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SEPTEMBER 2015

FALL FASHION THE LIFE & TIMES OF

CHESTER GOULD THE

KERR CENTER SUSTAINABLE Before It Was Cool

PLUS

OKLAHOMA’S INDEPENDENT PRODUCERS


Capture, Share #uticasquare

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#artinthesquare #crispair #meetlocalartists #creativevibes

Join us for Art in the Square. October 3rd from 10am to 5pm.

Time once again for Art in the Square. Peruse (or even purchase!) watercolors, stained glass, pottery, sculptures, and woodcarvings. Chat up local artists about their techniques and inspiration. Art Alley will be in full swing with face painting and activities for little artists.


Features September

2015 Oklahoma Magazine Vol. XIX, No. 9

50 Haute Stuff

This season’s hottest looks incorporate luxurious material, feminine fabrics and ‘70sinspired finishes. Vintage-esque accessories complete looks that give a nod to the past but are every bit today’s fashion.

64 Sustainable Before It Was Cool

Implementing a sustainable structure into its research, education and practice twenty years after its inception in 1965, The Kerr Center became The Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture, giving Oklahoma’s agricultural industry an important new focus.

60

Go With The Flow

Oklahoma’s economy is heavily tied to its oil and natural gas production, and independent producers, both large and small, are leading the way.

72 The Life & Times Of Chester Gould

Oklahoma native Chester Gould’s genius wasn’t quickly realized by all in the newspaper world, but as persistent as he was, a personality trait that he shared with his star character Dick Tracy, he didn’t give up until his name, and those of his characters, were well known.

Special Section 78 Active Years

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

ON THE COVER: EVERY DETAIL IS ACCOUNTED FOR IN THIS LOOK FROM ABERSONS, A PART OF OUR FALL FASHION SPREAD. HAIR STYLED BY SHAWNA BURROUGHS, JARA HERRON SALON. MAKEUP BY TAYLOR LEDBETTER. PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON.

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read

expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MORE PHOTOS:

View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.


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Departments

13 The State

Bruce Hendrickson is the winningest high school football coach in Oklahoma history, but arriving at that number was never a goal. Hendrickson’s objective through his fourdecade coaching career was to be a positive influence on his players and teach them the game he has always loved.

16 18 20 22 24

13

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Happening People Culture OK Then The Insider

27 Life & Style

Charles Faudree’s light-hearted personality, wisdom and genius for design shines between the pages of Jenifer Jordan’s book that pays tributes to his mastery through Jordan’s stunning photography.

30 32 36

Art Living Space Style

42 46 48

Destination Nutrition Scene

We’re digging fall’s ‘70s styles. Find your groove with these must-have pieces, including fringe, flare and fur.

91 Taste

Guernsey Park, a California-inspired, Asian fusion restaurant in Oklahoma City, has delightful cuisine that brings life to its guests’ taste buds the same way its twinkling decor energizes the night.

94 95

Sip Local Flavor

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32 97

97 Entertainment

These 20 portraitures of Roman emperors between 27 B.C. and 476 A.D. from the world’s oldest museum arrive in the United States for the first time, on display at The University of Oklahoma’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art.

98

Calendar of Events

104 In Person

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

91


Dr. Woodward knows how special Tulsa’s only children’s hospital is.

As a pediatric neurosurgeon at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, Dr. Meredith Woodward cares for children of all ages with specialized needs such as birth defects, head or spinal trauma and neurological conditions. She recently moved from California because she liked what she saw in Tulsa. “I was attracted to Saint Francis because of the organization’s dedication to serving the community and the children’s hospital is part of that,” Dr. Woodward said. With a multitude of pediatric medical specialties and the highest level of neonatal care in the region, the hospital’s focus is on family-centered care. “People may not realize what a special place the children’s hospital is,” she said. “If a child needs specialized healthcare, this is where they need to be.”

Meredith Woodward, M.D. PEDIATRIC NEUROSURGERY

Healthcare for life. saintfrancis.com/childrenshospital | 918-488-6688


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX EDITORIAL ASSISTANT BRITTANY ANICETTI CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE, MEGAN MORGAN GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN GRAPHIC DESIGNER BEN ALBRECHT

DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY ADVERTISING/OFFICE ASSISTANT ALYSSA HALL CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB INTERNS HANNAH HANZEL, NEHEMIAH TAYLOR CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204

LOVE IN BLOOM Let Oklahoma Magazine help you plan your special day!

Oklahoma Wedding Show Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 Expo Square Central Park Hall

Copyright © 2015 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. TM Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

2013

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

I

think that we Oklahomans take our state for granted. A born-and-raised Oklahoman, I have been surrounded by the Sooner spirit all my life; it’s easy, then, for me to forget about the things that make our state unique. A college professor once told me that, when he spent time writing for a major television show in the ‘70s, he was sure to include the fact that he was from Oklahoma as often as possible in introductory conversations. He said that he found people from all over the world that had a love affair – or, at least, romantic notions – related to our little, land-locked state. Used to be, when folks would mention to us Okies that they had recently relocated to our state, we would ask, “why?” Now, as the state’s reputation for friendly folks, a stable economy and low cost-of-living spreads, we no longer ask that question. Instead, we say, “glad to have you.” We are an exceptional state. Just over 100 years old, Oklahoma and its citizens are full of optimism, industry and solid work ethic. It is also home to great innovators, visionaries and creative individuals, and this issue highlights that. This month, we explore the

Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture in Poteau (“Sustainable Before It Was Cool,” p. 64), a small operation that has provided farmers, ranchers and others in the agricultural industry in Oklahoma with tips, tricks, advice and consultation on how to improve operations through sustainable efforts. We also take a look back at the life of Chester Gould, Pawnee native and creator of the famous Dick Tracy comic strip (“The Life & Times Of Chester Gould,” p. 72), as well as at the role that independent oil producers play in Oklahoma’s large oil industry (“Go With The Flow,” p. 60). I recently scanned my Instagram account and saw photos of a friend’s family, who were visiting Oklahoma from Europe. The photos were of quintessential Okie experiences: riding horses, attending a rodeo, eating barbecue, watching a movie at the Admiral Twin. I love seeing our state through a visitor’s eyes. What a great place to experience and learn something new, to enjoy authentic experiences and make memories that will last a lifetime. You’re a great state, Oklahoma. Jami Mattox Managing Editor

December 2015

Is your company a catch? Oklahoma Magazine is currently looking for great places to work in Oklahoma. If your company has what it takes, let us know. Visit www.okmag.com to nominate your company for inclusion in Oklahoma Magazine’s Great Companies To Work For. 2014

OKLAHOMA

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA 7/20/15 2:03 PM


GENERATION

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OKMAG.COM THAT ‘70S SHOW

TIPS

Football is back, and along with it comes tailgate season. At OKMAG.COM, get great tips on where to park, what clothes to wear, what cocktails to prepare and recipes for tasty tailgating treats. We all want to make the most out of those fall college games, and there’s nowhere better to find the best tips for maximizing your Saturday on campus.

Travel back in time to the ‘70s with this year’s fall fashion photography spread. This month, we showcase the best looks from Oklahoma’s top retailers, including Abersons, Balliets, Saks Fifth Avenue, Von Maur and more. See web-exclusive shots and a behind-the-scenes video of Oklahoma Magazine’s fashion coverage.

Quick Tip: If you didn’t prepare the night before, and you’re picking up beer on your way to the tailgate, you’re going to need a quick method of cooling it down: Put a warm six pack in a bucket of ice water and salt, and stir. Two minutes later, your beer will be perfectly chilled. Cheers.

Oklahoma Magazine presents

kitchens and baths

S TAY CONNECTED

What’s HOT At

OK

PAINTING THE PAST

In this issue, we get a close look at the recent repainting of the famous concrete totem pole at Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park. Artists and Tulsa natives Erin Turner and Margo Hoover have spent the last year planning and executing a complete repainting of the structure. At OKMAG.COM, see an expanded gallery of the detailed design work that has been given a second life, and the process behind restoring the 90-foot-tall historical monument.

October 2015 A look inside some of the state’s most elegant and functional rooms that make a house a home, including looks at national trends.

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

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“I was listened to. I was coached. I got the second opinion that was right for me.”

Todd Hardy, Youth Baseball Coach and Lung Cancer Patient

“When I was diagnosed with lung cancer, I needed a treatment plan that fit into my active life. After I got my first opinion, I wanted to learn about other options— I wanted a second opinion. That’s exactly what I found at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® in Tulsa. My doctors took the time to get to know me and we developed a treatment plan that felt right. They were all about what I can do. And that’s exactly how I coach my kids.” Atlanta | Chicago | Philadelphia Phoenix | Tulsa

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No case is typical. You should not expect to experience these results.


The State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

The King Of Friday Nights

Retired football coach Bruce Hendrickson made high school champions.

D

espite growing up in Green Country, Bruce Hendrickson, the winningest high school football coach in Oklahoma history, spent most of his teaching and coaching years in the western part of the state. When Hendrickson went to Texhoma for his first head coaching job in 1971, “I had no idea it was way out in the panhandle,” he recalls. “It was like a dust storm was going on in May when I drove out there to talk to them, and I got out that way and called my wife and said, ‘Tell me this is the stupidest thing I ever did.’” But Charlotte, Hendrickson’s wife of 49 years now, told him he was already out there, and he might as well keep going. “I swear I could see China out there – it was way the heck out there,” Hendrickson says. “But I took some 16-millimeter films of the guys playing and watched them, and my gosh, those guys had some talent, so I talked myself into going there.” Despite the misgivings, Hendrickson counts that year at Texhoma High School as one of the highlights of his career, where he led the team to a state championship and an undefeated record of 14-0.

The Championship Precedent

Hendrickson, 70, has a lifetime record of 363-101-2. He has led teams to state titles two other times – in 1981 at Okeene High School and in 1988 at Seiling High School. He began his coaching career at Commerce

and also coached at Wynnewood, Cordell and Wewoka. He first retired in 2005 from Cordell High School but returned to Seiling High School in 2013 and stayed there until May, when he again retired. Hendrickson’s first stint at Seiling lasted 14 years; he led the team, then a 1A school, to the state championship. Since that time, Seiling has changed to a Class B school that plays eight-man football. In the 2013-14 season, the Seiling Wildcats went 5-5, and 8-4 the next. Of those two

years returning to Seiling, Hendrickson says, “At least half of the kids I was coaching then were kids of parents I had taught or coached. It was like coaching my grandkids. “My first year there, the program was really down, but now they’ve got 33 kids in upper grades playing. I said I’d never in all my coaching career suited up a freshman for a varsity game, but after that third game, I’ll be dogged if we didn’t have to,” he says. He has a lot of praise for Class B District One Oklahoma high school football. “Sixteen of the last 20 state championships SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

have come from that district,” he says. Last year, Hendrickson facilitated the hiring of Brian Haynie as an assistant coach. Haynie is now the head coach at Seiling. “I more or less promised him if he moved here, I would just coach one more year. They really like him here,” Hendrickson says. “I think they have a real good coach, and they’ll do great.”

Work, School, Football

Hendrickson has fond feelings for Seiling, population 860, his “adopted home town.” “It’s always been home to me,” he says. “It’s not like where I grew up.” Hendrickson grew up in Claremore, the son of a businessman. “My dad had one problem: women. He liked the women, and they liked him. And then, Mom carried a Bible under one hand [and] a bottle under the other,” he recalls. “I just couldn’t live in that kind of environment. My grandpa was the mayor at one time, and he owned a duplex, and so he lived on one side, and when I was 14, he let me come live on the other.” Working, going to school and playing football consumed his life. “When I went there, there were only 51 kids in the graduating class. Now, I’ve been back there, and everyone is in a hurry. The traffic is bumper-to-bumper, and there are just too many people all over. “I really enjoy northwest Oklahoma,” he adds. “The people out here are really good all over. It’s a really big area but a small community. It seems like everywhere I go

I know everyone. I go in the truck stop in Seiling for some coffee, and everyone knows me. It’s a slow pace.”

A Legacy Of Success

Hendrickson says this is his final retirement. He is spending it mowing his lawn, among other things. Since moving to western Oklahoma, Hendrickson and his wife have maintained two houses, one in Seiling and one in Wynnewood. Currently, Charlotte, one of their daughters, and granddaughter live in Seiling, and Hendrickson lives in his Wynnewood house, where he helps another daughter with health care needs. His house in Wynnewood is in the perfect place for a retired football coach, right across the street from the high school football field. Hendrickson visits with the coaches and players there often. He says he has been fortunate to coach young athletes. “I just hope that I’ve had a positive influence. I’m going to miss them a whole lot more than they miss me,” he says. He is also proud of the legacy that some of his former players have carried on in their football coaching careers. “One of my proudest moments was six years ago when I realized I had four different former players coaching in the state finals. That is probably a record – that was really neat,” he says. Despite retirement, Hendrickson still anticipates those weekly football games that have been a part of his life for nearly a half-century. “I don’t sit around a whole lot. I’m looking forward to the first football game of the season. They are working hard at Seiling, and Coach Haynie is going to get them to play,” he says. Hendrickson thinks his state record for the number of wins will be broken in the next few years. “Mike Snyder out of Seminole will beat that record if he stays in it,” he says. “But I’ve never been big on records. I never set out to do that.” SHAUN PERKINS

PREVIOUS: BRUCE HENDRICKSON RETIRED FROM COACHING FOOTBALL LAST YEAR AND HOLDS THE STATE RECORDS FOR MOST WINS BY A FOOTBALL COACH. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

ABOVE: HENDRICKSON AT THE BEGINNING OF HIS COACHING CAREER. PHOTO COURTESY BRUCE HENDRICKSON.

RIGHT: HENDRICKSON HAS COACHED IN SEVERAL CITIES ACROSS OKLAHOMA. ILLUSTRATION BY BEN ALBRECHT.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

OKLAHOMA CLASS B DISTRICT ONE TEAMS Canton Kremlin-Hillsdale Laverne Merritt Pioneer-Pleasant Vale Pond Creek-Hunter Ringwood Seiling Turpin Waukomis

WINNING TRADITIONS

Retired football coach Bruce Hendrickson currently holds the record for the most wins by a high school football coach at 363. However, there are coaches inching closer to breaking Hendrickson’s record. Mike Snyder, the current head football coach at Seminole High School, has 334 wins. According to Van Shea Iven, the media relations director for the Oklahoma Secondary Schools Activities Association (OSSAA), several coaches, including Allan Trimble at Jenks High School, Gary Rose at Carl Albert High School and Jeff Myers at Kingfisher High School, are close to the 300-win level. Joe Tunnel retired from the head coaching position at Rush Springs High School in 2000 with 322 wins. Seymour Williams, a longtime coach at Booker T. Washington High School in Tulsa, finished his career in 1951 with 284 wins. Robert Kramer retired from Balko High School in 1995 with 270 wins to his name. – Jami Mattox


Patient-Centered Cancer Care

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The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


82

Oklahoma is well known for landing on “best of” lists for its business environment and “worst of” lists for health issues, incarceration and other socioeconomic factors. According to the Oklahoma Marriage Initiative, 82 percent of Oklahoma adults have been married at some point, compared to 73 percent nationally, making the Sooner State No. 1 in the percentage of adults who marry. That statistic also spells higher divorce rates for Oklahoma: 32 percent of adults have divorced, compared to just 21 percent nationally.

16

THE HEAT

on the List There are six restaurants in Oklahoma that make the cut when it comes to wine, according to the latest issue of Wine Spectator. The publication, which annually publishes Restaurant Awards that highlight restaurants around the world that offer the best wine selections, selected Boulevard Steakhouse & Martini Lounge, Museum Café and Opus Prime Steakhouse, all in Oklahoma City; and Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar, Polo Grill and Prhyme Downtown Steakhouse, all in Tulsa, to receive this year’s recognition. A total of 2,563 restaurants were selected for this year’s Restaurant Awards. In Oklahoma, two restaurants – Opus Prime and Polo Grill – additionally received the Best of Award of Excellence, which recognizes restaurants with wine lists that display vintage depth or excellent breadth across several regions.

WE BEAT

The State

HAPPENING

REDUX

There’s good news for our favorite feathered friends of the plains: According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, an aerial survey conducted this summer has shown that the endangered Lesser Prairiechicken’s numbers have increased by 25 percent over the past year. The bird’s ecoregion stretches across five states, including Oklahoma. Let’s hear it for the birds!

September brings the relief from summer heat, welcome news for those whose exercise routines move indoors during Oklahoma’s sweltering summertime. According to Nancy Shidler, director of the INTEGRIS Pacer Fitness Center, those switching to outdoor exercise routines during the fall should keep outdoor elements in mind. “When indoors you are in a very controlled environment,” she says. “Once you move outdoors, you have to deal with allergens, wind, humidity and hills, to name a few. The re-introduction of the outdoor elements may require an adaptation of nutrition and hydration.” Shidler says those who exercise regularly on a treadmill during summer months should be careful about natural inclines and declines when walking or jogging outdoors. Also, treadmill exercise requires less use of hamstrings, and she says that those muscles will likely be more sore after a vigorous walk or jog outside. She recommends those treadmill users who plan to move outdoors start by adding a little elevation to the treadmill to work the hamstrings. “The good news – you will probably feel as though you have more energy because it’s cooler,” she says. “Your body has to work very hard to cool itself off, so the cooler temps will be helpful.”

FOUND A PEANUT

At the 2014 Oklahoma Peanut Convention, plant researchers and pathologists introduced the OLe’ peanut, a new variety of the traditional Spanish peanut that is grown throughout Oklahoma and Texas. The variety was developed by peanut breeders in Stillwater and grown on Oklahoma State University test plots. According to Kelly Chamberlin, a USDA research biologist, the new variety is prized for its high oleic acid content, which makes the peanuts healthier and have a longer shelf life than regular Spanish peanuts.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

CHICKEN

“Spanish peanuts are mainly used in canned nuts and candies where peanuts are one of the main ingredients,” she says. “In the past five years, seed stocks of high oleic Spanish peanuts in the Southwest have become severely contaminated with normal oleic peanuts, making them undesirable to the manufacturers.” The OLe’ variety is 100 percent pure high oleic and is resistant to two fungal diseases commonly found in peanut fields in the Southwest. Chamberlin adds that the OLe’ variety has a high roasted peanut score and has been sent to several large food manufacturers, including Hershey, for sensory and nutritional analysis. “All results have been overwhelmingly positive regarding the flavor profile and nutritional composition of the OLe’ peanuts,” she says. “Peanut lovers, farmers and the environment will all benefit from OLe’.”


The University of Tulsa

Presidential lecture series Sponsored by The Darcy O’Brien Endowed Chair Presents

October 6, 2015 7:30 p.m. Donald W. Reynolds Center 3208 East 8th Street

Erik Larson

Photo courtesy of Benjamin Benschneider

Erik Larson

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P

Painting The Past

Two Tulsa natives lend their artistry to restoring a more-than-60-year-old structure in Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park.

aint-stained hands hug a cup of coffee after more than a month of 14-hour days. “I’ve never done anything like this,” Erin Turner, a freelance artist currently living in Brooklyn, N.Y., says. “It’s awesome, because it’s been like a research process, and clearly we wanted to make the best decisions for the structure and for the park and for the future.” In 2014, Turner and Margo Hoover, Tulsa natives and childhood friends, journeyed to Foyil, Okla., for the first time, venturing into Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park. The day before their trip, Turner had been in a friend’s studio. There, old, poster-sized images from the park, images Turner had seen many times but which had never grabbed her attention, now stirred conversation. Her friend asked, “You’ve never been there?” And with Turner’s “no” lingered an innocent ignorance. The next day, they were in the car, Hoover included, making the 45-minute trip northeast to Foyil. Turner and Hoover would leave the park that day, having to return to their professional lives – Turner to Brooklyn and Hoover to her role as an art and physical education teacher in Oakland, Calif. But the words they heard from an employee that day, “Been looking for someone to paint the totem pole for years,” could not be unheard, and for the next year, their minds would be in Foyil – the fulcrum of their newfound fascination –finding the funding to make the more-than-60-year-old structure new. Ed Galloway, a grassroots artist born in the late 1800s, found his craft in woodworking and blacksmithing. The park’s construction began in 1937 when he retired from teaching art at Sand Springs Home, a non-profit supporting children unable to stay in their home for a number of reasons. For the next 20 years, while residing on the property, Galloway constructed a 90-foot-tall totem pole, among other structures. In the early ‘80s, conversation first began concerning a large-scale restoration of the park, Turner says, The Kansas Grassroots Arts Association (KGAA); SPACES, an international nonprofit specializing in arts environments; and the Rogers County Historical Society, owner of the park, were the key players. They did the meticulous work in choosing the color scheme that would match Galloway’s. Using a mural found in the Fiddle House, Galloway’s studio and now a museum, and gray-scale photographs of the original totem pole, the groups found a match and went to a local company to get the same style latex paint that Galloway would have used. After starting a $5,000 online funding campaign and receiving money from the Rogers County Historical Society, as well as support from some other organizations, Turner and Hoover inched closer to their hopes of restoring the structure. The duo planned to use the same latex paint as the original restoration, but when they contacted SPACES to tell them about their project, they were told to ditch the latex paint. “[SPACES told us], ‘We no longer recommend latex paint, we recommend this other paint company called Keim and its mineral silicate-based paint,’” Turner

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

says. “It’s like wonder paint, and way more expensive.” Though more costly, the new paint helps make the work that Turner and Hoover are doing last. “It doesn’t chip, it doesn’t flake, it doesn’t break down with UV rays, so it’s not going to fade,” she adds. In July, after hurdling the hitch, Turner and Hoover began where a previous restoration, ending in 2009, left off, 25 feet in the air. Break the remaining 65 feet into three sections, they worked their way to the top, one day at a time. The days were long and grueling. Staying at a motel about seven miles from the park, they’d wake up each morning around 6 and work until sundown or their fingers lost function. While they painted, they primed areas where interior metal protruded and caulked cracks caused by the elements and time. They had line drawings of all the designs, Turner says, and a chart that laid out which colors go where. They’d brave the heat by hiding in the shifting shade of the totem pole, working their way around its width as the earth moved on its axis. At night, retreating to their motel, they’d muster the energy to cook a meal. Working with paintbrushes ranging in size from a needlepoint to a pocket dictionary, some designs were more intricate than others. “The Indian headdresses are most detailed,” Turner says. “They have five to seven colors for each headdress.” The paint didn’t make the details any easier to navigate. “[It] is like melted chocolate, really thick,” Turner says. “[And] you’re not working on a smooth structure … it was very difficult.” But with each stroke, the goal only became clearer. The park, which up until one year ago was a silent unknown to both of these native Oklahomans, now speaks volumes, and they want to continue telling the story of the totem pole and of Galloway, his artistry and Oklahoma. “It’s one of the coolest structures I’ve ever seen. It has a lot of history. Ed Galloway was in the military in the Philippines, and you can kind of see these southeast Asian figures and creatures, and you see a lot of Native American imagery … there’s lots of Oklahoma imagery … I think there are over 200 designs,” Turner says. “I think also, the concept of a totem pole is really beautiful in itself. It’s a tribute to your ancestors more or less. It’s a good practice in general just to learn about why it’s important. We’re building on our past.” As their summer project came to a close, two-thirds of their goal reached completion. The fourth, highest section will have to wait until next summer, when the two reunite from opposite coasts, taking the scaffold to the height of their vision. While still excited about the future of the park, the totem pole and all its possibilities, for now, good food, a nice massage and the comfort of home sounds really good, Turner says. “I need to rest up for a year, and then come back,” she adds. BRITTANY ANICETTI

PHOTO COURTESY ROGERS COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

The State

PEOPLE


The State

S M A R T M OV E JEFF MARTIN (RIGHT) STANDS WITH WRITER, DIRECTOR, ACTOR AND COMEDIAN B.J. NOVAK AT A 2014 BOOKSMART TULSA EVENT. PHOTO COURTESY BOOKSMART TULSA.

CULTURE

A Love of Literature and Tulsa What began as a citywide book club has morphed into a celebration of books, authors, friendships and civic pride.

B

ooksmart Tulsa was borne out of an idea for a citywide book club. In 2009, Jeff Martin and Mary Beth Babcock rented out the top floor of a downtown Tulsa bar and spread the word. They expected about 40 people to show up, but to their surprise, about 400 enthusiastic bibliophiles flooded into the building. Those numbers, however, began to dwindle over the next few months. “You could see that we weren’t bringing a lot of new people into the mix, so we changed the model about four months in,” says Martin. “It became more of what we call a visiting author series. Since then, we’ve had well over 200 events, 200 authors. We do different venues every time. Everything is donated. Venue space is donated. Hotels are donated. Flights are donated. Sometimes meals are donated. It’s all done on an in-kind donation partnership with different places throughout the city.” Those partnerships allow for a variety of venues, from iconic places like Cain’s Ballroom and the Philbrook Museum of Art to more unexpected places like the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma and a synagogue. “Half the mission is [to] not just have people see new authors, but to get out and see different parts of the city, meet new people that they might not otherwise meet,” Martin says. With anywhere from 100 to 1,000 people, ages 16 to 80, showing up for the three to four authors each month, there are plenty of opportunities to meet fellow Tulsans. “We kind of get away from the standard come-talk-and-sign-books model,” he says. “We want it to be more experiential. We’ll

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

usually have music and a bar and maybe some kind of activity, and then they’ll do a talk.” Martin says the program’s mission involves the idea of double exposure. “When we bring someone into town, we want to expose people of Tulsa to their book, their ideas, the culture that they’re bringing from wherever they are coming from; but there’s a flipside to that, which is we want to expose those authors, those guests, to this city,” he says. “We take them on tours. We eat at local places. We show them what cool things are happening here in town. We want them to leave this place with a really positive feeling about where they are.” Booksmart Tulsa’s mission is proving effective. It has hosted several prominent authors, including David Sedaris, Elizabeth Gilbert and Chuck Palahniuk. This month, Salman Rushdie will join that list when he makes his first appearance in Tulsa. “We’re partnering with the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa extension to [bring Rushdie] during Banned Books Week,” Martin explains. “Salman Rushdie wrote one of the greatest, most famous banned books of the last 100 years called The Satanic Verses. He is one of these iconic authors that I would have never thought we could have gotten six years ago.” Martin hopes that Booksmart will eventually be able to host a literary festival that will bring dozens of authors into the city to celebrate literature with book-lovers like him. “I did Booksmart because it was something that I wished I could go to, and it just wasn’t something that was around,” he says. “I have as much fun as anybody at these events. It’s not really work at all.” BETH WEESE

OH, THE HILARITY

Spencer Hicks, an Oklahoma City comedian as well known for his red hair as he is his zingers, recently recorded a comedy album that will be available for download in early October. Hicks began performing comedy in 2004. He is a regular on the Oklahoma City comedy circuit and has opened for comedians like Dave Chappelle and Paul F. Tompkins. Hicks is a co-founder of comedy booking and promotions company OKC Comedy, a contributing writer for The Lost Ogle and a host for local events like IgniteOKC. “It’s important for me to record this album because I’m not getting any younger,” Hicks says. This past August marked 11 years in the comedy industry for Hicks. “In that time, I have met some of my best friends, performed with some of my comedic heroes, and I feel like it’s time to have something to show for it,” he adds. The show that Hicks recorded was the first endeavor for the newly formed Red Phone Comedy production company, cofounded by Oklahomans Ryan Drake and Kristy Boone. Both Drake and Boone are well known in Oklahoma City’s comedy and improv circles. “The goal is to bring the improvised and stand-up comedy forces in Oklahoma City together,” Boone said in a press release. “We are trying to create a broader awareness of the comedy scene here, as well as create a culture in which audiences can enjoy a variety of performances, and the comedians can have multiple platforms to showcase themselves.” Hicks is part of Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40 Class of 2012. – Jami Mattox

SPENCER HICKS, AN OKLAHOMA COMEDIAN, RECENTLY RECORDED A NEW ALBUM. PHOTO BY JEREMY CHARLES.


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The State

A GRAIN ELEVATOR IN OKLAHOMA, WHICH HAS LOST ITS ORIGINAL PAINT, SHOWS ITS AGE.

OK THEN

From Hey-Day To Gray

Long a marker of the state’s agricultural history, grain elevators, pristine white when built, are fading.

G

limmering white, the state’s grain elevators thrust upward into pale blue skies across Oklahoma, dotting her landscape with the Plains’ version of castles or cathedrals. Now these iconic symbols have begun to fade away. Most of the state’s concrete elevators were built between the 1920s and the 1950s; most were finished with a coating of brilliant white paint. It was a one-time application, and most of the elevators have never been repainted. The staff at Orienta’s grain elevator remembers when one elevator was re-painted in 1978. Five-gallon paint cans littered the grounds. The bill for the new paint job exceeded the cost of the original construction of the elevator.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

“The cost is pretty prohibitive to have them painted,” says R.J. Gray, executive director for the Oklahoma Agricultural Cooperative Council. The Oklahoma Feed and Grain Association says roughly 200 active grain elevators are in the state, including some 160 concrete elevators. Most of Oklahoma’s concrete elevators were constructed by Borton Construction, a firm based in Hutchison, Kan. In the 1930s, the firm built 22 of the massive structures in Oklahoma. The last grain elevator the firm built in Oklahoma was in Durant in 2003. “It’s been decades since we received an order to re-paint a grain elevator,” Borton spokesman Pat Augustine says. The last paint job performed by the firm was in Florida in 1998. Augustine says Borton bases the cost of a paint job for a grain elevator on the surface square footage. The firm uses an oil-based outdoor paint, and each order requires two coatings. Augustine notes that demand for concrete construction for grain elevators in Oklahoma has dramatically dropped due to the cost effectiveness of erecting steel bins for wheat storage. The cost factor for repainting the iconic symbols of Oklahoma agriculture does not spare those on the list of the National Register of Historical Places. Jackie Anderson, a spokesman for Archer Daniels Midland, says there are no plans to repaint the twin Union Equity Y and Z elevators on the north side of Enid. Built by Borton in 1951 and 1954, respectively, the twin elevators have a storage capacity of 31.6 million bushels of wheat. Illinois-based ADM purchased the twin elevators in 2003. The mammoth elevators were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2009. Though rural Oklahoma is enjoying an economic boom from oil and natural gas production, the same cannot be said for segments of the state’s agriculture. “They just don’t have the money available for things like painting their elevators,” says Joe Hampton, president of the Oklahoma Grain and Feed Association. “The last couple of years have seen some of the poorest harvests in state history.” There is an outside chance some of Oklahoma’s elevators may see a facelift. Louisiana-based Consolidated Grain and Barge took ownership of 19 grain elevators from W.B. Johnston Grain in April; more than 15 of the elevators are in Oklahoma. Mark Cruse, director of grain operations, says it is up to local managers to request improvements and maintenance for their grain sites, but the firm takes the appearance and upkeep of its facilities seriously. “The cost of repainting them, that will have to be digested here,” Cruse says. MIKE COPPOCK

Grain elevators began dotting the Oklahoma landscape after 1914, the first year Oklahoma planted 2.7 million acres in wheat and became a major wheat-producing state. The first grain elevators were called “ironclads” and were built with wooden frames covered by corrugated steel.


Seven of the Premier Wildlife Artists in America will present a retrospective and sale of their work at Woolaroc Museum. Featured artists include:

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BARTLESVILLE, OK


The State

OKLAHOMA MUSICIAN DON WHITE WAS A MAJOR CONTRIBUTOR TO ERIC CLAPTON’S THE BREEZE: AN APPRECIATION OF JJ CALE. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

OPPOSITE: THE ALBUM COVER OF THE BREEZE: AN APPRECIATION OF JJ CALE.

THE INSIDER

The Breeze Blows In White’s Direction

A year after paying tribute to the late JJ Cale, a local musician reaps the rewards of his work on the sentimental project.

E

xactly one year ago, this space was devoted to a report on veteran Tulsa-based singersongwriter Don White, who, after decades of performing, touring, recording and writing, had just gotten one of the major breaks of his professional life. That column hit the streets about a month after The Breeze: An Appreciation of JJ Cale (Surfdog Records) became the highest-charting Eric Clapton disc in 20 years, soaring to No. 2 on Billboard magazine’s Top 200 Albums chart in its first week of release.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

The record wasn’t just Clapton’s, though. It’s officially credited to Eric Clapton and Friends, with a sticker on the CDs and LPs listing the more prominent Friends: Mark Knopfler, John Mayer, Willie Nelson, Tom Petty – and Don White. (Interestingly, it was Petty’s first chart-topping disc, Hypnotic Eye, that kept The Breeze from going to No. 1.) Clapton had recruited White for the project after the two met at Cale’s invitation-only West Coast funeral a year or so before the disc’s release. An admirer and good friend of Cale, Clapton rounded up a number of other

prominent T-Town musicians for the record, including keyboardist Walt Richmond, harmonica player Jimmy Markham and drummers Jim Keltner (a Tulsa native who moved to southern California early in his life), Jim Karstein, Jamie Oldaker and David Teegarden, all of whom had ties to the late Tulsa Sound architect. White’s history with Cale included having Cale as a regular guitarist in one of his bands. Decades later, White returned the favor by playing guitar (along with such rock-world heavyweights as Derek Trucks, Albert Lee, Reggie Young, Don Preston, David Lindley and Clapton himself) on three Breeze tracks. But his major contribution was as a featured vocalist, performing a beautifully understated version of one of Cale’s most wistful works, “The Sensitive Kind”; singing lead (with Clapton doing backup vocals) on “I’ll Be There (If You Ever Want Me),” a Ray Price shuffle that Cale recorded; and joining Knopfler and Clapton, with Markham on harmonica, for “Train to Nowhere,” a previously unreleased Cale composition. All are highlights of this 16-track collection that boasts, in addition to its star-studded roster, first-rate production and impressive packaging, especially on the 180-gram, doublegatefold vinyl version. “Eric went all-out on this record,” White says. “Everybody’s saying it’s a million-dollar record, and they’re probably right. He hired all those people, did some recording on it in Europe, in France, in L.A., in Nashville. He got Willie and all those guys in there, too.” And White is right in there with them. “The names on the sticker are the featured artists,” he notes. “Willie and Mark and Petty and Mayer and me – we’ve all got the same contract.” Being one of the friends on The Breeze has already paid off for White, who recently received his first check from its U.S. label and awaits a first payment from Polydor Records, the outfit handling worldwide distribution. He’s also gotten an offer to play some dates in Europe, which he’s considering. “I’ve been over there two or three times before, playing with [country artists] Johnny Rodriguez and Joe Sun,” he recalls. “I’d like to be able to go over there as Don White and play ‘em some of that good old Tulsa music.” Unlike the other friends listed on the sticker, White doesn’t have a management or promotional team in place to take advantage of the international buzz his work on The Breeze has generated. He does, however, have lots of musical friends around Tulsa, and one of them – the Grammy-winning drummer and Natura Digital Studios owner David Teegarden, who also plays on the Cale tribute disc – gave White some advice on


how to make the most of his new visibility. “Teegarden and I were talking, and he said, ‘You really need to get a new album out, but I don’t think we have time to make one,’” remembers White. “So I said, ‘Well, let me check my archives and see what I’ve already got that we might be able to use.’ “I found six songs I’d recorded in Nashville about seven years earlier. Greg Kane, who’s from Tulsa, had ended up in Nashville as a studio engineer. He’d always been a Don White fan, and he called me and said, ‘Come on down, man, and let’s cut something.’ “I hadn’t recorded in Nashville in a few years,” he adds, “but when I was living there I’d played in bands with Jamie Hartford, John Hartford’s son, who’s a guitar player, singer and songwriter. So I told Greg I’d like to use Jamie, if he was available.” As it turned out, Hartford was on the road and unavailable, so Kane found a substitute. “He said, ‘I’ve got a guy named Jack Pearson I think I can get, and I think you’ll like him.’ Come to find out, Jack Pearson’s one of the hot guitar players in the business, playing with the Allman Brothers and a lot of other people. He’s a pretty famous guy and a great guitar player.” Four of the songs featuring Pearson, multi-instrumentalist Robby Turner and drummer Billy Taylor found their way to White’s new disc. All are White compositions, with Kane and White co-producing, and they’re great examples of the low-key country-blues groove that’s a hallmark of the Don White sound. When you add those to the other tunes on this 11-cut disc, fittingly titled Patchwork, a lot of musical territory gets covered. There’s a cowboy number with some Sons of the Pioneers-style wordless harmonies, a powerful story-song called “Good Old Times,” and even a humorous offering to close the collection. The latter, one of only two tracks not written by White, is “Look At Granny Run, Run,” the tale of a newly randy grandpa and his appalled and fleeing wife. Penned by rock ‘n’ roll icons Jerry Ragovoy and Mort Shuman, it was a minor hit single for soul singer Howard Tate back in 1967. The other non-original is “I Didn’t Want to Boogie,” written by drummer Jerry Allison and recorded with his long-lived group the Crickets, Buddy Holly’s band. A wry and rueful tune about hesitating when you should be acting, it was sent to White by Allison himself. “I started doing it in my shows, mainly when I’d go to theaters and open for classic-country acts,” remembers White. “And I started doing ‘Look at Granny Run, Run’ for comedy relief. [Nationally known Tulsa promoter Larry] Shaeffer found a niche in places like Montana, Idaho and Wyoming where he could play Ray Price or Merle Haggard or Willie and make some money. So I went out with him several times. I’m perfect for those kinds of shows because I can come out and do 30-35 minutes, just me and a guitar. I don’t get in anybody’s way, I’m good at it, and I can warm ‘em up a little bit and then get off. I’d do ‘I Didn’t Want to Boogie’ and ‘Look at Granny Run, Run,’ and those folks would tell me that they’d like to have a CD with those songs on it. So I promised them I’d do that.” “Look at Granny Run, Run” was recorded at Natura Digital, with Teegarden on drums and Casey Van Beek on bass, as was a recut of one of White’s better-known tunes, “Tulsa Shuffle No. 1.” Those and the other tracks were all mastered by Teegarden and Brett Baldwin at the studio. By the time you read this, White should have Patchwork on iTunes and Amazon.com. It’s also available from his website, www. donwhiteok.com. JOHN WOOLEY

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Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

A Legacy in Design and Life Renowned photographer Jenifer Jordan remembers iconic designer Charles Faudree with a book that captures his aesthetic as well as his love of life.

P

erusing the latest book on Charles Faudree will be a walk down memory lane for those who loved his five previous books on Country French design. Charles Faudree – Country French Legacy is Jenifer Jordan’s tribute to Faudree’s design work, which she photographed for 27

years. The handsome coffee table book presents an endearing collage of Faudree’s earlier work, enhanced with Jordan’s portraits of his final design projects. Long-time fans of the designer’s iconic style will relish photographs they’ve seen before, while savoring newer work completed before he died in November 2013.

In the heart-warming book, Jordan captured Faudree’s distinctive style and delightful personality. He loved playing jokes on people, and she recalls that capricious spirit with recollections of photo shoots where he tested her with mischievous pranks. “I looked forward to every one of our photo shoots, in anticipation of not only seeing Charles’ magical talent, but of spending time and laughing with my dear friend. Charles was the funniest person I’ve ever known. He was the ultimate trickster,” she recalls. “The biggest ‘gotcha’ was in Spain. We were photographing an incredible villa. The home had a faux, life-size butler. We’d been shooting for three days, and Charles was having the butler ‘pop up’ for a startle and laugh all over the villa. The last night of the shoot, I thought I was free from the prank. We had to get up by 4 a.m. for an early flight. I wearily walked into the shower – and screamed. The butler was in my shower.” In Faudree’s first book, French Country Signature, he set the tone for the four books that followed. “I would like to think I’ve helped elevate French Country design to a fine art,” he wrote. “It is an excessive, exuberant style that fosters my favorite design principle – too much is never enough. “With my love for mixing past and present, old and new, I like to create inviting rooms that express a casual, comfortable feeling. French Country design has a pleasing, fluid quality and a timeless appeal.” In speeches, Faudree was often asked to define his style. He made it simple for his audiences: “It’s all about the mix, not the match.” He began each project with one pivotal item – an elegant mirror, a period armoire, a classic, comfortable chair – then brought order and balance to a room with symmetrical groupings. Pairs of accessories added elegance. “A room cannot proceed without pivotal fabrics,” he had said. Faudree was a master at mixing fabrics, which were as charming and compatible as he was. His magic with fabric, especially story-telling toiles, lives on in his designs for Stroheim, Waverly and Vervain. His influence was so strong his upholstery firm, Thayer of Muskogee, opened a Brookside studio after his death. To Faudree, a home’s front door was the all important first impression, providing a SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

27


Life & Style

glimpse of the rest of the home. He was both designer and teacher. “I am often guided by my belief [that] there are no rules about where you can use things,” he said. His principles – never intimidating or pretentious – became a design bible for his clients. Jordan’s exquisite photographs show how his layered design philosophy served him well during his 35-year career with clients around the world. “In his later work, he wasn’t afraid to add modern accents,” she relates. “He would use a contemporary painting, a Lucite table or chair, nestled in the arm of history. He had a great eye for chairs. “He designed interiors with warmth and personality,” she continues. “His designs were always a reflection of those who had placed their trust in him to create a home environment they would love and treasure.” Jordan’s book is a glorious travelogue, taking readers into Faudree’s world of elegant homes. She was present for all those assignments, from California to North Carolina, Oklahoma to Cape Cod, Jamaica to Spain. “I was always amazed and inspired by Charles’ talent every time I arrived to photograph,” says Jordan. “The beautiful rooms were photo-ready, down to the smallest of details. Every pillow was, as Charles would say, ‘poofed.’ Fresh flowers – always his favorite accessory – were in place. Every design element was artistically placed, and fires were roaring in the fireplaces.” Comments from Faudree and many of his clients are woven artistically through the book like a decorative ribbon. One of the most poignant is from Tulsan Linda James, a long-time client, who assumed Faudree’s studio on Cherry Street for her antiques emporium. “To watch him transform a room was magical,” James says. “We miss that wonderful, adorable man with impeccable taste and the twinkle in his eye. He will always be a part of our lives, and we remember him with fondness and treasured memories.” M.J. VAN DEVENTER

Van Deventer, a former Tulsan who grew up with Charles Faudree in Muskogee, is the co-author of Faudree’s first three books.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

PREVIOUS: FAUDREE AND JORDAN WERE LONGTIME FRIENDS AND COLLABORATORS ON FAUDREE’S FIVE BOOKS. LEFT: JORDAN CREATED A TRIBUTE TO HER LATE FRIEND IN THE FORM OF A BOOK. BELOW: FAUDREE’S COUNTRY FRENCH DESIGN PRINCIPLES INCLUDED TIPS LIKE, “IT’S ALL ABOUT THE MIX, NOT THE MATCH.”

PHOTOS COURTESY JENIFER JORDAN.


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Life & Style

LEFT: JAMIE WYETH: THE HEADLANDS OF MONHEGAN ISLAND, 2015, OIL ON CANVAS, 40 BY 60 INCHES. OPPOSITE RIGHT: ANDY WARHOL: THE PICNIC, 1959-1960, INK, WATERCOLOR AND GOUACHE ON PAPER, 28 1/2 BY 22 1/2 INCHES. COLLECTION DONALD ROSENFELD, ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI, © 2015 THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC. / ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK; PHOTO © ERIC W. BAUMGARTNER PHOTOGRAPHY. PHOTOS COURTESY CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART.

LAST CHANCE EXHIBITS

The Pop and Purity of Nature

A RT

Two exhibits at Arkansas’ Crystal Bridges Museum explore the natural world through two well-known American artists.

C

rystal Bridges Museum of American Art invites visitors to see the natural world through the eyes of two of America’s most prominent and distinctive artists: Andy Warhol and Jamie Wyeth. Their styles contrast radically, making their friendship – another focus of the exhibits, Warhol’s Nature and Jamie Wyeth – an unlikely one. “Presenting these exhibitions concurrently provides viewers the chance to experience art by two contemporaries with distinct artistic styles and different worldviews. The exhibitions explore the lives and careers of Warhol and Wyeth and uncover a fascinating and lesser-known friendship between the artists,” says Rod Bigelow, Crystal Bridges executive director. Warhol rose to prominence during the 1960s with his provocative explorations of the relationship between art and advertising. His works are among the most collectible – and expensive – in the art world. But the exhibition’s title, Warhol’s Nature, reflects its

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

unusual composition. Primarily known for his Pop art, Warhol often explored the natural world in innovative and surprising ways. Warhol’s Nature features 87 paintings, prints, photographs and videos, as well as documents and personal objects from Warhol’s collection. Among them are some of his best-known works, including his famous Self-Portrait, Flowers, the interactive exhibit Silver Clouds and 10 images from his iconic Endangered Species series. “Warhol’s engagement with nature is an important area of study and largely overlooked. We’re excited to present the untold story, uncovering layers of Pop to reveal an artist deeply interested in cultivating and preserving the nature outside and the nature within us all,” says Crystal Bridges Curator Chad Alligood. Jamie Wyeth follows six decades of the contemporary realist painter’s career, beginning with some of his earliest childhood drawings. It features 90 works, including paintings, works on paper, illustrations and objects of “combined mediums” – Wyeth’s preferred

The Art of Ceremony – Thru Sept. 6 Katsina carvings are on display and provide a window into Hopi ritual, belief and art. www.philbrook.org A World Unconquered: The Art of Oscar Brousse – Thru Sept. 6 The museum commemorates Oscar Brousse’s career with more than 50 works from the museum’s and the university’s permanent collections as well as other private collections. www.ou.edu/fjjma California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum – Thru Sept. 6 Explore California Impressionism, a popular subject in California in the early 20th century. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu The Figure Examined – Thru Sept. 13 Browse paintings, sculptures and works on paper by European and American artists of the 19th and 20th centuries. www. philbrook.org American Encounters: The Simple Pleasures of Still Life – Thru Sept. 14 These 10 masterpieces explore the diversity of still-life in the U.S. www.crystalbridges. org Cherokee Homecoming Art Show & Sale – Thru Sep. 21 The 20th annual art show features authentic Cherokee art. www.cherokeeheritage.org Fish Stories – Thru Sept. 21 Twenty color plates capture American fishes in their natural surroundings while conveying the drama of sport fishing. www.crystalbridges.org Faberge: Jewelers to the Tsars – Thru Sept. 27 Discover Peter Carl Faberge’s jewelry and adornments that once belonged to the Russian Imperial family. www.okcmoa.com


term for the distinctive technique he brings to many of his compositions. It is the first major retrospective of Wyeth’s works. “This body of work provides an intimate glimpse into the artist’s life and offers new insight into contemporary realism,” says Alligood. “Wyeth will be considered among the painters he emulated and admired, such as Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins and Edward Hopper, all of whom can be found in the Crystal Bridges collection.” An artistic prodigy at an early age, Wyeth crossed paths with Warhol in New York City, where he often visited the city morgue to study anatomy. He regularly worked with Warhol at the Pop artist’s studio, The Factory, a frequent and fashionable hangout for intellectuals, celebrities and wealthy patrons. During their time together at The Factory, Wyeth and Warhol exchanged self-portraits, which are on display at the museum. Wyeth is widely regarded as one of America’s finest portrait painters and brought his talents to bear on subjects such as Robert, Ted and President John F. Ken-

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nedy, as well as President Jimmy Carter and Arnold Schwarzenegger. Wyeth also excels as a mixed media artist, employing materials ranging from parachutes to cardboard. Along with portraits, he favors natural subjects, such as farm animals, several of which are featured in the exhibition. In addition to the works, a Spotify playlist offers an exhibition soundtrack with songs by the Velvet Underground, the experimental rock band managed by Warhol, along with a mix of culturally relevant tunes from the 1960s and 1970s. For both exhibits, a selfie booth is available for visitors to fashion their image with the flash of Warhol or the mystery of Wyeth by recreating works in the exhibitions. Both exhibitions are on view through Oct. 5. Admission is $8 for a combined ticket or free for museum members and youth ages 18 and under. Crystal Brides Museum is located in Bentonville, Ark. For more information, visit www.crystalbridges. org. PAUL FAIRCHILD

8/7/15 11:37 AM

SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style L I V I N G S PA C E

Out With The Old

A couple moves into an historical home that is made new by designer Jennifer Welch.

“I

Photography by David Cobb

don’t want anything old or two-story.” That was the client’s mandate to designer Jennifer Welch for her new home as an empty nester. She and her husband were downsizing after raising their children in a family neighborhood in Edmond. They wanted to live closer to downtown Oklahoma City’s numerous amenities. A friend suggested they look at a vintage beauty in Mesta Park, a midtown enclave featuring numerous older, two-story homes. Although it was old, the previous owners had completely and meticulously restored it. They took the home back to the studs and all the plumbing and electrical work, all while keeping the home’s historical character. “What made this home so appealing to my clients was the way it had been restored. It was an old home, full of charm and fully renovated. It was move-in ready, with the exception of paint on the walls,” Welch says. “Although it wasn’t on the market, [the clients] fell in love with it, and the couple made an offer immediately after the initial visit.” Even though the couple was downsizing – going from 4,500 square feet to 1,850 – the major directive to Welch was that they wanted everything new. That included custom-made furnishings, exquisite draperies, dramatic lighting and accessories. “It was a dream job for me,” Welch recalls. “I

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

LEFT: A RYAN CUMMINGHAM PAINTING ADDS A POP OF COLOR TO THE LIVING ROOM. A LARGE LUCITE COFFEE TABLE ANCHORS THE INVITING LIVING ROOM.


SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

completely let my creativity reign. We only had three meetings, and they liked everything I showed them.” Welch chose a neutral palette and accented with bold colors. Noted for renovations that give older homes an edgy, contemporary look, Welch’s strategy is to find an anchor piece for each room – a painting, an unusual chandelier, furnishings or draperies that will add drama to a setting. For this home, she chose a wool-and-silk Moroccan rug to make a statement in the entry. A vibrant Ryan Cunningham painting of an American Indian chief’s head is a focal point in the living room. The client was familiar with Cunningham’s boldly colored art, which Welch says, “adds a big pop.” The painting complements the room’s earthy hues, sparked with jewel-tone accessories. A French brass lumiere lights the room. A Lucite coffee table anchors this setting. A carved teak console and velvet pillows define the inviting room. The formal dining room has a Kyle Bunting cowhide rug nestled under a custom-made square table, which comfortably seats eight. Italian chairs are covered in jewel-tone fabric. Deep sapphire draperies feature embroidered details. Lucite bar stools were the perfect fresh touch in the kitchen, which acquired marble countertops in the previous owners’ renovation. The upstairs includes two full baths and three bedrooms; one of those was converted to a cozy sitting room. For the master suite, Welch chose a gray color theme and mixed velvet bed accessories with flax-and-linen draperies in a geometric pattern for a soothing environment. Like the interior, all the exterior needed was Welch’s touch, which includes tropical-style furniture so the couple could relax on the front porch – a Mesta Park leisure pastime. “This six-month project was just easy,” Welch recalls. “The clients are both professional people in their mid-50s and very sophisticated. They were completely ready to detach themselves from everything they owned in the past. They said, ‘We like what you do. There are no restrictions.’ They were some of the easiest people I’ve ever worked with. They let me be the designer.” An interior designer for 17 years, Welch travels often for her clients to New York and Europe, inspiring locales for cutting-edge style trends. “I do a lot of vacation residences, and clients always want a different look for those homes,” she says. “But this is the first time I’ve worked with people who wanted everything new – even the dishes.” M.J. VAN DEVENTER

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

A LARGE, SQUARE TABLE WAS CUSTOM-BUILT FOR THE DINING ROOM. BELOW: THE COZY MASTER BEDROOM IS ACCENTED WITH VELVET, FLAX AND LINEN FABRICS.


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Life & Style

STYLE

Can You Dig It?

The decade that brought us hippie chic and Halston is more fashionable than ever. The 1970s were full of turmoil, in everything from politics and the environment to fashion. Today, the ‘70s style is best remembered by free-wheeling hippies and by the fashionable club kids that crowded the likes of Studio 54. This season’s inspiration is best represented by a mix of high and low: denim and fringe accompanied by high-end jewelry and accessories. Military and goth and neoVictorian inspiration runs throughout. The result is an eclectic vibe that reminds us of the anything-goes culture.

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FOR LOVE & LEMONS LACE CROP TOP, $150; PAIGE DENIM FLARE JEANS, $235; AND LAMARQUE FRINGE VEST, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

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Life & Style

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Life & Style

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Life & Style

THINGS TO DO

Four Winds Casino Michigan’s first casino, Four

Winds Casino is situated next to Lake Michigan in New Buffalo. The casino offers slot machines and table games like craps, blackjack, roulette and baccarat. A 415-room hotel is attached to the casino, and several restaurants, including Hard Rock Café, are located within Four Winds Casino.

Fishing Fishing is a popular pastime in New Buffalo. Perch, varieties of salmon, rainbow trout, walleye bass and crappie are all popular catches pulled from the waters of Lake Michigan and Galien River. Pier and shoreline fishing are available at several locations, but for those looking for more of an adventure, several companies offer fishing charters. New Buffalo Public Beach The beach is

separated from the rest of the town by train tracks but is within walking distance of most of the small town. The beach stretches along the shores of Lake Michigan and is ideal for swimming, picnicking and building sand castles. The beach is located next to the Galien River harbor, which houses all sizes of boats. A small snack shack located on the beach serves milk shakes and other indulgent treats.

New Buffalo Railroad Museum This museum is a favorite stop for first-time tourists. It houses the history of the area and the integral role that railroad transportation played in developing southwest Michigan. D E S T I N AT I O N

A Great Escape

New Buffalo, Mich., serves as a welcome to Lake Michigan and a light-hearted ambassador for the state.

J

ust one mile from the Indiana-Michigan border lies a small town nestled in sand, sun and serenity. New Buffalo, Mich., sits at the mouth of Lake Michigan, the seemingly endless expanse of water in the northern U.S. The town is sleepy and small – population 1,883 – but during the summertime and on weekends, New Buffalo swells with tourists who arrive primarily by train and automobile from destinations like Chicago, Indianapolis and Detroit to escape the hustle-bustle of big city life. Cliffside beach houses surround the shores of Lake Michigan. Cottages, inns and condos intersperse with local restaurants, bars, spas and gift shops along Buffalo Street, the main corridor. You’re hardpressed to find any nationally affiliated storefronts in the town, save for the occasional bank or investment firm. This local feel aids in the escape from something larger. New Buffalo is made for relaxation.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

Relaxation New Buffalo is home to many spas.

Evolve Spa offers several services, including massage, facials and waxing. Revive Spa also offers massage and facials and adds body treatments and sauna sessions. For those looking for active relaxation, Dancing Feet Yoga offers classes on the beach.


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Life & Style

PLACES TO EAT Barney’s Market

For those who choose to stay in a cottage with a working kitchen, Barney’s is a great place to go to stock up on kitchen staples as well as gourmet foods. Upscale meats, cheeses, glutenfree options, a prepared foods counter and bakery help keep it simple for those shopping with purpose. www.barneysnb.com

The Lazy Perch Indicative of

its name, this restaurant serves locally caught perch, either on a sandwich, sautéed and topped with lemon-caper buerre blanc or fried and served with tartar sauce. Other menu specialties include steaks, burgers, salads and sandwiches. www. lazyperch.net

Pierre Anne Housed in a historical home, Pierre Anne serves light fare with European flair. Sweet and savory crepes, homemade soups and salads highlight the menu at this breakfast-and-lunch hotspot. www.pierreanne.com The Stray Dog Bar & Grill A large restaurant with a raucous atmosphere, The Stray Dog is a favorite among both locals and tourists. A large bar anchors the main dining area and serves local beer, wine and specialty cocktails. The food is simple, straightforward and served in large portions. Burgers, nachos and fish tacos are favorites. www.thestraydog.com

PREVIOUS TOP: A SMALL LIGHTHOUSE MARKS THE ENTRANCE TO THE NEW BUFFALO PUBLIC BEACH. PREVIOUS BOTTOM: FOUR WINDS CASINO, THE FIRST CASINO IN MICHIGAN, IS LOCATED IN NEW BUFFALO. TOP: FISHING AND BOATING ARE POPULAR ACTIVITIES IN NEW BUFFALO. FAR RIGHT: CONDOS LINE THE SHORES OF LAKE MICHIGAN AND THE GALIEN RIVER IN NEW BUFFALO. RIGHT: JAKE’S AT THE BEACH SERVES SUMMERTIME SNACKS AT THE NEW BUFFALO PUBLIC BEACH. PHOTOS COURTESY J. SMITCHGER – NEWBUFFALO.COM.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

STAY IN STYLE

Lake Country Inn Ten distinctive rooms

comprise this inn, located in downtown New Buffalo. Within walking distance to the beach, shopping, dining and entertainment, Lake Country Inn also offers a complimentary breakfast to its guests. www. lakecountryinn.com

New Buffalo Inn & Spa Located along

Buffalo Street, New Buffalo Inn & Spa is comprised of six rooms of varying size and price. The inn is within walking distance to surrounding restaurants and Barney’s and is just a short car or bike ride to the beach. www.newbuffaloinn.com

Marina Grand Resort Balcony views

from this hotel offer sweeping views of Lake Michigan. Its central location provides easy access to all the amenities New Buffalo has to offer. Suites intended for extended stays include a European-style kitchen, dining area and living room. www. marinagrandresort.com

VISIT ONLINE www.newbuffalo.com

10TH ANNUAL HARVEST & WINE FESTIVAL Oct. 10

Local wineries, craft brewers and restaurants bring sips and tastes to visitors at this annual event that includes live music, hayrides and a farmers market. www.newbuffalo.org

ARRIVE

By Train: Most city dwellers catch the Amtrak to New Buffalo. Amtrak services New Buffalo with two stops a day. Service is available from Oklahoma City’s Heartland Flyer, though for a substantial charge. To find a train route, visit www.amtrak.com. By Car: The trip from Tulsa to New Buffalo is around 750 miles and 10.5 hours. Take 1-44 toward Chicago, then 1-80 through Gary, Ind. Veer onto I-94 into Michigan. Take Exit 1.


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Life & Style

NUTRITION

Food for the Fridge

Dietitians weigh in on foods that we should all have on hand.

even substituting it for creams or mayo in recipes,” says Bendel. “You will save on sugar by buying plain and adding your own sweetener, like stevia or cinnamon.” Another source of calcium and protein is cheese, but Patty advises individuals to be particular in their selections. “Real cheese, like string cheese, versus processed cheese, like Velveeta or products labeled ‘cheese food product,’ usually have elevated levels of sodium due to the processing,” says Patty. “Another caution is to be mindful of the amount of fat in your choice. Cheeses made with whole milk will be higher in fat content and ultimately have more calories per serving, but that doesn’t mean fat-free is the better choice. Take a look at the ingredient list to see what is added when the fat is taken out. Artificial ingredients, stabilizers and preservatives do not trump real nutrients. Two percent or reduced fat cheeses can certainly provide a good middle-of-the-road choice.”

Salmon And Flaxseed

M

aintaining a healthy and well-balanced diet can be difficult. Dietitians share their top recommendations on what should stock the refrigerator.

Milk

“Milk is one of the best ways for our bodies to get calcium in a form that is easily absorbed to help build strong bones,” says Pamela Patty, a registered and licensed dietitian with a specialty in diabetes education at INTEGRIS Health in Oklahoma City. “Two-percent [milk] is a great choice because it represents a balance of the three main energy nutrients: fat, protein and carbohydrates.”

Yogurt And Cheese

“Yogurt is another great source of absorbable calcium as well as a way to get probiotics to the body – those ‘friendly’ bacteria that help the immune system to stay healthy and robust,” says Patty. “My favorite choice is the Greek yogurt style. It’s creamier and thicker as far as texture goes, and nutritionally it is higher in protein.” Connie Davis Bendel, a registered and licensed dietitian with Nutrition Consultants of Tulsa, also recommends Greek yogurt and adds that it is enjoyed in many ways. “From breakfast, a quick snack or fruit dip to

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

“Salmon is a great source of lean protein packed with vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids, and, as a bonus, it’s easy to cook,” says Bendel. “Ground flaxseed is a great plant source for omega-3s and can be added to smoothies or sprinkled on cereal or yogurt.”

Eggs

she says. “Fat has gotten such a bad rap that most people avoid it at all costs in their food choices, and that is just not healthy for the body. There are fat-soluble vitamins like A, D, E and K that need a fat substrate in order for the body to absorb them. Without fat, the hair and skin are lackluster and appetite never truly gets satisfied.” Patty also notes that she keeps shelled nuts in the refrigerator to help keep the fat component from spoiling.

Apples, Oranges And Berries

“Apples are an important source of soluble fiber and help the body regulate cholesterol production,” says Patty, adding that they’re also affordable, available year-round, and they keep well in the refrigerator for three to four weeks. “Oranges or [similar citrus] are an important source of vitamin C, which helps in immune system function, wound healing, collagen production and is a powerful antioxidant and important for maintaining skin, blood vessels and bones.” Bendel commends berries for containing high levels of phytochemicals, which help protect cells from damage. “Plus, there are never-ending ways to incorporate berries into your diet, whether it’s in cereal, a smoothie or part of a healthy snack,” she adds.

“Eggs are the gold standard when it comes to evaluating the quality of protein in a food source. And thankfully, research has recently rescinded its ban on eating the whole egg,” says Patty. “For years the cholesterol in the yolk has been associated with causing heart disease and clogging arteries. It’s been an unfounded claim that now has been laid to rest. Nutrients like choline and naturally occurring vitamin D are in the yolk and are not found in very many other food sources, so eating a whole egg every day can go a long way to helping your brain and your bones to be healthy.”

Nuts And Butters

“Nut butters are great for a quick meal or snack and can be spread on whole-grain toast, bagels or crackers or smeared on fruits and veggies,” says Bendel. “Just remember that nuts are high in fat, although good fat, so keep portions in check.” Patty explains that shelled nuts are an easy way to add fat to a food choice that may not include it naturally. “That may sound counterintuitive, but nutritionally speaking, the goal for meals and snacks is to have a balance of the major energy nutrients along with a variety of micronutrients, like vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients,”

Carrots And Leafy Greens

“Carrots are one of the best veggies you can eat,” says Bendel. “They are high in fiber, vitamins A and C and are great for a quick side veggie or with a low-fat dip like hummus. Leafy greens like spinach and kale make a quick side salad, or you can put it in a smoothie or throw it on a sandwich for an extra boost of nutrition.” REBECCA FAST


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is tissue regeneration. Blood vessels grow into the implanted ADM, and it becomes a part of the breast with its own blood supply.” In autologous fat grafting, liposuction is used to take fat cells from one part of the body and inject them into the breast. “I call fat ‘liquid gold’ because it improves the quality of the breast tissue and increases blood flow to the area,” Eid says. “The added benefit of fat grafting is body contouring. When I take fat from the thighs or stomach and inject it into the breast, it creates a more desirable body shape.” Finally, 3D nipple tattooing has taken breast reconstruction options to a new level, according to Eid. For women who have had a total mastectomy and are undergoing breast reconstruction, the options for nipple replacement were limited. “The two-dimensional (2D) tattoos didn’t look good. They faded, and didn’t look realistic,” says Eid. That’s why she sought out a local tattoo artist to train her in 3D realism techniques. “I am now using multiple, customized colors and shadowing to create nipple/areola tattoos that look very realistic, and it is making a huge difference for many of these women,” she says. For Eid, her skill comes from training, but her purpose comes from experience. “Cancer is like a wrecking ball and can destroy everything in its path, even the human spirit,” says Eid. “My goal for my patients is to help restore what cancer has taken away.”

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Life & Style

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HAUTE STUFF Leather and lace, pencil skirts, cropped jackets, shawls and oversized coats are the height of this season’s fashion, and all pay homage to the ‘70s, that important decade full of fashion extremes. Photography by Nathan Harmon HAIR STYLED BY SHAWNA BURROUGHS, JARA HERRON SALON. MAKEUP BY TAYLOR LEDBETTER. MODEL PROVIDED BY LINDA LAYMAN AGENCY.

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Lanvin shift dress, $1,990; Derek Lam wool coat, $1,890; Lanvin cut-out pumps, $695; Valextra tote, $1,850; Rene Escobar chainlink necklace with diamond detail, $3,500, and cuďŹ&#x20AC; bracelet, $1,125; Eddie Sakamoto cut-out ring, $1,313; all from Abersons.

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Proenza Schouler crew-neck sweater, $550, and white jeans, $225; M. Patmos coat, $1,695; Rag & Bone suede boots, $525; M. Patmos scarf, $225; Portolano leather gloves, $95, all from Abersons.

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Les Copains day dress, $1,200; Jimmy Choo lace-up pumps, $1,225; Tory Burch bucket bag, $475; Alexis Bittar labradorite, prehnite and crystal beaded necklace, $345; all from Saks Fifth Avenue. Tom Ford oversized sunnies, $395, Hicks Brunson Eyewear.

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Sachin & Babi knit top, $225; and cropped pants, $395; Jimmy Choo suede sandals, $925; Miu Miu fringed crossbody bag, $1,390; Alexis Bittar bangle, $395, all from Balliets. Oversized Chanel sunnies, $339, Visions Unique Eye & Sunwear.

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Alice + Olivia lace top, $198; PAUW lacetrimmed skirt, $602, and oversized brocade coat, $1,470; Stuart Weitzman studded suede and mesh booties, $465; Tory Burch handbag, $525; all from Saks Fifth Avenue.

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Akris Punto shawl, $1,190, and gray mock turtleneck, $340; Wolford leggings, $395; Jimmy Choo booties, $955; Loeffler Randall faux fur crossbody bag, $395; beaded elephant pendant necklace, $310, all from Balliets. Nine West floppy fedora, $44, Von Maur.

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Akris Punto tweed coat, $1,490, and mock turtleneck, $340; Wolford leggings, $395; Jimmy Choo studded pumps, $1,095; Stella McCartney shoulder bag, $1,025; Etro scarf, $350, all from Balliets.

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Go With

THE FL Oklahoma’s economy is tied closely to the independent oil and natural gas industry. he independent oil and natural gas industry has been and will continue to be the backbone of Oklahoma’s economy, says Cody Bannister, vice president of development and communications at the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association. “One out of every six jobs in Oklahoma is linked to the oil and natural gas industry,” says Bannister. “One out of every three dollars spent in Oklahoma comes from the oil and natural gas industry. Half of the state’s non-farm earnings come from the oil and natural gas industry.”

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Because of that, a thriving and growing oil and gas industry equals a thriving and growing Oklahoma. Economics Professor Russell Evans, executive director of the Steven C. Agee Economic Research and Policy Institute at Oklahoma City University, agrees with that statement. “Because Oklahoma has a long history as an oil and gas state, we have developed a network of oil and gas support operations that allows much of the spillover economic activity to be captured by the state,” says Evans. “In total, the industry likely has a role in somewhere between one out of every three dollars and one out of every four dollars of Oklahoma gross state product.” Just a decade ago, Oklahoma’s oil and natural gas industry was dominated by marginally producing wells and the companies across the state that managed them, says Bannister.


“Oklahoma’s historic oil and gas fields were considered all but depleted, and the integrated companies and the largest independents focused their attention offshore and in other parts of the world,” says Bannister. And then everything changed. The shale gas revolution was sparked by the pioneering use of hydraulic fracturing in the Barnett Shale. Oklahoma companies like Chesapeake, Devon and Continental applied that same technology with horizontal drilling in shale formations like the Woodford, the Marcellus, the Haynesville and the Bakken, unlocking a multi-generational supply of natural gas and the largest American crude oil discovery in the past four decades, Bannister explains. Now, the technology pioneered in the Barnett and perfected by Oklahoma oil and natural gas producers in basins across the United States is being used to inject new life into our state’s historic oilfields, says Bannister. The Mississippi Lime in northern Oklahoma, the SCOOP in southern Oklahoma, the Granite Wash in western Oklahoma and the STACK play in central Oklahoma all have driven new investment and renewed optimism in Oklahoma’s oil and natural gas industry, says Bannister. Oil production in Oklahoma has nearly doubled since 2005, reversing three decades of declines in the state and reaching output levels not seen since 1990, he says. The increased activity in the oilfield has overflowed into other parts of Oklahoma’s economy: Manufacturing, service industries and retail have all seen significant boosts in recent years, and Oklahoma’s unemployment rate, especially in the counties that overlie the producing areas listed above, is one of the lowest in the nation. In Oklahoma, independents are the leaders of the state’s oil and natural gas industry, says Bannister. They range in size from By Sharon McBride large, publicly traded companies to small mom-and-pop businesses where work is done out of the front seat of a pickup and around a kitchen table. Independent producers, by definition, are oil and natural gas producers who do not sell their product to consumers, says Bannister. Much like farmers and ranchers who sell their cattle and wheat at market prices, independent crude oil and natural gas producers have no say in what price their product brings. They simply take the price the market gives them, he explains. Generally speaking, an independent oil and gas company is one whose primary revenue source comes from the upstream production and sale of crude oil/natural gas (or NGLs, etc.), explains Evans. “An independent O&G company is different from an integrated oil and gas company in that large, integrated companies have both upstream production operations as well as downstream refining and marketing operations,” explains Evans. “All of Oklahoma’s oil and gas companies are independent producers (none have integrated refining and downstream marketing operations).” Independent producers have called Oklahoma home since the first days of the state’s oil and natural gas industry a century ago. Some of those early-day producers are still in operation today, with third-and fourth-generation oilmen leading them. Other companies are brand new, led by young entrepreneurs who have seen the benefits the oil and natural gas industry can offer and are willing to take the financial risk necessary to become a part of it, says Bannister. “The true beauty of Oklahoma’s independent oil and natural gas industry is that anyone can be a part of it,” says Bannister. “There is no special training required, although most are highly educated as geologists, engineers, land specialists or business entrepreneurs. There is no board that says yes you can or no you can’t be an oil and natural gas producer. “As long as you have the willingness to take the risk and the fortitude to withstand the ups and downs of the energy industry, anyone can drill a well and produce oil and natural gas in Oklahoma,” he adds. Oil and natural gas is produced in 70 of Oklahoma’s 77 counties. “Independent producers account for 96 percent of the crude oil and 88 percent of the natural gas drawn from the Oklahoma ground,” says Bannister. “Those same producers, mainly small, family-owned companies, use the majority of their earnings to drill wells and employ fellow Oklahomans.”

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Recent downturns in crude oil prices have dampened activity in Oklahoma’s oilfields, but ebbs and flows of commodity prices are a part of the oil and natural gas business, says Bannister. Plummeting oil prices seem like good news for U.S. consumers, who are paying less at the pump than they have in four years. But cheap crude has its drawbacks – from undermining domestic oil production, to discouraging investment in new energy sources. “Independent producers will weather this low-price environment just as they have in the past, and Oklahoma will continue to be one of the best places in the world to invest in the oil and natural gas industry,” says Bannister. Many working Oklahomans hold jobs in the oilfield, and more drilling rigs exploring for Oklahoma oil and natural gas put more Oklahomans to work. However, all Oklahoma’s independent producers will continue to face challenges in a low-price environment. “Oklahoma companies can be divided into the relatively small independent producers and the ‘super’ independents [like Chesapeake Energy or Devon Energy],” says Evans. “Each faces their own challenges.” The super independent has a larger asset base (large acreages, production reserves, subsidiary operations, etc.) and likely has easier access to financial capital (via debt/equity issuance, private equity, etc.) and is likely to be more actively managed on the financial side (active hedging, trading, rolling over debt, etc.), says Evans. “However, the larger independents are likely to be traded publicly and have to leverage the areas just identified to manage market expectations and shareholder unrest,” says Evans. “That is, they have to manage through the current price environment while positioning themselves for the next price environment.” In contrast, the small, independent producer is likely much less reliant on outside capital (although a fair amount of private equity money found its way to smaller producers in this last boom period) and has little in the way of marketable assets of significant size, explains Evans. “Small producers tend to survive the storm using cash reserves, reducing their drilling budgets significantly, and looking for strategic ways to generate cash flow during a downturn,” says Evans. “A well-managed small producer can survive a price downturn as easily as a large independent; they just face a different set of stressors.” However, these stressors can mean fewer jobs to go around, particularly in service companies. In a low-price environment, some independent producers have to lay off workers. “There is some differentiation between oil and gas production and exploration (E&P) companies, versus the oil and gas service compa-

nies,” explains Steven C. Agee, dean of Oklahoma City University’s Meinders School of Business. “Service companies would include companies involved in drilling and completion/logging services. “These service companies have been hit much harder, particularly in the area of employment, in this recent downturn than the E&P companies,” says Agee. In addition, because the E&P companies are reducing the number of wells they drill and complete, in an effort to bring capital expenditures (CapEx) more in line with cash flow, the demand for drilling rigs and completion units (frack jobs, acidizing, electric logs, etc.) has also decreased, says Agee. “As a result, E&P companies can extract a lower price for the services handled by the service companies,” says Agee. “This places an additional burden on the service companies, but actually works in favor of improving the margins for the E&P companies.” In the future, the role of independent producers in the state will continue to change, much like the prices at the gas pump. “The interests of the small producers are increasingly at odds with the larger super independents on issues like spacing, pooling, etc.,” says Evans. “At least for now, the days of the wildcatting producer seem to have passed.” Wildcatter is a term, coined in the 1800s, for a person who is willing to risk drilling in an unproven area. “The focus now is not on a wildcat search for the next big oil trap (a vertically drilled reservoir) but on the systematic extraction of oil from known formations (horizontally drilled and fractured wells through tight shale, for example),” says Evans. “Oil and gas companies are increasingly large, technologically complex, extraction industries where they were once small, scientifically driven finding industries,” says Evans. “I suspect it will get increasingly difficult for small producers to find a niche in tomorrow’s oil and gas landscape. A certain size is probably necessary to truly participate in enough high-cost plays to maintain a manageable risk/ return profile.” But, for now, independent producers continue to contribute significantly to the economy, not only in Oklahoma, but across America. “Independent producers develop 95 percent of domestic oil and gas wells, produce 54 percent of domestic oil and produce 85 percent of domestic natural gas,” says Neal Kirby, manager of public affairs and communications for the Independent Petroleum Association of America. “Independents support over 2.1 million American jobs,” says Kirby. “Independent producers are investing 150 percent of their domestic cash flow back into domestic oil and natural gas development to enhance their already aggressive efforts to find and produce more energy.”

“Independent producers account for 96 percent of the crude oil and 88 percent of the natural gas drawn from the Oklahoma ground.”

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“ T H IS L A N D WA S M A DE FOR YOU A N D M E .” —Woody Guthrie Words written 70 years ago strike a chord in the heart of every American. Especially Oklahomans. As one of our country’s top producers of oil and natural gas, our state continues to drive our nation forward, while investing extensively to protect Oklahoma’s air, water and land. Water recycling technologies and green completion methods are just a few examples of how Oklahoma’s producers are protecting the land we call home.

Learn more about how Oklahoma’s oil and natural gas producers are protecting our environment. Visit oerb.com/environmentalstewardship


Sustain

Before It Was

l o o C

By Megan Morgan Photography by Brandon Scott

FOR 30 YEARS, THE KERR CENTER OF SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE, IN ITS CURRENT FORM SINCE 1985, HAS RESEARCHED AND CONDUCTED SUSTAINABILITY PRACTICES TO HELP OKLAHOMA FARMERS AND RANCHERS IMPROVE PRODUCTION AND YIELDS.

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nable T

he Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture has undergone many changes since its formation in 1965. But, President/ CEO Jim Horne, who has been with the organization for 43 years, says public perception on the subject of sustainability has changed the most. “The biggest change for us since we started out has been public perception and concern about issues of sustainability,” Horne says.

An Advocate For Farmers

The Kerr Center, a nonprofit charitable foundation, was established by Oklahoma Sen. Robert S. Kerr’s wife and their four children shortly after Kerr’s death. Sen. Kerr, from Ada, served as governor of the state from 1943 to 1947 and as a United States senator from 1949 to 1963. One year after the formation of the foundation in his honor, the Kerr Foundation’s Agriculture Division was established to continue Kerr’s work in conservation efforts. “In the beginning, we traveled in teams of specialists to help farmers solve problems and work on designs,” Horne says. Horne himself grew up in western Oklahoma, the land of wheat, and came to the Kerr Center in 1972 as an agricultural economist. “After meeting some of the people who were here at the time, I became really excited to join the team,” Horne says. “I wanted to become an advocate for farmers. I think my background gave me credibility with them, which helped significantly, and I’m also open-minded to what our consumers are interested in.” One of the earliest successes of the center

was fighting the brucellosis (an infectious disease found in cattle) on a statewide scale, and later on a national level. “The [USDA] messed things up by telling people they had to solve the problem in only one way, so when that wasn’t working, they called us in, and we showed people what their options were,” Horne says. “We were hugely successful, and it’s something we’re still very proud of.”

Sustainability Challenges

Twenty years after its inception, the structure of the Kerr Center changed dramatically. “In 1985, the Kerr Center was split into four separate organizations,” Horne says. “In the mid-‘80s, farmers were going bankrupt like crazy. We started looking for alternative solutions. What we ended up doing was a brave move.” Kerr’s daughter, Kay, first sparked the discussion that led to the eventual change in focus for the center. “The split towards sustainable agriculture started from a question that the senator’s daughter was asking. She’s very wise, and she asked me a single question that began to change things. … She asked me, ‘Do you see something wrong in agriculture?’ It was a very piercing question, and I had to think about it honestly,” Horne recalls. “I decided that our current approach wasn’t working, so I thought I’d figure out how to make it work – and that was sustainability.” Horne’s line of reasoning, while viewed as innovative by some of his colleagues, did not make him a popular man for many others in his circle. Sustainability was widely misunderstood, Horne says, as simply maintaining the status quo and keeping things the same,

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as opposed to introducing new ideas. “The decision to become focused on sustainability was not an easy choice to make at the time. Before the split, we had a strong conservation ethic at the Kerr Center, and we weren’t strong users of fertilizers and chemicals, but in the mid-‘80s, a move towards sustainability was viewed as an environmental movement and looked down on, especially since most of us in the agriculture industry were coming from conservative backgrounds,” Horne says. “I found that I was suddenly uninvited from some of the committees I used to sit on.” Many of the difficulties stemmed from perceived differences between the various sides of the agriculture industry, Horne says. “The industrial agriculture industry had one view, and [sustainability] was viewed as a threat to them,” he says. “Now, everyone is hu-

mane with each other. Part of my message is that what we do isn’t just about agriculture; it’s about our resources and our population and its social dimensions.” The wider influence of agriculture and the effect it has on the world continues to interest Horne. After more than 40 years with the Kerr Center, and being a major force in its transition to the Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Horne says this is the major reason why he has continued working in the field. “That aspect – thinking about how sustainable agriculture can solve bigger societal issues like poverty – has both created and kept my passion for this work,” Horne says. “I’m glad I took this path.” It also helps, of course, that public perception about sustainability efforts has shifted dramatically since the mid-‘80s. Today, Horne says there is still a lot of resistance in Oklahoma to sustainable practices, especially in limiting the use of chemicals and fertilizers on crops, but most people are more open-minded to the ideas the Kerr Center emphasizes. “There is a growing movement emphasizing local food, and people are thinking about how you can meet needs now without jeopardizing your future needs. People are concerned now with the question of how the earth can sustain a growing number of people,” Horne says. “That didn’t used to be the case. We have things a lot easier now because people are open to these ideas.” “These ideas,” as Horne says, of sustainability, are researched, explored and presented in a number of ways at the Kerr Center today. It functions both as an educational hub for sustainability practices, the only one of its kind in the state, and a working farm and ranch. With a staff of around 10, the center conducts educational workshops and demonstrations, researches and implements sustainable best practices and provides outreach to groups all over Oklahoma and beyond.

Changing the Way We Think and Eat

One of the center’s recent successes was the creation of the farm-to-school program in the state that helps bring healthy, local, fresh food to schoolchildren and teaches them about its importance. Staff members conducted research with school personnel to find out why local foods weren’t used more often and found that convenience of purchasing from large food conglomerates like Sysco

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was a factor. “If the Kerr Center hadn’t put its money where its mouth is, the farm-to-school program might never have happened. One of the many great things about being a foundation is that you don’t have to answer to specific constituents,” Horne says. “We have a lot of freedom, and we can pursue avenues that traditional agricultural programs might not be able to. There’s a lot we can accomplish because of that.” The center, located in Poteau, houses demonstration areas that display various horticulture and livestock strategies for farmers and ranchers to experience. “The demonstrations that we do really build credibility with farmers because we’re out there doing it and testing things for their benefit,” Horne says. “Sometimes, new strategies don’t always work, but that’s what we’re there for. The demonstrations are a great way for farmers to see hands-on the things they can do and they’re a mainstay of what we do here. It’s a credible place for farmers to see and learn.” Kerr Center horticulture manager George Kuepper spends a lot of his time in the demonstration garden. “I get to be outside and work in the fields hands on, as well as learn new things and help spread those ideas to new people. I’m lucky that I get to work here,” Kuepper says. The demonstration plot is home to many vegetables and various plants, and is also the site of experimentation, Kuepper says. One recent project in the garden was working with a material called biochar. “The biochar project was about learning how to work with it and how to benefit from its use,” Kuepper says. “Biochar is a process of making charcoal that is added to the soil. When it’s in biochar form, carbon is very stable in the soil. We have the problem in the south of the burning up of organic matter because of the high temperatures. Enriching the soil with biochar has the potential for long-term carbon incorporation because it holds water and functions as sites for microorganisms. It conditions the soil and works very long-term, with the potential to counter climate change.” Kuepper, who has been in the field of organic farming for his entire career and at the Kerr Center for eight years, seconds the idea that while things are looking very positive for them today, new and different ideas


“At the time I first got involved, you couldn’t use the term ‘organic’ without hearing snickering and being dismissed. Now many universities have organic tracks and sustainable agriculture degrees; it’s no longer odd.”

about farming and ranching weren’t always so accepted. “At the time I first got involved, you couldn’t use the term ‘organic’ without hearing snickering and being dismissed. Now many universities have organic tracks and sustainable agriculture degrees; it’s no longer odd,” Kuepper says. “There’s still a ways to go, but it has gone in a very positive direction on a lot of fronts. I feel much more optimistic than I once did. I really and truly did not think we’d be at this stage during my lifetime. Maybe when I was in a nursing home, but not while I was still actively working in the field.” In addition to managing the organic horticulture program, Kuepper also works with the horticulture interns, most of whom are current students or recent graduates. He says that the Kerr Center has benefitted from the work of interns, and vice versa, since its beginnings.

“This part of the program started about seven years ago,” Kuepper says. “Many of the interns have a concept of sustainable food production but not a lot of practical work experience with it. In this program, they get their hands dirty. The academic side of the program is emphasized as well with research they perform that has value to us.” But even with the studies interns conduct on organic and sustainable growing practices, Kuepper says there is still an aspect of the intern program that he enjoys even more. “The best thing about it is that I get exposed to great people. If you are ever feeling discouraged on the news by things you might hear about young people, you need to meet our interns who come through here,” Kuepper says. “I feel that they take away a lot from us because we cover a very wide ground.”

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The young people Kuepper works with give him further encouragement in the growing public interest in organic methods, he says. Kuepper is also requested for many speaking engagements and presentations at conferences and universities. “We’re reaching a lot of people that way,” Kuepper says. “It’s exciting.”

Educating Oklahoma’s Agriculture Sector

Like many staff members of the Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Chief Program Officer David Redhage also has a solid background in farming. “I grew up on a beef cattle farm, and I have a master’s in agricultural economics,” Redhage says. Among other duties, Redhage oversees the educational side of the Kerr Center’s mission. At the headquarters, the center offers courses for new and experienced farmers alike, and on topics that vary widely. “We host workshops on things like manag-

ing shiitake mushrooms, blueberry growing and harvesting, best practices for maintaining livestock, how to manage your pastures to reduce the environmental impact and not spraying every pasture every year,” Redhage says. “You can learn something new and then actually apply it; you get the chance to get out in the field and actually see it happen. It’s a valuable opportunity for our farmers.” Redhage says that one recent project that he is especially proud of is the work done with native pollinators. With a massive decline in the number of honeybees in the country in the past several years, this is a hot topic. “Native pollinators is a popular subject right now, which we like to see,” Redhage says. “We need to adapt and figure out ways to stress the importance of wildflowers in agriculture because of the stress that honeybees have been under. With colony collapse syndrome and the mass production of agricultural products, we have to question whether we have enough honeybees left to pollinate. We encourage those who come to our workshops to tell their neighbors to plant

native wildflowers.” Through the Kerr Center’s efforts to educate the public about the importance of wildflowers, especially when understood in context with the honeybee problem, Redhage says they have had great success in raising awareness. “When farmers and ranchers come to us with questions and leave with new ideas they can implement, that’s what we want to see happen – especially when they take those new ideas and tell their neighbors about them, too,” Redhage says. Upcoming workshops at the Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture include an elderberry session and information about feral hog management, Redhage says. Workshop attendees are often people new to the farming industry, but experienced farmers looking to learn something new also frequent the sessions. The center gets regular questions from people thinking about breaking into the market, Redhage says. “For Oklahoma, we are the one source for people to go to for questions about sustainDAVID REDHAGE GREW UP ON A CATTLE FARM AND NOW PARLAYS HIS KNOWLEDGE OF SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE INTO EDUCATING FELLOW OKLAHOMANS ABOUT BEST PRACTICES.

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able agriculture practices, and there is a real demand for that information,” Redhage says. “When producers call me wanting to get into some system for the first time, I always tell them to start small, especially for those who have no background in farming. Keep your day job, and learn how to produce first, and then make the leap to full-time if you can make it viable. People don’t always realize that you need the up-front resources of the land and equipment paid for, and the knowledge, too. I love to see new people getting into sustainable farming, but I do urge them to take things slowly.” Redhage also serves as the program manager for the USDA’s Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program Professional Development Program, Southern Region. “That basically means that I coordinate a federal program in partnership with the University of Georgia to train trainers on sustainability,” Redhage says. “It provides grants in 13 southern states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.” Redhage reports to the group’s administrative council twice a year, providing updates on the Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture’s progress and advancements. Communications Director Maura McDermott helps keep all of these various balls in the air, so to speak, and works to produce materials that highlight the Kerr Center’s activities. McDermott, who has been with the Kerr Center since 1998, writes material for the organization’s website and maintains and updates its content, edits reports and grants from the staff and publicizes workshops and events, among other roles. McDermott says that with her background of both growing up on a cattle ranch and her experience in journalism, her position with the Kerr Center is a perfect fit. She, like her coworkers, is also a strong believer in the center’s mission and purpose. “We have provided so much information through our demonstrations to the public, all at a low cost. We reach out to ranchers, gardeners, people interested in local food and people working to better the population’s overall health,” McDermott says. “And through all of this, the Kerr Center has really been a leader and spurred other organizations over the years, such as the ‘Buy Fresh Buy Local’ movement.” McDermott says she encourages Oklahomans who might be in any way interested in sustainability farming to check out what the Kerr Center has to offer, because they have many different ways to get involved. “We are available, and we can help you answer your questions,” McDermott says. “Our website has a lot of resources available, and I’d also encourage people to come out on tours of the center to see what we’re up to.

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Even if you just have a small yard, you can get involved, and you can help create a more sustainable world.” Horne agrees that the more people get involved in sustainability practices, the better. “We aren’t purists; it’s not ‘our way or the highway’ all the time. But the center asks important questions and seeks to find economically profitable ways to farm without hurting the earth. We’re flexible because the world needs more farmers,” Horne says. “We have a strong belief in keeping families on farms, because when fewer people own more land, oftentimes, the right decisions aren’t made. We look to nature for the model and try to stay in harmony with that.” Looking at the center’s longstanding history, it almost seems impossible to imagine how the organization could do more in the DR. JIM HORNE OVERSEES THE OPERATIONS OF THE KERR CENTER AND HAS BEEN A PART OF THE OPERATION FOR 43 YEARS.

future, but Horne has his ideas. “We want to keep our antenna out there and continue to look at new options to see what we can accomplish,” Horne says. “We’ve always been known as working for the farmer. We want to see researchers and farmers working as partners. This is a good place to bounce plans, and we have a long record of helping farmers set goals for themselves and their land.” Because, in the end, Horne says he believes that farming is one of the greatest callings a person can pursue. “With all the uncertainty in the world – the stock market and terrorism and everything else – living and working on a good farm is one of the best lives a person can have,” Horne says. “I love farmers and our organization does, too.”


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The

LIFE

&TIMES OF

By John Wooley

The creator of one of the world’s most recognizable cartoon strips faced rejection after a promising start to his career, but it was persistence that cemented his legacy. On May 18, the Chester Gould-Dick Tracy Museum Facebook page shared the image of a telegram that had been sent to Chester Gould, Tracy’s creator, exactly 71 years earlier. Referring to a popular Tracy villain, the wire read, “WANT TO CLAIM FLATTOPS BODY LETTER WILL FOLLOW EXPLAINING,” and included a pair of names and a Beaumont, Texas, address. Gould, in a comic strip that ran only a few days before he got the telegram, had killed off the murderous Flattop, one of the scores of bizarre and wildly popular characters the Pawnee native would create during his nearly five decades as Dick Tracy’s creator, artist and writer. There was, of course, no body to claim. Flattop was a fictional character, a product of Gould’s mind and pen. And while we don’t know any more about the two who were so moved by Flattop’s fictional death that they felt compelled to ask Gould for his remains, we do know that their reaction points up one of the famed cartoonist’s great strengths.

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CHESTER GOULD, A PAWNEE NATIVE AND THE CREATOR OF THE FAMOUS DICK TRACY COMIC STRIP, DISCOVERED HIS FASCINATION FOR THE NEWSPAPER COMIC STRIP WHEN HE WAS AS YOUNG AS 7 YEARS OLD. BELOW: A MURAL OF A DICK TRACY STRIP SPLAYS A WALL ON SIXTH AND HARRISON STREETS IN PAWNEE’S DOWNTOWN SQUARE.

PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS AND TOM BRIGGS.

S

“It just lets you know how real his characters were to people,” says Mike Curtis, who’s been writing Dick Tracy since 2011, 26 years after Gould’s death. “He was very much like Charles Dickens in the way he wrote. Dickens came up with incredible characters, and Gould did the same thing.” Indeed, for every Uriah Heep, Mr. Bumble, Polly Toodle and even Ebenezer Scrooge put through their literary paces by the renowned 18th-century British novelist, Gould had characters like Vitamin Flintheart, B.O. Plenty, Haf-and-Haf and Gravel Gertie going through their paces in the daily episodes of Dick Tracy’s ongoing saga. Also, as was the case with the Dickens novels, the Gould characters were wildly popular in their time, their adventures read by untold millions, some of whom saw them as far more than one-dimensional drawings bounded by panels in their newspaper’s comics section. “When Chester Gould had B.O. Plenty marry Gravel Gertie in Dick Tracy,” wrote Paul McClung in the March 16, 1973, Lawton Constitution, “the couple was flooded with gifts and congratulatory telegrams. Their child, Sparkle Plenty, inspired

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a doll that produced $3 million in sales in one year.” The household-name fame of Gould’s characters could cut both ways, however. As writer Jimmie Tramel pointed out in a Tulsa World piece from Oct. 9, 2014, when Gould had the criminous Flattop announce that he was from Oklahoma’s Cookson Hills, the statement “offended both Sallisaw mayor Oscar Capps and Sequoyah County Times owner Wheeler Mayo, who criticized Gould in print: “Why would a Pawnee boy let one of his bad guys be from Oklahoma?” he wrote. “I assure [you] there wasn’t the remotest particle of sabotage in my actions,” Gould said in January 1944.” (In fact, Gould’s reference to the Cookson Hills, some 150 miles southeast of Pawnee, was probably a nod to the real-life ‘30s gangster Charles “Pretty Boy” Floyd, who had grown up in those hills and, some sources indicate, inspired the Flattop character.) Perhaps the reason Gould’s characters seemed so real to so many was that their creator viewed them in much the same way. “Around Christmas of 1949,” says Curtis, “an interview with Gould came out in The Saturday Evening Post, and one of the questions the reporter asked him was, ‘Is Tracy ever going to get married?’ Gould said, ‘No, he doesn’t have time for it. He doesn’t have time to get married. So he never will.’ “Because of the prep time on articles, by the time it came out in the Post, Tracy had eloped with Tess Truehart. So the magazine contacted him again, asking him, ‘What about this?’ And Gould just shook his head, smiled, and said, ‘Tracy never tells me anything.’”

Invention of the Tracer

According to Darrell Gambill, manager of the Pawnee County Historical Society Museum and Dick Tracy Headquarters, Gould was “born in a log cabin out east of Pawnee, outside the city limits.” On the date of his birth, Nov. 20, 1900, the town of Pawnee was still a part of Indian Territory. The state of Oklahoma didn’t come around until Nov. 16, 1907 – four days before young Chester’s seventh birthday. By that time, he’d discovered the newspaper comic strip, although “discovered” may be too mild a verb. He was apparently entranced, not only recreating them – notes the Chester Gould-Dick Tracy Museum website – but also “adding in his own dialogue.” He was encouraged to draw by his father, Gilbert R. Gould, who worked for the local paper, The Pawnee Courier Dispatch. The window of the newspaper’s office proved a fine place to display the budding art

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

CHESTER GOULD CONTINUED CREATING COMIC STRIPS UNTIL HE RETIRED IN 1977 AT 77 YEARS OLD. PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.


DICK TRACY MEMORABILIA IS ON DISPLAY AT THE PAWNEE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND DICK TRACY HEADQUARTERS.

CHESTER GOULD ON THE 1950 SET OF THE DICK TRACY TELEVISION SHOW.

DARRELL GAMBILL IS THE MANAGER OF THE PAWNEE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND DICK TRACY HEADQUARTERS.

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ist’s work, and it’s likely his course was competitor, the Chicago Evening American, set when he was 8 years old, and, as the part of the newspaper empire of mogul WilGould-Dick Tracy Museum site tells us, he liam Randolph Hearst. It was there that he was “thrilled when a lawyer on the Supreme first got a pair of comic strips into print, both Court [bought] a drawing that Chester drew concentrating on relatively new forms of enof him” while the man was in town for a tertainment: Fillum Fables was a humor strip countywide Democratic convention. with a movie background, while Radio Catts What followed for the next few years was took as its topic was a source of amusement a pattern familiar to any young, ambitious and information for an ever-growing number creator: contests entered and often won, of Americans. Both were syndicated by mail-order study, constant practice. In 1918, Hearst’s King Features, with the former havhis senior year of high school, Gould’s taling a decent, if unspectacular, five-year run. ent was discovered by the yearbook staff at A third strip, The Girl Friends, came into beOklahoma A&M in Stillwater; still in high ing after Gould had left the Hearst paper for the school, he ended up doing many of the line Chicago Daily News in 1928. As had been the drawings for their 1918 and 1919 editions. case with the Evening American, he wrote and Then in 1919, Gould enrolled at that institudrew the strip around his other work, including tion, studying commerce and marketing. advertising art and editorial cartooning. During Gould’s early days on the A&M campus, the oilmanCHESTER GOULD’S philanthropist Charles Page hired CHILDHOOD HOME IN him to draw 18 editorial cartoons PAWNEE, OKLA. for his newspaper, the Tulsa Democrat. Soon, Gould was also cartooning regularly for the sports section of the Daily Oklahoman. These were both paying jobs, but they weren’t nearly enough to satisfy Gould’s artistic ambitions. So, the summer after his sophomore year at Oklahoma A&M, he packed up his portfolio and headed for Chicago. Why Chicago? Editor Bill Crouch Jr. explained it in the 1990 book Dick Tracy: America’s Most Famous Detective: All along, Gould continued submitting “The Chicago Tribune Syndicate headed ideas to Patterson, who was now spending by Captain Joseph Patterson was the hottest much of his time at the offices of another thing in the new burgeoning syndicated carfamily-owned publication, the New York toon field,” wrote Crouch. “Chester wanted Daily News. Patterson just as reliably continto be where the action was. He arrived in ued to reject them. A timeline on the Chester Chicago on Sept. 1, 1921, with $50 cash Gould-Dick Tracy Museum site claims that in his pocket and a suitcase full of samples Gould shot Patterson exactly 60 unsuccessof his published work in Oklahoma newsful pitches for different strips before finally papers. Gould would turn 21 on Nov. 20, connecting in 1931 with his 61st, an effort 1921. The 10-year struggle to become a top called Plainclothes Tracy. (“Tracy” was a syndicated cartoonist had begun.” play on the word “trace” or “tracer,” which During those years, Gould found employreferred to the procedure of tracking down ment in Chicago’s flourishing newspaper criminals.) As Crouch wrote in Dick Tracy: scene. While he wasn’t yet achieving his America’s Most Famous Detective, it was a goal of a nationally syndicated comic strip, logical extrapolation of both the area and the he was making a living as an artist, drawera in which Gould lived: ing ads and cartoons for, first, the Chicago “Chicago and gangsters had become synJournal, a Tribune rival, and then the Chionymous in the Prohibition era, and Gould cago Tribune itself, home of the comic-strip thought about the possibilities of a modern syndicate headed by former Army captain Sherlock Holmes set in this period. Gould Patterson, whose family had founded the pafigured the public, like himself, was fed up per. But Gould’s employment there had little with crooked judges, crooked lawyers, hoodeffect on Patterson, who swatted down every lums and gangsterism.” comic-strip idea Gould sent him. But while it was certainly logical that the Continuing his education at Northwestern city of Al Capone, Bugs Moran and the St. University, Gould graduated in 1923 and Valentine’s Day Massacre would be the place was subsequently hired by another Tribune to give birth to a comic strip about a hard

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

boiled crimefighter, Dick Tracy (changed at Patterson’s suggestion, with “dick” being slang for “detective”) was also an unprecedented achievement – the first strip of its kind. “There had never been anything like Dick Tracy before,” says Curtis. “They were starting to do story strips [as opposed to the ‘gag-a-day’ humor strip], but they were The Gumps, and Little Orphan Annie, and Wash Tubbs. This was the first cop, or policeman, adventure story. For that alone, Gould gets into the history books, because nobody else had ever thought of it before.”

Back to the Future

“Everybody talks about all the villains Gould created – Flattop, Mumbles, B-B Eyes, and all of them, and that’s great,” says Bart Bush, one of the biggest collectors of Dick Tracy memorabilia in the world. “But one of the things people don’t talk about very much is that he was quite the inventor of things, and his ideas were eventually implemented by law enforcement.” Bush, who lives in Norman, Okla., cites 1946 as the year that these inventions began appearing in Dick Tracy. There were two of them, he notes: one that didn’t get very far, and another that became very famous. “He came up with the Atomic Light, a portable device that flashed a white, brilliant beam. Anyone who looked at it was blinded for eight minutes. At about the same time, he created the TwoWay Wrist Radio, which was worn on the wrist like a watch. It had a battery, a microphone and a speaker, and it allowed the user to tune to any wavelength and receive and send messages. Of course, something similar was later actually used by the police. “I’ve heard that when Gould came up with that idea, Bell Telephone was working on a concept that was very similar,” Bush adds. “They invited Gould out to their lab so they could show him what they were working on, and as I recall it, theirs had a microphone on the wrist, but you carried the speaker in your front pocket. Gould said, ‘Well, you know, television is coming on, so maybe you guys ought to consider a TV instead of just a radio.’ And they laughed at him and said, ‘Oh no, no, no. It’s hard enough for your readers to believe your two-way wrist radio, much less a two-way wrist TV.’ Of course, in 1964, the two-way wrist TV did show up in the Dick Tracy strip.” Other Gould inventions Bush cites are 1948’s Teleguard, a forerunner of the surveillance camera, and 1953’s Electronic Tele-


phone Number Pickup, a predecessor to the real world’s caller-ID systems. “Then, of course, there’s the Magnetic Space Coupe he introduced to the strip in 1962, and in 1968 the Magnetic Air Car, that little thing he rode around in that looked like the bottom half of a capsule,” Bush notes. “Those haven’t come to fruition yet. But they could still happen.” Perhaps Gould’s most lasting Dick Tracy invention wasn’t actually an invention at all, but a concept that proceeded out of a plot involving Junior Tracy, Dick’s adopted son, and some of his friends. “There was a storyline in 1947 where Junior and his friends got together to help Tracy solve crimes, and they called themselves the Crime Stoppers,” explains Bush. “It was a detective club of helping hands; its motto was ‘work and win.’ In one episode, Tracy taught them how to photograph fingerprints, and there were other instructional things in the strip. “Gould was living in Woodstock, Ill., and when he started this storyline the police chief in Woodstock decided there should be a real Crime Stoppers club in Woodstock, doing exactly what Tracy, or Gould, wanted done, which was to teach kids about the police force, and what the police do, and why you should stay honest and out of crime. It was extremely successful and spread to other cities and states.” Crime Stoppers became Crimestoppers, and by 1949, each Sunday installment of Dick Tracy included a one-panel “Crimestoppers Textbook,” offering tips on combatting illegality. The feature continues in the strip to this day. And while there doesn’t appear to be any official relationship between Gould’s Crimestoppers and the well-known telephone tip line of the same name that offers people both anonymity and rewards for reporting crimes, Bush believes the first Crimestoppers must’ve had something to do with the second. “I never have really gotten into that,” he says, “but I believe, at least somewhat, it’s all tied back into Chester Gould and Dick Tracy.”

Dick Tracy In B Flat

It would be a fool’s errand to try and list all of the Dick Tracy-inspired material absorbed by our culture over the last 80-plus years. Name a medium – TV, radio, movies, even animated cartoons – and he’s been there. Toys from dolls to “metal handcuffs with trick locking mechanism” have sprung from the strip. Tracy and his cast of characters have even been set to music, most notably a hilarious radio musical called Dick Tracy In B Flat that featured Bing Crosby as Tracy

and Dinah Shore as Tess Truehart, with the likes of Judy Garland, Frank Sinatra, Bob Hope and the Andrews Sisters in supporting roles. Its Feb. 15, 1945, broadcast over the Armed Forces Radio Network reached nearly 100 million troops. On a far smaller scale, but intriguing because of the involvement of a couple of Gould’s fellow Oklahomans, was a Liberty Records single released in October 1965 and titled “Dick Tracy.” Written by songwriters Jim Robinson, Johnny “Peanuts” Wilson and Roland Pike, it was recorded by Tulsa native J.J. Cale, still several years away from stardom. The arranger of the session, as well as its co-producer (with west coast music figure Snuff Garrett), was another Tulsan, Cale’s friend Leon Russell, who’d already made a name for himself as an L.A. session player. With narrative verses and a bouncy chorus, it was somewhat reminiscent of the comicstrip-themed No. 1 hit of a half-decade earlier, the Hollywood Argyles’ “Alley Oop.” Unfortunately, it didn’t duplicate that success and never cracked the national charts.

most heavily on funds from Chester Gould’s daughter, Jean O’Connell.” It took Pawnee a little longer, but several of the town’s residents knew something needed to be done to acknowledge its hometown hero – especially after TV crews, following the success of the film, began descending on Gould’s hometown. “We had TV people coming in from everywhere, and I’d take them around and show them Pawnee,” recalls Gambill. “I’d say, ‘Someday, we’re going to have a big mural up on the side of a building showing Dick Tracy, but we can’t afford it now.’ “Somebody in Tulsa saw me interviewed on TV, and he said, `You want a mural?’ I said, `Yeah, but we can’t afford it.’ He said, `Well, we’ll do it all for free.’” That man turned out to be Ed Melberg, head of the Tulsa-based company Sign Excellence. “He came over with two big trucks full of paint and people, and they were all over that building,” remembers Gambill. “In the middle of the morning, it started to rain, and I thought, ‘Well, that’s it.’ We took ‘em over to a little cafe for lunch, and when we came back it had stopped raining, and the rain hadn’t hurt a thing.” Although it still exists as an online entity, the Chester Gould-Dick Tracy Museum in Illinois closed its brick-and-mortar operation in 2008. Gambill says that Gould’s daughter then sent material from that museum to Pawnee, where it’s now on display in the Dick Tracy Headquarters section of the Pawnee County Historical Society Museum. The society also hosts an annual Dick Tracy Day. “Every day, we have people coming in,” says Gambill. “We’ve got three bus tours coming in next week.”

Two Museums, One Legacy

The Yellow Coat Keeps Going

Chester Gould had two hometowns: Pawnee, where he grew up, and Woodstock, Ill., 60 miles northwest of Chicago, where he moved with his wife, Edna, and young daughter, Jean, in 1935. Both Pawnee and Woodstock ended up with museums honoring their favorite son, and each can trace its origin back to 1990 – 13 years after Gould had retired from the strip, and five years after his death. The catalyst – or, at least, a major factor – in both cases was the big-budget summer blockbuster Dick Tracy, produced and directed by Hollywood superstar Warren Beatty, who also had the title role. The Chester Gould-Dick Tracy Museum in Woodstock began in 1991, after community members put on a Dick Tracy Days event, which raised enough money to open the doors, and for years, according to its site, “relied on donations, merchandise sales, and

Although they didn’t know it until they began working together, writer Mike Curtis and artist Joe Staton, the current creative team behind Dick Tracy, both started reading Gould’s strip in the same newspaper. “[Staton] grew up in Milan, Tenn. The big paper to get there was the Jackson Sun,” explains Curtis. “And I lived in Jackson, Tenn., where the paper came from.” Both comic professionals of long standing, the two got together in 2010 to create material for a website anticipating Tracy’s 80th birthday. By the time that 2011 birthday rolled around, artist Dick Locher, who was also writing the strip, had announced his retirement, and Curtis and Staton stepped in. “Chester Gould left all these actors to us, and it’s like a little playhouse,” says Curtis of the venerable strip. “All we’re doing is writing new plays for them.” SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Active Years

Legal Ease

M

Preparation is the most important component of an estate plan.

any people mistakenly believe that estate planning is only necessary for the rich. In actuality, a basic estate plan is essential for everyone, regardless of income or net worth, because we all want to minimize misunderstanding, unnecessary costs and stress for loved ones after a death or incapacitation. Without proper groundwork and documentation, assets like houses, retirement plans and savings accounts can end up in limbo for years, sometimes requiring expensive legal assistance to straighten out. “Being prepared makes things a lot easier on surviving family members because they know they are implementing what you wanted,” says Sara Barry, a shareholder and attorney with GableGotwals law firm in Tulsa. “Having an estate plan can be very advantageous in practical terms, save time and expense and avoid uncertainty or unintended effects for your estate and family.”

Wills

So what goes into estate planning? An estate consists of everything a person owns when they die, including a home, personal property, investments, bank accounts, retirement plans and any interests in a family business or partnership. Beneficiary designation forms control who gets retirement accounts, along with life insurance proceeds. For most other assets, you need a will or living trust

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

that says who receives your belongings. So what exactly goes into a will? Or a living trust? What is the difference, and how does the average person know which one is appropriate for his or her situation? “Simply put, a will is a document you sign that states how you want your assets to be transferred and estate to be managed after you die,” says Barry. “To be effective, a will must be signed in accordance with state statutes, following procedures for having other people witness you signing the document as your will and their signing it as well. “After you die, the will has to be filed with the applicable district court, and the probate and estate administration procedures must be followed to settle the estate,” says Barry. “When a will is signed, it needs to be kept in a secure place because the original signed and witnessed document must be filed with the court and approved by it to give it effect.” A will can be amended or revoked at any time during a lifetime and only has final binding effect after a death, when it is filed and approved by the court. Wills are easy to create, but they require the distribution of assets to go through probate.

Probate

The probate process often requires a lot of technical paperwork and court appearances, and the resulting legal and court fees are paid from estate property, reducing the

amount that is passed on to heirs. Probate court is often a necessary part of the process of distributing a person’s assets after his or her death. Whenever an individual passes away, probate court will typically get involved in order to make sure that everything in his or her estate is distributed properly, says David H. Herrold, an attorney with the Tulsa office of Doerner Saunders Daniel & Anderson. Probate court will look at estate planning documents, such as a will, in order to determine where everything should go. They have to review the will and make sure that it is legitimate and can be upheld. If the individual did not have a will, the probate court will then use their best judgment to distribute the assets. “Probate court can be costly,” says Herrold.

Trusts

A trust can be more expensive to set up and requires professional assistance, but it provides benefits that a will cannot. First, when they’re structured properly, trusts will help avoid guardianship or conservatorship if one becomes incapacitated. A will only works after you’ve died; a trust, by contrast, works all the time, including periods of incapacity before death, says Harry V. Rouse, an attorney with the Tulsa office of the Doerner Saunders law firm. Trusts usually avoid probate, which helps beneficiaries gain access to assets more


quickly as well as save time and court fees. Depending on how it’s structured, a trust may also reduce estate taxes owed and can protect an estate from heirs’ creditors. “Many people mistakenly associate trusts with the rich and famous … for example, a ‘trust fund baby.’ The term usually refers to a young person whose parents are wealthy and have set up a trust for their son or daughter,” says Herrold. “In actuality, any competent adult at any station in life can create a trust to protect assets and heirs.”

Powers of Attorney and Proxies

A power of attorney can also come in handy when planning for the unforeseen. “Powers of attorney are used for a variety of reasons, not just for estate planning,” says Barry. “They can be limited in scope or broad. They can apply just to medical decisions, like a durable power of attorney for health care, or they can apply to decisions related to your assets. “In connection with their estate planning, many people execute an advance directive, a durable power of attorney for health care and a durable power of attorney (for management of assets),” explains Barry. “A power of attorney can give the person appointed to act for you significant powers and authority.” The use of it, and who it is given to, should be carefully considered. Not all powers of attorney are created equal. For example, a power of attorney may give the person named in it the power to change investment of assets or to even change ownership of them, says Barry. “There are many choices to be made when executing these documents, so it is important to consult your attorney and understand the options,” he continues. Additional types of documents to consider when planning for the future include healthcare proxies and living wills. “A living will, also known as an advance directive, is not a ‘will’ in the traditional meaning,” says Barry. “The living will allows a person to give advance directions about end-of-life medical care, such as the desire not to be kept alive artificially or by mechanical devices for a prolonged period of time after he or she becomes unable to tell health care providers what to do.” In the living will, you can also appoint a “health care proxy” to act for you as to the medical decisions you make in a living will, says Barry. You can also sign another document called a durable power of attorney for health care to appoint another person to give direc-

tions to doctors and health care providers about your care and treatment if you are unable to do so. It is important to note that the durable power of attorney for health care does not authorize another person to make end-of-life decisions, such as ceasing to use life-sustaining procedures or devices, says Barry. In other words, this person will be your “attorney-in-fact” or “agent” to arrange for your care and give directions to doctors and hospitals if you are too ill or injured to do so for yourself. “Many people choose to execute both an advance directive and a durable power of attorney for healthcare,” says Barry. “You should consult an estate planning attorney to be sure you understand the documents and execute them in accordance with state law.”

Stay up to Date

It is important to keep beneficiary designation forms updated. Beneficiary designation forms on life insurance policies, 401(k) accounts and other assets will generally override any conflicting provisions within a will or trust. It’s essential to make sure all forms are checked and updated regularly, ideally on an annual basis. “Inevitably, we all reach a point in life where we experience an inability to control what happens to us personally and how our property is managed or distributed,” says Herrold. “Whether it’s our health, our relationships or our assets, we each will reach a point we can no longer take care of those things or make adequate decisions about them. “Thus, it’s critical that while we’re capable of caring for ourselves and our property and making meaningful and intentional decisions, that we put measures in place that will help us control our destiny,” says Herrold. Even if you decide not to execute any documents, there are things you can do to make it easier on a surviving spouse if you die, for example, making sure certain assets are in both your names with right of survivorship. “While many people may think of estate planning as just completing a ‘form,’ it is really much more than that,” says Barry. “It is deciding what you want done with your property and then preparing and signing the most appropriate and useful documents to accomplish it in the event of your illness or death.” At a minimum, however, most should have a will and an advance directive for health care, says Herrold. “I would also recommend you consider establishing a revocable trust. For many

people, a durable power of attorney is the most important document, since it designates who will manage your affairs, if you are unable to do so, and it can avoid a costly, cumbersome and contentious guardianship proceeding that is supervised by a court. Regardless of one’s financial status, he or she can need someone to make everyday decisions for him or her.”

Plan For Less

Estate planning doesn’t have to cost a bundle. A will doesn’t have to be expensive. If cost is an issue, you may be able to get low-cost help through a legal aid group or student-run clinic. Remember when using online resources that state laws can vary widely, says Barry. Whatever type of document you decide to implement for the future, it’s best to make that decision sooner than later.

“I find that many people put off estate planning because they have a hard time making these decisions, especially deciding who should be the guardian of their children, or if a trust should be put in place for children and who could be the trustee,” says Barry. “But, if you don’t decide, state law will govern, and not only may the result be something you did not want, it can be emotionally harder for your family. “For many individuals, the process of naming persons to be their beneficiaries for life insurance and 401(k) plan accounts in the event of death is a regular occurrence,” she adds. “When that is done, it is usually a good time to also have a will or trust prepared in order to give effective directions for how to transfer assets that you individually own, such as your home, any other real estate and your bank and personal investment accounts.” SHARON MCBRIDE

SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Active Years

Live And Learn

Learning should never stop, and there are plenty of ways for those over 50 to further their education.

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ob Grant says age doesn’t matter when it comes to learning. The 83-year-old, University of Central Oklahoma graduate is the oldest student to have graduated from the college in its 125-year history, but he’s not alone. In recent years, an increase of retirees like Grant have returned to or begun college. According to a U.S. News and World Report survey, the number of college students ages 40 to 64 has increased nearly 20 percent to almost two million in the last decade. UCO isn’t the only university to see an influx of older-student enrollment. “Last fall, we had 20 students age 65 and over,” says Julie Sawyer, executive director of institutional effectiveness at Northeastern State University. “Of those, 12 were undergraduate students seeking bachelor’s degrees – three of them pursuing [a] second bachelor’s – four were graduate students seeking master’s degrees, and four were nondegree seeking students taking classes in audit status.” There are benefits to seniors returning to school. “An advantage is that students who are age 65 or older and [taking] audit classes (no grade/no credit) are not charged tuition and fees for

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those courses after providing proof of age,” Sawyer explains. “These students do have to pay any other expenses” like application fees, parking permits, books, etc. University officials understand that it is no longer just 18- to 25-year-olds attending college, and they are changing the accessibility of courses to accommodate the older demographic. “The University of Central Oklahoma is expanding our expressions as we serve the metropolitan area,” says Elise Marrs, director of downtown and graduate recruitment at UCO. “We have continued our reach as a metropolitan university with UCO Downtown, CHK-Central Boathouse and ACM@ UCO.” Craig Davis, associate state director of AARP Oklahoma, says seniors are looking for things to keep them busy, and returning to school is another way to stay active. “Some people think, ‘I’ve had a career, now I want to do something that brings me more personal fulfillment,’ and whether that is starting their own business or returning to school, they are seeking that next step,” he explains. “People are trying to live vibrant lives after the age of 50.” Davis says AARP strives to help seniors determine the possibilities. “We are all about providing the tools to help people discover what options are available to them,” he adds. It doesn’t matter if you’re choosing courses that are whimsical or serious, attending classes is about finding new passions or filling a knowledge gap. For Grant, he wants to stay active and hopes to find a part-time job teaching a course on aging. “I think I know a thing or two about getting older,” he says. “I think I’m a bit of an expert on the subject.” More than anything, Grant wants adults to be inspired by his story. He encourages anyone to go back to school and get a degree. “No matter how old you are, if you don’t have all the education you want, it is never too late to return to school,” he says. ALAINA STEVENS


ADVERTISERS ’ NEWS

The Only Salt You Need

Looking to provide a positive change for its community, Salt Yoga Tulsa offers a clientbased approach.

“W

e wanted our studio to act as salt, which is to positively impact the people that come here,” explains Michelle Cara, a co-owner of SALT Yoga Tulsa. Salt is a protectant, a cleanser, a healer and an agent of change. Through SALT, owners Cara and Teresa Gawey look to be the agent of change through every aspect of the studio. Walking inside, visitors are instantly met with an all-encompassing Zen spirit. “We wanted SALT to be a warm environment,” Gawey says. “Secondly, we wanted SALT to be a peaceful, tranquil getaway for people, where they can feel safe.” “A lot of our clients tell us this is their sanctuary,” Cara says. “Our studio is truly a no-judgment zone. … Over our door says, ‘no shoes, no phone and no ego.’ Nobody is here for competition, nor the stress the competition brings.” The inception of SALT began with a friendship between Gawey and Cara. The two had practiced yoga for years and eventually decided to open their own yoga studio, one that was based around the clients’ needs. Their goal wasn’t to imitate other studios, but to be the best studio and provide the best environment. What makes SALT unique is that Gawey and Cara aren’t instructors. Gawey says they want to be able to see their business through the client’s perspective, ensuring that clients have the best yoga experience possible. “It keeps us, as owners, very sharp on how we can improve the SALT experience,” Gawey says. “It’s not about the instructors’ needs, it’s about the clients’ needs. It allows for an honest conversation of their classes. And the instructors are always open to hearing the client’s opinion.” Like everyone else in the SALT community, instructors are personable and approachable. Gawey says they wanted to choose instructors that were passionate about teaching yoga at a clientbased studio. What also makes SALT unique is its location in Utica Square. The shopping center is centrally located and provides its own friendly environment, which complements SALT. “It was important to be located in a place that is loved by Tulsans and a place that has great tradition of family, and just overall a welcoming community,” Gawey explains. “We really wanted to reach everyone, and Utica Square is so accessible. And it was really an attempt to bring yoga to people who maybe wouldn’t go to a yoga studio, but because of the reputation of Utica Square they would be more willing,” Cara adds. Inside the studio infrared panels hanging from the ceiling make

SALT CO-OWNERS MICHELLE CARA AND TERESA GAWEY. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

for a soothing hot yoga experience “It makes a huge difference in hot yoga. Blowing hot air can be rather hazardous to one’s health with all the germs in the air. With the infrared panels, the heat goes straight to your muscles, which feels amazing,” says Cara. “The panels act as the sun, heating objects below it, and not the entire room. That’s another thing that is unique about SALT,” adds Gawey. The reception to SALT has been a good one. Along with a new partner, Holly Rousch, Gawey and Cara’s SALT journey has continued at 8931 S. Yale Ave. Though SALT South stays true to the brand with its friendly and tranquil atmosphere, the studio is larger. “We, of course, wanted SALT South to have that same feeling of a peaceful, tranquil refuge, but we wanted the studio to have its own personality,” Gawey says. “It has all of the same standards, but we felt it was really important that we let SALT South build their own community, and South truly does have their own tranquil vibe,” Cara says. NEHEMIAH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Active Years

Those Ol’ College Days

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Retirees are flocking back to their alma maters to recapture the fun and affordability of college.

aby Boomers are redefining how people retire. They are no longer seeking the traditional retirement communities, but instead are looking for lifestyles that allow them to be active and near family and friends. They also want cheap homes, a reasonable cost of living and lots of culture and sports. What better place to get that than a college town?

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“The draw for retirees to live in thriving university towns, such as Tulsa, is the same as it is for TU students: an abundance of opportunities for academic engagement, cultural activities, sporting events and meaningful camaraderie,” says Amy Freiberger, executive director of alumni relations at The University of Tulsa. Many retirees are seeking intellectual immersion and returning to school, which is

another driving factor for seniors moving to college towns. Retiring to or near a college campus may not be the obvious choice for a lot of people, but some are discovering that college towns offer other important advantages besides access to classes, sports and cultural events. Many have world-class teaching hospitals that draw top medical talent. College towns may also offer full- or part-time job opportunities for retirees who


aren’t ready to exit the work scene. Across the nation, universities and developers are even building retirement communities affiliated with universities – or creating relationships with existing ones – to give residents full access to university facilities. Bill Moakley, director of alumni communications with the University of Oklahoma Alumni Association, says while the association doesn’t have any similar communities, he’s aware of the trend. “It is something that alumni associations around the country are doing,” he explains. “There are a few (associations) around the country that are building housing that is available to alums that are

‘empty nesters’ that want to be near the campus again.” According to AARP, the U.S. Census Bureau reports that 36 million Americans move to a new place each year – establishing households to settle near new jobs or pursue retirement dreams. Craig Davis, associate state director of AARP Oklahoma, says retirees are not only chasing the vision of retirement, but are often looking to “discover what’s next in their life.” Whether it’s returning to school, starting a business or finding the right place to live, seniors are simply considering what the next phase is for them in life. ALAINA STEVENS

RETIRE GLOBALLY

Sure, it’s great to settle in near familiar faces and spaces; but for those looking for an adventurous retirement, several countries offer unique – and affordable – experiences.

Ecuador

This Central American country boasts temperate climates year-round. Cuenca, one of the top cities for retirement in the country, is the former Inca capital and features beautiful, colonial Spanish architecture. The cost of living and of health care is very low in this country, and cars are not a requirement to get around.

Malaysia

Even though the official language is Behasa Melayu, English is widely spoken in this southeast Asian country. Everything in Malaysia is cheaper than western countries, including housing, food, clothing, medical expenses and entertainment. Technology, including highspeed Internet, is quickly catching up to modern standards, as well.

SOURCES: INTERNATIONAL LIVING AND AARP THE MAGAZINE.

Italy

Seas and mountains, culture and art, food and great wine – what’s not to love about Italy? Though a popular international tourist destination, there are small diamonds in the rough, villages that have not yet been discovered and made expensive by tourists. Savvy retirees will sniff out these niches in the country that give them access to the best of what Italy has to offer at an inexpensive price.

Panama

Another Central American country known for beautiful climes and low cost of living, Panama has friendly residents and stunning surroundings. The small country offers access to both beaches and to temperate mountains that are lush with tropical vegetation. Panama is a favorite retirement spot for both American and European expats.

Spain

Along the Costa del Sol – 150 miles of coastline that begins at Gibraltar and stretches toward the southern tip of Spain – is a popular tourist destination, but small villages with inexpensive housing and amenities also populate the area. Savvy retirees find the warm weather, easy beach access and low cost of living in these small, rustic villages a great draw. SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS ROOFER How often should I have my roof inspected?

RICKY HANKS

Your roof is just like anything else – it needs attention! I recommend a yearly inspection of both your roof and gutters. Preventative maintenance is always better than discovering water leaking into your home. During the inspection, you are looking for:

• Areas that debris might be gathering and stopping water flow • Gutters to be clear so they do not overflow and back up into the roof • Shingles that are missing or loose and need to be resealed • All penetrations to make sure they are properly sealed The better you take care of your roof, the better it can take care of you. Sometimes that simply means cleaning it off so that water can flow freely down into the gutters and into your flower bed where it belongs.

Ricky Hanks T-Town Roofing 5770 E Skelly Drive Tulsa, OK 74135 ricky@t-townroofing.com 918.445.4400

PERSONAL TRAINER Is there a nutritional way to fight skin cancer? Sunscreen is the most marketed way to fight skin cancer, but actually for every case of skin cancer, 20 to 30 individuals will develop breast and prostate cancer. This is because sunscreens block vitamin JOHN JACKSON D initiating rays of the sun. Poor diet is responsible for the majority of cases of melanoma, one of the deadliest forms of skin cancer. You will reduce your risk of skin cancer by eating foods containing lycopene (tomatoes, papaya, watermelon), lutein (spinach, Brussels sprouts, zucchini, kale), ECGC (oregano, garlic, green and black tea), polyphenols, flavanoids (citrus), proanthocyanadins (red wine, cocoa, grape seeds), cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, kale), fish and olive oil. For more info on nutrients that combat skin cancer, contact a certified nutritionist.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

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FINANCIAL ADVISOR My father is getting older, and I suspect that he may be suffering from Alzheimer’s. How can I ensure that his assets are protected? It isn’t unusual for issues related to dementia to first come to light if a person begins to have difficulty DAVID KARIMIAN, CRPC® managing financial matters. That could mean failing to pay bills on time, losing track of funds coming in and going out or even making wildly erratic decisions about their money. As a person’s inability to manage finances becomes more evident, other family members need to approach this issue delicately. One important step that should happen well in advance is to designate a person or persons as “power of attorney.” A general power of attorney gives the designated person the ability to act as principal for another, including opening or closing financial accounts. If a person who is beginning to face issues related to dementia is working with a financial advisor, that professional should be contacted, and a meeting can be held to discuss the circumstances. It makes sense to review all financial assets owned by the individual who has memory issues and make sure all are properly titled.

David Karimian, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT What are the benefits to using social networking sites for my business? There are many benefits. First, social networking helps establish a relationship with your customers and creates an ongoing conversation. And, if you are genuine with JESSICA DYER your prospects, it can instill a sense of trust in your company. Secondly, social media gives your business an online presence at a lower cost. So, you can save money and increase your SEO, which means that you’re more likely to be found on search engines such as Google. Also, it’s important to know that social media is more than Twitter and Facebook. Be sure to research the best social networking site for your business.

Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 539-777-6087 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

ed t a c u ed Your Opinion Here. Give readers advice in your area of expertise.

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA advertising@okmag.com • 918.744.6205

PHYSICAL THERAPY I sometimes feel numbness and tingling in my thumb and first and second finger. What might be causing this and what should I do? What you are describing are carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms. The carpal tunnel is found at the wrist TIM MINNICK, PT and if the nerve that travels through the tunnel gets compressed or irritated it can cause the symptoms you describe. Compression and irritation may be caused in many ways including computer work and repetitive grasping activities. Keep in mind that symptoms that mimic carpal tunnel syndrome may be caused in other areas of the arm, shoulder and even the neck. A comprehensive evaluation by a physical therapist should determine the origin of your symptoms. The treatment approach is dictated by the evaluation findings, but generally speaking, treatment will include nerve glides, manual techniques including joint mobilization and soft tissue mobilization, stretching and home program instruction.

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205.

What is the Oklahoma Corporation Commission? The Oklahoma Corporation Commission is the regulatory agency for the State of Oklahoma. In Texas, the comparable entity is the Railroad Commission. The Corporation Commission was established by BRAD BEASLEY Article 9 of the Oklahoma Constitution. The Corporation Commission regulates numerous industries within the State of Oklahoma. These include public utilities, oil and gas drilling, production and environmental protection, underground storage tanks, safety aspects of motor carriers, pipelines, telephones and railroads. The Corporation Commission establishes various rules and regulations governing each of the industries within its jurisdiction. Some of the better known areas include establishing the rates which may be charged by public utilities and oversight and regulation of all activities pertaining to oil and gas matters including drilling of wells. The Oklahoma Corporation Commission is overseen by three commissioners, each of whom serves a six-year staggered term.

Bradley K. Beasley Boesche McDermott LLP 110 W. 7th St., Suite 900 Tulsa, OK 74119 918.858.1735 (Direct Dial) 918.583.1777 telephone 918.592.5809 facsimile

DEVELOPMENTAL OPTOMETRIST What causes my eyes or my child’s eyes to wander? Both of our eyes work together as a binocular system. When our binocular system is not working well, it can cause problems. One of these problems is the wandering of an eye, or both eyes, called exoMEGAN KIRKPATRICK, OD tropia. Exotropia occurs because the connection between the brain and eye muscles is not working properly; therefore, the binocular vision system is unable to function as it should. Exotropia is usually caused by a misconnection with the eye teaming system. Due to this miscommunication, the eyes are unable to work together. This leads to double vision problems, the brain’s inability to process images from the eye, loss of peripheral vision, and other vision and learning related problems. Since exotropia is caused by a misconnection in the binocular system, it can successfully be treated with lenses, patching and vision therapy alone. In rare occasions, surgery may be needed to align the eyes and improve the binocular system.

Megan Kirkpatrick, OD South Tulsa Vision Development Center 8988- D1 S Sheridan Tulsa, OK 74133 918.992.2343 www.tulsavisiondevelopment.com

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST

HOSPICE CARE

LEGAL SERVICES

AVA HANCOCK

My brother has Alzheimer’s disease and has been declining more rapidly lately. His wife passed away, so my husband and I are helping care for him. We have been discussing hospice care and are not certain what the criteria are for hospice and if it is a good option. Can you help?

I am happy to help. The first step would be to meet with your brother’s physician to discuss his care and diagnosis. If the physician determines that he has six months or less to live, then hospice could be a good option for your brother. Once a family decides to take that step, our hospice team steps in and will work with your brother’s physician to develop a plan for medical care, pain management and emotional and spiritual support for you and your family. Please contact Grace Hospice at 918.744.7223 for further information.

“Grace Hospice: Caring for patients and families in Northeastern Oklahoma for more than 15 years”

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

After the long summer, my skin needs help. Now that my kids are back in school, I am ready to rid myself from the damage I’ve done to my skin. What are my options? Now is a perfect time to correct your overexposed skin. We typically see a wide array of sun damage issues this time of the year: brown spots, wrinkles, fine lines, shallowed texture, etc. There are many great services to help fix these, such as IPL or a Micropen to address the pigmentation problems, appearance of fine lines and overall skin appearance and quality. There are also products like Obagi’s NuDerm system. This prescription medication is an at-home treatment to transform the look of aging skin. Whatever your issues, our expert team will make a personalized treatment plan to help your skin look its best. To find out more and to schedule your complimentary consultation call us today at 918.872.9999. MALISSA SPACEK

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 South Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR

As a guy, I love the fall/winter season, especially when it comes to clothing. What will guys be wearing this year? Guys, prepare yourselves, because this fall is all about bringing personal style and textured layers back to your wardrobe. For example, start with a classic AUTUMN POHL Gingham button down covered with a solid half-zip cashmere sweater, layered with a fitted textured sports coat and finished off with a cashmere scarf. This look can be worn with a Euro-style trouser pant or something more casual like a pair a dressy jeans in a dark wash. Perfect the look with a pair of colored calf leather drivers, loafers or leather lace-ups.We tend to think dark colors and heavy materials when it comes to the cold season, but that is not the case this year. We have taken the classic cooler weather colors and added a brighter hue to really make the man stand out. This season, look for bold jewel tones, and be sure it works with your personal skin tones. Finally, think accessories. Usually it's the women who master this area but men are finding that this only heightens the look when you complete it with a belt, cuff links and a trendy watch.

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

My 17-year-old daughter seems excessively self absorbed. She is constantly on her phone posting videos and pictures of herself. She goes crazy if she can’t have her phone. Is this some new kind of addiction for teens? It seems we have entered an age of selfabsorption and need to be cautious to not steer too far away from the importance of character. With changes that have occurred in the information age, we have shifted to a culture of display: displaying our work, our thoughts and our images. It appears the measure of worth to many teens is how many “likes” they get on Instagram. Whether this is good or bad is a very lengthy discussion, but it is important for all parents to continue to foster within their children a sense of humility, restraint, creativity and self-worth. Individuals who possess character and a strong sense of selfworth do not feel an extremely strong need of validation from others or a sense of amplification of self. We all like compliments and accolades, but there is a difference between appreciation and need. Most teens are engaging in very trendy behavior, but it is up to parents to find the balance for their children. AMY KESNER, PHD, LPC, LADC

Amy Kesner, All Things Psychological 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505, Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com 85 SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM


WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENT

A Magical Day

Jane Hamm and Tom Lerum begin forever at the Grand Del Mar in Del Mar, Calif.

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n Thanksgiving morning in 2013, Jane Hamm and Tom Lerum rode horses through Mackenzie Mountain in Carmel Valley, Calif., where Hamm’s family has a ranch. They came upon a tree, where Tom had laid out a picnic, and engraved in its trunk were their initials. There, he presented Jane with an emerald-cut sapphire ring with diamond baguettes. “I was completely surprised,” she says. Riding their horses back to the main lodge where both of their families waited anxiously, they were greeted with champagne and celebration. Hamm, from Oklahoma, and Lerum, from California, crossed paths seven years earlier in Washington, D.C., while working as congressional pages. Their first day was at George W. Bush’s last State of the Union address, but it wasn’t until four years later that Lerum realized Hamm’s crush, a feeling he mirrored. “His mom eventually clued him in,” Hamm says. “We started dating our junior year of college. I attended Duke University, and he attended the Air Force Academy.” During the pair’s yearlong engagement, they choreographed the details of the big day. And on Oct. 4, 2014, when guests began to arrive and all the elements started coming together, it was everything they’d hoped for. “Tom and I both wanted to have a black tie wedding,” Hamm says, “to create an atmosphere of class and elegance.” Midnight blue and silver weaved its way through the ceremony and the reception in the form of flowers, bridesmaid dresses, place-settings and other decor. The ceremony was held outdoors at the Aria Pavilion at the Grand Del Mar in Del Mar, Calif. As guests took their seats, a line of violinists, Hamm’s favorite detail, serenaded them, she says. Arriving in view of Lerum and guests, Hamm stunned in a custom Vera Wang gown. “I have always admired Vera Wang’s artistry in her dress designs,” Hamm says. “I immediately fell in love with one of her gowns … I worked with the design team and created my dream dress.” A dramatic train, one of the longest they’d ever created, trailed Hamm as she walked toward Lerum, a parent on each arm. “Both of my parents have been such strong figures in my life, and I am grateful to have [had] them both there to walk me down the aisle,” she says.

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At the end of the aisle, Lerum, dressed in a Tom Ford tuxedo, watched as his bride neared. Joining hands, Hamm’s former pastor, David Wiggs, guided them to “I do.” In the grand ballroom, the couple’s first dance, a fourcourse dinner, touching toasts and a night of dancing awaited. Hamm changed into another striking Vera Wang dress, perfect for the celebration. “It was magical,” Hamm recalls. Before cutting the cake, the couple took their guests outside for a surprise firework show set to a few of their favorite songs. After dessert, the dancing continued and guests enjoyed food stations that included barbecue sliders, truffle fries and other goodies. “We had a “Beau”-tie Bar, where guests could switch out their black bow ties for wild ones, and a flash tattoo station,” she says. The two weeks following the unforgettable day were just as special. Hamm and Lerum spent their first week as a married couple on Richard Branson’s Necker Island and the second at The Rosewood Mayakoba in Mexico. Today, the couple resides in Los Angeles, where Lerum is stationed in the Air Force. They have recently become the owners of Joullian Vineyards in Carmel Valley, Calif. BRITTANY ANICETTI

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PHOTOS BY AMY & STUART PHOTOGRAPHY.

SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

FOOD, DRINK, AND OTHER PLEASURES

Fusion Feast

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THE CHICKEN LOLLIPOPS, CHICKEN WINGS BRINED TO TENDERNESS AND THEN COOKED, ARE A SIGNATURE APPETIZER OF GUERNSEY PARK. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Bringing West Coast-inspired Asian fusion to Oklahoma City, Guernsey Park is an unparalleled experience in décor and taste.

idden behind Cuppies and Joe on 23rd Street in Oklahoma City sits a building brought to life by twinkling lights. Guernsey Park is without a doubt a romantic location, illuminating the night with its beautiful décor and delightful bites. Inspired by restaurants in California, owner and head chef Vuong Nguyen and general manager Alex Steele wanted to bring a new, unparalleled Asian fusion dining experience to Oklahoma City. Having family in the west-coast state exposed them to the unique restaurant scene located there, which is where the beautiful look and delicious foresight for Guernsey Park came from. Providing a wide variety of food options to choose from, from fresh sushi to sinfully tender steak, Nguyen ensures each dish is prepared to perfection. The most popular appetizer is the Chicken Lollipops. A delicious choice, the bite includes small chicken wings brined in a special sauce, making them incredibly tender. They are the perfect size to share, and just the smell of the sauce is mouthwatering. The restaurant is also well-known for its delectable and affordable 12-ounce hand-cut rib eye, The Korean Cowboy. “We marinate it for 24 hours, and we cook all of the flavors into the steak in a vacuum seal until the steak is ordered, and then it is

grilled. For $27, you can’t beat the price for such a high quality steak,” says Steele. Guernsey Park does not overlook the value of a delicious dessert, either. Its carrot cake is something completely unique and unexpected. A different take from traditional, the pan-seared cake is topped with cream cheese ice cream, rum caramel, spiced pecans and candied carrots. This rich dessert is unforgettable in both beauty and taste. Now, with two years under its belt serving succulence, and patrons continuing to rave about its selections, Steele says Guernsey Park’s business is booming. “We’ve had our ups and downs,” he says. “We keep growing each month, however, and we have even opened our sister restaurant, Covell Park, this year.” Through all the restaurant’s success, Steele emphasizes how humbled the Guernsey Park team is to be a part of the growing restaurant scene in Oklahoma City. “We owe it all to our team.” he explains. “We all believe in what we are doing. We give it 110 percent every day for this place. We are all connected through building a brand and being something different.” 2418 N. Guernsey Ave., Oklahoma City. www.guernseypark.com JANELLE ARCHER

SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

RICHLY APPOINTED INTERIORS ARE A HALLMARK OF THE CHALKBOARD, LOCATED INSIDE THE AMBASSADOR HOTEL IN DOWNTOWN TULSA. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

FAV E

THE CHALKBOARD RESTAURANT

The Chalkboard has invited Tulsans and guests into its dimly lit, elegant dining room since the ‘70s. Almost 30 years later, a renovation of the building that housed The Chalkboard included the restaurant, and its new doors opened in 1999. Today, you’ll find deep, rich hues, assisted by natural light peaking through slated window blinds, weaving throughout the space’s wine shelves, white-linen dressed tables, full bar, partly open kitchen – giving customer a preparation perspective – and gracious staff. The restaurant, once run by Ayhan Ozaras,

is now spearheaded by his two children, Joshua and Shannon Ozaras, both of whom have worked in the restaurant industry most of their lives. Their combined experience, along with The Chalkboard’s skilled executive chef, Joshua McClure, allows for unparalleled service and tastes. Serving breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner, as well as offering catering, there’s nothing The Chalkboard restaurant doesn’t do well. The mouth-watering burger is a palate pleaser, with its red onion marmalade and aged cheddar, as is the goat cheese

and piquillo pepper stuffed chicken breast, which is served over Parmesan risotto and plated with a seasonal vegetable. The restaurant’s fresh salads are a great way to begin a meal before diving into an expertly crafted, pan-seared duck breast or grilled filet, among other delicious selections. On Saturday or Sunday, pairing any selection off The Chalkboard’s delectable brunch menu with live music playing in the background is an enjoyable, appetizing experience.1324 S. Main St., Tulsa. www. chalkboardtulsa.com – Brittany Anicetti B UZ Z

THE HUMMUS TRIO – PESTO, GARLIC AND ROASTED RED PEPPER – IS SERVED WITH HOUSE-MADE BREAD STICKS. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

THE ROOFTOP

Fall’s temperate weather has arrived, and if there’s one thing better than dining on the patio, it’s dining rooftop, and The Rooftop Bar & Grill in Broken Arrow has customers covered. Opened in 2014 by Jason Scarpa, who also owns Broken Arrow’s Main Street Tavern, this 3,500-square-foot space with indoor and outdoor seating hit the trifecta with its superb food, drinks and atmosphere. As a pizzeria, pastaria and deli, this Rose District eatery brings a whole new level of flavor to Main Street. Must-try appetizers include the bruschetta and the hummus trio, and whether you’re creating your own pizza or choosing from a Rooftop specialty, each artisanal-style pie is a mouthwatering masterpiece. Not in the mood for pizza or pasta, but craving a snack under the sun or stars? The Rooftop’s hot and cold sandwiches are piled high with ingredients. And when choosing what to wash it all down with, a comprehensive list of wine, beer, martinis and specialty cocktails is at your service. With football season kicking off this month, The Rooftop is the perfect place to catch a game on its gigantic outdoor screen. 214 S. Main St., second floor, Broken Arrow. 918.806.2603 – B.A.


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Oklahoma Foodie

A look at some of the tastiest bites in the state.

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SIP

Taste

POPS

It’s the stuff of children’s dreams: a soda ranch. More than 600 different brands and flavors of soda, most jewel-colored, packed in cases, lining walls, enticing, silently calling, “Drink me.” It is indeed a child’s dream come true at POPS, a gas station, restaurant and, yes, soda ranch located along Route 66 in tiny Arcadia, Okla., just east of Edmond. The large, neon glow of the 66-foot-tall soda bottle alerts passersby of what waits through the doors of the retro-yet-modern building that houses POPS. Breakfast, lunch and dinner is served in the restaurant. Classic diner favorites like eggs and bacon, burgers, chicken fried steak and chicken bites comprise the bulk of the menu. Hand-dipped shakes provide a flourish at the end of any meal. But it’s the soda selection that’s the real experience. Flavors like watermelon, pomegranate, kiwi, green apple, blueberry, orange, butterscotch, cherry, raspberryrhubarb, pineapple, mango, peach, grape and every type of cola and root beer one can imagine call to thirsty passersby. ON WHEELS

CRUNCH: NACHO NINJAS

When another food truck fell into the lap of Josh Lynch, the owner of Dog House, it was almost synchronistic timing. He’d just created his wonton nachos, and now, instead of slinging them out of his hot dog truck, Lynch has ‘em lining up at Crunch: Nacho Ninjas. Having something unique and different that he knew people liked, Lynch says, made starting Crunch a logical step. Along with wonton nachos, Crunch serves carne asada nachos, veggie nachos and Little Ninja Nachos for the kids. Always experimenting with new flavor combinations, Lynch hopes to continually have

one-of-a-kind and unforgettably-good bites available. Current concoctions in the works include Irish, Italian, Greek, pad thai and curry nachos. Rolling around Tulsa, you will most likely find Crunch at 13th and Boston on Tuesdays and Guthrie Green on Wednesdays. Lynch, a founder of the food truck rodeo and hangout spot The Park in the Pearl, hopes to see Crunch joined by other tasty trucks at the park Tuesday through Sunday. The park, the “biggest patio” in town, says Lynch, is set to open on Sept. 12 and 13. For more information,visit Crunch’s Facebook page. – Brittany Anicetti TOP LEFT: POPS’ FAMOUS SODA BOTTLE STATUE LIGHTS UP THE NIGHT. TOP RIGHT: ROCKET FIZZ RED LICORICE SODA, ONE OF MANY FLAVORS OFFERED. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

LEFT: CRUNCH NACHO NINJAS FOOD TRUCK. RIGHT: OWNER JOSH LYNCH HOLDING ONE OF HIS NACHO CREATIONS. PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

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There are also soda flavors for the adventurous: Dr. Brown’s Cel-Ray Soda is flavored like the vegetable it’s named for; Avery’s Dog Drool may sound like a byproduct of the family dog, but is flavored with citrus fruit; Lester’s Fixins makes several food-flavored sodas, including the Buffalo Wing and Ranch Dressing sodas, both of which POPS carries; and Cookie Dough Bites Chocolate Chip soda makes for a tasty, if somewhat strange, dessert. 660 Highway 66, Arcadia. www.route66.com – Jami Mattox


MIKE AND BRIDGETTE SKOW, OWNERS OF DINNER’S AT 6, CREATED THEIR BUSINESS WHEN THEY NEEDED A SERVICE THEY COULDN’T FIND. PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

L O C A L F L AV O R

Ready When You Are Dinner’s at 6 eases minds by providing meals for on-the-go customers.

W

ith a motto of, “We’ll make the mess, and save you the stress!”, that’s exactly what they do. Husband-and-wife duo Mike and Bridgette Skow, owners of Dinner’s at 6, created their family business when their oldest child was an infant. “We both worked full time,” Bridgette Skow says. “We needed the service and couldn’t find it anywhere, so we just decided to do it ourselves.” That service – preparing and packaging meals for families, couples or individual to pick-up or have delivered – allows their customers to spend more time with their families, run errands or just relax after a long day of work. With more than 300 recipes on hand, Dinner’s at 6 crafts monthly menus that cater to all households, the end of each month always welcoming new and tasty options for the month to follow. Various packages allow customers to purchase just the right amount for their families. Included with each entrée is nutritional information and cooking instructions. Dinner’s at 6 does all the preparation, so all that’s left to do is pop your order in the oven and enjoy. August’s regular- and family-sized menu included Cheddar Bacon Burgers, Cran-

berry Pineapple Pork Roast, Honey Mustard Glazed Chicken Wraps, Italian Chicken Calzones, Orange Ginger Salmon, Shrimp and Garlic Pasta Toss, Chili Lime Tilapia, Marinated Steaks, Lasagna Roll-ups, a Bacon Spinich Breakfast Bake and Spinich Artichoke Chicken Pasta, among others. Many times, Dinner’s at 6 prepares selections off its regular menu to accommodate

SUNNY LEWIS PREPARES MEALS IN THE KITCHEN OF DINNER’S AT 6.

those wanting a lighter option. “Lasagnas are always popular,” Skow says, “as well as the calzones. We have [a calzone option] every month but change the filling.” To place an order, visit Dinner’s at 6’s website, pick out entrees and choose a pickup time. Delivery options are available for an additional charge. It’s not only locals that enjoy the accessibility and taste that Dinner’s at 6 offers. “We have people coming from all over,” Skow says. She adds that customers come from an hour or more away for the convenience they get to take back home with them. There are also customers locally that express their gratitude for the time Dinner’s at 6’s service gives back to their families. Recently, Skow dropped her son off at daycare, and a customer whose child is in her son’s class commented on how thankful he is for the service. “He said to me, ‘I’m a religious orderer,’” Skow says. He told her that when he goes out of town for work, Dinner’s at 6 fills his absence, allowing his wife to work full time and take care of their two kids. “Most people are really thankful for the convenience,” she adds. 4652 W. Houston St., Broken Arrow. www.dinnersat6.com BRITTANY ANICETTI

SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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WORKING FOR YOU

BRIAN SANDERS

KAREN LARSEN

WEEKNIGHTS 5:00 / 6:00 / 10:00


Entertainment

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

Roman Relics

A collection of 20 Imperial Roman busts out of the Capitoline Museum in Rome arrives in the United States for the first time.

PORTRAIT OF ANTONINUS PIUS (140 A.D.) LUNA MARBLE CAPITOLINE MUSEUMS, ROME .

R

oman sculpture was molded by the Greeks. Both cultures idealized their rulers in statue. An example of this can be observed during Imperial Rome, 27 B.C. to 476 A.D., in the portraitures, or busts, of Roman emperors, including Augustus, Tiberius, Nero, Vespasian, Titus, Probus, Constantine and many more. Now, a selection of those Imperial Roman sculptures arrives in the United States for the first time, and the University of Oklahoma’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art welcomes the relics’ significance. Opening Sept. 4, Immortales: The Hall of Emperors of the Capitoline Museums, Rome comes from a collection of the world’s oldest museum: Capitoline Museum. The museum, dating back to 1471, takes pride in its collections that are closely linked with the city of Rome, including the 20 busts ranging from the age of Augustus

(first century, B.C.) to the late Roman Empire (fifth century, A.D.) that make up this exhibit. Within Immortales, three themes are explored: how portraitures served as propaganda; how they revealed social status, character and ideology; and the role of the family in maintaining Roman society. The style in which the portraitures were created helped convey these ideologies. Leading up to Imperial Rome – what was known as the Republican era (509 to 27 B.C.) – Romans favored Hellenistic sculpture, a Greek style that reflected realistic depictions of facial features and expression to convey personality and uniqueness. As Rome turned the corner into 27 B.C., we begin to see the influence of Greek’s Classical model, one that idealized human forms. The ability for audiences today to study, explore and enjoy these artworks, created in as early as the first century and depicting the individuals who built, destroyed, terrorized and ultimately ruled one of the most powerful empires in history, allows their legacies to live on. The exhibit’s title empowers this notion: Immortales, Latin for immortals, stems from Hippocrates’ aphorism, Ars Longa, Vita Brevis, which means, “art lasts forever, while life ends.” On display through Dec. 6 in the Lissa and Cy Wagner Gallery, Immortales offers related programs that include a student opening party on Sept. 6 in the gallery – students are encouraged to wear a toga; family day on Sept. 20; a gallery talk on Sept. 22 with Francesca Giani, the exhibition curator and OU art history graduate student; and a symposium and reception on Oct. 22 that will explore the history and art history of Imperial Rome. Speakers include Susan B. Matheson, the Molly and Walter Bareiss curator of ancient art at the Yale University Art Gallery; Dr. Noel Lenski, professor of classics and history at Yale University; and Dr. Christopher Celenza, co-director of the Singleton Center and Charles Homer Haskins professor of classics and German and romance languages and literatures at Johns Hopkins University. The Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Ave., Norman, is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursday until 9 p.m. and on Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, visit www.ou.edu/fjjma. BRITTANY ANICETTI

SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY

PERFORMANCE

PHOTO COURTESY BOK CENTER.

Entertainment

Calendar

PERFORMANCES TheresaCaputoLive!TheExperience Sept. 3 The medium from the TLC reality show Long Island Medium arrives at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. w w w.

Elo, Dwight Rhoden and resident choreographer Ma Cong. www.tulsaballet. org Parsons Dance Sept. 12 The athleticism, exuberant personality and joyous

hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Of Mice and Men Sept. 3-20 George and Lennie dream of owning their own land. www.okcciviccenter.com Miss Saigon Sept. 4-20 Don’t miss Tulsa’s first local production of the love story between an American soldier and a Vietnamese girl during the Vietnam War. www.tulsapac.com Julius Caesar Sept. 10-26 Oklahoma Shakespeare In The Park recreates the Shakespeare play filled with politics, co n s p i ra c y a n d v i o l e n ce. w w w.

oklahomashakespeare.com Half Life Sept. 11, 12 Explore the psychological fallout of global disaster and how it affects our emotions and imaginations. www.tulsapac.com Jim Gaffigan Sept. 11, 12 His comedy will fill the Riverwind Casino with laughter on Friday, Sept. 11 followed by a show at WinStar World Casino on Saturday, Sept. 12. www.riverwind.com, www. winstarworldcasino.com Jaimee Paul and Music of James Bond Sept. 11, 12 Audiences will hear Paul’s modern approach to jazz while she performs a show dedicated to 007. www.signaturesymphony.org Creations In Studio K Sept. 11-20 Tulsa Ballet’s 2015-16 season begins with three World Premiere pieces from Jorma

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Larry the Cable Guy

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

The Price is Right Live The Price Is Right has had contestants predicting prices with a chance to win big prizes – cars, appliances, vacations and more – since 1972 when Bob Barker first proclaimed the now-famous words, “Come on down!” Ever since, lucky audience members have accepted his request, arriving at Contestants’ Row, where bidding on a prize in whole dollar amounts offers each a chance to continue on to subsequent rounds, eventually making it to the Showcase Showdown. During the last nine years, The Price Is Right Live has brought the show’s excitement, energy and, best of all, prizes to stages across the country, giving audiences a new and improved game show experience. Arriving at Tulsa’s BOK Center on Sept. 20, enthusiastic contestants hoping to win big are encouraged to register. While all ages are welcome to attend as audience members, with tickets available for purchase any time leading up to the event, contestant registration is reserved for those over the age of 18 and opens three hours prior to showtime. Tickets are not required for contestant registration. For more information, visit www. bokcenter.com.

movement that is Parsons Dance performs for one night only at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com Pacifica Quartet Sept. 13 The quartet holds audiences spellbound with its virtuous

vocals. See why the Grammy-winning ensemble is a favorite in Tulsa. www. tulsapac.com Larry The Cable Guy Sept. 18 The always funny comedian brings his act to WinStar World Casino and Resort. www. winstarworldcasino.com Becky’s New Car Sept. 18-26 See the Duncan Little Theatre presentation at Hodgson’s Studio of Music & Drama. www.duncanlittletheatre.com Peter and the Starcatcher Sept. 18-27 Uncover the story of how Peter Pan became The Boy Who Never Grew U p. w w w.o k c u .e d u / t h e a t re / theatreocu Gabriel Iglesias Sept. 19 The comedian performs live at WinStar World Casino and Resort. www.winstarworldcasino. com From Beethoven to the Beatles Sept. 22 Brightmusic Chamber Ensemble presents a one-of-a-kind performance. www.brightmusic.org Jay Leno Sept. 24 The former Tonight Show host takes the Joint stage at 8 p.m. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com Sean Forbes Sept. 25 The incredible, deaf hip-hop artist arrives on the VanTrease PACE stage. www.tulsacc.edu TEDxUCO Sept. 25 Enjoy a series of talks and performances by members of the University of Central Oklahoma and the surrounding community. www.uco. edu TSO Classics: Experience The Exotic Sept. 26 Travel to exotic lands as the Tulsa Symphony tells the famous stories

of Arabian Nights. www.tulsapac.com Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Sept. 27 See the beloved family musical by Tim Rice and Andrew LloydWebberattheBrokenArrowPerforming Arts Center. www.thepacba.com

IN CONCERT Epic Rap Battles Of History Sept. 3 Va n g u a rd M u s i c H a l l . w w w.

thevanguardtulsa.com Mickey Gilley Sept. 4 Riverwind Casino and Hotel. www.riverwind.com Backwoods Camping & Music Festival S e p t . 4 - 6 S t ro u d , O k l a . w w w.

backwoodsmusicfestival.com Slim Cessna’s Auto Club Sept. 6 Mercury Lounge. www.mercurylounge918.com Z-Fest Sept. 6 Frontier City. www.

frontiercity.com Sunday Twilight Concert Series: Hip Hop Night Sept. 6 Myriad Gardens. www.oklahomacitybotanicalgardens. com The Tallest Man On Earth Sept. 9 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Gateway To Thrash The West Tour With Enslaved By Fear Sept. 11 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa. com Butch Hancock Sept. 11 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com One More Time: A Tribute to Daft Punk Sept.17 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com David Ramirez Sept. 17 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com Josh Garrels Sept. 18 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Peter Cetera Sept. 18 Riverwind Casino and Hotel. www.riverwind.com The Righteous Brothers’ Bill Medley & BJ Thomas Sept. 19 Choctaw Casino Durant. www.choctawcasinos.com Tannahill Weavers Sept. 22 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com Rick Springfield Sept. 23 The Zoo Amphitheatre. www.thezooamp.com Medicine Stone Music Festival Sept. 24-26 Diamondhead Resort. www. medicinestoneok.com Florida Georgia Line Sept. 25 BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com Herman’s Hermits Starring Peter Noone Sept. 25 Riverwind Casino and Hotel. www.riverwind.com Kid Rock Sept. 26 Choctaw Casino Durant. www.choctawcasinos.com Blues Traveler Sept. 28 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Twenty One Pilots Sept. 29 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com Beach House Sept. 29 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Foo Fighters Sept. 29 Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena. com GRiZ Sept. 30 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

SPORTS Oklahoma City Energy www.energyfc.com

v.Colorado Springs

Sept 12

v.Oklahoma City

Sept 6

v. Iowa v. Memphis

Sept. 1-3 Sept. 4-6

Tulsa Roughnecks www.tulsaroughnecksfc.com Oklahoma City Dodgers www.okcdodgers.com Tulsa Drillers

www.tulsadrillers.com


Sept. 1-4

www.wnba.com/shocks v. San Antonio Sept. 8 v. Phoenix Sept. 13 OU Football www.soonersports.com v. Akron Sept. 5 v. Tulsa Sept. 19 OSU Football www.okstate.com/sports v. Central Arkansas Sept. 12 v. UTSA Sept. 19 Tulsa Football www.tulsahurricane.com v. Florida Atlantic Sept. 5 Professional Bull Riders Sept. 4, 5 This thrilling event is sure to keep you on the edge of your seat as professional bull riders get pulled and jerked around by fierce bulls at the Coliseum at WinStar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino. com PRCA Rodeo of Champions Sept. 4, 5 One of the most renowned rodeos in the state, this sport brings thousands to watch top-ranked cowboys and cowgirls compete for cash and points as they ride, rope or wrestle their way to win national titles. www.visitelkcity.com Legacy Fighting Championship Sept. 11 The gloves go on as the championship returns to Tulsa’s Hard Rock Hotel & Casino for another hard-hitting night. www. hardrockcasinotulsa.com Arabian Horse Show Sept. 24 The most prestigious Arabian Horse show in North America is held annually at the Tulsa Expo. This nine-day show features the best Arabian, Half Arabian and Anglo Arabian as well as both amateur and professional riders. www.tulsastatefair.com

FAMILY Wiggle Out Loud Sept. 6 Wiggle, jump, jiggle, spin, clap, zip, boom and bam in downtown Oklahoma City with the whole family at Wiggle Out Loud, an active-family music festival that will get you moving and grooving your way to a healthier lifestyle. www.wiggleoutloud.com Base Camp at Turkey Mountain Sept. 12 This overnight family camping event includes live entertainment and glow hiking. http://www.turkeymtn.com/

campout/ Frozen on Ice Sept.17-22 Arriving in Oklahoma, see the Walt Disney motion picture Frozen brought to life by this amazing and athletic group of ice skaters. www.disneyonice.com Day Out with Thomas Sept. 25-27 Take a 25-minute ride with Thomas the Tank Engine. The entire family can enjoy story telling, live music, building with mega b l o c k s a n d m u c h m o re . w w w. oklahomarailwaymuseum.com The Tortoise and the Hare Sept. 25-Oct. 9 See who crosses the finish line first when the slow-moving tortoise steps up to compete with the hare. w w w. oklahomachildrenstheatre.org Art Adventures Ongoing Children ages 3-5 experience art every Tuesday morning at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, Norman, with special guests. www. ou.edu/fjjma

ART Red Earth Master Artist Show Thru Sept. 1 Award winning artists showcase their art. www.redearth.org The Secret Life of the City Sept. 1-Feb. 11 Eight Oklahoma artists explore the secrets of city life through their works on display at the Invited Artists Gallery. www. downtownokc.com PhotoFEST Sept. 4 Explore the diversity of contemporary Oklahoma photography in this annual juried exhibition that welcomes traditional and digital processes along with mixed media work that feature photography. www.thepaseo.com Two Room Schoolhouse Sept. 4-24 Dyslexia is explored through this installation and performance. www.livingarts.org City of Cyclone II: The Wrath of Corn Sept.

PHOTO COURTESY RPR MEDIA.

v. NW Arkansas

Tulsa Shock

IN CONCERT

Medicine Stone Red Dirt music, a genre that originated in Stillwater, Okla., under the wings of Bob Childers, Steve Ripley, Red Dirt Rangers and the late Tom Skinner, can be found at the center of Medicine Stone, a music festival, which, in its third year, is expected to draw thousands of festivalgoers to Diamondhead Resort in Tahlequah, Sept. 24-26. The Red Dirt genre Medicine Stone caters to brings out the best in Americana, folk, indie, rock and bluegrass music and even goes as far down the musical line as Western swing and honky tonk. This year’s lineup is a great representation of that assortment, including festival founders Jason Boland & The Stragglers and the Turnpike Troubadours, alongside Cody Canaday & The Departed, Randy Rogers Band, Shinyribs, Reckless Kelly, Micky & The Motorcars, American Aquarium, The Old 97’s, The Great Divide, John Fullbright, Dirty River Boys and Jonny Burke. “We are so excited for this year’s lineup,” says festival founder Jason Boland. “The crowd is going to be completely blown away and transported to a place they have never experienced at an American festival.” New to this year’s celebration are ongoing performances during the day, great performances Thursday night and camping packages that include RV spots and tented after parties. For more information, visit www.medicinestoneok.com.

Bert Seabourn: American Expressionist Sept. 10-Jan. 9 Since becoming a full-time painter, Seabourn has received many high honors for his work. Now his art displays at the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. www.oklahomahof.com Holly Wilson Thru Sept. 11 Wilson’s cast bronze figures are unique and shed light on daily subtleties. www. oklahomacontemporary.org The Figure Examined Thru Sept. 13 All artworks uniting in their portrayal of the human figure, the exhibit features a wide range of paintings, sculpture and works on paper by European and American artists of the 19th and 20th centuries. www.philbrook.org California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum Thru Sept. 6 Explore the style of California Impressionism – a popular subject in California in the early 20th century – and its use of light and color, specifically how it was cast onto a landscape. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu Interludes Sept.12-March27 Uncover more than 20 paintings, drawings and

Jay Leno 4-24 Rebuilding underground after heightened frequencies of natural disasters, treasures are discovered. www.livingarts. org Seemless Sept. 4-24 Large-scale photographs become the backdrops to three-dimensional props. www.livingarts. org Above & Below Sept. 4-26 Enjoy paintings by Eric Mecum at TAC Gallery. www. tacgallery.org Arts Festival Oklahoma Sept. 5-7 Spend Labor Day weekend viewing artwork by more than 125 regional artists, enjoying performing arts groups and sampling delicious foods. www.occc.edu Immortales: The Hall of Emperors of the Capitoline Museums, Rome Sept. 5-Dec. 6 A selection of 20 busts from the collection of the world’s oldest museum, the Capitoline

in Rome, arrives in the United States for the first time. www.ou.edu/fjjma Greenbelt Meridian Thru Sept. 6 Two artists bring a piece of their large-scale project and vision to the Hardesty Arts Center. www.ahhatulsa.org The Art of Ceremony Thru Sept. 6 This exhibition highlights contemporary katsina carvings that provide a window into Hopi ritual, belief and art. www.philbrook.org A World Unconquered: The Art of Oscar Brousse Thru Sept. 6 See a retrospective of Brousse’s career, including more than 50 works from the museum’s and the university’s permanent collection as well as other private collections. www.ou.edu/ fjjma New Genre XXIII Sept. 6-12 Fresh and exciting non-traditional forms of art arrive at Living Arts. www.livingarts.org

prints by Oklahoma printmaker Doel Reed. www.philbrook.org American Encounters: The Simple Pleasures of Still Life Thru Sept. 14 The 10 masterpieces in this exhibit explore the diversity of still-life in the U.S. www. crystalbridges.org TAC@AHHA Sept. 19-Nov. 22 The annual Tulsa Artist Coalition’s members show returns to AHHA. www.ahhatulsa. org SusanTaberAvila:MattersofDis-Ease Thru Sept.20 Avila creates textile artwork to enhance perception of contemporary culture. www.108contemporary.org Fish Stories Thru Sept. 21 These 20 color plates capture a number of distinctly American fishes in their natural surroundings while conveying the drama of sport fishing. www.crystalbridges.org Wakati: Time Shapes African Art Sept. 21-Jan. 16 Explore the question, How does time shape African art? http:// museum.okstate.edu TheLazyEPresents“OklahomaDepartment of Wildlife Expo” Sept. 25-27 The Lazy E Arena. www.guthrieok.com

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Focus on Favorites Ongoing This Gilcrease Museum exhibit highlights the treasures, art, artifacts and historical documents cherished in the museum’s collection.www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu On Common Ground Ongoing Within this exhibit, one is reminded that all human beings have similar needs that bring us to a common ground. www.gilcrease.

PHOTO BY BRUCE WATERFIELD – OSU ATHLETIC

S.

utulsa.edu

SPORTS

College Football Returns The fields are pristine, freshly painted, well-rested from an eight-month hiatus and anticipating the sensation of cleats, tackles and touchdowns upon its surface, as are we. Empty stadiums eagerly welcome back the noise and college football’s colliding camaraderie and competition. Last year, fans got to see OU running back Semaje Perine run for 427 yards against Kansas, securing the record a week after the almost-15-year best had been broken by Wisconsin’s Melvin Gordon; and Oklahoma State’s defensive tackle James Castleman showed the crowd exciting offensive grit during the Cactus Bowl. What does 2015 offer? Oklahoma State signed quarterback John Kolar, who ESPN’s Tom Luginbill called the “most underrated player in the entire class.” OU added power to their defensive roster with Neville Gallimore and Marquise Overton. For the University of Tulsa, freshman Chad President is an exciting recruit, ranked the No. 9 dual threat quarterback in the nation. Kolar, Overton and President join OU hopefuls Joshua Wariboko, Jalin Barnett and Will Sunderland Jr. on the ESPN 300. On the veteran front, Oklahoma State quarterback Mason Rudolph, who Odd Sharks listed in the Top 25 Heisman Trophy Favorites, returns to the snap, and OU’s receiver Sterling Shepard and linebacker Frank Shannon are two anticipated returns. Whether a University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State or University of Tulsa fan, college football is back: OU kicks off the season with a home game against Akron on Sept. 5 (www.soonersports.com), as does Tulsa, who will take on Florida Atlantic (www.tulsahurricane.com). Oklahoma State welcomes Central Arkansas to its field on Sept. 12 (www.okstate.com).

Fragmented Lives Sept. 26 Poets, spoken word artists, singers and visual artists explore the many facets of mental illness. www.livingarts.org Cherokee Homecoming Art Show & Sale Thru Sep. 27 The 20th annual art show featuring authentic Cherokee art returns to Tahlequah’s Cherokee Heritage Center. www.cherokeeheritage.org

Faberge: Jeweler to the Tsars Thru Sept. 27 See the fine craftsmanship of Peter Carl Faberge’s jewelry and adornments that once belonged to the Russian Imperial family. www.okcmoa.com Orly Genger: Terra Thru Oct. 2 This massive outdoor art installation made of more than a million feet of lobster-fishing rope creates a unique experience. www.

Theresa Caputo

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oklahomacontemporary.org Jamie Wyeth Thru Oct. 5 Discover Wyeth’s distinctive approach to realism over the course of six decades. www. crystalbridges.org On 52nd Street: The Jazz Photography of William P. Gottlieb Thru Oct.11 Tulsa and Oklahoma have a rich history and tradition of jazz music, which is celebrated in this exhibit. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu ProjectedClaims ThruOct.18 International acclaimed artist Nir Evron will showcase his latest films and photography that are based on romanticized views of the Holy Land. www.philbrook.org Remembering Chris LeDoux Thru Oct. 18 Browse Chris LeDoux’s (1948-2005) memorabilia and sculptures. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org An Ode to Hands: Selections from the Permanent Collection Thru Oct. 24 This exhibit explores the theme of hands in art and life through a variety of mediums. http://museum.okstate.edu Print Beyond Pop: American Lithography After 1960 Thru Oct. 24 This exhibition explores a critical moment for American lithography using objects from the OSU Museum of Art collection. www.museum. okstate.edu End of the Trail: A Centennial Celebration Thru Oct. 25 Celebrating the unique history of the seminal sculpture on the 100th anniversary of its creation, the exhibition draws from the archives of the museum’s Dickinson Research Center. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org Modern Times Thru Oct. 15 Explore beautiful depictions of city streets, underground stations and sports and leisure activities that celebrate speed. www.philbrook.org Posed and Composed: Portraits of Women from the Permanent Collection Ongoing Explore 12 portraits by 11 American artists from just before World War I through the early 1980s at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www. okcmoa.com

Illuminations: Rediscovering the Art of Dale Chihuly Ongoing Tour the Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s collection of glass art by the celebrated artist. www.okcmoa.

com First Friday Gallery Walk Ongoing The galleries of OKC’s Paseo Arts District welcome all each month. www.thepaseo.

com First Friday Art Crawl Ongoing Stroll the Brady Arts District in Tulsa for new exhibitions at galleries and art centers as well as live music and other events at Guthrie Green and other venues. www.

thebradyartsdistrict.com 2nd Friday Circuit Art Ongoing A monthly celebration of arts in Norman.

www.2ndfridaynorman.com

CHARITABLE EVENTS Culinary Cook-off Sept. 2, 3 The hottest competition in Oklahoma City will be at the Cox Convention Center and feature secret ingredients and top professionals in the industry as judges. www.

okrestaurants.com Booker T., Books and BBQ Sept. 4 This Booker T. Washington High School event coincides with the first high school home game of the year. www.

btwfoundation.net Art In Architecture Sept. 10 Benefiting the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, this event features art and art related items from local and national artists and includes dinner and live music. www.cff.org/ chapter/tulsa

Beach House

Navajo Weavings from the Pam Parrish Collection Ongoing This exhibit showcases 25 of the more than 60 major weavings donated to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum over the past three years by Pam Parrish. www.

nationalcowboymuseum.org

Enter the Matrix: Indigenous Printmakers Ongoing This exhibit explores how printmaking has become a matrix for cultural and artistic exchange, the critical sites of engagement and key figures.

www.ou.edu/fjjma Neoclassicism to Romanticism: Works on Paper in Eighteenth- and NineteenthCentury Europe Ongoing This studentcurated exhibit focuses on works on paper beginning in the mid-1700s when new ideas emerged from the extensive political, intellectual, economic and social changes that were unfolding across the continent. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Chapters: A Casual Evening of Books, Bards and Bites Sept. 11 Spend the evening with three favorite authors and enjoy delectable appetizers from some of your favorite restaurants at the Hardesty Regional Library. www.tulsalibrary.org Kaleidoscope Ball Sept. 11 This colorful bash of delightful eats and music at the Cox Business Center benefits emergency care of children five and under of families in need of assistance. www. emergencyinfantservices.org Renaissance Ball Sept. 11 Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club is where you’ll find cocktails, light hors d’oeuvres, great music from the SoulSations and fun in the name of raising money for the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa.com Million Dollar Masquerade Ball Sept. 11 Join the Pierce Phillips Charity for an evening of cocktails, music, dinner, silent


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Entertainment

and live auctions and dancing as they try to tip the scales at raising $1 million for childhood cancer research. w w w. piercephillipscharity.com United Way Campaign Kick-off Sept. 11 Hear United Way’s campaign goals, and enjoy a free pancake breakfast by community leaders and a family movie night. www.unitedwayokc.org Day of Caring Sept. 11 Tulsa Area United Way kicks off one of the nation’s largest days of service at Tulsa’s Johnson Park with a free pancake breakfast. www.tauw. org/dayofcaring 12x12 Art Fundraiser Sept. 11 Benefiting Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition’s programs, 12x12 brings patrons together with Oklahoma’s finest artists, local restaurants and live music. www.ovac-ok.org Oklahoma Walk for Wishes Sept. 12 The fifth annual Walk for Wishes will bring wish families, volunteers, donors and friends to the Oklahoma City Zoo for a 1-mile walk-a-thon. www.oklahoma. wish.org MIX Sept. 12 The Philbrook Museum of Art event returns to Cain’s Ballroom with live entertainment and expertly crafted cocktails. www.philbrook.org Walk to End Alzheimer’s Oklahoma City Sept. 12 Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark welcomes walkers of all ages to raise money that supports the Alzheimer’s Association’s mission to end the tragic disease. www.act.alz.org Route 66 CPA Run Sept. 12 Enjoy a morning of fitness, food and fun at the 22nd annual Route 66 CPA Run, benefitting the Crime Prevention Network. www.okcpn.org Restaurant Week Sept. 12-20 Benefiting the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma, dine out all week long at participating establishments. www. okfoodbank.org OMCA Charity Golf Tournament Sept. 14 The Oklahoma Municipal Contractors Association tees-off to play and benefit the J.D. McCarty Center with a tournament at Twin Hills Golf & Country Club, OKC. www.jdmc.org Saint Simeon’s Western Days Sept. 15 Enjoy an evening of action and dinner at Expo Square benefitting seniors and families served at Saint Simeon’s. www. westerndaysevent.com Bruce G. Weber Tennis Classic Sept. 15-17 The tournament will kickoff with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, bracket announcements and a jewelry raffle from Roberto Coin. www.brucegweber.com Tulsa Charity Flight Night Sept. 17 This event features aerial entertainment, a live auction and raffle plus engineering innovation. www.tulsaflightnight.org Zarrow Mental Health Symposium Sept. 17, 18 The 21st annual mental health conference with the theme Mind, Body and Spirit will bring patrons to the Cox Business Center. www.mhaok.org/ zarrow Gatesway Balloon Festival Sept. 18, 19 The family ballooning event features hot air balloons, competitions, live entertainment, arts, great food and festivities to raise awareness and funds for those with developmental disabilities. www. gatesway.org AIDS Walk OKC Sept. 20 The walk builds awareness about HIV/AIDS in the Oklahoma City community and raises funds to support the work of nonprofit organizations that provide direct care, supportive s e r v i c e s a n d e d u c a t i o n . w w w. oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com American Airlines Charity Golf Tournament Sept. 21 More than 200 golfers from across the country come to The Golf Club of Oklahoma to participate in the tournament. www.sook.org Remodeled Tulsa Tour Evening of Giving Sept. 20, 21 An evening of giving at the Tulsa Garden Center that helps homeless families regain financial independence. www.tulsahba.com/ remodeled-tulsa-tour Golf Fore Food Sept. 21 The only golf tournament where every team plays with a pro benefits the Community Food Bank

Bluegrass & Chili Festival

COMMUNITY

Festival Frenzy This month is proving to be one dedicated to myriad festivals. From cultural and music festivals to food and even a balloon festival, there are so many things to choose from this September. Kicking off the line-up, the Dusk ‘Til Dawn Blues Festival brings 35 bands to Rentiesville, Sept. 4-6 (www.dcminnerblues.com). Choctaw’s Octoberfest welcomes festivalgoers Sept. 4-12 with German food, beer, wine and dancing underneath 30,000 square feet of tents (www.oldgermany.com). The Bluegrass & Chili Festival in Claremore offers live music on three stages, a chili cook-off, open car show, singing competition and more, Sept. 10-12 (www.claremore.org). On Sept. 14, Temple Israel in Tulsa will be serving Jewish food, music and fun for its 21st annual ShalomFest (www.templetulsa.com). At The Tulsa Greek Festival on Sept. 17-19, enjoy authentic Greek foods, ethnic dancing and browse Greek jewelry and gifts (www.tulsagreekfestival.com). The Oklahoma Indian Summer Festival on Sept. 17-20 brings American Indian culture to the forefront with art, competitions, entertainment, cultural demonstrations and more (www.okindiansummer.org). The Rock ‘N Rib Festival returns to Tulsa Sept. 17-20 with four days of championship barbecue, concessions and entertainment (www.bokcenter.com). On Sept. 18 and 19, the Gatesway Foundation raises awareness for individuals with intellectual disabilities with its 20th Annual Gatesway Balloon Festival in Claremore (www.gatesway.org). ScotFest will offer live entertainment, Scottish, Irish and international beers, specialty whiskey tastings, traditional foods, dance demonstrations and more at Tulsa’s River West Festival Park, Sept. 18-20 (www.okscotfest.com). Norman’s 52nd Groovefest will host performers, speakers, vendors and artists, while raising human rights awareness on Sept. 28 (www.groovefest.org). On Sept. 21-26, the second annual OKC Jazz Fest presents performers at the Civic Center Music Hall and Bicentennial Park (www. okcjazzfest.com).

Rick Springfield

beautiful cars and delicious food, benefiting American Diabetes Association at Southern Hills Country Club. www.diabetes.org Champions of Health Sept. 29 Organizations making an impact on the health of Oklahomans will be honored at the 2015 Gala featuring Oklahoma native and MLB Hall of Famer, Johnny Bench. www.tulsachamber.com

COMMUNITY

of Eastern Oklahoma. www.tulsachamber. com/community-events Angelo Prassa Memorial Golf Tournament Sept. 21 Tee-off at Cedar Ridge Country Club, and enjoy a fun day of golf with friends and family. www.bishopkelly. org INTEGRIS Golf Classic Sept. 21 Tee-off for good health with other supporters of INTEGRIS Health at Gaillardia Country Club. www.integrisgiving.org/golf Tulsa Breast Cancer Shoot Out Sept. 22 The third annual event will be held a t t h e Tu l s a G u n C l u b . w w w . oklahomaprojectwoman.org An Evening of Wine & Roses Sept. 25 Tulsa Garden Center welcomes guests to sample hors d’oeuvres and wines by Tulsa vintners and restaurants. www. tulsagardencenter.com ZooBrew Sept. 25 Spend time at the Oklahoma City Zoo while sampling some of the state’s finest brews. www.okczoo. com The Broadway Ball Sept. 25 Celebrating its 20th anniversary, Lyric Theatre’s 2015 event – The Roaring 20th – will be held at

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

Embassy Suites Hotel. www.lyrictheatreokc. com/broadwayball 2015 Cattle Barons Ball - Sept. 26 One of Tulsa’s most memorable charity events will include live country entertainment, food provided by local restaurants, western-themed activities and silent and live auctions. www.coxcentertulsa.com Susan G. Komen Tulsa Race for the Cure Sept. 26 Join the race to advance research, education, screening and treatment of breast cancer at ONEOK Field. www.komentulsa.org DSACO Festival & 5K Sept. 26 For its 21st year, Down Syndrome Association of Central Oklahoma brings awareness to Down Syndrome at the Bricktown Ballpark. www.dsfestivaland5k.com Mini Laps Sept. 26 The Little Light House’s students put on a parade with fun costumes and props to support their school. www.littlelighthouse.org Bike MS: The Road Divided Sept. 26, 27 Take the two-day trek and challenge with hundreds of cyclists across the state.

www.msoklahoma.org Concours for the Cure Sept. 27 Enjoy

Pontotoc County Free Fair Sept. 1-5 Bring the whole family out for free food, entertainment and thrilling rides in Ada. www.pontotoccountyfair.com Gliddon Car Tour Sept. 2 The entire family will enjoy this unique car tour. www. okcfarmersmarket.com Holdenville Fall Festival and Car Show Sept. 2, 3 Take part in a celebration of the beginning of fall and a love for automobiles with shopping and tasty treats. www.travelok.com Temple Grandin Lecture Sept. 3 Enjoy a lecture about Temple Grandin, a professor of animal science at Colorado State University and autism activist. www. tulsacc.edu Tillman Country Fair Sept. 3-5 Take a spin on a high-flying carnival ride or sample some tasty treats while enjoying live entertainment. www.frederickokchamber. org Choctaw Nation Labor Day Festival & Powwow Sept. 3-7 Enjoy tribal heritage activities, intertribal powwow, Choctaw cultural exhibitions, stickball games, arts and crafts, free concerts and carnival rides. www.choctawnation.com Cherokee National Holiday Sept. 4-6 The holiday attracts visitors from across the country and celebrates Cherokee heritage and cultural awareness with activities for all ages. www.cherokee.org Jana Jae Fiddle Camp & Music Festival Sept. 4-6 Feast your ears on fiddlers of all levels and ages as they perform tunes of bluegrass, swing and more. www. grandlakefestivals.com

Dusk ‘til Dawn Blues Festival Sept. 4-6 Featuring 30 bands on three stages, enjoy workshops and a kid’s village with arts and music activities. www.

dcminnerblues.com MidSouth Youth Rodeo Cowboys Association Finals Sept. 4-7 The competition returns to the Stephens County Fair & Expo Center. w w w. duncancalendar.com Choctaw Oktoberfest Sept. 4-12 Visitors to this weeklong event will enjoy German food, beer and wine and music. www. oldgermany.com Rose District Farmers Market Sept. 5-26 Now in its eighth season, the market attracts a variety of people and is the home of quaint shops and great restaurants for visitors. www.visitbrokenarrow.com Tulsa Reining Classic Thru Sept. 6 An action-packed display of equestrian skills will take place at Tulsa’s Expo Center. www.tulsareining.com Jazz Eureka Festival Sept. 10-12 Enjoy live Jazz in the Ozarks. www.jazzeureka. org Bluegrass and Chili Festival Sept. 10-12 Enjoy the finest chili and great performances by bluegrass artists at this three-day festival in Claremore. www. bluegrasschilifest.com Lindy in the Park Sept. 11 Beginners and pros of swing dance are welcome to join Lindy at Guthrie Green for this free swing-dancing event. www.guthriegreen. com Labapalooza Sept. 12 Take your furry friends to Guthrie Green to raise funds for Lab Rescue of Oklahoma. www. labrescue.net/labapalooza.html Septemberfest Sept. 12 Join Gov. Mary Fallin at Oklahoma City’s Governor’s Mansion for a free festival that celebrates the rich heritage and diversity of Oklahoma. www.travelok.com Woolaroc Fall Trail Ride Sept. 12 Hidden away in Osage Hills, the Woolaroc trail ride takes you through 15 miles of terrain that is rarely seen by the public. www. woolaroc.org


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damjambicycletour.com Ultimate Calf Roping Sept. 12 See the action at the Stephens County Fair & Expo Center. www.duncancalendar. com Zombie Run Sept. 12 Obstacles, challenges and, of course, zombies will stand between you and the finish line. www.okcastle.com Turkish Festival Sept. 12 The 6th annual event celebrates Turkish culture through entertainment and education. www. turkishfestivaloklahoma.com Hideaway Pizza Concert Series Sept. 13 The Bop Cats will be performing live at this month’s concert at the Hideaway Pizza in Bartlesville. The fun begins at 7 p.m. www.hideawaypizza. com The Sanctuary Sept. 13-Nov. 8 The Oklahoma City haunted attraction opens its doors on Sept. 13. Enter if you dare. www.thesantuaryokc.com ShalomFest Sept. 14 Join others at Temple Israel to experience the best in Jewish food, music and fun. www. templetulsa.com ACA N S A A r t s Fe s t i v a l S e p t . 16-20 Works by emerging and established artists are featured in the festival committed to educating and enlightening the community about the arts. www.acasaartsfestival.org TulsaGreekFestival Sept. 17-19 Experience the culture, traditions and foods of Tulsa’s Greek community and the long-established festival at Holy Trinity Greek Or thodox Church. w w w. tulsagreekfestival.com Coweta Fall Festival Sept. 17-19 Get into the autumn spirit with live music, carnival rides and more in Coweta. www.cowetachamber.com Oklahoma Indian Summer Festival Sept. 17-20 Bartlesville brings back its big weekend featuring the American Indian and Western art market, American Indian storytelling and more. www. okindiansummer.org Rock ‘N Rib Festival in Tulsa Sept. 17-20 Barbecue teams from across the country showcase their award-winning barbecue recipes. www.bokcenter.com Rogers County Fair Sept. 17-20 Enjoy carnival rides, games, food, livestock shows and more in Claremore. www.

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rogerscountyfair.com Oklahoma State Fair Sept. 17-27 The state fair – its rides, games, entertainment, livestock, fair food and more – returns to Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.

okstatefair.com Wine’n on the Chisholm Trail Sept. 18, 19 Enjoy an Italian dinner on Friday night and music and dancing on Saturday night, alongside Oklahoma wines at Prairie House in Duncan. w w w. theprairiehouse.com ScotFest Sept. 18-20 Oklahoma’s premier Celtic Music Festival and Scottish Highland Games return to Tulsa’s River West Festival Park. www. okscotfest.com Art on the Hill Sept. 18-20 This event features a special collection from Rogers State University alumni that will be exhibited in the Foundation Gallery. www.rsu.edu/artonthehill Painting in the Garden Series with Wine and Palette Sept. 19 Instructors teach participants how to paint on a 16 x 20 inch canvas. w w w. oklahomacitybotanicalgardens. com Skiatook Pioneer Day Sept. 19 Residents honor the past with a modern-day carnival in Skiatook. www. skiatookchamber.com The Price Is Right Live! Sept. 20 “Come on down” to the BOK Center for the bright lights, games, prizes, wheel and showcase of The Price Is Right Live! www.bokcenter.com

AMHRNationals Sept. 20 The American Miniature Horse Registry will hold its annual show of outstanding Shetland ponies and other small breed horses at Expo Square. www.exposquare. com 2015 Second Annual OKC Jazz Fest Sept. 21-26 Relocating to the Civic Center Music Hall and Bicentennial Park, the festival promises to provide the best jazz in Oklahoma with a surprise headliner! www.okcjazzfest.com Annual Oklahoma Health Center Breakfast Sept. 24 The breakfast features guest speakers and updates on how members of the Oklahoma Health Center are making a positive impact on Oklahoma’s future. www. okcchamber.com Arabian Horse Show Sept. 24 The most prestigious Arabian Horse show in North America features the best Arabian, Half Arabian and Anglo Arabian, as well as both amateur and professional riders. www.exposquare.com CTAC Live Concert Series Sept. 24 M-Pact, a pop-jazz vocal group, joins the Chisholm Trail concert series in Duncan. www.chisholmtrailarts. com Duncan’s Grove Fall Festival Sept. 24-26 The fourth annual festival returns to Duncan. www.duncancalendar. com Industry Flea Sept. 25 In Oklahoma City, 10th and Hudson in Midtown becomes a market of artisans, shops and vintage treasures. www.industryflea.com

nationalcowboymuseum.org Plaza District Festival Sept. 26 Take the family out and see what makes the Plaza Oklahoma City’s fastest growing festival. www.plazadistrict.org Route 66 Cruisers Car Show Sept. 26 The annual car show offers great family fun, concessions, arts and crafts and entertainment at Claremore Lake Park. www.visitclaremore.org Pumpkin Festival at Shepherd’s Cross Sept. 24-Nov. 7 The annual pumpkin patch, hay maze, rides and more returns. www.shepherdscross. com Free Non-Credit Academic Strategies for Plus 50 Sept. 26 Participants will learn how to communicate more effectively, study more efficiently, manage time, set goals and self care. www.tulsacc.edu Country Festival Sept. 26 Enjoy a 30-mile bike ride, pancake breakfast, games, demonstrations, auction, music, rodeo and more at Eden Mennonite Church. www.edenmennonite.com Pelican Festival Sept. 26, 27 Bird watchers welcome back the American white pelicans migrating to Grand Lake with a festival in Grove. www. grandlakefun.com Brady Heights Historic HomeTour Sept. 27 Tour 10 homes in Tulsa’s oldest historic district. www.bradyheights.org Groovefest Sept. 28 Enjoy on stage performers, speakers, vendors and art at Norman’s Andrews Park. www. groovefest.org Fall Outdoor Film Festival Sept. 28 The seventh annual event takes place on Har well Field. w w w.utulsa.edu/ arts-at-tu/ Metro 50 Sept. 29 Annual dinner honoring the fastest growing businesses in Oklahoma that have more than $1 million in operating revenue. www. okcchamber.com Cherry Street Farmers Market Ongoing Every Saturday, find fresh, local and organic vegetables, breads, sweets, dairy products and meats; flowers and plants; handcrafted products; and so much more. www.tulsafarmersmarket. org Tulsa Roots Rocks The Green Ongoing Every Sunday from Sept. 6 to Oct. 4, enjoy free concerts accompanied

7/20/15 5:05 PM by OK craft brews, performance art, dance, educational booths and more. www.guthriegreen.com Sunday Twilight Concert Series Ongoing Enjoy a concert at the Myriad Botanical Gardens every Sunday night through midSeptember from 7:30 to 9 p.m. www. oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com Premiere on Film Row Ongoing Film Row in Oklahoma City welcomes its community to its monthly block party everyThirdFriday.www.filmrowpremiere. com Heard on Hurd Ongoing Every third Saturday from March through October, enjoy local music, food and shops in downtown Edmond on Broadway between Main and Hurd. 405.341.6650 H&8th Ongoing On the last Friday of every month March through October, enjoy the H&8th Night Market with gourmet food trucks and live music. www.h8thokc.com Starlight Band Concert on the Green Ongoing Take your blankets, lawn chairs, picnics and even pets to GuthrieGreenformusicandentertainment. www.guthriegreen.com Movie in the Park Ongoing Enjoy a movie at Guthrie Green most Thursdays through October. www.guthriegreen. com Walking Tour Ongoing Take a walking tour of historic downtown Tulsa. www. tulsahistory.org Gilcrease Films Ongoing See various films throughout the month. www. gilcrease.org OKCMOA Films Ongoing Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa.com Planetarium Shows Ongoing Science Museum Oklahoma. www. sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

To see more events happening around Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR

SEPTEMBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Extraordinary Hannah Following a childhood dream, writer and illustrator Hannah Harrison found success in the children’s book publishing industry.

A

t an age when most children proclaimed they wanted to be astronauts or the president when they grew up, children’s book author and illustrator Hannah Harrison already knew exactly what she wanted to do. “When I was in first grade, my school put

104

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2015

on a contest where all the students made their own book, and I immediately fell in love with the idea of creating stories,” says Harrison, a resident of Ada. Growing up in New Hampshire, Harrison says she was constantly drawing, so it might not have been a huge surprise when her kindergarten teacher put her in an art class with

MEGAN MORGAN

PHOTO COURTESY PENGUIN PUBLISHING.

IN PERSON

fifth graders. The school-wide book contest a year later put a new idea in Harrison’s head, that ended up sticking. “When I realized that making books was a job and something that grown-ups did, I knew that’s what I wanted,” Harrison says. “I’ve continued on down that path my whole life.” But just because Harrison is now doing exactly what she has always aspired to doesn’t mean that getting there was easy. “For a senior project in college, I created paintings inspired by short stories I had written, so I was able to tie writing and art together then, but it took ten years after I graduated to get a book published,” Harrison says. “If it’s something that you want to do, you have to be really committed.” Harrison’s paintings are realistic, with intricate textures, but the subject matter itself is fanciful – animals wearing clothes are common. While continuing to hone her skills after graduation, Harrison took various odd jobs in the art world. “Becoming a children’s author and illustrator was always the destination, but I had to make a living until I got there,” Harrison says. Joining the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) also proved to be very beneficial. “It has been the best experience, and it’s just a great group of people. I actually ended up meeting my agent at a conference through the group,” Harrison says. Harrison’s first book, Extraordinary Jane, was published in 2014. It tells the story of a circus dog who isn’t sure she is special or skilled enough to be a performer – but the ringmaster thinks differently. Extraordinary Jane won the Oklahoma Book Award in illustration for Harrison this year. Finally getting published and then experiencing success has been an incredible experience, she says. “It really is like a dream come true,” Harrison says. Bernice Gets Carried Away, her second book, featuring a grumpy cat as the main character, was released this summer. Harrison lives in Ada with her husband, an Oklahoma native, and their two young daughters. With kids, Harrison says she paints a little here and there whenever she can. “It can be tricky to squeeze it in, but nap times are the golden hours,” Harrison says, laughing. Right now, she is wrapping up the illustrations for her next book, featuring an elephant and a beaver, which will be released in 2016. “I just want to keep producing meaningful books for me and my family and for the people who read them,” Harrison says.


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