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GOOD LIFE

INTERIORS // ARCHITECTURE // FASHION // ART // DESIGN

PACIFIC NORTHWEST DESIGN

N O 40 :

JUNE / JULY 2018

GOOD DESIGN GOOD CAUSES GOOD LIVING

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64

N O 40

THE GOOD LIFE ISSUE

18. hello

Welcome to the good life.

36. architecture

A world away, Seattle’s Miller Hull Partnership brings a Pacific Northwest architecture ethos to a school for girls in Afghanistan.

42. happenings

Design news and events.

48. shop

After the 2016 presidential election, three Portland women founded Collectivo to celebrate Mexican design and craft.

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50. fashion

58. sourced

52. fashion

64. interiors

The chicest tote inspired by an oyster bag you’ll ever see.

Mexican-turned-Seattleite Paloma Hurtado debuts a fashion line that sprang forth despite less than ideal resources.

56. sourced

We show you how to get the look of this warm, minimal, and tranquil home office.

Three designers prove scrap material need not look so scrappy.

The refresh of a 1960s home draws its earthy palette straight from a 1990s Banana Republic catalog.

72. kitchen

What does a cookbook author want in a kitchen design? This.

74. workspace

After a chance opportunity to secure a new office, the staff at architecture firm Board & Vellum designed their dream workspace.


tents 78

96. architecture

A tricky site in Whistler is no match for a refined modern prefab residence designed by John Hemsworth.

102. architecture

Radical revisions didn’t ruin the spirit of a renovated childhood home.

110. resources

Design professionals, furnishings, and suppliers featured in this issue.

114. obsession

Give a hand for this Seattle designer’s unique collection of objects.

88

FEATURES

78. a place in the sun

A boomerang-shaped Palm Springs vacation house optimizes both winter and summer sunshine for yearround entertaining.

88. design gradient

An Arts and Crafts home once owned by Vancouver artist Martha Sturdy is furnished in an organic mix of traditional and contemporary furnishings.

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On the Cover

Image from the Spring 2018 lookbook for Nómada, Mexican designer Paloma Hurtado’s first US collection. SEE PAGE

52 Photographed by LAUREN COLTON

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| hello |

the meaning of good life. What is the “good life”? Is it easy living? Is it access to stellar design? Is it living for a greater purpose than ourselves? Yes, YES, it’s all of that and more. In this issue, we explore the meaning of the good life, covering everything from good design to good living to design for good causes. You’ll meet the trailblazing team of architects who are championing both sustainable design and female empowerment as they design new girls’ schools in Afghanistan, and you’ll feel the intensity of three mad-as-hell women who have channeled their post–presidential election angst into building a bridge, rather than a wall, between the US and Mexico. We cool things down with a lap around a luxurious Palm Springs home with an L-shaped pool and a convivial

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kitchen for big-time entertaining, and we tour an ultraefficient passive house–inspired home, complete with an onsite art studio, that marries the owners’ eco-principles to their personal passions. Easy living. Design. Purpose. Welcome to the good life! Shawn Williams, Publisher


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N O 40

THE GOOD LIFE ISSUE ™

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DIGITAL CONTENT / SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS

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COPY EDITOR

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CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

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Rachel Eggers Brian Libby Nessa Pullman Renske Werner Amanda Zurita

Solid Color, Surface-printed Wood Grain or Clear Blades

PRODUCTION + EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

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CONTRIBUTORS

Lauren Colton Christopher Dibble Alex Hayden Krista Jahnke Haris Kenjar Nic Lehoux Aaron Leitz Janis Nicolay Ema Peter Amanda Ringstad Guy Saddy Lara Swimmer Kaity Teer Andrew Vanasse Elizabeth Varnell Mark Welsh INTERNS

Teal Chinn Jamie Reed Lauren Wilcox

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No. 40. Copyright ©2018. Published bimonthly (DEC, FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT) by GRAY Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. While every attempt has been made, GRAY cannot guarantee the legality, completeness, or accuracy of the information presented and accepts no warranty or responsibility for such. GRAY is not responsible for loss, damage, or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, photography, art, or any other unsolicited material. Unsolicited material will not be returned. If submitting material, do not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by GRAY in writing. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GRAY, 5628 Airport Way S., Ste. 330 Seattle, WA 98108 Subscriptions $30 us for one year; $50 us for two years.

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| contributors |

CHRISTOPHER DIBBLE christopherdibble.com pg 62

ALEX HAYDEN alexhayden.com pg 74

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JANIS NICOLAY janisnicolay.com pg 102

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KAITY TEER kaitlynteer.com pg 36

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pacific northwest interior design The following design firms are among the best in the region. They also support GRAY’s effort to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. We’re proud to call them our partners. Look to them first for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more.

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| architecture |

desert bloom

TWO PIONEERING GIRLS’ SCHOOLS IN AFGHANISTAN MERGE VERNACULAR CONSTRUCTION AND NORTHWEST ARCHITECTURAL KNOW-HOW—AND BLAZE A NEW TRAIL FOR SUSTAINABLE DESIGN AND FEMALE EMPOWERMENT. Written by KAITY TEER : Portrait by ANDREW VANASSE Project photography by NIC LEHOUX

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Structural engineer Solaiman Salahi, architect Dave Miller, and Ginna Brelsford, executive director of the Sahar Education foundation, in the University of Washington’s Department of Architecture graduate studio. OPPOSITE: Schoolgirls gather in the north courtyard of the Gohar Khatoon Girls’ School, opened in 2015 in Mazar-i-Sharif, Afghanistan. »


“We’re not using fancy technologies. We’re making buildings in the simplest way— using bricks to carry loads, for example, and using wood very responsibly because there’s not a lot of it in the country.”

—DAVE MILLER, ARCHITECT

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| architecture |

i

n Mazar-i-Sharif, Afghanistan, in 2013, schoolgirls crowded around drafting paper, heads bent in concentration and pencils and rulers in hand. Tasked with designing a new school building, they envisioned the possibilities. In one drawing, students kick a soccer ball across a courtyard. In another, they stand in the shade of leafy trees. Their sketches show schools with welcoming wide doors and open windows that reveal classrooms filled with pupils.

“There is a real connection between the ethic of environmental stewardship in the Pacific Northwest and the use of traditional methods of environmental heating and cooling for structures in Afghanistan.”

—DAVE MILLER, ARCHITECT

Their visions became reality when the Gohar Khatoon Girls’ School opened in 2015 in Mazar-i-Sharif. Funded by the Janet W. Ketcham Foundation and managed by the nonprofit organization Sahar Education, the 1,800-square-foot complex

now serves more than 3,000 girls each year. Its pioneering sustainable design, by the late architect Robert Hull, a founding partner of Seattle’s Miller Hull Partnership, was also guided by graduate architecture students at the University of Washington, who worked with Hull and professor Elizabeth Golden to develop low-tech concepts suited to Afghanistan’s harsh climate, limited resources, and local building trades. Basing their ideas— including classrooms arrayed around courtyards and oriented to control solar heat gain and maximize natural ventilation—on the country’s traditional construction techniques, the team planned out a welcoming masonry structure pierced with deep-set multicolored windows. The visions of the Afghan schoolgirls are also in evidence: the school is flanked by well-loved soccer fields, and its campus, planted with grass and shade trees, is a rare outdoor oasis where girls in this gender-segregated society can safely socialize and play. Brightly colored murals by local female artists decorate the central staircases, or “sunspaces,” which capture heat in the winter and facilitate air circulation through floor-to-ceiling wall vents and door transoms. Other integrated technologies, such as a state-of-the-art, solar-powered biological wastewater treatment system that recycles up to 97 percent of the school’s »

The exterior of Gohar Khatoon Girls’ School. To invest in the local economy, the project team selected bricks— made by hand in Mazar-i-Sharif—as a primary building material.

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PEOPLE + VISION + CRAFTSMANSHIP

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| architecture |

water (and is only the third such system to be installed in all of Afghanistan), demonstrate that blending modern and vernacular techniques is both possible and efficient. The team behind Gohar Khatoon hopes the project will serve as a model for the sustainable design and construction of future schools. “It’s absolutely something new for Afghanistan,” says Solaiman Salahi, the Afghan engineer who oversaw Gohar Khatoon’s structural design and handled on-site quality control throughout the construction process. “It’s a turning point for my country. We have manuals for building schools, but they are not as sophisticated as they need to be. Typically, the same design is implemented throughout the country without considering regions’ unique environmental, social, economic, geographical, and geological conditions.” Adds architect Dave Miller, cofounder of Miller Hull, who took over the project after Hull passed away midway through construction: “Gohar Khatoon broadened the possibilities. We were able to demonstrate new ways you could build.” The architectural and social success of the project spurred Sahar Education to launch another capital campaign this

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summer to support the design and construction of Afghanistan’s first public boarding school for girls. Sited on the campus of Sultan Razia, a Mazar-i-Sharif day school serving 5,000 girls, its design draws upon lessons learned in the Gohar Khatoon project and was generated in an advanced design studio that Miller taught at the University of Washington. Ginna Brelsford, Sahar’s executive director, points out that Sultan Razia’s prestigious reputation will attract students from rural families who might otherwise be reluctant to send their daughters to boarding school. Miller Hull, working pro bono, is now refining the design, and the school will break ground in May 2019. Salahi will reprise his role as engineering consultant, motivated, he says, “by my passion for the promotion of education in Afghanistan, which I believe is the key to prosperity and self-sufficiency.” On every front—architectural, social, economic—“it’s an enormous thing to provide rural girls with a public institution.” h

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: NIC LEHOUX; SARAH CHAN; TRAVIS HAUAN

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: At Gohar Khatoon, a central stairwell in each classroom block serves as a “sunspace” that captures heat. Sahar Education also has launched a capital campaign to support the establishment of Afghanistan’s first public boarding school for girls, which will be situated on the grounds of Sultan Razia, an existing girls’ day school; graduate students in the University of Washington’s architecture program created these renderings of the new school.


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| happenings |

NOW OPEN

For fans of Scandinavian design and history, the wait is over— the Nordic Museum reopened on May 5 in a new, prominent location in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood. Designed by Mithun Architects, the 57,000-square-foot building invites its viewers to explore five Nordic cultures with exhibitions focused on Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden. Inspired by the topography of Scandinavia, the building is organized around a linear “fjord” that weaves together stories of the Nordic region. Bridges cross the fjord to connect exhibits and exemplify the transatlantic journey, while walls composed of faceted white planes evoke glacial origins.

Creating an avian habitat both beautiful in form and effective in function was the task that Oregon’s WELD Design Studio faced as it designed the Kingfisher Perch on the Deschutes River near Miller’s Landing Park in Bend, Oregon, in 2015. Constructed as part of the Colorado Dam Safe Passage Master Plan, the 30-foot steel pipe sculpture features braided “branches” for belted kingfishers— a vital part of Central Oregon’s ecosystem—that mirror the form of natural tree snags. Here the crested, steel-blue birds can safely scan the river below before they barrel downward to grab the aquatic prey they depend on. The Perch is both an object lesson in how to mitigate habitat disturbance through astute design and a key support feature for Bend’s local birdlife. »

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TOP: MIR; BOTTOM: DYLAN WOOCK

IN THE WILD


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| happenings |

NEW VIEW

THE ART OF CONSERVATION

On now at the Vancouver Aquarium, Vortex is a sculptural exhibition dedicated to raising awareness of the global consequences of oceanic plastic pollution. The first collaboration between internationally renowned author, artist, and designer Douglas Coupland and the Vancouver nonprofit Ocean Wise, the yearlong exhibition features a dynamic water installation, complete with a sunken Japanese ship covered in marine plastic debris that Coupland and collaborators from the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup collected along the British Columbia coastline. »

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: EMA PETER, EMA PETER, KRISTA JAHNKE, JLGIJSSEN

Last November, North Vancouver welcomed a new landmark cultural facility with the opening of the Polygon Gallery— the largest nonprofit photography gallery in western Canada. Founded in 1981, the gallery (formerly known as Presentation House) had long operated in a studio five times smaller than its modern new 25,000-square-foot waterfront home, just steps from the Lonsdale Quay public market. Designed by Patkau Architects, the two-story space, flooded with the shifting natural light of its harborside site, boasts a multipurpose exhibition and event space, gallery lobby, gift shop, and café. Its inaugural exhibition, N. Vancouver, paid tribute to the cultural evolution of the city itself, from its first years as a Coast Salish village to its industrial flowering to its present life as a sophisticated metropolis set between sea and mountains.


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| happenings |

THE QUEEN OF CLAY

LACE UP

From July 1 through 6, more than 4,000 US athletes and coaches will converge on the University of Washington to compete in the 2018 Special Olympics USA Games. Seattle-based Games partner Brooks Running Company has designed a limited-edition performance running shoe and apparel line to mark the event, and a portion of the proceeds from each sale will support the 2018 Games. Of the initiative, Beth Knox, CEO and president of the 2018 Special Olympics USA Games, says, “Brooks’s commitment to the community and to helping athletes prove that there are no bounds to their abilities makes them a terrific match for the mission of the Games.”

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CLAWS OUT

In response to the 2016 election, Portland-based fashion editor Eden Dawn and her husband, Ashod Simonian, have launched Claws Out, a “resistance” nail polish line. Each of its seven shades corresponds to a specific nonprofit, with 20 percent of the proceeds from the sale of that polish benefiting its respective cause. Resistance, a deep red polish, supports the ACLU; hot-pink Uterus supports Planned Parenthood. The vegan formulas are “five free,” meaning they’re free of five of the known carcinogens typically used in nail polish, and all are domestically manufactured. “We’re upset with the current state of affairs,” Dawn says. “But we can make a positive difference.” h

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY ANTHROPOLOGIE; COURTESY BROOKS RUNNING COMPANY; COURTESY CLAWS OUT

Growing up in Waterloo County, Ontario, in the heart of Mennonite country, artist Cathy Terepocki developed an appreciation for handmade objects at a young age. Now living in Yarrow, British Columbia, Terepocki taps into that influence with her ceramic works, currently available at Anthropologie. The Ontario Collection, consisting of stools, dishware, candles, and drawer pulls, uses print technology to layer hand-drawn, printed designs and motifs atop handcrafted ceramic pieces, a process Terepocki has honed throughout her career. In line with Anthropologie’s bohemian aesthetic, Terepocki’s work features patterns abstracted from nature and inspired by her home in rural British Columbia.


love coming home.

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| shop | Levi’s denim meets Mexican artistry: the jackets to the left and right display patches from vintage huipiles (shirtlike garments), and the middle one flaunts embroidery by a collective of Tzotzil women in Zinacantán, Chiapas.

BUILDING BRIDGES

AFTER THE 2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION, MILLIONS OF AMERICANS WERE MAD AS HELL. Among the

outraged hordes were three women in Portland—interior designer Jessica Helgerson; Vail Fletcher, professor of gender and environmental studies at the University of Portland; and Cristina Niculescu, professor of Spanish at Lewis & Clark College—who hatched an idea to use design as a positive connector between the United States and Mexico. The result: Collectivo, an online shop that sells a selection of handmade, Mexican-designed goods. Each founder has spent considerable time in Mexico at various points in her life, and all three were appalled by the president-elect’s attitude toward the country. “Mexico is

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fundamentally misunderstood by so many people,” Helgerson says. “I wanted to find a way to celebrate Mexican culture, and I thought, ‘What better way to talk to the American people than through shopping?’” Over the past two years, Helgerson and Niculescu have made a handful of trips to southern Mexico and spent weeks visiting village artisans who make everything from textiles and bags to colorful woolen animals. The two women forged connections with the craftspeople, who in turn have become steady suppliers for the online shop. “After the election, I felt like all I was doing was griping,” Helgerson admits. “Now, with Collectivo, I feel like we are helping build a bridge, not a wall.” h

COLLECTIVO

Written by RACHEL GALLAHER


Client | NBO4 Architecture Â

Project | Chelsea Waterside ResidencesÂ

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| fashion |

MARIAM SHAH

It took designer Zach Matheson 16 months, seven prototypes, and more than two dozen experimental materials to land on the final design for his industrial-chic bag.

IT’S RARE FOR SOMEONE TO WALK OUT OF A MUSEUM WITH THE THOUGHT “I COULD DO BETTER THAN THAT.” But two years ago, Portland

IN THE BAG

Written by RACHEL GALLAHER Photographed by MARK WELSH

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artist and designer Zach Matheson left the Louisiana Museum in Humlebaek, Denmark, obsessed with improving the design of a bag he’d seen in one of the exhibitions. Made from black plastic mesh with rope handles, the bag had been used by oyster divers to collect their harvest. “I’m from Michigan, and the material reminded me of the orange and black plastic snow fencing I saw everywhere as a kid,” Matheson says. “That sense of nostalgia was powerful, and I wanted to make one for myself but improve it.” Back in the States, Matheson experimented with various materials (going through 20 types of mesh before settling on his choice) until he came up with an 18-by-12-inch black plastic mesh tote with thin leather handles and a silver rim. “Efficient and unadorned,” as he describes it, the bag’s simple, squared-off form belies the number of iterations it underwent, as well as its power of attraction. Last September, as he started carrying the first prototype around Portland, Matheson found himself accruing orders from complete strangers on the street. The bag is even set to make an appearance in an upcoming ad campaign for a popular kombucha company. As Matheson puts it, “There truly is power in good design.” h


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TRUE NORTE

Written by JENNIFER MCCULLUM : Photographed by LAUREN COLTON

“YOU DON’T HAVE MANY CHOICES WHEN YOU’RE TRAVELING AS AN IMMIGRANT,” says Mexican designer

Paloma Hurtado. “You gather your resources and make them into something beautiful because that is all you have.” Her resources resulted in Nómada, the first US collection from the now Seattle-based designer’s line, Norte. Arriving in Washington in 2015 on a fiancée visa (Hurtado’s husband is American and an architect at Miller Hull), Hurtado was unable to find full-time work until her green card was approved. The 34-year-old designer fell back on her fashion education—a design degree from Centro University—to create a womenswear line from lace, leather, and wool she sourced from all over Seattle, even from the fabric bins at Goodwill. “When I came here, all I had was what fit in my

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suitcase,” she says. “So I had to be creative about transforming what I already had, and what was already used, starting from nowhere.” Nómada, Spanish for “nomadic,” nods to Hurtado’s journey through different countries and cultures. Her line shows the range of these influences, from vibrant swatches of pink that reference Mexican modernist architect Luis Barragán to woven knits that are absolutely at home in the layersrequisite Seattle climate. This June, Nómada will debut in Belltown boutique Sassafras, the first brick-and-mortar shop in the US to carry the Norte line. Of her Stateside success, Hurtado says, “I want to show the world that even though your resources may not be that good, that doesn’t have to stop you from doing something good.” »

STYLING: PALOMA HURTADO; HAIR AND MAKEUP: TANIA SALAZAR; PHOTO ASSISTANT: REVA JEAN; MODEL: CORINA BAKKER, SEATTLE MODELS GUILD

Mexican designer Paloma Hurtado drew inspiration for her first US collection, Nómada, from her experience as an immigrant. Created as a tribute to the influences of both cultures, Nómada’s dresses (seen here in images from the designer’s Spring 2018 lookbook) feature unique and contrasting fabric combinations such as lace with burlap (below right) and sheer mesh (below left).


Peeking through black lace, deep-pink silk is Hurtado’s nod to the signature color that Mexican modernist architect Luis Barragån used in his own vibrant works.

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The cotton viscose dress was made from a single piece of uncut 2-by-3-meter fabric and constructed using only seams. OPPOSITE: A handsewn deer leather jacket with a front lining woven by the Mazahua people of central Mexico continues the designer’s innovative pairings of material. Hurtado found the wool blanket in the background in Chinconcuac, Mexico. h

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Kelsey Brookes’s Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) acrylic on canvas hangs in a Southern California study designed by Suzie Lucas of Seattle’s Lucas Design Associates.

put it in neutral Written by JENNIFER MCCULLUM : Photographed by AARON LEITZ

Brushed oak planks, pale gray limestone, and mixed metal furnishings give this La Jolla study, designed by Seattle-based Lucas Design Associates, a layered, natural palette that keeps work life minimalist and calm the PNW way.

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1. Featuring floor lamp by Alexandre Dubreuil, Roche Bobois, Portland and Seattle, roche-bobois.com. 2. Nordic Silver wool rug by James Tufenkian, Tufenkian Carpets, Portland, tufenkian .com. 3. Marble bookends, Homestead Seattle, Seattle, homesteadseattle.com. 4. Apelle P armchair by Midj, EWF Modern, Portland, ewfmodern.com.

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5. Keys sideboard by Alexandre Dubreuil, Roche Bobois, Portland and Seattle, roche-bobois.com. 6. Paulistano chair by Paulo Mendes da Rocha, produced by Objekto, Design Within Reach, Portland and Seattle, dwr.com. 7. Fir beam end table, The Joinery, Portland, thejoinery.com. 8. Omaggio a Morandi marble bottles by Elisa Ossino for Salvatori, Design Within Reach, Portland and Seattle, dwr.com. h

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| sourced |

SCRAPPER’S DELIGHT Written by STACY KENDALL

MARBLE COUNTERTOPS MAY BE ALL THE RAGE, BUT BELOW THEIR REFINED SURFACE IS A DIRTY LITTLE SECRET: the staggering amount of waste their

“THIS IS A HUGE OPPORTUNITY TO NOT ONLY DIVERT STONE FROM THE WASTE STREAM BUT ALSO TO GIVE IT A SECOND LIFE WHERE ITS BEAUTY CAN BE APPRECIATED.” —ROMNEY SHIPWAY, SHIPWAY LIVING DESIGN

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BRIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

manufacturing process leaves behind. Almost two years ago, Vancouver-based designer Romney Shipway, founder of Shipway Living Design, discovered this alarming industry issue while working on an interior design project that required him to visit a stone-processing facility where discarded off-cuts sat piled in bins. Asking about the fate of the scraps, Shipway learned that if they weren’t eventually picked up for a project, they would end up roadside, tagged with a “free” sign. “That was a huge ah-hah moment,” he says. Upcycling the discarded scraps, Shipway created the Luna Collection: a series of tables (bistro, dining, coffee, and side) with circular marble tops and legs made from Douglas fir harvested from a sustainably managed community forest on Cortes Island, BC. “It’s a win-win scenario,” he says. “Not only do I get the material for free, I also hire the stone company that the scraps came from to cut and polish the tops for me. They don’t have to pay for disposal, and the carbon emitted in the excavation and shipping of the stone hasn’t been released in vain.” Shipway plans to expand his line of sleek marble products this coming fall by using smaller pieces of scrap to make desk lamps, umbrella stands, charcuterie slabs, and new coffee tables. »


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| sourced |

just three years ago, after receiving a loom as a gift, her education in fashion design provided a solid platform for her craft. After a year spent honing her warps and wefts, Petersen began to sell her handmade rugs through her newly launched studio, What Because. Her process begins in an unlikely spot: Goodwill’s linen bins, where Petersen purchases a selection of sheets and tablecloths. She tears them into strips, feeds them into the loom, and weaves them into expressive, contemporary patterned rugs. The development of her designs is less straightforward, however. “Most of it happens in the moment,” Petersen says of the boldly colored geometric shapes that dominate her work. “I often change the design as I see how things are weaving up, and that’s the most exciting time: when I can get lost in the free form, without being attached to the outcome.” Petersen invites custom orders, and each one-of-a-kind rug, made over a period of six to 18 hours, is imbued with a strong feminine lineage. “My great-grandmother was a weaver, my grandmothers were both excellent seamstresses, and my aunt is an incredible fiber artist,” she explains. “Weaving is in my blood, and it’s in all women’s blood if you go back far enough in history.” »

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BRANDON HERRELL

WHAT SEATTLE RUG ARTIST LENNA PETERSEN MIGHT LACK IN YEARS AT THE LOOM, SHE MAKES UP FOR WITH HER EYE FOR INNOVATIVE RUG DESIGN. Although the 36-year-old started weaving


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| sourced |

That may sound ironic, given that working with castoffs means a reduced number of material options, but for Adam Zeek, that limitation has liberated him to experiment with new cuts and designs. Two years ago—after a decade and a half in the home-remodeling industry—Zeek started exploring uses for the leftover wood accumulated on worksites and from discarded shipping pallets, hand-carving geometric sculptures and furnishings from all types of wood. Recently he has increased his hauls by posting a homemade flyer around his neighborhood asking for wood castoffs. The effort has yielded plenty of raw materials, as well as camaraderie with local old-timers who invite Zeek out to their barns to haul away scraps. Over the past two years, the designer has refined his experiments into contemporary pieces, ranging from 12 to 48 inches high, that play with pattern and texture. “The richness of wood is celebrated first and foremost,” he explains. “I try to react to its personality and leave behind any forced ideas.” For now, he sells mostly via email and Instagram, with some pieces available at Lowell in Portland. h

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| interiors |

NEW CENTURY MODERN Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by HARIS KENJAR

“WHEN YOU KNOW, YOU KNOW.” That sentiment’s usually

applied to meeting the love of your life, but for one Washington native, the quip succinctly sums up the feeling she experienced when stepping into her new house for the first time. It was April 2015, and the young woman, who was moving back to the Pacific Northwest from San Francisco, where she’d worked as a tech recruiter for five years, had been searching for houses in the lakeside town of Yarrow Point in an unconventional way. “My parents and sister were going to open houses and scouting out places for me,” she recalls. “There was even a time when they FaceTimed me in on a tour.” Her perfect match turned out to be an off-market property, and she jumped on a plane to view it in person. When she

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walked into the 1965 gem, complete with a sunken living room, “there was a really positive sense of energy,” she says. “I immediately knew it was the one.” Aside from the good vibes, the client was drawn to the vaulted ceilings that had been whitewashed in the ’70s and the large, west-facing windows that would help combat winter’s early darkness. “I knew that with heavy cosmetic work and the right furniture, the house could be totally transformed while still honoring the fact that it was built in the ’60s.” At a friend’s suggestion, the homeowner enlisted designer Brian Paquette, founder of Brian Paquette Interiors, to lead the renovation charge. “The house was beautifully designed but had gone through some light remodeling about 20 years ago,” »


Interior designer Brian Paquette whitewashed the brick fireplace surround in the dining room of this 1965-era Yarrow Point, Washington, home to harmonize it with the gray-toned ceiling. Lawson-Fenning side chairs flank the RH dining table, paired with armchairs from Hollywood at Home at the head and foot. The rug is vintage, and the chandelier is an Apparatus Cloud. OPPOSITE: The entryway vignette is built around a Noir console topped off with a Kelly Wearstler lamp and a Casamidy mirror. The chair is Jason Koharik, and the twin ottomans are from Lawson-Fenning.

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The centerpiece of the sunken living room is a 14-foot-long custom sofa designed by Paquette and upholstered in Pindler fabric. The homeowner loved the original ceilings, washed in a gray tone back in the ’70s, so the décor plays a tonal riff on the overhead boards. The coffee table is Lawson-Fenning, and the ottomans are from Bunny Williams Home. The black side table is a piece by Grain. »

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| interiors | The kitchen had been remodeled 10 years ago, and the homeowner decided to keep the cabinetry and paint it white. The appliances were fairly new, so they stayed put, too, but Paquette cut down the island by a foot and replaced nondescript lighting with pendants from Visual Comfort. New counters are Calacatta marble from Meta Marble & Granite. Existing fixtures were replaced by hardware from Anthropologie, and the trio of LawsonFenning Elysian barstools upholstered in Moore & Giles leather provides casual seating. Âť

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| interiors |

A sitting room off the kitchen holds the Lawson-Fenning sofa, upholstered in green Pindler fabric, that served as an aesthetic launchpad for the whole renovation. The rug is vintage; the ottoman is Lawson-Fenning, and the rush chair is from Hollywood at Home. Pillows from ZAK + FOX add subtle pattern to the seating.

Paquette says, noting that his team didn’t have to tear down any walls. “It just needed some of the ’90s taken off.” The kitchen had updated appliances and cabinetry, so it stayed relatively untouched, but Paquette did remove the wall-to-wall carpet in most of the other rooms to reveal original hardwood floors. He refinished and stained them espresso brown, and the walls throughout the house received a coat of Farrow & Ball’s warm white Pointing to create a fresh, uplifting backdrop. With the anchor palette in place, Paquette started to populate the rooms with neutral-toned furniture. “The palette she wanted was very 1990s Banana Republic catalogue: khakis, dusty greens, tan. She’s spent quite a bit of time in South Africa, so some of those colors are inspired by natural, earthy tones.” In the living room, a major hangout spot for the homeowner’s friends and family, the client needed a couch that would accommodate them all. In response, Paquette custom-designed a low-slung 14-foot sectional. A large vintage rug provides a cozy place for floor seating, and a work by ceramicist Jolinda Linden adds texture to one wall.

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Shades of blue appear in the Romo-upholstered LawsonFenning dining room chairs and a leather ottoman in the sitting room. A sofa in the sitting room is covered in green Pindler fabric that proved to be an aesthetic driver for the entire project. “In one of our first meetings, we were standing over a table of fabric swatches,” Paquette remembers. “She pretty quickly picked that fabric, and off we went from there.” Other decisions weren’t as easy. The client initially contested Paquette’s choice of a Cloud chandelier from Apparatus to hang over the dining table. “When I first saw it, I said, ‘Absolutely not! That looks like Bubbles the Clown.’ But once it was up, I saw how much softness it brought to the room. Brian was right,” she admits. This trusting rapport between client and designer was the backbone of a project that both taps into a Northwest neutral palette and puts a slightly global twist on modern sensibilities. “She knew what she wanted,” Paquette says, “but I helped stretch her aesthetics and shepherd things along.” h


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| kitchen | The new kitchen of this 1927 Capitol Hill house features a custom island with extra storage. The simple open shelving is crafted from solid walnut planks suspended with uncoated brass tubes from Brassworks USA. The homeowner chose hexagonal glazed basalt tile from Ann Sacks to add subtle texture.

THE BRASS STANDARD Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by LARA SWIMMER

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An Imperial hood hangs over the Wolf range, and an unfinished brass tube and fittings from Brassworks USA hold often-used pots and utensils above the stove. Black soapstone countertops from MS International are inspired by James Beard award-winning chef Renee Erickson’s personal kitchen, and the unfinished brass sink is custom from Texas Lightsmith.

“WHEN WE BOUGHT THE HOUSE, WE JOKED THAT IT LOOKED LIKE PRIME LADY DI IN HERE.” Cookbook author

Sara Dickerman gestures around her newly connected kitchen and dining room, which now neatly square with contemporary Northwest aesthetics instead of screaming 1980s Windsor parlor. “The walls were heavily stuccoed and sponge-painted oxblood red and hunter green,” she explains, “and everywhere you looked there were drapes upon drapes upon drapes. The kitchen had dark cherry wood and busy granite counters—just an accumulation of textures and colors.” Managing to overlook those drapes, Dickerman and her husband, Andrew Shuman, fell in love with the rest of the centuryold Federal-style house at the north end of Seattle’s Capitol Hill, purchasing the property in 2010 with the intention of an eventual kitchen remodel. Five years later, when that time came, Dickerman reached out to Lisa Chadbourne and Daren Doss of local firm chadbourne + doss architects to undertake the project.

“The biggest thing we did was create connection on the first floor by enlarging an opening between the kitchen and the dining room and removing a large peninsula cabinet,” Chadbourne says. The archway was given the same curve as additional ones throughout the house and a fresh set of French doors opens to a newly installed deck. A prolific food writer with two cookbooks under her belt, Dickerman needed a kitchen that would both give her space to experiment with recipes and provide a welcoming place for family hangouts. The architects, with the help of Bellan Construction, installed a custom island with a black soapstone top that matches the new counters. The author also requested a large single-chamber sink that would allow her to easily wash sheet pans. Brass hardware lightens the dark cabinetry and adds what Chadbourne calls “a living finish” that will evolve with time—a perfect expression of the kitchen’s decades of growth and change. h graymag . com

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| workspace |

HOME/ OFFICE

Written by JENNIFER MCCULLUM : Photographed by ALEX HAYDEN

“IT LOOKED LIKE A 1950S DOCTOR’S OFFICE—LOW CEILINGS, BAD GREEN WALLS—and it was unbearably

hot because there was no ventilation,” says architect Jeffrey Pelletier, principal and owner of Board & Vellum, describing his Seattle firm’s original office. “We were working shoulder to shoulder. There weren’t even 10 square feet that wasn’t someone’s desk or conference room or the kitchen.” The team made do with the subpar space for three years— until fate intervened one morning in 2015. When Pelletier and his employees walked to a nearby bank to cash their paychecks, he learned that the branch was closing and the approximately 5,000-square-foot, two-story Capitol Hill space was available for lease. He jumped on the opportunity, and, together with his staff and contractor Woodmark Homes, completely transformed the space. »

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Board & Vellum’s conference room features custom divided lite windows from Frank Lumber Company, FLOR carpet tiles, and wall art made of LEGOs from founder Jeffrey Pelletier’s personal collection. ABOVE: Pelletier in the office’s upstairs kitchen.


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| workspace |

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Custom sliding panels reveal Board & Vellum’s materials library. Pottok Prints’ All of Us wallpaper— a high-contrast pattern depicting illustrated people—covers a back wall in the kitchen. Beetle-kill pine floors from Montanabased Sustainable Lumber Company run throughout the office.

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The new studio forgoes design-office clichés in favor of a welcoming, almost home-like environment—one that “doesn’t impose on our clients’ visions for their own spaces but rather serves as a blank page we create on,” says project associate Katie Mallory, who led the overhaul. “The space feels different than other architecture firms,” adds Pelletier. “It’s not the typical raw-industrial, exposedwood and metal-beams aesthetic. We wanted something that felt fresh, comfortable, and casual.” A partial-height whitewashed plywood wall with crisp white baseboards divides desks from the spacious kitchen and other communal spaces while preserving an open floor plan. Downstairs, a below-grade space houses a second kitchen, bathrooms with showers for the firm’s bike commuters, and a “classroom” where Board & Vellum hosts design events. “We lucked out by finding a space that allows us to engage with the community,” says Pelletier, who is proud that his firm works at every scale and “designs ‘neighborhoods’”—from city parks and coffee shops to family homes. Creating the new office was truly a communal effort: the entire 20-person firm weighed in and sourced almost all furnishings and objects locally. FaceTime furniture shopping calls and texts happened at all hours. “Being your own client is insane,” says Pelletier. “Most designers feel confident in the decisions we make for our clients. But with this office, I not only wanted to get it right but knew the space needed to reflect who we are as a company. That’s a lot of pressure. I second-guessed every decision and sweated every detail." h


A Room & Board Reese sofa, a Crate & Barrel Bel-Air coffee table, and a layered cowhide and overdyed rug in the office’s front room set a residential tone that is carried throughout the workspace. Painted PINnacle tackboard panels from Homasote, suspended from ceiling rods, display framed art by local artists and firm staff, which Board & Vellum changes every few weeks.

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a place in the sun

A boomerang-shaped Palm Springs vacation house optimizes winter and summer sunshine for year-round entertaining. Written by ELIZABETH VARNELL : Photographed by LARA SWIMMER

Architect Jill Lewis used cement tiles from Cement Tile Shop, inspired by those seen in French-style apartment buildings in Buenos Aires, on the deck and throughout the interiors of Casa Caballeros, her Palm Springs home, which she named after its Movie Colony street. Fleetwood doors foster an indoor-outdoor lifestyle, and the shou sugi ban charred cypress siding is from Delta Millworks. Âť

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DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Jill Lewis, JL Architecture construction: Palm Pacific Construction

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An RH Modern Cannele Collection raw brass chandelier hangs in the living room, and another illuminates the adjoining dining room. Lewis selected nine slabs of white marble from Arizona Tile’s stone yard for the indoor-outdoor fireplace and other fixtures throughout the house. The two long ModShop sofas in aqua-blue leather and walnut add dashes of color. 

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i

n 1947, when Frank Sinatra first set foot on the sand-filled lots that would later blossom into Palm Springs’ celebritydense Movie Colony neighborhood, he dreamed of building a home in this sun-soaked oasis. Decades later, architect Jill Lewis and her husband, Mike Doyle, conjured up a similar dream when they stumbled upon an undeveloped 10,000-square-foot parcel here. The lot looked much like the terrain—rich in sand dunes and tumbleweeds but little else—that midcentury architects Richard Neutra, John Lautner, and Donald Wexler famously encountered while building here at the foot of the San Jacinto Mountains. Lewis and Doyle, who’d spent years living with their family in Asia and South America, decided to fashion a restorative vacation home for themselves in the serene Southern California desert. Before launching her eponymous firm in 2007, Lewis, a Washington native who studied architecture at Washington State and abroad in Florence, worked at Seattle’s Lane Williams Architects for almost 10 years, developing a well-defined and transparent design process with clients. Drawing upon two decades of experience, the architect sketched her own home’s initial shape by hand but then set about trying to understand the site’s natural environment digitally. “I did a lot of sun studies on the computer to see how far into living areas light would go when the sun drops behind the mountains,” she explains. The lot’s western side provides a picturesque view of the formidable peaks above Coachella Valley, but the sunset’s blazing rays also originate from the same direction. “The living areas had to face south and west so deep overhangs could offer shade from the higher summer sun and western sunsets and yet we’d still have the gorgeous mountain view,” explains Lewis. She dreamed up a boomerang-shaped house tucked into the northeast corner of the lot, its elegant yet durable interiors flowing into an expansive shaded deck, bocce and shuffleboard courts, and a splash pool for her three children. An adjoining 75-foot lap pool fulfills the single request that Doyle, the CFO

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of Expedia-backed online travel agency Despegar.com, made during the design process. With the sun still at the top of her mind, Lewis—following the lead of so many midcentury Palm Springs architects— quickly decided that the 3,000-square-foot house’s roof would be its unifying feature. “In the desert, your go-to solution is a horizontal roof plane cantilevered over the whole house,” she explains. A virtually flat roof (the arid region gets so little rain that a slope isn’t necessary) allows for extended overhangs that provide shade without blocking mountain views. As an added bonus, the flat roof keeps the house’s solar array, from Palm Springs–based Hot Purple Energy, completely invisible from the ground. Then, Lewis arranged the adjoining interior rooms to foster leisurely impromptu gatherings. The family’s primary residence is in Buenos Aires, and Lewis explains that “our latest chapter has been all about socializing.” The Argentinian custom of gathering multiple families for meals prompted her to choose a large kitchen island where 12 adults can gather to mix drinks and craft picadas (appetizers), as well as two extra-long aqua-blue leather couches facing each other in the living room. Lewis chose a minimalist palette of black, white, and shades of gray; kept furniture sparse to free up space for entertaining; and eschewed anything overly precious. All the house’s white marble—from the fireplaces to the kitchen island—came from the Arizona Tile stone yard in Palm Desert, and while Lewis expects to spot signs of desert wear and tear on it, she says she “doesn’t mind the little marks of life, the stains and watermarks.” The home’s unlacquered Newport Brass faucets and hardware are already showing unique dark brown and bright green patinas. “I like finishes to feel like they’re living, not polished,” Lewis notes. Such details, combined with the simple concrete floor running throughout the house’s interiors and exterior grounds, contribute to the home’s relaxed aura, as does the vitamin D influx from outdoors. “When you grow up in Seattle, you never lose your appreciation for nice weather,” says Lewis. “Now I find the relentless blue sky rejuvenating.” »


A skylight illuminates the 16-foot-long entry hall, where Lewis placed ornately patterned Above View plaster ceiling tiles—reminiscent of Hollywood Regency décor—on one wall. A trio of brass Tom Dixon Etch pendants hovers above Cement Tile Shop encaustic cement floor tiles in a floral design commonly seen in Buenos Aires, where the family has their primary home.

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RH Modern’s Reclaimed Russian oak dining table in a smoked gray hue, paired with Eames molded plastic chairs sourced from Design Within Reach, sits on a rectangle of Cement Tile Shop floor tiles inset into the concrete floor. The couple found the hand-carved Buddha—sitting below a painting by Argentinian artist Daniel Callori—while bicycling in Thailand on their honeymoon. The kitchen island, topped with white marble and walnut, is surrounded by RH Modern 1940s Vintage Toledo leather bar stools and lit by a cadre of Burke Décor gold-colored hammered brass Lazy Susan pendants. OPPOSITE: Cole & Son Malachite wallpaper adds an organic element to the study, as does the Horchow pendant lamp. The West Elm Bone Inlaid Faceted black-and-white coffee table contributes yet another strong graphic element to the mix. »

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Detroit Wallpaper Co.’s Goldrush Metrix, in a custom black-and-white combination, covers the powder room walls and ceiling, and Newport Brass unlacquered brass bath and plumbing hardware—in tandem with a Horchow mirror—adds a dash of shine. OPPOSITE: Lewis covered a master bedroom wall with Above View’s ornamental plaster ceiling tiles and installed dangling Black Rooster Décor pendants above brass-inlaid wooden West Elm bedside tables. Quilted white Trina Turk linens cover the bed. h

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DESIGN TEAM

architecture: RUFproject construction: Kenorah Design + Build millwork: inGrain Custom Millwork windows, glazing wall: Atlas Meridian Glassworks

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A glazing wall dominates the rear of a Vancouver home renovated by designer Sean Pearson of RUFproject. Because the rear wall was removed, to prevent the roof from spreading apart, Pearson replaced the original collar ties with substantial horizontal fir beams, visible in the master bedroom’s cathedral ceiling. 

design gradient Vintage in the front, modern in the back: how a house with dual architectural identities remains cohesive in its design.

Written by GUY SADDY : Photographed by EMA PETER

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n a time when even the idea of modesty has grown quaint, there’s something reassuringly anachronistic about Alex and Jyoti’s Vancouver home. Perched on a sloping lot, its early-20thcentury façade hidden from the street by a dense tangle of trees, the home seems transported from a different time. The couple bought the house in July 2015 because its quiet Spanish Banks neighborhood ticks some major boxes: it’s close to the ocean, and Jyoti’s parents live nearby, which makes it a perfect place to raise their three-year-old daughter. Celebrated local artist and designer Martha Sturdy once lived in the home, too, which added a dash of intrigue. But to make their home what they wanted it to be, Alex and Jyoti knew that a substantial amount of work was needed, especially because they wanted to remake the actual house they’d bought rather than hew to the tear-down, build-up

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Vancouver norm. It was a directive that upheld an important element of sustainability. Renovation would equal less material waste and at the same time retain the home’s history by literally building on its past. To that end, the homeowners tapped designer Sean Pearson of Vancouver-based RUFproject, whose wide-ranging CV encompasses everything from creating retail space for major brands such as Nike to more domestic projects. They had met Pearson through friends (he had also previously worked on a project for Jyoti’s parents) and admired his original, creative thinking process. The designer’s first task was the back of the house, which a typical 1980s reno had made uninspiring. But as he assessed the rear lot—which slopes down through a manicured garden featuring mature Japanese maples and a panorama of the North Shore mountains—he realized that he had an opportunity to do something unique. Presenting the couple with his idea to make the entire rear of the house »


The dining room, situated between the living room and the kitchen/deck area, is a transition point, says Pearson, a hybrid of new and old elements. The original window and casings were retained but are now framed by a modern bookshelf of Pearson’s own design. “A wonderful thing about working with Alex and Jyoti is that it wasn’t about making things ‘big,’” he says. “It was about making things work harder.” The couple’s three-yearold daughter sits at a table from Rove Concepts, illuminated by a Lambert et Fils chandelier from LightForm.

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“I don’t want to recreate the past, but at the same time, I don’t want to destroy it.” —SEAN PEARSON, DESIGNER

A concrete-tiled backsplash by Villa Lagoon harmonizes well with the kitchen’s slate-colored heated porcelain tile floors by Stone Tile and its white oak cabinets and island, designed by RUFproject and executed by Vancouver’s inGrain Custom Millwork. A Lambert et Fils Suspension Dot pendant from LightForm hangs above the island; the stools are from Vancouver Special. The fridge and the stovetop, from a 1980sera renovation, were kept. “The clients are conservation-minded,” says Pearson. “If it’s not broken, why change it?” »

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THIS PAGE: A Hay Dot quilt covers the master bed upstairs. Timorous Beasties’ Indie Wood wallpaper lines the stairwell leading up to the master suite, where a Random light by Bertjan Pot for Moooi illuminates vintage Danish furniture and classic modern pieces, including an Eames lounge chair from Herman Miller. OPPOSITE: Carrara marble from GL Stone & Tile covers the master bathroom wall and floor. A freestanding bluestone bathtub by Blu Bathworks creates an interior focal point, while Reynaers curtain-wall windows provide serene views to the outside.

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says Alex. “You could drop a marble on the floor and it would roll from the front of the house to the back.” Yet the greatest challenge was installing the huge, triple-glazed glass panels on the rear façade. Made by Reynaers, a Belgian manufacturer, they weighed up to 900 pounds apiece and were supplied and installed by Atlas Meridian Glassworks (AMG) of North Vancouver. To support their weight and stabilize the rear of the house, a steel frame had to be installed, no small task given that the home lacks laneway access and the work had to be done by hand. Fortunately, as Pearson says, AMG staff are “not the kind of people who walk away from a project. They’ll say, ‘Okay, you need 10 guys to lift these panels? We’ll get 10 guys.’” The renovation took almost two years from start to finish. The end result? A functional, eclectic home that refuses to be squeezed into any one historical period—or any particular architectural movement. And that, says Alex, is only natural. “We’re a mixed-race, mixed-religion couple. What could we possibly be dogmatic about?” h

STYLING: LAURA MELLING

glass, Pearson was met with immediate support, but an additional question loomed: “How do you mix modern and traditional in a way that allows you to live the way that people want to live today?” Soon they’d generated an overarching design concept: the front of the house would remain intact, its traditional Arts and Crafts bones and period-specific details preserved. But walking from the front to the back of the home would also mean moving through eras: the rear of the house would be entirely modern. The transition is eased by the couple’s midcentury furniture pieces, which make the movement from traditional to contemporary space seem organic. Next the owners chose their builder, Kenorah Design + Build. As with most renovations, the true scope of work became apparent only after the reno was underway: potentially dangerous knob-and-tube wiring had to be replaced, asbestos remediated, and structural defects addressed. “Not only was the house slanted, but it was functionally compromised,”


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| architecture |

factory model

Forget shipping containers and cookie-cutter models— architect John Hemsworth is changing the way we look at (and live in) prefab houses. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by EMA PETER

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A steeply raked lot and a desire for energy efficiency drove the trilevel design of this new 3,500-square-foot Whistler, BC, home, designed by architect John Hemsworth and prefabricated at the BC Passive House Factory in Pemberton, just a half-hour from the site. Âť

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| architecture |

AS THE OLD SAYING GOES, SOMETIMES ONE THING LEADS TO ANOTHER. Such was the case four years ago when architect

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Dense trees on the east side of the lot ensure privacy for the freestanding Blu Bathworks tub and Kohler sink in the master bathroom. Floor and wall tiles were sourced through Stone Tile Pacific. In the kitchen, floor tile by Terratinta Ceramiche and Caesarstone countertops from Mario Marble & Tile visually balance Sherwin-Williams’s zero-VOC White Cloud paint. Vertical cedar strips and charred cedar siding on the home’s exterior are meant to weather naturally, changing shades over time.

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John Hemsworth designed the award-winning BC Passive House Factory (Canada’s first manufacturing plant to produce prefabricated wall panels for use in highly energy-efficient homes) in Pemberton, British Columbia. Through the plant’s owners, he would meet Whistler residents Federica and Andrea Padovani, an Italian couple looking for a modern, environmentally conscious home with an artist’s studio for Andrea. A prefab structure was on the table from the start, with one caveat: it couldn’t look like a stereotypical shipping-container dwelling. Given the site’s sharply sloping 30-degree grade and Whistler’s stringent height regulations, a traditional house would not be feasible. Instead the structure is made up of two wood-clad rectangles, offset one above the other and connected by a central section that contains the main living areas. Working closely with BC Passive House and Dürfeld Constructors, Hemsworth designed the ultra-low-energy home using Passive House principles. Utilizing BCPH’s high-performance panel system and Optiwin Passive House–rated windows, the building’s envelope is super-insulated and air-tight and has been detailed to minimize the amount of energy required to heat or cool the interior spaces. The house was prefabricated in panels, delivered to the site, and erected in three days. Both the upper and lower sections are clad in thin vertical slats of cedar siding. The onsite team charred the cedar of the linking central section with blowtorches to visually distinguish it from the home’s other volumes. Modern lines and a light interior palette, bolstered by larchwood ceilings and floors, lend the house a calm Scandinavian sensibility that its residents readily embrace. “There has to be a connection between the building and the people who live there,” Andrea reflects. “Like a heart inside a body, giving it life, we see ourselves as the heart of this home.” »


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| architecture |

The clients asked for a simple, streamlined interior. Hemsworth answered with a living room connected to an outdoor patio by a sliding-door system from Optiwin. A wood-burning Stรปv Model 30 stove from Vaglio Fireplace Centre adds a hyggeinspired aesthetic. The nesting tables and sofa were purchased through Home Delight, and the cowhide rug is from IKEA. h

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| architecture |

YOU CAN GO HOME AGAIN

Written by RENSKE WERNER : Photographed by JANIS NICOLAY

ONE MORNING ELEVEN YEARS AGO, MYRIAM FREEDMAN WOKE UP WITH A JOLT. She and her husband, Mason, had

always been fans of modern architecture, but they had a sudden chance to move into Mason’s childhood home—a 4,000-square-foot 1957 traditional ranch house in Vancouver—and Myriam realized they needed to jump on it. “The residence was already on the market, with an interested buyer to boot,” she recounts, “so while the purchase seemed impulsive, with a future renovation as part of our calculated budget, it made complete economic sense in the crazy Vancouver housing market.” Nine years later, the Freedmans were still happy with the house—they’d fallen in love with the functional master suite on the main floor and the semiseparate kitchen—but the couple was ready for a modern update. “I started planning all this a decade ago,” Myriam confesses. “I even trained my family to not use

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the back door because I knew it would be gone eventually.” When the time came to upgrade the house, they knew that remodeling rather than rebuilding was the wisest choice. “There is a lot of sentiment here,” Myriam notes, “but the real reason for choosing a renovation over new construction was our desire to preserve the practical layout. We also didn’t need any additional square footage; the house was big enough as is!” Architect Allison Holden-Pope, principal at One SEED Architecture + Interiors, understood and fully embraced the homeowners’ approach. “Functionally, the layout of the three-level house worked, so we focused on preservation of the footprint and reintegration of the structure with its site,” she explains. The home was stranded in the middle of the lot, with a humble garden and a simple strip of concrete running up to the door. The homeowners wanted to reclaim their underused front yard and redevelop an area in »


THIS PAGE: A 1957 ranch house in Vancouver received a modern makeover courtesy of One SEED Architecture + Interiors, complete with a low-maintenance exterior of aluminum siding, fiber-cement board, and boardform concrete. INSET: The house before its transformation. OPPOSITE: Architect Allison Holden-Pope and homeowner Myriam Freedman. The sofa is a Hyde sectional by G Romano from the Other Room. graymag . com

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| architecture |

the back that was dominated by an old cedar tree and a garage. “The house was fighting its environment instead of relating to it,” HoldenPope says. “Reconnecting the two permeated the design.” The Freedmans weren’t initially sure what to do with the exterior (they favored a West Coast modern style, with large windows and sustainable materials), so Holden-Pope presented an idea: redefine the home’s visual identity through themes of folding and wrapping. “The original residence wasn’t pushing up against the city’s set boundaries for height, so we ripped the roof right off and raised it,” she says. The west-facing façade is now a pair of bold, stepped-back rectangles, both partially paneled in Longboard, a type of sustainable aluminum siding. A visually modest third rectangle, at the back of the house, contains the kids’ bedrooms. “The layered effect of the boxy roofs grants the house a gentler relation to the site,” Holden-Pope explains. Each of the three rectangular additions is wrapped in a charcoal aluminum box that allows for oversized windows and raised ceilings. Both the front and back yards received a total overhaul—the former

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was reimagined with oversized concrete pavers, wispy tufts of grass, and several large, raised garden beds framed in Cor-ten steel. In the back, a wide set of stairs leads to an outdoor living space that gives way to a basketball court for the boys. At the front entrance, a little alcove was carved out to better position the front door, but otherwise the main floor’s footprint is practically unchanged. “We preserved 92 percent of the exterior walls and left most windows in the same place,” Holden-Pope explains. On the main floor, the den was converted into an open-plan master suite, and one wall ascending the full height of the stairwell was clad in slate to visually connect all three levels of the house. “The functions of each room are the same,” Myriam notes. “It’s funny: my youngest son now sleeps in the exact room where my husband slept when he was the same age.” This sense of continuity brings comfort to the entire family. Despite the radical revisions, Myriam happily reports, “my boys feel like they live in the exact same house as before.” »

The house’s formerly flat rear façade has been given depth, and a four-paneled folding glass door from Marvin Windows and Doors connects it to the backyard. The concrete basketball court is a family favorite. INSET: The back of the house prior to the remodel. Many of the original window openings remain, but the raised roof allowed an increase in window height.


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| architecture |

The interiors take cues from the patterns and materials used for the home’s exterior architecture. One living room wall, clad in vertical Douglas fir slats, was painted a charcoal hue to echo the scale and rhythm of the horizontal landscape walls in the front yard.

Pale blue millwork, in tandem with white cabinetry from Vertical Grain Projects, lends cool airiness to the minimalist kitchen. The countertops are a porcelain product from Neolith. The range is GE Monogram and the hood is Venmar. All appliances are from Edmonds Fine Appliances. Cabinet hardware is Richelieu, and the faucet is Valley from Save More Plumbing. The light fixture over the island is from Luminosa Light & Home. h

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| resources | 36. ARCHITECTURE Miller Hull Partnership Seattle millerhull.com Sahar Education sahareducation.org University of Washington washington.edu 42. HAPPENINGS Anthropologie anthropologie.com Brooks Running Company Seattle brooksrunning.com Claws Out Portland clawsout.co Douglas Coupland Vancouver coupland.com Mithun Seattle mithun.com Nordic Museum Seattle nordicmuseum.org Ocean Wise ocean.org Patkau Architects Vancouver patkau.ca Polygon Gallery Vancouver thepolygon.ca Special Olympics USA Games specialolympics usagames.org Cathy Terepocki Yarrow, BC cathyterepocki.com Vancouver Aquarium vanaqua.org WELD Design Studio Bend, OR weldstudio.com 48. SHOP Collectivo Portland ourcollectivo.com 50. FASHION Zach Matheson Portland zachmatheson.com 52. FASHION Norte Seattle norteshop.com Sassafras Seattle sassafras-seattle.com 56. SOURCED Design Within Reach dwr.com EWF Modern Portland ewfmodern.com Homestead Seattle homesteadseattle.com Lucas Design Associates Seattle lucasinterior.com

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Roche Bobois roche-bobois.com The Joinery Portland thejoinery.com Tufenkian tufenkian.com 58. SOURCED Shipway Living Design shipway.ca

Woodmark Homes Redmond, WA woodmarkhomesllc.com 78. A PLACE IN THE SUN Above View aboveview.com Design Within Reach dwr.com Fleetwood Windows & Doors fleetwoodusa.com

102. ARCHITECTURE Edmonds Fine Appliances Vancouver edmondsappliances.ca

116. Henrybuilt henrybuilt.com

Green Elevations North Vancouver greenelevations.com

105. Hoyt Realty Group liveinthepearl.com

Luminosa Light & Home Vancouver luminosalight.com Marvin Windows & Doors marvin.com

4. Hive hivemodern.com

10. IDS Vancouver idsvancouver.com 71. J Geiger jgeigershading.com

99. Kasala kasala.com Myriam Freedman Designs 32. Keller Supply Company Vancouver Adam Zeek kellershowrooms.com (604) 760-6932 Lee Jofa @adamzeek kravet.com 107. Kozai Modern One SEED kozaimoderntrade.com Architecture + Interiors Palm Pacific Construction 64. INTERIORS Vancouver palmpacificconstruction.com 47. Kush Rugs Apparatus oneseed.ca kushrugs.com RH Modern apparatusstudio.com The Other Room restorationhardware.com 108. Life Studios Inc. Brian Paquette Interiors North Vancouver lifestudiosinc.com Tom Dixon Seattle theotherroom.ca tomdixon.com 21. 63. Lundgren Enterprises brianpaquetteinteriors.com Save More Plumbing lundgrenenterprises.com Trina Turk Bunny Williams Home Surrey and Vancouver, BC trinaturk.com 101. Maison Inc. bunnywilliamshome.com savemoreplumbing.com maisoninc.com Grain Vertical Grain Projects 88. DESIGN GRADIENT 21. Marvin Windows & Doors Bainbridge Island, WA Vancouver marvin.com grainstudio.com Atlas Meridian Glassworks verticalgrainprojects.com lundgrenenterprises.com North Vancouver Hollywood at Home atlasmeridian.com 63. Milgard Windows & Doors hollywoodathome.com 114. OBSESSION milgard.com Inform Interiors Pulp Design Studios Jason Koharik lundgrenenterprises.com informinteriors.com Seattle collectedby.com pulpdesignstudios.com 105. Modern Design Sofas inGrain Custom Millwork Jolinda Linden moderndesignsofas.com Vancouver Seattle ingrain.ca AD INDEX 20. The Modern Fan Co. @jolinda.linden modernfan.com Kenorah Design + Build 75. Above View Kelly Wearstler Langley, BC aboveview.com 109. Methow Valley kellywearstler.com kenorah.com Chamber Music Fest 107. Bedrooms & More Lawson-Fenning methowmusicfestival.org LightForm Vancouver bedroomsandmore.com lawsonfenning.com lightform.ca 34. Neolith 39. Bellan Construction Meta Marble & Granite neolith.com; fmdistributing.com Reynaers Aluminum bellan.com Seattle reynaers.com 22. Porcelanosa metamarbleandgranite.com 49. Bittermann porcelanosa-usa.com Rove Concepts bittermannphotography.com Pindler Vancouver 69. Provenance Hotels pindler.com 23. BoConcept roveconcepts.com provenancehotels.com boconcept.com ZAK + FOX RUFproject 101. Ragen & Associates zakandfox.com 17. Bradlee Distributors Vancouver ragenassociates.com bradleedistributors.com rufproject.com 13. Roche Bobois 72. KITCHEN 115. Cisco Home Stone Tile roche-bobois.com ciscohome.net Ann Sacks Vancouver annsacks.com 19. Room & Board stone-tile.com 99. Clarke & Clarke roomandboard.com clarke-clarke.com Brassworks USA Vancouver Special Ferndale, WA, and Surrey, BC 45. Royal Building Products shop.vanspecial.com 75. Clayhaus brassrails.com royalbuildingproducts.com clayhaustile.com Bellan Construction 96. ARCHITECTURE 29. Schuchart/Dow 111. Crescent Hill Winery Seattle schuchartdow.com BC Passive House Factory crescenthillwinery.com bellan.com Pemberton, BC 33. The Shade Store 43. Design Within Reach chadbourne + doss architects bcpassivehouse.com theshadestore.com/sunbrella dwr.com Seattle Blu Bathworks 111. SKAHA Vineyard 107. Designer Furniture chadbournedoss.com Vancouver skahavineyard.com Galleries blubathworks.com Sara Dickerman dfgseattle.com 17. Sub-Zero and Wolf Seattle Caesarstone subzero-wolf.com/seattle 12. Dovetail saradickerman.com caesarstoneus.com dovetailgc.com 105. Sun Valley Bronze MS International DĂźrfeld Constructors sunvalleybronze.com 109. Everything Is Seattle Whistler, BC Full of Gods msistone.com 51. Tufenkian durfeldlogconstruction.com everythingisfullofgods.com tufenkianportland.com/rabatHemsworth Architecture natural-white 71. EWF Modern 74. WORKSPACE Vancouver ewfmodern.com 59. Urban Interiors hemswortharchitecture.com Board & Vellum & Thomasville Seattle 41. Ferguson Kohler urbaninteriors.com boardandvellum.com ferguson.com kohler.com 109. Westeck Frank Lumber Company 16. Fleetwood Mario Marble & Tile Windows & Doors Shoreline and Marysville, WA Windows & Doors Surrey and Whistler, BC westeckwindows.com franklumber.com fleetwoodusa.com mariomarbleandtile.com 2. Western Window Systems Room & Board 107. Heather Osgood Vaglio Fireplace Centre westernwindowsystems.com roomandboard.com heatherosgoodrealestate.com Vancouver vagliofireplace.ca What Because whatbecause.com

JL Architecture jlarchitecture.com


| market | THE ULTIMATE BUYER’S GUIDE Alchemy Collections Located in downtown Seattle, Alchemy Collections is your Western Washington source for modern and contemporary furniture. Sensing a void in the Seattle furniture landscape, Alchemy Collections opened in 2004, bringing a modern yet accessible furniture venue to the everyday Seattleite. (206) 448-3309 alchemycollections.com

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The Shade Store For more than 70 years, The Shade Store has handcrafted the finest custom shades, blinds, and draperies available. With a wide selection of products and over 1,300 exclusive materials, finding the perfect window treatments has never been easier. (800) 754-1455 theshadestore.com

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| obsession |

WHY I COLLECT HAND SCULPTURES

BETH DOTOLO, COFOUNDER, PULP DESIGN STUDIOS As told to LAUREN MANG Photographed by AMANDA RINGSTAD

“MY GRANDMOTHER COLLECTED GLOVE MOLDS AND DISPLAYED HER JEWELRY ON THEM. For her, decorating

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was all about bringing personality into a space, and those hands epitomized her classic but bold sense of style. My grandmother passed away last year, and I inherited one of her white porcelain hand molds. I keep it in my bedroom, hung with a big statement necklace, as a reminder of how her style inspired me to always want to create beautiful spaces. On one design trip, my partner, Carolina, and I spotted brass hands that have become some of the most highly requested pieces by our clients. We use them to display jewelry, in a home bar, or just as a sculptural conversation starter. We love that they serve a purpose beyond just looking pretty.” h graymag . com


HENRYBUILT

GRAY No. 40  

An exploration into all that is good—from design for good causes to ideas and sources for exceptional homes, workspaces, and hospitality pro...

GRAY No. 40  

An exploration into all that is good—from design for good causes to ideas and sources for exceptional homes, workspaces, and hospitality pro...