foot, 5,000-pound glass-paneled pivoting door. Since steel I-beams don’t arrive completely straight from their manufacturers, the general contractor, Lockhart|Suver, had to assess each beam on site and then send it to a local fabricator to be aligned and straightened. Only then could the builders fit it into the home’s complex framework. “The door is probably the largest window area we’ve ever done,” says Osolin. “We wanted to maximize natural light—a huge selling point in Seattle.” Such transparency requires relinquishing a bit of the

residents’ privacy, but a solution was found in custom wool curtains by Penthouse Drapery that run along ceiling tracks and allow the residents to tuck them into corners when not in use. Interior architect Maryika Byskiniewicz of Spaces joined the team after construction was completed. Her greatest challenge: figuring out what to do with the expanse of concrete wall in the living room. “First we thought of murals,” she says. “But after a massive amount of research on different artists around the world, [the owner] just clicked with Florian Baudrexel,” the multidisciplinary German artist most famous for his cast plaster »

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FROM TOP: The back of the house features a patio and a bioretention planter designed by GCH Planning & Landscape Architecture; rainwater is carried to the planter by a gutter and channel system designed by RHO. In the master bedroom, a Tufty bed from Diva Furniture/B&B Italia Seattle sits on a hand-knotted mohair wool rug from The Rug Company. A laminated and fritted glass catwalk connects the kitchen, dining, and living areas. OPPOSITE: The master bathroom echoes the home’s architecture with its clean lines and palette of glass and metal. The vanity is backed with Pilkington Profilit channel glass.

“I don’t have a norm, and I don’t do normal things. I approach every project as a fresh set of issues that need to be addressed.”

—MARYIKA BYSKINIEWICZ, INTERIOR ARCHITECT

and cardboard sculptures. Byskiniewicz flew to Berlin to finalize the concept with Baudrexel. Accepting the commission, he rented a studio space for six months to construct the colossal piece and then flew to Seattle to personally install it with help from Lockhart|Suver. “I hate the word juxtaposition, but concrete and cardboard do create a great symbiosis,” says Byskiniewicz. Concrete, she notes, “is very hard, poured, finite, and unchangeable, while cardboard is very soft, pliable, and easily disintegrates.” Such a fusion of opposites—softness and impermeability; the rigors of metalwork and the gentleness of domesticity—defines the home itself as well: it is a tangible example of modern work-life balance. h

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BECAUSE NO ONE WAS EVER INSPIRED BY A CUBICLE Written by STACY KENDALL : Photographed by JANIS NICOLAY

AS A KID, I THOUGHT MY LITTLE PONY WAS TOPS. NOW THE CARTOONS SUPERNOOBS AND SLUGTERRA ARE WINNING THE HEARTS AND MINDS OF A NEW GENERATION. They are all animated by the Canadian company

DHX Media—the world’s foremost producers of children’s programming—whose newly built B.C. office was designed by Evoke International Design. When DHX acquired Nerd Corps Entertainment in late 2014, it opted to move both operations into one new building, a 75,000-square-foot, 5-story space in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood of Vancouver. Evoke developed a seamless design plan for the new West Coast headquarters, bringing together the animation and live action studios as well as the house management teams while creatively accommodating more than 700 employees. Several creative moves set this office design apart. Windows along the street level presented a privacy problem, but rather than sheathing the glass with vinyl, the design team embraced the fishbowl effect and made part of the large ground-floor space into a collection of meeting areas. Curious passersby get a glimpse of bleacher seating and playful murals of DHX’s

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cartoon stars in gradient tints of the company’s signature cyan blue. Bold colors recur throughout the building on doors and furnishings and in the cozy, house-shaped alcoves that line a wall in the main cafeteria. In a clever nod to a computer screen’s RGB color model and to DHX’s robust 2D animation successes, whole floors are blanketed in red, green, or blue. People in tech and animation companies spend a lot of time at their desks (and often in the dark), so Evoke thoughtfully considered how to provide equal access to daylight. “It was a democratic approach,” says Evoke founding partner David Nicolay. “We were thinking about how to create a sense of community in a deeper way than just by adding a basketball hoop.” To that end, the amenity spaces on floors 3 through 5 are boldly positioned facing north, in front of the windows with the best North Shore mountain views, while C-suite offices are instead positioned facing south. There are also “quiet” lounges, done up in muted shades of gray, that offer a visual break from the brightly colored main floors and have walls that animators can draw on. Evoke’s workspace redesign proves that in order to successfully create the world’s most beloved cartoon stars, you need an office that inspires people off-screen, too. »


THIS PAGE: In DHX Media’s new Vancouver office, alcoves in the cafeteria resemble children’s drawings of houses. OPPOSITE: A space for companywide town hall–style meetings is visible from the street and sports a mural by Evoke depicting DHX characters in the company’s signature blue hue. A library is hidden in the space beneath the bleachers.

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THIS PAGE: “Quiet” lounges on the top three floors eschew the bold swaths of red, green, and blue found in the company’s other common spaces; drawing on the whiteboard walls is encouraged in these softer-hued areas. Furniture throughout the building includes pieces from Haworth, sourced through Brooks Corning, and from Andreu World and Muuto, sourced through Inform Contract. OPPOSITE: Evoke added meeting booths to slightly widened corridors, a move Nicolay characterizes as “bringing function and value to the ‘in-between’ spaces.” The wall covering is from FilzFelt, and the light is a custom installation of a Muuto fixture. »

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“With teams of 30 to 50 people, we wanted them to be able to move freely, so we included an amenity space on each floor—it’s a really good idea to let the animators get some light and see mountains.”

—DAVID NICOLAY, DESIGNER

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The color model of computer screens—known as RGB—is the reference for bold splashes of red, green, and blue on floors 3 through 5 of the building. Each amenity space features a kitchen and seating area that looks out to the North Shore Mountains. h

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MODERN GLAMPING Written by RACHEL GALLAHER

THE TERM “RV PARK” LIKELY BRINGS TO MIND ROWS OF TRAILERS LINED UP ON CONCRETE PADS, NOT STREAMLINED MODERN STRUCTURES AND SWEEPING COASTAL VIEWS. But architect Christian Robert, principal and

co-founder of R&A Architecture + Design (with offices in Portland and Culver City, California), has flipped the script on that preconceived notion with the Camps at Coos Bay Lagoon. Positioned on a 103-acre wedge of seaside land in southern Oregon, the project is on track to become a luxury vacation compound with 188 traditional RV campsites, 14 cabins, a communal pavilion containing a dining hall, mercantile, a clubhouse, and posh amenities such as a heated pool and a bar. “There’s a very outdated stereotype of RV parks,” Robert says, “that they’re very utilitarian and spare. Maybe there’s a little patch of grass or some picnic tables, but you wouldn’t call them beautiful or well designed.” »

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ABOVE: The communal buildings at the Camps at Coos Bay Lagoon, designed by R&A Architecture + Design with associate architect McSwain & Woods Architects, are inspired by their surroundings: the roofs not only aid in rain dispersal and wind protection but also mimic the slopes of nearby sand dunes. OPPOSITE: Situated between the camping area and waterfront, each new wood-and-glass structure has large windows that take advantage of sweeping natural views.

RENDERINGS COURTESY OF R&A ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

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“The sloping roofs of the communal buildings have a very functional purpose—they provide wind protection and shed rain quickly—but we also chose angles because they suggest the topography of the sand dunes in the area.”

—CHRISTIAN ROBERT, ARCHITECT

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The Camps at Coos Bay aims to model a new kind of recreational space. Slated to open in July (with work by Nishkian Dean Structural Engineers and Path Construction), the compound is located on property that served as a lumberyard and mill until the 1970s. Rather than gloss over the site’s history, Robert purposefully drew upon it when designing the communal pavilion. Conceived as four rectangular blocks pulled apart and angled to take advantage of beach views (and provide wind protection), the pavilion buildings are wrapped in charred cedar skin, while the interior ceilings are exposed two-ply decking with glulam beams—both material choices nod to the local timber industry. Eschewing the grid-like arrangement standard at most RV parks, Robert took inspiration from the surrounding lagoon as he created clusters of cabins and campsites set in an archipelago that flows organically toward the beach. “Across the campus, we wanted to create places where people could easily meet and interact—those are draws in traditional RV parks, too. But we wanted them to feel elevated, modern, and smartly designed.” h

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Inside the communal dining room, blonde-toned ceilings and floors add lightness to the interior palette, and wood-framed doors slide open for a seamless indoor-outdoor experience. Smaller structures around the central pavilion are reminiscent of historic seaside cabins. The Camps at Coos Bay is located on a wedge of waterfront land in southern Oregon. Modeled after an archipelago, the campsites are linked by numerous walking trails that lead to a private beach.


Day 1: A room with a view.

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EAST MEETS NORTHWEST

The basement family room is decorated with art from the homeowners’ personal collection. The coffee table is from Designhouse and the rug is from Restoration Hardware.

Written by NESSA PULLMAN : Photographed by JANIS NICOLAY

“I REMEMBER SO CLEARLY THE DAY SHE WALKED INTO THE CROSS,” says designer Erin Chow, then a designer at wellknown Vancouver furniture store The Cross Decor & Design. The woman who would soon become her client and friend “was just looking for a chair, but it turned into so much more than that.” “We hit it off instantly,” says the client, who ended up hiring Chow to renovate her family’s home in Vancouver’s West Side (Chow has since branched off to open her own fullservice design firm, The Haven Collective.) “Erin understood my taste and could see what I was trying to achieve. I also think she liked that I wasn’t afraid to take design risks.”

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The renovation required some heavy lifting by Chow and the builders at Kennedy Construction. “The kitchen was a disaster, the master bath was overwhelmed by a gigantic jet tub, and we needed to create a family room out of a crawl space,” recalls the homeowner. The mandate for the interiors was a challenge, too. The client spent her formative years in Jordan and had co-founded that country’s largest bookstore, so she sought a space that would marry Middle Eastern motifs with a West Coast palette. In response, Chow broke with the pervasive PNW minimalist trend in favor of layered arabesque decorations, oversized vintage rugs, and vibrant, colorful »


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“They wanted the house to be inviting yet also show off their fun personalities,”says designer Erin Chow, who revamped a home in the West Side neighborhood of Vancouver for a family of five. In the entryway, a flat-weave rug and side table are sourced from The Cross Decor & Design, as well as the chandelier that “adds a bit of glam to the space,” says Chow. »

“I knew I didn’t want anything traditionally West Coast. I want people who come into my home to feel like they are experiencing something very different.” —HOMEOWNER


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| interiors |

BELOW AND TOP RIGHT: The Mediterranea wallpaper pattern by Fornasetti was inspired by the city of Jerusalem, where the client’s husband was born. Layered atop it is a photograph of the old part of Jordan’s capital city, Amman, by the photographer Tariq Dajani—the client spent her formative childhood years there. “I love the way that wall echoes both Jerusalem and Amman,” she says. “I wanted anyone who visits our home to have a visual of our story.” The custom blue velvet sofa is from The Cross, as are the chandelier, wall sconces, and dining room rug. BOTTOM RIGHT: The spare white kitchen gains visual interest from Mark Alexander embroidered curtains from The Cross and an intricate marble mosaic backsplash from Walker Zanger.

sofas and tables to set an exotic tone throughout the home. Details such as marble mosaic tile and embroidered window treatments in the kitchen allude to Middle Eastern aesthetic traditions. And eccentric, unusual wallpapers in the dining area and bedrooms show off the client’s fun and quirky personality. “I just love art—my mother and grandfather were both painters, and wallpaper, like art, tends to draw people in,” she says. The interior revamp put a new gloss on a house that “architecturally was not my dream home,” says the client. “But the way we worked together to design the interior turned something that wasn’t unique into just that.” This project is the embodiment of never judging a book by its cover. »

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Architectural Planters for Commercial and Residential Applications Full Design Services Available 517 E Pike Street Seattle WA 98122 206.329.4737 www.ragenassociates.com

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Texture, as in the crystalline light fixtures from The Cross and the Walker Zanger Calacatta “Hollywood” mosaic backsplash, enhances the achromatic kitchen. “We knew we wanted the kitchen to be light and bright,” says Chow. h


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| hospitality | Portland’s Virtuous Pie vegan pizzeria fuses handcrafted elements (the counter, slatted wall panel, and cabinetry) created by local contractor Hammer & Hand with fresh décor (including Cedar & Moss globe pendants) selected by local firm Bright Designlab.

THE VIRTUE OF GOOD DESIGN

Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by LOCAL HAVEN

FORGET EVERYTHING YOU KNOW ABOUT PIZZA PARLOR STEREOTYPES. Portland’s Virtuous Pie sports no red-and-white plastic tablecloths or ersatz wall frescoes—instead, when you walk into the vegan pizzeria (which also serves a selection of plant-based ice cream), the first thing that hits your eye is a big serving of modern design alla moda di Bright Designlab. That Portland firm crafted the interiors of the Vancouver transplant’s new outpost last June just southwest of Ladd’s Addition, and in place of the muted-glam aesthetic of its Canadian big sister, Virtuous Pie chose to appeal to the locavore Portland crowd by tapping the resident talent pool for the buildout and interiors.

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Housed in a former tire shop, the 1,650-square-foot restaurant—200 of which are devoted to a loft with lounge-like seating—took shape under the guidance of general contractor Hammer & Hand. According to the project’s operations manager, Mac Casares, when Virtuous Pie’s owners handed his firm the keys, the space “had been demo’ed down to the studs. Essentially, it was a blank slate.” The team installed critical systems (electrical, HVAC, and plumbing) and built a large, L-shaped fir counter to offer extra seating and serve as a coffee bar. To match the counter (and incorporate visual texture), they mounted a slatted fir panel along one wall; its »


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Dark-green Muuto Nerd barstools tuck into the reclaimed fir counter, where a Modbar brewing system serves up morning coffee. Âť

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Light Field Club Chair Shinsaku Miyamoto

HANDCRAFTED TILE MADE IN PORTLAND, OR order direct at 503.928.3076 clayhaustile.com

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Plants sit on a Blu Dot shelf above the daily menu, and a trio of Cedar & Moss sconces provide extra light. The Bright Designlab team had a set of Artek Rocket stools custom-painted in Benjamin Moore’s Antique Rose. The mezzanine above the main dining area is tiled and wallpapered in a black-and-white riff on a picnic blanket pattern. The tile is from Clé Tile, and the wallpaper is custom from Makelike. The black chairs are vintage Russell Woodard; the Flos lamp between them was sourced through Design Within Reach.

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soft color contrasts nicely with the darker wood ceiling beams, which are original to the building. “We focused on creating a full spatial experience,” says Bright Designlab co-founder Alissa Pulcrano, who worked on their project with business partner Leela Brightenburg and senior designer Ericka Violett. “It’s industrial but elegant, casual but complete. Walking into the restaurant is an experience that feels familiar. Gathering with food and friends . . . it’s something you want to repeat.” A “perpetual picnic” was the designers’ organizing vision for the restaurant, so they selected black-and-white-checked Makelike wallpaper—a sophisticated twist on the traditional gingham picnic cloth—to extend that theme. Concrete Clé Tile, also checked in black and white, faces the stair risers and covers the loft floor, and a casual assortment of modern chairs encourages guests to hang out while they eat. In the main dining room, a custom communal table designed by Bright Designlab and fabricated by Reed LaPlant is a contemporary nod to the humble park picnic table, and Artek Rocket and Muuto Nerd barstools, glossed in light pink and dark green, provide vibrant front-row seating at the counter. All of Virtuous Pie’s décor, down to the furniture itself, is vegan, Pulcrano assures diners, so no animals were harmed in the process. Now that’s design we can really get behind. h


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FROM LEFT: Gary and Adam Glant; Wesley and Gavin Younie; Jeff, Andi, and Kim Kovel; Doug Streeter; Mary, Cedric, and Marieke Burgers; Wesley and Dylan Harkavy; Allan Switzer, Jennifer Wosk, Adam Bellas, and William and Renee Switzer.

EVERGREENS MAY BE THE TREES MOST OFTEN ASSOCIATED WITH THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST, BUT IN THE DESIGN WORLD, THERE’S ANOTHER PREVALENT GENUS: THE FAMILY TREE. In a region rich in accomplished and influential architects, designers, and artists, the only thing more surprising than the density of talent is how many of these creatives are actually related to one another. Jennifer McCullum examines the intergenerational impact of these dynamic families on the design direction, culture, and output of this region—and discovers that when it comes to Pacific Northwest creative legacies, roots run deep.

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TOP: Seattle-shaded swatches from Glant Textiles; from top, Washington Park/Cedar, Oyster Bay/Pale Saltwater, and Quinault/Moss, all inspired by the natural palette of the Pacific Northwest. BOTTOM LEFT: Artist Wesley Younie’s Dark Garden, acrylic inks on wood panel. RIGHT: A southwest Portland garden by landscape designer Gavin Younie. »

TOP PHOTOS COURTESY OF GLANT TEXTILES, BOTTOM IMAGES BY GAVIN YOUNIE

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~ THE GLANTS ~

THE VIEWFINDERS

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hen I was young, I’d play a game: I would create a narrow square with my fingers and peer through it at a leaf, a branch, a rhododendron bush. . . . I was noticing not just colors but textures,” says Gary Glant, founder of Seattle’s luxury Glant Textiles house. “I started doing it just out of pure enjoyment of our environment, but it’s served me well.” “Well” is an understatement. For more than 40 years, Glant’s refined wefts, with their subtle textures and nuanced hues, have graced some of the world’s highest-profile interiors, from the Hôtel de Crillon in Paris to Jennifer Aniston’s Bel-Air home to the Obamas’ private quarters in the White House. But Gary credits his early years growing up on the shores of Lake Washington with shaping his powers of observation and his design sensibilities. “You get that Northwest color base in your DNA,” he says.

opinions—and they were very good,” Gary says. “At age eight or nine, Adam would come to the studio, where there could be 28 options on a table, and he would go to the one. And that happened a number of times. He just got it!” So was it nature or nurture? Adam puts a bid in for the latter. “My dad taught me to draw inspiration from everything around you,” he says. “And that observation is not a passive act; you’re not a voyeur.”

~ THE YOUNIE TWINS ~

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DOUBLE VISION

high level of attention is required when interviewing Portland-based brothers Gavin and Wesley Younie. The identical twins speak in an unmistakable sibling shorthand, finishing each other’s sentences and at times appearing to communicate telepathically, with no verbal cues at all. When speaking with both brothers over

“We don’t do any printed fabric. We consider our work to be woven constructions.” —ADAM GLANT, GLANT TEXTILES

Judging by his company’s nextgeneration evolution, Gary has handed down his good design genes. In 2011, his son, Adam, came onboard as Glant Textiles’ president, charged with bringing a fresh perspective to the company aesthetic while honoring its traditions of innovative color and texture. “From a very young age, Adam understood scale and balance. He had very strong

the phone, it’s nearly impossible to tell their voices apart. What is easy to discern, though, is the indelible impact that the Pacific Northwest has had on both of these creatives. Gavin, a landscape designer and the owner of Outdoor Scenery Design, and Wesley, a trained artist and an emerging garden designer, have both cultivated their careers as a direct

testament to the natural landscape in which they were raised. The Younies grew up on a half-acre of land in Raleigh Hills, Oregon, where Gavin undertook his first landscape project when he was seven years old. “My mother gave me my first garden, a one-brick-wide path in our yard,” he remembers. “She gave everything to us,” Wesley adds. “When we traveled together, she made sure we saw nurseries or gardens or art—she prioritized a regional education and experience in design.” Gavin picks up the story again: “In other families, the parents come home and start watching television or something. They leave work at the office, and you don’t see what they do. But we saw my dad’s work [as a structural engineer]. I would see the drawings he was working on and think, ‘Wow, that’s really going to be built.’” After studying fine arts at the Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland, Wesley shifted his focus to garden design, which he characterizes as “painting with plants.” Gavin’s career in landscape design continued to blossom after that first garden patch, with the young designer subsequently earning a landscape architecture degree from the University of Oregon and establishing his firm in 2007. This year, Gavin and Wesley will collaborate on design projects ranging from residential gardens to wedding floral arrangements, and the two recently came back from a trip to Japan, where they “nerded out” while admiring the meticulous pruning of moss in the Kyoto gardens. “We have that twin connection,” Gavin explains, which “definitely adds to the work we do and how we work together. Two years ago, I just looked at my brother and was like, ‘Oh, my gosh, you’re the same person as me!’” » graymag . com

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“We’re all extremely free thinkers, in whatever our medium might be. We’re not into reproducing what other people are doing. We’re always looking to challenge or innovate or create that next thing.”

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—JEFF KOVEL, SKYLAB ARCHITECTURE


FROM LEFT: Harry Allen + Esque Studio’s Liaison lamp and pendant lighting; Nike Makers’ Experience, at Nike by You Studio, New York; Exterior of Skylab Architecture’s mixeduse YARD building, Central Eastside, downtown Portland. »

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~ THE KOVELS ~

THE TRIPLE THREAT

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e all love the outdoors, surfing, hiking. . . . It was never a question that all of us would move west. It tapped into the pioneering, entrepreneurial spirit that’s in all of us,” Kim Kovel says about herself and her two siblings, Andi and Jeff. Native New Yorkers, the three all headed to the Pacific Northwest within a few years of one another, drawn to the year-round outdoor lifestyle and the equally fertile design landscape. “Twenty years ago, there weren’t articles about Portland in the New York Times,” says Jeff, principal and design director of Skylab Architecture. “It really was this place where each of us could pave our own path.” And the region is better for it. For Jeff, that path resulted in acclaimed residential and commercial projects for the likes of W Hotels and Nike, where older sister Kim works in material and color design at the brand’s Innovation Lab. “I can’t talk a lot about what I do,” she says mysteriously—but the creative fruits of her labor are clear in groundbreaking retail launches such as Nike Makers, a live design experience that creates custom shoes in 90 minutes, at the Nike by You Studio in New York. Following 9/11, middle sister and glassblowing artist, Andi Kovel, left Brooklyn with partner Justin Parker to reestablish their Esque Studio in Portland.Known for its pioneering use of green energy to power its hotshop, the studio’s biomorphic, delicately toned works have won Kovel and Parker wide acclaim in the glassblowing world. Jeff and Kim, both parents, have continued the Kovel family tradition of exploration and creativity with their own children. Aunt Andi says of the next generation: “They’re really growing up in an environment of our creation. We’ve quite literally designed their surroundings. Jeff built the house they live in. I’ve done the lighting. Kim’s

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helped design the shoes they’re wearing . . . they don’t know anything else aside from that.” Kim’s 17-year-old son, Nic, is already showing industrial design leanings and has taken summer courses at the Parson School of Design/The New School in New York. “We both prefer to start off with actual materials and ideate in 3D instead of sketching,” says Kim. “I want him to know that there are many ways to communicate his ideas.”

~ THE STREETERS ~

THE MAVERICKS

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hen the late architect Mel Streeter first arrived in Seattle in 1957, he was wearing his college ROTC uniform. Not only was it a symbol of his military commitment, but it literally opened doors. “White landlords would rent to a black man in uniform,” says his eldest son, Doug Streeter, who most recently was a design principal for Perkins+Will in Seattle. The senior Streeter had to apply to more than 20 firms before one would hire him, despite his architecture degree from the University of Oregon. He ultimately opened his own firm in 1965, initially operating from the basement of his Phinney Ridge home. A key tenet of the company was its commitment to offering opportunities to designers from minority communities. “‘Can we be an example?’ was his credo,” says Doug. “The adversity pushed [my dad] to question, ‘What is my differential here? Who am I going to be?’ Mel became an outstanding architect.” Some of the elder Streeter’s hallmark projects in Seattle include the regional headquarters of the Federal Aviation Administration, Safeco Field, and the African American Academy. His father’s success helped spur Doug to pursue his own 40-year-long architecture career, which has included roles at top design firms in London, Hong Kong, and Dubai,

drafting a new chapter in the Streeter creative legacy. “I added an international dimension to something Mel had already started,” he says. Doug describes himself as a “fierce modernist” and admits that his adamant approach to design can create professional friction—which ultimately led to his departure from Perkins+Will in 2016. “It’s hard for me to follow the lines,” he says. “I push people, probably too hard sometimes, to break the rules.” But he’s all right with the fallout. “My dad’s experience prepared me for being bumped around or put down to one side as ‘the other.’ I’m pretty OK with that; my work speaks for itself.” That work includes the University of Washington’s Life Sciences Building and School of Medicine building, with construction on both projects estimated to finish this July. More than a decade after he returned to Seattle from his stints overseas, the parallels between Doug’s homecoming and the initial experiences of his late father are increasingly obvious. “When his story is told, Mel is basically a guy who came to the Pacific Northwest and made good against all odds,” Doug says. “He was going to put his flag down in this city whether they wanted him or not.” Like father, like son.

~ THE BURGERS ~

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mong the creative families of this region, probably few can boast a more prolific design portfolio than the Burgers. Their patriarch, the late architect Robert Burgers, arrived in Vancouver in the 1960s from the Netherlands and proceeded to build, with his wife, Marieke, one of the leading modernist architecture firms in the region, Burgers Architecture Inc. (BAI). Over his 50-year career, Burgers also designed 12 family homes in which to raise his and Marieke’s three children: Alex, now a project manager; Bobbie, who has »


ANDREW VANASSE

Architect Doug Streeter in the stands at Safeco Field in Seattle. His late father, architect Mel Streeter, was part of the design team that built the ballpark.

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BOWEN ISLAND: MICHAEL BOLAND; CORTADO TABLE: DYLAN HARKAVY; BOBBIE BURGERS: KYRANI KANAVAROS

TOP: A Bowen Island home in British Columbia, designed by Cedric Burgers of Burgers Architecture Inc., features sloped wooden roofs in the contemporary style synonymous with his family’s Vancouver firm. BOTTOM: Cortado walnut and steel coffee table, designed by brothers Dylan and Wesley Harkavy of Portland’s Harkavy Furniture. OPPOSITE: Artist Bobbie Burgers, Cedric’s sister and daughter of Marieke and the late Robert Burgers, in her North Vancouver studio.

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“It’s in your blood. My sister’s an artist and she took her painting out of [our upbringing]. My brother found construction and I took design out of it. The apple didn’t fall far from the tree. None of us became lawyers or doctors because design was home to us.” —CEDRIC BURGERS, BURGERS ARCHITECTURE INC.

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| profile |

become an internationally acclaimed artist; and Cedric, a principal in his parents’ firm. “None of us became lawyers or doctors, because design was home to us,” Cedric says. Home had an ever-evolving definition for the Burgers, with the family often moving into their next address even before construction was complete. “There was one instance where the entire lower floor of the house didn’t have drywall yet,” remembers Cedric. “It was just the studs, the electrical wiring, and a toilet in the middle of the space, but my parents were just so excited to get in there.” Dinnertime involved the entire family gathered around the table with sheets of sketch paper. “My father would ask us, ‘What do you think your room should look like? Where do you want it to face?’ This was our family dinner routine.” Cedric’s wife, Mary, an interior design principal at BAI, was encouraged to explore her own creative pursuits within the family business while she and Cedric were newly dating. “I landed in the deep end for sure,” she jokes. “I had just started seeing this boyfriend, I was new into my career, and my now mother-in-law started mentoring me. People thought I was crazy, but it was incredible.” The Burgers’s bountiful design work brings together a uniquely Dutch design sensibility—combining elements that are both intentional and pragmatic but also playful—with an innate understanding of their adopted home’s climate and materials. The result is an aesthetic that is distinctly representative of the Pacific Northwest. “Your roots grow in a region, and our family’s roots grow deep here,” Mary says.

“i

~ THE HARKAVYS ~

HOMEGROWN

t’s a playground; that’s why I stay,” says Dylan Harkavy of the Pacific Northwest environment that influences the modern tables, credenzas, and bookshelves he creates with his brother, Wesley, cofounder of Harkavy Furniture. It’s not surprising that Portland is Dylan’s playground. Growing up in

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Lake Oswego, he and his siblings were homeschooled, so surfing in Pacific City was essentially recess. Their family’s dining table was their classroom, and their mother was their teacher. As teenagers, they spent summers working in construction, and their school years exploring creative disciplines ranging from architecture to photography to oil painting. “Being homeschooled played a massive part in our story,” says Dylan. “We could explore anything we wanted to do in the most beautiful place in the world.” In 2013, the brothers combined their creative skills to design an outdoor dining table as a gift for their mother— and inadvertently launched their business. When family friends spotted the table, they kept requesting ones of their own, and the brothers kept building, eventually selling their designs on Craigslist. Two years ago, they quit their full-time jobs and officially launched Harkavy Furniture, using walnut and welded steel to craft the contemporary, geometric pieces that have become their signature. “We both appreciate clean, elegant, and simple design, which I think is inspired by Oregon’s natural beauty and the emotions such beauty evokes,” says Dylan. “If we’d grown up in a more clustered cityscape, it’s hard to say what our furniture would look like.”

~ THE SWITZERS ~

t

HEIR APPARENT

en cents was the starting rate for young Adam Bellas, the grandson of celebrated furniture designer William Switzer, for each piece of inventory he unwrapped as it arrived at his grandfather’s Vancouver showroom. An atypical pastime for an eight-yearold, perhaps, but not for one born into design. “I had a crib in my mother’s office at our factory on East Second Avenue in Vancouver,” remembers Bellas, now partner and manager of SwitzerCultCreative, the furniture showroom

he launched with his mother, Renee Switzer, in 2016, just minutes from his family’s former factory. “I grew up going to that building every day. I didn’t really know any other way for furniture.” In an age when antiques were often bypassed in favor of trend-driven and mass-manufactured furnishings, William Switzer’s “way” prized impeccable craftsmanship and the goal of creating

“Nobody hangs on to things like heirlooms anymore. But I never knew any other way.” —ADAM BELLAS, SWITZERCULTCREATIVE forever pieces that would be handed down through generations. He put that ethos into action in his own family: “In the same way other people pass down heirlooms like artwork or jewelry,” Bellas says, “we pass down furniture.” Switzer’s descendants have inherited less tangible gifts as well—notably something Bellas calls “an unseen checklist,” meaning the innate design criteria Switzer used to evaluate each piece that arrived at his showroom. At SwitzerCultCreative, Bellas applies these same principles to curating the showroom and gallery space’s modern, eco-conscious collections of furniture, lighting, accessories and textiles. Allan Switzer, William’s son and Bellas’s uncle, also refers to this checklist as influencing the bespoke, transitional designs he creates for WD Western Designers Furnishings Ltd., which he became owner of in 2013 after 40 years working in the family business. As Allan explains, his company’s commitment to quality production continues an inherent theme in William Switzer’s design approach. “There’s an essential respect for the designs, for the people making them, and for the people they are being made for,” he says, and then pauses. “That’s all Dad.” »


SWITZERCULTCREATIVE: JEREMY SEGAL PHOTOGRAPHY; KABUKI CHAIR: WD FURNISHINGS

TOP: The interior of SwitzerCultCreative in Vancouver, the modern showroom owned by Renee Switzer and Adam Bellas, daughter and grandson of fine furniture maker William Switzer. BOTTOM: The Kabuki chair, designed by Allan Switzer (William’s son) for WD Furnishings, was handcrafted from a single block of solid walnut, its design drawing inspiration from both 1950s Italian aesthetics and Danish modern influences.

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| profile | Andi and Kim Kovel, Vermont, circa 1974.

Gary Glant, Glant Textiles advertisement, 1990.

Allan Switzer, apprenticing at Titchmarsch & Goodwin, England, circa 1969. The Kovels: Kim (left), Andi (center), and Jeff (right), New York, 1974.

Doug Streeter at home in Seattle’s University District, circa 1960.

Dylan Harkavy with father Daniel, Cannon Beach, Oregon, 1998.

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Robert Burgers, with (from left) Cedric, Bobbie, and Alex, Long Beach, Vancouver Island, 1976.

William and Allan Switzer in original Vancouver showroom, circa 1969.


Twin brothers Gavin (left) and Wesley Younie in Portland, 1985.

Dylan and Wesley Harkavy, Southern California, 1996.

Doug Streeter in Streeter & Associates Architects’ Capitol Hill office, 1974. Mel Streeter, 1970. Adam Glant at Glant Textiles’ mill in Italy, 1984.

William Switzer’s first store in Vancouver, 1960.

Robert and Marieke Burgers with family, Delft, the Netherlands, 1965

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GOOD LIFE. REASON TO SUBSCRIBE NO. 40:

ISSUE DROPS JUNE 2018. WE’LL DELIVER IT TO YOUR MAILBOX. SUBSCRIBE ONLINE BY MAY 1. graymag.com

#GRAYMAGAZINE

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| resources | 33. HOSPITALITY Benjamin Moore benjaminmoore.com

ICFF New York icff.com

Capitol Bar Portland capitolpdx.com

Interior Design Show Vancouver vancouver.interior designshow.com

David LaChapelle davidlachapelle.com Flavor Paper flavorpaper.com Lightning Bar Collective Portland lightningbarcollective pdx.com PentalQuartz Portland and Seattle pentalquartz.com 34. HAPPENINGS Adidas adidas.com

Gallerie Franzhiska Seattle 206-261-8525

LightArt Seattle lightart.com

Schumacher Seattle fschumacher.com

Luma Design Workshop Seattle lumadesignworkshop.com

The Shade Store Portland, Bellevue and Seattle, WA theshadestore.com

Martha Sturdy Vancouver marthasturdy.com Molo Vancouver molodesign.com Mutuus Studio Seattle mutuus-studio.com

Bensen Vancouver bensen.ca

NYCxDESIGN nycxdesign.com

Blanche Jelly Portland parker.works

Studio Gorm Eugene, OR studiogorm.com

BoConcept Bellevue, WA and Vancouver boconcept.com

Toronto Design Offsite Festival Toronto todesignoffsite.com

Custom Blocks Portland customblocksportland.com Design Week Portland Portland designweekportland.com Design Within Reach Portland and Seattle dwr.com

Urban Hardwoods Seattle urbanhardwoods.com Urbancase Design Seattle urbancase.com Vancouver Design Week vancouverdesignwk.com Wanted Design New York wanteddesignnyc.com

Diamond Schmitt Architects Toronto dsai.ca

42. ARCHITECTURE Lead Pencil Studio Seattle leadpencilstudio.org

Emily Carr University of Art and Design Vancouver ecuad.ca

Lease Crutcher Lewis Seattle lewisbuilds.com

Fin Design Seattle findesignshop.com Graypants Seattle graypants.com Henry Art Gallery Seattle henryart.org Hinterland Design Vancouver hinterlanddesign.com

Design Within Reach Portland and Seattle dwr.com

Juju Papers Portland jujupapers.com

AIA Portland aiaportland.org

Chernoff Thompson Architects Vancouver cta.bc.ca

Designer Furniture Galleries Seattle dfgseattle.com

Perkins+Will Seattle and Vancouver perkinswill.com Touchstone/Urban Renaissance Group Seattle touchstonenw.com 48. INTERIORS Brio Interior Design Seattle briointeriordesign.com

Strand Woodworks Seattle 425-686-5829 Thayer Coggin thayercoggin.com 56. WORKSPACE Anthropologie anthropologie.com Guesthouse Seattle guesthouseseattle.com Jordan Goetz Tacoma, WA etsy.com/shop/ JordanLeeGoetz Marabou Design Seattle maraboudesign.com The Mine Kirkland, WA themine.com Minted minted.com Molly Moon’s Homemade Ice Cream Seattle mollymoon.com Smeg smeg.com 60. GRAY SCALE Aurora Mills Aurora, OR auroramills.com

Ellie Cashman Design elliecashmandesign.com Emmert International Clackamas, OR emmertintl.com

Hygge & West hyggeandwest.com

Globe Lighting Portland globelighting.com

Kable Design Build Seattle kabledesignbuild.com

Look Construction LLC Portland 503-825-8113

Land of Nod landofnod.com

Manor Fine Wares & Curious Goods Portland manorfinewares.com Old Portland Hardware & Architectural Portland oldportlandhardware.com Parker Furniture Portland parker-furniture.com Penny Black Interiors Portland pennyblackinteriors.com Rejuvenation Portland and Seattle rejuvenation.com Revive Upholstery & Design Portland revivepdx.com Roche Bobois Portland and Seattle roche-bobois.com Victoria + Albert Baths vandabaths.com

Meta Marble Seattle metamarbleandgranite.com onefortythree onefortythree.com Super Rural super-rural.com Thomas Paul thomaspaul.com Townsend Design townsenddesign.net 78. HOBBY HOUSE Custom Steel Fabricators Seattle customsteelfabinc.com Decorative Metal Arts Seattle decorativemetalarts.com Diva Furniture/B&B Italia Seattle divafurnitureseattle.com Florian Baudrexel florianbaudrexel.com

Watermark Designs watermark-designs.com

GCH Planning & Landscape Architecture Seattle gchsite.com

Woonwinkel Portland woonwinkelhome.com

Holland & Sherry hollandandsherry.com

68. COMING IN TO PLAY Benjamin Moore benjaminmoore.com

Chown Hardware Bellevue, WA and Portland chown.com Clé Tile cletile.com

Couch Seattle couchseattle.com

CoCoCo Home cococohome.com

Crosscut Hardwoods Portland and Seattle crosscuthardwoods.com

Design Within Reach Portland and Seattle dwr.com

Floyd floyddetroit.com

Evelyne Prélonge evelyne-prelonge.com

Best Practice Architecture and Design Seattle bestpracticearchitecture. com

Cole & Son cole-and-son.com

Design Within Reach Portland and Seattle dwr.com

Daltile Seattle daltile.com

Inform Interiors Seattle and Vancouver informinteriors.com Lockhart|Suver Seattle lockhartsuver.com Minotti minotti.com Penthouse Drapery Seattle penthousedrapery.com Pilkington USA & Canada pilkington.com Pivot Metal Seattle pivot-fabrication.com RHO Architects Seattle rhoarchitects.com graymag . com

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| resources | The Rug Company therugcompany.com Spaces Seattle maryika-spaces.com Spectrum Lighting speclight.com T-Tech Welding & Fabrication Woodinville, WA t-techinc.com

The Haven Collective Vancouver thehavencollective.com

Harkavy Furniture Portland harkavyfurniture.com

95. Dossier Portland dossierhotel.com

77. Miller Paint Multiple locations millerpaint.com

Mark Alexander markalexander.com

Nike Beaverton, OR nike.com

8. Dovetail General Contractors Seattle dovetailgc.com

107. Modern Design Sofas Seattle moderndesignsofas.com

103. Everything is Full of Gods everythingisfullofgods.com

18. The Modern Fan Co. modernfan.com

Tariq Dajani Photography tariqdajani.com Walker Zanger walkerzanger.com

Village Interiors Seattle villageinteriorsinc.com

104. HOSPITALITY Blu Dot Seattle bludot.com

86. WORKSPACE Andreu World andreuworld.com Brooks Corning Vancouver brookscorning.com   DHX Media Vancouver dhxmedia.com

Bright Designlab Portland brightdesignlab.com

Evoke International Design Vancouver evoke.ca FilzFelt filzfelt.com Haworth haworth.com Inform Contract Vancouver informinteriors.com Muuto muuto.com 92. ARCHITECTURE McSwain & Woods Architect Coos Bay, OR 541-269-0618 Nishkian Dean Structural Engineers Portland nishkian.com Path Construction Portland 503-208-3282 R&A Architecture + Design Culver City, CA and Portland r-a-a-d.com 96. INTERIORS The Cross Decor & Design Vancouver thecrossdesign.com Designhouse Vancouver designhouse.com

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Cedar & Moss Portland cedarandmoss.com Clé Tile cletile.com Design Within Reach Portland and Seattle dwr.com Hammer & Hand Portland and Seattle hammerandhand.com

Outdoor Scenery Design Portland outdoorscenerydesign.com Skylab Architecture Portland skylabarchitecture.com SwitzerCultCreative Vancouver switzercultcreative.com WD Western Designers Furnishings Ltd. Vancouver wdwesterndesigners.com 130. OBSESSIONS Sub Pop Records Seattle subpop.com AD INDEX 109. Adorn House Seattle adorn.house

105. EWF Modern Portland ewfmodern.com 107. The Fix Photo Group Seattle thefixphotogroup.com 59. Fleetwood Windows & Doors fleetwoodusa.com 32. FM Distributing Multiple locations fmdistributing.com 132. Henrybuilt Seattle henrybuilt.com 2. Hive Portland hivemodern.com

76. AGS Stainless Bainbridge Island, WA agsstainless.com

109. Hoyt Realty Group Portland liveinthepearl.com

41. AIA Portland Portland aiaportland.org

30. ICFF New York icff.com

Muuto muuto.com

19. Bedrooms & More Seattle bedroomsandmore.com

99. J Geiger Seattle jgeigershading.com

Reed LaPlant Portland reedlaplant.com

47. BoConcept Bellevue, WA and Vancouver boconcept.com

4. Jeremy Bittermann Photography Portland bittermannphotography.com

Virtuous Pie Portland and Vancouver virtuouspie.com

101. Bonhams Portland bonhams.com

Woodard woodard-furniture.com

12. Chown Hardware Bellevue, WA and Portland chown.com

112. PROFILE Andrew Vanasse Portland andrewvanasse.com

105. Christopher Dibble Photography Los Angeles and Portland christopherdibble.com

Makelike Portland makelike.com Modbar modbar.com

Bobbie Burgers Vancouver bobbieburgers.com Burgers Architecture Inc. Vancouver baiarchitects.com Esque Studio Portland esque-studio.com Glant Textiles Seattle glant.com

107. Clayhaus Portland clayhaustile.com 39. Design Week Portland designweekportland.com 35. Design Within Reach Portland and Seattle dwr.com 109. Designer Furniture Galleries Seattle dfgseattle.com

45. Keller Supply Company Multiple locations kellershowrooms.com 107. Kozai Modern Vancouver kozaimoderntrade.com 46. Kush Handmade Rugs Portland kushugs.com 103. Maison Inc. Portland maisoninc.com 111. Marvin Windows & Doors marvin.com 97. Milgard Windows & Doors milgard.com Available through: Lundgren Enterprises Seattle lundgrenenterprises.com

32. Neolith neolith.com 13. Neil Kelly Company Portland and Seattle neilkelly.com 20. Porcelanosa Seattle porcelanosa-usa.com 101. Ragen & Associates Seattle ragenassociates.com 9. Roche Bobois Portland and Seattle roche-bobois.com 17. Room & Board Portland and Seattle roomandboard.com 27. Schuchart/Dow Seattle schuchartdow.com 54. Seattle Design Center Seattle seattledesigncenter.com 31. The Shade Store Portland and Seattle theshadestore.com 43. Spark Modern Fires sparkfires.com 11. Sub-Zero and Wolf subzero-wolf.com/seattle Available through: Bradlee Distributors Seattle bradleedistributors.com 10. Sunbrella sunbrella.com 21. Tufenkian Portland tufenkianportland.com 91. Urban Interiors & Thomasville Bellevue and Tukwila, WA urbaninteriors.com 36. Vancouver Design Week vancouverdesignwk.com 110. Sun Valley Bronze Bellevue, ID sunvalleybronze.com 109. Westeck Windows & Doors Seattle and Vancouver westeckwindows.com


| market | THE ULTIMATE BUYER’S GUIDE Alchemy Collections Located in downtown Seattle, Alchemy Collections is your Western Washington source for modern and contemporary furniture. Sensing a void in the Seattle furniture landscape, Alchemy Collections opened in 2004, bringing a modern yet accessible furniture venue to the everyday Seattleite. (206) 448-3309 alchemycollections.com

Kat & Maouche Traditional Techniques + Modern Design specializing in authentic vintage Moroccan rugs. Each is carefully sourced and chosen for its expressive modern style and cultural significance. 33 N.W. 4th Ave., Portland katandmaouche.com Instagram @katandmaouche

Fran’s Chocolates Considered one of the best chocolatiers in the U.S., Fran’s Chocolates offers elegant presentations of award-winning chocolates for every occasion. Each confection is handmade in small batches with the finest local and organic ingredients to reflect a passion for exquisite flavors and the pure taste of chocolate. Visit us online and at our four Seattle-area retail stores. (206) 322-0233 frans.com

Sunbrella Textiles are the most important ingredient for extraordinary design. Bring soft, luxurious décor to your home with high-end Sunbrella® fabrics for your indoor and outdoor upholstery. Available in a variety of globally-inspired designs, colors and textures, Sunbrella is easy to care for, fade proof, and bleach cleanable, so you don’t have to sacrifice beauty for performance.

Designer Furniture Galleries DFG is proudly celebrating 25 years serving the Pacific Northwest design community. Located in the Seattle Design Center, we offer a vast selection of furniture an lighting for every lifestyle and budget. dfgseattle.com

sunbrella.com 18841-1 Gray Magazine 1/8 Page Market Ad Indoor AZ Trend Board.indd 1

The Shade Store For more than 70 years The Shade Store has handcrafted the finest custom shades, blinds, and draperies available. With a wide selection of products, and over 1,300 exclusive materials, finding the perfect window treatments has never been easier. (800) 754-1455 theshadestore.com

2/9/18 9:37 AM

Urban Interiors & Thomasville Urban Interiors & Thomasville proudly introduces “Tailored to the Trade”, a program created specifically for industry design professionals. This design resource offers allows percentage discounts on Thomasville, Henredon, Drexel, Bernhardt, Broyhill and more. From inspiration, logistics management, to fulfillment contact Ameena Malik at 425-6153090 or amalik@urbaninteriors.com urbaninteriors.com

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| obsession |

WHY I COLLECT VINTAGE CONCERT POSTERS JEFF KLEINSMITH, VICE PRESIDENT OF CREATIVE, SUB POP RECORDS As told to RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by AMANDA RINGSTAD

“I WENT TO SCHOOL AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, AND AT LEAST ONCE A MONTH I WOULD DRIVE UP TO PORTLAND TO SEE SHOWS.

I was very into music, and in the ’80s I started noticing band posters on telephone poles. I was drawn to their graphic nature, so one day I just took one, and my collection started from there. Before the Internet, there was a huge amount of regionalism in concert posters, but when the website gigposters.com launched in the early 2000s, suddenly a whole world—literally—opened up for me and other poster designers. For a kid from Corvallis, seeing so many new and interesting approaches to rock poster design had a big creative impact. Now I have thousands of posters in my collection, but those discoveries were early inspiration.” ❈

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DESIGN GROUP

GAUGE DESIGN GROUP offers a broad range of interior solutions, including custom

cabinetry, millwork, furniture and metal fabrication, in addition to its national award-winning monumental stairs. The Gauge team has a 38-year history of delivering world-class design to high-profile residences and commercial buildings alike.

GAUGEGROUP.COM 3810 4TH AVE SOUTH SEATTLE, WA 98134 206.587.5354


HENRYBUILT

GRAY No. 39  

The DESIGN magazine of the Pacific Northwest.

GRAY No. 39  

The DESIGN magazine of the Pacific Northwest.