Page 1

SEPTEMBER 2019

Vision

2 0 4 9

A daring look at Oklahoma in 30 years

THE MANY

FALL FESTIVAL

PREVIEW

FACETS OF AGING

FALL FASHION


Sports medicine is not just for athletes.

Sports-medicine surgeon Dr. Andrew Ebert says most of his patients are not top athletes and most don’t require surgery. “We look at non-operative methods first, including ultrasound-guided injections and therapy,” he said. “Surgery is usually the last option.” Dr. Ebert and his colleagues at Warren Clinic Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine diagnose and treat sports-related conditions that include knee and shoulder injuries, meniscus tears, ACL injuries, tendinopathies and stress fractures, as well as age-related conditions such as osteoarthritis. Dr. Ebert primarily performs arthroscopic procedures, which are minimally invasive and allow the patient to recover faster. “The best part of my job is seeing patients no longer in debilitating pain,” he said. “They can return to doing what they love again.” For more information or to make an appointment with a Warren Clinic sports-medicine specialist, please call 918-494-4460.

Andrew Ebert, M.D. SURGICAL SPORTS MEDICINE

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Features SEPTEMBER

2019 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XXIII, No. 9

32 An Oklahoma Vision for 2049

KKT Architects envisions a transportation hub halfway between OKC and Tulsa and a futuristic corridor connecting the two cities.

As people enter their golden years, they tend to focus on health, safety and optimum enjoyment during life’s ‘third act.’ We explore the light and dark sides of getting older, such as planning vacations, the perks of today’s retirement homes, spotting the signs of elder abuse, and the spectrum of care options.

38

PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON

58 The Many Facets of Aging

A Study in Style

Hit the books to learn all about fall’s most sought-after trends. The above look includes a body suit from Saks Fifth Avenue and several pieces of Roberto Coin and Marco Bicego jewelry from Bruce G. Weber Diamond Cellar.

WANT SOME MORE? SEPTEMBER 2019

SEPTEMBER 2019

62 Fall Festival Preview

Autumn air means Oklahoma’s festival season kicks off. Whether you’re looking to chow down, jam out, celebrate culture, watch sports or just explore your favorite hobbies, there’s a festival for that … guaranteed.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

Vision

2 0 4 9

A daring look at Oklahoma in 30 years

THE MANY

FALL FESTIVAL

PREVIEW

FACETS OF AGING

FALL FASHION

ON THE COVER:

KKT ARCHITECTS ENVISIONS WHAT OKLAHOMA COULD BE LIKE IN 30 YEARS IN AN OKLAHOMA VISION FOR 2049 FEATURE. A FEW IDEAS INCLUDE VERTICAL FARMING, DRONE DISTRIBUTION CENTERS AND A MAJOR TRANSPORTATION HUB BETWEEN TULSA AND OKLAHOMA CITY. RENDERING COURTESY KKT ARCHITECTS

Visit us online. MORE ARTICLES

Read expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MORE PHOTOS

View expanded Scene, Style, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS

The online calendar includes more Oklahoma events.


CAPTU RE , SHARE # UTICASQUARE

|

UTICASQUARE .COM

DATE NIGHT Fleming’s Steakhouse | Glacier Confection | Olive Garden | P.F. Chang’s Pepper’s Grill | Polo Grill | Queenie’s | Stonehorse Cafe | The Wild Fork


9 11 12 13 14 15 16

Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

State

Boat clubs across the state have opportunities aplenty for those searching for wind-propelled adventures.

Sports Makers Attractions Hobbies I Hobbies II Insider

9

20

19 Life and Style 20 24 26 28 30

Interiors Revitalized downtown Pawhuska, burnished by the Pioneer Woman Mercantile store, has two elegant boutique hotels. Destinations Health Home and Garden Scene

67 Taste 68 70 71

Frida Southwest draws inspiration from Mexican artist Frida Kahlo and experiments with the region’s traditional cuisine.

Local Flavor Chef Chat Tasty Tidbits

70

73 Where and When

74 78

Tulsa’s fair features rock and country music, Disney on Ice and a rodeo; OKC has a Renaissance Village, a film festival and a flyin’ fiddler.

In Tulsa/In OKC Film and Cinema

80 Closing Thoughts

4

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

73


YOU ALWAYS PLANNED ON ADOPTING A NEW DOG.

(You just didn’t plan on also needing a new couch.)

Some expenses in life you know are coming. Others come out of nowhere. That’s why it’s good to have both a checking and savings account, so you can keep cash on hand for the things you want to buy and the things you have to buy. Open an account online in as little as five minutes. And let us help you plan for life.

Checking | Savings | Lending | Retirement www.bankofoklahoma.com © 2019 Bank of Oklahoma, a division of BOKF, NA. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender

.


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA™

LET TER FROM THE EDITOR

Feel free to shoot me a line at editor@okmag.com. Mary Willa Allen Managing Editor

PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

S TAY CONNECTED

Unless you steadfastly abstain from the internet, it’s nearly impossible to miss the grandiose statements from tech gurus like Elon Musk and Richard Branson about hyperloops and intergalactic travel becoming realities in the near future. What you haven’t heard about is a local architecture firm dreaming big to make Oklahoma a hub of this tech boom. In an Oklahoma Magazine exclusive, we sit down with KKT Architects to discuss the company’s ideas about what our state could look like in 30 years. Spoiler: It’s pretty amazing. Read it all starting on page 32. Speaking of amazing, don’t skip over our fall fashion spread (page 38). We had a blast shooting at the Tulsa City-County Central Library, and we hope you enjoy the sharp outfits we styled. Our focus on seniors this month (page 58) covers everything from learning how to be a reliable caretaker for your aging parent to travel tips and new trends in retirement communities. While we can’t promise September brings chilly air and crunchy leaves, a barrage of fall festivals rushes in nonetheless. Explore your many weekend excursion options on page 62. Other highlights this month include a story on the wonders of sailing in Oklahoma (page 9), a look inside two gorgeous Pawhuska boutique hotels (page 19), and a chat with Tulsa chef Jacque Siegfried (page 70).

OKLAHOMA

DANIEL SCHUMAN

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K . SCHUMAN

MANAGING EDITOR

MARY WILLA ALLEN

SENIOR EDITOR BRIAN WILSON

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR JOHN WOOLEY

OK

GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN

GRAPHIC DESIGNER GARRET T GREEN

OFFICE/ADVERTISING ASSISTANT OLIVIA LYONS

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, NATHAN HARMON, JOSH NEW, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, DAVID COBB, SCOTT JOHNSON

What’s HOT at

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Enjoy an in-depth look inside KKT Architect’s Vision 2049 project, with detailed renderings of many of the team’s ideas and an explanation into how they could work, at okmag.com.

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Copyright © 2019 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 741591204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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established

1989

Andy Kinslow, Co-Owner

looking toward

2049

Sarah Gould, Co-Owner

THANK YOU to all of our clients

that have made our first 30 years so successful. We are beyond grateful for all of the design opportunities you have given us to improve the places where we live, work, and play. We look forward to continuing to design for Oklahoma in the next 30 years and beyond.

www.kktarchitects.com


If your mother was diagnosed with cancer, how would you want her to be treated? That’s the way we care for you.

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State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Come Sail Away Boat clubs across the state have opportunities aplenty for those searching for wind-propelled adventures.

M JERRY LOJKA HAS SAILED ON 23 OF OKLAHOMA’S NUMEROUS LAKES. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

any Oklahoma sailors have been at the sport since childhood, but theirs is a skill that can be learned at any age. Sailing clubs are a great place to start. Thunderbird Sailing Club offers classes for kids and adults and enrollment fills up fast, says Jerry Lojka, a former club commodore and volunteer sailing instructor. A retired firefighter, Lojka loves the solitude of taking his multi-hulled catamaran out on Lake Thunderbird near Norman; he finds the weeklong sailing camps just as rewarding. “Kids come who have never been on a boat,” Lojka says. “They are on the water by themselves by the end of the second day or beginning of the third day, depending on the wind. By the end of the fourth day, they are often proficient.” Another club benefit is that members can try before they buy, or never own a sailboat at all, says Kurt Hagen of the Grand Lake Sailing Club near Grove. A fleet membership allows people to use the club’s boats. Associate members “just enjoy the socializing and go out sailing with other members,” says Hagen, a retired geologist. SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

Greg Thomas, rear commodore of the Oklahoma City Boat Club at Lake Hefner and a member since 1989, describes sailing as “just a magical experience – to be out there on the water without any motor, just working with the wind to take your boat where you want it to go.” Of Lake Hefner, Thomas adds: “We think it’s one of the top 10 sailing venues in the country, but … we are kind of prejudiced. It sits up high. The wind is not obstructed by buildings.” At 86, Hagen proves that sailing is a lifelong sport. When he was 12, he and his older sister joined a club and started racing every summer weekend in their native Wisconsin. He says he didn’t sail for a while after his career took him to Colorado, but he joined the Grand Lake club in 1986 after moving to Oklahoma. He and his wife, Patsy, eventually retired at the lake and are often on the water in their Catalina 27-foot sloop with two sails, called a main and a jib. Having learned to sail as a Boy Scout in his native Utah, Lojka also resumed the sport after moving to the state. “I found out it has more sailing lakes than most states, he says. “I have been on 23 of Oklahoma’s lakes, and I wasn’t disappointed in any of them.” Skeeter Chilton, commodore of Windycrest Sailing Club at Lake Keystone near Prue, has sailed since 1968. “Being out and sailing your boat, making the sails trim to the optimum, and all you hear is the wind through your sails and the water rushing by – it’s very idyllic,” she says. “I love that you take what you know and you apply it to the sails and the way you are sitting on the boat to make the boat go faster. It’s an art.” Stan Nieves, a past commodore of the Oklahoma City Boat Club and owner of OKC Boatworks, repairs watercraft and sells a few sailboats every year on consignment. He says when people buy a sailboat for the first time, it should be small and easy to sail because they can always trade up – and most do. “The thing about sailing is that it’s more of a disease,” Nieves says with a laugh. “The … cliché is you are not a true sailor until you have owned 100 feet of waterline, not necessarily on one boat. So if you’ve had four 25-foot boats, you can call yourself a sailor.” Nieves says a small, used sailboat can cost between $1,000 to $2,000.

“Fiberglas is really durable, he says. “Older boats are cheap because there are so many out there.” Young people looking to get their feet wet often start with a centerboard, a one-person boat, Nieves says. “You are sitting inches above the water,” he says. Sailors often graduate to keelboats after they have children, he says, because they are designed for multiple passengers and have more amenities and storage areas. However, “bigger is not better,” Hagen says. “Until you are experienced, anywhere from 14 to 22 feet is good for a starter. A lot of people trade up after they get more skilled. They want a boat they can sleep on and anchor out overnight.” A new 14-foot sailboat runs about $5,000, Hagen says. Buyers also have to consider sails. “All boats will have at least a main sail,” Nieves says. “The more advanced will have a main, a jib and a spinnaker. The spinnaker is the big colorful sail that’s way out front. When you have all three sails, you need two to three people.” KIMBERLY BURK

LEFT: JERRY LOJKA TEACHES CLASSES AT LAKE THUNDERBIRD NEAR NORMAN. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS BELOW: MEMBERS OF THE GRAND LAKE SAILING CLUB SET OUT TOGETHER. PHOTO BY DAVID MAXEY

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019


SPORTS

The BounceBack Kid Numerous injuries haven’t stopped Owasso pitcher Brian Flynn from keeping his spot in the major leagues.

T

BRIAN FLYNN DELIVERS A PITCH AGAINST THE CHICAGO WHITE SOX.

PHOTO BY JASON HANNA COURTESY KANSAS CITY ROYALS

ulsa native Brian Flynn, in his sixth season pitching in major league baseball and fourth with the Kansas City Royals, has earned a reputation of perseverance, especially when it comes to overcoming injuries. The 29-year-old Owasso High School graduate bounced back most recently from a strained left ulnar collateral ligament, which landed him on the injured list to start this season. He was reactivated in May. Flynn, who made his big league debut in 2013 with Miami, has previously dealt with vertebrae, groin and back problems. But the lefthander has made it back from each one – comebacks he attributes to the trainers and medical staff with the Marlins and Royals. “I’ve been fortunate in that some have been minor [injuries] where I’ve been able to get back during the season, and I’ve had some season-enders. It’s been a mixture of both,” Flynn says. “A big credit to the staff here

[in Kansas City] – they get paid to get us back on the field and they’ve done a great job. They’ve put me back together through some random injuries. “It’s a little bit of a pride thing, too, when you get back on the field – like getting to throw four innings after coming back from a UCL injury. When you put yourself back together and work hard through the rehab, it makes you feel a sense of accomplishment when you fight back through those.” Something else Flynn takes great pride in is his Oklahoma roots, especially those in Owasso, where fellow big leaguers Dylan Bundy (Baltimore) and Pete Kozma (Detroit) also played. “Being from the Tulsa area, there’s a lot of good baseball there,” Flynn says. “Coming through Owasso when I did, we had a lot of good ballplayers like Kozma and some other guys that played pro ball.” Bundy and Muskogee’s Archie Bradley, who pitches for the Arizona Diamondbacks, “took that to another

level,” says Flynn, who’s “definitely proud of the baseball bloodline there.” Flynn says competition, especially one-on-one battles between pitcher and hitter, is what makes baseball appealing to him. Once his time in the sport is over, he knows he’ll have to find another way to compete. In the offseason, which includes plenty of fishing and hunting, he and his wife, Kelsey, call McAlester home – an area with plenty of outdoor activities, lakes and open land. “I did some fishing down at Lake Texoma this offseason, did some striper fishing and did some hunting,” Flynn says. “I’m lucky I married into a cattle ranching family, so there’s plenty of land to be hunted down there.” He and his wife also make frequent trips to nearby Krebs to dine at or get takeout from Pete’s Place, a longtime favorite for Italian food. Or they buy groceries from neighboring Lovera’s to prepare their own festa at home. STEPHEN HUNT

SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

MAKERS

Storytelling in Miniature

“This is where I fit the bill as an angst-y artist, waffling between liking the work I do and wanting to be so much better Owasso native Mat Smith blends his passion for Dungeons it,” Smith says. and Dragons with the art of creating figurines and dioramas. at “But the moment the audience and players react to the sing beads, bassdiorama I built, that’s when I feel best wood and polymer about what I do.” clay, Owasso native Smith’s process begins with a month Mat Smith transof planning and sketching; he often forms materials into magical creatures or Lilliputian build- uses Adobe Illustrator to make detailed blueprints for each element. Over two ings with realistic touches, such as burned wicks on tiny candles or sharp months, the diorama comes together bit by bit. blades on a pint-sized ax. His wife, Zara Nelson, has caught From the foil stamp embossed on spines of leather-bound books to color- the diorama fever and, between 12-hour ful liquor bottles made of beads, Smith shifts as a nurse, joins him in creating each project. doesn’t miss a detail as he patiently D&D caught Smith’s eye at age 12. constructs art pieces for large stage His growing passion for the game evenshows of the popular game Dungeons tually led him to a copywriting career and Dragons. for Wizards of the Coast, the company The staged D&D game is an elabothat produces the game in Seattle, rate production steeped in storytelling where he began to make costumes, and role-playing – with costumes, props and dioramas by using tradilighting, a set and live audience. Each tional artistic techniques show is livestreamed, recorded and uploaded to YouTube and the popular platform Twitch. Known for his intricate work, Smith has received commissions each of the MAT SMITH CREATES MINIATURE FIGURINES past eight years to create a diorama for AND DIORAMAS AT HIS the annual show at the Penny Expo BUSINESS, THE CZAR OF in Seattle, but he still feels he can HAPPINESS PROPS. PHOTO COURTESY MAT SMITH improve.

U

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

that he learned in college. After 12 years with Wizards of the Coast, Smith struck out on his own to turn his hobby into a job. He started Czar of Happiness Props and supplements his income with freelance copywriting and design work. The name Czar of Happiness comes from “a tale of misanthropic sarcasm made good,” he says. It was crafted two decades ago as a facetious salute to a creative director who chastised Smith for being negative. “Years later, when starting my propmaking business, I looked at the name as something that’s unique and kind of fun,” he says. “I liked the idea that I could create things that would make people smile. That’s what a Czar of Happiness does.” Smith credits his dad for teaching him basic building skills and knowledge while growing up. His parents have since died, but Smith returns to Oklahoma to visit his brother and 98-year-old grandmother in Tahlequah. “A trip to Goldie’s and Braum’s is an added bonus,” he says. KIM ARCHER


AT T R A C T I O N S

Sooner State Sports Shrines Museums and halls of fame feature stars in baseball, football, gymnastics, tennis, wrestling, rodeo, and track and field.

T

RIGHT: JIM THORPE, WEARING MISMATCHED SHOES DURING THE 1912 OLYMPICS, IS ONE OF TWO GOLD MEDALISTS WHO’S ALSO A MEMBER OF THE PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME. BELOW: THE JIM THORPE MUSEUM AND OKLAHOMA SPORTS HALL OF FAME HAS EXTENSIVE COLLECTIONS OF MEMORABILIA.

PHOTOS COURTESY JIM THORPE MUSEUM AND OKLAHOMA SPORTS HALL OF FAME

he exploits of Jim Thorpe, Shannon Miller and Mickey Mantle, among the highest-profile athletes in state history, are chronicled in numerous forms. However, they are not Oklahoma’s only notable sports stars, whose stories are told at a variety of museums and halls of fame. The Jim Thorpe Museum and Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame, in Oklahoma City, offers a shrine to this Lincoln County native. Thorpe, a member of the Sac and Fox Nation, became an internationally renowned athlete with a superhuman skill set. “The king of Sweden once called him the world’s greatest athlete,” says Mike James, the museum’s executive director. “He won the decathlon and pentathlon at the [1912] Olympics. He played major league baseball. He was a professional football star. He even won a ballroom dancing contest. “All of this is amazing, especially when you consider how Native Americans were treated in his era.” For instance, in those Stockholm Olympics, Thorpe competed in some events in mismatched shoes, found in a trash can, because his had been stolen and he couldn’t afford to buy replacements. Thorpe was also an initial inductee in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The museum features exhibits on lesser-known Oklahoma sports stars, including tennis great and Chickasha native Don McNeill, who won the 1939 French national championships and, in 1940, the U.S. national championships and U.S. clay

court title. The free museum draws visitors from across the country. “We had a lady … not too long ago from New Jersey who was passing through and wanted to stop because she had long admired Thorpe,” James says. “She said her father used him as an example to teach life lessons to her as a girl.” Also in OKC, the National Softball Hall of Fame complex hosts the Women’s College World Series every spring, but there’s plenty to see the rest of the year, including exhibits on the sport’s history. The Oklahoma Territorial Capital Sports Museum in Guthrie highlights athletes with Oklahoma ties, along with unique memorabilia – parts of a wooden goal post from the 1955 University of Oklahoma vs. University of Texas football game, a saddle from rodeo star Jim Shoulders, a bronze statue of gymnast Miller, and the original stock chute from the Lazy E rodeo arena in Stillwater. There are exhibits about Mantle and the six other Oklahomans who are members of the Baseball Hall of Fame. “Oklahoma has a long history with baseball, and we have a lot of exhibits dedicated to that history,” museum director Richard Hendricks says. “We have some baseball memorabilia that goes back into the late 1800s.” The free museum requests a $5 donation to enter. “Most visitors who stop in really seem to enjoy the time spent here,”

Hendrick says. “Even if you know a lot about Oklahoma’s sports history, most people come away learning something they didn’t know before.” Miller, an Edmond native and gold medal Olympian, is also featured at the International Gymnastics Hall of Fame, inside the Science Museum Oklahoma in Oklahoma City. Other members include Olympic gold medalists Nadia Comaneci; her husband, Bart Conner (they run a gymnastics academy in Norman); Mary Lou Retton; and Olga Korbut. Grapplers enshrined at the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in Stillwater include Olympians and collegiate national champions. Themed exhibits include African Americans in wrestling, the 1948 London Olympics team and individual stories from wrestlers like former world champion and current Oklahoma State University coach John Smith, along with Perry greats Jack Van Bebber and Danny Hodge. MATT PATTERSON

SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State HOBBIES I

From Trash to Treasure

A paint brush, some imagination and a little TLC give old furniture new life.

M

TOP LEFT: A SCRATCHED -UP SLEIGH BED MORPHS INTO A SHABBY CHIC WONDER, QUADRUPULING THE OF ORIGINAL INVESTMENT OF $60. PHOTO BY SHARON MCBRIDE

TOP RIGHT: GARY STURSA WITH RESTORATION STATION REPAIRS AN ARMOIRE. THE STORE SPECIALIZES IN ALL TYPES OF RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL FURNITURE.

PHOTO COURTESY RESTORATION STATION

14

any a homeowner has a few old pieces of furniture lingering, unused, in the garage. Maybe they don’t fit with the décor anymore or maybe the set has just seen better days. Regardless, options exist to spruce them up, especially in the world of junkers, who take the adage of “reduce, reuse, recycle” and apply it to furniture or other household items. “For me, it was taught as a way of life,” says Darla Bush, owner of Past Perfect Too, an antique store in Lawton. Bush says she grew up “dirt poor” and was taught by her mother, Juanita Faye Williamson, to use what others would probably throw away to decorate the home. “If my mother wanted a new shelf, we didn’t have the money to go out and buy one,” Bush says. “We would just paint what we had.” The same went for household décor. “We would make the prettiest displays using old Coke bottles or rusty cans with wild flowers,” she says. “It’s funny – now that type of decorating is en vogue.” Past Perfect Too has become a haven for anyone who loves vintage,

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

up-cycled, refurbished, painted, antique and eclectic goods for the home. Many vendors sell their wares there. “Our shopkeepers use a little paint and a whole lot of know-how to transform sad pieces into glorious heirloom keepers,” Bush says. From full dining room sets to one-of-a-kind statement pieces, junkers find great satisfaction in saving furniture from the landfill and giving it a new life. Bush says the Facebook market place, Craigslist, thrift stores, flea markets and even a quick scan of local streets on trash day are all prime for picking. People begin junking for reasons as varied as their creations. “I started painting furniture after I became an empty-nester,” says Amy Rhoads of County Rhoads, a store inside Past Perfect Too. What started as a part-time hobby has turned into a profitable full-time job, she says. A retired second-grade teacher, Janie Batt of Cottage Creations, also

inside Past Perfect Too, has painted furniture for eight years. “I always refer to myself as a second-grade artist,” she says. “I love to do art, and some of that finds its way onto my furniture.” But isn’t it bad to paint furniture? “People ask us that all the time,” says Blaine Pinard, owner of The Restoration Station in Oklahoma City, which restores, repairs and refinishes all types of furniture. “The answer is no. Feel free to have your antiques and family heirlooms professionally painted.” For those itching to start their first do-it-yourself projects, Pinard has some advice. “If you want to get started in furniture, simply pick up your first piece on the side of the road,” he says. “Side-of-the-road finds are free and the easiest way to practice sanding, repairing and finishing furniture with little to no investment – other than your time.” SHARON MCBRIDE


HOBBIES II

Find Your Floating Zen

I

Aerial yoga, growing in popularity, provides both physical and mental benefits.

t defies gravity and may seem like training for Cirque du Soleil, but aerial yoga combines the tenants of Pilates and acrobatics to help participants achieve poses they never thought possible. Aerial yoga, similar to traditional yoga, has a few bonuses: deeper stretching; strengthening oft-unused muscles; and relaxing into the compression and support of a fabric hammock. Using a hammock as a prop is the primary difference between classic and aerial yoga, says Amy Miller, owner of Zen Body Yoga and Wellness in Tulsa. “The hammock can create a more comprehensive session by making some poses more challenging and advanced, while alternatively making some poses softer and more accessible,” she says. “Most, if not all, classical yoga poses can be re-imagined or refined with the fabric as a prop.” Aerial yoga, begun in New York City in 2007 by Broadway choreographer and former gymnast Christopher Harris, continues to gain popularity and has made its way to Oklahoma. The workout offers a bevy of positive outcomes, including increased flexibility, joint decompression, core strengthening and relief of back pain. “It can facilitate alignment in standing postures, add a new outlook by inverting seated postures, and create accessibility for those who should not bear weight on certain joints,” Miller says. “For some, AERIAL YOGA BEGAN IN the primary benNEW YORK CITY IN 2007. efit comes from PHOTO COURTESY ZEN BODY YOGA AND WELLNESS the psychological

challenge of letting go of fear. While sometimes we haven’t developed the strength or flexibility to master a challenging yoga pose – such as arm balances, inversions and back bends – the hammock provides assistance as we work toward these goals.” Zen Body Yoga offers two types of aerial yoga. AeroZen Float is a gentle, restorative version suitable for most levels and increases balance and body awareness. The challenging AeroZen Fly requires a participant to take a basics workshop before enrolling. In this version, a person builds strength and flexibility while enjoying creative transitions and strong inversion (or upside-down) practice. Visit zenbodytulsa.com for details. Aerial yoga also eliminates the discomfort of hard floors as well as the pressure created by some of the poses, according to Lynn Crowe-Richardson, owner and instructor at Teaze Dance and Fitness in Oklahoma City. “Hanging upside down, also known as inverting, is a way to obtain back decompression as well as deep stretching,” Crowe-Richardson says. “Inversions are obtained easily and they allow handstands to be achieved without the head, neck and spine pressure against the floor. “Our clients enjoy working on their splits and deep leg stretches while sitting in the fabric because they are not feeling the hard floor against their hips and knees as they work to gently deepen the stretch.” At the end of each class, Teaze offers a cool-down that includes cocooning in the hammock and focusing on deep-breathing exercises, progressive muscle relaxation, visualization, positive thoughts and meditation. Visit teazedance.com for schedules. ALAINA STEVENS

SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

INSIDER

‘Nice People for Friends’

F

RAY BINGHAM HELPED TO FOSTER THE EARLY CAREERS OF REBA MCENTIRE AND GARTH BROOKS.

PHOTO BY DARLENE ARMSTRONG

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‘My job is a vacation,’ says Claremore’s Ray Bingham, agent, producer and manager for some of country music’s biggest stars.

or some years, at precisely 8:30 a.m., Claremore’s Ray Bingham has gotten a phone call from veteran country-music star Leroy Van Dyke, known for classic hits like “The Auctioneer” and “Walk on By.” With few exceptions, this happens every morning of Bingham’s life. “I’ll get that call from Leroy no matter where he is,” Bingham says. “Now, if he’s out in the middle of Wyoming or something and doesn’t have any service, then he won’t be able to call. But that’s maybe one or two days out of the year.” Bingham doesn’t remember how or why Van Dyke’s calls started, but that doesn’t matter as much as what they symbolize: his relationships with country-music artists he’s known and worked with the past six decades as a booking agent, producer and manager. Most of those performers – including the soon-to-be nonagenarian Van Dyke, who still works 30-40 dates a year – have, like Bingham, logged many years in the business. All of them share a common element: Bingham likes them. Otherwise, he says, they wouldn’t work together. “That’s what I’ve looked for in my life,” he says, “and I’ve been lucky enough to do that. Occasionally, I’ll buy someone new, and they won’t turn out to be a Gene Watson or a Moe Bandy, like I hoped they would.” He laughs. “But, for the most part, my job is a vacation. And I’ve got some nice people for friends.” One of the earliest of those friends was the Tulsa-based steel-guitarist and bandleader Leon McAuliffe, who rose to fame as an early member of the trailblazing westernswing act Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys. By the time Bingham became acquainted with McAuliffe, he not only led his own swing band but also had his own dancehall,

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

the Cimarron Ballroom at Fourth Street and Denver Avenue in Tulsa (now the site of a downtown bus depot). From its beginnings in the late 1940s, the Cimarron had been the chief rival of the Cain’s Ballroom, home of McAuliffe’s old boss, Bob Wills. By the time Bingham came on the scene, Wills’ brother Johnnie Lee led the Cain’s band, and he and McAuliffe both drew big crowds to daily lunchtime radio shows at their respective venues. “I think Johnnie Lee’s went off at 12:30, and then Leon’s came on,” Bingham says. “I had gotten out of the military and had a good job in Tulsa, but I just couldn’t stay away from the Cimarron. During the lunch hour, I’d run down to his broadcasts. So in 1960 or ’61, Leon gave me a part-time job, sweeping up and taking tickets and stuff, because I was there every day. I think he just wanted to find something for me to do. “Rock ’n’ roll had kind of eaten up western swing at that time, so he’d begun playing Las Vegas, at the Golden Nugget and all these different places. Since he was gone a lot, he started letting me book acts at the Cimarron. So I booked Conway Twitty, Ray Price, Patsy Cline, Jim Reeves – a bunch of these acts. And I’m talking $500 and under for them during that period of time.” As he got deeper into the business, he became acquainted with a young radio personality and country performer named Billy Parker, who helped him get a weekend gig at Tulsa’s KFMJ. “I was probably the worst disc jockey ever on the air,” says Bingham, laughing again. “But thank God for Billy Parker. I owe everything to Billy Parker and Red Steagall.” Like Parker, Steagall became a great friend of Bingham’s and started working with him professionally. That


happened around 1973, after Bingham had been knocked out by Steagall’s hit westernswing version of “Somewhere My Love,” the theme song from the 1965 blockbuster movie Doctor Zhivago. “I heard Red was going to be in Stillwater, so I headed up there to see him,” Bingham says. “Got there and his show was sold out. So I went around back to the bus. A guy was there named Wormy, who drove Red’s bus and sold his product. He was loading his cart to take it into the ballroom, and I said, ‘Look, I drove down here from Tulsa and they tell me it’s sold out. I need to get in there.’ “He said, ‘If you’ll help me sell product, I’ll get you in.’ “I said, ‘It’s a deal.’ “So I met Red that night after the show was over. And the next week I went to see him play in Oklahoma City because I had just fallen in love with his music. We started talking, and he said, ‘I’d sure love to play that Johnnie Lee Wills rodeo in Tulsa.’” Bingham knew Johnnie Lee and he got Steagall the gig. “Red and I have been hooked up ever since,” Bingham says. “We never did a contract because we never needed one.” The same went for the other acts Bingham went on to represent over the years, includ-

ing Parker, Peggy Rains, Becky Hobbs and the band Stonehorse. And those performers brought others into the Ray Bingham Productions stable, including a young singer Steagall had been helping along. “Reba’s mother had asked Red to listen to the Singing McEntires, which was [siblings] Susie, Pake and Reba,” Bingham says. “It wasn’t that he didn’t see anything in the other two, but he just saw something special in Reba, maybe because she had red hair and he did, too. I don’t know. But he got her the Mercury [Records] deal, and she was using his band when he asked me to help book her. “That worked out really, really well for me because after she got so popular and went on to have professional people handle her deal, I had all kinds of acts wanting me to book ’em. They thought I had something to do with Reba’s career, and I really didn’t. All I did was book her – sometimes for $250 a night.” Another performer who came into Bingham’s orbit was a young man who, amazingly, ended up selling more records than McEntire. “I really liked Garth Brooks as a person before I even knew he could sing,” Bingham says. “I’d booked his mother [country performer Coleen Carroll] with Billy Parker, years before, over at Jump’s Roller Rink in

Fairfax, and Garth would always sit in with Stonehorse, or Red Steagall, when I’d have them in Stillwater. “I booked him a lot. I’ve got all those contracts here on my desk, and I was looking through them one day when I found a letter from him thanking me for booking him on his first professional gig. I thought that was kind of neat. I’ve got it on the wall of my office.” These days, with the help of his nephew Brett Bingham, Ray continues to supply country-music talent to a variety of venues, both in Oklahoma and surrounding states. He still gets plenty of work, even though the scene in his home state has gone through some big changes. The biggest, he believes, is the death of dancehalls. “Sherry Beard, who used to work for me, would have three to five dancehalls booked every weekend with local and national bands,” Bingham says. “It might be Durant or Drumright or Cushing, but every town in Oklahoma had a dancehall. That’s where we’d keep the up-and-coming acts, like Ronnie Dunn, working. And man, we looked forward to Monday morning, when all those cars drove up bringing us our commissions.” JOHN WOOLEY

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Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

THE EMERALD ROOM AT THE BOARDING HOUSE HAS A STUNNING BATHROOM WITH GREEN, BLACK AND WHITE BRICKS AND TILE. PHOTO BY SHANE BEVEL/SHANE BEVEL PHOTOGRAPHY

Pawhuska’s Splendor The revitalized downtown, burnished by the Pioneer Woman Mercantile store, has two elegant boutique hotels.

T

By M.J. Van Deventer

here’s no reason to go beyond Oklahoma for an early fall getaway. Pawhuska, gateway to the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in Osage County, beckons with two elegant retreats. The Pioneer Woman Boarding House was created by Ree Drummond, and her husband, Ladd. Just as they did with their next-door, wildly popular Pioneer Woman Mercantile, which draws visitors from around the country, the couple took a downtown building they owned and found a good use for it. Before renovation, the building, which once housed a silk shop and a smoke shop, sat empty for three years. SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

THE BOARDING HOUSE LEFT: THE EMERALD ROOM OFFERS A FEMININE ALTERNATIVE TO OTHER ROOMS WITH ACCENTS OF PINK.

RIGHT: THE ENTRY WELCOMES GUESTS WITH AN INTERESTING MIX OF ORNATE LIGHTING AND HOMEY TOUCHES. BELOW: AN OLD ADVERTISING MURAL IS PART OF THE CHARM IN THE DRUG STORE ROOM.

A CLAWFOOT TUB AND STUNNING TILE MAKE THE BUTTERFLY ROOM SHINE.

PHOTOS BY SHANE BEVEL/SHANE BEVEL PHOTOGRAPHY

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

“The boarding house was actually Ladd’s idea to turn into a boutique hotel,” says Brittany Mauricio, a staffer at Pioneer Woman Mercantile, which sells thousands of items and has a restaurant. The boutique hotel is another way the Drummonds have added to the Pawhuska experience. Ladd Drummond, acknowledging the high customer traffic at the store, saw a lack of hotel rooms in a town of 3,300 residents. Creating a place for an overnight stay allows visitors to spend additional time sampling a variety of attractions, including the tallgrass preserve, 17 miles north. The boarding house became the Drummonds’ “his and her project.” None of the eight dazzling rooms looks the same; those that Ladd designed have a strong cowboy and western theme, while Ree’s reflect her penchant for splashes of color and celebrating a prairie lifestyle with a contemporary, feminine feel. On the main floor are the Tack Room, the Ranch Room and the Drug Store Room (simulating an old-time pharmacy … with original, 1920s tile floors). Photographs of Oklahoma by Ree Drummond add authentic design touches. Hotel manager Sondra Ward says the boarding house is “all about hospitality. We want our guests to feel extremely special.”


THE FRONTIER HOTEL

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: THE HOTEL’S FOYER OFFERS RUSTIC-CHIC DECOR, CHANDELIERS AND THE TRIANGLE BUILDING’S ORIGINAL MARBLE STAIRCASE. THE TRIANGLE BUILDING IN PAWHUSKA IS AN EYECATCHING TREASURE. A CORNICE ANNOUNCES THE TRIANGLE BUILDING’S PRESENCE. A SOOTHING COLOR SCHEME ADDS TO THE AMBIANCE. PHOTOS BY JOHN AMATUCCI, AMATUCCI PHOTOGRAPHY

Across the street, the five-story Triangle Building (similar to the iconic Flatiron Building in New York) and its distinct design appealed to interior designer Lori Wilson during the creation of the Frontier Hotel. The Frontier, with 20 rooms, offers visitors overnight or weekend experiences. Its rusticchic ambiance invites guests to hang their hats and stay awhile. The building is lined with historic, leadedglass “windows on the world,” which provide views of the revitalized downtown. The Frontier, created by Triangle Pawhuska LLC, shares common ownership with Tulsa’s Mayo Hotel, says Macy Snyder-Amatucci, vice president of the umbrella company Brickhugger LLC. Co-owner of the Frontier, Dale Forrest, says the building was originally slated for a different purpose. “We thought about doing apartments,” Forrest says, “but the Frontier has been successful, and it complements what Ree has downtown.” “The idea of a hotel that would draw visitors and repeat patrons was much more enticing,” Snyder-Amatucci adds. “The potential for offering jobs to local residents was also compelling.” SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

For the Triangle, vacant for many years, “the intent during construction and design was to maintain as much of the building’s original beauty as possible,” SnyderAmatucci says. “We had to keep the beautiful marble staircase that goes all the way through the building.” Forrest, who says it was “special to bring a historic building like this back to life,” mentions the hotel is adding a coffee bar that should be opening during the holiday season. “It was a huge undertaking,” Snyder-Amatucci says of the Frontier. “A lot of times a project like this is a real gamble, a financial risk. We are thankful Ree and Ladd gave us a reason to invest in Pawhuska.” RESERVATIONS ARE A MUST. VISIT PWBOARDINGHOUSE.COM AND FRONTIERHOTELPAWHUSKA. COM TO CHECK AVAILABILITY.

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PHOTOS BY JOHN AMATUCCI, AMATUCCI PHOTOGRAPHY

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019


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Life & Style

D E S T I N AT I O N S

A City of Sensations

Chicago appeals to both residents and visitors because of its conglomeration of sights, sounds, auras and experiences.

THE SHORELINE OF LAKE MICHIGAN PROVIDES ONE OF MANY WALKING SPOTS IN CHICAGO.

PHOTO COURTESY ILLINOIS OFFICE OF TOURISM

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Chicagoans love their city” is a pervasive impression one gets when visiting America’s third-largest burg. Throngs of people enjoy, celebrate and participate in their energetic metropolis. Walkable highlights include downtown amid the skyscrapers, the streets beside and over the Chicago River, and nearby Lake Michigan, which creates a massive backdrop for the city. Chicagoans create a “happy hour” that lasts all day. Hitting the pavement on the Magnificent Mile, residents and tourists become a part of the cityscape as they pose for selfies among famous landmarks. In Millennium Park, Cloud Gate, the stainless steel sculpture often called The Bean, invites people to capture their reflections with the remarkable skyline behind them. Crowds gather on foot, scooters and bicycles to enjoy the humanity and urbanity. Nearby, sounds pulsate from the outdoor amphitheater, site of numerous performances and where the city symphony has rehearsals and concerts in the summer. From late spring to early autumn, the Windy City’s usually mild weather keeps pedestrians outside with a levity that lasts until well into the night. The gleaming, blue-and-gray buildings don’t compete with each other; rather, they stand in architectural harmony and frame Lake Michigan with its

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

ripples and waves. There, hydrotherapy is the vibe as people roll up their pants to splash in the water. Thousands of sailboats and powerboats are anchored in shallow spots. On the Chicago River, people take water taxis. Kayaks are frequent in both bodies of water while bicycles and pedi-cabs wheel down the streets. Provocative, engaging sights put their stamp on this cultured city. In Congress Plaza, The Bowman and The Spearman, gigantic bronze sculptures of Native Americans, by design do not carry weapons to symbolize peace. Elsewhere, fountains, gorgeous clock faces and the moss-covered Fourth Presbyterian Church (featured in the movie My Best Friend’s Wedding) delight the senses. Excitement abounds. Window washers at incredible heights terrify and impress passersby. Brave souls ascending the Willis Tower (once the tallest building in the world) step onto the Sky Deck for a notable tourist accomplishment. Some intrepid people have climbed the skyscraper; one even dressed as Spiderman. When he reached the top, police arrested him. A bus tour or boat cruise is a relaxing way to view and learn about the city. History, ambition and the evolving curiosity of visionaries multiplied in great force to create Chicago. You even notice that electric lines are under-

ground, so views are uninterrupted and picturesque. Chicago is also romantic. Love is in the air with couples day-drinking on balcony decks or sitting on steps lining the river as kayakers paddle past. Whether dining al fresco, watching street performers, admiring a drum corps or listening to live music, you find yourself ruminating on the city’s inspiration. Professional sports teams (Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, Cubs and White Sox) and theaters keep residents and tourists entertained year-round. Foodies savor the city’s pizzerias and international districts. Dinner at the Greek Islands restaurant, which flies in seafood from the mother country, is easily followed by dessert at the Artopolis Bakery for espresso and pastries. The Children’s Museum, the Lincoln Park Zoo, the Shedd Aquarium and the Adler planetarium are all familyfriendly. Navy Pier, magical by itself, provides a respite from sightseeing; you can ride the Ferris wheel or flying swings, watch the gulls or eat from a food truck. Regardless of the specific location, stroll hand in hand with your loved ones. Be a part of Robert Johnson’s famous blues song and ask, “Baby, don’t you want to go … to my sweet home Chicago?” GINA MICHALOPULOS KINGSLEY


Life & Style H E A LT H

On Your Feet … Get Moving Health risks abound for those who sit for many hours every day, but easy solutions exist.

U

nless you still have youthful exuberance, you likely experience creaking, groaning joints while extricating yourself from a lengthily occupied chair or couch. This happens to everyone at some point, but, when sedentary periods become extended, it’s time to consider the sobering effects on the body. Jimmy Robinson, director of physical therapy with Oklahoma Sports and Orthopedic Institute in Oklahoma City, says he and his colleagues often treat the negative results of sedentary lifestyles. “A large portion of our patient population sees us because they sit too much and it leads to so many different orthopedic problems,” he says. Robinson cites muscular imbalances, tightness in some areas of the body and weakness in others, and problems with shoulder movement that can lead to rotator cuff tears, tendonitis, bone spurs and other injuries. Because many people sit for large portions of every day – at work and home, and while commuting – poor posture can occur. Yogesh Mittal, a surgeon at The Orthopaedic Center in Tulsa, says sitting slumped in a chair can actually change the shape of the spine, creating “a flat back appearance.” Mittal and Robinson don’t mince words when discussing the long-term damage of sitting for long stretches day after day. “Studies say if you sit for six [waking] hours a day, you increase the likelihood of early death by 19 percent,” Robinson says.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

However, a two-word solution exists for those wanting to reverse or neutralize the ramifications of sedentary living: move more. That’s not as hard as you think, experts say; frequent, small amounts of movement throughout the day can do wonders. “People should try to stand up and walk around every 30 minutes or so and maintain a healthy sitting posture,” Mittal says. Robinson advises sitting for “no more than 20 minutes out of every half hour. Try to stand at least 8 minutes out of every half hour and then try to actually move 2 minutes out of every half hour.” You don’t have to have a specific destination for the movement, he says. It can be simple exercise in place or at a desk. He suggests extending your legs and pumping your ankles or doing a handful of squats. “People can come up with what seems to work for them – that doesn’t distract them from their job – but allows them to increase the circulation and increase the alertness that they have as well,” Robinson says. Mittal suggests standing up, twisting and flexing your back, stretching your neck from side to side, and stretching your hamstrings and calves. These simple movements can have a dramatic impact. Robinson says you should remember two key components to become more active. First, make increased movement a priority because your life and quality of life depend upon it. Second, have a specific plan for making it happen. BONNIE RUCKER


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Life & Style HOME AND GARDEN

Reconsidering Your Lawn Xeriscaping, costly to start, requires little water to maintain and creates a unique, environmentally friendly yard.

I

n many neighborhoods, you can find a few types of lawns. There’s the one manicured with extreme care, down to the last blade of grass. Then there’s the lawn you can tell is mowed only out of obligation. More recently, you might have noticed a yard that has just cacti, gravel and raised gardens. Once seen as unusual, homeowners favoring the last option find an increasing number of neighbors doing the same because the ubiquitous green grass rug is being reexamined. Xeriscaping is one of the biggest trends in today’s yards. Rather than Bermuda, St. Augustine and fescue grasses, it incorporates drought-resistant species like yucca, fountain grass and hydrangea. “It’s the art of using plants that hardly require any water,” says Brian Jervis, a horticulturist with the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service. “You see that a lot in Arizona and places where there are drier climates. It’s a pretty neat option.” Xeriscaping has become a

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

critical choice in municipalities with water rationing. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the average American household uses about 320 gallons of water per day, with about 30 percent of that going to irrigating lawns and gardens. Xeriscaping costs less than a conventional green lawn in the long run, but it’s expensive to get started and complicated for some. “You want lava rocks, and those cost more,” Jervis says. “Also, those types of plants can be slower to grow; therefore, they’re often more expensive at nurseries.” For those who don’t want to fully commit to xeriscaping, Jervis says another trend includes vegetable gardens in raised beds. They can be used to grow produce but require a lot of care. Flower beds can also replace grass, but they generally require more work than mowing a lawn. Many plants grow well in Oklahoma’s climate, says David Hillock, a consumer horticulture specialist at the extension service. “There’s a lot more out there than just cactus,” he says. “Annuals that

give ground cover but don’t require a lot of water are great for xeriscaping. Ice plants are an example of that. Red yuccas are ornamental and look good. Native species like purple clone and baptisia are good, as is rattlesnake master and sumacs. Anytime people can choose native species, that’s always a good idea.” Rethinking front and back yards continues to evolve. “Native buffalo grass is really suitable for lawns and requires very little irrigation and fertilizer,” Hillock says. “Some people still want some kind of grass but want to reduce the amount of mowing they do; they can go that route. There’s also food-scaping – that’s a more recent trend where you can grow species that are ornamental but also edible.” Jervis says finding a favorite nursery helps when reimagining your property’s landscaping. “There’s all kinds of trends,” he says. “There are some people who have become tired of looking at grass and have gotten pretty imaginative on how they want their yard to look.” MATT PATTERSON


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Life & Style

SCENE

Alexander Tamahn, Tai Tindall, Elizabeth Henley, Aundria Braggs, Summer Washington, Christina Henley, Nosa Myrag; Collectively Local: Takeover at Living Arts Exhibition, Living Arts, Tulsa Brittany & Cole Province, Jason & Angela Schuff, Brooke & JD Stough; Kids and Care Packs, Tenaciously Teal, OKC

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Chris Moody, Sarah & Jim Savage; House Party, Ronald McDonald House Charities, Tulsa

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By Brian Wilson

KKT Architects imagines a transportation hub halfway between OKC and Tulsa and a futuristic corridor connecting the two cities. A giant airport for conventional and hypersonic jets. A station for bullet trains or hyperloop pods. Launch pads for satellite delivery and space tourists. Stands for sky taxis and autonomous ride services. A subterranean highway with separate lanes for human-driven and autonomous vehicles. A place called MidOK. These elements make up part of a transportation hub between Oklahoma City and Tulsa in 2049 that KKT Architects predicts would spawn economic growth, innovation and an eco-friendly environment. KKT, celebrating its 30th anniversary, created a business-wide project for all 72 employees, whose directions were to envision the next 30 years for the company, especially public-private partnerships involving Oklahoma’s two biggest cities. “The international airport is the catalyst for everything,” says Francis Wilmore, KKT’s architecture design director. “Both cities would use it and refocus their existing airports for something specific.”

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

KKT sees the transportation center as an economic engine spurring enormous growth in Oklahoma – akin to what happened in 1974, when the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth unveiled what was then the world’s largest airport. The North Texas region, often called the Metroplex, increased in population from about 2.3 million people to nearly 8 million people in the 45 years since the D/FW Airport opened. North Texas, the fourth-largest metropolitan area in the country, is one of the top economic drivers in Texas and the Southwest. Revenue from industrial, technological, commercial and residential growth has long eclipsed the $700 million that Dallas and Fort Worth paid for the airport ($3.6 billion in today’s money).

Fort Worth closed its municipal airport, but opened Alliance Airport, an industrial hub, in 1989. Dallas still has Love Field, but its landlocked facilities limit the number of daily flights. (D/FW Airport has about 185,000 daily passengers, Love Field 43,000). Wilmore suggests that Tulsa International Airport could expand on its American Airlines maintenance facility and become a repair and production center for all aircraft. Will Rogers World Airport in OKC could transform its work with Amazon and become a leading distributor of all packages and products. The KKT project was inspired by Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum’s 2018 state-of-the-city address, in which he called for cooperation between Tulsa and OKC to


RENDERINGS COURTESY KKT ARCHITECTS

The international airport and transportation center in MidOK would offer Oklahoma a central hub to solve regional transportation issues while spurring economic growth. Tulsa International Airport and Will Rogers World Airport in OKC could transform into maintenance and distribution centers. solve regional transportation issues. KKT stresses that its project is merely a concept. The halfway center, dubbed MidOK, does not replace the city of Stroud. The highway does not necessarily replace Interstate 44. However, the firm foresees private investment in a vertical corridor, about 2 miles wide and 90-100 miles long, after the public infrastructure for the transportation hub is established. The multi-story corridor, with technological, industrial, agricultural, entertainment, educational and residential elements building upward, would allow thousands of acres

of land to return to nature. KKT architect Jim Boulware says the project envisions no one losing property through eminent domain or seeing towns between OKC and Tulsa die. “Such a project would be hard for Oklahomans to get onboard; we were conscious of that,” he says. “Everyone was sensitive to how a normal, everyday person would react to a giant airport and corridor appearing out of nowhere.” A transportation hub would require billions of public dollars. A new terminal alone at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport is slated to cost

more than $1.3 billion. The Istanbul New Airport, opening in phases with completion by 2025, will cost $13 billion. However, revenue from jobs created by the MidOK airport and the corridor would far exceed the price tag of the initial public outlay for the transportation hub, KKT says. Public-private partnerships, according to many economists, make grand visions become reality in efficient, cost-effective ways. “One of government’s core strengths is that it has the land, it has the assets and it has access to inexpensive money,” Larry Belinsky, who advises municipal governments

SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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on infrastructure projects, told governing. com. “I don’t know that people would necessarily think that government’s core strength is building. The private sector tends to be more innovative.” A tall, dense, narrow corridor of activity between Tulsa and Oklahoma City would change how people live, interact and work, Wilmore says. A hyperloop pod or bullet train would deliver people from both cities to the transportation hub in less than 10 minutes. Hypersonic jets could get a worker with international partners to and from a meeting halfway around the world in about eight hours. “The idea of commuting to any job completely changes,” says Wilmore, adding that homes and neighborhoods could do without driveways, garages and streets since autonomous ride services would get people to work or play in town or to hyperloop/bullet train stations for out-of-town destinations. KKT owner Andy Kinslow reminds that everyone, not just those at his firm, needs to consider what the future holds. “People need to look at where we’re going with technology,” he says. “How do we prepare for it when technology changes?”

KKT envisions that Oklahoma could become a global leader in the agricultural industry by creating a new research institute in MidOK. This hub would include vertical farming towers, biodomes with distinct microclimates and methane-collecting domes that could power the facilities.

AVATARS FOR THE FUTURE

As part of the Vision for 2049 project, leaders at KKT Architects created avatars symbolizing people coming in contact with a conceptual hub and corridor between Oklahoma City and Tulsa. Employees from all KKT departments were split and mixed into five groups. Following are glimpses at the avatars and how KKT workers came to envision them as real people in the future.

Gavin

Living in Tulsa’s Brookside, Gavin works at the MidOK hub as an autonomous vehicle controller for a regional freight/packaging distributor. Gavin also gets around via autonomous vehicle services, along with high-speed rail and hypersonic transport. He and his neighbors don’t own cars, so their garage-less homes share outdoor areas and meeting spaces. “The houses face each other and open to a common green space where people mingle,” says Steve Stevens, a relatively new member of KKT’s internet technologies department. “The concept turns the neighborhood around literally and figuratively.”

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Wren

As a chaperone for her daughter’s class field trip to MidOK’s cultural district, the Dallas mother finds everything to entertain a bunch of fifth graders and the supervising adults – several museums, a familyfriendly concert and a Broadway show. Liz Robertson, a KKT interior designer for 11 years, says Wren made team members ask, “What is drawing this person to MidOK? What makes MidOK different from Dallas?” “We concentrated on Wren’s visit bringing people together and being interactive,” Robertson says, “like an arts center that combines hands-on painting with

artificial intelligence or a concert venue where you can experience the performance with people from around the world.” Robertson says buildings in the cultural district would be flexible so exhibits and programs “would be different every time you come.”

Isaiah

A business traveler with clients and partners in the Middle East, Isaiah maintains his family life daily as an involved father. In the morning, he takes an autonomous vehicle to a high-speed rail station connecting to the MidOK airport, then a hypersonic jet to Dubai for a lunch meeting. He’s back at his Tulsa home for supper with his kids. All of his travel is in a personal pod that connects to each mode of transport, so he can work while he zooms from place to place. “We looked at the three speeds of transportation that a worker like him would need – 60-65 mph to


One group assumed that autonomous vehicles were mainstream, so areas of Tulsa, like Brookside, would transform side streets into service alleys accessing multi-modal buildings. These buildings could act as distribution centers for regional drone deliveries. Another group focused on the mental health of Oklahomans by creating “wellbeing spaces” to escape bombardments of future technologies.

With a dense, vertical corridor, a multi-modal highway system with autonomous vehicles, plus bullet trains or a hyperloop, residents could enjoy Oklahoma’s natural landscape and avoid urban sprawl. the station, 200-plus mph on the train and more than the speed of sound in the plane,” says Jim Geurin, a structural engineer at KKT for 12 years. “Isaiah is a people person; he wants to meet with his business associates one-on-one. “Thirty years from now might be pushing it for some of what we discussed, but look at what’s happened technologically in the past 30 years. It’s not as far-fetched as you might think.”

Amara and Asher

A transportable apartment lets this young, international couple keep a home base in the hub while they easily visit loved ones and have professional trips on other continents. Amara is a resident at the MidOK university hospital; husband Asher is a graduate student in energy systems and teaches classes at the university. “With their mobile home, the size of a studio or one-bedroom apartment, they can travel the world,”

says Wanas Jasim, a recent Oklahoma State graduate in architecture. “The home would slide into a transportation structure [like a hypersonic cargo jet] and they’d be taken and dropped off anywhere.” In MidOK, where they live most of the time, Amara and Asher’s home sits on the perimeter of a green berm, which serves as a communal, natural area for them and other residents. “In the core of the complex, there’s a gathering spot with a lot of water, grass and natural light,” Jasim says. They live and work on various levels of the corridor, depending upon whether they are at their jobs, traveling to Tulsa or OKC on high-speed rail, or shopping, dining or catching a movie in the hub’s entertainment district. And when Asher and Amara have children, they can buy a connecting unit that expands their living space and moves around just as easily as their main home.

Joe

This retired farmer still drives his pickup, built in 2029, the last year manually operated vehicles were made. Joe likes to reminisce with his old buddies every morning at the MidOK Diner, which only serves food produced within a 20-mile radius. He also focuses on what he leaves to his children and grandchildren, particularly with agricultural research and vertical and hydroponic farming. “We like the idea of moving farming into the future,” says Brandon Hackett, a 13-year architect at KKT. “We came up with a research center where local farmers like Joe can meet with farmers from around the world facing similar situations – like growing corn in Dubai or wheat in Kansas. You can create any type of growing environment at this research center and experiment with what works best. It brings people together. “We even named the research center after Joe: the Journey Oklahoma Environmental, or JOE, Institute. This was created as his legacy.” SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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THE PROJECT’S BASICS

Following are key elements of KKT Architects’ Vision for 2049, a conceptual rendering of a hub and corridor between Tulsa and Oklahoma with transportation, commercial, industrial, residential, agricultural, educational, research and entertainment possibilities. Jim Boulware, a KKT architect for 13 years, says everyone on the five teams assigned to the project “saw the human element at all times and figured out ways to solve problems.”

The site

KKT teams are clear that their imaginary hub is not a substitute for Stroud, halfway between OKC and Tulsa. The corridor and its high-speed rail and highway lanes for autonomous and human-driven vehicles are not necessarily along Interstate 44. “It could be defined by topography and be pretty much a straight line from Oklahoma City and Tulsa,” Boulware says. “It’s not meant to disrupt anyone’s life. We’re not talking eminent domain of anyone’s property.”

Dimensions

The imaginary corridor runs 90-100 miles between

the edges of each metropolitan area. It’s about 2 miles wide because it has multiple levels, including several underground. The corridor’s verticality returns tens of thousands of acres of land to nature.

Highway lanes, with separate lanes for autonomous and human-driven vehicles, are sunken or underground. High-speed rail is on any level – from a subway-type bullet train to pods shooting through vacuum tubes atop columns or pylons several stories above ground.

The transportation hub

Aero transportation

KKT came up with the name MidOK as the halfway spot between the state capital and T-Town. The project begins at this hub and stretches toward each city with public and private investment along the corridor. MidOK is the center for commerce, transportation, entertainment, industry, research, education and farming. Bullet trains or hyperloops make the commute to MidOK less than 10 minutes from either Tulsa or OKC.

WORKPLACE DYNAMICS

KKT’s Vision for 2049 project did not transform the structure of the company and reorganize departments of architects, engineers, interior designers and planners. However, the futuristic concept fostered increased awareness throughout the workplace. Interior designer Yolanda Wright, with KKT for 29 of its 30 years, was initially hesitant and didn’t buy into why she and her colleagues, all with packed schedules, had to devote many hours to what owner Andy Kinslow calls “a big group project like what you did in college.” “We’re all busy,” Wright says. “Normally, we keep our heads down and do our individual jobs. But with this project, we collaborated with all the other disciplines. This led to getting up and seeing what others were doing. It meant getting away from your headphones and music and from concentrating on just what you were doing.” Wright says getting to know co-workers socially in other departments has been “beneficial to the whole environment” and “made me appreciate what others have to do. For example, human resources and marketing have a lot of deadlines that aren’t commonly known.” Kinslow says the five teams that fleshed out the futuristic concepts didn’t go in the directions he had anticipated … and he was overjoyed. “One of our core philosophies is to do whatever you think is best,” he says. “This gives people the freedom to create. I wouldn’t expect them to not do that.” Kinslow withdrew from team discussions after he and several other leaders offered intentionally vague scenarios. “I threw the ideas out there and didn’t want them to think, ‘What does Andy want us to do?’ This is not a real project. We just want people thinking,” Kinslow says. Jim Boulware, a 13-year architect at KKT, says coworkers had always talked with each other about various projects before Vision for 2049, “but now we’re always looking at how to do stuff in the future, not just the present. We’re thinking many decades down the line now.”

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Ground transportation

In addition to having one of the world’s largest airports, with air and high-speed rail connections to pretty much anywhere on the planet, the MidOK hub has pads and runways for hypersonic jets and rockets. Space tourists and satellite deliveries launch from here. “It provides customizable transportation for each person,” Boulware says. “It’s like a content provider for commuters.”


HYPERLOOP TRANSPORT

Commerce

Conference centers, museums, shopping, restaurants, hotels, concert venues and sports facilities, including a stadium for the Super Bowl and Olympics, sprout in the hub and extend toward Tulsa or Oklahoma City. Autonomous vehicles, pods and sky taxis get people from place to place if it’s too far to walk.

Agriculture

Hydroponic and vertical farming provide food for Oklahoma and the world. A research facility draws agronomists from around the world to combat extreme weather and famine. Test facilities simulate growing crops on Mars.

Industry

Some elements of KKT Architects’ Vision for 2049 are being developed today. Hyperloop One, part of the Virgin Group conglomerate founded by British entrepreneur Richard Branson, has an operational test Housing facility north of Las Vegas, combines vacuum People living in apartments, homes and transportand magnetic-levitation technologies to proable pods connect with each other on multiple levels, pel pods through tubes. Its timeline is for a literally and personally. Green spaces, natural light, fully operational system by 2025 with paying various bodies of water and hundreds of places for passengers onboard in 2029. daily interaction bring residents together. The vehicles, designed for 25-28 passengers, have already reached 240 mph at the Nevada site, with a goal of 670 mph. Today’s Density fastest bullet train, the Shanghai Maglev in The hub and corridor are about “limiting urban China, hits 267 mph, but it doesn’t run in the sprawl by going vertical and giving the land back to low-resistance atmosphere of a near-vacunature,” Boulware says. “With density, you get more um. Passenger jets travel about 650 mph. people interacting, collaborating and inventing ways Missouri, Texas, North Carolina, Coloto solve problems. That’s how societies advance.” rado and a Chicago-Columbus-Pittsburgh consortium have feasibility studies in place. The 250-mile, St. Louis-to-Kansas City route ($30 for the 30-minute ride) would cost between $30 million and $40 million per mile to build, engineering firm Black and Veatch says. Using similar numbers, a Tulsa-Oklahoma City route, over similar terrain, would cost about $4 billion. MidOK University offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in hundreds of fields, along with a medical school and residency program.

IMAGE BY HYPERLOOP

Manufacturers of all kinds design, build and deliver their products from one place. The hub and corridor create a shipping and receiving mecca for the middle of the continent.

Education

MORE ONLINE Highways of the future would have separate lanes for autonomous and human-driven vehicles. Other types of transportation, either underground or sunken, could include bullet trains or pods shooting through vacuums.

For bonus information about how the Vision for 2049 project affected KKT workers and how hyperloop technology should become viable by 2029, go to okmag.com/kkt.

SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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A Study in Style Hit the books to learn all about fall’s most sought-after trends. Photography by Nathan Harmon

Hair by Shawna Burroughs, Jara Herron Salon and Spa Makeup by Starla Ward, StunningbyStarla Makeup Artistry Clothing, shoes and accessories courtesy Saks Fifth Avenue and Travers Mahan Fine jewelry courtesy Bruce G. Weber Diamond Cellar Models are Alex Eppler-Williams and Shane Nearman A special thanks to the Tulsa City-County Central Library for acting as the venue for the shoot. A three-year renovation came to fruition in October 2016. Created with a $55 million budget, the renovated space boasts everything from a recording studio to 3-D printing stations, expanded meeting rooms and a children’s play area. To learn more about the library and its programs, visit tulsalibrary.org.

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Paige Jeans Cicely silk camisole, $169; Joe’s leopard-striped skinny jeans, $198; Theory faux rabbit camel jacket, $695; Jimmy Choo Minny ankle-strap leather sandals, $795; Saint Laurent velvet shoulder bag, $1,190, Saks Fifth Avenue. Pesavento sterling silver/rose gold vermeil polveri suite: black dangle earrings, $250; three-strand necklace, $334; crossover ring, $396; asymmetrical cuff, $700, Bruce G. Weber Diamond Cellar.


On Shane: Peter Millar Collection cotton lightweight denim button-up, $198; Peter Millar Collection cashmere zip-up, $598; Peter Millar collection all-weather flex vest, $548; Brax stretch denim jeans, $200; Peter Millar collection suede sneakers, Travers Mahan. On Alex: Theory wool turtleneck, $255; Layfayette 148 New York brown leather button-up dress, $1,198; Burberry scarf, $400; Jimmy Choo Beyla snake-embossed leather point-toe booties, $1,050; Saint Laurent shearling and leather shoulder bag, $2,850, Saks Fifth Avenue. David Yurman suite: sterling silver pure form drop earrings, $425; sterling silver and 18-karat yellow gold albion ring with champagne citrine, $1,050, Bruce G. Weber Diamond Cellar. SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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On Shane: Samuelsohn all-wool, yearround natural shoulder suit jacket and pants, $1,350; Hagen Carmel allcotton dress shirt, $185; Dolcepunta Italian handmade silk tie, $165; Martin Digman soft-cured alligator belt, $475; Alan Payne Italian calf cap-toe shoes, $325, Travers Mahan. On Alex: Mackage shearling-trip wool wrap coat, $950; Ramy Brooke leopard Winsten dress, $425; Jimmy Choo Misty velvet ankle-strap sandals, $875; Saint Laurent metallic leather shoulder bag, $2,250, Saks Fifth Avenue. Armenta sterling silver and 18-karat yellow gold suite: opal/Mother of Pearl earrings with champagne diamonds, $2,290; turquoise/kyanite 40� bead necklace, $1,590; Crivelli ring with diamonds, $990; Crivelli huggie bracelet with diamonds, $2,690, Bruce G. Weber Diamond Cellar.

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On Alex: Cinq a Sept velvet cargo jacket, $595; Cinq a Sept silk mock neck dress, $445; Jimmy Choo Bing embellished patent leather mules, $995; Saint Laurent turquoise and leopard print shoulder bag, $1,850, Saks Fifth Avenue. David Yurman 18-karat yellow gold suite: blue topaz and diamond drop earrings, $2,400; Stax ring with black spinel and diamonds, $3,800; cable spiral bracelet with diamonds, $2,550; Continuance hinged bracelet, $3,900; Stax chain link bangle bracelet with diamonds, $4,500, Bruce G. Weber Diamond Cellar. On Shane: Samuelsohn all-wool, year-round natural shoulder suit jacket and pants, $1,350; Edward Armah pocket round, $85; Hagen Carmel all-cotton dress shirt, $185; Dolcepunta Italian handmade silk tie, $165; Martin Digman soft-cured alligator belt, $475; Alan Payne Italian calf cap-toe shoes, $325, Travers Mahan. SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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On Shane: Jack Victor wool and silk sport coat, $800; Stenstroms all-cotton floral sport shirt, $295; Alberto stretch five-pocket jeans, $250; W. Kleinberg American bison belt, $155; Alan Payne woven calf shoe, $350, Travers Mahan. On Alex: Les Copains blazer, $895; Les Copains long-sleeve blouse, $275; Les Copains striped trousers, $525; Stuart Weitzman snakeskin-print leather booties, $595; Saint Laurent rouge legion bag, $2,250, Saks Fifth Avenue. Ippolita sterling silver suite: Classico snowman earrings, $250; lollipop ring with lapis triplet, $1,295; rock candy eclipse bracelet, $1,795, Bruce G. Weber Diamond Cellar.

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Alice and Olivia deep scoop back leopard-print body suit, $195; Alice and Olivia ribbon stripe pleated skirt, $485; Stuart Weitzman cheetah-print leather platform sandals, $495; Saint Laurent bandana red leather should bag, $1,650, Saks Fifth Avenue. Robert Coin 18-karat yellow gold suite: Classica Parisienne earrings, $2,500; satin princess ring with diamonds, $5,800; Byzantine barocco bangle with diamonds, $6,500; Marco Bicego 18-karat yellow gold Lucia collection pendant, $2,630, Bruce G. Weber Diamond Cellar.

For bonus images from the fall fashion photoshoot, visit okmag.com/studyinstyle SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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FACES of AS AN ENGAGED CONSUMER, you should be

searching for the top quality candidates to give your business.

Maybe you’re in need of a lawyer or exceptional medical care. Perhaps you’re on the hunt for the perfect engagement ring, or itching to book a cosmetic procedure. You could be in the trenches of a home renovation and needing skilled interior design help. Regardless, the businesses you choose to patronize – and the people running them – are the key elements to making your dreams a reality. Faces of Oklahoma puts the dedicated owners and employees of quality Oklahoma companies in the spotlight. When deciding who to trust, turn to the best. Turn to the FACES OF OKLAHOMA.

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FACES FACES of of

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FACES ofFACES

of

Tulsa

Tulsa

FACES FACES of of

OKC

FACES

OKC

of

The Face of

CORPORATE LAW

Doerner, Saunders, Daniel & Anderson

Doerner, Saunders, Daniel & Anderson’s history spans over 123 years while serving Oklahomans in complex corporate legal matters. Founded in Indian Territory in 1896, our lawyers were leaders who actively shaped our region to help pioneer success. Our history plays an important role in today’s contemporary business world – evident in our depth of experience and getit-done attitude that each of our lawyers brings to the table. Practicing in three locations, Doerner is one of the oldest law firms in Oklahoma.

Back row: D. Benham Kirk and Kristen L. Brightmire Front row: Sara E. Potts and Nathan S. Cross Our clients include startup and Fortune 100 companies, family-owned businesses and partnerships, developers and Indian tribes, public trusts and municipalities. We provide counsel on legal matters pertaining to business operations, contracts, purchases/sales, financing and infrastructure transactions. Regardless of where clients’ business interests take them, we help them grow and survive during economic hardships.

Two W. Second St., Ste. 700, Tulsa — 918.582.1211 | 210 Park Ave., Ste. 1200, Oklahoma City — 405.319.3500 1215 Crossroads Blvd., Ste. 210, Norman — 405.319.3501 | www.dsda.com SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Tulsa

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Stephen M. Brownlee, M.D.

Jeremy G. Foon, M.D.

David W. Hall, M.D.

Anthony E. Loehr, M.D.

Evan R. Moore, M.D.

William P. Sawyer II, M.D.

Christopher R. Siemens, M.D.

Atul M. Vaidya, M.D.

David W. White, M.D.

The Face of

EAR, NOSE & THROAT CARE Eastern Oklahoma ENT

Eastern Oklahoma Ear, Nose and Throat has been dedicated to providing the highest quality of care with respect, integrity and compassion for more than 40 years. In fact, it’s grown to be the largest clinic of its kind in Oklahoma, specializing in complete care for pediatric and adult ear, nose and throat diseases. The clinic has the only board certified neurootologist in Tulsa, a full service allergy testing and treatment center, board-certified audiologists and staff members who

are committed to ensuring patients and their families enjoy a positive experience during each visit. The dedicated Eastern Oklahoma Ear Nose and Throat team includes Drs. Anthony Loehr, Stephen Brownlee, William P. Sawyer II, David White, David W. Hall, Atul Vaidya, Christopher Siemens, Evan Moore and Jeremy G. Foon, and our audiologists include Jessica Degginger, Mary Ellen Finerty, Megan D. Ellwood, Karen B. Cox, Desirae Webb, Kevin Hamilton and Shelley Ballard.

5020 E. 68th St. S., Tulsa | 9343 S. Mingo Rd., Tulsa | 918.492.3636 | www.eoent.com

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FACES FACES of of

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Tulsa

FACES FACES of of

OKC

FACES

OKC

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The Face of

FINE JEWELRY STORES

Bruce G. Weber Diamond Cellar

Back row: Mary Morrell, Donna Grant, Byron Gaines and Lynn Redwine Front row: Erin Burgess, Michelle Holdgrafer and Andre Wafer Not Pictured: Sasha Patterson and Randy Deere

We at Bruce G. Weber Diamond Cellar are so grateful to call Tulsa home – and to call you our family. For decades, you have allowed us to celebrate life with you. Engagements. Weddings. Children. Anniversaries. Career successes. Love. We are grateful to be part of your most special moments, and we’re thrilled to show you that our commitment to Tulsa is as strong as ever.

Our new location on Cherry Street offers a beautiful space to showcase some of the finest luxury jewelry and timepieces in the world. We’ve built our reputation on excellent service, fine craftsmanship and unwavering integrity. If you haven’t stopped in before, we hope you will now. Whatever it is you’re celebrating, we’re ready to give you the experience you deserve. Thank you, Tulsa. Here’s to you.

1523 E. 15th St., Tulsa | 918.749.1700 | brucegweber.com SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The Face of

COSMETIC SURGERY Tulsa Surgical Arts Dr. Angelo Cuzalina has practiced cosmetic surgery with passion for the last 21 years in Tulsa. Anyone who meets him can instantly see the true love he has for his work. His zeal, passion and numerous accomplishments have helped him to become a leader in the field of cosmetic surgery. Dr. Cuzalina was elected the 2011 president of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery; the 2013 president of the American Board of Cosmetic Surgery; and the 2016-2017 president of the Cosmetic Surgery Foundation. He is advanced fellowship trained in cosmetic surgery and board certified by three surgical boards.

Dr. Cuzalina also fosters a passion for sculpting, and the same artistic gifts it takes to sculpt in clay helps him while sculpting surgically in the operating room. Dr. Cuzalina feels sincerely blessed by these gifts, which prompts him to give back to his community by selecting one deserving person per month for free cosmetic or reconstructive surgery.

As an author and lecturer, Dr. Cuzalina has written multiple key articles and over 35 book chapters in major medical publications on a variety of topics, from facial, breast and extremity surgery to tummy tucks and beyond. He is routinely asked to lecture and perform surgery across the U.S., South America, Asia, the Middle East and Europe. He has given over Dr. Cuzalina has performed over 14,000 cosmetic surgery 200 lectures across the globe and has hosted over 1,000 procedures and is well known for his expertise in extremely surgeons to visit his state-of-the-art facility in Tulsa. difficult facial aging cases, challenging breast revision cases, post-weight loss surgery and complex rhinoplasty procedures His medical spa and amazing staff are an extension of Dr. with rib grafting for noses of cleft lip patients. Cuzalina’s joy for helping people improve their self-esteem. 7322 E. 91st St., Tulsa | 918.925.9368 | www.tulsasurgicalarts.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Back row: Rubi Penaloza, Lisa Sprague, Nicki Jones, JoDee Killingsworth and Hana Thompson Middle row: Jessica Stockton, Aaron Williams, Misty Bunch, Dr. Angelo Cuzalina, Francesca Cuzalina, Paige Cuzalina and Lindsey Voss Front row: Jessica Tyler, Kylie Kusik, Sydney Barr, Kathy Floyd, Angelica Callis and Missi Graham SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The Face of

CABINETRY

Sullivan’s Custom Cabinetry, Inc.

Back row: Brian Crawford, Seth White, Jack Martin, Adam Harley, Jacob Stanley and Jenna Hilsman Front row: Stephanie Martin and Lisa Reynolds

5235 S. 43rd West Ave., Tulsa | 918.445.9191 | www.sullivanscabinets.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Founded in 1980 as a one-man operation, Sullivan’s Custom Cabinetry, Inc., has grown over the last 40 years to employ over 35 talented designers, professionals and craftsmen. The company is family owned and operated by Jack and Stephanie Martin. As the premier design-and-build cabinet company in the greater Tulsa area, Sullivan’s has been voted into Oklahoma Magazine’s The Best of The Best 11 years in a row. Our team of designers has over 55 years of combined experience, and we pride ourselves in the ability to provide functional, current and fun layouts to fit our homeowners’ needs. With the 30,000-square-foot manufacturing and finishing facility, our capabilities are endless – from faceframe to frameless construction; traditional to contemporary design; finished or unfinished. As one of the only cabinet manufacturers in the Tulsa metro capable of finishing cabinets in-house, we can even create

custom finishes specific to our homeowners’ tastes. Our onsite manufacturing center also affords us the ability to create custom molding and door stock. And, it means we can cater to the needs of all homeowners, regardless of budget. Even more, Sullivan’s is not just a kitchen and bath center – we build custom closets, bookcases, furniture and more. We are honored to have built loyal relationships over the years with some of Tulsa’s most well-known and accomplished architects, builders and interior designers, but we get just as excited to work with individual homeowners whose projects may be smaller or more budget-conscious. Our passion and ability to take a homeowners’ dream, design it, provide a computer modeling of it and then turn it into a reality is what drives us at Sullivan’s Custom Cabinetry. We invite you to visit our 8,000-square-foot showroom, talk with a designer and see some of the latest trends in cabinetry. Let us turn your dream into a reality. SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The Face of

HEARING AID PROVIDERS

Clear-tone

Charley Feeley and Paul Jackson

2323 S. Sheridan Rd., Tulsa | 918.493.4000 | www.cleartonehearingaids.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Situated on the corner of 24th and Sheridan is Clear-tone, a hearing aid clinic with an amazing story.

weeks – or even months – before a person got their hearing aids.

Most folks from Green Country are familiar with the Cleartone name; in fact, you probably just sang the jingle, complete with the ding at the end. If you’ve been paying attention recently, you’ve also seen NFL Hall of Famer Steve Largent in Clear-tone’s commercials. But expert branding aside, what you’re probably not familiar with is how this simple hearing aid clinic in Midtown has revolutionized not just hearing aids, but the entire hearing industry.

The Feeley brothers knew things had to change.

In 1984, brothers Jim and Mike Feeley started Clear-tone with a simple vision: to help people hear better. At that time, hearing aids were custom made to each ear, a burdensome process that included the creation of a custom mold and shipment off to a lab for casting and programming with the hopes of a perfect fit. If the fit wasn’t right, it required more shipping and waiting for adjustments. It could often be

Throughout the 1980s and ’90s, they tried different methods to improve the process to make hearing aids better for their patients – even manufacturing their own hearing aids in Tulsa. In 2003, Jim and Mike introduced an entirely new style of hearing aid that eliminated many of the issues of custom aids. Today, that patented technology is licensed to other manufacturers and is used in over 80 percent of all hearing aids sold in the United States, and over 70 percent sold worldwide. At Clear-tone, our passion is, and always will be, helping Oklahomans hear better. If you or a loved one is struggling with hearing loss, call Clear-tone for a free hearing test and consultation. SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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ES ofFACES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

ES ofFACES

a

Tulsa

ES ofFACES

C

OKC

ES

The Face of

FURNITURE

Luxe Furniture & Design Shopping for furniture and decorating your home can be overwhelming, but Luxe Furniture & Design strives to make the process as easy and enjoyable as possible. Whether you are simply looking for accessories or an entire room makeover, the talented and trained designers at Luxe provide the expertise, tools and resources to transform your home with an eye for both beauty and function. It has been an exciting year for Luxe. In March, the team moved into a newly renovated, 10,000-square-foot showroom located at 106th and Memorial in south Tulsa.

The Luxe team has nearly 100 years of combined design experience and includes owner Tamara Noel and designers Kristin Yannaccone, Michelle Harrison, Robin Splawn, Maureen Walters, Kimberley Blackwell, Rachael Jelley and design assistant Payton Ray. In addition to providing complimentary design services, exceptional quality and unparalleled service, the designers care about making lasting relationships with clients and work with them through every step of the design process and delivery.

10545 S. Memorial Dr., Tulsa | 918.459.8950 | www.luxetulsa.com

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

Tamara Noel


FACES FACES of of

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FACES ofFACES

of

Tulsa

Tulsa

FACES FACES of of

OKC

FACES

OKC

of

The Face of

HEATING AND AIR

Airco Service, Inc.

Airco Service was founded in 1961 by John R. and Louise Boyce. After all these years in business, Airco has earned the third-generation, family-owned reputation built on excellent service, hard work, honesty and integrity. We now have three locations in Tulsa, Oklahoma City and the Grand Lake area. Airco offers not only heating and air, but also electrical and plumbing services for residential and

Chase and Austin Boyce commercial properties. The three divisions work seamlessly to provide complete and comprehensive services. From employee training to customer care, Airco is fully qualified and dedicated to finding customers the best solutions and providing quality products for their homes. We offer free estimates on replacing equipment in your home. All our locations offer 24/7 service.

11331 E. 58th St., Tulsa — 918.252.5667 | 14801 Santa Fe Crossings, Oklahoma City — 405.715.2665 343 Magnolia Dr., Grand Lake — 918.782.2263 | www.aircoservice.com SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Tulsa

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ELECTRICAL SERVICE

Ritchie Electric, Inc.

Ritchie Electric, Inc., founded by Justin Ritchie in 2013, takes pride in its well-earned, stellar reputation around Oklahoma. Through word-of-mouth recommendations, hospitable service and quality craftsmanship, Ritchie Electric has quickly become a go-to location for all electrical needs.

Justin Ritchie Ritchie Electric, Inc., finds success in its focus on personal relationships with clients, along with a commitment to professionalism and top-tier work. The team remains dedicated to performing services that warrant glowing recommendation to friends, family and business associates.

This full-service company covers a variety of jobs for both The company strives for reliability, honesty and quality and commercial and residential clients. The team can help with believes strongly in making lasting connections with every homes, retail storefronts, hotels, restaurants and even pools. client. Specialties include new installations, remodels, repairs and general troubleshooting. Oklahoma City and surrounding areas | 405.250.2889 | www.ritchieelectric.com

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019


FACES FACES of of

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Tulsa

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The Face of

MEDICINAL CANNABIS DISPENSARIES

Doctor Green

Taylor and Paul Bush

Doctor Green is a step above other medical marijuana The Bush family strives to provide top-tier products to Tulsans dispensaries in the region because of its primary focus on as a labor of love. To ensure customers are satisfied, Doctor caring for the Tulsa community. Green limits the number of vendor relationships so shelves aren’t bombarded with products of inconsistent quality or Independently owned by Paul and Taylor Bush, Doctor Green value. opened the doors to its first location in mid-December 2018. With the exemplary combination of high quality products and The heart of the business, however, is the customer base. The expert service, the business expanded rapidly, adding three time and care put into making the product reflects that. more storefronts and employing 30 people. This dynamic dispensary dominates metro coverage to include two Tulsa “We grow our own flower in a labor-intensive, organic soil method to create the best medicine,” says Paul Bush. storefronts, with two more in Bixby and Glenpool. 13831 S. Casper St. W., Glenpool | 3232 E. 15th, Tulsa | 3151 S. 129th E. Ave., Tulsa 918.271.5631 | www.doctorgreenusa.com SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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ZARROW POINTE OFFERS OUTDOOR TAI CHI CLASSES FOR RESIDENTS.

PHOTO COURTESY ZARROW POINTE

The Many

Facets

of Aging

AS PEOPLE ENTER THEIR GOLDEN YEARS, they

By Tracy LeGrand

tend to focus on health, safety and optimum enjoyment during life’s ‘third act’. We explore the light and dark sides of getting older, such as planning vacations, the perks of today’s retirement homes, spotting the signs of elder abuse, and the spectrum of care options. Whether you are an aging adult or the caretaker or relative of one, the following can provide life-improving information.

KEEPING A SHARP MIND Challenging, fun games reap cognitive benefits for seniors.

Common sense dictates that limiting passive behavior, like watching television, and challenging your brain can preserve mental acuity. Having fun as you age is also important and playing games keeps your brain sharp, says Lane Tinsley, a neurologist with INTEGRIS Neuroscience Institute in Oklahoma City. She offers options for everyone, such as cooking or language classes, reading books, playing games with children, exercising (or just listening) to music, gardening or simply taking time every day to have meaningful interactions with others. Tinsley also advocates for “any activity that requires detailed work and hand-eye coordination.” She suggests that seniors find personal favorites among word searches, Sudoku, cards, chess, board games and jigsaw puzzles. Recent trends include adult coloring books and brainteaser applications for phones and computers.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

RESIDENTS OF SENIOR STAR ARE WELCOMED WITH OPEN ARMS.

PHOTO COURTESY SENIOR STAR AT BURGUNDY PLACE


A NECESSARY CONVERSATION Planning creates a relatively smooth transition to end-of-life priorities.

The time to talk with your parents about their end-of-life care, financial decisions and health-care choices is now, before unexpected circumstances arise. These often-uncomfortable conversations can create a road map for their final years while their minds are sound. Legal documentation is key, mediator and estate attorney Gale Allison says. At a minimum, a person needs to create an advance directive for health care, spell out end-of-life care decisions, and procure a health-care power of attorney and a financial power of attorney. The latter two documents legally authorize a person to act on another’s behalf. Communication and planning can reduce chaos, financial discord, arguments and weeks of waiting if and when a health crisis occurs. “It is better for these documents to be

immediately effective, rather than triggered by some doctor’s opinion,” Allison says. “It is very difficult to get a doctor to issue an opinion in writing, and it makes the use of the powers of attorney more difficult.” Allison says a person’s choice of a power of attorney is a serious matter. “One should never name a person to a power of attorney that is not completely trustworthy,” she says. “If the person is completely trustworthy, they should know when to use the power.” Planning also applies to financial matters because banks and other entities often take their time during cases that involve a power of attorney. “Financial institutions are often very difficult in honoring powers of attorney and will frequently say it has to go to their legal department for approval before they will let

the power holder exercise it,” Allison says. “This may take weeks for approval. It is better for the parent, while still of sound mind, to take the power of attorney to the various financial institutions and get it approved while the parent can force the approval, so it is already associated with the accounts.” It’s important to understand all parts of the aging adult’s finances. Allison says the power of attorney document should address and designate specific power to each asset. For example, with an Individual Retirement Account, stipulations can include the power to direct investments, change financial institutions, cause a distribution, contribute money, change the beneficiary and/or make a new designation at a new institution. The bottom line: Sit down with parents and get health-care and financial matters squared away sooner rather than later.

INCREASING AMENITIES No longer staid and boring, retirement homes offer dynamic options for seniors. Retirement communities continually improve by keeping seniors active with mental and physical exercises while intertwining independent living and hands-on care. “We are offering more and more all the time,” says Jim Jakubovitz, the CEO of Tulsa retirement community Zarrow Pointe. “It sure isn’t rocking chairs and bingo as our industry meets a younger, more active senior.” Jakubovitz mentions Zarrow Pointe often gets recommendations from residents about new amenities to add. The campus offers semester-long programs on a wide variety of topics, and the staff listened when residents requested a more “green” way of living by utilizing solar power, adding electric car charging stations and improving the recycling program. Zarrow Pointe also offers a private school and museum on campus, which Jakubovitz believes “allows us to be truly inter-generational and adds such a fantastic dimension to our campus, as children bring light and excitement.” Jana Decker, wellness director for Tulsa’s Inverness Village, adds that Inverness and other facilities should be places “where people want to live – not have to live – [which] lends itself to successful aging.” Inverness helps to preserve cognitive and physical health and maintain strong interpersonal connections, says Decker,

citing Mindful by Sodexo, a popular meal plan that balances nutrition with enticing flavors, and daily activities that keep residents on the move and interactive. As advances in medical research and technology enter everyday life, retirement communities increasingly offer state-ofthe-art fitness centers and classes in tai chi, yoga, aquatics and dance. One such program, neuroplasticity, is a cognitive cardiovascular class that challenges the brain and the body simultaneously. Other studies have contributed to fitness programs at Inverness. “Research has shown that weak feet can lead to a weak pelvic floor; therefore a class, Heart and Soul, is offered – a combination of cardio and barefoot training,” Decker says. For stimulation of the mind and spirit, retirement communities around Oklahoma have informative speakers, film nights, live music, art programs, trips to local and regional visual and performing arts functions, technology courses and intergenerational activities. For those who lust for thrills, Decker says Inverness takes residents for skydives, zip lining, ax throwing, slip and slides, and nature hikes. “Services and experiences are intentionally designed to meet residents where they are in the continuum of care, blur the lines between the living levels and maintain engagement,” she says.

RETIREMENT HOMES OFFER A BEVY OF FUN AND HEALTHY ACTIVITIES FOR RESIDENTS, INCLUDING WATER AEROBICS. PHOTO COURTESY INVERNESS VILLAGE

SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SPOTTING DANGER SIGNS

Make sure your relative is being treated with care.

Elder abuse comes in many forms, according to the National Institute on Aging. Senior citizens can suffer physical, emotional, financial and sexual mistreatment – along with neglect and abandonment – from facilities, caregivers or relatives. If you’re worried about a relative, the institute says to look for symptoms of abuse, such as confusion, depression, unexplained bruises or burns. Increasing social isolation, bed sores and an unclean appearance are also red flags. Over- or under-medicating can also be a form of abuse. If you have access to your older relative’s banking records, look for unusual changes in spending. If you think people are taking advantage of your senior loved one, ask her or him questions and call the county department of human services, the statewide abuse hotline at 1-800-522-3511 or the police.

THE SPECTRUM OF CARE Options abound: home health, hospice or retirement home?

Many adults face the question of moving to a retirement community or welcoming in-home care at a certain point in the aging process. “Retirement community livA STRONG SENSE OF COMing is a resort lifestyle,” says MUNITY IS FOSTERED AT Kathy Logsdon, director of INVERNESS VILLAGE. PHOTO COURTESY INVERNESS VILLAGE marketing at OKC’s Epworth Villa. “Sometimes people get the idea that moving to a retirement community would be giving up something. In actuality, you gain freedom from what you don’t want to do. Living in a retirement community can be a step up to age in a place where you’re totally independent [and] unconfined.” Aging in place, which Zarrow Pointe’s CEO Jim Jakubovitz dubs a “buzzword” in the industry, is taken seriously at this Tulsa establishment. The community, which offers independent housing, apartments, long- and short-term nursing care and hospice, “is one of the few continuum care licensed facilities in Oklahoma,” he says, meaning residents can come in at an independent state and receive more help as they age, without having to move from their original housing on campus. For those who want to remain in a private residence, a spectrum of services is offered by organizations, including Interim HealthCare of Oklahoma in OKC and Tulsa or Oxford Home HealthCare in Tulsa. From light housekeeping and medication management to assistance in daily living, home health care offers aging adults the familiarity of home with varying levels of assistance. Regardless of where you live, hospice provides highly personalized services, including companionship and skilled nursing, says Caitlin Eversole, admissions supervisor for Tulsa’s Grace Hospice of Oklahoma. Hospice is used when a doctor gives a terminal diagnosis of less than six months, but “it doesn’t always happen that way; many people live longer, and the point of hospice is to take care of people wherever it is they are calling home,” Eversole says. Making care decisions before they’re needed gives your family peace of mind, Logsdon says, “so you can have a beautiful, worry-free lifestyle knowing that future care is there if needed, financial choices are planned and you remain in control of your care.”

TRAVEL TIPS

It’s easy to prioritize both entertainment and health on vacations. RETIREMENT HOMES LIKE SENIOR STAR AT BURGUNDY PLACE OFTEN PLAN OUTINGS AND VACATIONS FOR RESIDENTS. PHOTO COURTESY SENIOR STAR AT BURGUNDY PLACE

FOR AN ONLINE BONUS ON

SENIOR SELF DEFENSE, VISIT

OKMAG.COM/ SENIORS2019

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

Whether organizing a bucket list trip or a visit to family members, you can optimize travel as a senior while keeping health a priority. Sonya Pratt, program director for independent living at Senior Star at Burgundy Place in Tulsa, leads frequent trips with seniors. “Always keep a couple of copies of a complete medical list, allergies and emergency contact numbers with you when you travel, along with those for medical providers where you’re going, in case needed,” she says. “And for those using continuous oxygen, call your durable medical equipment provider for assistance to obtain supplies you need while there. Also ask about portable oxygen concentrators for travel.” Pratt says to always think of access. Before embarking on a trip, you need to know whether wheelchairs and walkers can fit in rented vehicles, whether hotels and restaurants have sufficient handicapped access, and what, precisely, is included in “handicap accessible” hotel rooms. Calls in advance make for smoother trips. “And please don’t forget about your home while you’re gone,” Pratt says. “Talk with a trusted neighbor or friend; this can also be the person that you share a detailed itinerary with. Finally, it’s good to have someone to check in with you on a certain date while you’re gone, so if they don’t hear back from you by that time, they can make inquiries.”


They probably weren’t thinking about home health care fifty years ago. At Interim, we were already providing it. Providing quality home care since 1966.

Oklahoma City: 405-848-3555 Tulsa: 918-749-9933 ©2019 Interim HealthCare Inc. Each office is independently owned and operated. Photo: “A Happy Family” by Tony Alter, flickr.com/photos/78428166@N00/3809376154, creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

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SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Fall Festival Preview By Mary Willa Allen

PHOTO BY CHARLES SAMUELS

Autumn air means Oklahoma’s festival season kicks off. Whether you’re looking to chow down, jam out, celebrate culture, watch sports or just explore your favorite hobbies, there’s a festival for that … guaranteed.

Greek Festival Sept. 19-22 – Tulsa

Give a rousing Opa for the return of this annual cultural celebration. Draw No. 1? The food. Try Greek grub, including loukaniko (pork sausage and peppers), keftedes (meatballs), rice pilaf and the classic gyro. Entertainment features dancers, live music, shopping and church tours. Enjoy “Kefi hours” from Thursday through Saturday, with late-night dancing in the streets and tempting drink specials. The event runs at the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church. Visit tulsagreekfestival.com.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

Dusk ’Til Dawn Blues Festival Through Sept. 2 OK Blues Hall of Fame, Rentiesville dcminnerblues.com Banjo Fest Sept. 5-7 American Banjo Museum, OKC banjofest2019.com Bluegrass and Chili Festival Sept. 6-7 Downtown Wagoner bluegrasschilifest.com Septemberfest Sept. 7 Oklahoma History Center, OKC okhistory.org Let It Be Arts Festival Sept. 7-8 Kiefer City Park travelok.com Coweta Fall Festival Sept. 12-14 Downtown cowetachamber.com Scotfest Sept. 13-15 Broken Arrow Events Park okscotfest.com Norman Film Festival Sept. 14 Downtown normanfilmfest.com Wiley Post Festival Sept. 14 506 Williams St., Maysville chickasawcountry.com MisFest Sept. 14 Guthrie Green, Tulsa misfest.com Skiatook Pioneer Day Festival and Rodeo Sept. 19-21 Skiatook Central Park Corner skiatookchamber.com Buckin’ Wild Music Festival Sept. 19-21 Lost Creek Ranch, Erick buckinwildmusicfest.com Tulsa Greek Festival Sept. 19-22 Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, Tulsa tulsagreekfestival.com

Medicine Stone Music Festival Sept. 20-22 Diamondhead Resort, Tahlequah medicinestoneok.com Stone River Music Festival Sept. 20-22 343188 E. 870 Road, Chandler stonerivermusicfestival.com Hennessey Wine and Chocolate Festival Sept. 21 Memorial Park hennesseyok.org Arts ’N’ Action Festival Sept. 21 Tillman County Courthouse Square, Frederick ramonatheatre.com Wings and Wheels Festival Sept. 21 Anadarko Municipal Airport anadarkochamber.org Elk City Fall Festival Sept. 21 Convention Center elkcitychamber.com Aviation Festival Sept. 21 Max Westheimer Airport, Norman ou.edu/airport/events/ festival Oklahoma Book Festival Sept. 21 Boathouse District, OKC okbookfest.org Fall Festival at the Orr Family Farm Sept. 21-Nov. 9 Orr Family Farm, OKC orrfamilyfarm.com Mesta Festa Sept. 22 Perle Mesta Park, OKC mestapark.org Pumpkin Festival at Shepherd’s Cross Sept. 24-Nov. 9 Shepherd’s Cross, Claremore shepherdscross.com Illinois River Jam Sept. 26-28 Peyton’s Place, Tahlequah illinoisriverjam.com


Linde Oktoberfest

PHOTO COURTESY LINDE OKTOBERFEST

Oct. 17-20 – Tulsa

One of the most lauded fall events in the nation runs at Tulsa’s River West Festival Park. Linde Oktoberfest celebrates its 41st year in Tulsa with authentic music, food and entertainment from Germany. The fun kicks off Oct. 16 with Corporate Night, where sponsors from around Oklahoma convene for a night of entertainment. Oct. 17 welcomes the general public with opening ceremonies, a whimsical parade and a fireworks display kicking off at 5 p.m. Activities to catch throughout the weekend include energetic performances atop Das Glockenspiel – a double decker stage with a bar below – and the adorable Dachshund Dash, where costumed canines race to be crowed top dog. Athletic events offer locals the chance to compete in a variety of challenges. The bier barrel races are a highlight, where participants roll barrels of beer down a track. Another wildly amusing event is the stein competition, where the brave of heart see who can hold a full stein of beer in an outstetched arm the longest. Stick around to try relays and ax throwing. For something more low-key, visit the arts and crafts markets or jam out with local musicians at a variety of tents around the property. Like any traditional fair, rides abound in a variety of intensities; scaredy-cats and adrenaline junkies alike can find their perfect fit. The crowned jewel atop Linde Oktoberfest is the fare. From kebab wraps and German skillet potatoes to bratwurst, schnitzel and sauerkraut, you’ll find something to enjoy while sipping on a beverage in the biergarten. For those looking to imbibe or hoping to save on parking, a free shuttle service runs downtown and at hotels around the city. For tickets and a schedule, visit tulsaoktoberfest.org.

SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Bluegrass and Chili Festival

Fiesta de las Americas Oct. 5 – OKC

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month in the Historic Capitol Hill district. Guests can enjoy a lively parade, dubbed the Parade of the Americas; this multicultural event showcases artistic floats from numerous small businesses, schools, cultural groups, nonprofits and clubs. The fun continues with live entertainment, a Latino art corner, a kids zone, food, a pageant and various vendors selling their wares. The fiesta runs from noon to 9 p.m. in Calle Dos Cinco. Visit historiccapitolhill.com. Fin and Feather Fall Festival Sept. 27-29 Fin and Feather Resort, Gore finandfeatherresort.com Oklahoma Born and Branded Festival Sept. 27-29 Oklahoma Street, Guthrie oklahomabornandbranded. com International Festival Sept. 27-29 Elmer Thomas Park, Lawton lawtonok.gov Haunted Castle Halloween Festival Sept. 27-Oct. 26 The Castle of Muskogee okcastle.com Sucker Day Festival Sept. 28

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Main Street, Wetumka travelok.com Plaza District Festival Sept. 28 Plaza District, OKC plazadistrict.org Grape Stomp Festival Sept. 29 Canadian River Winery, Lexington canadianriverwinery.net Oklahoma’s International Bluegrass Festival Oct. 3-5 Cottonwood Flats Recreation Area, Guthrie oibf.com EdFest Oct. 4 Farmers Market Pavilion, Edmond edfestokc.com

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

Honobia Bigfoot Festival and Conference Oct. 4-5 Kiamichi Mountain Mission Campgrounds, Honobia honobiabigfoot.com Oklahoma Regatta Festival Oct. 4-6 RiverSport Adventures, OKC riversport.org Rock Island Arts Festival Oct. 4-6 Rock Island Depot, Chickasha rockislandfestival.org MojoFest Oct. 5 The Church Studio, Tulsa tulsadaycenter.org Fiesta de las Americas Oct. 5

The 40th annual Bluegrass and Chili Festival offers many activities, live music and grub downtown. The free festival’s main event is the bluegrass. Headlining acts include Ricky Skaggs and the Kentucky Thunder; Michael Cleveland and Flamekeeper; The Cleverlys; and Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver. Other attractions include a car show with more than 50 class specifications, an antique tractor exhibition, a junior musical showcase and a Kiddie Koral for youngsters with crafts and inflatables. Guests should stick around for the exciting (and delicious) Mid-America Regional Chili Cook-Off on Sept. 7. The event runs from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily. Visit bluegrasschilifest.com.

PHOTO COURTESY BLUEGRASS AND CHILI FESTIVAL

PHOTO BY PHOTONATALIA

Sept. 6-7 – Wagoner

Historic Capitol Hill, OKC historiccapitolhill.com Oklahoma Czech Festival Oct. 5 Main Street, Yukon czechfestivaloklahoma.com Idabel Fall Festival Oct. 5 Downtown visitmccurtaincounty.com Tulsa American Film Festival Oct. 9-13 Kendall-Whittier Main Street tulsaamericanfilmfest.com Pelican Festival Oct. 10-13 Wolf Creek Park, Grove pelicanfestok.com Watonga Cheese Festival Oct. 11-12

Downtown thewatongacheesefestival. wordpress.com Owasso Harvest Festival Oct. 12 Redbud Festival Park cityofowasso.com Boo on Bell Fall Festival Oct. 17-19 Main Street and Bell Avenue, Shawnee visitshawnee.com Linde Oktoberfest Oct. 17-20 River West Festival Park, Tulsa tulsaoktoberfest.org Poteau Balloon Fest Oct. 18-19 LeFlore County Fair Grounds, Poteau poteauchamber.com


Robbers Cave Fall Festival Oct. 18-20 Robbers Cave State Park, Wilburton robberscavefallfestival.com Talihina Fall Foliage Festival Oct. 26 School Agriculture Barn

talihinacc.com National Weather Festival Oct. 26 National Weather Center, Norman ou.edu/nwc Dia de los Muertos Festival Nov. 1

Aviation Festival

Living Arts of Tulsa livingarts.org Will Rogers Days Nov. 1-4 Will Rogers Memorial Museum, Claremore willrogers.com/will-rogersdays Chamber Music Festival Nov. 7-10

McKnight Center for the Performing Arts, Stillwater mcknightcenter.org Beavers Bend Folk Festival and Craft Show Nov. 8-10 Forest Heritage Center Museum, Broken Bow forestry.ok.gov/fhc

Festival Food

Sept. 21 – Norman

E URT PHOTO CO

Learn the ins and outs of the aviation world at Max Westheimer Airport at the University of Oklahoma. The 13th annual Aviation Festival, free to the public, runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and offers static aircraft displays and question-and-answer sessions with professionals. Enjoy a kids corner with tours of the hangar, hands-on science-technology-engineering-and-math activities, and appearances from Caesar, a bomb-sniffing dog, and OU’s pony mascots, Boomer and Sooner. Lunch is free, and snow-cones and other treats are available to purchase. Visit ou.edu/airport/ events/festival.

SY LS TU

AG RE EK FE

STIVA L

The menu at the Tulsa Greek Festival spans from souvlaki – a chicken or pork shish kabob with rice and green beans – to rice pilaf, tyropita and baklava.

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Oct. 4-6 – OKC

SC

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Scotfest

You can’t go wrong with the food options at Tulsa’s Scotfest. Popular choices include fish and chips, haggis and shortbread. Stick around for several beers on tap.

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Oklahoma Czech Festival

OK

HO MA C

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TIVAL

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Oct. 26 – Norman

FE A THE R RE S OR T

Food trucks abound at the Fin and Feather Fall festival, or you can try Soda Steve’s on the property. Menu items include a variety of burgers, funky salads, fries and sandwiches.

Linde Oktoberfest

E URT PHOTO CO

SY D L IN

The University of Oklahoma’s National Weather Center plays host to this educational event for all ages that shines a light on the state’s important weather-related organizations. For the aspiring meteorologist – or just for those keen on learning more about how weather works – this festival has tours of the center’s premier facilities, along with meet-and-greets with some of Oklahoma’s most popular broadcast meteorologists. Other highlights include displays of emergency response vehicles, drone demonstrations, a children’s area, food trucks and the opportunity to issue your own tornado warning. The free event runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Visit ou.edu/nwc/visit/national-weather-festival.

The Czech Festival offers a variety of foods to nosh, including kolaches – pastries filled with sausage, cheese or fruit – plus sausages and klobasy sandwiches.

Fin and Feather Fall Festival

E URT PHOTO CO

PHOTO BY GEORGIA READ

LA

National Weather Festival

The most delicious part of any festival is the bevy of food options available. From multicultural delicacies to classic grub, you can find just about anything at Oklahoma events.

Tulsa Greek Festival

Oklahoma Regatta Festival Experience an entertaining day on the water at OKC’s RiverSport Adventures. Sporting competitions include dragon boating, whitewater rafting, kayaking and rowing; you’ll have a front row seat to all the action on the lawn. Apart from a riveting regatta, the festival offers beer gardens and food trucks to enjoy. New this year is the concurrent Thrive Outside Expo on Oct. 5. This exhibition offers a variety of informative stations where kids and adults alike can learn about getting active in the outdoors. Visit riversportokc.org.

Chocolate Festival Dec. 3 Frisco Avenue, Clinton clintonok.org Minco Honey Festival Dec. 7 Minco High School minco-ok.com

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Delectable German fare at this festival ranges from potato pancakes and applesauce to kebabs and bratwurst. Yum! SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST What can I do to start looking better for the holidays now? I want to feel comfortable at holiday parties. The first thing I would do is schedule a complimentary consultation to assess your individual needs and goals. However, a lot of people find Emsculpt to be a great option for MALISSA SPACEK what you’re talking about. Emsculpt uses muscle contractions to target and strengthen areas of the body including the abdomen, thighs, buttocks and arms. A full treatment consists of four, thirty-minute sessions completed over the course of two weeks. With each treatment, you’ll receive a 19% reduction of fat in the area as well as a 16% increase in muscle mass. To find out more, give us a call at 918.872.9999 or visit our website www.baweightspa.com.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 510 N. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

Esther M. Sanders Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. Tulsa, OK 74120 • 918.745.2000 Telephone 800.745.2006 Toll Free

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BOARD CERTIFIED BEHAVIOR ANALYST My child is beginning full-time ABA (applied behavior analysis) therapy soon. What does a typical day look like?

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC®, APMA® Prime Wealth Management A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2009 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.primewealthmgmt.com

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It is a violation of the laws of the State of Oklahoma for an employer to retaliate against an employee when the employee has made a ESTHER M. SANDERS good faith claim for benefits under the workers compensation act; retained a lawyer to represent him/her for the claim; or testified/is testifying in a workers compensation matter. The date of the injury will determine where a claim for the employers retaliation may be addressed, as well as what damages are available to the employee. It is best to contact an attorney about your rights quickly after being injured on the job.

How can a health savings account (HSA) help with healthcare expenses in retirement? In order to have access to an HSA, you generally must be covered under a high deductible health plan (HDHP) and have no other form of health coverage. Since HDHP plans come with larger up-front costs, they generally offer a HSA to DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC®, APMA® help participants manage their medical expenses. HSAs offer three key benefits. 1. They provide a flexible source of savings to cover a variety of out-of-pocket qualifying medical expenses. 2. HSAs are a tax-efficient source of funds. 3. The money doesn’t have to be spent by a specific deadline. Once you retire and reach at least 65, you can enroll in Medicare to help cover your heath expenses. Be aware that you will still need to pay premiums. In addition, Medicare generally doesn’t cover long-term care expenses, so you may need to purchase some form of long-term care coverage. Your HSA savings are available for you to use on a tax-free basis to pay Medicare-related premiums and even to pay premiums for long-term care insurance; this, is in addition to other qualified out-of-pocket expenses you may face in retirement.

ATTORNEY AT LAW I was injured on the job, then my employer fired me while I was off work ... for my workrelated injuries. Can he/she do that?

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

Our programming is tailored to uniquely fit each child. Sessions consist of one-on-one therapy with our highly trained behavior technicians. ABA BRIANNA BERRY focuses on positive reinforcement, so M. ED, BCBA each child receives high levels of praise to make learning fun. At Soaring On Hope, we believe in encouraging social reinforcement, so we do not use any edible or electronic rewards. Our clients enjoy exploring our toy room or racing scooters down the hall during breaks, and our therapy rooms are designed to facilitate multiple therapists and children for optimal social opportunities. After your child’s assessment, the board certified behavior analyst writes an individualized treatment and behavior plan for your child, which is implemented each session by targeting specific skills like communication, social and play/leisure activities and decreasing problem behaviors. Depending on your child’s needs, we also have therapy rooms dedicated to learning self-help skills like brushing teeth, hand washing, preparing meals and showering.

Brianna Berry, M. Ed, BCBA Soaring on Hope Pediatric Therapy and Autism Center 4908 S. Sheridan Rd. Tulsa, OK 74145 918.984.9153 www.sohkids.com

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL What does my car insurance liability stand for? Most people have no idea what their car insurance liabilities actually stand for. The first number represents your bodily injury coverage, per person/per accident. The last number represents the property damage liability limit. These are BRYAN SMITH very important components to remember when shopping for insurance. Of course, lower coverage can be cheaper, but it will also leave you exposed in the event of an accident. Unfortunately, the data tells us a good amount of people don’t have enough coverage to even cover the value of the car they drive, much less the values of the cars they could hit. For a review of what you have, never forget to visit callbryansmith.com.

Bryan Smith State Farm 6770 South Sheridan Road, STE B, 918.481.7283 1410 East 11th Street, 918.794.0001 www.callbryansmith.com

HOSPICE CARE My father has been diagnosed with inoperable cancer and his doctor recently recommended that we look into hospice care. We aren’t sure we should go. Where are hospices located? I am very sorry to read about your father’s diagnosis. First, please know that you are not alone; many CAITLIN EVERSOLE people are in the same situation. Your doctor is right – hospice can be a big help. Many people believe that hospice is a place, but it is actually a type of medical care specifically for patients facing a life-limiting disease. A central aspect of hospice is that whenever possible, people would rather be home when they are sick, instead of someplace else. Because of this, care is delivered wherever the patient calls home, whether that’s a house, apartment or senior living facility. Hospice also helps the family understand and cope with the situation. Please feel free to reach out to Grace Hospice at 918-7447223 at any time of the day or night so we can answer your questions. We are here to help.

Caitlin Eversole Admissions Supervisor Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6218 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

Channeling Kahlo in OKC Frida Southwest draws inspiration from the Mexican artist and experiments with the region’s traditional cuisine.

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THE QUIRKY SEAFOOD TAMALES COME WITH HOUSE-MADE GREEN CHILI TAMALES, JUMBO SHRIMP, LOBSTER, CRAB, SCALLOP AND SHERRY CREAM. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

he Paseo Arts District in Oklahoma City has long been home to free thinkers – a place where revolutionaries find refuge and solace, where the creativity of local and regional artists thrive. Artist and free thinker Magdalena Carmen y Calderón, commonly known as Frida Kahlo, defied identity and class through her paintings. It’s no wonder that Frida Southwest, a new restaurant in the Paseo district, chal-

lenges customers to think outside the box when it comes to southwestern inspired cuisine. In 2014, Shaun Fiaccone of Humankind Hospitality bought the lot at 500 Paseo and north Walker Avenue. He had ideas for the space, but the building needed artistic renovation. Enter Brian Fitzsimmons of Fitzsimmons Architects. “Brian designed 95% of Frida Southwest,” Fiaccone says. “One of the things I asked Brian to deliver was a restaurant that is going to look

as beautiful and relevant now [as it will] 20 years from now. I wanted him to treat this as an art project, not just architecture.” The flow and grace from the restaurant’s front curvature, with its perfectly tinted floor-to-ceiling windows, allow natural light to cascade through accents of terra cotta, sand and cobalt. A quiet study known as The Daley is incorporated into the design – a quaint, hidden nook, purposely not mentioned (well … until now) for those in the know. SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

CLOCKWISE: THE BONE-IN JIDORI CHICKEN BREAST COMES WITH THE “THREE SISTERS” OF HEIRLOOM BEANS, CORN AND SQUASH. FRIDA’S SEA BASS COMES WITH LOBSTER BEURRE BLANC, SAUTEED SPINACH AND WILD MUSHROOMS ON CREAMY CORN AND TRUFFLE OIL RISOTTO, PAIRED WITH THE DANTE’S INFERNO COCKTAIL. A BARTENDER AT FRIDA SOUTHWEST CREATES THE PURPLE RAIN COCKTAIL, WHICH INCLUDES BOURBON, LEMON AND BLUEBERRY LAVENDER SYRUP. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

More architectural elements channel Kahlo. “The jutting Corten steel beam [above the front door] represents the metal handrail that pierced through Frida during a bus accident when she was young,” says Ryan Parrott, chef and member of Humankind’s culinary team. “Other than that and a painting we have of her in the restaurant, that’s all the reference of Frida Kahlo there is. It isn’t our intent to represent or misuse her. We’re in an arts district; we have another restaurant named after an artist – Picasso Cafe – so Frida Southwest was a perfect match.” For the menu and cuisine, Parrot and head chef, Quinn Carroll, draw from flavors of both land and sea. “If you set a dinner plate on a map, and the top of the plate was at northern New Mexico, and it came over to Oklahoma City, went down into Texas and northern Mexico, that’s our food,” Parrott says. “Quinn is a big part of this menu.” Customer favorites include the house-rolled seafood tamales loaded

with crab, scallops, jumbo shrimp and mouthwatering lobster slipper tail or claw meat on light and fluffy green chile tamales. Another prized catch is Frida’s sea bass, with decadent lobster beurre blanc and spinach on creamy corn and truffle oil risotto. From the land, Carroll and team offer wood-grilled steaks galore; a bone-in jidori chicken breast with heirloom beans, corn and squash; pork belly and scallops; and a vegan-licious pepita crusted chile relleño. The appetizers, salads, soups and desserts take you on a fine ride through the most delicious parts of the southwest. To wet your whistle, Frida offers select wines with labels and receipts

to dazzle all levels of connoisseurs. For cocktails, let the colors of a Santa Fe sunset be your guide – from the blueberry-lavender syrup of Purple Rain (bourbon) and the Banana Star Galactica to the Sriracha icecubed Avocado Toast and the tall Dante’s Inferno with Thai chiliinfused Aperol. SCOTTY IRANI

LO C A L F L AV O R

PHOTO BY VALERIE GRANT

SQUISITO: PROSSIMO RISTORANTE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

Black leather banquettes. Tables with starched white linens. Waiters in shirt and tie. Large chandeliers with crystals glittering. A prawn bigger than a dinner plate perched atop jalapeño pesto. This is Prossimo Ristorante, new on Tulsa’s Cherry Street. Owner Jim Bausch, who also runs pizza behemoth Andolini’s, says Prossimo’s appearance is all by design. “If we’re going to do fine dining,” he says, “let’s go over the top.” One evening in Milan, Bausch found a tiny restaurant that served octopus roasted with sausage. “Holy lord, this is delicious,” he said then. And now, he has it on Prossimo’s menu. The bread, made from dough aged five

days, is served with roasted garlic, butter made in-house from creme fraiche, and tapenade from olives grown in Gaeta, just south of Rome, where Bausch once lived. Executive chef Mike Evangelista, who trained with Pacific Rim cuisine pioneer Sam Choy, has dreamed up edgy, spectacular entrées, such as the branzino filet served on caponata (Italian ratatouille) dotted with mascarpone cheese. “If you say this isn’t Italian,” Bausch says, “I’ll say, ‘You’re right; it’s ours.’” There are simple pasta dishes, too, like spaghetti bolognese. “That’s what I cook for my own kids every week,” he says. BRIAN SCHWARTZ


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Taste before Siegfried can think of going home. For most people, that long day would be a nightmare. For Siegfried, it’s a childhood dream come true. She’s been entranced by food and cooking since the day when, at age 5, she watched her grandmother make pastries and was thrilled that “someone C H E F C H AT could make a cake or bread out of nothing and make everyone happy.” “And for me,” she says, “cooking is pure happiness. It’s how I know to show love. I had Jacque Siegfried at the Tulsa Club’s Chamber restaurant cooking contests fosters a collaborative environment … with innovative results. with my dad every week, and the joshing and laughter made it magical. t’s 5 a.m. and Tulsa’s downMy dad is Native American, and he town lies deserted. On most taught me to show respect for nature days, however, if you walk and the animals that died that we past the Tulsa Club – an Art LEFT TO RIGHT: HEAD might eat.” Deco landmark that ArchiCHEF JACQUE SIEGFRIED IS While Siegfried was at Platt ColHAPPY TO COME IN EARLY tectural Digest recently called lavish, AND STAY LATE AT THE swanky and dazzling – you see a light lege’s culinary program, her instrucCHAMBER INSIDE THE NEW tor chef, Curt Herrmann, spotted on. Jacque Siegfried, executive chef TULSA CLUB. her budding talent … and critiqued of the Chamber restaurant, is preparGRILLED LOBSTER OVER RIher work mercilessly. Her proudest SOTTO IS ONE OF SEVERAL ing for the daily brunch. SEAFOOD DISHES AVAIL“Cleaning a salmon, cutting onions moment was when he said, “You did ABLE AT THE CHAMBER. for 45 minutes, whatever it takes, I’ll good, kid.” PHOTOS BY JOSH NEW Siefried put in time on the line do it,” she says. “I won’t ask my staff at kitchens all over Tulsa, and also to do anything I wouldn’t do.” TO SEE THE RECIPE waited tables at Goldie’s. After brunch ends, it’s time to do FOR SIEGFRIED’S GRILLED “So many chefs get angry at servordering and inventory; at 2 p.m., the LOBSTER OVER RISOTTO, ers,” she says. “I wanted to see things VISIT OKMAG.COM/ next shift arrives to begin prepping SIEGFRIED the evening meal. It’s long after dark from the server’s point of view so I

Puing in the Work

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

wouldn’t be that angry chef.” Later, Siegfried got a job at Cedar Ridge Country Club, where she worked for many years. “There were no angry chefs there,” she says, “because they were doing what they were passionate about. It was a happy place – very hectic but invigorating. I learned all I could.” She and executive chef Geoffrey van Glabbeek soon became fast friends. “I was insanely lucky,” Siegfried says, “because he let me run around creatively. One day, I said I wanted to make octopus because I had never worked with it, and a few days later it was there. Another time, I asked if he knew where I could get pig’s blood, and he showed up a few hours later with it.” Throughout Siegfried’s career, chefs have taught and encouraged her. Now, as an executive chef, she tries to do the same for her staff. “What do you want the restaurant to be?” she asks them … and then listens. Menu items are often collaborations. One cook suggested a coffee-crusted meat dish; another opined that pork went great with blueberry jam. Voilà: A coffee-crusted pork chop with blueberry compote was born. “Nobody knows everything, and I try to learn from everyone,” Siegfried says. “A cook wants to make a dish a new way? Why not try it? “I want my staff to have fulfilling lives, to go out and enjoy life. I try to give everyone two consecutive days off each week, and if that means I have to clean flattops at 5 a.m., I’ll do it. My life? Not much to tell. I married my high school sweetheart. I hang out with my family. I wanted to be an executive chef before I was 30, and I am. I’m 29 now. And I cook.” BRIAN SCHWARTZ


ROXY’S ICE CREAM SOCIAL OKC and Edmond

TA S T Y T I D B I T S

A Specialized Ice Cream Social Tour CAPITALS ICE CREAM OKC

The founders of this shop envision one store in each state capital, hence the plural in its title. The Oklahoma City location was created by four friends (including two brothers) so they could have something to do together. “We start with our classic vanilla ice cream as the base, but, from there, you choose toppings to be swirled in so each flavor is customized just for you,” says Landon Ferguson, the shop’s owner. The upcoming cooler months mean the debut of a shop in Edmond by the group, called Cities Cookies + Ice Cream. Beverages include beer and locally roasted coffees. capitalsicecream.com

THE SUPER SCOOP ABOVE: ROXY’S ICE CREAM SOCIAL IN THE OKC METRO OFFERS SWEET TREATS FOR THOSE WITH DIETARY RESTRICTIONS.

PHOTO COURTESY ROXY’S ICE CREAM SOCIAL

RIGHT: STG GELATERIA PRIDES ITSELF ON THE AUTHENTIC TASTE OF ITS GELATO. PHOTO BY VALERIE GRANT

Edmond

Edmond was ripe for a non-chain option to get ice cream; plus, residents with special needs deserved additional opportunities for employment, owner Riley Eden says. The ice cream is homemade from Oklahoma ingredients. The namesake dessert is a wedding cake-flavored ice

cream made with batter from an old recipe, Eden says. Another favorite is an offbeat combination with Dr Pepper and chocolate chips. Plans include partnering with Not Your Average Joe’s coffee shop, which also hires those with special needs. thesuperscoop.com

BIG DIPPER CREAMERY Tulsa

This locally owned, small-batch shop carries homemade ice creams inspired by seasonal fruits, nuts, herbs and vegetables grown in-state, owner Samantha Cooper says. “We’ve experimented with sand plums, wild blackberries, sumac and foraged herbs, too,” she says. “You’ll still find decadent flavors like vegan cookies and cream, ooey gooey butter cake and salted caramel with brown butter ganache. We know this community appreciates quality and creativity, which is why we feel really supported here. “Ice cream is a feelgood food that we take seriously, and sharing it with our patrons is incredibly rewarding.” bigdippercreamery.com

The four locations in metropolitan OKC feature classic dairy ice creams, along with vegan, gluten-free and nut-free treats, catering to those who may not get treats otherwise, general manager Sierra Mason says. Roxy’s has offered more than 80 flavors, including special holiday favorites for Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Special-ordered ice cream cakes are popular during cooler months. Mason admits to a couple of personal favorites. “Five pounds of fresh mango go into every batch of our mango [ice cream] and I can’t resist it,” she says. “I also love the raspberry chocolate chip, which is a sorbet with a sweet cream base and mini chocolate chips.” roxysicecream.com

STG GELATERIA Tulsa and Broken Arrow

It’s not enough to offer authentic Italian pizza and gelato at Andolini’s; the same owners of STG Gelateria say everything must be specialita tradizionale garantita (traditional specialities guaranteed). The gelato tastes more than “a lot like” the smooth dessert found in Italy – it’s exactly the same, says co-owner Mike Bausch who, along with brother Jim, put in the time, travel and resources to buy the specific equipment for the precise, multi-level process necessary to perfect every batch of gelato. In addition to various gelati, the shops have homemade pastries and fresh-roasted Topeca coffees. stgitalian.com TRACY LEGRAND

SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Where & When

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

Fair Times Ahead

Tulsa features rock and country music, Disney on Ice and a rodeo; OKC has a Renaissance Village, a film festival and a flyin’ fiddler.

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA STATE FAIR

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hose who love eating fried foods on a stick, walking the midway and enjoying all sorts of carnival rides can get their fixes in Oklahoma’s two biggest cities. At Oklahoma City’s State Fair Park, the Oklahoma State Fair runs Sept. 12-22. “We’re excited to debut awesome new shows, contests and demonstrations,” State Fair Park’s Holly Bottrell says. “Fair-goers will love going back in time when they step into our Renaissance Village, featuring royalty, jesters [and] dancers.” Also new is the first Oklahoma State Fair Film Festival, a joint effort with

the group behind the deadCenter Film Festival in OKC, Bottrell says. The winning films play in the OK Contemporary Arts Theater on Sept. 14. Other attractions this year are the Xtreme Chinese Acrobats, Kids Celebration, young trick horseman Charro Gabriel Hernandez, live music with Flyin’ Fiddler Wayne Cantwell, and an exhibition on American pottery techniques from the 1800s. This year’s Tulsa State Fair, Sept. 26-Oct. 6, emphasizes “live music daily, from country to rock; the stages are sure to keep the beat going and your boots tapping all evening,” says Amanda Blair, CEO for Expo Square and the fair.

Concerts on the Oklahoma Stage include Lanco, Ginuwine, Chris Janson and Whiskey Myers. Family fun abounds, too. “This year’s Disney on Ice performance feature Mickey’s Search Party, and will entertain kids and kids at heart,” Blair says. “Don’t miss your favorite Disney characters the first weekend of the fair in the historic [Expo Square] Pavilion.” She says the second weekend features Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association-sanctioned contests in the pavilion. Blair adds that the fair has “new foods, new rides, new entertainment and an overall 11 days of awesome.” SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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FROM BROADWAY TO BALLET

September is kickoff time – not only for football but for myriad performing arts companies around Oklahoma. In Tulsa, Signature Symphony’s shows include The Wonderful Music of Oz on Sept. 6 and Classics - Tchaikovsky 5 on Sept. 28 at the TCC Van Trease PACE. The world-renowned Tulsa Ballet presents Creations in Studio K from Sept. 12 to 22, with works by choreographers Ma Cong, Garrett Smith and Val Caniparoli in the company’s Studio K Theater. On Sept. 14 at the Performing Arts Center, the Tulsa Symphony begins its season with Classics I: Opening Night Gala Concert with guest Rachel Barton Pine. Celebrity Attractions rounds out the month with the musical Les Misérables from Sept. 24 to 29 at the PAC. Oklahoma City boasts shows aplenty. Based on the 1977 interviews between former President Richard Nixon and TV host David Frost, Lyric Theatre’s Frost/ Nixon runs Sept 4-22 at Lyric at the Plaza. Romance and music fill the air when the Four Italian Tenors perform Sept. 12 at Edmond’s Armstrong Auditorium. The Oklahoma City Philharmonic offers Oklahoma Stories: Kilpatrick and Beethoven on Sept. 14 at the Civic Center Music Hall. You can catch OKC Broadway’s Fiddler on the Roof, also at Civic Center Music Hall, from Sept. 24 to 29.

OKLAHOMA ANNUAL DERBY GRADE III

IN TULSA PERFORMANCES

THEATRE TULSA PRESENTS: MAMMA MIA! Through Sept. 1 Tulsa PAC

Theatre Tulsa opens its 97th season with the sunny, funny and heartwarming musical based on ABBA’s famous songs. theatretulsa.org

OK WORLD STAGE THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS: SHE LIKES GIRLS Sept. 5-8 Tulsa PAC See this compelling

story about Kia and Marisol’s forbidden romance as they juggle social expectations.

tulsapac.com

TULSA SYMPHONY PRESENTS: SYMPHONY IN THE PARK Sept. 6 Guthrie Green Tulsa Symphony

kicks off its season with an outdoor concert and fireworks. tulsasymphony.org

SIGNATURE SYMPHONY PRESENTS: POPS I – THE WONDERFUL MUSIC OF OZ

Sept. 6-7 TCC Van Trease PACE

Follow the yellow brick road and defy gravity on a musical journey somewhere over the rainbow. signaturesymphony.org

CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS

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PRESENTS: HAMILTON

Through Sept. 8 Tulsa PAC

Featuring a score that blends hip-hop, jazz, blues, rap and R&B, Hamilton is the story of America then as told by America now. celebrityattractions.com

TULSA BALLET PRESENTS: CREATIONS IN STUDIO K

Sept. 12-22 Studio K Creations in Studio K commissions works from the most in-demand choreographers in the world.

tulsaballet.org

THEATRE TULSA PRESENTS: PICASSO AT THE LAPIN AGILE Sept. 13-22

Tulsa PAC From the

imagination of Steve Martin comes a profound, hilarious comedy. theatretulsa.org

TULSA SYMPHONY PRESENTS: OPENING NIGHT GALA CONCERT

2 CHAMBER MUSIC TULSA PRESENTS: AMERICAN BRASS QUINTET Sept. 22 Tulsa PAC With vibrant

harmony and bold power, the American Brass Quintet creates a visceral listening experience.

chambermusictulsa.org

CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS PRESENTS: LES MISERABLES Sept. 24-29 Tulsa PAC With glorious

new staging and dazzlingly re-imagined scenery inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo, this production has left audiences awestruck.

celebrityattractions.com

TULSA PAC TRUST PRESENTS: MISS NELSON HAS A FIELD DAY Sept. 27

Tulsa PAC Return to Horace B. Smedley School, where the Tornadoes have never won a football game. tulsapac.com

PHOTO BY DUSTIN ORONA PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY REMINGTON PARK

READY FOR AN EXCITING SEPTEMBER? READ ON FOR OUR TOP CHOICES THIS MONTH.

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PHOTO BY MATTHEW MURPHY

Where & When

PERFORMANCE

LES MISÉRABLES

COMMUNIT Y

WOODWORKING, SPEAKERS AND HORSE RACING

Tulsa’s and Oklahoma City’s town halls offer intriguing speaking engagements this month. Enjoy environmentalist and activist Alexandra Cousteau at Tulsa Town Hall’s Sept. 13 event at the Performing Arts Center. Known as the father of supply-side economics, author Art Laffer speaks at the OKC Town Hall opener Sept. 19 at Church of the Servant. For those in search of some adrenaline, Remington Park’s 31st Oklahoma Annual Derby Grade III runs from Sept 23 to 29 with horse racing, a wine-tasting festival, a golf tournament and a gala. You can see talented artists at work Sept. 13-15 during the Master Woodturning Competition at the Broken Bow Forest Heritage Center.

series features some of Oklahoma’s finest professional musicians performing in the Westby Pavilion. tulsapac.com

WALLOWS Sept. 12 Cain’s Ballroom Enjoy Wallows on its Nothing Happens Tour.

cainsballroom.com JEFF BECK Sept. 18 Brady Theater English rocker and

guitarist Jeff Beck performs.

bradytheater.com BUDDY GUY Sept. 19 Hard Rock Hotel and Casino

Blues guitarist/singer Buddy Guy performs.

hardrockcasinotulsa.com JOJO SIWA Sept. 20 BOK Center JoJo Siwa has added

more dates to Nickelodeon’s JoJo Siwa D.R.E.A.M The Tour. bokcenter.com

DEEP PURPLE Sept. 21

ART FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL

Sept. 6 Arts District This

year-round, monthly event features works from galleries, artists, studios and museums.

of Spectres is a series of large-scale drawings exploring specters and shrouds.

exhibition from artist Jave Yohimoto. livingarts.org

WONDROUS WORLDS: ART AND ISLAM THROUGH TIME AND PLACE Through Oct. 6

thetulsaartsdistrict.org 6-Oct. 18 Living Arts of Tulsa See the newest

DORTHEA LANGE’S AMERICA Sept. 13-Jan. 5

Gilcrease If it is a cliché to

suggest that art and suffering are often connected, it is true that the Great Depression was a catalyst for an outburst of creative energy from America’s photographic community.

gilcrease.org

28 TCC Van Trease PACE

hardrockcasinotulsa.com BEN HARPER Sept. 25 Cain’s Ballroom See Ben Harper

PORTICO DANCE THEATRE PRESENTS: PROJECT ALICE

signaturesymphony.org

JONAS BROTHERS Sept. 29

Dance Theatre celebrates its 10-year anniversary with a re-staging of its inaugural production, Project Alice.

Sept. 15 Gilcrease Bob Dylan: Face Value and Beyond is the culmination of efforts by Gilcrease in partnership with the Bob Dylan Center to create a temporary home for the center’s collection.

BROWN BAG IT: BRANJAE

by world-renowned violinist Rachel Barton Pine, Tulsa Symphony opens its concert season. tulsasymphony.org

Sept. 20-21 Tulsa PAC Portico

tulsapac.com

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

SIGNATURE SYMPHONY PRESENTS: CLASSICS I – TCHAIKOVSKY 5 Sept.

Enjoy a return to the classics with this evening of music.

CONCERTS Sept. 4 Tulsa PAC The Brown

Bag It free noontime concert

English rock band Deep Purple performs.

with his band, the Innocent Criminals. cainsballroom.com BOK Center After

overwhelming anticipation, this Grammy-nominated powerhouse is on tour.

bokcenter.com

INTO THE LAND OF

SPECTRES Through Sept. 22 ahha Tulsa Into the Land

JAVE YOHIMOTO: INTRACTABLE CHASM Sept.

Hard Rock Hotel and Casino

Sept. 14 Tulsa PAC Joined

Body exhibits jewelry crafted from construction materials, such as lightweight paper or cement. 108contemporary.org

BOB DYLAN: FACE VALUE AND BEYOND Through

gilcrease.org

BUILDING ON THE BODY

Through Sept. 22 108 Contemporary Building on the

ahhatulsa.org

Philbrook The most extensive exhibition of Islamic art to be shown in Oklahoma represents more than 1,200 years of rich creation, illustrating the geographic expanse of the Muslim world. philbrook.org

THE EXPERIENCE Ongoing

Ahha Tulsa This artist-driven, large-scale, fully immersive installation invites participants to explore a fantastic multimedia environment. ahhatulsa.org

SPORTS TULSA REINING CLASSIC

Through Sept. 1 Expo Square

See reining experts and their equine partners at this competition. exposquare.com

DRILLERS BASEBALL Sept. 1-2 ONEOK Field The season


200 of Mother Nature’s most ill-mannered plants.

tulsabotanic.org

CHARITABLE EVENTS CHAPTERS Sept. 5 Hardesty Regional Library This annual fundraiser benefits the Ruth G. Hardman Adult Literacy Services and the Tulsa City-County Library.

tulsalibrarytrust.org/events KALEIDOSCOPE BALL Sept. 6 Cox Business Center Enjoy a

cocktail reception with dinner, a live auction and dancing to follow. eiskball.org

RESTAURANT WEEK Sept. 6-15 Citywide Participating

restaurants offer a special prix fixe menu for lunch or dinner and donate a portion of Restaurant Week menu sales to the Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma. okfoodbank.org

Center Hosted by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma, this program celebrates people and organizations that make a positive impact on the health of Oklahomans.

PHOTO COURTESY OSU ATHLETICS

College football season begins with home games for the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University and the University of Tulsa. The Sooners began the season at the Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium in Norman on Aug. 31 against the Houston Cougars. OU takes on South Dakota on Sept. 7 and Texas Tech on Sept. 28. OSU plays McNeese State on Sept. 7 and Kansas State on Sept. 28 at Boone Pickens Stadium in Stillwater. TU hosts OSU on Sept. 14 and Wyoming on Sept. 21 at Chapman Stadium. Oklahoma’s professional soccer teams begin to wind down, but there are still matches to enjoy. The Oklahoma City Energy FC hosts New Mexico United on Sept. 8 and Sacramento Republic FC on Sept. 22 at Taft Stadium. The Tulsa Roughnecks entertain Orange County SC on Sept. 21 and San Antonio FC on Sept. 25 at ONEOK Field. Don’t forget to make a pit stop at the Oklahoma State Fair for some exciting bull riding at the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association’s Extreme Bulls and Broncs event Sept. 20-21.

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA FOOTBALL Sept. 14, 21

Chapman Stadium See TU take on Oklahoma State and the University of Wyoming. tulsahurricane.com

TULSA CLASSIC Sept. 21

BOK Center The Dallas Stars return to take on the Florida Panthers for the second annual Tulsa Classic. bokcenter.com

ROUGHNECKS FC SOCCER Sept. 21, 25 OneOK Field See

the Roughnecks take on Orange County and San Antonio. roughnecksfc.com

COMMUNITY TULSA’S GREAT RAFT RACE Sept. 2 Arkansas River Get

ready for the fifth year of the Great Raft Race’s revival on the Arkansas River. tulsaraftrace.com

JUST BETWEEN FRIENDS SALE Sept. 8-14 Expo Square Enjoy deep discounts on a variety of items. tulsa.jbfsale.com

TULSA TOWN HALL PRESENTS: ALEXANDRA COUSTEAU Sept. 13 Tulsa

PAC An explorer, filmmaker

and globally recognized advocate on water issues, Alexandra Cousteau continues the work of her renowned grandfather Jacques Cousteau and her father, Philippe

Cousteau Sr.

tulsapac.com

SECOND SATURDAY ARCHITECTURE TOURS Sept. 14

Tulsa Foundation for Architecture Each

month, the group offers popular walking tours highlighting some of downtown’s architectural treasures.

tulsaarchitecture.org

DISNEY ON ICE: MICKEY’S

SEARCH PARTY Sept. 26-29 Expo Square Join Mickey Mouse and his friends during a brand-new adventure filled with world-class skating, high-flying acrobatics and unexpected stunts.

exposquare.com TULSA STATE FAIR Sept. 26Oct. 6 Tulsa Fairgrounds The

fair is the city’s largest family event, providing educational experiences and entertainment.

okcciviccenter.com

OKC BROADWAY PRESENTS: FIDDLER ON THE ROOF Sept. 24-29 Civic

Center Music Hall Fiddler on the Roof is the heartwarming story of fathers and daughters, husbands and wives, and life, love and laughter. okcbroadway.com

CONCERTS Theatre The Fixx has been heralded as one of the most innovative bands to come out of the MTV era.

REBIRTH BRASS BAND Sept. 9 Tower Theatre

Whether seen on HBO’s Treme or at its legendary gig at The Maple Leaf, Grammy-winning Rebirth Brass Band is a New Orleans institution. towertheatreokc.com

HILLSONG UNITED Sept. 13 Chesapeake Energy Arena

Hillsong United’s The People Tour and special guest Amanda Lindsey Cook perform. chesapeakearena.com

ALAN JACKSON Sept. 14 Chesapeake Energy Arena

Country superstar Alan Jackson rocks the house.

chesapeakearena.com

championsofhealth.org

TOMMY EMMANUEL Sept.

Spirit Casino Resort Participate

Tommy Emmanuel has achieved enough musical milestones to satisfy several lifetimes. okcciviccenter.com

23RD ANNUAL RACE FOR THE CURE AND HALFMARATHON Sept. 28 River

concludes with games against Corpus Christi. milb.com

Comedian Bill Maher is an Emmy-nominated talk show host and commentator.

towertheatreokc.com

CHAMPIONS OF HEALTH GALA Sept. 26 Cox Business

FOOTBALL, SOCCER AND RODEO

Civic Center Music Hall

western-themed gala benefits the American Cancer Society and its research to find a cure for cancer.

themed dinner includes entertainment, silent and live auctions, and a wine pull – all to continue staff education and training at the Jane Phillips Medical Center. jpmc.org

SPORTS

AN EVENING OF STANDUP WITH BILL MAHER Sept. 22

THE FIXX Sept. 4 Tower

tulsacattlebaronsball.org GLITZ BLITZ Sept. 21 Hillcrest Country Club, Bartlesville This football-

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY FOOTBALL

Center Music Hall When Count Almaviva and his love, Rosina, run into an issue preventing them from being married, they call on local barber Figaro, who knows exactly how to solve the problem. paintedskyopera.org

LIGHTS, CAMERA, CURE!

Sept. 20 Christiansen Hanger, Jones Riverside Airport This

3

SEVILLE Sept. 20, 22, 27 Civic

in a half-marathon, 5K or 1-mile fun run, celebrate breast cancer survivors and support the fight against the disease. komentulsa.org

IN OKC

PERFORMANCES LYRIC THEATRE PRESENTS: FROST/NIXON Sept. 4-22 Lyric at the Plaza Politics

and the news media collide spectacularly in David Frost’s 1977 landmark interviews of former President Richard Nixon.

lyrictheatreokc.com

FOUR ITALIAN TENORS

Sept. 12 Armstrong Auditorium

For the first time in the United States, the Four Italian Tenors perform arias in wonderfully unique arrangements.

armstrongauditorium.org

RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE: WERQ THE WORLD TOUR

Sept. 12 Civic Center Music Hall Mission leader Asia

O’Hara is on a journey to save the universe with the help of her intergalactic queens.

20 Civic Center Music Hall

CARRIE UNDERWOOD Sept. 25 Chesapeake Energy Arena

Carrie Underwood emerged from her 2005 American Idol victory to become a true multiformat, multimedia superstar.

chesapeakearena.com HOME FREE Sept. 25 Hudiburg Chevrolet Center, Midwest City The band’s rich,

Southern harmonies from four vocalists come to town. okcciviccenter.com

IRON AND WINE, CALEXICO Sept. 30 Tower Theatre

Calexico and Iron and Wine first made an artistic connection with In the Reins, a 2005 EP.

towertheaterokc.com

ART UNDER THE ARCTIC

Through Sept. 2 Sam Noble

Museum, Norman Step into the shoes of climate science researchers, piece together clues and solve engineering challenges posed by thawing permafrost. samnoblemuseum.ou.edu

okcciviccenter.com

FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK Sept. 6 Paseo Arts

WICKED PLANTS: EXPLORING HORTICULTURAL HORRORS WITH AUTHOR AMY STEWART Sept. 28 Tulsa

Music Hall Enjoy the music of

and more than 25 businesses, all within walking distance, stay open late the first Friday of each month. thepaseo.org

Wicked Plants, Stewart showcases more than

PAINTED SKY OPERA PRESENTS: THE BARBER OF

tulsastatefair.com

Botanic Garden In her book

OKC PHIL PRESENTS: CLASSICS I – OKLAHOMA STORIES Sept. 14 Civic Center Ralph Kilpatrick and Ludwig van Beethoven at OKC Phil’s season opener. okcphil.org

District More than 80 artists

BETWEEN THE ISMS

Through Sept. 8 Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, Norman This

exhibition features recent

SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

75


paintings from the Oklahoma Society of Impressionists as well as a selection of paintings by Oklahoma artists working in expressionist styles. ou.edu/fjjma

WEDDING CLOTHES AND THE OSAGE COMMUNITY: A GIVING HERITAGE Sept.

14-Dec. 8 Sam Noble Museum of Natural History, Norman See

the newest exhibition, featuring authentic Osage garb. samnoblemuseum. ou.edu

CABALLEROS Y VAQUEROS Sept. 14-Jan. 5 National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum The iconic Western

cowboy actually can trace his roots to north and west Africa, up through Spain and then to the New World.

nationalcowboymuseum.org

VAN GOGH, MONET, DEGAS: THE MELLON COLLECTION OF FRENCH ART FROM THE VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS Through

Sept. 22 OKCMOA Featuring

more than 70 works by French and other European masters, this exhibition celebrates the Mellon family’s extraordinary gift of 19th- and early 20th-century art to the Virginia Museum of Fine Art. okcmoa.com

LIFE IMAGINED: THE ART AND SCIENCE OF AUTOMATA Through Sept.

29 Science Museum Oklahoma

From the Greek word automatos, meaning “moves on its own,” automata are the first complex machines produced by humans. This exhibition features 41 automata by 15 artists from around the world. sciencemuseumok.org

LAYERED STORIES – AMERICA’S CANYONLANDS Through Oct. 20 National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum Enjoy stunning

art of America’s many vast

76

canyons in this exhibit.

nationalcowboymuseum.org

PHOTOGRAPHING THE STREET Through Dec. 1

OKCMOA Photographing the Street features the work of four American and Canadian artists who have chosen the street as their primary subject. okcmoa.com

PASSPORT Through March 1 National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum Though

often defined by their most well-known work or style, artists experiment and evolve throughout their careers. nationalcowboymuseum.org

COLORS OF CLAY Through

May 10 National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum

Ballpark See the OKC Dodgers

take on New Orleans in the season closer. milb.com

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA FOOTBALL

Sept. 1, 7, 28 Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, Norman The Sooners host

Houston, South Dakota and Texas Tech. soonersports.com

WHEELER CRITERIUM Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24 Wheeler District

wheelerdistrict.com ENERGY FC SOCCER Sept. 8, 22 Taft Stadium The Energy

host other teams in the United Soccer League. energyfc.com

COMMUNITY

FROM THE GOLDEN AGE TO THE MOVING IMAGE: THE CHANGING FACE OF THE PERMANENT COLLECTION

days of friendly competition and on-the-water fun.

Museum of Art reopens its second-floor galleries with a new presentation of its permanent collection.

17, 19, 21, 24, 26, 28 Myriad Botanical Gardens Visit every

nationalcowboymuseum.org

Ongoing OKCMOA The OKC

okcmoa.com

APICHATPONG WEERASETHAKUL’S FIREWORKS (ARCHIVES)

Ongoing OKCMOA Fireworks

(Archives), from 2014, is the first of a series of works by Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

okcmoa.com

LABOR DAY WEEKEND FUN Through Sept. 2 Riversport Adventures Enjoy a few

Sept. 1-2 Chickasaw Bricktown

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

PHOTO COURTESY CHOCTAW CASINO AND RESORT

There’s no shortage of music this month. At Tulsa’s BOK Center, mark Sept. 20 for tween sensation JoJo Siwa or chill with the Jonas Brothers on Sept. 29. The Hard Rock Hotel and Casino rocks out with Buddy Guy on Sept. 19 and Deep Purple on Sept. 21. OKC’s Chesapeake Energy Arena features Hillsong on Sept. 13, Alan Jackson on Sept 14, and Oklahoma native and American Idol champ Carrie Underwood on Sept. 25. Thackerville’s Winstar World Casino and Resort boasts a busy lineup with ’80s rockers Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo on Sept. 7, Sebastian Maniscalco on Sept. 13, Intocable on Sept. 14, Dwight Yoakam on Sept. 20, the Doobie Brothers on Sept. 27, and Hall and Oates on Sept. 28. Also on Sept. 28, Boys II Men perform at the Choctaw Casino and Resort in Durant.

5

season opener, Art Laffer, economist and author.

townhall.publishpath.com/ lecture-series

own garden with this free, educational event.

myriadgardens.org

CHARITABLE EVENTS

of music under the Ferris wheel lights with music from Saint Loretto, Flock of Pigs and Sophia Massad.

RENAISSANCE BALL Sept. 6

Enjoy exciting banjo music and talented musicians.

BANJO FEST Sept. 5-7 American Banjo Museum

banjofest2019.com VEGFESTOKC Sept. 7 Myriad Botanical Gardens Celebrate

OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR

OKC DODGERS BASEBALL

A MUSICAL MONTH

WHEELER SUMMER MUSIC SERIES Sept. 20 Wheeler

so after World War II was one of the most fertile periods in the history of abstract painting.

SPORTS

IN CONCERT

Tuesday and Thursday evening and Saturday morning for yoga in nature. myriadgardens.org

healthy living and eating by way of plant-based lifestyles.

okcmoa.com

ALAN JACKSON

BOYS II MEN

riversportokc.org

BOTANICAL BALANCE FREE YOGA Sept. 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 14,

POSTWAR ABSTRACTION: VARIATIONS Ongoing

OKCMOA The half-century or

BUDDY GUY

This is the city’s premier cycling festival. Cheer riders as they race against the clock and each other.

Colors of Clay explores the cultural and regional diversity of indigenous ceramic vessel traditions in North America.

PHOTO COURTESY BOK CENTER

4

JONAS BROTHERS

PHOTO COURTESY HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO

DORTHEA LANGE’S AMERICA

HILLSONG

PHOTO COURTESY CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA

Jewelry, photography and sculptures are part of this month’s art exhibitions in Oklahoma. Jewelry created from construction materials are featured in Building on the Body through Sept. 22 at Tulsa’s 108 Contemporary. At Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Dorthea Lange’s America, a photography exhibition about the Great Depression, debuts Sept. 13. It showcases images by many talented photographers of the era. The show runs through Jan. 5. The National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City presents Caballeros y Vaqueros from Sept. 14 to Jan. 5. It explores the Western cowboy’s roots from around the world.

PHOTO COURTESY CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA

EXHIBITIONS ABOUND

UNEMPLOYED MEN ON HOWARD STREET. SAN FRANCISCO, 1937. PHOTO COURTESY GILCREASE MUSEUM

Where & When

ART

vegfestokc.com

Sept. 12-22 Oklahoma State Fair Park Enjoy the fun of the

Ferris Wheel Enjoy a night

wheelerdistrict.com

HOT WHEELS MONSTER TRUCKS Sept. 21 Chesapeake Energy Arena

The stars of the show perform jumps and stunts with crashing and smashing as they entertain fans. chesapeakearena.com

fair with rides, food, music and games. okstatefair.com

GARDENS MONTHLY WALKING TOUR Sept. 28

Sept. 19 Church of the Servant Community Hall See the

Expand your knowledge of Oklahoma plants and find inspiration for your

OKC TOWN HALL PRESENTS: ART LAFFER

Myriad Botanical Gardens

heritagehall.com/hh50

MIRACLES ON 39TH STREET FUNDRAISING GALA Sept. 21 Children’s

Center Rehabilitation Hospital

Oklahoma City Golf and Country

With more than 300 guests, this event raises money for children with complex medical needs.

com/fundraising-events

beer and raise money for the Oklahoma Zoological Society.

Club This elegant, black-tie gala is the largest annual fundraiser benefiting the Oklahoma City Museum of Art and its programs. okcmoa.

HERITAGE HALL 50TH ANNIVERSARY WEEKEND Sept. 6-8 Heritage Hall

Heritage Hall commemorates its golden anniversary with schoolwide celebrations featuring alumni and faculty reunions, a family day, a Saturday evening dinner and performances, and a Founders’ Day brunch.

miracleshappenhere.org ZOOBREW Sept. 27 Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Gardens Drink

zoofriends.org/events TINKERFEST Sept. 28 Science Museum Oklahoma

This celebration of curiosity and creativity encompasses the entire museum and grounds and features dozens of hands-on tinkering activities. sciencemuseumok. org/tinkerfest


PHOTO COURTESY TULSA GREAT RAFT RACE

6

TULSA’S GREAT RAFT RACE

FA M I LY / K I D S

FUN FOR ALL

PHOTO BY DAVID T. KINDLER

Tulsa’s Great Raft Race is planned at River West Festival Park on Labor Day (Sept. 2). It’s the fifth consecutive year of masses floating down the Arkansas River since the tradition was reinstated. Head to Chesapeake Energy Arena in OKC on Sept. 21 for Hot Wheels Monster Trucks. This adrenaline-pumping show features six giant trucks performing jumps and stunts with plenty

of crashing and smashing. Excitement fills the skies at the Guthrie Edmond Regional Airport Community Day and Fly-In. This Sept. 14 event offers free admission, aircraft displays, radio-controlled aircraft, a car show, food vendors and activities for children. Previously known as the Ada Medieval Fair, the Rocky Top Winery Medieval Fair runs Sept. 28 near Allen with arts, crafts, storytellers, food vendors and a re-creation of a 14th-century market.

Ready for some fun in the fall? Dance with us! www.SouthTulsaDanceCo.com 918.369.5299 101st and Yale

Classes have begun, join us today! 23876 South Tulsa Dance Co.indd 1

7/24/19 1:03 PM

UPCOMING EVENTS

HOT WHEELS MONSTER TRUCKS

AROUND THE STATE PERFORMANCES

GASLIGHT THEATER PRESENTS: ONE MAN, TWO GUVNORS Sept. 6-8,

12-14 Gaslight Theatre, Enid

Enjoy this comedic play based upon the 1743 piece Servant of Two Masters.

gaslighttheatre.org

POLLARD THEATRE PRESENTS: DRIVING MISS DAISY Through Sept. 7

Pollard Theatre, Guthrie

Alfred Uhry’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play returns after nearly 20 years with a cast of Pollard veterans. thepollard.

org

SEBASTIAN MANISCALCO

Sept. 13 Winstar World Casino and Resort, Thackerville

Comedian, actor and best-selling author Sebastian Maniscalco received Billboard’s inaugural Comedian of the Year award in 2018. winstar.com

DUNCAN LITTLE THEATRE PRESENTS: EVENING OF SHORTS Sept. 13-21 Marlow

Opera House Enjoy quality

performances, along with drinks and desserts during intermission.

duncanlittletheatre.com GABRIEL IGLESIAS Sept. 21 Winstar World Casino and Resort, Thackerville You’ll

blizzard. One of them is killed and sets off an investigation.

sapulpatheatre.org

CONCERTS PAT BENETAR AND NEIL GIRALDO Sept. 7 Winstar

World Casino and Resort,

laugh until you cry while watching Gabriel “Fluff y” Iglesias perform his standup routine. winstar.com

Thackerville Two icons of rock hit the Global Event Center stage. winstar.com

Theatre, Miami Frank Loesser’s brassy, immortal score makes Guys and Dolls a crowd pleaser.

by Hank Williams, Johnny Cash and Buck Owens, Dwight Yoakam is a country music staple. winstar.com

MIAMI LITTLE THEATRE PRESENTS: GUYS AND DOLLS Sept. 26-29 Coleman miamilittletheatre.com

SAPULPA COMMUNITY THEATRE PRESENTS: THE MOUSETRAP Sept. 27-29,

Oct. 4-6 Sapulpa Community Theatre Seven strangers arrive

at Monkswell Manor during a

DWIGHT YOAKAM Sept. 20 Winstar World Casino and Resort, Thackerville Inspired

DOOBIE BROTHERS Sept. 27 Winstar World Casino and Resort, Thackerville With one

of the most loyal fan bases in music, the Doobie Brothers continue to tour the world.

winstar.com

FOR MORE EVENTS IN TULSA, OKC AND AROUND THE STATE, HEAD TO OKMAG.COM.

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SEPTEMBER 2019 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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7/23/19 3:42 PM


FILM AND CINEMA

AD ASTRA

Fantasy Favorites Under the Stars After seeing Princess Buttercup and Willy Wonka outside, head inside to watch a Der Bingle classic or James Gray’s Ad Astra.

Around Town

Last month, we highlighted some outdoor film screenings to attend. The weather is a little cooler this month, but it’s still not time to give up seeing films under the stars, especially in Oklahoma City and Tulsa, which feature favorites for the whole family. OKC’s Deep Deuce Grill hosts its Director’s Cut event at 8 p.m. Sept. 6 with The Princess Bride, which is one of those films that, if overvalued by some fervent fans,

never gets old as a group re-watch. Many chant along to every utterance of “inconceivable!” Tulsa’s Philbrook Museum of Art presents Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory at 8:45 p.m. Sept. 27. It’s the (superior) original, not the Tim Burton remake, so Gene Wilder is on display as the perfect Wonka. You can enjoy the classic songs and general oddity of Roald Dahl’s source material on the big screen. Come early for pre-film picnicking.

We will never stop stumping the work of Leo McCarey, one of the most underrated directors of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Despite making an all-time great comedy (The Awful Truth) and perhaps cinema’s best melodrama (Make Way for Tomorrow), McCarey has had a lasting cultural imprint with two films starring Bing Crosby as Father O’Malley, a young priest shepherding poor, urban Catholics. The first of these films, Going My Way (also a sneakily great Christmas film), receives a 75th anniversary Blu-ray release this month from Shout! Factory. Odder than you might remember, Going My Way is a picaresque depiction of the agonies and ecstasies of religious belief in a tight-knit but struggling community. Crosby sings, of course, but the best parts of the film come in its quiet moments. McCarey, a lifelong Catholic, directs the film with a steady, personal touch.

In Theaters

Most ambitious directors have been drawn to outer space as a subject, from Stanley Kubrick to Andrei Tarkovsky; 2019 has brought efforts from two modern masters: Claire Denis’ High Life and, this month, Ad Astra by James Gray, who’s almost certainly the best director you’ve never heard of. Gray’s previous two efforts, The Immigrant and The Lost City of Z, are two of the decade’s best films, and now he aims even higher with a space tale featuring Brad Pitt and Tommy Lee Jones. The trailer looks breathtaking, and Gray has never disappointed, so this should be a major upgrade from the last would-be profound space film, Christopher Nolan’s disappointing Interstellar. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS

AD ASTRA, PHOTO BY FRANCOIS DUHAMEL © 2019 TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX FILM CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Where & When

At Home

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Thank you Tulsa for another year of

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CLOSING THOUGHTS

Jennifer Hankins

B

orn and raised in Kansas City, Missouri, Jennifer Hankins comes from a family deeply rooted in its community; her father and grandfather both served as mayor and city counselor in Kansas City, where the family also owns a bowling alley. After graduating from Oklahoma State University with a degree in political science, Hankins worked in nonprofits, the Wyandotte County (Kansas) Economic Development Council and the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce. She is vice president of entrepreneurship and small business at the Tulsa Regional Chamber of Commerce. We caught up with Hankins and got her thoughts on …

… her professional focus.

Community-focused work has always been extremely important to me, and I managed to somewhat stumble into economic development. My career has allowed me to work with companies of all sizes across multiple industries, but I’m most passionate about our entrepreneurs and innovators because they are the future of our communities and present opportunities that in many ways are still hard to imagine.

… her routine.

My primary role is to ensure that Tulsa-area startups and small businesses have the resources and environment they need to succeed. We have a lot of great startups that are disrupting industries and have significant potential, but they need a lot of support to access capital, talent and expertise. We work … with other partners to make sure the community is doing everything it can to support this new era of Tulsa-made companies. One of the resources we provide is The Forge, our certified business incubator for innovative, high-growth companies. We provide affordable office space for up to six companies, pairing them with mentors, resources and other strategic partnerships that will help them gain access to resources … to build a sustainable business. I also oversee the Tulsa Small Business Connection, our suite of programming designed for small-business owners.

… the state of small business.

80

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2019

… supporting small businesses.

It’s extremely important for our existing business community to take a chance on local startups. Often, especially for our tech companies, it’s hard to even get in the door with established Oklahoma companies. This reluctance to take risks on our local entrepreneurs isn’t just bad for them; it’s bad for our economy at large, so we need to be sure to take the time to meet with other entrepreneurs, learn about their businesses and look for areas of collaboration.

PHOTO BY JOSH NEW

It’s excellent. Small-business owners applaud Tulsa’s recent renaissance, which has given them an increase in pride and … positively impacted their businesses, whether it be through increased sales [or] improved access to talent. Inc. magazine and WalletHub have rated Tulsa as one of the top 10 large cities for launching a business, and Forbes rated Tulsa as the No. 1 city for young entrepreneurs in 2017. As the best city for female founders, according to Thumbtack, we also see a lot of women launching businesses, which is creating a new wave of enthusiasm.


Profile for Oklahoma Magazine

Oklahoma Magazine September 2019  

Unless you abstain from the internet, it’s nearly impossible to miss the grandiose statements from tech gurus like Elon Musk and Richard Bra...

Oklahoma Magazine September 2019  

Unless you abstain from the internet, it’s nearly impossible to miss the grandiose statements from tech gurus like Elon Musk and Richard Bra...