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THE LEGACY OF SEAN MARSEE

OKLAHOMA WEDDING GUIDE

OLD-SCHOOL ITALIAN CUISINE

MAKEUP ARTIST WOWS HOLLYWOOD

CTysO in D3O icians 7 4 ph s

100 THINGS TO DO this summer in Oklahoma ecialtie

58 sp

watch the fireworks, celebrate Woody, catch a foul, gaze at stars, tour a home, ride a roller coaster, hunt for dinosaur tracks, go fishing, tour a museum, take a dip, eat a slice, watch the turtles, pick and grin, learn a thing or two...

JUNE 2014

BEST RS

+ 8 ROAD TRIPS, 40 GREAT ACTIVITIES


Capture, Share #uticasquare

uticasquare.com

#happyhour, #summerbreeze #brunchunderthesun #soyummy #uticasquare

Something about patio dining adds to the overall flavor and experience. This time of year Utica Square restaurants swing open their doors, inviting you to gather over drinks and delectable food, while taking in the fresh summer air. Create photo-worthy memories at any of our ten distinct restaurants. All found at Tulsa’s hometown treasure.


VOL. XVIII, NO. 6

FEATURES

June 2 014 O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

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50

Culture And Adventure

This summer, go beyond Oklahoma’s borders to experience a mix of art, outdoor activities and culture in several cities located in states bordering Oklahoma.

68

Best Doctors

More than 300 physicians in 58 specialties are named to the 2014 Best Doctors list. Did your physician make the cut?

78

A Young Man’s Legacy

In 1984, a teenager named Sean Marsee died of mouth cancer. A subsequent lawsuit brought by his mother, Betty Marsee, against the smokeless tobacco company that manufactured the products she believed killed her son was unsuccessful, but Marsee’s legacy has influenced policy and education regarding smokeless tobacco products since.

THE BLACK MESA.

100 Things To Do This Summer In Oklahoma

Looking for something cool to do this summer? There are countless activities just a car ride away. Oklahoma is home to many attractions, museums, state parks, events, oddities and more; we’ve highlighted 100 of them for you. Keep the list handy this summer – you never know where an adventure is waiting.

SPECIAL SECTIONS 86 89

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OKMAG.COM

THE LEGACY OF SEAN MARSEE

OKLAHOMA WEDDING GUIDE

OLD-SCHOOL ITALIAN CUISINE

100 THINGS TO DO this summer in Oklahoma ialtie

58 spec

watch the fireworks, celebrate Woody, catch a foul, gaze at stars, tour a home, ride a roller coaster, hunt for dinosaur tracks, go fishing, tour a museum, take a dip, eat a slice, watch the turtles, pick and grin, learn a thing or two...

JUNE 2014

June 2014

ST

BE RS CTO in DO icians s 347 phys

+ 8 ROAD TRIPS, 40 GREAT ACTIVITIES

2

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read expanded

MAKEUP ARTIST WOWS HOLLYWOOD

articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition. OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE PRESENTS 100 THING TO DO THIS SUMMER IN OKLAHOMA, YOUR GUIDE TO A SEASON OF FUN AND SIMPLE PLEASURES THAT ARE CLOSE TO HOME.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

MORE PHOTOS: View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries. MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.

Get Oklahoma

On The Go!


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Contents

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101

DEPARTMENTS The State

13

Walter Echo-Hawk, Pawnee, is an attorney, scholar and world-renowned speaker. He is also the author of two books on the subject on federal Indian law and indigenous rights and regularly travels the world speaking on the subjects.

16 18

People 3 Qs

20 22 26 28 32 36 42 44 46

Culture The Insider Scene Spotlight Living Space Style Beauty Your Health Destination

Artist Marilyn Artus takes on issues affecting Oklahoma’s women in her visual art. Her work is known nationally for its provocative challenges of societal norms and advocacy for female empowerment.

101

18 36

Taste

For more than 20 years, the Sternad family has labored to make Mary’s Italian Trattoria a favorite spot in Tulsa for everything topped with creamy alfredo sauce, slow-simmered marinara and more. Food writer Brian Schwartz falls in love with Italian all over again.

104 What We’re Eating

107

Entertainment

Wicked is about to blow away audiences again when the musical fantasy tours to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center for a three-week run this month. Filled with great music, humor and unexpected turns, Oz was never this complicated – or fun!

108 Calendar of Events

112

In Person

107

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014


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OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

Form and Line:

AllAn Houser’s sculpture And drAwings

PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX ASSOCIATE EDITOR KAREN SHADE

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS TARA MALONE, CHRIS SUTTON, JOHN WOOLEY, MEIKA YATES HINES GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN GRAPHIC DESIGNER NATE PUCKETT DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT SAMANTHA E. GRAMMER

The Force

by Allan Houser Vermont marble, copyright 1990 copyright Chiinde LLC photo by Wendy McEahern

Celebrating the centennial of the birth of Chiricahua Apache artist Allan Houser. Works loaned by Allan Houser, Inc.

conTinues Through June 29, 2014 Title sponsor of the Gilcrease Museum 2013-14 exhibition season is the sherman E. smith Family Foundation.

1400 N. Gilcrease MuseuM rd. Tulsa, OK 918-596-2700 Gilcrease.uTulsa.edu TU Is an EEO/aa InsTITUTIOn.

18952 Gilcrease.indd 1

5/1/14 12:09 PM

IT’S A PIECE OF CAKE Let Oklahoma Magazine be your guide in planning the big day!

The Oklahoma Wedding Show and Issue Returning January 2015 Booth space now available.

CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2014 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman TM Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

2013

Member

440 0 UNDER

Reserve your space today! Call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com WeddingGuide 1-3h.indd 1

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

5/12/14 3:45 PM

TM


June


THE VOTES ARE IN!

2014 Look for The Best of the Best of Oklahoma.

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR A recent Gallup poll reported that 30 percent of Oklahoma residents would like to relocate to another state, if given the opportunity. If that 30 percent moved away, they would miss out on the wealth of culture, exploration, adventure and entertainment that is found in all corners of this great state. Associate Editor Karen Shade and I sat down earlier this year to make our list of 100 things Oklahomans should do this summer. It was hard to keep it to 100. There’s the obvious (the Porter Peach Festival, museum tours, state parks), the not-so-obvious (touring the historic Mattie Beal home in Lawton, taking a ride on the Cherokee Queen on Grand Lake, hunting for dinosaur tracks) and the downright eclectic (the Parker Drilling Rig in Elk City, a monument to the world’s largest peanut in Durant, Grascar races in El Reno, noodling in Pauls Valley). This list was compiled with residents across the state in mind. Whether you have an afternoon free and want to find something nearby to do, or you are planning a road trip of sight-seeing across Oklahoma, our list will hopefully guide you to what you may have never seen or even knew existed. I have seen and experienced only a handful of the items included on our list. My goal this summer is to add to that number. Personally, I look forward to digging for crystals at the Great Salt Plains, to visiting the Stafford Air & Space Museum in Weatherford, to learning about all the bones at Oklahoma City’s Osteology Museum, and perhaps even taking a selfie with that totem pole in Chelsea. I hope you have fun this summer exploring our state. And if you visit one of the sites on our list, take a photo of yourself and send it to us by email or Instagram. We’d love to share your adventures with the rest of our readers. There are countless things to do in Oklahoma, especially during the summer. Don’t waste these months binge-watching TV shows on Netflix; get out and see what our great state has to offer its residents. Jami Mattox Managing Editor

Coming in July.

Don’t miss this exciting issue. Call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com

THAT’S A LOT OF BANJOS – THE AMERICAN BANJO MUSEUM IN OKLAHOMA CITY. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

8 OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014 BOB_1-3v_Strip.indd 1

3/19/14 3:48 PM


Excellence at its Best TU congratulates our 2014 winners of nationally competitive awards. NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP

CAITLIN PEGG, biological science senior WESTON KIGHTLINGER, chemical engineering

senior

computer science and mathematics (’13), not pictured CODY MARTIN, chemistry (’13), not pictured STEPHEN MACKE,

FULBRIGHT STUDENT GRANT

Spanish, women’s & gender studies and linguistics senior

TREY JOHNSTON,

GOLDWATER SCHOLARSHIP

chemical engineering and biological science junior MITCHELL TRAFFORD, chemical engineering and mathematics junior DEVIN STRANFORD,

EUROPEAN UNION ERASMUS MUNDUS SCHOLARSHIP

economics, political science and history senior J. CHRISTOPHER PROCTOR,

The University of Tulsa is a top-ranked research university that emphasizes community engagement and global education. TU is home to more nationally competitive scholars than all other Oklahoma universities combined.

Office of Admission 1-800-331-3050 918-631-2307 www.utulsa.edu/admission TU is an EEO/AA institution.


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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014


Invested in Oklahoma Fo r H e a l t h . Fo r L i f e . Fo r G o o d .

INTEGRIS’ dedication to quality has once again earned Baptist recognition as U.S. News & World Report’s #1 hospital – not only in the metro but throughout Oklahoma. But it takes more than awards to provide healing. That’s why we’ve invested millions renovating and revitalizing our facilities throughout the metro and building new hospitals in Edmond and Grove. And that’s just one part of what it takes. It also takes the INTEGRIS Cancer Institute partnering with ProCure to build the state’s only proton therapy center and one of only 10 campuses in the nation. It takes award-winning stroke programs at INTEGRIS Baptist and Southwest Medical Center, saving lives with one of the nation’s only artificial heart programs at Advanced Cardiac Care, performing Oklahoma’s first heart transplant at the Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute and INTEGRIS Heart Hospital’s first and only four-dimensional heart scanner. It takes a lasting partnership with Lakeside Women’s Hospital – a national Woman’s Choice Award hospital – merging Lakeside’s female focus with INTEGRIS’ complete continuum of care. It takes Jim Thorpe redefining rehabilitation outcomes, the state’s most comprehensive burn center and more new lives at the Bennett Fertility Institute. INTEGRIS has a proven history of doing whatever it takes to provide the exceptional healthcare Oklahomans deserve, reaching beyond our 19 healthcare campuses and nearly 100 statewide clinics into the neighborhoods and communities that need us most. Challenging standards, exceeding expectations and building hope – whatever it takes. That’s INTEGRIS Health.

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‘‘When I found out I had cancer, I thought I’d have to stop being active. But all I wanted to do was keep going.’’ — Heather Holladay Breast Cancer Patient

I’m a wife with two kids, I’m getting my master’s degree, I teach Zumba—so I was determined to get through my battle with breast cancer without having to give it all up. My naturopathic clinician and dietician at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® helped me stay strong during my treatments— and stay on track with my life.

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©2014 Rising Tide


The State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

WALTER ECHOHAWK, PAWNEE, IS AN ATTORNEY AND SCHOLAR ON FEDERAL INDIAN LAW AND INDIGENOUS RIGHTS. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

E

A Generation’s Voice Walter Echo-Hawk continues the fight for indigenous rights.

ven in Oklahoma, a state noted for its large American Indian population, few are familiar with the term “Red Power.” This often-overshadowed movement of the 1960s Civil Rights era was characterized by the push to reclaim tribal lands from the federal government, social protest in the face of poverty and poor education systems and a revival of native culture and literature. While several of the movement’s objectives were achieved – ushering in a new age of protection for indigenous rights – since the 1980s, the hard-won gains of the movement have faced a slow erosion in federal courts. Plenty of today’s generation are unaware the Red Power Movement even existed.

But Walter Echo-Hawk remembers. The movement was one of the primary inspirations that led him to dedicate his life and work to the pursuit of justice for indigenous peoples. “I decided to go to law school during my college days in the late 1960s,” Echo-Hawk says. “I was encouraged by the family to become a lawyer to address Indian issues, problems and aspirations, especially those from our Pawnee community. This was during the early days of the Red Power Movement, when youth were concerned about civil rights and the need to coax the federal government into abandoning the destructive termination and assimilation policies and adopting an Indian self-determination policy.” Echo-Hawk, a member of the Pawnee tribe and native of the city of Pawnee, has since enjoyed a storied career as a crusader for American JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

Indian rights. For a quarter-century, he served as an attorney for the Native American Rights Fund, representing tribes in landmark cases on such matters as religious freedom; civil, treaty and water rights; and legislation regarding religious and repatriation rights of American Indians. Today, Echo-Hawk continues to represent tribes through his work with Crowe and Dunlevy, while also serving as a chief justice for the Supreme Court of the Kickapoo Tribe. Echo-Hawk is also committed to teaching others about federal Indian law and indigeECHO-HAWK’S SON, BUNKY nous civil rights and culture. He ECHO-HAWK, CARRIES ON is a sought-after public speaker, HIS FATHER’S ACTIVISM traveling around Oklahoma, the ON A DIFFERENT PATH: THROUGH ART. country and abroad to discuss topics from social justice and human rights to philanthropy for indigenous arts and culture. “In recent years, I have tried to share my disturbing judicial trend since 1985 toward trimming back our hard-won Native American legal experiences that contributed to the rise of modern Indian nations,” Echo-Hawk says, legal advances. So the challenge for this generation is to reform and strengthen our legal framework and make it a more just and reliable body of law.” “first as an author, and second as an adjunct Echo-Hawk urges today’s generation of American Indian youth to educate themselves on professor of law at the University of Tulsa federal Indian law. College of Law.” “This generation should study human rights and work to implement the United Nations He is the author of multiple books and Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People standards into U.S. law,” Echo-Hawk says, publications, including two volumes on na“just like our forebearers worked to obtain the Indian self-determination policy during the tive law titled In the Courts of the Conquer1950s and 1960s.” or: The 10 Worst Indian Law Cases Ever TARA MALONE Decided and In the Light of Justice: The Rise of Human Rights in Native America and the U.N. Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous OK THEN Peoples. “Today, federal Indian law is a very The organization has been active for nearly In 1918, a group of Oklahomans living in vibrant body of federal law that provides a century now, excepting a break from 1930 Washington, D.C., including Thomas Gore, the legal framework in the United States to 1931. According to Riley Pagett, vice presiOklahoma’s first senator, decided to found for recognizing and protecting the political, dent of communications for OKSS, the society an organization that would, according to its property, cultural, civil, religious, economic, helps build a sense of community among constitution, “promote goodwill and amicable environmental and treaty rights of Native the many Oklahomans living in the D.C. area social relations among Oklahomans in the Americans,” Echo-Hawk says. “Under the through social events and community service District of Columbia and vicinity, to foster a protective features provided by this legal programs. wholesome state pride and a sympathetic unframework, great nation-building advances “We try to meet at least once a month, derstanding of Oklahoma institutions; and to have been made by Indian nations across promote, insofar as consistent with the nature but some months are busier than others,” he the country. Most tribes have full-service says. “For example, we met a few times in of such a society, the interest of the state of governments and are the economic engines April to celebrate the Oklahoma City Thunder Oklahoma and its people.” for their local economies.” in the playoffs.” – Jami Mattox And with that, the Oklahoma State Society However, he cautions, vigilance and activwas formed. ism are still essential. “Federal Indian law also has a dark side to it from doctrines of colonialism that were implanted in this legal framework during the 1800s. That dark side of the law serves to weaken indigenous rights and make them vulnerable, and this problem in the law is compounded by an unfriendly (U.S.) Supreme Court that has embarked on a

OKIE EXPATS

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014


2014 Vision in Education

Leadership Award Dinner HONORING

Jake Henry Jr. President and Chief Executive OfďŹ cer Saint Francis Health System

Tuesday, September 30, 2014 – 6:00 PM Renaissance Hotel

2014 Vision in Education Leadership Award Dinner The Vision in Education Leadership Award honors exemplary leaders in the Tulsa area for their dedication to education and community betterment through education.

Over the past

decade, the Vision Dinner has raised over $1.9 million to support scholarships and programs for TCC students, faculty and staff.

For sponsorship information, call 918-595-7836 or email jgrant@tulsacc.edu.


The State

PEOPLE

The Next Big Thing

Tulsa native Clea Alsip is transitioning a successful theater career into film and television.

G

racing the stages of New York City, Clea Alsip is Broadway’s fresh face. With credits including numerous theater roles – most recently in Sarah Ruhle’s hit play, Stage Kiss – the indie flick The Little Tin Man and appearances on HBO’s Boardwalk Empire, the Tulsa native exudes authentic energy and the hardworking enthusiasm of a true Oklahoman whose star is on the rise. Since graduating from the prestigious Tisch Graduate Acting Program at New York University in 2011, Alsip is living a dream that began when she turned 7 and was cast in Tulsa’s American Theater Company production of A Christmas Carol. “I was riding in the car with my mom, and we heard an ad for A Christmas Carol auditions on NPR. I said, ‘Mom, I know what I want for my birthday – I want to be on stage.’ And she said that she couldn’t really TULSA NATIVE CLEA ALSIP just get that for HAS MADE A CAREER ON THE me, but she STAGES OF BROADWAY AND could take me to ON-SCREEN. PHOTO COURTESY CLEA ALSIP. the audition. So

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

I went, and since it was my first audition, I didn’t even have a song to sing, so I sang ‘Happy Birthday’ and got cast,” she recalls. Alsip has been acting ever since. “I find that when I’m performing, I’m the most fulfilled and the most in-the-moment. Becoming a character is basically just being you under different circumstances,” she says. “I like to ask myself, ‘What if I hadn’t grown up with X, Y and Z or grown up in this town – how would that affect me, and how would I be different?’ “I love the psychology of it all – how it affects your body and your voice and your mind,” she continues. “We all get so swept away by so much other stuff in our lives, but for me, when I’m on stage, I can really focus and live in a way that I don’t even live in my real life.” Alsip keeps her Tulsa cell phone number – she says it makes a great conversation starter – and explains that while people can tell she’s not from New York, she is very proud of where she comes from and how she got to where she is. “You don’t find much of what we have in Oklahoma in New York,” she says. “People are very kind and generous in Oklahoma, and there’s a different level of the way that New Yorkers see the world. People always comment on my optimistic attitude, and I think a huge part of that is where I grew up and the community I was raised in.” Although live theater has been her bread and butter, Alsip has new representation and is focusing her career on adding more film and television work. “I want to be able to do it all because I think that’s what really successful actors do these days,” she says. “I think I have a lot to bring to the table, and I’m very excited about this next step in my career. I can’t wait – I feel like I’m on the cusp of some big things.” MEIKA YATES HINES


Wealth Management Isn’t One Thing. It’s Everything. When planning for the future, you’re really planning your legacy. But in doing so, you take everything into consideration. Retirement goals. Family trusts. Succession plans. The list goes on and on. Which is why you need a wealth advisor who takes a holistic approach and considers how your particular variables work together. We know there is more to your ambition than simply accumulating money. Let us be an advocate for your life’s dreams. Give us a call, or better yet, let us come see you.

Private Banking | Fiduciary Services | Investment Management | Financial Planning | Specialty Asset Management | Insurance Tulsa: 918.293.7560 | Oklahoma City: 405.936.3797 | www.bankofoklahoma.com © 2014 Bank of Oklahoma, a division of BOKF, NA, member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. Private Bank at Bank of Oklahoma provides products and services through BOKF, NA and its various affiliates and subsidiaries. Investments and insurance are not insured by the FDIC; are not deposits or other obligations of, and are not guaranteed by, any bank or bank affiliate. All investments are subject to risks, including possible loss of principal.


The State

SP ORT

NATIONS AT PLAY

MARILYN ARTUS IS PICTURED IN HER HOME. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

3 QS

Our Lady Of Art Marilyn Artus challenges viewers to reflect upon societal norms.

Oklahoma City-based neo-pop artist Marilyn Artus drew nationwide attention with her controversial exhibit Our Lady of the Anti-Personnel Weapon & Her Stepford Friends that displayed at Oklahoma City’s a.k.a. gallery in 2010. Her mixed media pieces continue to shock and inspire. Artus’ work can be seen in 24 Works On Paper, an art exhibit traveling in Oklahoma in 2014 and currently at the Tulsa Artists’ Coalition Gallery through June 28. What are your thoughts about the intersection of art and politics? When I came out of art school, I wasn’t paying too much attention to politics. I didn’t give feminism a whole lot of thought until I ended my commercial art career in order to get back to making fine art for myself. When I did that, this feminist voice just came out of me that I couldn’t control. All of a sudden, I was making art that really spoke to my feelings about women’s issues in Oklahoma and around the world. It was unexpected. It surprised me, honestly. To what issue should young women pay special attention? It’s definitely reproductive rights. If a woman can’t control when she gives birth, she can’t control her life at all. If a woman controls that, she can make her life whatever she wants it to be. I’m very concerned about some of the legislation that’s being passed. I’ve sat in the [State Capitol] Senate gallery and listened to some of the bills they’re passing regarding reproductive rights. I’m horrified. It’s usually me and some women that fought in the 1970s in there. There aren’t any young women in there listening to this, and I’m wondering where they are. I’m not on the frontlines having to personally deal with this issue, but I care a great deal about the women who are. They need to be able to control when and how they choose to have babies. How did you learn needlework for your mixed media pieces? My grandmother, my mom and my aunt were influential women in my life when I was a kid. They made all of my clothes when I was little. They were constantly doing needlepoint, cross-stitching, petit pointing – all of this needlework. It’s very meditative for me. It makes me slow down, and I very much enjoy the thinking that I do. I love the texture and the threedimensional component it adds to the piece. PAUL FAIRCHILD

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

Oklahoma native Jim Thorpe left a lasting legacy in the sports world. Recognized for winning gold medals for the pentathlon and decathlon in the 1912 Olympics, Thorpe also played football, basketball and baseball professionally. To honor one of Oklahoma’s most famous native sons –a member of the Sac and Fox Nation – the third annual Jim Thorpe Games will be held June 8-14 in Shawnee. Athletes representing more than 70 nations, bands and tribes across the U.S. will converge upon Oklahoma to participate in more than 10 sports. The Jim Thorpe Native American All-Star Football Game will give American Indian high school seniors from Oklahoma the opportunity to compete against one another. “Native American communities know the importance and value of supporting healthy lifestyle choices for their youth,” says Annetta Abbott, Jim Thorpe Games executive director. “Some of the many benefits of the games include promoting leadership development, increasing cultural awareness and, most importantly, motivating young people to achieve great things. Our young people are not only the leaders of the future; they are the leaders of today.” According to Abbott, one male athlete and one female athlete participating in this year’s games will each receive a $2,500 scholarship. For more information on this year’s games, visit www.jimthorpegames.com. – Jami Mattox


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The State

CULTURE

T

Local actors, directors and producers celebrate at the annual TATE Awards.

his month, actors and actresses will anxiously await their cues. This time, however, they will not be backstage dressed in costume. The cue will not come from a stage manager, and it may not come at all. They will be sitting in the audience along with directors and producers, hoping to hear that their show is a winning production at the 2014 Tulsa Awards for Theatre Excellence. The TATE Awards are an initiative of the George Kaiser Family Foundation and provide a total of $20,000 for the top three theater productions of the season and one award for best youth production, says Shirley Elliott, program director for the Tulsa Performing Arts Center Trust. Elliott says when the awards began in 2009, they were intended to recognize outstanding local theater by nonprofit groups and to attract a larger audience to it. “The general public is very aware of the blockbuster Broadway series at the PAC and the huge commercial events at the BOK Center, but our own local theater companies are producing wonderful work on a monthly basis,” says Elliott. “They also deserve recognition and public attendance – and the tickets are much cheaper.” Elliott believes the TATE Awards have made the theater scene in Tulsa stronger and more competitive by providing funding to those groups producing great productions. “Most of the people involved are volunteers giving up their nights and weekends to rehearse and perform,” she says. “We believe the TATEs put a value on that kind of creativity and devotion, and the prize money inspires a bit of friendly competition that we feel is healthy for growth and improvement.”

GLOSS MOUNTAIN STATE PARK. PHOTO BY LISHA NEWMAN/OKLAHOMA TOURISM.

Center Stage

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

ACTOR, DIRECTOR, WRITER AND PRODUCER – AND TULSA NATIVE – TIM BLAKE NELSON, RIGHT, RECEIVED THE TATE DISTINGUISHED ARTIST AWARD IN 2012. PHOTO COURTESY TATE AWARDS.

There are eight nominees for this year’s award in the main category and two nominees in the youth category. TATE also gives two achievement awards each year: the Distinguished Artist Award, for a theater figure who got a start in Tulsa and has had continued success nationally, and the Mary Kay Place Award for a Tulsan who has actively worked in local theater for at least a decade. Elliott encourages the public to attend the awards and hopes Tulsans will become more adventuresome with their entertainment choices. “Tulsa has so much creativity to offer,” says Elliott. “I would encourage theatergoers to try something locally produced.” This year’s TATE Awards will be held June 22 at the Cascia Hall Performing Arts Center, 2520 S. Yorktown Ave. BETH WEESE

35

Oklahoma is a state known as much for its diverse terrain as it is for its diverse weather. The state’s 3.8 million residents have plenty of opportunities to take advantage of this natural beauty by visiting one of the state’s 35 state parks. Hiking, biking, fishing, horseback riding, camping, golfing and more can be found in all corners of Oklahoma. For a complete list of state parks and their activities, amenities and attractions, visit www.travelok. com. – Jami Mattox


&

QA Dr. J Hendricks – Pediatrics

Medical Director at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma

Why did you decide to become a doctor?

At first, it was the attraction of science. While in residency, I realized I wanted to see children grow up with their families, which is why I chose pediatrics.

What moments do you find inspiring in your field?

Pediatrics is really family medicine, because you know the parents, grandparents and children and you learn a lot from them. That knowledge was especially helpful when I became a grandparent.

What do you like about working for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma? My favorite thing about my job is that I get to wear a lot of hats. I’m fortunate that I am not just doing one job. In fact, I haven’t had the same day yet!

What do you think BCBSOK members would be surprised to know? Members own this company. We value that trust and we want them to know that we are trying to do the best we can to stand with our members whether they are healthy or sick, which is our purpose.

What is the most rewarding part of your job at BCBSOK?

Over my career, I’ve spent a lot of time with nurses and that is a big and rewarding part of what I do. When I was in medical school they passed out stethoscopes and told us that it was not something to listen to someone’s heart with, but rather something to help us focus. That basic rule has allowed me to focus when reviewing a case with a nurse or a patient because every word makes a difference.

The health care system is shifting, both in terms of advancements in technology and patient care, and also with changes in health care laws. How will these things affect the way doctors treat patients? It’s not so much that we’re shifting, it’s that the point that we are going for is shifting. We are in a progression trying to find the right way. We are really trying to stay focused on better health care for all of our patients so they strive for a better quality of life.

A Division of Health Care Service Corporation, a Mutual Legal Reserve Company, an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association

601425.0414


The State ARTIST MATTHEW MUNGLE APPLIES SPECIAL EFFECTS MAKEUP TO GLENN CLOSE ON THE FILM SET OF 2011’S ALBERT NOBBS. PHOTO BY ANNIE LEIBOVITZ.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014


THE INSIDER

The Human Canvas

Celebrated special effects makeup artist and Oklahoma native Matthew Mungle applies his art to Hollywood.

F

or a sparsely populated area in the mountainous region of southeastern Oklahoma, Atoka County has produced a pretty nice batch of notables, including 1930s mystery novelist Todd Downing, former Kansas City Royals shortstop U.L. Washington, 2009-10 Oklahoma Poet Laureate Jim Barnes and one-time WNBA star Crystal Robinson. And then, there are a couple of others, who met for the first time nearly 20 years ago. “It was in ‘95, I think, and I had to do a face cast of Reba,” recalls Matthew W. Mungle. “I walked into her hotel room, shook her hand, and said, ‘Hi. I’m Matthew Mungle.’ “She looked at me. And I said. ‘Yes. Matthew Mungle.’ “She said, ‘Mungle Guernsey Farm?’ I said, ‘Yeah. Mungle Guernsey Farm. When you were growing up, you drank the milk from my parents’ cows.’” He laughs. “That was a very funny moment.” “Reba” is, of course, country music superstar Reba McEntire, who grew up in the Atoka County hamlet of Chockie. And while Mungle himself was raised on his parents’ farm near Atoka – the county seat – he made his own mark outside the dairy profession. Although Mungle handles all kinds of makeup-related assignments for movies and television, he’s best known for his special-effects makeup or makeup effects – both names for the process that transforms an actor into another character, often a horrific one, or otherwise radically changes an actor’s face or body. In 1993, he won an Academy Award for his work on Francis Ford Coppola’s Dracula; since then, he’s been nominated three more times, most recently for 2011’s Albert Nobbs, in which he applied gender-bending makeup onto Glenn Close. That Oscar and those nominations go along with six Emmy Awards – for assignments ranging from the 2008 John Adams miniseries to The X-Files – and an amazing 20 more Emmy nominations. How did a young man from the largest Guernsey dairy in the state become a first-call makeup artist in Hollywood? For Mungle, unsurprisingly, it all had to do with a couple of movies: 1964’s The Seven Faces of Dr. Lao – starring fellow Oklahoman, Tony Randall, in seven different roles – and the original Planet of the Apes from 1968, released about the time Mungle was hitting his teens. “I was just amazed at how those actors put on makeup and became different characters,” he says. “That’s how I got started in makeup, by making myself up and becoming the character. I was probably 12 or 13 years old, and it just somehow got in my blood, and that’s all I wanted to do with my life.” Of course, jobs for a makeup artist were limited in Atoka County, even for one who employed professional makeup kits he’d ordered from New York and Dallas, studied almost religiously the work of famed monster-maker Dick Smith, and got so good at what he was doing that his photo of himself as a Planet of the Apes denizen was published in Famous Monsters of Filmland, the country’s No. 1 horror-movie magazine at that time. So when an opportunity came JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Energy

Sept 2014

along to showcase his work, Mungle jumped at it. “It was in 1972, when Conquest of the Planet of the Apes was on at the Our look inside the people, places and policies Thompson Theatre in Atoka,” recalls Mungle. “I was going to school with driving one of the state’s biggest industries. the owner’s daughter, Teresa Thompson, and I showed her a picture of the ape makeup I’d sent to Famous Monsters, which was running a contest for best makeup at the time – I’d won second prize. “She said, ‘Oh, I’ll show this to my dad.’ She took it home, and her dad, John Thompson, called me that night and said, ‘We’ve got Conquest of the Planet of the Apes this weekend. Would you consider doing that makeup and walking around town Saturday to promote the show?’ “I said, ‘Well, that would be great.’ So I got up at five o’clock in the morning, put the makeup on and drove into town. Of course, that was weird, driving five miles into town from the farm dressed as an ape,” he Reserve your space today. Call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com. says. Dropping by the Thompson home, he was given a sign to carry, and Energy 1-8h.indd 1 5/14/14 9:35 AM from there, he says, “that whole day, I walked up and down the main street of Atoka, Oklahoma – which was only about two blocks – promoting the show. Nobody knew who I was, and I played it to the hilt.” He recalls being in makeup until about 10 p.m. and being rewarded with $15 from Thompson. “That was my first check for doing makeup,” he says. “And I thought, ‘I can do this and make money? Wow.’” From that acorn, an oak-sized career grew. Although Mungle wanted to go directly to a West Coast makeup school upon his graduation from Atoka High, his father insisted that he attend college at Oklahoma State University instead. Mungle agreed, providing he could major in theater. “So I went to OSU, and they immediately put me to work doing costumes, makeup, props, anything I could do, because they knew I loved to do makeup, and I loved to do costumes,” he says. “As a freshman, from my first week there, I was in the theater.” It also marked the first time that he’d done makeup on people other than himself, which he admits took a little getting used to. But it served him well when, in the middle of his junior year, he left OSU for Hollywood and the famed Joe Blasco Makeup Center with the blessings of his father, who’d checked the school out. “I wanted to do horror makeup, but Joe Blasco said, ‘You need to learn every aspect of makeup if you’re going to be a makeup artist,’ and that made total sense to me,” says Mungle. “When you do a character makeup, or an old-age makeup, or a monster makeup, highlights and shadows and beauty have a lot to do with it. It all ties in together.” Mungle was such a good student that Blasco immediately put him to work teaching at the school upon Mungle’s graduation. From there it was a short step to his first film, Roar, a wild-animals-vs.-humans picture starring Melanie Griffith and her mother, Tippi Hedren. By the time of its release in the early ‘80s, Mungle was already busy on low-budget horror pictures like The Dorm That Dripped Blood (1982) and Mausoleum (1983). From there, he branched out into more prestigious work on bigger films and television series, balancing it with the occasional independent picture and garnering awards and nominations as he became one of the top professionals in his craft. And, while he notes that the business he’s been in for more than three decades has changed, Mungle can still tap into the sense of wonder possessed by that thrilled teen who scored 15 bucks for doing what he loved. You can hear the joy in his voice, for instance, when he talks about one of his current projects, the TV series Salem, which premiered in April on WGN America. “It all happens in 1692 during the witch trials, and it’s so fun,” he enthuses. “We’re doing witches, we’re doing hags, we’re doing all kinds of great, great stuff. We’re doing a main hag who comes back every once in a while and inhabits different people’s bodies. It is just such a pleasure to work on a show like that. It’s revitalized my whole outlook. “Always, you know, I’ve wanted to do makeup,” he adds. “A lot of makeup-effects people say, ‘Oh, it’s my stepping stone to directing,’ or whatever. Not me. I just love doing makeup effects.” ©2014 San Antonio Convention & Visitors Bureau.

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

JOHN WOOLEY

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18920 San Antonio.indd 1

4/18/14 4:34 PM


©2014 SAN ANTONIO CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU


The State

SCENE

KATIE FITZGERALD, DESIREE DOHERTY, LAUREN BRANCH AND PHIL LAKIN JR. WERE AMONG THOSE AWARDED AT THE ONE AWARDS PRESENTED BY THE OKLAHOMA CENTER FOR NONPROFITS.

JUDY CLAUDETTE WILLIAMS, DIANE GAWEY-RILEY AND DEBORAH GASPAR ATTENDED THE DEBORAH GASPAR JEWELRY DESIGNER EVENT AT J. CLAUDETTE GALLERY.

PRINCE MANVENDRA SINGH GOHIL WAS PRESENTED THE 2014 GLOBAL ADVOCATE AWARD BY MICHAEL SMITH AT THE EQUALITY GALA, A BENEFIT FOR OKLAHOMANS FOR EQUALITY.

KAREN LUKE, POLLY NICHOLS, ROMEO DALLAIRE AND LINDA LAMBERT ENJOYED THE REFLECTIONS OF HOPE AWARD CEREMONY PRESENTED BY THE OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL & MUSEUM.

BLANE SNODGRASS, TAMRA SHEEHAN AND BRANDON MILLER ATTENDED THE PATRON PARTY FOR THE EQUALITY GALA.

WANDA PRATT – BETTER KNOWN AS MAMA DURANT, AND ERSIN DEMIRCI ARE PICTURED AT THE LUNCHEON FORUM SPONSORED BY THE DIALOGUE INSTITUTE OF OKLAHOMA. TIM SALVIN, JUSTIN THOMPSON, CALLIE FOWLER AND RAMIRO HERRERA WERE AMONG THE CHEFS WHO COOKED

BERNADETTE PRICHARD, MINA ACQUAYE, ALEXIS JOHNSON AND CRYSTAL BURGESS ENJOYED THE FOURTH ANNUAL WOMEN OF THE SOUTH MAGNOLIA BRUNCH AND FASHION SHOW.

WENDY THOMAS, JEANNIE MCDANIEL AND JANET PEARSON ENJOYED THE NEWSMAKERS LUNCHEON HOSTED BY THE ASSOCIATION FOR WOMEN IN COMMUNICATIONS.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

MIKI FARRIS AND MALLARY BRESHEARS PARTICIPATED IN INFANT CRISIS CENTER’S TEEN ASSOCIATE BOARD CHARITY AUCTION.

DUSTIN THAMES, CHRISTY CRAIG, JENNY ROBY AND JOSHUA ROBY ATTENDED THE WHITE PARTY, WHICH BENEFITED FAMILY AND CHILDREN’S SERVICES.

BILL AND ROZANN KNIGHT AND ANGIE AND BILL BLANKENSHIP ARE PICTURED AT MONARCH BALL, THE SECOND ANNUAL EVENT TO RAISE FUNDS FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE INTERVENTION SERVICES.

BRAD NAIFEH, VALERIE NAIFEH AND AMELIA AND LEE WOODWARD ATTENDED THE 15TH ANNUAL MEMORY GALA IN OKLAHOMA CITY, HOSTED BY THE ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION.


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The State

SP OTLIGHT

Philbrook Wine Experience HUNDREDS FLOODED THE GROUNDS AT PHILBROOK MUSEUM OF ART TO APPRECIATE THE ART OF GOOD WINE AT THE BIENNIAL EVENT. ON FRIDAY NIGHT, PATRONS ENJOYED THE GRAND WINE TASTING, WHICH INCLUDED SAMPLES FROM MORE THAN 30 VINTNERS ALONG WITH FOOD FROM SOME OF THE AREA’S BEST CHEFS. SATURDAY SAW THE VINTNER DINNER & AUCTION, WHICH WAS A CHANCE FOR WINE ENTHUSIASTS TO DINE WITH VINTNERS AND LEARN ABOUT WINEMAKING. ALL MONEY RAISED AT THE EVENT BENEFITS PHILBROOK’S EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS.

Grand Wine Tasting WILL THOMAS, MEGAN FURMAN AND SUSAN AND BILL THOMAS

ALLISON AND MARK LAUINGER

PAT CHERNICKY AND DICK ALABACK

CHARLES AND PEGGY STEPHENSON

TAMRA SHEEHAN AND ISAAC ROCHA

LARRY AND MARILYN LEE

GENTNER AND WENDY DRUMMOND

JIM RODGERS, CAROLE PARRISH AND BETH AND DAVID WHITE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

LINDSEY AND CHAD SMITH

FRANK AND MARY SHAW

GREG HUGHES AND MICHELLE ANDERSEN

CHUCK AND LEIGH ANN FULLER AND KEITH AND CATHY BURDICK


Vintner Dinner & Auction

MARILYN AND LARRY LEE

SARA GORR, JONATHAN HONIG AND TRACY HONIG

BILL AND SUSAN THOMAS AND RAND SUFFOLK

LUC TOMASINO, EMILY CARY AND DAN AND VIDA SCHUMAN HOWARD AND BILLIE BARNETT

NANCY AND PETER MEINIG

LINDA RICHARDS MALONE, GREG HOLT, MATT WALLACE AND BUCH MEIER

TODD PYLAND AND TAMRA SHEEHAN

TALMADGE POWELL, BEN STEWART AND CHRIS MURPHY

MARLA AND STEVE BRADSHAW

KAYLA ACEBO AND JOHN HALE

BILL LOBECK AND KATHY TAYLOR

MARLENE MARTINDALE, MIKE BOYD AND CONNIE SEAY

JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

SP OTLIGHT

Go Red For Women

Hundreds of men and women gathered to learn about women’s heart health and to help combat heart disease at Go Red For Women, an annual fundraiser for the American Heart Association. Guests were treated to lunch, along with presentations and live and silent auctions.

CORDELL DEMENT AND ERMA MATTHEWS RACHEL BLUE, LAUREN LABASS, COURTNIE TIDWELL AND MARY K. JONES

JEANETTE NICHOLS AND RICHARD BOONE

TONYA BERESH, TERRI WALL AND ANN’A ZIMMER

SHARON KING DAVIS AND MARY SHAW LIZA ANDERSON AND JILL WENGER

CRYSTAL KELLER, WHITNEY STAUFFER AND BRET PFEIFER

SUZANNE WHEELER AND JULIE SELLERS

LYNN FLINN AND ROCKY GOINS

VICKI ADAMS AND AMANDA BLAIR

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

CHEENA PAZZO AND KATHLEEN MANNING

CASSIE REESE AND LEAH HARPER

CHER LAWRENCE AND LINDA CONLEY


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The State L I V I N G S PA C E

Reflections

Of Detail Simplicity creates an inviting and calm environment in this newly designed home.

W

Photography by Scott Miller

hen you design an interior, it doesn’t have to be decorated,” says Kent Oellien, president of Oellien Design Inc. An example of his philosophy is evident in the sophisticated simplicity and exquisite detailing of this midtown Tulsa home. Inspired by a house the owners saw in the Highland Park area of Dallas, architect and builder Mike Dankbar and Oellien worked in tandem to create a home that met their clients’ goals. Along with architect Robert Freeman, the creative team’s attention to detail is threaded together in the architecture and interior. Cast stone from Tulsa Casting leads to the striking front entrance, and because the home’s design provides a view from the front through to the back yard and pool, a custom pair of stainless steel gate doors with fluted glass provides privacy from the street as well as additional security. Once inside, the cast stone transitions to 24-by-24inch French limestone. Flanking the front door is a pair of Lucite pedestals with French limestone tops custom designed and fabricated through Oellien Design. Mary Murray Flowers created the floral art. The ceilings soar to 14 feet, so to anchor the space and provide a division between the living and dining rooms, Oellien custom designed a Pagani Studio lighting fixture covered in quartz and mica. To create a soothing symmetry between the open spaces, Oellien used matching custom wool and leather bound area rugs. Hanging at the same height in each room are matching contemporary glass chandeliers manufactured by Ochre. In the living room, four lounge chairs are set around an Oellien-designed stainless steel

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014


THE FURNITURE IN THE DEN ADJACENT TO THE KITCHEN WAS CUSTOM DESIGNED BY DESIGNER KENT OELLIEN. LEFT: THE ENTRY TO THE HOME IS MADE DRAMATIC WITH CAST STONE WALK-UP AND STAINLESS STEEL GATE DOORS INSET WITH FLUTED GLASS.

JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State and glass table. The imposing beveled glass and stainless mirror was fabricated by Chelsea Gallery. The dining room features a table produced by Wiggers Custom Furniture and custom designed chairs using Spinneybeck leather. Oellien designed the drapery rod and draperies mindful of the room’s scale and proportions. A collection of antique silver glass is displayed in the custom niche. “I like the simple repetition of shape and color,” says Oellien. The cherry wood kitchen cabinets were designed by Shelley Goodrich Cummins with Jay Rambo Company. To create a visual statement, Oellien continued the same cherry wood above the cabinets, wrapping it with an over-scaled cherry crown molding. Large hinged storage areas flanking the cooktop contain all the small appliances that can clutter a kitchen counter. By concealing the refrigerator and dishwasher and using a stainless steel toe-kick, Oellien created the feel of a large furniture piece instead of kitchen cabinetry. “We wanted the larger counter surface to appear lighter and

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

reflect more light throughout the kitchen,” says Oellien. The counter’s French limestone slab matches the floor tiles, and 12-by-24-inch metallic tiles from Artistic Tile placed behind the cooktop help reflect more light. All of the furnishings in the adjacent den/media room were custom designed and fabricated through Oellien Design. As an example of the meticulous detail taken throughout the house, the island barstools were custom designed to the height difference between the owners by varying the depth of each stool.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: THE MASTER BEDROOM IS MINIMAL WITH GLAMOROUS TOUCHES, LIKE THE ACRYLIC LEGS ON THE BED. SPINNEYBECK LEATHER CHAIRS AND AN ANTIQUE SILVER COLLECTION ARE UNIQUE-YET-SOPHISTICATED TOUCHES TO THE DINING AREA. CUSTOM CHERRY WOOD CABINETS THAT STRETCH TO THE CEILING ADD DRAMATIC FLAIR TO THE KITCHEN. THE BACK YARD INCLUDES A MULTI-LEVEL POOL. THE MASTER BATHROOM IS SPACIOUS WITH MATCHING CUSTOM VANITIES.

The soft quiet of the master bedroom is accented by a bed with polished acrylic legs. The bedside chests repeat the detail in the curtain sheers. “We used an automotive metallic paint that allows the grain to be seen with a sparkle of light,” Oellien adds. The custom drapery rods also mirror the pattern in the sheer fabric. This newer house in an older area is light and fresh, creating the calm, peaceful environment the owners desired. TAMARA LOGSDON HAWKINSON


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Fun in the Sun

The State

STYLE

Heading to the pool? Don’t forget to bring your style.

KATE LANDRY WOVEN FEDORA, $28, DILLARD’S PROMENADE MALL.

CREMIEUX BLACK BIKINI TOP, $56, AND TIE BOTTOM, $52, DILLARD’S PROMENADE MALL. JIMMY CHOO BLACK PATENT WEDGES, $425, AND DIANE VON FURSTENBURG TORTOISE TOTE, $265, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. KATE LANDRY BLACK-AND-NATURAL STRAW HAT, $24, DILLARD’S PROMENADE MALL. CELINE BLACK SUNGLASSES, $340, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

DIANE VON FURSTENBURG CORAL WOVEN DRESS, $600, BALLIETS.

TORY BURCH TWO-TONE SUNGLASSES,

VALENTINO BLUE SANDALS, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TRINA TURK MULTI-PATTERNED BIKINI TOP, $84, AND BOTTOMS, $68, DILLARD’S PROMENADE MALL. KATE SPADE GOLD CRAB SANDALS, $198, BALLIETS. ALEXIS BITTAR BLUE LAPIS NECKLACE, $295, MISS JACKSON’S. ALEXIS BITTAR LAPIS CUFF, $345, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. TORY BURCH GREEN TOTE, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

ELAINE TURNER MULTICOLORED CLUTCH, $230, BALLIETS.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATALIE GREEN. SPECIAL THANKS TO BRINK MODEL MANAGEMENT.

$195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


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The State

HALSTON HERITAGE ORANGE SHOULDER BAG, $245, BALLIETS.

VINCE BLUE MAXI DRESS, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

DAVID YURMAN MULTICOLORED SUNGLASSES, $329, VISIONS.

ZINKE GEOMETRIC BIKINI TOP, $88, AND BOTTOMS, $58, ROPE. VALENTINO CHARTREUSE CORK WEDGE SANDALS, $645,

TORY BURCH STUDDED FLIP-FLOPS,

BALLIETS. KATE SPADE

$95, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

CHARTREUSE-ANDBASKET-WEAVE TOTE, $348, MISS JACKSON’S. NEST DOUBLE-DROP EARRINGS, $95, AND ROSE GOLD HAM-

MICHAEL KORS AQUA ONE-

MERED CUFF, $250,

PIECE RUCHED SWIMSUIT,

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

$152, DILLARD’S PROMENADE

PRADA PURPLE

MALL. JIMMY CHOO SILVER

SUNGLASSES, $240,

SANDALS, $525, SAKS FIFTH

HICKS BRUNSON

AVENUE. CLAUDIA LABAO WHITE

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$135, MISS JACKSON’S. NEST

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GOLD MEDALLION CUFF, $295;

PROMENADE

ERIC JAVITS BLUE, PINK AND

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CREAM WOVEN TOTE, $425; DIOR WHITE-AND-GOLD SUNGLASSES, $310, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. COLLECTION 18 FEDORA, $24, DILLARD’S PROMENADE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

IMAGE COURTESY SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ETRO.

MALL.


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The State

REBECCA MINKOFF YELLOW LACE ESPADRILLES, $175, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SPLENDID PATTERNED MAXI DRESS, $148, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MICHAEL KORS ORANGE SANDALS, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

CELINE TWO-TONE SUNGLASSES, $340, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ANTONIO MELANI ORANGE RUFFLED BIKINI KENNETH COLE

TOM, $63, DILLARD’S PROMENADE

REACTION BLACK

MALL. JIMMY CHOO GOLD-AND-CRYS-

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TAL SANDALS, $595, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SWIMSUIT, $98, DILLARD’S

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TOTE, $90, BALLIETS. NEST AGATE NECKLACE, $395; ALEXIS BITTAR GREEN LUCITE BRACELETS, $295 AND $175; TORY BURCH BLUE AND GREEN SUNGLASSES, $195, SAKS FIFTH STRAW HAT, $35, BALLIETS.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

MISSONI.

AVENUE. MICHAEL STARS

IMAGE COURTESY SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TOP, $63, AND SKIRT BOT-

CHOO BLACK PATENT WEDGES, $425; NEST SHARK’S TOOTH NECKLACE, $350, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. GOLD MESH EARRINGS, $175, AND GOLD NUGGET CUFF, $380, BALLIETS. TOM FORD WHITE-AND-BLACK SUNGLASSES, $395, HICKS BRUNSON EYEWEAR. KATE LANDRY BLACK-ANDNATURAL STRAW HAT, $24, DILLARD’S PROMENADE MALL.


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The State

SHAKE YOUR BONBON

Following up the wildly popular launch of Flowerbomb nearly a decade ago, Viktor & Rolf recently debuted a new scent that is certain to be equally captivating. Bonbon, now available at Saks Fifth Avenue, is unique, flirty, uplifting and well-suited for warmer months. Notes include mandarin orange, caramel, peach and jasmine. Gaïc and cedar woods, combined with sandalwood, smooth out the uplifting top notes. The raspberry-toned glass bottle is shaped into a bow; craftsman Pochet du Courval achieved the challenging design with a patented process and added pink tones into the contour of the bow, making for a fragrance just as beautiful on the vanity as it is on the skin.

BEAUT Y

No-makeup Makeup

T

here is no better person to trust with formulating makeup than a dermatologist, and well-known skin care expert Dr. Nicholas Perricone is a pioneer in developing products that keep skin looking youthful and radiant. He recently launched a new makeup line, No Makeup Skincare. As Perricone points out, “One of the first visible signs of aging begins with the loss of pigment in one’s skin.” With the loss of radiance, skin may look dull due to decreased blood flow, which can be exacerbated by lifestyle choices and sun exposure. To boost a healthy radiance, No Makeup Skincare can help add dimension and restore skin health. The overall look of the collection is natural

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

and luminous. Mostly liquid formulations, the products can be layered to emphasize bone structure and contours. One product, No Foundation Foundation, adds anti-aging ingredients with light-to-medium coverage while feeling weightless on the skin. No Concealer Concealer targets blemishes and dark circles while offering SPF 35 coverage. A true standout, No Mascara Mascara distributes inky pigment on lashes without clumping or flaking as the small applicator builds definition and length. As a bonus, the formula contains anti-aging lash treatment to strengthen each strand. Uniquely liquid, No Bronzer Bronzer also contains sunscreen while illuminating skin with a flawless sun-kissed glow. LINDSAY ROGERS

Win With Bronze Now that we are officially in the summer season, it’s time to fake that glow with bronzer. Skip the damaging rays and get sunkissed with powders and creams. This season’s formulas are better than ever, featuring lasting power and a natural look. The rule of thumb is to use creams on top of creams and powders on top of powders. If you prefer a liquid-tinted moisturizer of foundation, try a cream formula like the NARS Matte Multiple in Vientiane for deeper skin tones or Altai for a softer and rosier glow. If you prefer powder foundation, reach for Chanel Les Beiges Healthy Glow Sheer Colour SPF 15 available in seven versatile shades.


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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014


and refreshing, many people find the planning and preparation for a trip stressful. Then, upon return, they feel thrown into a frenzy of playing catch-up, both personally and professionally, to make up for the days they were gone. In addition, individuals may feel guilty for being out of the office or worry about job security. To help avoid this scenario, Hopkins recommends, if possible, for people to take a day off before or after their vacation to pack or unpack, sort mail and complete errands. “Try to eliminate distractions while on vacation and be present with your loved ones during the trip,” she says. Warwick agrees and adds it’s important to stay optimistic. “Start preparing early to avoid last-minute stressors. Cover your bases so that while you are gone, you can feel like things are taken care of,” she says. “Incorporating a new mindset is imperative. For example, remind yourself that vacations are a benefit you have worked hard for. Let go of thinking no one else can do the job but you. Trust that your coworkers know how to manage on their own, and remind yourself that the job will still be there when you return. Vacations are actually good for job security, as the employee usually comes back rested and rejuvenated.” If jetting away for a week or two to an exotic locale doesn’t fit your budget or schedule, you can still reap the same health benefits through a staycation. “Discover places within town that you can visit. Go to a park, a museum, the lake or antique shopping,” says Warwick. “The key is to stay in the present moment, really enjoying the outings as if you were in another state or country.” Warwick offers a reminder to put away technology for the day – let emails and phones calls go unanswered. “Let work know you are on vacation and not available,” Warwick says. “Let go of the to-do list to avoid working on home projects your whole vacation.” Hopkins also encourages individuals to take time for themselves, whether they are traveling or not. “Sometimes just staying at home and pursuing personal interests, such as reading or gardening, allows you to take a break from the grind of everyday life and work,” says Hopkins. “If children are involved, plan a weekend for them with grandparents or other family you trust while you stay at home and relax. Try to enjoy simple pleasures such as a picnic, a walk around your neighborhood or even visit local attractions in your city.” REBECCA FAST

Meet the Masters of Modern Experience a spectacular exhibition of the European masters of Modern art, selected from the private collection of the founder of CBS television. Crystal Bridges will be the last venue to offer this special temporary exhibition before it returns to The Museum of Modern Art in New York. $8, FREE on Wednesdays from 5 to 9 pm Admission is sponsored for youth ages 18 and under. Reserve tickets online or at guest services (479.418.5700). Organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. At Crystal Bridges, the exhibition is sponsored by The William S. Paley Foundation, ConAgra Foods, Greenwood Gearhart Inc., and Stephens Inc.

CrystalBridges.org BENTONVILLE, AR

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9:46 AM


The State

MISSION SANTA BARBARA. PHOTO BY JAY SINCLAIR.

D E S T I N AT I O N

Mediterranean on the Pacific

S

Santa Barbara is, indeed, the American Riviera and much more.

ome say Santa Barbara is a state of mind. It’s also a county, a city and a fabulous stretch of California coastline so closely matching terrain and temperature of south-

ern Europe’s Mediterranean coast that it has been dubbed the American Riviera. Thanks to the Santa Ynez Mountains to the north and the Pacific Ocean to the south, this region of central California enjoys

stunning scenery. White sand beaches, chic shopping districts, the harbor and Spanish Colonial architecture are perfect for post cards, but there’s more to Santa Barbara worth exploring. Downtown Santa Barbara Downtown Santa Barbara is filled with cute shopping boutiques that beckon to be checked out, but it’s also the city’s historic hub filled with museums (Santa Barbara Historical Museum, Santa Barbara Museum of Art) and old architecture (The Granada Theatre, Casa de la Guerra). Plus, State Street zips right through the middle, dividing the city into east and west and taking you straight to the famous Sterns Wharf. It’s also been said that the nightlife is more than a little upbeat. Mission Canyon So, you’re done with barefoot walks on the beach, for now. Head inland to explore the valleys, where locals make their homes and enjoy the privacy in short supply closer to the water. The Mission Canyon area offers the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, the glorious Santa Barbara Botanical Gardens and a great entry to Mission Santa Barbara, the Spanish mission founded in the late 1700s by Franciscan monks and a huge tourist draw for the area. Carpinteria In Oklahoma, carp is a big, Kevlar-scaled fish most people toss back when caught on the line. In Santa Barbara, it’s the laid-back bedroom community best known for its surf culture and a picturesque downtown of boutique shops and restaurants. Carp, short for Carpinteria, has a long history going back to early settlement by ancestors of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash and other American Indian tribes native to the area drawn to the coast or, perhaps, the perfect wave. If tube riding is on your agenda, Carp is a must.

AT A G L A N C E

SANTA BARBARA IS CALLED THE AMERICAN RIVIERA FOR GOOD REASON. PHOTO BY JAY SINCLAIR.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

Access: Located on California’s central coast between San Francisco and Los Angeles, Santa Barbara is accessed by land through U.S. 101 highway and Amtrak. Shuttle bus service Santa Barbara Airbus operates between Santa Barbara and LAX, but guests can directly connect by select commercial flights to the Santa Barbara Municipal Airport. Climate: Average temperature (degrees in Fahrenheit) is lower to mid-70s between June and October. Main attractions: Beaches, Channel Islands, the Reagan Ranch, University of California, Santa Barbara


There are simply some things that cannot be missed while visiting Santa Barbara. Sterns Wharf and Santa Barbara Harbor: The famous pier in Santa Barbara Harbor is a landmark attesting to the region’s economic history. These days, instead of heavy cargo ships coming to port, the wharf is a dock for fishing and sailing boats along with vessels carrying visitors out to sea for whale watching and panoramic shots of the coast from afar. Beaches: You can’t go to Santa Barbara and not check out the numerous amazing beaches

and parks. There are beaches for lounging, (Butterfly Beach in Montecito), beaches for nature lovers (Arroyo Burro Beach, aka, Hendry’s Beach), beaches for surfing and sport (West Beach) and beaches for families (East Beach). Mission Santa Barbara: If you want to look at the foundation of today’s Santa Barbara, you’ll find it at this late 18th century marvel. The Franciscan mission transformed the lands and its original inhabitants with agriculture and Christianity, which altered the course of the region. Today, the mission continues to operate as a church, and its architecture is still exquisite.

LOCALS AND VISITORS ALIKE EXPLORE ARROYO BURRO BEACH. PHOTO BY JAY SINCLAIR.

S TAY I N S T Y L E

T R AV E L E R ’ S N O T E S

CLASSIC S A N TA B A R B A R A

Montecito Inn: Convenient without giving up luxury, the Montecito Inn is located close to much of what Santa Barbara has to offer. A favorite local backdrop for weddings, the inn has single rooms but also features an apartment and spacious suites that look more like decadent private residences. If the entrance, pool and public spaces look more like something out of old Hollywood and Sunset Boulevard, you’re right – the inn was built by Charlie Chaplin in 1928. www.montecitoinn.com San Ysidro Ranch: A “romantic hideaway” in the truest since, San Ysidro Ranch has made industry magazine lists for top hotels in the world several times for its gorgeous views, grounds and uniquely lavish-yet-rustic interiors that are the very essence of Santa Barbara. Vivian Leigh and Laurence Olivier married there, and John and Jackie Kennedy stayed as honeymooners. www. sanysidroranch.com El Capitan Canyon: In a resort town like Santa Barbara, even camping is elegant. El Capitan Canyon resort believes in minimalism and getting back to nature but without the deprivation. One night’s stay in the resort’s pretty, petite cabin or in one of the yurtinspired canvas tents will set you to rights. If that doesn’t, you can watch the resort llamas munch grass on the hillside while you get your spa massage. www.elcapitancanyon.com

DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA’S PASEO NUEVO. PHOTO BY JAY SINCLAIR.

Goleta The city of Goleta stands out in the region for several reasons. It is home to the University of California, Santa Barbara; the Goleta Butterfly Grove; Santa Barbara Municipal Airport and the county’s only bowling alley. Attractive to more than just students, league teams and migrating monarchs, Goleta is also home to the California Lemon Festival in October as well as a harbor of familiar box stores, homes and other signs of recognizable middle class life. Santa Ynez Valley On vacation, all you really want is to relax. If that involves a leisurely venture to wineries and vineyards, then the Santa Ynez Valley is on your schedule. Wine lovers who enjoyed the film Sideways about Paul Giamatti and pal on a California wine trail tour may recognize this Santa Barbara region as the backdrop of the 2004 flick – which significantly boosted the local wine industry’s pomp and visibility. There are wineries and vineyards aplenty to visit, but you’ll also find tasting rooms in downtown Santa Barbara and in the nearby Lompoc Wine Ghetto to the west. The town of Santa Ynez also displays its fondness for the Old West on the streets and in the Santa Ynez Valley Historical Museum & Carriage house. KAREN SHADE

VISIT ONLINE www.santabarbaraca.com

SMALL CABIN COMFORTS MAKE BIG STATEMENTS AT EL CAPITAN CANYON. PHOTO COURTESY EL CAPITAN CANYON.

JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

47


Dr. Daniel Morris Dr. Jayen Patel

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• Implantable Migraine Therapy/Botox Injections • Provocative Discography • Sympathetic Blocks • Ultrasound Guided Peripheral Nerve Blocks • Medication Management • Trigger Point Injections

Oklahoma Pain And Wellness Center Dr. Jayen Patel • Dr. Daniel Morris • Mark Hall, PA-C 2811 E. 15th St. • Tulsa 918.935.3200 • www.tulsabackcare.com


Aesthetic Surgery Institute of America

Dr. Nicole Patel offers both surgical and nonsurgical procedures to help you to look and feel your best. Dr. Nicole also supports antiaging medicine, incorporating bio-identical hormones and nutritional supplements to your regimen for overall health, beauty & wellness. Come visit our exquisite office in midtown Tulsa, located on 15th Street, between Harvard and Lewis.

Your Beauty, in the Hands of a Woman

All surgeries are performed at Tulsa Ambulatory Procedure Center (TAP), an AAAHC accredited ambulatory procedure center, located adjacent to the clinic. You will have a board certified anesthesiologist take care of you, along with Dr. Nicole, who is board certified by both the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Cosmetic Surgery. There is no better place for all your cosmetic surgery needs.

From Moroccan chandeliers to Italian glass bead wall coverings, the exquisite setting is the perfect backdrop for your private medical retreat.

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Aesthetic Surgery Institute of America Find us on Facebook @ Aesthetic Surgery Institute of America


1Things 00 To Do

By Jami Mattox

THIS SUMMER IN OKLAHOMA

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014


1.

Gaze at the fireworks over ONEOK Field and downtown after the Tulsa Drillers’ Friday night games.

10.

Enjoy a Big Country at one of the state’s many Hideaway Pizza locations.

2.

Cheer for contestants in the dance competition at the annual Red Earth Festival June 5-7 in Oklahoma City.

11.

Take advantage of Oklahoma’s topography with a romantic weekend at Beaver’s Bend and Hochatown State Park in southeast Oklahoma’s picturesque Ouachita Mountains.

3.

Gnosh on goodies from the food trucks on Wednesdays at Guthrie Green in the Brady Arts District.

4.

Camp at Osage Hills State Park. Enjoy the hilly walking trails, water falls and wildlife.

5.

Oklahoma is home to a wealth of wineries. Spend a day visiting several in central Oklahoma, including Tres Suenos Vineyard and Winery in Luther, StableRidge Vineyards and Winery and Territory Cellars, both in Stroud.

6.

Celebrate Oklahoma’s native son at Woody Guthrie Folk Festival July 9-13 in Okemah.

7.

Hike the Black Mesa to enjoy the view from Oklahoma’s highest elevation point.

8.

Take a photo in front of Chaps My Ass, a motorcycle specialty store, in Medicine Park. While you’re in the town, take advantage of its quaint, locally owned shops, restaurants and lodging.

9.

Float along the Illinois River in a raft, inner tube or canoe.

12.

#99: AMERICAN BANJO MUSEUM IN DOWNTOWN OKLAHOMA CITY. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Stay late on Saturdays at the Oklahoma City Zoo and take advantage of cooler temperatures while enjoying the zoo’s exhibits.

13.

Visit America’s only skeleton museum, the Museum of Osteology, in Oklahoma City.

14.

Cheer on athletes with physical disabilities at the annual UCO Endeavor Games June 5-8.

15.

Reserve a space to tour Once Upon a Time: Stories in Art About People, Animals and the Land at Gilcrease Museum.

16.

Ring in the start to summer with a summer solstice walk at Spiro Mounds. Hear about the history of these ancient mounds that were used to track the sun’s movements throughout the year.

17.

Drink a pop at Pops, which offers more than 600 flavors in its Soda Ranch in Arcadia. #19: TOTEM POLE IN CHELSEA.

Whether it’s indoors or outside, a tour or a seedspitting contest, there’s lots to do this summer in the Sooner state. JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

51


#23: OKIE-TEX STAR PARTY. PHOTO BY DAN LESSMANN.

18.

Regroup at Quartz Mountain Resort, a serene lodge and state park nestled in the Wichita Mountains in southwestern Oklahoma.

19.

Take a selfie with a totem pole in Chelsea.

20.

Cheer on the turbocharged lawn mowers during El Reno’s Grascar season.

21.

Tour the State Capitol with a guide, and let your legislator know how he or she is doing.

22.

Dig for crystals in the Great Salt Plains, located near Jet.

23.

Star gaze in the panhandle at the 31st annual Okie-Tex Star Party, Sept. 20-28, hosted by the Oklahoma City Astronomy Club.

24. 25.

Learn about a Wild West performer and cowboy movie star at the Tom Mix Museum in Dewey. Take a moment to reflect on the effects of terror and the resiliency of Oklahomans at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum.

26.

27.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

Watch Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park at the Myriad Botanical Gardens Water Stage beginning June 5.

28.

Catch a foul ball at an Oklahoma City RedHawks game.

29.

Learn how the rest of the world plays football at a professional soccer game. Professional teams play in both Tulsa and Oklahoma City during the summer.

30.

Cheer on the Tulsa Tough cyclists as they ascend Crybaby Hill. Stick around for the peoplewatching.

Spit seeds at Rush Springs’ annual watermelon festival Aug. 9.

31.

Root for the Tulsa Shock on to a winning season at one of many home games at the BOK Center.

32.

See the world from a different angle on the Diamondback, one of Frontier City’s many thrill rides.

33.

Find all 30 painted guitars located around Muskogee. A map picked up

from the tourist information center in the city will help with the scavenger hunt.

34.

Learn the history of the U.S.S. Batfish, the “submarine-killing submarine of World War II.” The submarine, now retired, is located outside of Muskogee.

35.

See where the buffalo roam at the wildlife preserve at Woolaroc outside of Bartlesville.

36.

View one of the world’s tallest oil rigs, the parker Drilling Rig, in downtown Elk City.

37.

Learn about Oklahoma’s vital role in aviation and space exploration at the Stafford Air & Space Museum in Weatherford.

38.

Disregard the name and relax with a fishing pole at Experiment Lake in Woodward. The lake is located on the western edge of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Southern Plains Research Station.


the grass is always greener...in “Green Country” With 19 of Oklahoma’s 35 great state parks nestled in this northeastern corner of the state, Green Country is a verdant playground for outdoor enthusiasts of all ages. Miles and miles of shoreline sustain year-round water recreation, everything from scuba diving at Tenkiller to angling for trophy bass at Okmulgee. Rolling hills, rocky bluffs, and winding trails roll out all-terrain adventures, including single-trail mountain biking at Osage Hills and off-roading at Keystone. Visit TravelOK.com to discover Oklahoma’s state parks, full of hidden treasures and endless adventures.

Tenkiller #34 of 35

Keystone #16 of 35

Osage Hills #26 of 35

Okmulgee #25 of 35


#7: THE BLACK MESA.

39.

Watch original films and world premieres at Oklahoma City’s deadCENTER Film Festival June 11-15.

40.

Marvel at the largest natural gypsum cave in the world at Alabaster Caverns State Park.

41.

Be blown away by more than 50 vintage windmills at the Shattuck Windmill Museum in northwestern Oklahoma.

42.

View a sod home – the only known one in Oklahoma still existing – to see how the state’s early settlers lived at the Sod House Museum in Aline.

43.

Admire the cabin Sequoyah built in 1829 and now designated as a National Historic Landmark.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

44.

Tour Marshall Brewing Co. to see the process of beer-making. The tours, held on the first and third Saturdays of each month, are free, as are the samples.

45.

Experience the historic Mattie Beal Home, a house built more than 100 years ago in the Neoclassical Greek Revival style with dashes of Baroque and Mediterranean styles. The home, located in Lawton, belonged to Beal, the second person selected from a lottery to own a 160-acre parcel of land in the Lawton district.

46.

Learn about the history of artillery dating back to 1775 at the U.S. Army Artillery Museum at Fort Sill.

47.

View this year’s Prix de West Invitational Art Exhibition June 15-Aug. 3 at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum.

48.

Decide dinner from more than three dozen food trucks at one of Oklahoma City’s H&8th events.

49.

Imagine Vikings exploring Oklahoma’s beauty and leaving their mark by way of rock carvings in Heavener Runestone State Park.

50.

Take a bite out of the Porter Peach Festival July 17-19.

51.

Tour Oklahoma’s only antebellum home, built by George Murrell in Park Hill, Indian Territory. Learn the history of Murrell and his wife, Minerva, a member of a prominent Cherokee family, who came to Oklahoma from Virginia during the Trail of Tears.

52.

Rev your engine at Darryl Starbird’s National Rod & Custom Car Hall of Fame Museum, featuring more than 50 custom-built exotic vehicles, in Bernice.

53.

Cruise Grand Lake aboard The Cherokee Queen.


54.

55.

Discover dinosaur tracks preserved in sandstone in Kenton. The tracks are located on private property, but daytime viewing is allowed.

56.

Learn the history of the American Indian at Ataloa Museum, located on the campus of Bacone College in Musokogee.

57.

Gaze at the so-called Methuselah Light Bulb, which has reportedly burned for 80 years, at a firehouse in Mangum.

58.

See how chocolate is made at the Bedre Fine Chocolate factory in Davis.

59.

Tour Guthrie’s majestic Scottish Rite Temple and Museum. Built in 1919 in the Classical Revival style, the temple was named to the National Register of Historic Places in 1987.

60.

61.

Barn in Edmond.

Plan a “medieval” family vacation to Wentz Camp & Pool in Ponca City, where bunkhouses, mess halls and swimming are the attractions.

Visit the Museum of the Red River in Idabel, a hidden gem that houses a wide range of art and artifacts, including the Acrocanthosaurus atokensis, the official State Dinosaur of Oklahoma. Collections include representations from North America, Central America, Asia and Africa. Make the drive to Okarche to visit Eischen’s, the state’s oldest bar, and

sample the famous fried chicken.

62.

Partake of authentic Italian cuisine at Pete’s Place in Krebs.

63.

Take part in the festivities of the 133rd annual Otoe-Missouria Summer Encampment in Red Rock July 17-20.

64.

Open you mind to interpretation at Opening Abstraction, an exhibition at Philbrook Downtown, before it closes June 19. Opening Abstraction features works drawn primarily from Philbrook’s permanent collection created from the end of World War II to the present. Speaking of openings, the exhibition Monet and the Seine begins June 29 at Philbrook Museum of Art and features some of his best known works.

65.

66.

Rent a boat for a day of fishing and watersports on Lake Skiatook.

67.

Soak up a diverse array of music and culture at Bartlesville’s annual OK Mozart festival.

68.

Tour the historic Price Tower, the only skyscraper in existence to be designed by renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright, in Bartlesville.

69.

Splish-splash in the waters at Pelican Bay Aquatic Center in Edmond.

70.

Get your anime on at the 10th annual Tokyo in Tulsa, a celebration of Japanese culture and animation, July 11-13.

71.

Visit some of Oklahoma’s most renowned barbecue spots, and decide for yourself who produces the best ‘cue.

72.

Have an impromptu picnic on the 29th Street Pedestrian Bridge in Tulsa.

73.

Learn about inhabitants of Oklahoma – from prehistoric to present-day – at the Sam Noble Museum of Natural History in Norman.

74. Celebrate the

Take the catfish challenge at Dino & Maria’s Steak and Catfish

works of the University of Oklahoma professors emeriti George Bogart and James Henkle at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, located on the OU campus.

75. See where your ice cream comes from on a tour of Braum’s Processing Plant and Bakery in Tuttle.

#37: STAFFORD AIR & SPACE MUSEUM IN WEATHERFORD. PHOTO COURTESY STAFFORD AIR & SPACE MUSEUM.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

76.

Trace the history of aviation in Tulsa at the Tulsa Air & Space Museum.

77.

Catch a concert at the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame in Muskogee. Some of the state’s most talented musicians regularly play there.

78.

Bird-watch in Redbud Valley, part of Tulsa’s Oxley Nature Center.

79.

Attend Pauls Valley’s annual Okie Noodling tournament, an event that is uniquely Oklahoma, June 21.


88.

Saddle up for Cavalcade, the world’s largest amateur rodeo, July 14-20 in Pawhuska.

89.

View a monument to the world’s largest peanut in Durant.

90. Attend one or both nights of the second annual Center of the Universe Festival, featuring both local and national music acts.

80. Tackle the easy hiking trails with the whole #45: THE HISTORIC MATTIE family at Oklahoma City’s BEAL HOME IN LAWTON. Martin Park Nature Center.

PHOTO COURTESY LAWTON HERITAGE

81.

Find respite in the urban wild at Tulsa’s Turkey Mountain. Hiking, trail running and cycling are popular activities at this nature park.

82.

View the Captain’s Castle from Castle Street in Cameron. The castle, purportedly built in 1890 by Confederate Capt. J.E. Reynolds, is a private residence that was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. A highway marker tells its story.

83.

Pet precious baby farm animals at the Tulsa County Free Fair July 31-Aug. 1.

84.

Travel back in time at the Har-Ber Village Museum in Grove. Tour historical buildings and view antiques and reproductions of items that were essential to living in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

ASSOCIATION.

85.

Pay respects at Geronimo’s grave in Fort Sill.

86.

View American Indian art in various media at the Masters Art Show beginning June 21 at the Five Civilized Tribes Museum in Muskogee.

87.

Enjoy lots of memorabilia from BWestern films at the Gene Autry Oklahoma Museum in the tiny town named for the famed cowboy actor.

exhibition Gods and Heroes: Masterpieces from the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, June 21-Sept. 14.

94.

Soak up native culture at one of the state’s annual powwows. The Intertribal Indian Club of Tulsa’s Powwow of Champions will meet Aug. 8-10 at Tulsa’s Mabee Center.

95.

Watch the turtles bask on logs in the creek at the Tulsa Zoo and Living Museum.

96. Learn the history of Pensacola Dam, the first hydroelectric facility constructed in Oklahoma, which spans a mile across the Grand River Valley near the towns of Langley and Disney. 97. Ride horses at Roman Nose State Park. 98.

Visit the 99’s Museum of Women Pilots, a collection of historical artifacts related to the organization founded by female pilots, in Oklahoma City.

99. 91.

Learn about various aspects of the state’s historical people and places at the Oklahoma History Center.

92.

Tour Fort Gibson, a U.S. Army post that served as a base camp for military expeditions and played a role in the Civil War. Abandoned by the Army in 1890, the fort now holds a reconstruction of the early log fort as well as buildings that are original to Fort Gibson.

93.

View Beaux-Arts works of art at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art in the

Pick and grin at the American Banjo Museum in downtown Oklahoma City.

100. Enjoy Oklahoma’s wide-open skies

at one of many primal camping spots across the state.

JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

57


By Jami Mattox

CULTURE And

e r u t n e v d A There’s much to explore both indoors and outdoors in these destination cities.

58

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014


CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM. PHOTO COURTESY CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM.

21C MUSEUM HOTEL IN BENTONVILLE. PHOTO COURTESY 21C MUSEUM HOTEL.

Bentonville, Ark.

Bentonville is a growing metro area that regards culture as essential as commerce. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art celebrates art and nature in a sprawling estate nestled in the foothills of the Ozark Mountains. The permanent collection highlights American works dating back to the Colonial era, and temporary exhibits include works from some of America’s most celebrated artists as well as those lesser known. The magnificence of Crystal Bridges’ architecture is matched only by the beautiful nature surrounding the museum. Several nature trails offer visitors the opportunity to take in flora. While in Bentonville, stay in style at the 21c Museum Hotel. Combining a luxury hotel with a contemporary art space, the 21c is a boutique hotel offering a variety of suites and packages. The hotel also boasts a fine dining restaurant, The Hive, highlighting the best of Arkansas cuisine. See where it all began for Sam Walton at

the Walmart Museum. Visitors can shop at Walton’s 5&10 as well as take part in an interactive exhibit that tells the story of the evolution of Walmart from a small storefront to the international corporation it is today. Enjoy a scoop of ice cream from The Spark, an old-fashioned soda fountain. The Museum of Native American History pays homage to America’s indigenous cultures. With artifacts and relics dating back more than 14,000 years, the museum tells the story chronologically in its exhibits with an audio tour. Be sure to see the complete skeleton of a woolly mammoth. Don’t forget to pack the bikes when heading to Bentonville. The Slaughter Pen Mountain Bike Trail offers more than 20 miles of singletrack trails that range from easy to moderately intense. If biking isn’t an option, hiking is also allowed on the scenic trails.

21C MUSEUM HOTEL IN BENTONVILLE. PHOTO COURTESY 21C MUSEUM HOTEL.

JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART. PHOTO COURTESY WWW.VISITDALLAS.COM.

GEORGE W. BUSH PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. PHOTO COURTESY WWW.VISITDALLAS.COM.

Dallas, Texas

A cosmopolitan experience awaits in this modern city deep in the heart of Texas. The Dallas Museum of Art boasts collections from all parts of the world, with pieces ranging in age from the third millennium B.C. to the present. In addition to permanent and temporary exhibits, the Dallas Museum of Art also houses an art conservation studio that allows visitors to see how art is preserved. An entirely different kind of museum, the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum houses artifacts, photos and papers pertinent to Bush’s two terms in the White House. Permanent exhibits are devoted to key policies enacted and events that occurred while Bush was president. Located on the campus of Southern Methodist University, the facility also hosts temporary exhibits as well as a presidential records research center. The Sixth Floor Museum archives the assassination – as well as the life and legacy – of President John F. Kennedy. Located in the former Texas School Book Depository, the museum houses both a permanent exhibit of film, photos and artifacts of Kennedy’s life and death as well as temporary exhibits. Audio guides walk visitors through this museum dedicated to that somber day in America’s history. Be sure to watch the Texas Rangers take the field at Global Life Park. The Rangers host two home stands during June. Take a break from the museums, sports and sightseeing by stopping into Highland Park Village to shop and dine at some of Dallas’ chicest locales. Stop by Carolina Herrera, Alexander McQueen and Christian Louboutin before heading to Bistro 31 for Mediterranean-inspired fare or to Mi Cocina for Tex-Mex faves.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

BOTANICAL GARDENS OF THE OZARKS. PHOTO COURTESY WWW.EXPERIENCEFAYETTEVILLE.COM.

Fayetteville, Ark.

In a city where Razorbacks reign supreme, there is much to do outside the collegiate atmosphere, though a tour of the University of Arkansas’ scenic campus should be a part of any trip to Fayetteville. While on the campus, admire the historic architecture and beautifully landscaped green areas. Next to campus is Dickson Street, a strip of stores, restaurants, coffee shops and bars. Spend time looking for that unique trinket, and enjoy lunch, dinner or both al fresco at one of many establishments on Dickson. Learn about the diverse ecosystems of the area at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks. Twelve gardens offer different areas to learn from and to play. The gardens are also home to the region’s only butterfly house. Visit the home that once housed one of America’s most powerful political couples at the Clinton House Museum. The small home was the first owned by the couple and the site of their wedding vows. Photographs, videos and other documents show a glimpse of the man who would be president and the woman who stood by him before gaining the spotlight for herself. The museum also offers directions for a driving tour of Clinton-related sites around Fayetteville, referred to as the “Billgrimmage.” The Arkansas Air & Military Museum gives the history of aviation in the state. View aircraft, engines and military vehicles along with photos and artifacts of famous aviators with Arkansas ties.


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Joplin, Mo.

THE ALAMO, CLOCKWISE, THE RIVER WALK AND SEAWORLD SAN ANTONIO.

Contrary to popular belief, Joplin wasn’t named after ragtime composer Scott Joplin, but arts are at its heart today. The Spiva Center for the Arts is located in the center of downtown Joplin and is the place to go to see works from local, regional and national artists. The museum is famous for its annual PhotoSpiva contest, which receives submissions from all over the country. Become one with nature at the Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center. The center is home to an outdoor classroom, a 1,300-gallon aquarium showcasing aquatic species found in Ozark waters and a chert glade terraria complex that features lizards, tarantulas, snakes and other creatures. The Audobon Center, which provides fantastic views and the chance to see native species in their habitats, is also there. The George Washington Carver National Monument marks the place where the famous American inventor and scientist stoked a passion for nature and agriculture. Enjoy a walk along the Carver Trail, then walk through the museum and Discovery Area that offers interactive exhibits for both children and adults to learn about Carver’s life and education. Joplin lies in the midst of the lush Ozarks, and Grand Falls shows off the beauty of the area. The largest continuously flowing natural waterfall in the state, the water spills over a 25-foot ledge, creating breathtaking falls in a peaceful setting. Take in some of Joplin’s grandest homes in the Historic Murphysburg District. The homes – most built in Victorian and postVictorian style – can be toured at various times of the year, but the drive is worthwhile year round. GRAND FALLS. PHOTO COURTESY JOPLIN CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

PHOTOS COURTESY WWW.VISITSANANTONIO.COM.

San Antonio, Texas

A trip to this gem in south Texas unearths myriad possibilities for entertainment, from familycentered activities to more sophisticated destinations. The heart of San Antonio’s entertainment district, the River Walk is a great place for enjoying the summer days. River Walk’s 15 miles of walking paths lead to shopping, dining, lodging and historic and cultural sites. Celebrating its 50th anniversary, SeaWorld San Antonio offers visitors a chance to get up-close and personal with some of the world’s most exotic sea life. Watch sea lions perform comedy routines and beluga whales, dolphins and birds take part in a perfectly synchronized show. There’s also Aquatica, SeaWorld’s waterpark, which allows visitors to cool off in pools, on waterslides and in unique attractions. Stingray Falls gives visitors an opportunity to float through an underwater grotto while stingrays swim overhead. In addition to housing several important permanent collections, the McNay Art Museum regularly hosts important traveling exhibits. Among the permanent collections, a large collection of late 19th- and early 20th-century European and American art has contributed to McNay’s world-class status. Located on a Spanish Colonial Revival estate, the McNay has expanded many times to house its ever-growing collections, which now include nearly 20,000 works representing a wide variety of periods and media. The University of Texas at San Antonio Institute of Texan Cultures celebrates the diverse heritage and many cultures that make up the state. The annual Texas Folklife Festival, June 7-8, is a tremendous celebration of this heritage with music, dance, food and crafts. Other attractions at the Institute of Texan Cultures include temporary exhibits honoring Texas’ past and present, as well as a permanent collection of artifacts. No visit to San Antonio is complete without a tour of the Alamo. Originally established in 1718 as a Catholic mission by Franciscan priests from Spain, the small-but-mighty building played an important role in the Texas revolution. Learn the history of the Alamo through an audio tour, and don’t miss the Alamo battlefield tour.


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Topeka, Kan.

The oldest accredited art museum west of the Mississippi River, Mulvane Arts Museum – located on the campus of Washburn University – exhibits work ranging from student projects to pieces addressing social and political issues. The museum also has a permanent collection of more than 4,000 paintings, sculptures, photo prints and more, mostly from Kansas and the Midwest. Get those motors going at Heartland Park Topeka, a motor sport racetrack that regularly hosts track races and drag racing. Weekly races throughout the summer occur on both the dirt track and road course. The Kansas Museum of History is the perfect place to brush up on Sunflower State knowledge. The museum is home to such artifacts as Civil War battle flags, an 1860s-era stage coach and temperance warrior Carry Nation’s hammer. Themed exhibits highlight the colorful past of Kansas. A more specific museum of history, the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site pays homage to the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that ended legal segregation in public schools. This year marks the 60th anniversary of the decision. Chug over to the Great Overland Station, a museum and education center that celebrates Topeka’s railroad heritage. Photos, exhibits and costumed docents tell the story of the railroad as it expanded westward in a former Union Pacific Station. KANSAS MUSEUM OF HISTORY. PHOTO COURTESY VISIT TOPEKA, INC.

GREAT OVERLAND STATION. PHOTO COURTESY VISIT TOPEKA, INC.

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Vail, Colo.

To appreciate the majesty of the Rocky Mountains during the summer in Vail is to take a ride on the Eagle-Bahn Gondola or Centennial Chairlift. In addition to providing fantastic views, the lifts give visitors access to various outdoor activities. Vail offers six hiking trails designed for both beginner and intermediate hikers. The hikes allow nature lovers to take in the natural beauty of Vail in the summertime. Trails range in distance from one to four miles. Since Vail is all about the outdoors, horseback nature tours are a great way to appreciate the surroundings. Tours are available for adults and children 7 years and older. Learn the history of skiing and snowboarding at the Colorado Ski and Snowboard Museum. Exhibits look at everything from the legacy of the National Ski Patrol to the history of ski

Wichita, Kan.

bindings and an archive of snowboards. The museum is also home to the Colorado Ski & Snowboard Hall of Fame. View peak flower season through August at the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens, the world’s highest botanical garden. Several gardens feature diverse flowers and plants, while some showcase the Alpine landscape. The beautiful mountains surrounding the gardens make summer viewing all the more breathtaking. HORSEBACK NATURE TOURS PHOTO COURTESY WWW.VISITVAILVALLEY.COM.

The Exploration Place, also known as the Sedgwick County Science and Discovery Center, offers a variety of exhibits teaching about science. Children and adults can learn how creativity and functionality meet in the Bridging Art & Science exhibit as well as learn about the past, present and future of agriculture in the AgMagination section. One of the oldest living history museums in the Midwest, Old Cowtown Museum allows guests to relive the days of the Old West. A treat for both children and adults, the museum offers the opportunity to experience life in the 1870s, including a wagon ride, tours of historic homes of prominent Wichita founders and perhaps an old-fashioned shootout on the main street. Take in the interesting architecture and heritage of Wichita’s Old Town District. The place to go for art, shopping, dining and nightlife, Old Town offers a lively atmosphere in this quintessentially Midwestern city. Enjoy a little entertainment with dinner at Crown Uptown Dinner Theatre. This 1920sera theater that once hosted vaudeville acts now sees Broadway-style musicals and celebrity acts grace its stage while guests enjoy a gourmet dinner. The largest art museum in Kansas, the Wichita Art Museum houses a diverse collection of more than 8,000 objects, most of them American art. Temporary exhibits focus on historical and contemporary American works by renowned artists of different cultures. Summer exhibitions include Night: Works on Paper from the Amon Carter Museum of American Art and Gesture and Expression: Isabel Bishop and OLD COWTOWN MUSEUM. PHOTO BY DARREN DECKER. the Fourteenth Street School.


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1 OUT OF 3 DIAGNOSES IN THE U.S. IS WRONG.

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The U.S. healthcare system places an enormous burden on doctors and their patients. As a result, approximately 34% of patients in America are misdiagnosed. And 68% of treatment plans require correction.* Best Doctors is helping lower these numbers. How? By providing patients with access to the best minds in medicine for virtual second opinions, answers to personal healthcare questions and more. Our services are offered as an employee benefit by outstanding companies like The Home Depot and other leaders nationwide. Ask your Human Resources representative if your company offers Best Doctors. It would be a mistake not to.

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STEPS YOU CAN TAKE TO AVOID MISDIAGNOSIS

1 2 3 4 5

Ask questions, even “unimportant” ones. Don’t be a spectator in your own care. Ask questions about your disease, diagnosis, treatment, drugs and overall care. Prepare questions in advance for every doctor’s visit. Bring along a friend or family member to remind you what you want to ask. Don’t hold back – no question is too “silly” or “uncomfortable” when it’s your health. Tell a 10-second story. Studies show that doctors interrupt patients after about 10 seconds to assist as quickly as possible. Hold your doctor’s attention by telling a brief, compelling story up front. Don’t just focus on symptoms (“my knee hurt”), but also on situations (“My knee hurt so badly I couldn’t walk from my bed to the kitchen.”) The more your doctor knows, the stronger the foundation for your diagnosis. Always get a second opinion. Or a third. Second opinions are becoming increasingly routine in modern medicine. Be your own advocate and seek out second, third – or even fourth – opinions from medical experts. Understand what you’re facing and get the information you need to make decisions with confidence. Give your tissue samples a second look. If your diagnosis is based on a biopsy, have a second specialist re-review your tissue samples. An inaccurate pathology report can lead to an incorrect diagnosis, which leads to the wrong treatment. Tell your doctor you want to be a partner – and be one. Establish an active partnership with your doctor. That doesn’t mean self-diagnosis on the Internet. It means working together to ensure the best possible care. Share your family history using tools like My Family Health Portrait from the U.S. Surgeon General. Understand your tests and their risks. Ask your doctor to explain his or her thought process. And partner in the decision-making.

Most important of all, know your diagnosis – and don’t leave your doctor’s office until you do. If your doctor is uncertain, ask what steps are necessary for confirmation. Know what you have, what to expect and what to do about it. The greater your knowledge, the better your decisions and your health. About Best Doctors

Founded in 1989 by Harvard Medical School physicians, Best Doctors is an expert medical consultation service that works with employers and health plans to help improve healthcare quality. With 30 million members worldwide, Best Doctors provides people facing medical uncertainty with access to world-class medical expertise to ensure they have the right diagnosis and treatment.

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More than a traditional second opinion, Best Doctors delivers a comprehensive evaluation of a patient’s medical condition – providing value to both patients and treating physicians. By utilizing Best Doctors, members have access to the brightest minds in medicine to ensure the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Best Doctors’ team of researchers conducts a biennial poll using the methodology that mimics the

informal peer-to-peer process doctors themselves use to identify the right specialists for their patients. Using a polling method and balloting software, that Gallup® has audited and certified, they gather the insight and experience of tens of thousands of leading specialists all over the country, while confirming their credentials and specific areas of expertise. The result is the Best Doctors in America® List,

which includes the nation’s most respected specialists and outstanding primary care physicians in the nation. These are the doctors that other doctors recognize as the best in their fields. They cannot pay a fee and are not paid to be listed and cannot nominate or vote for themselves. It is a list which is truly unbiased and respected by the medical profession and patients alike as the source of top quality medical information.

BEST DOCTORS, THE BEST DOCTORS IN AMERICA, and the Star-in-Cross Logo are trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries, and are used under license. Best Doctors, Inc. is transforming and improving health care by bringing together the best medical minds in the world to help identify the right diagnosis and treatment. The company’s innovative, peer-to-peer consultation service offers a new way for physicians to collaborate with other physicians to ensure patients receive the best care. Headquartered in Boston, MA, the global company seamlessly integrates its services with employers’ other health-related benefits, to serve more than 30 million members in every major region of the world.

Anesthesiology

JAMES S. (JIM) DAY Tulsa Spine and Surgical Specialty Hospital Olympia Anesthesia 6901 S Olympia Ave, Tulsa, 918.388.5723

JOHN L. ALDRIDGE Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S Canton Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.0612

JONATHAN D. FRIEND St. John Medical Center Department of Anesthesia 1923 S Utica Ave, Tulsa, 918.744.2333

DAVID L. AKERS St. John Medical Center Department of Anesthesia 1923 S Utica Ave, Tulsa, 918.744.2333

SCOTT E. AMES Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S Canton Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.0612 WILLIAM P. BAILEY Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S Canton Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.0612

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THOMAS D. GILLOCK Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S Canton Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.0612 RAINER KOHRS Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S Canton Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.0612

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

Gallup® has audited and certified Best Doctors, Inc.’s database of physicians, and its companion The Best Doctors in America® List, as using the highest industry standards survey methodology and processes. These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America® 2014 database, which includes more than 45,000 U.S. doctors in over 40 medical specialties and 400 subspecialties. The Best Doctors in America® database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www. bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-6751199 or by e-mail at research@ bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors Web site. Best Doctors, Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person or other party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. Copyright 2014, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. This list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission.

DENNIS W. MORRIS Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S Canton Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.0612

KENT WOOLARD Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S Canton Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.0612

RICHARD W. SMARINSKY St. John Medical Center Department of Anesthesia 1923 S Utica Ave, Tulsa, 918.744.2333

Cardiovascular Disease

MARK WALLER St. John Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 1923 S Utica Ave, Tulsa, 918.832.6049 WILLIAM WATSON II St. John Medical Center Department of Anesthesia 1923 S Utica Ave, Tulsa, 918.744.2333

KAREN BECKMAN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Heart, Lung and Vascular Clinic OU Physicians Building, Suite 2500, 825 NE 10th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.7001 WILLIAM CLAIR BURNETT St. John Heart Institute Cardiovascular Consultants 1919 S Wheeling Ave, Suite 400, Tulsa, 918.403.7100

R. DOUGLAS ENSLEY Warren Clinic Cardiology of Tulsa 6151 S Yale Ave, Suite A100, Tulsa, 918.494.8500 RALPH LAZZARA OU Physicians Heart and Lung Center 825 NE 10th St, Suite 2500, Oklahoma City, 405.271.7001 CHARLES WILLIAM MCENTEE Warren Clinic Cardiology 6151 S Yale Ave, Suite 1304, Tulsa, 918.494.5300


Left to right: Mark Olsen, Daron Street, Charles Strnad, Alan Keller, Y.C. Choo, Michael Gold, Edward Yob, John Lohrey

Eight physicians make “Best Doctors” list Tulsa Cancer Institute (formerly Cancer Care Associates) has provided advanced cancer treatment in Northeastern Oklahoma since 1972. Our new facility in Tulsa has the largest team of cancer experts in the state with over 20 cancer specialists and over 100 nurses. We provide compassionate care as well as superior access to the latest technologies and therapies. We are extremely proud that eight Tulsa Cancer Institute oncologists have been recognized in the list of Best Doctors in America. To receive this honor, a physician is elected by peers through an extensive survey. Congratulations to our hardworking physicians for making the Best Doctors list! Dr. Choo graduated from the National University of Singapore. Dr. Choo is board certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology. Practicing in Tulsa since 1989, his area of practice includes gynecologic surgery, robotic gynecologic surgery, radical pelvic surgery and chemotherapy for gynecologic cancers. Dr. Choo has been listed in “Best Doctors in America: Central Region, Woodward/White, Inc.” since 1996. Dr. Gold is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine. Dr. Gold specializes in gynecologic oncology and pelvic surgery. He received his medical degree from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Gold is board certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology. Executive Board of Member of the American Society of Colposcopy and Surgical Pathology. Dr. Keller completed his undergraduate studies at Oklahoma State University and received his medical degree from University of Oklahoma School of Medicine. Dr. Keller is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) in internal medicine and medical oncology. Dr. Lohrey received an undergraduate degree from Evangel College (now Evangel University), a master’s degree in clinical psychology from Ft. Hays State University in Kansas, and a medical degree from the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Dr. Lohrey is board certified in internal medicine and oncology by the American Board of Internal Medicine.

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Dr. Olsen received an undergraduate degree in biology from St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN. He received a doctoral degree in oncology from the McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research at the University of Wisconsin and a medical degree from the University of Wisconsin Medical School. Dr. Street graduated from Southern Nazarene University and received a medical degree from the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine in Tulsa. He is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology. Dr. Street serves on multiple community and national boards to improve the state of healthcare and oncology care in America. Dr. Strnad attended Texas Christian University and the Chicago Medical School. Dr. Strnad is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology. He serves as a group consultant for the diseases of blood and bone marrow for Tulsa Cancer Institute. Dr. Yob received his medical degree from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. Dr. Yob’s practice is limited to the diagnosis and treatment of skin cancers, including Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). Dr. Yob is board certified by the American Osteopathic Board of Dermatology in dermatology with a certificate of added qualification in Mohs micrographic surgery.

Tulsa, Oklahoma 74146 Visit us online at www.tciok.org | facebook.com/tulsacancerinstitute

Phone (918) 505-3200


SUNNY SEN PO University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Heart Rhythm Institute Everett Tower, Room 6103, 1200 Everett Dr, Oklahoma City, 405.271.9696 DWIGHT W. REYNOLDS University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Heart, Lung and Vascular Clinic OU Physicians Building, Suite 2500, 825 NE 10th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.7001 RICHARD C. SLAGLE Warren Clinic Cardiology of Tulsa 6151 S Yale Ave, Suite A100, Tulsa, 918.494.8500 MICHAEL SPAIN Warren Clinic Cardiology of Tulsa 6151 S Yale Ave, Suite A100, Tulsa, 918.494.8500

Colon and Rectal Surgery

CRAIG S. JOHNSON Surgical Associates Warren Professional Building, Suite 900 6465 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.481.4800

Dermatology

LYNN A. ANDERSON St. John Medical Center Department of Dermatology 1725 E 19th St, Suite 702, Tulsa, 918.728.3100 RAYMOND L. CORNELISON Dermatology Associates 3727 NW 63rd St, Suite 205, Oklahoma City, 405.608.4494 GLENN PETE DOSSER Warren Professional Building, Suite 522 6465 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.492.8301 DAVID K. DUNCAN 2413 Palmer Circle, Norman, 405.321.3868 LAWRENCE J. GREGG Tulsa Dermatology Clinic 2121 E 21st St, Tulsa, 918.749.2261 MICHAEL D. JOHN Edmond Dermatology Clinic 620 W 15th St, Edmond, 405.359.0551 MARK D. LEHMAN Tulsa Dermatology Clinic 2121 E 21st St, Tulsa, 918.749.2261 SCOTT WILLIAM MEYERS The Dermatology Surgery Center 1440 Terrace Dr, Tulsa, 918.293.9966 BERNARD N. ROBINOWITZ 8803 S 101st E Ave, Suite 335, Tulsa, 918.492.8980 DONALD R. SEIDEL Tulsa Dermatology Clinic 2121 E 21st St, Tulsa, 918.749.2261 THOMAS STASKO OU Physicians Dermatology 619 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.6110 JAMES B. SUITEWART, JR. Skin Cancer Associates 3705 W Memorial Rd, Suite 101, Oklahoma City, 405.751.0020 MARK S. SULLIVAN 3366 Northwest Expressway, Suite 720, Oklahoma City, 405.947.0676 THOMAS D. URICE 2413 Palmer Circle, Norman, 405.321.5322 EDWARD H. YOB Tulsa Cancer Institute Skin Cancer Center SouthCrest Medical Plaza, 8803 S 101st E Ave, Suite 335, Tulsa, 918.307.0215

Endocrinology and Metabolism

BARBARA A. BAKER Warren Clinic Department of Endocrinology 6160 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.497.3140 RALPH J. DUDA, JR. Oklahoma Heart Institute 1265 S Utica Ave, Suite 101, Tulsa, 918.592.0999 JAMES T. LANE OU Physicians Adult Endocrinology Clinic Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center 1000 N Lincoln Blvd, Suite 2900, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1000 JOHN S. MUCHMORE Integris Endocrinology North 3366 Northwest Expressway, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 405.945.4700

Family Medicine JAMES R. BARRETT Family Medicine Center 900 NE 10th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.9940

JAMES LEE BRAND University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Center 900 NE 10th St, First Floor, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4311 CURTIS COGGINS OMNI Medical Group 402 W Morrow Rd, Sand Springs, 918.245.1328 STEVEN A. CRAWFORD University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St, First Floor, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3537

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PETER A. WINN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Center 900 NE 10th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4311 JOHN ZUBIALDE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St, First Floor, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3537

Family Medicine/ Hospice and Palliative Medicine

ROBERT SALINAS University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St, First Floor, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3537

Gastroenterology

PAUL N. MATON Digestive Disease Specialists 3366 Northwest Expressway, Suite 400, Oklahoma City, 405.702.1300 PHILIP B. MINER, JR. Saints Medical Plaza Building, Suite 325 535 NW Ninth St, Oklahoma City, 405.601.6630 DON P. MURRAY Digestive Disease Specialists 3366 Northwest Expressway, Suite 400, Oklahoma City, 405.702.1300

NE 10th St, Suite 4300, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3445 DAVID H. CHANSOLME Infectious Disease Consultants of Oklahoma City 4221 S Western Ave, Suite 4010, Oklahoma City, 405.644.6464 DOUGLAS A. DREVETS University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Infectious Disease Institute Presbyterian Professional Building, Suite 430, 711 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.6434 JOHN RUDMAN HARKESS Infectious Disease Physicians 729 S Boulevard, Edmond, 405.844.2922 JAMES HUTTON St. John Medical Center Department of Infectious Disease 1923 S Utica Ave, Tulsa, 918.744.3424 JAMES LEROY KIRK, JR. Infectious Disease Physicians 729 S Boulevard, Edmond, 405.844.2922 WILLIAM J. LEWIS Inter I.D. Kelly Building, Suite 812 6565 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.9486 MARK D. ROWLAND Inter I.D. Kelly Building, Suite 812 6565 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.9486 LINDA JOY SALINAS University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Infectious Disease Institute Presbyterian Professional Building, Suite 430, 711 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.6434

WILLIAM M. TIERNEY University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center General Internal Medicine Clinic Section of Digestive Diseases, 825 NE 10th St, Suite 4300, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3445

LEONARD N. SLATER Oklahoma City VA Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 921 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, 405.456.2511

JOE C. ZUERKER Mercy Gastroenterology 4200 W Memorial Rd, Suite 901, Oklahoma City, 405.749.4247

JAMES K. BAILEY Warren Clinic Department of Internal Medicine William Medical Building, Suite 1150, 6585 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.9425

BRENT W. LAUGHLIN OMNI Medical Group Department of Family Medicine 1919 S Wheeling Ave, Suite 404, Tulsa, 918.748.7640

Geriatric Medicine

MARY ANN BAUMAN Integris Family Care Central Department of Internal Medicine 3400 Northwest Expressway, Suite 500, Oklahoma City, 405.945.4787

TRUDY MILNER OMNI Medical Group Family Physicians 1919 S Wheeling Ave, Lower Level, Suite 100, Tulsa, 918.748.7890

INSUNG KIM Warren Clinic Department of Geriatric Medicine 6160 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.497.3650

CHEYN D. ONARECKER St. Anthony Family Medicine Center 608 NW Ninth St, Suite 1100, Oklahoma City, 405.231.3000

LAURENCE Z. RUBENSTEIN OU Physicians Senior Health Center 1122 NE 13th St, ORB 1200, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3050

DUSTAN P. BUCKLEY Mercy Clinic – Internal Medicine Building D 13313 N Meridian Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.254.9690

TOMAS P. OWENS, JR. Great Plains Family Medicine 3500 NW 56th St, Suite 100, Oklahoma City, 405.951.2855

ROBERT SALINAS University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St, First Floor, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3537

JEFFREY B. CRUZAN Integris Family Care Memorial West 5915 W Memorial Rd, Suite 300, Oklahoma City, 405.773.6415 JOHN K. GEARHART Utica Park Clinic 6528 E 101st St, Suite I, Tulsa, 918.392.5588

ROBERT ALLAN PAULSEN OMNI Medical Group Family Physicians 1919 S Wheeling Ave, Lower Level, Suite 100, Tulsa, 918.748.7890 CHARLES CLAYTON POWELL St. John Family Medical Care 8131 S Memorial Dr, Suite 100, Tulsa, 918.872.6880 KALYANAKRISHNAN RAMAKRISHNAN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Center 900 NE 10th St, First Floor, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4311 RHONDA A. SPARKS Deaconess Family Care Clinic Department of Family Medicine 4805 E Highway 37, Tuttle, 405.381.9979

A. VAIL STEPHENS Long Term Care Specialists 4334 Northwest Expressway, Suite 175, Oklahoma City, 405.557.1200

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

ROBIN K. GONZALEZ St. Anthony Physicians North 6201 N Santa Fe Ave, Suite 2010, Oklahoma City, 405.272.5555

BRYAN STRUCK OU Physicians Senior Health Center 1122 NE 13th St, Suite 150, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3050 PETER A. WINN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Center 900 NE 10th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4311

Infectious Disease

MICHAEL STUART BRONZE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center General Internal Medicine Clinic Section of Infectious Diseases, 825

Internal Medicine

THOMAS C. CONIGLIONE Oklahoma Sports Science and Orthopaedics 6205 N Santa Fe Ave, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 405.427.6776 JON P. COX OMNI Medical Group Department of Internal Medicine 1919 S Wheeling Ave, Suite 402, Tulsa, 918.748.7877 S.A. DEAN DROOBY 5728 NW 132nd St, Oklahoma City, 405.603.7610 EARL SANDERS ELLIOTT Integris Family Care Central Department of Internal Medicine Physicians Building C, Suite 500, 3400 Northwest Expressway, Oklahoma City, 405.945.4805 JANIS FINER Saint Francis Hospital Department of Internal Medicine 6161 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.502.1900

STEPHEN J. GAWEY St. John Medical Center Department of Internal Medicine 1819 E 19th St, Suite 302, Tulsa, 918.742.0552 ERIN KATHLEEN GLASGOW Integris Family Care Central Department of Internal Medicine Physicians Building C, Suite 500, 3400 Northwest Expressway, Oklahoma City, 405.945.4433 ROBERT B. HAUGER Warren Clinic Department of Internal Medicine 6600 S Yale Ave, Suite 600, Tulsa, 918.491.5990 T. KARL HOSKISON Oklahoma University Physicians Hospitalist Program Department of Internal Medicine, 4502 E 41st St, Tulsa, 918.660.3467 JOHN E. HUBNER Hubner Health Internal Medicine Specialists 2000 S Wheeling Ave, Suite 1100, Tulsa, 918.742.5533 MIKE L. HUBNER St. John Medical Center Department of Internal Medicine Williams Building, Suite 1100, 2000 S Wheeling Ave, Tulsa, 918.712.8111 MARTINA JELLEY University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine Department of Internal Medicine, 4502 E 41st St, Tulsa, 918.619.4173 JOHN M. KRODEL The Norman Clinic 950 N Porter Ave, Suite 300, Norman, 405.329.0121 ALI A. MOHAMMAD Integris Baptist Medical Center Department of Internal Medicine 3300 Northwest Expressway, Oklahoma City, 405.949.3011 DAVID M. NIERENBERG St. John Medical Center Department of Internal Medicine 1725 E 19th St, Suite 501, Tulsa, 918.745.6990 JOE LYNDLE REESE Warren Clinic Department of Internal Medicine William Medical Building, Suite 1150, 6585 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.9425 HANNA A. SAADAH 4205 McAuley Blvd, Suite 400, Oklahoma City, 405.749.4260 RONALD BARRY SAIZOW Oklahoma University Physicians Department of Internal Medicine Schusterman Center Clinic, 4444 E 41st St, Tulsa, 918.619.4400 MICHAEL A. WEISZ Oklahoma University Physicians Department of Internal Medicine Schusterman Center, 4502 E 41st St, Tulsa, 918.619.4175 KERSEY WINFREE Saints Medical Group Metro 120 N Robinson St, Oklahoma City, 405.232.3111 WILLIAM H. YARBOROUGH Oklahoma University Physicians Department of Internal Medicine Schusterman Center Clinic, 4502 E 41st St, Tulsa, 918.619.4176

Internal Medicine/ Hospital Medicine

MICHAEL S. GEBETSBERGER Utica Park Clinic Department of Internal Medicine 9001 S 101st E Ave, Suite 230, Tulsa, 918.392.5470


Medical Genetics

SUSAN E. PALMER The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Pediatric Genetics OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 5100, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.2006 KLAAS WIERENGA The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Pediatric Genetics OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 5100, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4211

Medical Oncology and Hematology

VICKI C. BAKER Warren Clinic Medical Oncology 11212 E 48th St, Tulsa, 918.556.3000 PHILIP C. COMP University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center – Cade Clinic Division of Hematology, 800 NE 10th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.8299 KATHY K. DAGG Mercy Oncology of Norman 701 E Robinson St, Suite 100, Norman, 405.321.4644 RALPH G. GANICK Frank C. Love Cancer Institute 1011 N Dewey Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.228.7100 BRIAN VINCENT GEISUITER Integris Cancer Institute of Oklahoma 5911 W Memorial Rd, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 405.552.0490 ALAN M. KELLER Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E 51st St S, Tulsa, 918.505.3200 JOHN H. LOHREY Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E 51st St S, Tulsa, 918.505.3200 JOSEPH P. LYNCH Warren Clinic Medical Oncology 11212 E 48th St, Tulsa, 918.556.3000 JOHNNY MCMINN Integris Cancer Institute of Oklahoma 5911 W Memorial Rd, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 405.552.0490 MARK R. OLSEN Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E 51st St S, Tulsa, 918.505.3200 CRAIG LEE REITZ Mercy Oncology Physicians 4205 McAuley Blvd, Suite 375, Oklahoma City, 405.751.4343 CHARLES MARTIN STRNAD Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E 51st St S, Tulsa, 918.505.3200

Nephrology

JAMES E. BOURDEAU Nephrology Specialists of Oklahoma 6465 S Yale Ave, Suite 507, Tulsa, 918.481.2760 ROBERT M. GOLD Nephrology Specialists of Oklahoma 6465 S Yale Ave, Suite 507, Tulsa, 918.481.2760 PRANAY KATHURIA University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, 4444 E 41st St, Tulsa, 918.619.4888 THOMAS C. KENKEL Nephrology Specialists of Oklahoma 1124 S Saint Louis Ave, Suite 201, Tulsa, 918.592.0296 SATISH KUMAR OU Physicians Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy

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OU Physicians Building, Suite 4300, 825 NE 10th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.8478 LAURA ANN ISAACS RANKIN Kidney Specialists of Central Oklahoma 3366 Northwest Expressway, Suite 550, Oklahoma City, 405.942.5442 CHRIS M. SHOLER 4334 Northwest Expressway, Suite 201, Oklahoma City, 405.842.8298

Neurological Surgery DAVID A. FELL Neurosurgery Specialists 6767 S Yale Ave, Suite A, Tulsa, 918.492.7587

NAINA GROSS University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Neurosurgery The Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center, Suite 400, 1000 N Lincoln Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4912 MARY K. GUMERLOCK Oklahoma City VA Medical Center Section of Neurosurgery 921 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, 405.456.3409 DONALD D. HORTON Neuroscience Specialists 14100 Parkway Commons Dr, Suite 201, Oklahoma City, 405.242.4720 STANLEY (STAN) PELOFSKY Neuroscience Specialists 4120 W Memorial Rd, Suite 300, Oklahoma City, 405.748.3300 CRAIG RABB University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Neurosurgery The Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center, Suite 400, 1000 N Lincoln Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4912 JAMES A. (JIM) RODGERS Tulsa NeuroSpine Kelly Building, Suite 709 6565 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.481.4965

Neurology

J. MIKE BANOWETZ Mercy Clinic Neurology 4120 W Memorial Rd, Suite 218, Oklahoma City, 405.302.2661 BRENT A. BESON 4221 S Western Ave, Suite 5000, Oklahoma City, 405.644.5160 JOHN ERNEST CATTANEO OU Physicians Department of Neurology 591 E 36th St N, Tulsa, 918.619.8717 JAMES R. COUCH, JR. University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Neurology Clinic OU Physician’s Building, Suite 5200, 825 NE 10th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3635 DAVID LEE GORDON University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Neurology Clinic 825 NE 10th St, Suite 5200, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3635 LINDA ANN HERSHEY University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Neurology Clinic 825 NE 10th St, Suite 5200, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3635 JEANNE ANN F. KING University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Neurology Clinic OU Physician’s Building, Suite 5200, 825 NE 10th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3635 GERMAINE L. ODENHEIMER Oklahoma City VA Medical Center CANDO Alzheimer’s Clinic 921 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, 405.456.3365

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

CALIN PRODAN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Neurology Clinic 920 Stanton L Young Blvd, Suite 2040, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3635 RALPH W. RICHTER St. John Medical Center Department of Neurology Holiman Building, Suite 406, 1705 E 19th St, Tulsa, 918.743.4374 ELLIOTT D. ROSS Oklahoma City VA Medical Center Neurology Service 921 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, 405.456.3365 W. DEAN SHIPLEY Mercy Clinic Neurology 4120 W Memorial Rd, Suite 218, Oklahoma City, 405.302.2661 DAVID L. SMITH Saints Medical Group 1111 N Lee Ave, Suite 334, Oklahoma City, 405.272.4953 WAYNE L. WASEMILLER Mercy Clinic Neurology 4120 W Memorial Rd, Suite 218, Oklahoma City, 405.302.2661 RANDALL M. WEBB Neurological Associates of Tulsa 8110 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.488.0990 PEGGY J. WISDOM University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Neurology Clinic 825 NE 10th St, Suite 5200, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3635

Obstetrics and Gynecology

RAY CLAUDE BABB, JR. Hillcrest South Medical Plaza, Suite 230 8803 S 101st E Ave, Tulsa, 918.481.4860 MAY-LI BARKI Mercy Health Center Center for Women’s Health 4140 W Memorial Rd, Suite 500, Oklahoma City, 405.755.7430

ROYICE EVERETT Women’s Healthcare Associates 3617 NW 58th St, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 405.942.5593 LYNN EDWARD FRAME Utica Womens Specialists 1705 E 19th St, Suite 707, Tulsa, 918.749.1413 PAUL GEHRING Tulsa ObGyn Associates Williams Medical Plaza 2000 S Wheeling Ave, Suite 800, Tulsa, 918.747.9641 MICHAEL ALAN GOLD Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E 51st St S, Tulsa, 918.505.3200 GENA C. GRAY Tulsa ObGyn Associates Williams Medical Plaza 2000 S Wheeling Ave, Suite 800, Tulsa, 918.747.9641 KARL R. HANSEN OU Physicians Reproductive Medicine 1000 N Lincoln Blvd, Suite 300, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1616 MARSHA KAY HOWERTONENGLES 6465 S Yale Ave, Suite 310, Tulsa, 918.236.3000 DEBORAH LORRAINE HUFF Oklahoma City Gynecology and Obstetrics 11200 N Portland Ave, Second Floor, Oklahoma City, 405.936.1000 DAVID A. KALLENBERGER Integris Bennett Fertility Institute ObGyn Specialists Building B, Suite 210, 3433 NW 56th St, Oklahoma City, 405.945.4701 LORA J. LARSON Saint Francis Hospital Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 6161 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.2200 AMANDA LEVINE Stonebridge Obstetrics and Gynecology 3815 S Boulevard, Edmond, 405.341.9996

J. MARTIN BEAL Tulsa ObGyn Associates Williams Medical Plaza 2000 S Wheeling Ave, Suite 800, Tulsa, 918.747.9641

LAURA L. MACKIE Oklahoma City Gynecology and Obstetrics 11200 N Portland Ave, Second Floor, Oklahoma City, 405.936.1000

JUDITH BLACKWELL The Women’s Health Group 9001 S 101st E Ave, Suite 350, Tulsa, 918.293.6200

ROBERT S. MANNEL University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center 800 NE 10th St, Suite 6043, Oklahoma City, 405.271.6822

JENNIFER BUTLER The Women’s Health Group The SouthCreek Medical Plaza 9001 S 101st E Ave, Suite 350, Tulsa, 918.293.6200 SUSAN L. CHAMBERS Oklahoma City Gynecology and Obstetrics 11200 N Portland Ave, Second Floor, Oklahoma City, 405.936.1000 YEW CHEONG CHOO Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E 51st St S, Tulsa, 918.505.3200 GRANT COX Tulsa ObGyn Associates Williams Medical Plaza 2000 S Wheeling Ave, Suite 800, Tulsa, 918.747.9641 LATASHA B. CRAIG OU Physicians Reproductive Medicine 1000 N Lincoln Blvd, Suite 300, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1616 PATRICIA A. DAILY South Tulsa Women’s Clinic 6465 S Yale Ave, Suite 815, Tulsa, 918.492.1001 RUPA K. DESILVA The Women’s Health Group 9001 S 101st E Ave, Suite 350, Tulsa, 918.293.6200

TERESSA JOAN MCHENRY Warren Clinic Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 2605 W Main St, Jenks, 918.298.2336 DONALD SCOTT MCMEEKIN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center Division of Gynecologic Oncology, 800 NE 10th St, Suite 2100, Oklahoma City, 405.271.8707 CHARLES MIRABILE Mercy Health Center Perinatal Center of Oklahoma 4140 W Memorial Rd, Suite 321, Oklahoma City, 405.748.4726

ELI N. RESHEF Integris Bennett Fertility Institute ObGyn Specialists Building B, Suite 210, 3433 NW 56th St, Oklahoma City, 405.945.4701 STEPHEN D. SCHLINKE Mercy Physicians Obstetrics and Gynecology 820 W 15th St, Edmond, 405.216.4004 MICHAEL R. SEIKEL Integris Bennett Fertility Institute ObGyn Specialists Building B, Suite 210, 3433 NW 56th St, Oklahoma City, 405.945.4701 K. ANTHONY SHANBOUR Mercy Women’s Center Mercy Plaza Building, Suite 215 4140 W Memorial Rd, Oklahoma City, 405.242.4030 JOHN STANLEY Mercy Health Center Perinatal Center of Oklahoma 4140 W Memorial Rd, Suite 321, Oklahoma City, 405.748.4726 GARY F. STREBEL 4200 W Memorial Rd, Suite 201, Oklahoma City, 405.749.4200 DARON GENE STREET Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E 51st St S, Tulsa, 918.505.3200 JOAN L. WALKER University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center Division of Gynecologic Oncology, 800 NE 10th St, Suite 2100, Oklahoma City, 405.271.8707

Ophthalmology

CYNTHIA A. BRADFORD Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of General Ophthalmology and Cataract Surgery 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1090 REAGAN H. BRADFORD, JR. Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of Retina and Vitreous 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1092 ADAM G. DE LA GARZA 14000 N Portland Ave, Suite 101, Oklahoma City, 405.521.0041 BRADLEY K. FARRIS Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of Neuro-Ophthalmology 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Suite 315, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1091 STEPHEN R. FRANSEN Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of Retina and Vitreous 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1092 RALPH B. HESUITER III Dean A. McGee Eye Institute 3500 NW 56th St, Suite 101, Oklahoma City, 405.942.9545 P. LLOYD HILDEBRAND Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1096 GERARD JAY HUNTER The Eye Institute 1717 S Utica Ave, Suite 101, Tulsa, 918.747.0289

MIKIO A. NIHIRA OU Physicians Women’s Pelvic and Bladder Health OU Physicians Building, Suite 5300, 825 NE 10th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.9493

DAVID W. JACKSON Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of General Ophthalmology and Cataract Surgery 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1090

DONALD K. RAHHAL Mercy Health Center Center for Women’s Health 4140 W Memorial Rd, Suite 500, Oklahoma City, 405.755.7430

MAHMOUD A. KHAIMI Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Glaucoma Service 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1093


W

e’re all about women’s health. From teenagers with acne to women in their active years, we believe women should be empowered to be healthy, happy and self-fulfilled. Obstetrics, gynecologic surgery and hormonal issues are at the forefront of our day, and minimally invasive surgery and utilization of the DaVinci robot system is practiced whenever possible. Sharing life’s journeys with my patients and seeing each of them year after year has been the highlight of my practice and my life. Thanks to all of you!

Dr. Melanie

BLACKSTOCK

Congratulations to Dr. Hawkins for being recognized by Best Doctors in America for 2014. R. Clio Robertson, MD

Jeffrey R. Morris, DO

Don L. Hawkins, MD

Ronald S. LaButti, DO

David R. Hicks, MD

Jeff A. Fox, MD

James D. Cash, MD

Kathleen M. Sisler, MD

David E. Nonweiler, MD

Troy A. Glaser, DO

Randall L. Hendricks, MD

Bradley J. Lawson, MD

David K. Wong, MD

Blake E. Shockley, MD

Bryan J. Hawkins, MD

Debbie A. Gladd, DO

Thomas G. Craven, MD

Casey L. Smith, MD

Bryan J. Hawkins, MD

M.D., F.A.C.O.G.

918.236.3000

obgyntulsa.com 6465 S. Yale, Suite 310 • Tulsa, OK 74136

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JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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RONALD M. KINGSLEY Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of Retina and Vitreous 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1092 ROBERT E. LEONARD II Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of Retina and Vitreous 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1092 REBECCA K. MORGAN Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of Low Vision Rehabilitation 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1793 SUMIT K. NANDA Oklahoma Retina Institute Building D, Suite 750 3366 Northwest Expressway, Oklahoma City, 405.948.2020 ANIL D. PATEL Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of Neuro-Ophthalmology 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1091 BEN PETTIGROVE II Tulsa Eye Consultants 6606 S Yale Ave, Suite 220, Tulsa, 918.492.4122 JAMES F. RONK Tulsa Eye Associates 6465 S Yale Ave, Suite 215, Tulsa, 918.492.8455 STEVEN R. SARKISIAN, JR. Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Glaucoma Service 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1093 VINAY A. SHAH Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of Retina and Vitreous 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1092 R. MICHAEL SIATKOWSKI Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1094 RHEA L. SIATKOWSKI Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Cornea and External Diseases Pavilion A, First Floor, 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1095 SCOTT C. SIGLER Eye Associates 2020 E 15th St, Suite B, Edmond, 405.348.9993 GREGORY L. SKUTA Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Glaucoma Service 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1093 DONALD U. STONE Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Cornea and External Diseases Pavilion A, First Floor, 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1095 MARK J. WEISS The Eye Institute 1717 S Utica Ave, Suite 107, Tulsa, 918.742.2428 THOMAS C. WOLF 3431 South Boulevard St, Suite 106, Edmond, 405.562.2036

Orthopaedic Surgery MARK A. CAPEHART Eastern Oklahoma Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center Natalie Medical Building, Suite 301 6475 S Yale Ave,Tulsa, 918.494.9300

SCOTT J. DUNITZ Tulsa Bone and Joint Associates 4802 S 109th E Ave, Tulsa, 918.392.1400

DONALD WRAY MCGINNIS McBride Orthopedic Hospital Clinic 1110 N Lee Ave, Third Floor, Oklahoma City, 405.230.9270 SCOTT E. RAHHAL Eastern Oklahoma Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center Natalie Medical Building, Suite 301 6475 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.9300 BROCK SCHNEBEL McBride Orthopedic Hospital Clinic 1110 N Lee Ave, Third Floor, Oklahoma City, 405.230.9270 DAVID CARLTON TEAGUE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Orthopaedic Surgery Clinic 825 NE 10th St, Suite 1300, Oklahoma City, 405.271.2663

Otolaryngology

STEPHEN M. BROWNLEE Eastern Oklahoma Ear, Nose and Throat 5020 E 68th St, Tulsa, 918.492.3636 KEITH F. CLARK Oklahoma City Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic Saints Medical Plaza 535 NW Ninth St, Suite 300, Oklahoma City, 405.272.6027 JOHN R. HOUCK, JR. OU Physicians Department of Otorhinolaryngology OU Physicians Building, Suite 4200, 825 NE 10th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.7559 GREG A. KREMPL University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center Department of Otolaryngology, 825 NE 10th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.7559 JESUS EDILBERTO MEDINA OU Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology 700 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4132 DAVID W. WHITE Eastern Oklahoma Ear, Nose and Throat 5020 E 68th St, Tulsa, 918.492.3636

Pathology

BARBARA L. BANE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Division of Anatomic Pathology Presbyterian Tower, 700 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.5653 MICHAEL R. HARKEY Saint Francis Hospital Department of Pathology 6161 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.1420 JAN V. PITHA Oklahoma City VA Medical Center Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Service 921 NE 13th St, Room 4F128, Oklahoma City, 405.456.5019 STANLEY S. SHRAGO Integris Baptist Medical Center Department of Pathology 3300 Northwest Expressway, Oklahoma City, 405.949.6842

Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

MARTHA M. TARPAY Mercy Health Center Allergy, Asthma and Clinical Research Center Mercy Tower, Suite 206, 4200 W Memorial Rd, Oklahoma City, 405.752.0393

BRYAN J. HAWKINS Central States Orthopaedic Specialists William Medical Building, Suite 200 6585 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.481.2767

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology RUPA K. DESILVA The Women’s Health Group 9001 S 101st E Ave, Suite 350, Tulsa, 918.293.6200

Pediatric Cardiology

EDWARD D. OVERHOLT The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Oklahoma Children’s Heart Center OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 2900, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.5530 KENT E. WARD The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Oklahoma Children’s Heart Center OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 2900, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.5530

Pediatric Critical Care R. PHILLIP BARTON Saint Francis Hospital Children’s Hospital Intensive Care 6161 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.502.6135

MORRIS R. GESSOUROUN The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Critical Care Medicine 1200 Everett Dr, Oklahoma City, 405.271.5211

Pediatric Developmental and Behavioral Problems DONALD R. HAMILTON OU Child Study Center 1100 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.5700 LAURA MCGUINN OU Child Study Center 1100 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.5700 MARK LEE WOLRAICH OU Child Study Center 1100 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, 405.271.5700

Pediatric Endocrinology STEVEN D. CHERNAUSEK The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Diabetes and Endocrinology OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 4500, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.3303 KENNETH C. COPELAND The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Diabetes and Endocrinology OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 4500, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.2006 DAVID H. JELLEY Oklahoma University Physicians Department of Pediatrics Schusterman Center Clinic, 4444 E 41st St, Tulsa, 918.619.4400

Pediatric Gastroenterology

JOHN E. GRUNOW The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Gastroenterology and Nutrition OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 9500, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.6549 MICHAEL P. MORRIS Integris Baptist Medical Center Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology 3300 Northwest Expressway, Suite 1003443, Oklahoma City, 405.949.3349

JUDITH ANN O’CONNOR The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Gastroenterology Clinic OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 9500, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.6549 MARILYN I. STEELE The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Physician GI Clinic OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 9500, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.6549

Pediatric Hematology – Oncology JOAN PARKHURST CAIN The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Jimmy Everest Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders in Children Section of Hematology and Oncology, 1200 Children’s Ave, 10th Floor, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4412 RENE Y. MCNALL-KNAPP The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Jimmy Everest Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders in Children Section of Hematology and Oncology, 1200 Children’s Ave, Ste 10000, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4412 WILLIAM H. MEYER University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Pediatrics 1200 N Phillips Ave, Suite 14500, Oklahoma City, 405.271.5311

Pediatric Infectious Disease

SUSANA CHAVEZ-BUENO The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 5100, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4211 THOMAS L. KUHLS Norman Pediatric Associates 808 Wall St, Norman, 405.321.5114 TERRENCE L. STULL The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Department of Pediatrics 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4401 ROBERT C. WELLIVER The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Department of Pediatric Infectious Disease OU Children’s Physicians Building, 12th Floor, Suite 12301, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.5703

Pediatric Medical Genetics

JOHN J. MULVIHILL The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Pediatric Genetics OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 5100, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.2006 KLAAS WIERENGA The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Pediatric Genetics OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 5100, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4211

Pediatric Nephrology

MARTIN ALLAN TURMAN The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Pediatric Nephrology OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite

5100, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4409

Pediatric Neurological Surgery

TIMOTHY B. MAPSTONE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Neurosurgery The Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center, Suite 400, 1000 N Lincoln Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4912 AMANDA L. YAUN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Neurosurgery The Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center, Suite 400, 1000 N Lincoln Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.4912

Pediatric Ophthalmology

JAMES M. RICHARD Children’s Eye Care Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Eye Muscle Surgery 11013 Hefner Pointe Dr, Oklahoma City, 405.751.2020 MARK H. SCOTT Children’s Eye Care 11013 Hefner Pointe Dr, Oklahoma City, 405.751.2020 R. MICHAEL SIATKOWSKI Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1094 TAMMY L. YANOVITCH Dean A. McGee Eye Institute Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology 608 Stanton L Young Blvd, Oklahoma City, 405.271.1094

Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery MARK A. CAPEHART Eastern Oklahoma Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center Natalie Medical Building, Suite 301 6475 S Yale Ave, Tulsa, 918.494.9300

JOSEPH DAVEY The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Orthopaedic Surgery OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 3100, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.2669 WILLIAM A. HERNDON The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Orthopaedic Surgery OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 3100, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.2669 J. ANDY SULLIVAN The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Orthopaedic Surgery OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 3100, 1200 Children’s Ave, Oklahoma City, 405.271.2669

Pediatric Otolaryngology

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A Young Man’s Legacy

By Tara Malone

Three decades after he lost his life, Sean Marsee still speaks to subsequent generations.

In 1983 Sean Marsee had everything going for him. It was his senior year at Talihina High School, and he was a track star, winner of 28 medals in the sport. He looked forward to the state-level track competition and planned to join the U.S. Army after graduation. Then one day, he opened his mouth and discovered a small sore on the back of

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his tongue. He waited for the sore to heal, but it didn’t. As it became larger and more painful, he finally confessed to his mother that he had been dipping smokeless tobacco since he was 12 and that he was afraid. Ten months later, at 19, Sean Marsee was dead.


TALAHINA TEEN SEAN MARSEE TOOK HIS LAST PHOTO AFTER MULTIPLE SURGERIES REMOVED HIS TONGUE, LYMPH NODES, MOST OF HIS BOTTOM JAW, PART OF HIS NECK AND HIS PECTORAL MUSCLES TO PREVENT THE SPREAD OF HIS CANCER. PHOTO COURTESY AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

BELOW, SEAN MARSEE, SEEN IN A SCHOOL YEARBOOK PHOTO, BEFORE HIS LIFE WAS IMPACTED BY CANCER OF THE MOUTH. PHOTO COURTESY AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

The Cancer

At the time of Marsee’s death in 1984, nobody was talking about the dangers of smokeless tobacco or “snuff,” as it’s sometimes called. The notion that smoking was dangerous had only recently caught on with much of the public. Nobody gave much thought to dipping. In fact, smokeless tobacco was frequently advertised on television by celebrity athletes like Walt Garrison, running back for the Dallas Cowboys and rodeo star, and the celebrated baseball pitcher Catfish Hunter. Dr. Carl Hook, however, knew plenty about the effects of snuff. Hook is the CEO of PLICO, a company that insures a large chunk of Oklahoma’s practicing physicians. At the time, however, he was a practicing otorhinolaryngologist at the hospital where Marsee’s mother worked. “I was aware of the potential for smokeless tobacco to cause ulcerations, dental decay, gum disease and sometimes, unfortunately, cancer

formation in the oral cavity,” Hook says. “I treated patients with that type of cancer a great deal during my residency training days at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, particularly at the VA. But all these patients who had oral cancer from using smokeless tobacco…most of them were in their 60s, 70s, 80s. They’d been doing it for years and years. Sean was the youngest patient with cancer from smokeless tobacco I had ever seen.” When Betty Marsee brought her son in to see Hook, the physician’s heart sank. “When he opened his mouth and showed me...I’d seen cancers before, but people were 60 years older than him,” Hook says. “I was not accustomed to seeing that in a teenager. But there wasn’t much doubt in my mind about what it was.” JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Hook didn’t even take a biopsy during the first office visit, so sure he was that Marsee had a dangerous malignancy. The surgeon’s training had taught him that in cases such as this – where the tumor could drain into the lymph nodes of the head and neck – removal of the tongue and lymph nodes and a radical neck dissection were usually necessary to stop the spread of the cancer. Marsee, however, was adamant that only his tongue be removed at the time. He knew that if he had any visible surgery to his neck and jaw, he would never pass the physical to enter the military. “Betty allowed him to make that decision,” Hooks says. “Sean was mature and independentthinking, and I told him what the recommendation was, and they listened, and he made his decision…She wanted him to get treated, but she wouldn’t force him to do anything he didn’t want to do.” Betty Marsee was a registered nurse at Valley View Hospital in Ada and the mother of four other children. Marsee’s father had recently passed away, and she divided her time between Ada, where she worked nights and took care of SEAN MARSEE AND HIS SIBLINGS her youngest children, and Talihina, where MarIN EARLIER DAYS. see and his brother, Shannon Marsee, lived on PHOTO COURTESY AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY. their own while finishing high school. The family was already close to unraveling under the strain of poverty and, for some members, addiction. Marsee’s diagnosis threatened to send them careening over the edge. His younger brother, Jason Marsee, remembers clearly. “When [Sean] was doing his first round of chemo, it didn’t seem like it was affecting him at all,” Jason Marsee says. “But he came to me midway through [treatment] and asked me to come with him.” During the drive to and from Oklahoma City for chemotherapy treatment, Marsee would get so ill that he would pull to the side of the road to vomit and pass out, recalls Jason Marsee. “We would stay away longer and longer so he could gather himself so no one knew how sick he was getting,” Jason Marsee says. “…He dipped all the way up to his second surgery; he was putting Copenhagen in his mouth when his mouth was nothing but an open sore. That’s the kind of thing we’re dealing with. I found Copenhagen in the dashboard when I dropped him at his chemotherapy. He wrote down, ‘Don’t tell mom, it’s all I’ve got left.’ The addiction where people pull cigarettes out of ashtrays so they can smoke – it’s desperation at that point.” Marsee’s cancer had metastasized to his lymph nodes, his brain and his back. In a desperate attempt to stop the malignancy’s course, Hook first took Marsee’s tongue. Subsequent surgeries took part of his jaw and the lymph nodes under the jaw. Eventually, Marsee lost most of his bottom jaw, parts of his neck, the lymph nodes under his arms and his pectoral muscles. He had a tracheotomy and received nourishment through a feeding tube. Meanwhile, he practiced with weights to try and train what was left of his neck to hold up the weight of his head. His weight dramatically dropped from an athletic 140 pounds to almost 80. “He didn’t even look like the same person,” Hook says. When tentacles of the cancer were found wrapped around his spine and at the base of his brain, Marsee had enough. “He said no more surgery,” his brother recalls, “and went home to die.” Marsee’s last picture shows a barely recognizable, disfigured remnant of a boy surrounded by the medals and plaques commemorating his athletic achievements. Shortly after the picture was taken, his journey was over. Marsee died on Feb. 25, 1984. “I don’t know what happened at the end,” Jason Marsee says. “…I heard a horrific wail, and I knew it was my sister finding him gone. I smiled when it first happened. I woke up thinking, ‘Thank God.’ That wasn’t the case for the rest of my family.”

The Trial

Marsee’s story did not die with him. Betty Marsee had no intention of letting her son and what had happened to him – in her eyes, because of smokeless tobacco – be forgotten.

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“She was angry from the beginning,” Jason Marsee says. “She didn’t quite know where to put that anger. She didn’t know quite what to do.” Betty Marsee found two Ada attorneys, George Braly and Dania Deschamps-Braly, to take her case pro bono; she was going to take on U.S. Tobacco, the manufacturer of Happy Days, Skoal and Marsee’s favorite, Copenhagen. And she was going to make them pay. But what price could be put on her son’s life? Betty Marsee sued for $137 million – the equivalent of U.S. Tobacco’s net profits in 1983. In 1986, attorneys for Betty Marsee and for U.S. Tobacco faced each other in a federal courtroom in Oklahoma City. From the beginning, dozens of U.S. Tobacco’s lawyers descended on the state like a hurricane, searching every crevice for information that could be used to cast doubt upon Marsee’s lifestyle. For local counsel, the corporation chose Andy Coats, then-sitting mayor of Oklahoma City and attorney with Crowe and Dunlevy and future dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Law. Also at the table every day of the trial was celebrity Walt Garrison, lending silent support to the U.S. Tobacco defense team. “[Garrison] was there the whole time,” Hook says. “The trial lasted weeks, and he was there every day, sitting at the defense table. His tin of tobacco was in the back pocket of his jeans. When he stood up, you could see the ring. He was there…never said a word for three weeks, but he was there to be in front of the jury as part of the defense team.”

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Hook at the time still lived in Ada and was trying to operate there full-time. His friends flew him to Oklahoma City in their private plane so he could testify as an expert witness for the plaintiff. “[U.S. Tobacco’s] defense was to blame Sean’s lifestyle, which amounted to a little bit of beer and a lot of Mexican food,” Hook says. The trial was a long, complicated matter, Coats recalls. “We spent lots of time, lots of hours, and the company spent several million dollars,” Coats says. “It is one of those cases...in some ways, it’s a ‘bet your company’ case. If it turns out that snuff causes this kind of cancer, then obviously the company that makes smokeless tobacco is in danger.” In the end, the jury sided with the company’s


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defense: Sean Marsee had not developed oral cancer from using tobacco products. “They said that because he hunted and fished and ate what he caught, that is what caused cancer,” Jason Marsee recalls. “Hauling milk home from the dairy is what caused cancer. Hauling hay is what caused cancer.” “We spoke to lots of doctors and pathologists across the country, but the bottom line was that the chief head and neck surgeon from M.D. Anderson [Cancer Center] in Houston testified that snuff didn’t have any more to do with that type of cancer than if it had been raining that day,” says Coats. “Several people came up with ideas [about what caused Marsee’s cancer], but it didn’t fit with any pattern in previous medical history. The really knowledgable physician, he was absolutely convinced that there was nothing in Sean’s life, that there was no other extrinsic cause [of the cancer].” According to Hook, damning evidence against U.S. Tobacco was dismissed by Judge David Russell, with dire consequences for Betty Marsee’s claims. “The plaintiff’s attorney had many pieces of incriminating evidence against the company, such as notes and copies of minutes of their board meetings where they talked about their mission to provide samples of Happy Days (the sweet, milder choice) and Skoal at rodeos,” Hook says. “They made comments at the meeting that they needed to get the youngsters using this. They [young consumers] could start by using Happy Days, because it was sugarysweet and didn’t have a whole lot of nicotine kick. Get them started, then they’d move up to Skoal, then to Copenhagen. The judge would not allow that evidence to be brought into the trial. “It was the smoking gun,” he continues. “If they could have gotten that before the jury, it would have been extremely hard for U.S. Tobacco to deny the plaintiff’s claims, but they couldn’t get it admitted. It really deflated the plaintiff’s team.”

The Legacy

No legal consensus was reached about what caused Sean Marsee’s cancer, but the jury decided it was not the snuff he used. U.S. Tobacco was held in no way liable for Marsee’s death. The impact on his family was devastating, but in the years following the court’s decision, others would take up the Marsees’ demands for justice.

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The television show 60 Minutes aired a story on Marsee; his tale was recounted in both the Saturday Evening Post and Reader’s Digest. Betty Marsee began to travel with the American Cancer Society to share Marsee’s story, and Hook continued campaigning locally regarding the dangers of smokeless tobacco. Jason Marsee still speaks at summits, schools and churches to warn of the dangers of smokeless tobacco. “If I can get one person to say no, then they don’t get that cancer, their family doesn’t get destroyed like mine did,” Jason Marsee says. “…I will talk to a tree if it will listen.” “With all the publicity, people would ask me, ‘What else could have caused this?’” Hook remembers. “Nothing else. Sure, genetics can be a factor, whether it takes 30 years or six years to develop cancer, but the initiator is the tobacco. Sean’s cancer was in the exact place that he held his tobacco. I traveled and showed slides of cancer I’d seen that ate through the skin of the chin and face at the VA hospital. I showed them to young kids because I wanted to scare the hell out of them.” Hook remembers in one rural town, he met a child whose story chilled his blood. “He wasn’t even in kindergarten, just in daycare at the elementary school. I showed the slides, and afterward, he came up with tears in his eyes. ‘Dr. Hook, am I going to get cancer like that?’ ‘Why do you ask?’ I said. ‘Because I sit on papa’s knee and we dip snuff every night together,’ he said.” Hook pauses. “It just blew me away.” The now-late Betty Marsee also spoke about her son’s struggles before state legislatures and those in other states in the northeastern part of the country. Despite the outcome of the U.S. Tobacco lawsuit, people believed her accusations. One by one, states began to pass laws demanding that smokeless tobacco carry warnings on the labels, just as cigarettes did. Quickly, the law went federal. “That warning is Sean Marsee’s legacy,” Hook says. “Sean Marsee gave his life for that.” Yet today, Marsee’s home state has one of the highest tobacco-use rates in the nation, and the Marsees’ battle is far from won. “I feel the tragic death of Sean Marsee brought to light many areas of concern we still face today with youth and tobacco,” says Adrienne Rollins, interim cessation system coordinator and tobacco use prevention coordinator with the Oklahoma State Department of Health’s Center for the Advancement of Wellness. “First, it brought to light the misinformation that smokeless tobacco products were safe. Unfortunately, more than 13 percent of Oklahoma youth report having used smokeless tobacco in the last 30 days, compared to 7.7 percent nationally. Second, youth are highly marketed to by the tobacco industry, even identified in tobacco industry internal documents. “The final aspect that I feel Sean’s life experience shows COPENHAGEN WAS SEAN MARSEE’S PREFERENCE youth and all tobacco users is that tobacco-related disease OF SMOKELESS TOBACCO. does not discriminate,” Rollins continues. “Sean was a young, ROB HAINER / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM healthy athlete in all areas of his life with the exception of using tobacco. Tobacco took away his entire adult life in just six years of use.” Rollins says the tobacco industry spends an estimated $8.8 billion nationally and $160.3 million in the state of Oklahoma on marketing each year, while tobacco-control programs only have about 14 percent of that budget. Not all of Oklahoma’s youth are buying what the tobacco industry is selling, though. Young people across Oklahoma have formed Students Working Against Tobacco. Had such a group existed when Sean Marsee was alive, he might not have picked up a can of snuff. Instead, his is a tragic, cautionary tale. Additional reporting by Jami Mattox

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014


Special Advertising Section

PHD LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR

Am I in love with my partner anymore? People will often find themselves in therapy because they believe they’ve fallen out of love with their partner. Losses of emotional and sexual intimacy are commonly reported in addition to a loss of physical attraction Courtney Linsen- or desire to invest time and energy meyer-O’Brien, in the person. What this person is PhD, LPC, MHR communicating is a language born from fantasy story books and ego-centered feelings. True love is not about “falling in love;” this type of love is based on momentary emotional states that consistently change. True love is about choosing to become a person capable of loving another. Although acting in loving ways is critically important, intimacy that originates from true love demands something more. It asks you to move beyond “doing the right things” and to become a person who consistently acts from love versus one who reverts to acting from ego, which is a feelings-driver, self-protective and self-serving in that it always seeks to gain something from the exchange.

Courtney Linsenmeyer-O’Brien, PhD, LPC, MHR 1723 E. 15th St., Suite 250 Tulsa, OK 74104 918.639.0570 www.drcourtneyobrien.com drobrien@drcourtneyobrien.com

VETERINARIAN How do I protect my pet from fleas and ticks? Flea and tick season is a year-round concern in Oklahoma. • Discuss the use of preventive products, including over-the-counter products, with your veterinarian. • Always talk to your veterinarian before Dr. Rodney Robards applying any spot-on products, especially if your dog or cat is very young, old, pregnant, nursing or on any medications. • Only purchase EPA-registered pesticides or FDA-approved medicines. • Read the entire label before you use/apply the product. • Always follow label directions. Apply or give the product as and when directed. Never apply more or less than the recommended dose. • Cats are not small dogs. Products labeled for use only for dogs should only be used for dogs and never for cats. • Make sure that the weight range listed on the label is correct for your pet because weight matters. One pet may react differently to a product than another pet. When using these products, monitor your pet for any signs of an adverse reaction, including anxiousness, excessive itching or scratching, skin redness or swelling, vomiting, or any abnormal behavior.

Rodney Robards, DVM Southern Hills Veterinary Hospital 2242 E. 56th Pl. Tulsa, OK 74105 918.747.1311 www.southernhillsvet.com

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BUSINESS BANKER What is net worth, and why is it important when applying for a business loan? One of the most important factors that our bank considers when evaluating a business loan request is whether the client has sufficient net worth to qualify for a loan. Net worth is a company’s equity or assets in excess Sean Kouplen of liabilities. This is the cushion a business uses to operate when their cash flow suffers. This cushion can be excess cash owned by the business or owners; it can also be equity and assets that can be turned into cash in tough times. We analyze the applicant’s financial statement to determine if the cushion is adequate. Sometimes, business owners mistakenly withdraw much of a business’ cash when things are good, and there’s no cushion available when times get tough. Business owners that have an adequate cushion demonstrate discipline in their finances, making them a great candidate for a business loan.

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL

If a neighbor's tree falls on your house, whose insurance pays? In Oklahoma, we insure our own property. Your insurance pays for your damage from any tree that falls on your house, even if it’s the neighbor’s tree. It does not matter where the tree came from. It could be yours, the John Onorato neighbor’s or it could fall out of the sky from an unidentified owner. A standard home insurance policy also covers sheds, fences, awnings and other detached structures. Home insurance does not usually cover a tree that falls in your yard that causes no damage to a covered structure. The ground is not covered in a standard home owner’s policy. Tree removal is also not usually covered unless the tree falls on a covered structure or blocks a driveway or entrance to your home. Trees that fall on your auto, boat or motorcycle are not covered on your home policy. They are covered by separate auto, boat or motorcycle polices. For additional information on home insurance call or stop by your local AAA Insurance office.

John Onorato – Agent AAA Insurance 6808 S. Memorial Rd., Suite 208 Tulsa, OK 74133 • 918.872.7100 www.insuringoklahoma.com john.onorato@aaaok.org

Sean Kouplen Regent Bank 7136 S. Yale, Suite 100 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.488.0788 www.bankregent.com

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT What is a white paper, and why is it important to my marketing strategy?

PHYSICAL THERAPY My feet hurt. What can I do for plantar fasciitis?

You are a credible and reliable authority in your industry, and it’s important to position yourself as an expert. A white paper will help spread the word. A white paper is more than Jessica Dyer just a sales tool; it is a contribution to your industry. A well-executed white paper provides relevant and accurate information on a timely, industry-specific topic. It becomes a useful reference tool for your colleagues and customers, providing quick and factual information. It is important to remember that white papers are not based in opinion, they are always factual, with the sole intention of educating readers and helping your audience make decisions. They should be limited to one or two pages. Think of it as a lunch and learn on paper, providing your customers with bite-size information in an easily digestible format. A well executed white paper will not only become an effective sales tool, but will position your company as an authority in your industry, enhancing your overall marketing efforts.

Plantar fasciitis is an overuse injury when the tough, fibrous band of tissue that connects your heel bone to your toes becomes inflamed. Causes of plantar fasciitis include physical activity overload, occupations that Todd Petty, require increased standing or walking, PT/CSMT being flat footed or having high arches, and improper shoes. Symptoms of plantar fasciitis include sharp or burning pain in the heel and bottom of your foot that is worse upon waking, after long periods of standing or getting up from a seated position, and after exercise. First, try rest and ice to decrease the symptoms. If symptoms persist, your doctor may prescribe physical therapy for exercises to stretch the plantar fascia and strengthen the ankle and foot for improved stability. Night splints help to stretch the heel while sleeping so the plantar fascia does not become contracted overnight. Once symptoms have subsided, shoe inserts, properly fitting footwear and continuing your home exercises will help to maintain flexibility in the plantar fascia.

Jessica Dyer Emerge Marketing & PR 11063-D S. Memorial Dr. #445 918.925.9945 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

Todd Petty, PT/CSMT Excel Therapy Specialists 918.398.7400 www.exceltherapyok.com Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


Special Advertising Section

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. HOSPICE CARE My father has Alzheimer’s disease and he has been declining recently. His doctor is now recommending that we bring in hospice care. I am concerned we cannot afford this. Do you have any advice?

MARRIAGE COUNSELOR

I suspect my husband of six years is cheating; what signs should I look for? I’m sorry to hear you suspect your spouse may be cheating. The best clue is typically your own gut instinct, especially if you’ve never been suspicious before. Other comBrad Robinson, mon hints can be phone calls and LMFT text messages taken privately. More time away from home, longer working hours, more out-of-town travel and more evening or weekend meetings are clues. Showing an out of character preoccupation with personal appearance, abrupt transformation in hair or clothing style (especially a new image more appropriate at a singles bar), passwords on devices they refuse to share, efforts to lose weight and purchasing new, sexy underwear (that you never get to see on) are also clues. One of the most predictive emotional cues your spouse may be cheating is no longer saying, "I love you.” A combination of these actions could be indicators that your spouse may be cheating.

Brad Robinson, CEO Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Marriage Solutions 2121 S. Columbia Ave Suite 301 Tulsa, OK 74114 918.281.6060 www.MarriageSolutionsTulsa.com

PROFESSIONAL CLEANING SERVICE Summertime has finally arrived, but my windows are awfully dirty. What is the best way to clean them? Winter weather often leaves a layer of dirt on your windows, so it is important to prepare your home before welcoming the warm weather. Amy Bates Start by washing your windows with a vinegar and water mixture. We recommend cleaning them on a cloudy day so you can ensure that streaks are not left behind. Next, clean your window screens with soap and water, then leave the window open to let them dry. While cleaning your windows, check for worn weather-stripping. Replace these as needed to ensure that cool air stays in and warm air stays out.

Amy Bates Merry Maids 5656 S. Mingo Road Tulsa, OK 74146 918.250.7318 www.merrymaids.com

The good news is most private insurance companies as well as Medicare do cover hospice care. At Grace Hospice we work with patients to help them determine what type of coverage they have. Even if your insurance does not cover hospice care, we can help. At Grace Hospice, we are committed to ensuring every patient who needs hospice care receives it, regardless of ability to pay. The Grace Hospice Foundation is a 501 c-3 organization that subsidizes the cost of care for any individual who needs hospice care. Please call Grace Hospice any time at 918.744.7223 for more information.

Ava Hancock

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST What’s new in the dermal filler world? Juvederm Voluma® is a new FDAapproved hyaluronic acid dermal filler and is the first and only gel filler injected deep into the cheek muscle to improve age-related volume loss. It has been used in Europe and Canada for many years and was recently Malissa Spacek introduced in the U.S. When injected into the cheek, it gives a subtle lift, helping to restore and contour and giving a more youthful profile for up to two years. If you would like more information on Voluma or any other dermal fillers and how you can look younger and more refreshed, please call BA Med Spa at 918.872.9999 for a complimentary consultation.

“Grace Hospice: Caring for patients and families in Northeastern Oklahoma for 15 years” Ava Hancock Executive Director Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT I want to look a little different from the other guys at my office that have style. What are ways to change it up without looking like I am trying too hard? If you read anything from me, you know that I’m always encouraging others to establish a personal style. It’s Autumn Pohl just a big part of developing that individual character. Today, when it comes to clothing style for men, there are many ways to look unique. If you check out style blogs or even just catch a glimpse of the commentators from the game over the weekend, you will notice that it’s all in the small details. An idea would be something simple, like adding a pop of color to your pocket square or having a different design between your pocket square and your tie. How about trying out a new way to knot your tie? Try the Trinity knot or the Eldredge knot. Both very fresh looks can jazz up any suit. One of my favorite small details is matching the color of your shoe laces to your dress shirt. It’s a very soft detail that pulls a look together as if it was a fully finished look. Note that women do notice those details and appreciate the fact that you took the time to care. Don’t overthink your style. Do what comes natural and enjoy your individuality. Be inspired, but always be you.

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 South Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR

Is it possible to change negative thinking, or is that just part of personality? Thinking is automatic to us, like breathing. However, just as you can alter your breath, you can also alter your thinking. Most people develop negative thinking patterns we refer to as thinking errors. Amy Kesner, PhD, There are different ways you can change your thinking depending on what type of LPC, LADC thinking error you are experiencing. • Black and white thinking: Only thinking in terms of one extreme to another. To challenge this, allow yourself to see the middle, or gray area. • Over-generalizing: Usually identified by using words like “never” or “always.” Try challenging yourself by looking at the exceptions. • Negative focus: Always see the negative or explain a positive experience away. Logically, we know good things happen to all people, so try making a list of the positive things in your life. • Fortune telling: You assume things will always turn out bad for you. Changing negative thought habits can be challenging, but the first step is to acknowledge them. Sometimes it may be necessary to work with a professional to help find the right steps to challenge your thinking errors.

Amy Kesner All Things Psychological 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505 Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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S E N I O R L I V I N G FA C I L I T I E S

Confronting Tough Choices

Choosing a living facility for yourself or a loved one can be a difficult decision, but planning can help.

F

acing changes in living needs, whether as seniors or as a loved one concerned for a parent, grandparent or other relative, is something no one wants to accept. Confronting the situation, however, offers more choices for finding the right solution and a happier outcome for all.

Where Does It Begin?

Congregated housing, continued care retirement centers, naturally occurring retirement

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communities, skilled care facilities and nursing homes are descriptions in the senior housing lexicon. To simplify the search, most arrangements fall within three tiers of retirement facilities. Independent or alternative living provides 24-hour security in an apartment or house-like surrounding. Seniors manage their own lives and finances but have options for health care and housekeeping assistance, covered parking and recreational services. The occupant selects the degree of involvement CONTINUED ON P. 88


QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

There’s no ideal time to approach the subject of senior housing and living arrangements. When facing such questions of personal care, health and housing for yourself or a loved one when age or illness hinders independence, there are options. “We believe a wide range of accessible, affordable housing should be available to all seniors,” says Sean Voskhul, director of Oklahoma AARP. The organization’s website, www.aarp.org/cargiving, features useful tools comparing state-by-state health and assisted living costs plus more than 100 questions to ask when making a plan. Making the right transition starts with the right questions and some first steps. • Think, plan and discuss your future. How do you want to live your life? • Plan finances wisely. That may determine your choices.

• Request a copy of the Oklahoma Nursing Home Patient’s Rights from www. nursinghomepatientsrights.com or www.okdhs.org/NR and refer to it often.

• Expect respect at all levels at all times.

• Research options tailored to your needs. • Visit a prospective facility, eat a meal there and check on facility policies. • During a visit, ask the facility’s current residents, staff and health care professionals for their opinions and concerns about the center.

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South Park East Licensed Alzheimer's Care 405.631.7444 A recommended site by South Oklahoma City residents

Grove Nursing Center Skilled or Long Term Care 918.786.3223 Convenient to Grand Lake Area in Grove

The Lakes Skilled or Long Term Care 405.773.8900 Convenient to Northwest Oklahoma City and Bethany

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Grace Hospice serves Northeastern Oklahoma. Please call 918-744-7223 to learn how we can help you and your family.

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I am a Tulsa native, but the city is growing quickly. Services I need are moving south, where traffic is thick and fast. At Saint Simeon’s, I enjoy a stress-free life – time in the gardens, watching wildlife, and admiring beautiful flowers. I also love the regular chapel services and my favorite spot on campus – the warm-water therapy pool. Thanks to Saint Simeon’s, my family and I have gained something priceless – peace of mind. Sincerely, Pat

3701 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. Tulsa, OK 74106

Saint Simeon’s Resident Pat with daughter Kathleen and son-in-law Michael

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from the staff or their independence. Assisted living is a state-regulated facility designed for seniors requiring help with one or more daily needs living in an apartment or private room. Support staff depends on the assistance required. Specialized facilities for Alzheimer’s or memory care challenges exist. Skilled nursing care facilities require a state license and offer 24hour nursing care, both long- and short-term. Accommodations may be private or shared. Check the amenities offered, including transportation, physical therapy or registered dietitians in a consultant capacity, to fulfill particular needs. Ask about services provided and which are provided out-of-pocket. Each setting has advantages and disadvantages. Independent living provides the obvious pros with endless recreation opportunities, ease of living, house and yard care and expert onsite services. The downside may include expenses not met by Medicare, maintaining quality staff and the resident’s adaptability to a new living environment. Peace of mind for seniors and their families is a point in favor of assisted living. Eliminating the stress of living with chronic diseases, dependency on transportation, medication routines, daily care and isolation make assisted living a good choice for some individuals. The downside of an assisted living center is the expense. New residents may find it difficult parting from possessions, feeling isolated from family and pets and following what can be considered intrusive rules. A good nursing home facility provides round-the-clock medical services, the company of peers, safety and peace of mind. Some things to think about, however, are cost and separation from family. Also, families are too aware of news stories and lawsuits surrounding troubled nursing homes with poorly trained and vetted personnel. Whatever the situation and condition, seniors and their families should ask questions and research before deciding on the best living arrangements. For seniors, planning for the future is the best solution to do things on your terms. RHONDA SHEPHARD

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Wedding Guide

Nearing The Nuptial

Getting from proposal to wedding day doesn’t have to be stressful. Photography by Chris Humphrey

Wedding Planner or DIY

One question a couple faces when they begin planning their wedding is if they should hire a wedding planner or plan the wedding themselves. While the couple could use the money that would have been paid to a planner on other wedding expenses, the added stress of a DIY wedding may not be worth the trouble. “The biggest benefit of hiring a wedding planner is peace of mind,” says Kacy Hughes, Gilcrease Museum event sales coordinator. “The wedding planner is going to think of all the small details

that one might overlook. They are also going to be the point person on the day of the wedding, so the couple is not constantly communicating with vendors, but really getting to enjoy their day.” Hughes adds that a wedding planner can help the couple plan within their budget and stick to it. The Internet, however, has many planning resources for couples choosing to go it alone. Websites like Pinterest are a great jumping off point for inspiration, but doit-yourselfers should remember to infuse their own personality and creativity when crafting their perfect wedding. JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Wedding Guide

Selecting A Date

Before any other wedding details can be decided, the couple must select a date. With 365 options a year, it may take some time to pin down a day. The first step is to select which season best suits the wedding envisioned, especially if planning an outdoor event. Off-season weddings may keep some costs down, but unpredictable weather could make planning more difficult. Couples should try to avoid holidays or large sporting events for the sake of budget and guest attendance, unless there is a special meaning to them. Also, it is good to check with immediate family and close friends to make sure they do not have any conflicts with potential dates. Once the year has been whittled down to a few possible options, the couple can begin meeting with and booking vendors. “They should have a couple of dates in mind and be willing to be a bit flexible if they have their heart set on a particular venue, especially during the months of September, October, November, April, May and June,” says Hughes.

Securing a Venue

The recommended time to book the venue is nine to 11 months prior to the wedding day. Popular venues may book up years in advance for peak days. When selecting a location, make sure the practicality matches the appearance. It may be a gorgeous building, but no one will be able to tell when the guests are packed into a room that is too small. Ask what is included in the price of the venue, like tables and chair rental or a sound system. “Wedding budgets are very complex, but there are ways to save on your budget without skimping on the wedding,” says Hughes. “The first is selecting a venue that has a built in ambience so you do not have to supplement with over-the-top décor.”

Choosing A Caterer

The caterer should be booked right after the venue has been selected. Depending on the venue, an outside caterer may not be permitted. Many caterers will allow the couple to customize the menu to suit their needs, so the couple is not necessarily locked in to the venue’s typical fare. Hughes recommends scheduling menu tastings in order to select the perfect foods. “We can always make changes and substitutions before the event, but once the recep

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Wedding Guide

tion starts, there is no going back,” she says. It’s important to remember that the meals are typically priced per person, so cutting the guest list may be the best way to reduce the catering bill. As an alternative, Hughes recommends selecting a signature cocktail for the reception rather than having a full-service open bar. Optional services, such as bartenders and passed hors d’oeuvres, are not usually included in the base price, but rather charged hourly for each additional server needed. “Couples need to read through contracts thoroughly so there are not any surprises that greatly affect the budget,” says Hughes. “Some of these surprises include delivery fees, setup fees and minimums.” The type of catering – buffet or served meals – will both affect the tone of the reception and the cost of the service. Hughes adds that the expertise of the chef will affect the food presentation more than the menu choices. “Couples should always keep in mind catering minimums, reputation, food style and overall comfort with the person or company when selecting their caterer,” she says.

Finding A Photographer

Photographer Chris Humphrey says the best time to book the wedding photographer is typically between six to nine months prior to the wedding. However, during busier seasons, up to a year in advance may be a safer option in order to secure the photographer you want. He says when choosing someone, it is important to look for more than just photography skill. “You should also be looking for someone who is prepared to take care of you in any way,” he explains. “A wedding day is no place for big egos and artistic tantrums. This is the day when genuine wedding professionals all come together to work towards a common goal, which is taking care of the bride, groom and the entire group of family and friends surrounding them.” He says engagement photos are a great way to test out a potential photographer to make sure the business will be right for a couple’s wedding. While the couple will want photographs of all the important moments, it is crucial that the photographer not interfere with the true focus of the day. “This day is still about the couple and about their family and friends that are there to witness a wedding,” says Humphrey.

Deciding on a Dress

Bridal Palace owner Houda Elauf recommends picking the wedding dress at least six months before the ceremony so it can be ordered and altered. She says it takes four months for the manufacturer to ship the dress and four to six weeks for alterations. Bridesmaids’ dresses take about three weeks to be altered. On the day of the appointment, Elauf recommends the bride bring photos of what she likes so the consultant is better prepared to help her find the perfect dress. Limiting the number of people at the appointment also will make the process go more smoothly. “Everyone has his own opinion, and many opinions get the bride very confused,” says Elauf. As for the bridesmaids, coordinating dresses rather than matching them will allow everyone in the bridal party to leave with a flattering dress. Elauf recommends playing with color, style and fabric. Most importantly, “Love what you pick, pick what you love, and be happy,” says Elauf.

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Wedding Guide

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Wedding Guide

Creating A Cake

Ann’s Bakery manager Shannon Harris recommends booking the baker for the cake at least six months before the wedding. Many bakeries offer free consultations and tastings by appointment. If the bride and groom have different tastes, there are options to make sure they both get a cake they can enjoy. Each tier can have its own flavor, and a groom’s cake can reflect his taste and personality. Harris says many designs are included in the price of the cake, but more detailed and time-consuming undertakings will cost a bit more. “As for money-saving tips, you can order a smaller bride’s cake and sheet cakes to serve,” says Harris. “Cupcakes are an option, also.” When selecting a bakery, Harris advises couples to make sure it is dependable, licensed by the state health department, and has delivery service, if needed. “Word-of-mouth carries great weight; your vendors always know of other great, reputable vendors,” she says.

Picking Flowers

Toni Garner of Toni’s Flowers and Gifts advises that flowers should be ordered at least three months before the wedding, and although selecting flowers is really a matter of personal taste, there are some practical matters to keep in mind. Ask if the flowers will be in season at the time of the wedding. Even though out-ofseason flowers can be flown in, the cost is likely to significantly increase. There is also the choice of using real or silk flowers. Silk flowers may not save money, but their durability makes them worth consideration. They won’t wilt or be damaged on transport. This lasting quality allows newlyweds to keep their flowers as a memento of their wedding day that can easily be used as décor in their home. However, silk flowers may not create the same impact as the real thing. “Fresh flowers are a great way to treat yourself on your special day,” says Garner. “The only way I would suggest silk flowers would be an allergy situation.” As for preserving a bouquet of real flowers after the wedding, Garner says the wedding photos may be the best way to go.

Ring Recommendations

Wedding bands should be ordered at least six to eight weeks before the wedding, but unless the couple knows exactly what they

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Wedding Guide

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Wedding Guide

want, the search for the perfect rings should start even earlier. Unlike most other wedding decisions, this is the one that the couple will have to live with long after the guests have gone. This is why it is important for the couple to find a trustworthy jeweler who can help guide them through their options. “A reputable jeweler will educate you about diamonds so you are getting the best quality for your money and advise on what looks best,” says Donna Grant, sales associate for Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. In addition to finding a ring that is aesthetically pleasing, it is also important to make sure it will be durable enough to survive daily wear and tear. “Look for rings that have a nice weight to the band and securely set diamonds,” says Grant. “Rings with very tall settings may snag and have maintenance issues if worn every day.” It is also a good idea to select a ring that is not overly trendy, or it may lose its appeal soon after the wedding. This doesn’t mean the ring has to lack personality, however. “Look for classic designs with interesting detail that makes them look current and fresh,” says Grant. For couples on a tight budget, she recommends a style called the halo, which features a circle of diamonds around the main diamond. “This allows for a bigger look for a lower price because the center diamond is smaller,” she explains. The permanency of this decision can easily make it overwhelming for the couple, so Grant urges couples to relax and take their time while shopping. “Narrow down style choices and focus on quality. Don’t get bogged down in too many details,” she says.

Managing Stress

Stress is imminent when planning a wedding, pushing many couples to the consider eloping. It doesn’t have to be so stressful, though, as long as the couple can step back and look at the bigger picture. “The key to having a great wedding is to plan an event that makes you happy and to set realistic expectations,” says Hughes. “Ask for help, and trust the professionals.” Remember, when hiring vendors, the cheapest option is not always the best option. “I can’t think of anything more stressful than wondering if the job is going to get done the way you dreamed it would,” says Humphrey. Once the couple is confident they have hired the right people, it will be easier to let go of control. “On the wedding day, I recommend you wind up the vendors and let them do their thing,” says Humphrey. “As a wedding professional, I do my best work when I know my bride is confident in me and just lets me do what she hired me to do.” Garner recommends the couple relax, surround themselves with family and friends and enjoy the day no matter what happens. “Probably the best advice for eliminating stress is simply to remember this day is about the bride and groom getting married,” says Humphrey. “The food and the music and the flowers and all the decorations are wonderful, but at the end of the day, the emphasis has to be placed on what this day is really about.” BETH WEESE

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Wedding Guide

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Wedding Guide

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Taste

FOOD, DRINK AND OTHER PLEASURES MARY’S ITALIAN TRATTORIA SERVES A TANGY PASTA PUTTANESCA THAT’S DECEPTIVELY SIMPLE. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT.

TA S T E

A Grand Old Name

Mary’s Italian Trattoria shows what being a real classic is all about.

I

talian restaurants are family affairs, and Mary’s, one of the oldest Italian restaurants continuously running in Tulsa, is no exception. Just walk around the old brick building and in through the back door – all the regulars do – and see why. In the tiny, spotless kitchen, you’ll find (if you’re lucky) owner Bruce Sternad stirring the long-simmering marinara. Everything you eat at Mary’s Italian Trattoria is cooked by Sternad, his wife, Sherry, or their son. Ahead is the bright, pleasant dining area. The walls, a welcoming gray pastel, are barely visible – every inch is covered with framed portraits and memorabilia, all family relics. Sherry Sternad’s face lights up when you ask about the portraits. “That’s my great-great-grandpa on his wedding day,” she says,

pointing to a proud yet somewhat terrified-looking young man in one of the photos. “That was back around 1875. Now over there is my great-aunt Christina’s christening gown, and right next to it is my great-grandmother’s wedding gloves and shoes. Those doilies on the tables? My great-grandma crocheted them. “And that old lady? She’s the only one not from our family,” Sherry Sternad continues. “When I was a girl I spent summers on my grandma’s farm just over the Kansas line. She was our neighbor, and I’d ride my pony over to see her.” Aside from those pleasant Kansas summers, Sherry Sternad grew up overseas. “My father sold mud,” she wryly says. He was, in fact, a drilling fluids engineer, and wherever oil wells pierced the ground and needed “mud” to cool and lubricate the pumps, that’s where they lived – Libya, Iran, Australia, Singapore, Norway. “I was exposed to foreign cultures,” she says, “and meanwhile, I learned to cook from watching my mom.” The last thing she expected was to end up running an Italian restaurant one day. When the Sternads moved to Tulsa, she looked for a part-time job and found Mary’s. This was around 1987, and in those days, Mary’s Italian Trattoria was run by an Italian woman named Mary, who learned all her recipes from her large family back in Providence, R.I. Working as wait staff, the Sternads bought the restaurant JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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when its owner retired in 1991. Twenty years later, many customers mistakenly call Sherry Sternad “Mary,” but she doesn’t mind. Many of the dishes are still based on those original recipes, although, she says, “we’ve tweaked and improved them.” Mary’s is a labor of love, heavy on the labor. Sherry Sternad does the prep work and desserts. She makes the salad dressing (a 19-ingredient secret recipe), she helps bake the bread, and she makes the sinfully fabulous tiramisu. “There’ve been people who’ve traveled all over the world,” she says, “and they tell us our tiramisu is the best they’ve ever eaten.” She supervises the front of the house, which means she knows most of the customers. “Almost all of our customers are regulars,” she says. “Some come every week, and I make sure they have their favorite table. I’ve seen couples come in on their first date, and I’ve seen them a few years later when the man kneels and proposes marriage; and then I see them every year as they come here to celebrate their anniversary.”

FAV E S POTATO MUNCHIES AT RAPHAEL’S BBQ & GRILL. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

T H E B UZ Z

YOU WON’T FIND FAST FOOD AT MARY’S – SAUCES, LIKE THE MARINARA IN CHICKEN CACCIATORE, ARE SLOWLY COOKED TO PERFECTION.

The menu is classic Italian, and, like any classic, the selection hasn’t changed much over the years. There’s the champagne chicken – pounded cutlets with a rich, complex cream sauce, served with fettucine alfredo. It’s Sherry Sternad’s favorite, but she’s also proud of the eggplant parmigiana. Even the simplest dishes, such as spaghetti and meatballs, are memorable thanks to the delicious, hearty red sauce. Back in the kitchen, Sternad and the couple’s son stay busy making the creamy alfredo sauce several times every evening. They crank the bulky old pasta machine to make homemade fettuccine. They stir the simmering Bolognese. They cook each dish to order. “Our food is not fast food,” says Sherry Sternad, “and when we’re busy, it takes a long time … sometimes people get upset at the wait, but we just can’t compromise our quality.” 1313 E. 15th St., Tulsa. 918.585.2495 BRIAN SCHWARTZ

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Grill

Raphael’s BBQ and

Chef Rapheal Jacob, owner of Rapheal’s BBQ & Grill in Broken Arrow, blends cultures in his fusion cooking; it’s this focus that makes his barbecue different. “We are not Texas barbecue, we are not Kansas City barbecue, we are just barbecue,” Jacobs says. Seasoned with hints of Mexican, Indian and Mediterranean flavors, Raphael’s has something for just about every craving one may have. Jacob builds his core menu around three staples – brisket, pulled pork and ribs – but chicken, quail and various sides are also on the menu. Whether you go with a plate of ribs, a sandwich or tacos (brisket or pulled pork wrapped in flour or corn tortillas and topped with fresh cilantro, red onion and chopped tomato), meals arrive at the table well-dressed. Gone are the paper plates, wax sheets and red plastic baskets common to barbecue joints. Rapheal’s plates on real china and adds garnish to everything. As Jacob likes to say, “It is barbecue with a twist.” 2001 W. Houston St., Broken Arrow. www.raphaelbbq.com – Jill Meredith

Dot Wo Garden

Dot Wo Garden may not be located in Oklahoma City’s Asian District, but as many diners know, good food can’t be contained by borders. A staple of Oklahoma City’s cuisine scene since 1989, owner Denny Ha moved Dot Wo Garden out of its modest strip center shoe box into a spacious new location in late 2012 in what had been a Golden Corral restaurant. The move increased seating capacity, which meant new seating was in order, but Ha didn’t stop there – Dot Wo revamped the space and lighting to reflect a cool contemporary feel with a fully-stocked, under-lit bar. In an even bigger move, Dot Wo Garden expanded its menu to include sushi, including specialty rolls like the majestic Grand Canyon (tempura shrimp, lobster tail, scallions) and the Thunder Up (a spicy stack of soft shell crab, avocado and tempura shrimp). The restaurants gained new customers even as it reassured regulars Dot Wo Garden was the same restaurant serving fresh offerings of Asian fusion, Chinese, Japanese and Vietnamese cuisine along with a respectable selection of vegetarian options. And those prices still make it a favorite for dine-in, take-out, dinner, lunch and those sudden ginger-garlic cravings. 6161 N. May Ave., Oklahoma City. www.dot-wo.com – Karen Shade DOT WO GARDEN’S CHINESE BROCCOLI IS AS FRESH AS IT GETS. BY PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.


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Taste

W H AT W E ’ R E E AT I N G

THE GOLDEN SADDLE SERVES UP A VARIETY OF RICE DISHES. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

Persian

Golden Saddle BBQ Steakhouse The pine shelves are laden with Wild West trinkets, and tables are jammed with truckers in overalls hunched over huge plates of chicken fried steak. But you’re at Golden Saddle for something else.

If you ask about what is cryptically described on the menu as “Chef Choice $9.99 per person,” the waitress finds a long, empty table and drags it next to yours. That’s your first clue a feast is in the offing. A spread of Levantine appetizers soon materializes: hummus, tabouleh, baba ghanoush, fluffy pita bread. It’s only a prelude. Energetic owner and chef Nasim Salari learned his trade as a child in Iran, where family dinner is important and everyone – man, woman and child – plays a part. An enormous platter arrives. A roast lamb shank atop yellow rice. “That’s lamb rice,” explains Salari. “We take the juice from the roasting lamb and cook the rice in it.” Then comes an even larger platter of white rice topped with stacks of lamb chops and koobideh kebabs, spiced minced meat molded around a skewer and cooked on a charbroiler. The plates keep coming – a roast chicken, roasted whole tomatoes, bowls of khoresht, the sprightly herbal stews that are a hallmark of Iranian cuisine. Too tame? Ask for the kale pache – lamb’s eyes, brain, tongue and feet all mixed together in a bracing, vibrant soup. 6618 E. Admiral Pl., Tulsa. 918.835.2882 – Brian Schwartz

Diner

Hungry Frog Restaurant

YOU CAN’T GO WRONG WITH CHICKEN FRIED STEAK AT THE HUNGRY FROG RESTAURANT.

There are only two reasons why you shouldn’t try the Hungry Frog, the small Oklahoma City diner that has been serving breakfast and lunch since 1976. The first reason is if you have a fear of amphibians, since you’ll find frog figurines and art all over the place. The second is if you have a problem with tidy, unpretentious establishments more interested in making good food hot and hearty rather than trendy. Yes, this is the kind of place you find competent, genuinely amiable staff, generous breakfast plates, tasty burgers, chicken fried steak, juicy pork chops and frog legs. These perfectly battered, seasoned and fried delicacies won’t be on everyone’s menu (notably, the frog phobic), but to those who hunger for something new-yet-strangely-familiar at the same time, they’re a small adventure, and an affordable one at that – most people love the prices. 1101 N. Pennsylvania, Oklahoma City. 405.524.0686 – Karen Shade S I M P LY H E A L T H Y

How Sweet It Is

It should be so simple. Sugar – it’s pure, it’s natural, has no fat and relatively few calories per teaspoon, yet we villainize it and cut it out of our diets with a variety of substitutes, including artificial sweeteners. According to an article published in 2012 by Harvard Medical School, however, artificial sweeteners may actually contribute to weight gain by giving a false sense of security that says its all right to eat in excess as long as you’re drinking a diet soda. The article goes on to state that artificial sweeteners can make people crave even more sugar while making un-sweet foods less palatable. Some people, including diabetics, should consult with a doctor about sugar substitutes, but if you’re looking for a natural replacement for processed sugar, choices such as maple syrup, molasses, honey, agave or date sugar are easily available. Used in moderation, a little sugar may be preferable to filling your body with artificial chemicals. – Jill Meredith

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

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Entertainment G R E AT T H I N G S T O D O I N O K L A H O M A GINA BECK AND ALISON LUFF ARE THE WITCHES OF OZ IN WICKED, RETURNING TO TULSA THIS MONTH. PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS, COURTESY CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS.

So Delightfully Wicked

T

The Oz-based musical returns to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center for the summer.

here’s something about a show that drums up big excitement even after it has played town more than a few times. Of course, not all musicals are truly Wicked. The 2003 hit Broadway production that starred Broken Arrow sweetheart Kristin Chenoweth along with Frozen’s Idina Menzel in its original cast has toured the world a few times over and made its way to Oklahoma several times, but when it returns for a three-week engagement this month, it will be as if it was the first. Celebrity Attractions brings the sparkling fantasy musical Wicked back to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center’s Chapman Music Hall. Based on the 1995 novel Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire, Wicked the musical tells a different side of Frank L. Baum’s classic The Wizard of Oz of how two unlikely friends, Elphaba and Galinda, grow to become the Wicked

Witch of the West and Glinda the Good. While Elphaba is spirited and fiercely independent, Glinda is bubbly and popular. A love triangle drives a wedge between them, but it takes the political underpinnings of Oz to make them enemies. But there’s more to good and evil in this tale of friendship, power, loyalty and love. Wicked reveals more about the characters of Oz and interjects the story with humor, lavish costumes, effects and sets along with the outstanding original music and lyrics by award-winning composer Stephen Schwartz. Wicked plays the Tulsa PAC, 101 E. Third St., Tulsa, June 18-July 6. Tickets are $35-$175 at www.celebrityattractions.com. Visit the site to learn about Celebrity Attractions’ next season of shows headed for Tulsa and Oklahoma City. KAREN SHADE JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY Janet Rutland Sings the Sixties June 20-21 The Sand Springs vocalist and actress gets down with her 10th summer cabaret show of ‘60s hits at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.myticketoffice.com

Rick Miller’s BOOM June 20-21 The one-man, multimedia performance looks at the Baby Boom generation on stage at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com Sweeney Todd June 21-29 LOOK Musical Theatre turns up the macabre in Stephen Sondheim’s dark musical and satire of a bloodthirsty barber bent on revenge at the VanTrease Performing Arts Center for Education. www.looktheatre.org

PHOTO BY SCOTT SIMONTACCHI, COURTESY SUGAR HILL RECORDS.

Entertainment

Calendar

TATE Awards

June 22 Tulsa’s theater community comes together at the Cascia Hall Performing Arts Center to see which productions earn the top prizes in excellence. www. greenroomok.com

Les Miserables

June 24-28 The epic musical set against the French Revolution is presented by Lyric Theatre at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.lyrictheatreokc. com

Dreamgirls June 26-29 Follow the hit Broadway play about the making of a ‘60s girls group with Certain Curtain Theatre at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com

PERFORMANCES 30th OK Mozart If you’ve ever dropped in on OK Mozart, you know there’s more to the music festival than Mozart. After three decades, the showcase of art has gone from a mainstay for classical and chamber music performances to a celebration of all music. And these days, OK Mozart invites artists of all kinds – visual arts to theatrical – to Bartlesville’s venues. One location, however, is most prominent to the festival, and that’s the Bartlesville Community Center, 300 S.E. Adams Blvd. There, visitors this year will hear the masterful pianist John Kimura Parker, rising folk star Sarah Jarosz and the festival’s resident Amici New York Orchestra. Don’t restrict yourself to the center, however. The Miro Quartet plays at the city’s St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, while the orchestra brings patriotic numbers to the lawn at nearby Woolaroc Museum. Visit www.okmozart.com to see who’s playing where between Saturday, June 7, and Saturday, June 14. PERFORMANCES Charles Ross: One-Man Star Wars Trilogy June 1, 13 Canadian comic

Charles Ross delights the geek masses and more with his fun show combining the Star Wars film trilogy into one hour and all by himself at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall and Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.okcciviccenter.com

Ophelia Orchestra June 3 Ragtime for Tulsa welcomes the 10-piece band from Oslo, Norway, to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center to play ragtime and early jazz hits from Scott Joplin, Jelly Roll Morton and more. www. tulsapac.com The Complet Wrks of Wlm Shkspr Abridged June 4-22 The Bard’s

most famous plays are pressed into a 96-min-

ute satire at Arkansas Repertory Theatre, Little Rock, Ark. www.therep.org

Twelfth Night

June 5-29 Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park opens a new season with the romantic comedy of disguise, a love triangle, warring kingdoms and yellow stockings. www.oklahomashakespeare.org

Other Desert Cities

Thru June 7 Carpenter Square Theatre presents the Jon Robin Baitz drama of a writer returning home and his soon-to-be-published memoir recalling happenings his family would rather forget. www. carpentersquare.com

OK Mozart Opening Night Celebration June 7 Head up to Bartlesville

for two special block party events and performances to open the 30th anniversary year of great chamber music, orchestral concerts, folk artists and more. www.okmozart.com

John Kimura Parker and the Amici New York Orchestra June 8 The

star concert pianist joins OK Mozart’s resident orchestra along with the festival’s All-State Youth Orchestra at the Bartlesville Community Center. www. okmozart.com

M o z a r t ’s T h e Magic Flute June Charles Ross: One-Man Star Wars Trilogy

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11 OK Mozart presents the Amici New York Orchestra

and Bartlesville Choral Society in a night of semi-staged selections from Mozart’s opera. www.okmozart.com

Sarah Jarosz

June 12 Rising folk artist Jarosz graces OK Mozart with Amici New York Orchestra musicians in concert at the Bartlesville Community Center. www.okmozart.com

Brightmusic Chamber Ensemble Spring Festival June 12-17 The en-

semble plays “The Music of France” for its third festival season at St. Paul’s Cathedral, Oklahoma City. www.brightmusic.org

Woolaroc Outdoor Concert June 13 OK Mozart continues its traditional outdoor concert at Woolaroc Museum and Wildlife Preserve with patriotic works, including Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture. www.okmozart. com Blue Whale Comedy Festival June 13-15 The weekend showcases the best improv, sketch and stand-up comedy across the country at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center, Guthrie Green and Comedy Parlor. www. tulsapactrust.org

OK Mozart Grand Finale Concert June 14 The festival wraps its special anniversary year presentation with a grand finale from the Amici New York Orchestra, the Bartlesville Choral Society and soloists performing Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in D Minor at the Bartlesville Community Center. www.okmozart.com

The Gondoliers

June 18-28 Staying true to its beginnings, LOOK Musical Theatre brings the charming Gilbert & Sullivan musical

of mistaken identity and romance in Venice to the VanTrease Performing Arts Center for Education. www.looktheatre.org

Wicked

June 18-July 6 A musical favorite returns to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center as Celebrity Attractions brings the Tony Awardwinner about the witches of Oz and what really happened before Dorothy arrived. www. celebrityattractions.com

Vintage Wildflowers Tulsa trio lauded for its way of tying together Celtic, folk and bluegrass into an irresistible instrumental dialogue takes the prowess it showed at the Kennedy Center to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.myticketoffice.com

June 19 The

A Really Cool, Cool Show (Please Come!) June 27-28 Performance artists JohnTom Knight brings a coming-of-age story to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www. myticketoffice.com

Mistakes Were Made June 27-July 19 Craig Wright’s farce about an off-Broadway producer in over his head takes off at Carpenter Square Theatre. www.carpentersquare.com The Drunkard and The Olio Ongoing The melodrama continues with heroes, damsels in distress and over-the-top characters plus an entertaining musical revue featuring celebrity drop-in guests most Saturdays of the year at Tulsa Spotlight Theatre. www. spotlighttheatre.org

IN CONCERT Chvrches

June 1 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Vampire Weekend

June 1 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros June 3 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

cainsballroom.com

Book of Days June 19-22 Theatre Pops brings Lanford Wilson’s play about a Missouri town with a cheese plant, a fundamentalist church and a community theater and how one play and actress change everything. www. myticketoffice.com LOOK Cabarets June 19-29 LOOK Musical Theatre’s ensemble shows a different side in a series of revue-style shows at the VanTrease Performing Arts Center for Education. www.looktheatre. org

Eddie Izzard: Force Majeure


– a unicorn, a mammoth and more – in this show of legends that also features circus performers at the BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com

Scooby-Doo Live! Musical Mysteries June 14 Hop in the Mystery Machine and solve ghoulish mysteries with Scooby and the gang at the Mabee Center. www. mabeecenter.com

Fun & Frolic Family Magic Show June 15 Master magician Steve Lancaster mystifies and excites with illusion and sleight-of-hand tricks along with Sponji the Clown at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapactrust.org

PHOTO COURTESY ATLANTIC RECORDS.

IN CONCERT

Bruno Mars

bokcenter.com

June 4 BOK Center. www.

Dr. Dog

June 5 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Reel Big Fish

June 5 Bricktown Music Hall. www.bricktownmusichall.com

Christopher Cross

June 20 River Spirit Casino. www.riverspirittulsa.com

The Avett Brothers

June 21 Cox Business Center. www.bokcenter.com

Eddie Izzard: Force Majeure

Tallgrass Music Festival

June 21 Rose State Performing Arts Center, Midwest City. www.myticketoffice.com

Backstreet Boys & Avril Lavigne

Steely Dan June 21 Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com

June 6 Chesapeake Energy Arena. www. chesapeakearena.com

com

June 5-7 Skiatook. www.tallgrassmusicfestival.com

Jerry Seinfeld June 7 Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com Thompson Square

www.frontiercity.com

June 7 Frontier City.

The Haunted Windchimes

June

8 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Don Williams June 10 Rose State Performing Arts Center, Midwest City. www. myticketoffice.com Toadies

June 12 Diamond Ballroom. www. diamondballroom.net

Black Flag

June 12 OKC Farmers Public Market. www.ticketstorm.com

Margo & The Nuclear So and So’s June 13 Opolis, Norman. www.ticketstorm. com

Zendaya

frontiercity.com

June 14 Frontier City. www.

Andrew Bird & the Hands of Glory June 15 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

cainsballroom.com

Sevendust

June 17 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

TechN9ne

June 18 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Neon Trees

June 19 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

A Wilhelm Scream

June 19 The Conservatory. www.conservatoryokc.com

Granger Smith June 20 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Karmin

June 21 Frontier City. www.frontiercity.

Eddie Izzard: Force Majeure

June

22 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Tech N9ne June 24 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com Collective Soul

June 25 The Joint, Hard Rock Tulsa. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

OKC Fest

June 27-28 Merle Haggard, Dierks Bentley and Lady Antebellum play the free outdoor music festival at the Myriad Botanical Gardens. www.okcfest.com

Chris Young frontiercity.com

June 28 Frontier City. www.

www.tulsashock.net

v. Phoenix June 6 v. New York June 10 v. Los Angeles June 13 v. Seattle June 15 v. Los Angeles June 28 v. Phoenix June 29

OKC RedHawks

www.okcredhawks.com v. Memphis May 31-June 3 v. Salt Lake June 9-12 v. Las Vegas June 13-16 v. Omaha June 26-29

Tulsa Drillers

www.tulsadrillers.com v. Midland May 30-June 1 v. Arkansas June 11-14 v. Springfield June 15-18 v. San Antonio June 25-27

Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse June 20-29 Taking a purse to school changes everything for Lilly in this production from Spotlight Children’s Theater. www.spotlighttheater.org Honk! Jr. June 25-29 The misadventures of a gawky duckling discovering true beauty is told at the Oklahoma Children’s Theatre. www. oklahomachildrenstheatre.org Kidsfest

June 28-29 The weekend belongs to kids at Woolaroc Museum & Wildlife Preserve near Bartlesville with and old-fashioned circus theme, jugglers, pony rides, games. www. woolaroc.org

ART Deborah Gaspar

Thru June Jewelry is art in a special exhibition of work by designer and artist Gaspar at J. Claudette Gallery. www. jclaudettegallery.com

Ansel Adams: An American Perspective Thru June 1 Nearly 60 photographs of landscapes by one of the most well-known and respected American photographers go on exhibit at Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www. okcmoa.com

Brett Weston: Land, Sea and Sky Thru June 1 The Oklahoma City Museum of Art celebrates the recent gift from Christian Keesee of 150 photographs by Weston, whose used close-ups and abstracted detail to turn ordinary objects and landscapes into fascinating images. www.okcmoa.com

v. Corpus Christi June 28-30

Oklahoma City Energy www.energyfc.com v. Sacramento June 14 v. Rochester June 22 v. Sacramento June 28

Noire

June 6-26 Nathan Lee and other artists explore the shifting definitions of African-American culture in an invitational exhibition at Living Arts of Tulsa. www.livingarts. org

Tulsa Athletics

www.tulsaathletics.com v. Joplin June 6 v. OKC FC June 14 v. Corinthians FC June 20 v. Dallas City FC June 27

Plein Air Invitational on Brady: Show and Sale June 6-29 Drop in to see what Tulsa artists have been up to in plain sight at the Zarrow Center for Arts Education. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

NCAA Women’s College World Series Thru June 4 Oklahoma City All Sports

Association and the University of Oklahoma host the 2014 tournament of women’s softball at the ASA Hall of Fame Stadium, Oklahoma City. www. okcallsports.org

Endeavor Games June 5-8 Athletes with physical disabilities train all year to compete at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond in such events as table tennis, wheelchair basketball, archery, sitting volleyball, shooting, track and field. www.uco.edu/wellness Tulsa Tough

SPORTS Tulsa Shock

Bruno Mars When Bruno Mars stopped in Oklahoma City last August during his Moonshine Jungle World Tour, some Tulsans felt a little left out of the chance to see perhaps the hottest pop music act of the moment on stage. But patience is a virtue, and the BOK Center seats thousands. The next leg of Mars’ tour stops at 200 S. Denver Ave. at 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 4. The Grammy Award-winning artist and Billboard magazine’s 2013 Artist of the Year is known for his hit singles “Locked Out of Heaven,” “When I Was Your Man” and “Treasure.” Acclaimed for his songwriting, Mars’ charismatic performances have earned him equal praise and sky-rocketing ticket sales, especially following his half-time show at this year’s Super Bowl. And it’s that kind of magic that every concertgoer expects at a Bruno Mars show. Unfair? Maybe, but he has yet to let anyone down. Tickets are $51.50-$87 at www.bokcenter.com.

June 6-8 Take the challenge of Cry Baby Hill, leisurely tour T-Town on your own steam or find a pace in between during the annual bicycling weekend event for riders of all levels. www.tulsatough.com

Oil and Wood: Oklahoma Moderns George Bogart and James Henkle June Red Earth Festival 55th annual weekend with barrel racing, bull riding and more takes place at “the birthplace of rodeo,” the 101 Ranch rodeo grounds, Ponca City. www.101wildwestrodeo.com

Battlegrounds MMA

Oklahoma City Nationals Drag Boat Races June 6-8 Fast boats make

June 27 Mixed martial arts fighting at the BOK Center features native Oklahoman and MMA welterweight champion Johny Hendricks and Kenny Monday, Olympic gold medal winner and Oklahoma State University wrestling star. www.bokcenter.com

Jim Thorpe Native American Games June 8-14 Athletes from across the

Sandridge Stars & Stripes River Festival June 28 The Independence Day-themed

waves on the Oklahoma River near downtown Oklahoma City. www.okcmotorsports.com

continent play hard for honors at the third annual games at Grand Casino, Oklahoma Baptist University and other locations in Shawnee. www. jimthorpegames.com

Oklahoma Freewheel

June 8-14 The 35th edition of the state’s premiere biking tour takes participants through small towns and scenic highlights across the state from the Red River to Kansas. www.okfreewheel.com

101 Wild West Rodeo

June 12-14 The

festival includes a 500-meter kayak/5k run duathlon, the Stars & Stripes Regatta, dragon boat racing, OGE NightSprints and more. www. boathousedistrict.org

FAMILY Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey: Legends May 31-June 1 The

circus summons mythical and mysterious creatures

7-Sept. 14 The Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art shows works from two professors emerti of the University of Oklahoma School of Art & Art History. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Prix de West Invitational June 13-Aug. 3 More than 30 works of fine art – paintings and sculpture – by contemporary Western artists are the main attraction of this art sale and exhibition at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org National Contemporary Realism 2014 Thru June 14 The M.A. Doran Gallery presents “Exceptional Realism by Artists Throughout the Country” in a variety of media. www.madorangallery.com

Masters Art Show June 21-July 19 The Five Civilized Tribes Museum in Muskogee presents its annual show of work by some of the most significant American Indian artists working today. www.fivetribes.org Gods and Heroes: Masterpieces from the École des Beaux-Arts June 21-Sept. 14 About 140 paintings, sculptures and art works on paper dating between the 17th

JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Top of the Town

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA CITY ENERGY.

Entertainment

June 12 The sixth annual event benefiting Child Care Resource Center of Tulsa takes guests to the rooftops of Tulsa’s tallest downtown buildings, where great food and views await. www.ccrctulsa.org

Andrew Bird & The Hands of Glory

Junior Achievement Golf Classic June 13 Game benefits Junior Achievement

Oklahoma City and takes place at Gaillardia Country Club. www.jaok.org

The Most Amazing Race

SPORTS Oklahoma City Energy Who’d have thought Oklahoma, a bastion of all-American sports like football, basketball and baseball, would be struck by that variety of football madness that incites a fervor for striped scarves? Oklahoma City is serious about its sports, and it seems the Oklahoma City Energy is about to become the Sooner state’s next game obsession. Also known as The Grid, the football club is the city’s pro soccer (alright, football) team in both the USL Pro and North American Soccer League. The Energy plays its home games at Pribil Stadium at Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School, 801 N.W. 50th St., Oklahoma City. This is the team’s first big season, but the Energy’s home opener last month proved to be a draw when the match sold out. The team may have lost that game, but soccer is known for its loyal supporters, and the Energy has them. Single game tickets start at $7. For more, see www.energyfc.com. and 19th centuries go up in this exhibit at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa. com

24 Works on Paper

Thru June 28 The unique collaborative show between Individual Artists of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition goes up at the Tulsa Artists Coalition Gallery. www.ovac-ok.org

Oklahoma Colors: Earth, Sky and Water Thru June 28 Artist Joey

Frisillo shows her latest landscapes at Performing Arts Studio, Norman. www.pasnorman.org

In the Spirit of Allan Houser

June 28-29 Join Gilcrease Museum for a weekend of activities shining light on the life and work of the late Allan Houser. Events include film screenings. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Identity & Inspiration

Thru June 29 Philbrook Downtown showcases pieces from Philbrook Museum of Art’s collection of American Indian art with historic and traditional works as well as contemporary pieces. www.philbrook.org

Opening Abstraction Thru June 29 This exhibit of abstract works in a variety of mani-

festations continues at Philbrook Downtown contemporary gallery. www.philbrook.org

Form and Line: Allan Houser’s Sculpture and Drawings Thru June 29 Gilcrease Museum exhibits work of the Chiricahua Apache artist. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu

Naomi Wanjiku

Thru June 29 The multimedia artist, who just had her first solo exhibition in the fall in London, brings her sculptural works to 108 Contemporary. www.108contemporary.org

Monet and the Seine: Impressions of a River June 29-Sept. 21 Philbrook Mu-

seum focuses on Claude Monet’s intimate connection to the river Seine in an exhibit bringing together pieces from across his career. www.philbrook.org

Collective Past: Works on Paper Thru July 20 Philbrook Museum of Art exhibits its diverse collection of art on paper – from European traditions to American contemporary – and the generosity of collectors who gifted items to build the collection. www.philbrook.org

Allan Houser: On the Roof Thru July 27 Six abstract bronze sculptures by the famed Oklahoma artist go on exhibit at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art roof terrace as part of a regional focus on the late Apache artist on the centennial of his birth. www. okcmoa.com

Making Change Thru June 30 The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum tells the stories of groundbreaking coin designs by sculptors Laura Garden Fraser and Glenna Goodacre. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Art 365

The William S. Paley Collection: A Taste for Modernism Thru July

Jason Willaford Thru Aug. 22 The Dallas mixed media artist best known for his re-purposed billboard vinyl series of found art work brings his latest projects and exhibition to Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center. www. oklahomacontemporary.org

7 More than 60 works of art created between 1880-1940 by Paul Gauguin, Matisse, Cezanne, Degas, Picasso and Derain are in this collection of the late CBS founder and on exhibit at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark. www.crystalbridges. org

Eureka Springs Blues Weekend

110

13 Gilcrease Museum has the goods when it comes to contemporary Western art – the annual exhibition and art sale are back with great works by featured artists Greg Beecham and Ross Matteson among many others. www. gilcrease.utulsa.edu

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

Rendezvous Artists’ Retrospective Exhibition and Art Sale Thru July

Thru Aug. 9 The innovative work of five Oklahoman artists working through the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition goes on exhibit at the Hardesty Arts Center in Tulsa. www. art365.org

Beauty Within

Thru Sept. 7 The work of Hopi artist Charles Loloma – including jewelry, drawings, ceramics and prints – are part of this exhibit looking at his innovative use of materials and technique at Philbrook Downtown. www.philbrook.org

Totemic Taxonomy

Thru Sept. 15 Artists Peter Froslie and Cathleen Faubert present a show interpreting people’s relationship to objects and symbols at Science Museum Oklahoma. www.sciencemuseumok.org

Allan Houser: A Celebration Thru Nov. 2 Philbrook Downtown features the paintings of Oklahoma artists Allan Houser, part of regional celebration of work by the late Apache artist on the centennial of his birth year.

CHARITABLE EVENTS Demand Project Second Annual Golf Tournament June 6 Take

a stand against sexual exploitation of children with The Demand Project and a charity golf tournament at the Tulsa Country Club. www. thedemandproject.org

2014 Vintage Tulsa: The Oil Barons Ball June 6 Dress for the era of

Tulsa’s oil giants when the Tulsa Historical Society hosts a sophisticated evening of dinner and dancing that is also sponsored by Oklahoma Magazine. www.tulsahistory.org

Glamour, Glitz and Gatsby June 7 Canterbury Choral Society’s 2014 Masquerade Ball at the Skirvin Hilton keep’s the music going as well as the organization’s youth choral program. www.canterburyokc.com St. John Street Party: Red Dirt Roundup June 7 Favorite, local restaurants

bring their best to St. John Medical Center’s event supporting patient-care programs. Includes a wine tasting. www.stjohnhealthsystem.com/ streetparty

LOOK Stars 2014 June 8 Southern Hills Country Club is the scene of a night of dinner and a toast to LOOK Musical Theatre’s past seasons. www.looktheatre.org Mayors’ Golf Tournament

June 9 Oklahoma City Beautiful’s annual game brings together leaders and Oklahoma City mayors past and present will be at Oklahoma City Golf and Country Club. www.okcbeautiful.com

Viennese Waltz Ball June 9 OK Mozart invites you to a night of dancing with the Amici New York Ensemble at Bartlesville’s Johnstone-Sare Building. www.okmozart.com Chip in to Rebuild

June 9 The fifth annual golf tournament at Forest Ridge Golf Club benefits Rebuilding Together Tulsa’s work to help low-income people with home repairs. www.rebuildingtogethertulsa.org

June 14 The Salvation Army’s scavenger hunt and adventure race takes participants around downtown Tulsa with fun challenges at every turn. Benefits Tulsa’s homeless population www.mostamazingracetulsa.org

T21 Golf Tournament

June 16 Benefiting the Down Syndrome Association of Tulsa, play will be at Meadowbrook Country Club. www.dsat.org

Links for Little Ones Golf Tournament June 16 Golf at Golf Club of Oklahoma

to benefit the Little Light House, a school for children with special needs. www.littlelighthouse. org

23rd Annual Golf Classic June 16 It’s tee time for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma. www.bbbsok.org 25th Henry P. Iba Citizen Athlete Awards June 16 Sherri Coale, head coach

of women’s basketball at the University of Oklahoma, is this year’s keynote speaker for the award’s night honoring exceptional athletes at the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel. www.ibaawards. com

Waltz on the Prehistoric Side June 20 Tulsa Zoo goes back to the “Roaring 20s B.C.” with its annual fundraiser of fine foods and drinks from area restaurants along with entertainment. www.waltzonthewildside.org

Zoobilation

June 20 The Oklahoma City Zoo’s biggest fundraiser goes wild for the annual “no-tie gala” with great food from favorite restaurants, libations (including the “zootini”), silent auction and live music. www.okczoo.com

Membership Banquet and Awards Gala June 21 The Urban League of Greater

Oklahoma City hosts its signature event, which includes a reception, entertainment and a silent auction, at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. www.urbanleagueok.org

Rebuilding Together Annual Golf Classic June 23 Register, play and win at

Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club for Rebuilding Together OKC, helping low-income seniors to live safely in their homes by making free home repairs. www.rebuildingtogetherokc.org

Cups & Cuffs

June 23 Head for Oaks Country Club and play for safe neighborhoods and the efforts of the Crime Prevention Network. www.okcpn.org

Youth at Heart Charity Golf Tournament June 23 Swing for Youth at

Heart and kids at the Golf Club of Oklahoma, Broken Arrow. www.youthatheart.org

RSVP’s Somewhere in Time Gala June 28 Join the Retired Senior Volunteer Program for “Paris When it Sizzles” at the Hard Rock


Starlight Concerts Summer Series June 24-Aug. 1 The Starlight Band brings its orchestra and jazz shows to the Guthrie Green for outdoor entertainment every Tuesday. www. starlightbands.net

LibertyFest

IMAGE COURTESY AMERICAN FEDERATION OF ARTS.

June 26-July 4 One of the country’s top-rated Independence Day celebrations features multiple events all week in Edmond. www.libertyfest.org

ART Gods and Heroes: Masterpieces from the École des Beaux-Arts The artists who created the 140 paintings, sculptures and pieces on paper comprising Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s latest exhibit looked to the classical world with an ardor reserved for gods. Today, we look at those artists the same way – sources for inspiration on themes and creative execution. Among the artists represented in Gods and Heroes Masterpieces from the École des Beaux-Arts are Rembrandt, Nicholas Poussin, Albrecht Dürer, Jacques-Louis David, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres and François Boucher, and they’re some of the most famed “graduates” of the influence of École des Beaux-Arts, Paris’ original school of fine arts and a repository for works by European masters between the 17th and 19th centuries. Gods and Heroes goes on exhibit at 415 Couch Drive beginning Saturday, June 21, and continues through Sept. 14. For more, visit www.okcmoa.com. Tulsa Hotel & Casino, where auctions and entertainment benefit RSVP and its volunteer services for seniors. www.rsvptulsa.org

COMMUNITY SunFest

Thru June 1 Oklahoma’s biggest outdoor picnic is back at Bartlesville’s Sooner Park for a weekend of music, American Indian dancing, fun. www.bartlesvillesunfest.org

Gem Faire

Thru June 1 Vendors set up displays of jewelry, gems, precious stones, jewelry supplies and more at Expo Square. www.gemfaire.com

Grand American Arms Show

Thru June 1 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. grandamericanarmsshows.com

Arts Council of OKC’s Sunday Twilight Concerts June 1-29 Don’t miss

these mellow evening concerts at the Great Lawn and band shell at Myriad Botanical Gardens. www.oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com

Miss Oklahoma Scholarship Pageant June 3-7 A new winner is crowned at the Mabee Center. www.mabeecenter.com

Brookside Rumble & Roll June 5 Roll down to Brookside for a parade of motorcyclists and the annual street festival and benefit event that starts from the University of Tulsa. www. rumbleandroll.com The Wes Anderson Experience June 7 Philbrook Museum of Art celebrates the films, style and culture of the filmmaker behind Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums and The Grand Budapest Hotel. www.philbrook.org

Red Earth Festival

June 5-7 The 28th annual festival of American Indian culture brings out the best in dance, art and tradition with a powwow, parade, art show and more at Remington Park, Oklahoma City. www.redearth.org

American Heritage Music Festival June 5-7 Grove hosts its nationally sanctioned

fiddle and clogging competition event with dinners, camping and entertainment for families by Grand Lake. www.grandlakefestivals.com

2014 Quilt Tulsa June 6-7 Quilters show off their prized works while vendors offer goods at Expo Square. www.greencountryquiltersguild. com Miami Nation Tribal Powwow June 6-7 Gourd dancing, shell shakers and competitive dancers head for Northeastern Oklahoma College Arena in Miami for the big dance event. www.miamination.com

Tulsa Pride Block Party & Parade June 6-8 Get happy – the weekend includes the Tulsa Pride Parade, Tulsa Shock Picnic in the Park, Rainbow Run, the Pride Celebration and Eric Himan’s Eurythmics tribute in downtown Tulsa. www.tulsapride.org

Leake Car Auction

June 6-8 Collector cars, boats, trucks, motorcycles at Expo Square. www.leakecar.com

Ada Air Expo 2014

June 7 The Ray Stout Memorial Warbird Fly-In annual event takes place at Ada Municipal Airport. www. adaairexpo.com

variety at Expo Square at the Pinto Horse Association of America’s grandest show. www. pinto.org

Oklahoma Chatauqua 2014: World War I June 10-14 This year’s lecture and literary event looks at “The War That Changed the World” with engaging, knowledgeable scholars portraying significant figures from that time under a tent at Tulsa Community College’s Southeast Campus. www.okchautauqua.org

deadCENTER Film Festival June 11-15 Film is big in and around Oklahoma City on this special weekend of screenings, filmmaker discussions, workshops, live music and more. www.deadcenterfilm.org 14th Annual Art of Wine Festival June 12-14 Enjoy this weekend of wine tastings and fantastic cuisine from Fayetteville’s finest restaurants www.waltonartscenter.org

Eureka Springs Blues Weekend

World’s Largest Calf Fry Festival & Cook-Off June 7 If you have to ask, you

June 12-15 International, regional and local blues acts invite you to join them at Eureka Springs, named one of the “Top 25 Art Towns in America” by American Style Magazine for four years in a row. www.eurekaspringsblues.com

Wines of the West

Spirit of Oklahoma Storytelling Festival June 13-14 Cowboy poet and sto-

must try. The festival takes place at the Craig County Fairgrounds, Vinita. www.vinita.com June 7 Oklahoma’s best wineries and vineyards bring their favorites to sample and sell at Stockyards City. www. stockyardscity.org

Asian-American Festival

June 7 Learn about the variety of Asian cultures through dance, music and art at Martin Regional Library. www.tulsalibrary.org

Metcalf Gun Show

June 7-8 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com

Redbud Spectacular Horse Show Thru June 8 One of the biggest horsing events in the state gets underway as the Oklahoma Quarter Horse Association sets up for a week-plus of clinics, classes and competition at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okqha.org

Pinto World Championship Horse Show June 9-21 The colorful horse with a personality to match is shown in all its skill and

ryteller Kent Rollins is the featured entertainer at the festival of words and music at Southern Nazarene University. www.territorytellers.org

Wood Carvers World

June 13-14 The annual show takes place at the Union Multipurpose Activity Center in Broken Arrow and features carvers and their work. 918.251.8734

Pawnee Bill’s Wild West Show June 13-14 Step right up for the shooting, roping and riding tricks of by-gone “Wild West Show” entertainment at the Pawnee Bill Ranch and Museum in Pawnee. www.okhistory.org

Hogs ‘n’ Hot Rods

June 14 Hot cars and bikes are the star attractions of this annual show on Collinsville’s Main Street that’s for the entire family. www.collinsvilledowntowninc.com

Tinker Inter-Tribal Council Powwow June 14 Ceremonies and competitive

4th of July Celebration and Fireworks in San Antonio

Green Corn Festival June 26-28 Spend some time with the family at Charley Young Park with the live music, food and fun. www.bixbyoptimist.org Mvskoke Nation Festival

powwow dancing get underway at Joe Barnes Regional Park, Midwest City. tribalcouncil@ sbcglobal.net

Battle of the Big Cats: Route 66’s Richest Noodlin’ Showdown June 14 Big catfish are yanked out of their mud holes and hauled to the Claremore Expo Center to be weighed and possibly eaten. www.bigcatbattle. com

R.K. Gun Show June 14-15 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.rkshows.com Juneteenth

June 19-20 Living Arts of Tulsa. www.livingarts.org

Jazz in June

June 19-21 Norman’s Brookhaven Village and Andrews Park will swing to the sounds of live jazz, folk and country for the three-day festival. www.jazzinjune.org

Summer Solstice Walks

June 2629 This is the 40th year for the tribe’s summer festivities of free concerts (Kix Brooks, Ohio Players, The Jacksons, Diamond Rio), traditional games and more at the Claude Cox Omniplex in Okmulgee. www.creekfestival.com

SoonerCon 23 June 27-29 Heroes, villains and their fans land in Midwest City for the convention of comics, science fiction, fantasy, cosplay and more. www.soonercon.com Red, White, Blue Festival

June 27-29 Celebrate America at Mountain Home, Ark., and this free patriotic festival with a car show, 5K race, pancake breakfast, rodeo and fireworks. www.redwhitebluefestival.com

Sandridge Stars & Stripes Family Festival June 28 Features racing action for the family on the Oklahoma River, live music, food vendors and fireworks at Oklahoma City’s Boathouse District (part of the Stars & Stripes River Festival). www.boathousedistrict.org

Metcalf Gun Show June 28 Expo Square. www.metcalfgunshows.com

June 20-21 The Spiro Mounds Archaeological Center in Spiro takes visitors on a stellar walk around the prehistoric mound site to tell about its history. www. okhistory.org

Rockets Over Rhema

Farming Heritage Festival

4th of July Celebration and Fireworks in San Antonio July

June 20-21 Antique tractors and other farming equipment share a state’s history of farming at the Shawnee Feed Center, Shawnee. www. oktractorclub.com

Bricktown Blues & BBQ Festival June 20-21 Live music and food vendors in Bricktown. www.brewerentertainment.com

OKC Pride 2014 June 20-22 Singer Taylor Dayne headlines this year’s Pride Week celebration in Oklahoma City. Look for the parade and arts festival through the weekend. www.okcpride. org National Reining Horse Derby

June 29 Start the July 4 holiday early at Broken Arrow’s Rhema Bible Church for music, festivities and one of the state’s largest fireworks displays. www.rocketsoverrhema.com

4 Enjoy a family-friendly Independence Day celebration in unforgettable San Antonio. www. VisitSanAntonio.com

Summer’s Fifth Night Thru Aug. 28 The song goes on throughout summer Thursday evenings at Utica Square. www.uticasquare. com To see more events happening around Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM

June 21-28 Only the best make it to this event featuring reining horse teams that stop on a dime and show off their best moves at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.nrhaderby.com

Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at.

Okie Noodling Tournament June 21 As they say in Pauls Valley, “no hooks, no bait, no fear” for the winners of the catfish catching tournament. www.okienoodling.com

or email to events@okmag.com.

OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR

JUNE 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

111


IN PERSON

B

A Life In Signatures

An Oklahoma City attorney makes history with his autograph collections.

ob Burke’s law office is like a museum. The Oklahoma City attorney with a long history of battling for worker’s compensation reform and enforcement began collecting historical items when he was a boy, and his love of signed items grew into collections now housed in several universities. On Burke’s office walls are “samples of my worldclass Greek and Roman coin collection and Oklahoma fossils,” he says. They include 300-million-year-old brachiopods, arrowheads, a piece of the ruins of Pompeii, ash from Mount Vesuvius and a sliver of marble from the Coliseum. However, Burke’s largest collection is made of autographs and signed documents from U.S. Supreme Court justices. “Since the U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the land and the last word on appeals, its members have great significance to me as a lawyer,” Burke says. This collection, which is on exhibit at Oklahoma City University, is the largest known collection of Supreme Court justice writings and signatures. A favorite piece in the collection is a hand-written lawsuit document filed by Justice Thurgood Marshall, who represented Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher of Chickasha in 1947 before his appointment to the court. Marshall’s lawsuit made it possible for Fisher, a black woman, to enter the University of Oklahoma College of Law, which, Burke says, “opened higher education to minorities in the nation.” His collecting has humble origins. “My dad collected old gasoline station signs, so perhaps that is where I got my love for collecting,” Burke says. “Collecting gives you a reason for visiting old bookstores and antique parlors at any town in the world you visit.” When young, Burke began collecting Bibles, rocks, stamps, old books, coins and baseball cards, but it was the 1964 presidential campaign and an autographed photo of Arizona U.S. Sen. Barry Goldwater that hooked Burke. “That ignited the fire. I subscribed to a monthly service, which gave me home addresses of famous people. I consistently, since 1964, have written to about 20 famous people per month,” he says. Burke has continued collecting by writing to people all over the world and asking for autographs when he meets famous people. “Every two years, I write a letter to the president or prime minister of every country in the world. Over the past 30 years, I have received signed photos of nearly 500 leaders – kings, queens, presidents, prime ministers – from more than 200 countries,” he says. At 65, Burke has begun giving away many of his collections. The University of Oklahoma holds three: the largest privately owned Bible collection, signatures and writings from American presidents 112

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2014

OKLAHOMA CITY ATTORNEY AND LIFELONG COLLECTOR BOB BURKE SHOWS OFF PART OF HIS COLLECTION OF U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE SIGNATURES, HOUSED AT THE OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF LAW. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

and vice presidents and autographs from 300 western movie and TV stars, including Gene Autry, Hopalong Cassidy and John Wayne. Several universities have displayed Burke’s collections, and he regularly donates documents for charity auctions and nonprofit events. Through his philanthropy, many educational institutions and social organizations have benefited. Yet, there has always been a gratifying side to collecting for Burke. His most recent autograph came from Petula Clark, whose radio hit “Downtown” was Burke’s favorite song when he was a disc jockey at the radio station KOMA in college. “I wrote her and told her how much I liked her song and how pretty I thought she was in the 1960s,” he says. “I also told her I should have written her back then, since we were both single. She sent me a wonderful photo, now on my wall with a 45 RPM record of ‘Downtown.’ On the photo, she writes, ‘To Bob, love, Petula Clark. P.S. Better late than never.’” SHAUN PERKINS


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IT DOESN’T JUST EXHILARATE, IT DOMINATES.

THE UNRELENTING

2014

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June Oklahoma Magazine 2014