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SPECIAL ISSUE OKLAHOMA

WEDDING From ‘Will You?’ to ‘I Do’ Let us help you plan your big day!

OKLAHOMANS OF THE YEAR State Question 794

MARSY’S LAW

HEALTH AND WELLNESS IN THE NEW YEAR Resolve to Get Fit

SATURDAY, JAN. 13

10 A.M.-4 P.M. EXPO SQUARE • CENTRAL PARK HALL

JANUARY 2018

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

JOIN FOR FREE. Valid January 6 – 13, 2018.

SATU R DAY, JAN UARY 13, 2018

HEALTH ZONE FEATURES AND SERVICES:

Whatever you have promised yourself to do this year—trim down, tone up, eat healthier, exercise more— now is the time to get started. Join us on Saturday, January 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and sample everything the Health Zone at Saint Francis has to offer. The event is free and open to the public and will include fitness classes, cooking classes, free health screenings and wellness education. • 70,000 square-foot fitness facility

• Year-round swimming lessons

• Parents’ night out

• Full schedule of classes

• Indoor cycling

• Annual kids’ triathlon

• Premier cardio, weight training and strength equipment

• Zumba, barre and yoga

• Cooking classes for kids and adults

• Basketball and racquetball

• Kids Zone activity center

• Massage services

• Indoor walking track

• Weight loss and life balance classes

• Grab-and-go deli with smoothies, wraps and sandwiches

• A dedicated Pilates equipment studio • Boot camp, suspension training and CrossFit • Two indoor saltwater pools

5353 East 68th Street South | Tulsa, OK 74136 | 918-494-1671 saintfrancis.com/healthzone

• Locker rooms with steam room, sauna and towel service

• Summer programs for kids and teens


The biggest acts. The hottest games. The most decadent food. There’s no shortage of moments to share before, during, and after a show at the Grand Theater at Choctaw Casino & Resort–Durant. choctawcasinos.com


Features JANUARY

39 Health and Wellness

2018 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XXII, No. 1

The latest fitness trends include high-intensity interval training, group training and wearable technology – don’t get left in the dust.

57 Oklahoma Wedding

Plan your wedding from top to bottom with the Oklahoma Wedding special segment. Explore beautiful local and global wedding gown designs, delicious cakes and catering, along with colorful floral bouquets and a comprehensive guide to planning your own nuptials.

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Oklahomans of the Year

Hard-working, determined people, full of compassion and charity for others, work to make our state a better place. Oklahoma Magazine honors such Oklahomans each year for their quality contributions to the arts, philanthropy, business, public service and cultural preservation.

WANT SOME MORE? January 2018

Visit us online. MORE ARTICLES

JANUARY 2018

VOTE NOW FOR 2018 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM

Read expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

SPECIAL ISSUE OKLAHOMA

WEDDING

ON THE COVER:

From ‘Will You?’ to ‘I Do’ Let us help you plan your big day!

OKLAHOMANS OF THE YEAR State Question 794

MARSY’S LAW

HEALTH AND WELLNESS IN THE NEW YEAR Resolve to Get Fit

2

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

SATURDAY, JAN. 13

10 A.M.-4 P.M. EXPO SQUARE • CENTRAL PARK HALL

OUR COVER FEATURES A MODEL FROM THE LINDA LAYMAN AGENCY, A TRULY ZAC POSEN GOWN AND OLEG CASSINI VEIL FROM DAVID’S BRIDAL, JEWELRY FROM BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS AND A MILLY CLUTCH FROM SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON

MORE PHOTOS

View expanded Scene, Style, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS

The online calendar includes more Oklahoma events.


Listening to you helps us see your whole picture. To get great care for your everyday life, you need more than an everyday doctor. AscensionÂŽ care teams at St. John Clinic take the time to listen so we can understand all aspects of you and your life.

And with convenient locations, online scheduling for urgent care and virtual visits, you can get the care you need, when you need it. Find a doctor who is right for you by calling the St. John PulseLine at 918.744.0123 or visit stjohnclinic.org.


Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

11 State 14 16 18 20

Oklahoma police departments work with communities to build bridges, establish trust and reduce crime.

Business People Issues Insider

23 Life and Style 24

Interiors The exterior of a

28 29 30

Health Scene FYI

11 24

designer’s home has a “barnyard look,” while the interior mixes quartz, wood, steel and granite.

14

43 Taste 46 47

Tulsan James Shrader’s new venture, a pizza joint called Prairie Fire Pie, features ciabatta-like crusts and contrasts his usual finedining gig.

Chef Chat Local Flavor

49 Where and When 50

43

Festive lights and amazing sights await at the family-friendly Tulsa Lantern Light Festival.

In Tulsa/In OKC

49

54 Closing Thoughts

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46 OKLAHOMA AHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018


THE OU FAMILY CONGRATULATES PRESIDENT DAVID L. BOREN ON HIS RECOGNITION AS AN OKLAHOMAN OF THE YEAR!

OU PRESIDENT DAVID L. BOREN One of America’s longest-serving presidents of a major university 51 YEARS OF PUBLIC SERVICE First person in state history to serve Oklahoma as Governor, U.S. Senator and President of the University of Oklahoma Under President Boren’s leadership, the University of Oklahoma has initiated more than 30 new programs and has become a pacesetter in public higher education. Throughout Boren’s 24-year presidency, OU has experienced significant improvement in academic rankings, program growth, private fundraising, national scholarship awards, internationalization, research output, graduation and retention rates, application numbers, student satisfaction, athletic achievement and every other major metric of institutional excellence. OU became the only public university in U.S. history to rank first among all universities, public or private, in National Merit Scholars enrolled. It also became the only university in the nation whose students won the Rhodes, Marshall, Mitchell, Goldwater, Fulbright and Truman scholarships in the same year. During his tenure, OU has ranked in the top ten public universities in private fundraising with over $3 billion raised from private donors. Private scholarships for students have quadrupled and endowed faculty positions have increased from 94 to over 550. Boren is one of a handful of university presidents across the nation who teaches an undergraduate course every semester. He will continue to teach a political science class after his retirement. A Rhodes Scholar, Boren was recently elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the country’s oldest and most distinguished honorary societies. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

– A Pacesetter for American Higher Education


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA™ PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

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CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOT T MILLER, DAN MORGAN, DAVID COBB, MARC RAINS, SCOT T JOHNSON, CHARLIE ROSENTHAL , LUKE OPPENHEIMER

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Copyright © 2018 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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THANK YOU PRESIDENT BOREN FOR YOUR DEDICATION AND LEADERSHIP TO OU-TULSA

BUILDING OU-TULSA

During President David Boren’s tenure, a new home for OU-Tulsa has been established at the Schusterman Center, featuring a new learning center, library, simulation center and medical center. The Wayman Tisdale Specialty Health Center opened to serve residents in north, east and west Tulsa and the OU-TU School of Community Medicine was created in partnership with the University of Tulsa. Since 1994, OU-Tulsa has added, expanded or renovated: • Schusterman Center • Tandy Education Center • Schusterman Library

• OU Physicians Schusterman Center Clinic • Wayman Tisdale Specialty Health Center • Schusterman Learning Center

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


Vote FOR THE BEST OF THE BEST!

2018 VOTING OPENED DECEMBER 1ST.

LET TER FROM THE EDITOR Oklahoma Magazine delivers another fine lading of intriguing articles about Oklahoma and Oklahomans from across our fair state, and a wedding guide that will inspire your own marvelous matrimonial ceremony. From our 2017 Oklahomans of the Year selections to a small-town philanthropist and a chef serving up Tin Lizzie burgers in Oklahoma City, the people in this issue have compelling stories to tell. Learn about a potential law that will appear on the next state ballot. Read about longhorn parades, community policing and a comic convention returning to Pryor Creek. Each January we also bring you weddings – from flowers and cake to where to say, “I do.” We have compiled an insightful collection of illuminative pages filled with the latest trends, beloved traditions and a timeline to help you plan your special day. But don’t just read it in the magazine; you can meet cream-of-the-crop wedding planners, caterers, designers, musicians and venue hosts by attending The Oklahoma Wedding Show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 13, at Tulsa’s Expo Square Central Park Hall. With $12,000 of Dream Wedding Giveaways up for grabs, it’s a can’t-miss event. Visit oklahomawedding.com for details. Wendy King Burton Managing Editor

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

Visit us online each month for web-exclusive content not seen in the print edition. In January, Oklahoma Magazine turns its focus to all things weddings as we gear up for our annual bridal expo, The Oklahoma Wedding Show. At okmag.com, see even more of the hottest bridal styles for 2018 in our expanded fashion feature showcasing gowns, shoes and other accessories from Oklahoma’s favorite retailers. Readers can also take a peak behind the curtain of our annual bridal shoot with an on-set, behind-the-scenes video. Also at okmag.com, find out even more about our selection of Oklahomans of the Year with expanded interviews, offering a closer look at the how these Oklahomans have worked hard to positively impact their communities. WEB-EXCLUSIVE VIDEO STICK AROUND AND WATCH ALL OF OUR WEB-EXCLUSIVE VIDEOS AT OKMAG.COM/WEB.


THANK YOU PRESIDENT BOREN FOR YOUR DEDICATION AND LEADERSHIP TO THE OU HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER

President Boren’s visionary leadership has advanced health care in Oklahoma most notably through the establishment of Harold Hamm Diabetes Center; the Stephenson Cancer Center, which is on track to become Oklahoma’s first and only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center; and the Health Sciences Center Student Union in Oklahoma City. Under President Boren’s leadership, the Presbyterian Research Park in Oklahoma City became OU’s University Research Park.

New, expanded or renovated facilities at the OU Health Sciences Center since 1994 include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

David L. Boren Student Union Stephenson Cancer Center Harold Hamm Diabetes Center OU Children’s Physicians clinics expansion University Research Park acquisition and development University Village Apartments M. Dewayne Andrews Academic Office Tower College of Allied Health Building Family Medicine Building Dermatology Clinic renovation Stanton L. Young Walk and central campus beautification OU Physicians Clinic Building Picnic Pavilion and Student Intramural Field Toby Keith OK Kids Korral Embassy Suites Hotel and Conference Center Gene Rainbolt Graduate School of Business facility Stanton L. Young Biomedical Research Center Oklahoma City Clinic Building College of Dentistry comprehensive clinic renovations University Health Club The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

– The Impact of Excellence


Mom, wife, daughter, cancer fighter. Jennifer Thigpen Breast Cancer Patient

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State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

It Takes a Village LEFT TO RIGHT: SGT. TRAVIS SERNA, CAPT. TAYLOR DINH, LT. SINUE ZEPEDA, LT. KIM VANCE AND MAJ. DEXTER NELSON ARE AMONG THE OKLAHOMA CITY POLICE DEPARTMENT OFFICERS UTILIZING A COMMUNITY POLICING PHILOSOPHY. PHOTO COURTESY OKCPD

W

Oklahoma police departments work with communities to build bridges, establish trust and reduce crime.

e often think of law enforcement officers as just that – enforcers. The term connotes punishment and overlooks what Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan calls one of the six integral pillars of the field: community policing. Jordan describes community policing as officers and the community working together to solve crime. Maj. Paco Balderrama, community relations officer for the Oklahoma City Police Department, describes it as “a law enforcement philosophy which involves residents and stakeholder entities [giving] input and [taking] an active

role in solving community problems.” Building these relationships has far-reaching effects, Balderrama says. “This includes reducing crime and increasing trust and cooperation between the community and the police,” he says. “This is particularly important in minority communities, where a lack of trust is a constant obstacle which hinders cooperation and can lead to increased tension. “Partnerships and relationships must be forged between the community and its police force. This can help police departments better understand the communities’ concerns and needs to better help police create and JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

11


The State

implement policies and practices that are procedurally fair and will improve cooperation, reduce the fear of crime, and increase the quality of life. Modern community policing includes … proactive communication, transparency and cooperation in building trust with members of the community.” In Tulsa, a recent grant provided funds toward interventions in a high-crime housing complex, where a community outreach officer makes connections with residents and neighbors every day. Jordan says that since the officer’s placement, crime rates in the area have fallen and residents are more satisfied with law enforcement. This is one of 77 initiatives in Tulsa that are either complete, underway or forthcoming. In Oklahoma City, each patrol division has a community relations officer who serves as a liaison for residents and businesses. Youth programs and a heavy social media presence also contribute to building trust and solving problems together in OKC. Balderrama says community policing involves a different mindset from usual interventions. “Traditional law enforcement strategies are sometimes reactive,” he says. “A crime occurs, a victim calls 911, and the police respond to try to apprehend the offender or take a police report.” The proactive approach of community policing is not new. Balderrama says that as far back as the mid-1800s, the London Metropolitan Police had beat officers walk the streets and interact with residents and business owners. “The community knew and had a good relationship with their neighborhood beat officers, which created trust and dialogue,” he says. “As police forces modernized with police cars and car two-way radios, the police community relationships became less personal and more distant. “The Oklahoma City Police Department, along with hundreds of other departments across the country, has pushed for increased engagement with its citizens and re-implementing the concept of community policing.” Jordan adds: “Community policing has become the buzz word or panacea for everything, and it can be, but it’s really not new. If you look how policing was done in the 1950s, when there was more community involvement, we’re now going back to some old strategies.” However, Jordan emphasizes that community policing as a concept and a goal has never disappeared entirely – indeed, that it is an integral part of everyday law enforcement. “Everything is all-inclusive,” Jordan says. “Community policing is not a separate entity; 12

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

all of policing is combined with community policing. It’s part of all our strategies. “The biggest hurdle right now is getting community policing done with low staffing levels. We’re unfortunately at 1984 levels of staffing, but we have a population [with 60,000 more people] than then. We have Homeland Security tasks and more gangs. Calls for services are quadruple [what they were]. “Community policing is part of an unassigned time for our officers. We are spending 85 percent of our time on calls for service, and don’t have time to drive through a neighborhood, or stop and talk to someone watering their lawn. That’s where real relationships happen; that’s where trust happens. That’s our ultimate goal: to have enough people to have that proactive time to get out and police how we want to police.” Jordan says community policing is a labor of love for officers. “We count on the dedication of our officers,” he says. “We have to have dedication

and keep up officer morale to accomplish these things.” Balderrama says one way OKC residents can help is to apply for a job with the department; Oklahoma City is hiring about 100 police officers. “Overall, Oklahoma City enjoys a strong and positive relationship with its media and community,” Balderrama says. “But this relationship, like any other, has to constantly be invested in with time, communication and engagement.” TARA MALONE

BELOW LEFT: TULSA CAPT. MALCOLM WIGHTMAN VISITS A LOCAL DAY CARE. PHOTO COURTESY TULSA POLICE DEPARTMENT

BELOW RIGHT: TULSA SGT. SEAN “STICKS” LARKIN, WHO WAS ON THE POPULAR TV SHOW LIVE PD, STOPS FOR A PHOTOGRAPH WITH A FAMILY WHO RECOGNIZED HIM. PHOTO COURTESY TULSA POLICE DEPARTMENT

BOTTOM: OKC OFFICERS ENJOY A PLAYGROUND VISIT WITH KIDS. PHOTO COURTESY OKCPD


The State

Western Americana

BUSINESS

OKC’s Historic Stockyards City offers culture, shopping, dining and longhorn cattle drives.

S

ABOVE: THE CHAIN RANCH LONGHORNS PAUSE AT THE INTERSECTION OF AGNEW AND EXCHANGE IN THE HEART OF STOCKYARDS CITY. RIGHT: COWBOYS FROM THE CHAIN RANCH ARE AN INTEGRAL PART OF KEEPING THE LONGHORNS MOVING DURING EVENTS. PHOTOS COURTESY HUMMINGBIRD AERIALS

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tockyards City, with parades led by herds of red-and-white speckled, 1,000-pound longhorns, is steeped in more than a century of history, but the district has broadened its iconic stature in national livestock commerce to encompass dining, shopping, art, music and special events. A tourist destination, Stockyards City Main Street is both a state organization and a business improvement zone within Oklahoma City, says Kelli Payne, the first Stockyards City Main Street director with a hands-on agriculture background. “I grew up on those bricks, selling cattle,” she says. “The Stockyards sells half a million head of cattle every year and the general public is welcome at cattle sales. We are the only working stockyards of this size that is still tied to a historic district in the entire world. The beef industry is just that huge in Oklahoma.”

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

The Stockyards offers authentic cowboy goods and the opportunity to dine at Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, just like former President George H.W. Bush (and Ronald Reagan before he became president). “There is Cattlemen’s Event Center, and now we have Rodeo Opry relocated in the district as well as specialty boutiques and a newly opened saloon,” Payne says. “There’s some room for expansion but mostly just a few vacant lots. There are still many of the original businesses that have been serving Western lifestyles here for decades.” In Old West tradition, a scantily clad lady is the subject of a large painting over the 50-foot bar at McClintock Saloon and Chop House. Locally owned, the chophouse boasts “an unforgettable experience” with menu highlights such as bourbon pork belly and a signature side dish of fried angel hair onions. Sidle up to the daily lunch buffet at The

Longhorn Cafe or find an array of spicy Mexican fare at Los Comales. At Panaderia La Herradura, choose from among 100 varieties of pastry bursting with Central American flavors. Cowboys and those choosing classic Western flair in their coldweather gear seek out Mustang Creek Alpaca Co., owned by Kathy Fleming. The shop carries alpaca-related clothing and materials, including socks, scarves, yarns, blankets, long johns, sweaters, coats, vests and slippers, as well as made-inOklahoma gifts. “You just have to touch the alpaca items,” Fleming says. “It’s known as ‘Mother Nature’s finest fiber’ because it’s warm, yet cool against your skin while being very soft and luxurious.” An avid knitting and crochet enthusiast, Fleming fell in love with alpaca fleece after she followed a “Yarn for Sale” sign while she va-


cationed in Oregon. Before long, she had a flock of the critters that needed to earn their keep, so a business was born in 2016. Stockyards City, with its emphasis on livestock-related merchandise, was the perfect spot because “people from literally all over the world visit the Stockyards,” she says. National Saddlery, founded in 1926, is the state’s oldest working saddle and tack shop and the area’s largest carrier of rodeo gear; it features hand-cut, handmade, high quality leather goods. Cross Bar Gallery, part of the saddle shop, showcases upscale western furniture, jewelry, original art, home decor and accessories as well as custom interior-design services. For children of all ages, perhaps Stockyards Sarsaparilla is the highlight, where a shopper can wander an old-fashioned candy store while munching on free samples of homemade fudge. Western-themed gifts mingle with flavored Arbuckle coffees, taffies

and candies. You can also build a six-pack souvenir among more than 350 nostalgic choices of soda pop. Bonnie Skaggs chose to locate her boutique, Prairie Dust Soaps and Stuff, just across the street from her former employer, National Saddlery. “Our slogan is ‘dig up a deeper clean’ because our wares are based on Oklahoma clay and scented naturally with ingredients such as oatmeal and cedar,” Skaggs says. “I call this place ‘an artisan apothecary’ because we offer wholesome, handcrafted soaps, candles, balms and bath products, and are developing

more all the time.” Other Stockyards City shops include 4W Western for chic cowgirl apparel, handbags, handcrafted accessories and decor, and Cowtown Company, a boot repair and retail shop. Art found at Cattlemen’s Steakhouse is likely from Jack J. Wells, who also has a gallery on Exchange Avenue. Western fashions are featured at many shops, including Western Wear Outlet, Gellco Clothing & Shoes, and Langston’s Western Wear. For a perfect pair of boots, check out Little Joe’s Boots for personalized service. Old-school chic can be found amid the vintage merchandise at Rusty Chandelier and the wide selections of hats at Shorty’s Caboy Hattery. The next special event is the St. Patrick’s Parade on March 17. Other yearly Stockyard City events include June’s Wine of the West Festival, the Stockyard Stampede every autumn, various chuck wagon cookouts and Cowboy Christmas. TRACY LEGRAND

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

PEOPLE

A veteran of the U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps, Lezama helps his military brothers and sisters leverage services available to them in town. “There’s a lot of amazing resources in Muskogee,” Lezama says. “They’re so scattered, sometimes not known, so we wanted to consolidate everything. If you have questions about the G.I. Bill or a mortgage loan, we want … to answer you directly or send you to the place where you can get your answers.” Muskogee’s sense of charity has shown up at The Barracks, too, when Lezama realized he needed financial help in furnishing shelter rooms. “We opened up to sponsorships from local businesses, and they came to us,” he says. “Every room we have is currently sponsored. We give them the room and they furnish it. I’m having to turn businesses away from sponsoring rooms, which is a really good problem to have.” Lezama also helped victims of Hurricane Harvey in Texas with a funding drive via Facebook. What began as a small-scale plan to provide some food and water became a full-scale effort that brought in 160,000 pounds of supplies, filling two semi-trailers and a smaller trailer to the brim. Lezama showed the organization in Texas that helped distribute the supplies where Muskogee was on the map. “They said, ‘Little Muskogee raised all this?’” he says. “But this community cares so much. That’s the community Muskogee is.”

Muskogee Proud A businessman embraces his community and works tirelessly to improve the town for all.

P VICTOR LEZAMA HAS BEEN INSTRUMENTAL IN ORGANIZING THE CREATION OF “THE BARRACKS,” A HOME FOR VETERANS. PHOTO BY DAWN OSBORNE

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uerto Rico native Victor Lezama got his first taste of the Sooner state when he attended the University of Oklahoma in the late 1990s. He moved to Muskogee after serving in the military, and soon got his first taste of the town – and its sense of charity – through an event that he and his then-fledgling business put on near Christmas in 2013. “We just went to Walmart and started giving away $20 bills to total strangers,” says Lezama, who owns an electronics repair shop called PC Landing Zone. His group handed out nearly $1,200 that day, but he says almost half of the people approached turned down the money and, instead, asked that the money go to people in need. “I was in total awe,” Lezama says. “That’s what sparked off our involvement in Muskogee. That’s

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

when I realized, ‘This community is like me.’” Lezama has a penchant for charity work. Since opening his business in August 2013, he has worked to give back to a town that has wholeheartedly supported him, and says “You have to support the same community that supports you.” That giving spirit has surfaced in multiple charity projects and donations from Lezama and his company, such as sponsoring underprivileged families’ trips, the Arrowhead Mall’s annual ice-skating event and showing free outdoor movies. Lezama also serves as the founding CEO of The Barracks, which will house homeless military veterans and assist their families. He wants to centralize the multitude of veteran services in Muskogee and provide education and training while veterans make their transitions back into society.

CHESLEY OXENDINE


The State

ISSUES

Marsy’s Law Oklahoma will vote this year on a landmark amendment to extend crime victims’ rights, especially in domestic cases.

I

n 2014, a Muskogee police officer violated a legal protective order obtained by his estranged wife, Misti Martin-Sullins, rammed her car off the road, kidnapped her at gunpoint and forced her to perform sex acts. Prosecutors dropped all sexual assault charges before he was convicted of three other felonies and given a 10-year deferred sentence. He served 48 days in jail – mostly on weekends. “When you speak out,” MartinSullins says, “and you get slapped in the face and other victims [of domestic abuse] see there is no justice, they don’t speak out either.” Domestic abuse/violence is the world’s most prevalent and underreported crime. Crime victims and proponents of Marsy’s Law – named for a California collegian killed by her ex-boyfriend – intend to remedy

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

that through an amendment to the Oklahoma constitution. The bill sailed through both houses of the legislature in April, and State Question 794 will be up for a general vote in November. Kim Moyer, state director for the Marsy’s Law Project, extols passage of the bill as a landmark for crime victims, particularly those of domestic abuse. “We are one step closer,” she says, “to extending constitutional rights to all crime victims.” Marsy’s Law originated after a former boyfriend shot to death Marsalee “Marsy” Nicholas, a senior at the University of California-Santa Barbara in 1983. A week later, the Nicholas family returned from visiting Marsy’s grave and were alarmed to encounter the accused killer released on bail. Henry Nicholas, Marsy’s brother, organized a campaign to enact a constitutional bill of rights for victims of crime. Marsy’s Law passed as an amendment to the California constitution in 2008. More than 30 states offer constitutional rights to victims, but Marsy’s Law seeks to elevate them

to constitutional rights equal to those of the accused and cannot be altered or dismissed. At least 20 states since then, including Oklahoma, have either enacted Marsy’s Law into their constitutions or are in the process of doing so. The amendment requires law enforcement to inform victims of “Marsy’s Rights” in the same way that offenders are advised of their Miranda rights. A “Marsy’s Card” enumerates these rights in the judicial process, including legal standing before the court, protection from the defendant, notification of all court proceedings, the opportunity to be present in court, privacy, and the court’s obligation to treat the victim with dignity and respect. Moyer says if the Oklahoma constitutional amendment were to pass, more abuse victims would come forward and trust the criminal justice system. Victims of abuse often do not report domestic crimes for many reasons: the sake of children, nowhere else to go, financial problems, guilt or shame.


CHILDREN AND LIFELONG SUFFERING

Research into children who grow up subjected to repeated exposure to domestic Marsy’s Law applies to violence shows an increase in the likelihood of their becoming victims or perpeall crime victims, but it trators. Susan Sharp, professor of sociology at the University of Oklahoma, focuses was originally intended on female criminal behavior and why Oklahoma is a long-standing No. 1 in rates to protect victims of of female incarceration. Many of these women’s childhoods were wrought with abuse by encouraging abuse. them to come forward The state imprisons 151 women for every 100,000 Oklahoma women, more than into a supportive juditwice the national average, according to Bureau of Justice statistics. cial system. “We have conditions that contribute [to female incarceration] through drug Former victims, use, high rates of domestic violence, child abuse, lack of social services and such as Martin-Sullins very harsh laws,” Sharp says. “Three-fourths of women I surveyed each year [in and Oklahoma teacher prison] reported physical or sexual abuse [or both] in childhood. About 70 percent Virginia Lewis, want to reported being victims of intimate partner violence. They also came from chaotic pave the way for other households where someone had a drug problem, mental illness and so forth.” victims to seek help through the criminal justice system and from KIM MOYER, STATE DIRECTOR domestic abuse organizations FOR THE MARSY’S LAW PROJECT, and hotlines. SPEAKS AT A RALLY. PHOTO COURTESY BUMBERSHOOT PR “I speak out now because I know abused women may think it’s impossible to walk away,” Martin-Sullins says. “But I want them to know they have the strength and Domestic abuse/violence is an important help to do it.” factor in many mass shootings. The CongresLewis was sexually sional Research Service counted 317 mass molested by her father for shootings in the U.S. from 1994 to 2013, with more than five years, starting more high-profile shootings occurring since when she was 11. She held then. Perpetrator backgrounds reveal that her pain and trauma inside more than half of the shooters had histories of for 34 years before she spoke domestic violence. in support of Marsy’s Law at Before Devin Patrick Kelley massacred 26 a 2017 rally. people at the First Baptist Church of Suther“Going through hell takes land Springs, Texas, in November, he was an eternity to process and convicted by the U.S. Air Force for beating his cope with,” Lewis says. wife and fracturing his infant son’s skull. He “It’s much easier to report a served a year in confinement before receiving stranger who has stolen your a dishonorable discharge. purse than to report someone Cedric Ford shot 17 people in Newton, you loved and trusted for Kansas, in 2016, shortly after a restraining murdering your soul.” order was issued against him for abuse of his According to a 2015 former girlfriend. report by the National CoaliOmar Mateen, who murdered 49 at the tion Against Domestic VioPulse Night Club in Orlando, had physically lence, one in three women abused his wife for years. and one in four men will, in their lifetimes, be victims of domestic abuse, ranging from physical, sexual, emotional and economic According to 2015 Oklahoma State Bureau abuse to coercion, intimidaof Investigation statistics, Oklahoma ranks sixth tion, isolation, threats and in the nation for women killed by men in single humiliation. victim-single offender incidents. Domestic And law enforcement officers’ safety is also Intimate partner violence accounts for 15 abuse in one form or another accounts for more at risk when responding to domestic violence percent of all violent crimes in the United than 20 percent of all Oklahoma homicides. calls. States. Domestic victim hotlines nationally Female and male victims were almost “You never know what to expect on a doreceive a daily average of 20,000 calls. Police equally represented in these statistics – 50.5 mestic dispute call,” retired Tulsa officer Craig departments receive more than that. percent female, 49.5 male, with 76 percent of Roberts says. “It can range from a family brawl “The average victim leaves seven times bemale victims killed by other men. to a homicide.” fore she leaves for good,” says Martin-Sullins. CHARLES W. SASSER

DOMESTIC ABUSERS AND MASS SHOOTINGS

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

19


The State

LEFT: COMIC BOOK FANS TRADE AND SELL COMICS AT THE FIRST COMIC CONVENTION AT PRYOR CREEK. RIGHT: PRYOR CREEK COMIC CONVENTION VISITORS SHOW OFF THEIR COSTUMES.

PHOTOS COURTESY GEORGE JONES, JONES PHOTOGRAPHY ARTS

INSIDER

A Jim-Dandy Comic Con The Trammel cousins, with nearly identical first names, put on quite a show in Pryor Creek.

F

irst, thanks to a checkered literary career that includes work as a comic-book scriptwriter, I was a guest at the inaugural Pryor Creek Comic Convention, held at this time last year. I’ve also been asked back for the new one, set for Jan. 20. Second, during the latter part of my newspaper career I was privileged to work several years with the convention’s chairman, Jimmie Tramel, in the Tulsa World newsroom, where I came to admire both his talent and his unflagging enthusiasm. We share a lot of the same passions, especially when it comes to escapist literature. So I’m well acquainted with Jimmie Tramel, who runs the Pryor Creek Comic Con. And that’s where I met Jimmy Tramel, who runs the city of Pryor Creek. Of course, he has plenty of help. But his is the desk where the buck stops, to paraphrase Harry Truman, because he’s Pryor’s mayor. Mayor Jimmy Tramel can explain to you, as he did to me, that while Pryor is the name everyone calls the town, legally it’s Pryor Creek. And both he and Jimmie Tramel can also explain why there are two Jim Tramels associated with the Pryor Creek Comic Convention. “The mayor is my first cousin,” Jimmie says. “My dad was part of a family with 11 children, raised around the Salina-Locust Grove area. Then they all started having kids,

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

and the kids started having kids. I tell people we apparently ran out of first names for all the cousins. We both have our dads’ names for our middle names, so to distinguish between him and me, everybody in the family calls him Jimmy Joe, and I’m Jimmie Don.” Jimmy adds: “Jimmie Don’s dad and my dad worked together at the Georgia-Pacific paper mill in Pryor. When we were kids, they’d bring bales and bales of old comics out to the mill. Jimmie Don would hide in a corner, and then he’d go through those bales and find the ones he wanted. He might spend eight hours and come out with one or two of ’em. We all thought he was a little weird.” The mayor laughs. “He’d take ’em home and stack ’em in his room,” Jimmy says. “This is back in the ’70s, probably, the early ’70s. So he’s had this thing for comics as long as I can remember.” Of course, young Jimmie’s burgeoning comic-book collection didn’t just depend on those bales of unsold, coverless books headed for the recycling heap. “I grew up buying comics off spinner racks at Locust Grove and Pryor and all over Mayes County,” he says. “They were 20 cents each brand new. Then I’d go to the Locust Grove Sales Barn on Thursdays to see what back issues I could find. So if someone would’ve told me when I was young that I

could get to hold a comic convention, and do it in the county where I grew up – well, that would’ve been beyond my wildest dreams.” At that time, comic-book conventions – or comic cons, as they’re known to aficionados – were hardly ubiquitous. The era of geek chic, ushered in by the likes of TV’s Big Bang Theory and the plethora of comic-book-based big-studio movies, was decades away. In fact, if a guy (and it was almost always a guy) was still into comics after graduating from high school, he was considered – as Jimmy Joe said about Jimmie Don – “a little weird.” But even as young Jimmie was busy hunting down comics in Mayes County, things were changing. In 1970, following a few similar Texas-based get-togethers, a group called the Oklahoma Alliance of Fans held its first Multicon in Oklahoma City, celebrating comic books, old movies, radio plays and related material. Other conventions began appearing, and there were at least a couple of big statewide cons a year by the time Jimmie Tramel made his first one. “It was 1979, probably, and I was too young to drive,” he says. “Jimmy Joe’s sister, Shelly, drove me to the Camelot Inn in Tulsa, where the convention was. Clayton Moore, the Lone Ranger, was there, and he autographed a picture for me. I had him autograph one for my dad, and he reacted just like the Lone Ranger: ‘It’s very noble that you’re getting an autograph for your dad.’ From that point, I was hooked on comic cons.” Flash forward nearly four decades. That’s when Jimmie, who continued to collect comics and attend cons, had what he terms “a happy accident.” “I was over at the building where we now have the con to do a story about a display of Willard Stone’s art,” he says. “He’s a Native American artist from my hometown of Locust Grove. As I was walking through, I just happened to meet Diana Reeves, who at that time was in charge of the Pryor Area Arts and Humanities Council. She said, ‘Hey, I hear these comic con things are kind of fun, and I’ve heard you like comics. Could we maybe do one here in Pryor?’ “I’d never thought about having one


there. But one thing led to another, and all of a sudden she and I were planning a comic convention.” He’d attended plenty of conventions over the years, but Jimmie readily admits that he didn’t know much about running one. Luckily, he had help. “A young man named Eric Eaton has put on several Collector Con shows in Tulsa, so I went to him for advice,” Jimmie says. “Also, there’s a Facebook group called Northeast Oklahoma Comic Book Swap, and being in that group gave me automatic access to people who would be interested in being dealers.” That was one demand he made at the Pryor Creek Comic Convention: comic books. Oddly enough, in today’s comic-convention climate, that’s not always a given. “Many years ago, a comic con was nothing but comic vendors in a hotel ballroom selling comics to the people who came there,” Jimmie says. “Maybe you’d have a guest or two. But in this millennium, a comic con has become a pop-culture convention – especially the big ones, like San Diego. Comics may be a part of the convention, but you have all these celebrity guests, and vendors selling comic-related things like shirts and toys and action figures. And the costuming thing has

exploded; maybe people who don’t even read comics love dressing up as the characters. “So I know people go to cons for different reasons, but because comics are what keep people in the room, I placed a priority on comic dealers to come to this.” Realizing also that potential attendees might come for other reasons, he made sure to include a costume contest, gaming and some guests, including artists and writers from the area. It worked, too. He estimates a crowd of more than 1,000 came through the doors for last year’s one-day event. “It brought people downtown, some from other states, who shopped and ate here,” Mayor Jimmy Joe Tramel says. “It increased our sales tax. It put us on the map for promoting arts events. And without Jimmie Don, it wouldn’t have been a success.” One that Jimmie Don Tramel hopes to duplicate this month. “Some people might have viewed the town’s size as a negative, as far as holding a comic con there,” he says. “I

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think it was a positive because Pryor is just the right size for a con to be a big deal – and I mean that as a compliment.” The Pryor Creek Comic Convention is set for the Graham Community Center, 6 N. Adair St. Admission is $5, with all proceeds benefiting the Pryor Area Arts and Humanities Council. For updates, visit the Pryor Creek Comic Convention Facebook page. JOHN WOOLEY

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Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

Aainable, Not Lofty, Goals

A

New Year’s resolutions are easily broken because they’re difficult to achieve. Instead, take baby steps in 2018.

nyone who has made lofty resolutions while toasting the New Year has also come to a quick realization: tipsy promises are easily broken. Studies show that only 9.2 percent of Americans who make New Year’s resolutions feel like they successfully achieve

them by the time the next year rolls around. Many experts say that’s because promises we make to ourselves are too ambitious. Instead, resolutions should be reasonably attainable and well-planned. Instead of vowing to lose 30 pounds before bikini season, resolve to add more vegetables and fewer calorieladen drinks into your daily diet. Instead of

declaring that, as of midnight, you will never smoke another cigarette, promise to call a smoking cessation hotline on a certain date … and stick to it. Rather than make a promise to declutter your entire house, set a date to organize the first room – or the first closet. Baby steps work; after all, we all learned to walk one step at a time. JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

THE FAMILY’S KITCHEN IS BRIGHT AND AIRY. LEFT: THE FRONT ENTRY TO THE BENSONS’ HOME IS HIGHLIGHTED WITH AN IMPRESSIVE TWIG CHANDELIER.

INTERIORS

Grand Lake Rustic

The exterior of a designer’s home has a ‘barnyard look,’ while the interior mixes quartz, wood, steel and granite. By M. J. Van Deventer Photos by Capulin Creative “I live in a glass house that’s very functional and comfortable, with a simple floor plan, hardly any walls, mostly windows and a great view of Grand Lake,” Amber Benson says. The exterior of the one-story home on Monkey Island’s Sailboat Bridge resembles a rustic farm house Amber calls “a barnyard look.” The design style she and her husband, Jason, wanted inside their new home was “a crisp, sleek look.” Amber knew exactly how to achieve that. She’s been in the interior design business for 23 years and opened her own design studio, Nuance Interiors, in 2016. Amber credits long-time clients with making the almost impossible happen by pitching in to get Nuance Interiors and its turn-key approach to design opened quickly. “I couldn’t have done it without them,” she says. “They brought all kinds of gifts and products to help open the store. Now, it’s a very happy place.” The decor in her home is simple and clean, and features modern surfaces mixed with unique touches, such as twig-shaped hardware in the kitchen, chandeliers made from bent twigs and art pieces created from distressed wood. She reached out to Tammy Trotter with Silex Interiors for assistance with material selections for the kitchen and bath. Quartz was Tammy and Amber’s choice for the hard surfaces, including the master bath, which features vanity countertops coordinated with the look of the shower. “Quartz is a man-made product that is scratch and stain resistant

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

LEFT TO RIGHT: A HANDSOME PINE CREDENZA IN THE LIVING AREA FEATURES AN UNUSUAL MIRROR AND TWIN TABLE LAMPS WITH MIRROR ACCENTS. COMFORTABLE CHAIRS COVERED IN A BRIGHT BLUE FABRIC WITH AN IKAT DESIGN ADD A COLORFUL DESIGN NOTE IN THE SUN ROOM. AMPLE SEATING IN THE LIVING/ FAMILY ROOM MAKES THIS A FAVORITE GATHERING PLACE FOR FRIENDS AND FAMILY.


JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

and similar in price to marble,” Tammy says. Tammy also assisted with the kitchen countertops and backsplash, which are Mount Everest-white granite over mintgreen cabinets. Amber says designing for other clients is easier than designing for herself. But with years of experience in her portfolio, she knew she and Jason wanted a home that would capture multiple views of the lake, provide a carefree environment and become a perfect place for entertaining family and friends. A spacious kitchen was a must. In this home with few walls, the kitchen is located near a spacious family room. The kitchen has a large center island that becomes a dining table at one end. There’s also a hidden pantry, a beautiful hood over the restaurantstyle oven, all stainless steel appliances and an old-fashioned farm sink. That sink was probably inspired by Amber’s childhood close to farms near Miami, Oklahoma, she says. Two fireplaces in the open areas – kitchen, living/family and dining rooms – add the right touch of warmth to this home. “There’s also lots of seating in the living area, which makes the design quaint but comfortable,” says Amber, who designed all of the furnishings in the home. Not surprisingly, Amber shopped at her own store, Nuance, for fabrics, lighting fixtures and accessories. The master bedroom offers multiple views of the lake and Amber designed this suite to enjoy those spectacular views. “The design is simple in this area,” she says. “The views of the lake were most important.” Reflecting on her design career, Amber says she especially enjoys the initial part of a project while listening to the clients’ needs and desires for a new look in a room or new home. “What I’ve learned is people want you to do what you say you can do,” she says. “That’s what I try to do. I stay with a project until it’s finished. At the end, it’s a wonderful experience to know we made people happy.” TOP LEFT: THE HOME USES NATURAL MATERIALS FOR ACCESSORIES THROUGHOUT. TOP RIGHT: TWIGS ARE INTERTWINED TO FORM A RUSTIC CHANDELIER. MIDDLE: A COZY SEATING AREA ADDS A COMFORTABLE CONVERSATION AREA TO THE MASTER BEDROOM. BOTTOM: NEARLY ALL OF THE HOME’S COUNTERTOPS FEATURE WHITE QUARTZ.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018


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Life & Style

H E A LT H

Adjusting to the Cold Options exist for the common winter concerns of dry skin, outdoor exercise and seasonal affective disorder.

W

inter can affect the mind and body in a variety of ways – some good, some not so good. Following are a few seasonal conditions that can arise when the weather turns cold, and how to combat them.

Dry skin

John Ashley, a dermatologist with Warren Clinic in Tulsa, says the most common patient complaint during winter is dry, itchy skin. “It’s very important to make sure that one uses a mild soap like Dove or a body wash with moisturizers in the winter months if you suffer from dry skin,” he says. “Lotions which contain ceramides are much more effective, such as CeraVe.” Ashley also suggests over-the-counter, 1-percent hydrocortisone ointment if the area affected isn’t too large. Taking fewer hot baths and using a humidifier can help. For those with psoriasis and eczema, the cold weather can make these conditions worse, so frequent moisturizing is a must.

Outdoor exercise

Just because the temperature has dropped doesn’t mean you have to exercise indoors. “Many workout enthusiasts enjoy the colder season for outdoor exercise,” says Doran Taylor, an exercise specialist at St. John Siegfried Health Club in Tulsa. “The change in temperature and air quality can help strengthen the immune system. You will also tend to burn more calories because of the body’s tendency to have a higher

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

pulse rate to increase body temperature – thermoregulation.” However, before venturing outdoors, Taylor has four recommendations: dress warmly with added thermal base layers to keep your core warm; warm up properly with some light jogging and/or dynamic stretches; train during the day when it is warmer to get sun exposure for some vitamin D; and don’t skip the cool down, because your muscles may tighten when going into indoor warmth. “Another helpful hint is to work out as soon as you can,” Taylor says. “Whether you have time in the morning, during your lunch break, or directly after work, waiting too long in the evening will cause you to lose motivation. Early exercise has tons of benefits. It helps boost your metabolism so that you will continue to burn calories throughout the day, enhances mood, and increases focus during the work day.”

Seasonal affective disorder

Dr. Tessa Manning, with Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital in Tulsa, says seasonal affective disorder is a form of major depression that occurs during a specific season every year with full remission during other seasons. While it most often occurs in winter, it can also happen in summer. The symptoms of seasonal affective disorder can vary from mild to severe and include sadness, loss of interest in activities, changes in sleep (typically too much), changes in appetite (typically overeating and carbohydrate cravings), trouble concentrating, loss of energy, feeling hopeless, having negative self-worth and, in severe forms, thoughts of suicide. “It is more than just ‘winter blues’ in that this disorder causes the person a marked decline in functioning in many areas of life,” Manning says. “This may include withdrawal from social activities, missed time from work or loss of productivity. Patients with a summer depressive pattern may have a different presentation with more insomnia, decrease in appetite and nervousness.” For those diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder, Manning says evidence-based treatments include psychotherapy, light therapy and antidepressants. REBECCA FAST


SCENE

Vashonda Sherra, Quinton Marcellis; Champagne and Chocolate, Living Arts of Tulsa, Tulsa

Top row, left to right: Kenneth Levit, Barry Switzer, Mary Lou Retton, V. Burns Hargis, Tom Selleck, Frank Keating. Bottom row, left to right: Tom Colbert, Hal Smith, Shannon Miller, Phil Parduhn, Robert A. Funk, Tom Cole; Oklahoma Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, Oklahoma Hall of Fame, OKC

Ruth & R.D. Al Sowards, Carey & Brett Baker; Toyland Ball preparations, The Parent Child Center of Tulsa, Tulsa

Kenneth Levit, Le’Shawn Turner, Kate Dodoo, Tom & Dorothea Colbert, Frank & Cathy Keating; Oklahoma Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, Oklahoma Hall of Fame, OKC

Beth Leavel, Michael Baron, Mary Deane Streich; Lyric Theatre’s Broadway Ball, Lyric Theatre, OKC Bryan Dyson, Tim Berney, Erick Worrell; ARTonTAP, OKCMOA, OKC

Bennet Omalu, Leslie Pritchard, Bob West; Bennet Omalu Speaking Event, Tulsa Town Hall, Tulsa

Lori Waddell, Laura Oliver, Monte & Paula Seidel; Living Donor Gala, St. John Health System, Tulsa

Kimberly Alls Firestone, Piper Bain, Marilyn Morris, Deniese Dillon; Lunar New Year Gala preparations, Dillon International, Tulsa

Denny Mask, Zak Helmerich, Peggy V. Helmerich, Rik Helmerich; Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Gala, Tulsa Library Trust, Tulsa

Gordon Pennoyer, Marnie Taylor, Mark Williams; Chesapeake Open House event, Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits, OKC

Laura Stauffer, Peggy V. Helmerich, Richard Ford, Kim Johnson; Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Gala, Tulsa Library Trust, Tulsa JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

F YI

The Two Faces of January

Janus, the Roman god of passages, looks backward and forward, just as we end one year and begin another.

B

ANCIENT STATUES OF JANUS TYPICALLY FEATURE HIM LOOKING FORWARD AND BACKWARD.

30

eginnings … endings. Forward … backward. Comings … goings. These contrasts are why we have January, named after a god whose two faces and dualities embody transitions. Janus, unique among Roman deities in that he doesn’t have an ancient Greek counterpart, gets his name from ianua, the Latin word for doorway or gate, where one can look behind or ahead, keep going or turn around, start anew or retrench. As University of Tulsa professor Bruce MacQueen, Ph.D., notes, Janus distinctly symbolizes the past or the future, but not the present. “If we think of time, you can’t put a beginning or ending on the present,” says MacQueen, who specializes in ancient history and languages, especially Latin and Greek. “You can’t capture the present. We have an impression of moving through it. It’s a piece of the past and the future that we call now.” MacQueen says ancient Romans recognized the elusiveness of the present. “The Romans were a conservative, pragmatic people, but they also realized social institutions change, so you

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

can’t progress into the future unless you look to the past,” he says. “The Greeks would never have had a god with two faces. They would have seen a god like Janus as barbaric.” Janus ranks as a major Roman deity (up there with Zeus) because of his omnipresence. His face was carved into marble and wood throughout the empire. “Walking down the street, Romans would have encountered Janus constantly at every archway, every gateway,” he says. “He was in every public space. “Because he doesn’t resemble a Greek god, Janus lacks a mythology. The Romans didn’t tell stories about him, but that was fine because he was in their everyday life.” With Janus, MacQueen dispels the notion that Romans merely took Greek deities and renamed them. “That couldn’t be more wrong,” he says. “Romans do appropri-

ate a lot of the mythology, but the religions are different. You can say Jupiter is Zeus, but not really. It’s not the same. Religion and theology should remain separate when studying the ancient Greeks and Romans. It’s a mistake to equate them.” January marks the year ahead – the face of Janus gazing at the future – but in making resolutions or plans for 2018 (or whatever year), we also look to bygone days. A desire to lose x-number of pounds or read y-number of books is based upon what has (or has not) been done. MacQueen, also learned in neurolinguistics, illustrates this paradox with his students. “I teach how the brain works by using Janus and asking what is now,” he says. “Now doesn’t really exist because, as soon as I say something, it’s in the past.” So, after New Year’s revelry and excitement for the upcoming 12 months pass, our neural programming (not just our inner Roman) guides us to consider the past … just like Janus. BRIAN WILSON

NOT QUITE JAN. 1

Ancient Romans celebrated the Festival of Janus historically around Jan. 9. His two faces were symbolic, practical and accessible. For example, a building’s weakest points are its doorways, so the Romans added this significant god of passages into frames and arches. Having a party for him just made sense.


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Oklahomans OF THE YEAR Oklahoma is not only a beautiful, diverse land, with rolling plains and hills, and miles of lakes and rivers, but a place full of beautiful, diverse people.

Oklahomans love their state and work tirelessly to improve the lives of others and honor the state's spirit. Hard-working, determined people, full of compassion and charity for others, work to make our state a better place. Oklahoma Magazine honors such Oklahomans each year for their contributions to the arts, philanthropy, business, public service and cultural preservation. Our picks for Oklahoma Magazine’s 2017 Oklahomans of the Year include a woman whose every moment is dedicated to serving others, the leader of one of Oklahoma’s most beloved institutions of higher learning, a principal chief who is seeing his tribe into the future while honoring the past, a mayor with a global vision, and a man tasked with leading a federal agency that takes care of America’s elderly and disabled. Read on to learn more about these top Oklahomans and their work.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018


UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT DAVID BOREN HAS 51 YEARS OF PUBLIC SERVICE. PHOTO COURTESY TRAVIS CAPERTON, UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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OF THE YEAR

Teaching Idealism 101

David Boren retains a youthful zeal as he heads into retirement. After a halfcentury in public life – baby-faced member of the state House of Representatives, leader of the Broom Brigade sweeping into the Governor’s Mansion, U.S. senator, president of the University of Oklahoma – David Boren unabashedly remains a youthful idealist. Boren feeds off young people's zeal and optimism (his own included), whether it’s been as a 25-year-old entering the Oklahoma House in 1967, a 33-year-old taking the governor’s oath in 1975 or a 76-year-old facing retirement in June as OU’s second-longest leader. “In many ways, I have the same outlook as when I led the Broom Brigade,” he says. “I’m still a reformer. I’m impatient for change.” Boren has transformed OU into the nation’s leader in attracting National Merit Scholarship winners. The number of endowed professorships has increased from 100 to 564 since he took the helm in November 1994. Boren raised the university’s academic profile to equal that of its storied athletic department; 31 major programs, including Boren’s beloved College of International Studies, and $2 billion in construction projects have been added during his tenure. Boren will still teach his political science/ government course. He wants to set up shop in the Student Union. “It’s going to be a real opportunity to do the parts of the job that I love best,” he says. “I don’t want to give that up. I have the privilege of being in contact with young people. They inspire me.” When Boren was in the U.S. Senate, where he chaired the intelligence committee, he had one of the youngest staffs on Capitol Hill. At OU, the president’s office is abuzz with students who bring him ideas and, in some cases, personal problems. “At every freshman convocation, I tell students that I’m not off-limits, that I’m part of their family,” he says. “You’d be surprised at how many take me up on that offer. I had one young man come in to tell me that his mom was always on campus checking on him and wouldn’t leave him alone. I offered to call her and have a talk. “You know, when Mollie [Shi Boren, his wife] and I began at OU, we saw ourselves as parents of these students. Now, we’re like their grandparents and they discuss stuff with me like a grandparent. Young people are frank and candid. I’m a great believer in inter-generational friendships because they’re authentic and not competitive.” Boren certainly brags about young Sooners the way grandparents do. He cites two instances when their energy produced colossal results. One came when OU students drew national at-

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PHOTO COURTESY TRAVIS CAPERTON, UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

Oklahomans

tention by rallying against bigotry and for inclusion after a racist video involving Sigma Alpha Epsilon surfaced in 2015. Boren disbanded the fraternity and expelled two students. “In retrospect, speaking to our country about this racial incident, civil rights, equal rights and mutual respect was the single most gratifying experience I’ve had in public life,” Boren says. “It was a crisis and it was emotionally and physically draining, but to have the opportunity to speak out was really important.

"I want [Oklahomans] to understand how much they have enriched my life. They let me live out my dreams.” “[The University of] Missouri lost enrollment because of their response to a racial incident. Our enrollment went up because we let everyone know that we’re inclusive. We’re a strong community and we have a strong sense of family. That’s something a university president can’t do by himself. It all involves care for each other. That’s the thing I take most pride in.” Another time Boren cites as an example of OU’s student success came in 2012, when Sooners simultaneously held the prestigious Rhodes, Mitchell and Marshall scholarships. “Can you imagine how good it felt to tell that to presidents of Harvard and Yale and Stanford?” says Boren, emphasizing that the faculty is also vital to OU’s academic leadership. “Measuring the legacy of a great university is not rocket science. It’s putting the greatest possible faculty teaching the greatest possible students. Elevating the student body and the faculty has been essential.” Boren lauds OU’s professors because “presidents change, students change, but the faculty remain. It’s shared governance. You bring about decisions that the faculty and administration agree upon to the benefit of everybody.” In addition to teaching and remaining in touch with students, Boren says his retirement

will allow him to write a blog. “It would be good to have a strong, progressive political voice out there on national and state issues,” he says. He also wants to become a one-on-one mentor to an at-risk youth who doesn’t have a stable life, perhaps through Big Brothers, Big Sisters. “Nothing’s more important than a mentor,” Boren says. “There’s a person depending on you to show up and encourage them.” One person whom Boren has influenced is Tulsan Jenny Carmichael, an OU discus thrower who was one of nine finalists for the 2017 NCAA Woman of the Year award. “President Boren invests directly into the lives around him,” she says. “As his student, I had the privilege of getting to know him and more importantly learn from his leadership and example. He never missed an opportunity to teach, whether that was in the classroom, in campus leadership or in the community. He taught me to strive for the impossible.” It’s always about young people for Boren, who wasn’t much older than typical collegians when he represented Seminole in the Oklahoma House. He enjoys their enthusiasm; they remind him that such vitality elicits change. “How did I get to be governor, U.S. senator and OU president? I got mad at the government and I wanted to straighten it out,” he says. He relishes youthful aspirations and difficulties, passions and concerns. Doing so takes him back to his days as a student and his lofty goals. “When I was at Oxford [as a Rhodes scholar in the early 1960s], I kept a diary for two years,” says the son of Lyle Boren, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, 1937-1947. “At one point, I wrote about three things that I hoped to do in my lifetime. One was to be U.S. senator from Oklahoma; the second was president of the University of Oklahoma. The third was an opportunity that never presented itself at the right time. You can take a logical guess and figure it out, but I’m not going to say.” Boren credits his academic and political careers to the state and its people. “That Oklahoma spirit is a great advantage in life,” he says. “The people of Oklahoma have given me everything, even the Rhodes scholarship. I was selected by Oklahomans for that. “I truly love the people and the opportunity to represent them. I want them to understand how much they have enriched my life. They let me live out my dreams.” - Brian Wilson ONLINE EXCLUSIVE READ MORE OF OUR INTERVIEW WITH DAVID BOREN AT OKMAG.COM/2017OKTY.


A Legacy of Philanthropy

Long-time philanthropist Mary Blankenship Pointer works tirelessly for those in need for two reasons. “God just charged me with lots of energy,” she says. “And giving is my family’s legacy.” Pointer began her personal philanthropy in earnest in 2004, when she hosted former First Lady Barbara Bush for an event that “had 880 attendees, and funds raised were to support education in Oklahoma,” she says. Since then, Pointer says she has been honored to work on numerous events over the years. Recent events she has chaired include 2017’s YWCA Purple Sash Gala, the Oklahoma Creativity Ambassadors Gala, and the Pioneer Library System Foundation Guac and Roll with Rick Bayless. The Oklahoma City resident has been recognized in numerous ways for her generosity, most recently with the Global Humanitarian Award from the World Experiences Foundation. “I remember when I was 4 or 5 and I heard John F. Kennedy’s speech – the one when he said, ‘Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country,’” she says. “And I remember saying to my parents, ‘This is how we should live.’ Of course, my parents and my grandparents were already living that way. They were just quiet about it. I guess I’m just a little louder.” Both of Pointer’s grandmothers raised gardens “a city-block wide, and just gave the food away,” she says. And her maternal grandfather offered her a life lesson about giving without any expectation in return. “During the Depression, he would give people money and, to help them keep their dignity, he always made them sign an IOU,” Pointer says. As a youngster, Pointer found a trunk full of those IOUs and said to her grandmother, “Oh, look how rich we could be.” “And my grandmother said, ‘That’s not how we do it,’” Pointer says. “My grandfather never collected a penny, and never intended to.” Her mother and father were constant volunteers, serving others throughout their lives, Pointer says. Her mother volunteered anywhere she could, and her father used the carpentry skills he learned in the Navy to build things to help others. Any way she looks at it, Pointer doesn’t see herself and the countless hours she has spent helping others – she sees how her family always gave their money and their time selflessly. “They never spoke of it. They just did it,” she says. “I’m just carrying on their legacy.” - Wendy King Burton

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Mary Blankenship Pointer’s energetic charitable work springs from grandparents and parents who led by example.

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Oklahomans OF THE YEAR

An Experienced Hand

Lance Robertson takes his decades of work with older Oklahomans to a federal position on aging issues.

Lance Robertson says he was honored to be among Oklahoma Magazine’s Oklahomans of the Year – and he’s grateful for the opportunity to represent the state on the federal level as the Assistant Secretary of Aging and Chief of the Administration for Community Living after his June appointment by President Donald Trump. “We have some strong representation from Oklahoma here [in federal government], and I’m proud to be one of them,” Robertson says. A Wellston native, Robertson attended Oklahoma State University as a business

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major, but he couldn’t have predicted then where he would be today. “It’s always fascinating to look back and see the paths that God has put us on,” he says. “I was asked to help launch the Gerontology Institute at OSU, and from there it just took off. It is something I can get up in the morning and be passionate about. “And at the root of all that is my desire to be a public servant. After I left the college, I went to work in government. Higher education is certainly different from working for the state, and working for the federal government is different from both.” Robertson says he has always had an ambition to step into a federal post where he can make a difference. “But the stars have to align to get a presidential appointment. So last fall I did position myself for consideration, and it was

exciting in February or March when I began participating in conversations where I knew I was being considered.” Robertson’s considerable experience and accolades for his work likely helped him earn the appointment. He worked for 12 years at OSU, then in 2007 became Oklahoma’s director of aging services in the Department of Human Services, where he oversaw an annual budget of $325 million, supervised 19 major programs and led a statewide team of 225 staff members. Robertson also served as the executive director of PartnerShips for Aging, and is past president of the National Association of States United for Aging and Disabilities (NASUAD), an authority on aging and disability issues. In addition, he is a trustee for the Oklahoma Public Employees Association


PHOTO BY CHARLIE ROSENTHAL

From a family of Tulsa leaders, G.T. Bynum brings youthful vitality to City Hall with a nod to what’s worked in the past.

G.T. Bynum isn’t really a newcomer to the City Hall scene, even though he’s just finished up his first year in office as Tulsa’s 40th mayor. Bynum says he has known since he was a boy that he wanted to be mayor someday, thanks to a long family history of public service. Bynum is a fifth-generation Tulsan who comes from a family of former mayors: his great-grandfather, his grandfather and his cousin. “When I was born, my grandfather was the mayor of Tulsa, and by the time I was 8, he no longer was – but everywhere we went people would come up to my granddad and talk to him,” Bynum says. “This, of course, was during my formative years, and people would tell him he was a great mayor.” Bynum says he has always been motivated by service and altruism,

Political Action Committee, a council member of the Edmond YMCA, and a veteran of the U.S. Army. He has received the Oklahoma Aging Professional of the Year Award, the Salute to Leaders in Aging National Award, and the 2015 NASUAD President’s Award. “Fortunately, I was able to demonstrate to this president [Trump], with my 22 years of experience, that I could promise him competence in running a multi-billion dollar agency,” Robertson says. “You have to bring to bear your willingness to be transparent, exhibit passion, and be a relationship builder – and I really pride myself on my work as a unifier rather than a divider, and vision casting, creating a vision, a path, for the agency.” That path comes with not a few challenges that Robertson says he is more than ready to take on with a staff that he calls “some of the

learned after working for two U.S. senators, then becoming a Tulsa city council member for eight years. He knew that city government was where he wanted to be. “The ambition and drive that Tulsa had when we became a great American city in the ’20s – I felt like we had lost that focus,” Bynum says. “We were fortunate to have pioneers with a spirit of high expectations for their hometown, and I am excited to bring that spirit back to the city of Tulsa.” Bynum has pledged to “renew a spirit of high expectations at City Hall, focusing on goals that would encourage and shape the next generation of Tulsans.” His energy as mayor is funneled toward education, economic development, government efficiency, public safety and community development, he says. Bynum considers two men true heroes – his grandfather, Robert J. LaFortune, and Theodore Roosevelt. “Roosevelt was young and energetic and he re-energized this country, really launching it toward being

best professionals I’ve ever worked with.” The number of older adults and people with disabilities in this country is growing rapidly, he says, with 10,000 people a day turning 65. “Funding for services cannot keep up with this growth, so we are working on innovative ways to capacity build,” Robertson says. Other challenges include recognizing increasingly complex health conditions and needs, and integrating services into health care. “We can’t forget that there are things that make us feel better that aren’t related to a pill or a shot, or a visit to a physician,” he says. “We need to make sure we’re folding these services into our health-care systems and doing everything we can to help people stay in their homes and communities.” - Wendy King Burton

an international power,” Bynum says. “And I don’t think it’s entirely intentional on my part, but I like his approach and his style.” Bynum’s youth and vitality have attracted the notice of young professionals in Tulsa; voting turnout for mayor in 2016 increased among that population by 50 percent. “A lot of political experts told me I didn’t have much chance of winning because the people who they predicted would vote for me – young professionals – typically don’t vote,” he says. “And that’s largely because young people are turned away from politics and turned more toward nonprofit work today. Politics, backbiting and mudslinging campaigns cause that to happen. I’m proud that we ran a clean campaign, based on positivity.” Bynum says he’s trying to bring youthful vitality into the mayor’s office. “The average age of my staff is 34,” he says. “What we’re trying to do is empower younger Tulsans to play a leadership role for the next generation.” - Wendy King Burton

PHOTO COURTESY LANCE ROBERTSON

A Mayoral Lineage

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Oklahomans OF THE YEAR

A Confluence, Not a Contradiction

PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON

Muscogee (Creek) Nation chief James Floyd says cultural values weave with tribal enterprises. When James

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Floyd, principal chief of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, discusses culture guiding business interests, the message cannot ring hollow … because he will hear about it. The Nation, with scores of social-welfare agencies throughout Green Country, serves 84,000 members, and garners profits from casinos and resorts. For Floyd, those missions don't contradict; instead, they mesh. “You can’t hide anything,” Floyd says. “We want to be successful financially, but also maintain an identity unique to ourselves. Our values give us balance.” He cites the River Spirit Casino Resort along the Arkansas River in south Tulsa; it became fully functional in 2017. Floyd discusses hotel amenities and Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville in the same breath as the tribe’s violent removal from homelands in the southeastern United States in the 1800s. “River Spirit is the biggest investment we’ve had and the staff takes a lot of pride in presenting this as a place people want to come to,” Floyd says. “But the most important part for me is what this property represents. We want to make sure that patrons know our history, our people and our art. Here’s who we were and who we are now. The whole theme is in the structure.” Tribal enterprises like River Spirit underwrite $6 million annually in human services. “Health, education and welfare – the big three – are the focus of our national council,” Floyd says. “For instance, we have assistance programs for gas and electric bills, both summer and winter. There’s burial assistance, money for school clothes, scholarships, incentives for students to maintain at least a 3.0 GPA, funding for vocational training.... We help about 3,000 college students every semester, from UCLA to Harvard.” Education is vital to the past … and future. “When we were forced to Oklahoma, the first thing we did was set up schools and colleges,” Floyd says. “The council house in Okmulgee had a school in it in the 1880s.” Floyd gets excited about young people earning collegiate degrees or vocational certifications because they remember their roots. “We use our culture in our everyday life to guide our decisions,” he says. “We know our ancestry. We want to retain our language and our families. We’ve overcome obstacles and traumas the last 300 years by relying on our traditional beliefs.” - Brian Wilson ONLINE EXCLUSIVE READ MORE OF OUR INTERVIEW WITH JAMES FLOYD AT OKMAG.COM/2017OKTY.


Resolve to

Get The latest trends include highintensity interval training, group training and wearable technology.

by Rebecca Fast

Fit I

f you’ve made New Year’s resolutions and they include hitting the gym or losing weight, check out continuing trends in fitness and diet … because being healthy and staying fit never go out of style. The American College of Sports Medicine’s Health and Fitness Journal recently predicted popular exercise regimens for 2018; topping the list were high-intensity interval training, group training and wearable technology. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is known for its short bursts of extreme exercise followed by a short period of rest or recovery. It’s not new – it ranked No. 1 in 2014 – but it has evolved thanks to innovations in wearable technology.

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Jared Meacham, fitness services director for Sky Fitness and Wellbeing in Tulsa, says heart-rate monitors can make exercise more efficient and effective. The center recently introduced SkyPulse, a heart-rate monitoring system utilizing the MYZONE chest strap monitor, an exercise tracker with 99.4 percent EKG accuracy that can be used in and out of the gym and connects with smartphones and other wearable devices. “Heart-rate monitoring is so foundational to exercise physiology that we would be … negligent in the fitness industry if we didn’t apply this technology,” Meacham says. “The heart rate is the most fundamental measure of exercise, so we see the monitor as a necessity to efficient and intelligent training.” Based on an individual’s heart rate, the heart-rate data is displayed in five color-coded zones, with gray being the least intense and red being the most intense. In addition, each zone has a point system to support friendly competition and group challenges. During exercise, this wearable technology shows people their levels of workout intensity. “What we often see is that people are staying at a high intensity and not achieving the varying levels,” Meacham says. “Staying in a high intensity holding pattern puts huge amounts of stress on the body. You may burn an extra 100 calories, but a lower percentage of body fat is burned per minute in these upward intervals. We also know that staying in these upward zones for a long period of time can trigger the hunger response, which can be difficult for people who struggle with emotional connections with food or struggle with making the right food choices.” In the future, Meacham says we may see more moderate-intensity interval training as people learn more about fitness zones through wearable technology. According to the Health and Fitness Journal survey, group training has been around for years and appeared as a potential worldwide trend, but it wasn’t until 2017 that it made the top 20. Angela Jones, director of health and wellness initiatives for the YMCA of Greater Oklahoma City, has seen considerable growth in group exercise classes and small-group sessions, as well as individual personal training. “In particular, members are asking for HIIT classes that challenge them from their regular routine,” she says. “We have also seen our older adult members requesting and participating in classes such as ‘Golden

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RECENT R MOST U O ORT Y W VIE NE EFF NT, O Z Y M , T U WORKO U ILOCALORIE CO ENTK C , R S E T P N I PO FORT F S E E G AL GOAL AVERA PERSON APP. D N A AGE ONE URMYZOMNEYZ ON OYCOO SY TE UR PHOT

NETTE VANS, JEAN CANDICE E IE ND ROBB NICHOLS A SING XERCISE U MOELLER E HEALTH IEGFRIED ST. JOHN S E R RCLUOBW RS. DOIEDOHEA ’S IN LTH CLUB GFR SIE N JOH RTESY ST. PHOTO COU

HIIT,’ which demonstrates … that they can do so much more than they ever thought possible.” Kendra Holmes-Morris, group fitness coordinator at St. John Siegfried Health Club in Tulsa, says that facility’s most popular classes are spin, Zumba, yoga flow, cardio circuit and high-intensity interval training. A new class called Rogue is a blend of strength, core and cardio training that aims to fuel an “after-burn effect” for up to six hours. “Rogue has taken fitness to a new level for our members,” Holmes-Morris says. “And for those age 65 and older, St. John offers classes that help you maintain independence as you age, such as yoga flow and body balance, which focus on stability, core strength and balance.” CrossFit, another high-intensity program, continues to gain momentum and has moved from the fringes to mainstream, despite controversy over potential harmful health effects. Brian Dowler, fitness manager for the Health Zone at Saint Francis in Tulsa, says, “We are fortunate to have a coach that emphasizes proper form and technique. He won’t allow people to move forward until they master form and technique.” The Health Zone also offers small-group training called ZoneFit. “It is unlimited training that we offer 37 times [a] week that will meet your schedule and fitness needs,” Dowler says. “Smallgroup training is affordable and gives the participant accountability as well as camaraderie.”


Diet Resolutions

Making New Year’s resolutions is easy. Keeping them is the hard part. “It’s important to remember that the new year isn’t meant to serve as a catalyst for sweeping behavior changes,” Jones says. “It is a time for people to reflect on their past year’s behavior and promise to make positive lifestyle changes. Setting small, attainable goals throughout the year, instead of a singular, overwhelming goal on Jan. 1, can help you reach whatever it is you strive for.” Connie Davis Bendel, a registered dietitian at Nutrition Consultants of Tulsa, says if you’re not ready to overhaul your diet, then try the 80/20 approach. “Trying to eat too healthy can set you up for failure,” she says. “Instead, strive for healthy food choices 80 percent of the time, which gives you some leeway for the remain-

ing 20 percent. You can enjoy all foods on a healthy eating plan, but pay attention to how much and how often you select higher-calorie, higher-fat items.” She recommends adding one produce item into each meal and snack and eliminating liquid calories – meaning no soda, juice, sweetened iced tea and fancy coffee drinks. “Eliminating these sweetened beverages is often one of the most effective steps to losing weight,” Bendel says. “Women should keep added sugar to less than 25 grams per day and men less than 35 grams per day.” Gaining popularity is the plant-based diet, which Bendel says brings more vitamins, minerals, fiber and healthy fats into our bodies. “In one particular study, those following a 70 percent plant-based diet had a 20 percent lower risk of heart disease and stroke, as

well as lowered risk for inflammatory diseases and Type 2 diabetes,” says Bendel, adding that you don’t have to cut out meat. “A simple shift toward a more plant-based diet can offer significant health benefits.”

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS HOSPICE CARE We spent time with my parents during the holiday season and the topic of Advance Directives came up. We are all interested in having one of these on hand. Can you explain how they work? Absolutely! There are two main types of Advance Medical Directives. One is a living will and the other is a medical AVA HANCOCK power of attorney. A “living will” allows you to write down your wishes about medical treatments if you are nearing the end of your life. There are safeguards in place before it can be utilized. First, two physicians must certify you are unable to make medical decisions and have a medical condition covered by the state’s living will law. A medical power of attorney allows you to appoint a person you trust as your healthcare agent. This person will be authorized to make medical decisions on your behalf. Before a medical power of attorney can go into effect, that person’s physician must make the conclusion that they are unable to make their own medical decisions. Grace Hospice can provide you more information about Advance Medical Directives and other related topics. Please call 918-744-7223 or visit www.gracehospice.com.

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

ATTORNEY AT LAW I was injured at work, but my employer says my injury is not covered under workers’ compensation insurance because I had a previous injury to the same area. Is there anything I can do? Currently, there are a lot of ESTHER M. SANDERS workers’ compensation laws under review by the Oklahoma Supreme Court. Many have already been determined to be unconstitutional or found to be unenforceable for other reasons. Simply because an employee had a previous injury or condition does not preclude the individual from having a work related compensable injury under the law. Under the current law, there are multiple deadlines to meet as it relates to filing your claim to protect yourself. Therefore, it is critical to immediately contact an attorney to protect your rights.

Esther M. Sanders Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. Tulsa, OK 74120 • 918.745.2000 Telephone 800.745.2006 Toll Free

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INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL How do I take a fresh look at my insurance in the new year? The New Year is a time of reflection and change – and an excellent time to reevaluate your insurance policies to ensure your coverage meets your needs. Consider the following recommendations: Review your current policy – Make sure you have the RUSS IDEN right coverage that fits your needs, especially if you’ve had life changes like a new car, home, or a new addition to the family. Also consider life insurance to protect your assets & provide coverage for your loved ones in a time of need. Inventory your belongings – A list of your possessions can help you replace your treasures if they’re stolen or lost in a fire. Check for discounts – Take time to review your policy to make sure you’re getting all the discounts you should, including things like a security alarm on your home, smoke detectors, and training programs that drivers in your household can take to reduce auto insurance premiums – especially teens. If you have any questions about insurance, call a AAA agent near you.

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.748.1034 800.222.2582, x1034 russ.iden@aaaok.org

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST Every New Year my resolution is to lose weight, and every year my resolution eventually fizzles out. How can I make this year different and achieve my goal? The truth behind weight loss is that there is no cure-all plan. Each of us loses weight a little bit differently, MALISSA SPACEK which is exactly why the BA Med Spa staff treats each of our patients on an individual basis. We start by assessing your needs, utilizing the information gathered from lab work, medical history and current lifestyle to form the best plan for you. Our plans combine different tools and medications with constant support – both during and after your weight loss journey – to help our patients keep the pounds off for good. Call us today and let us make your “Resolution a Reality.”

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

PERSONAL TRAINER Why can’t I lose weight as fast as I did during the first month of my diet? Scientifically, in order to lose one pound of fat (3,500 calories), your food intake must be 3,500 calories less than your usual calorie expenditure. The first two weeks of a reduced calorie diet, up JOHN JACKSON to 70 percent of the initial weight loss is in the form of water. As your body burns its most accessible fuel – the glycogen stored in the muscles – it releases three or four grams of glycogen. For the first two weeks of a low-calorie diet, you may lose three or more pounds per week. This is a dramatic amount of weight loss, but it isn't until about two weeks into your reduced-calorie diet that your body starts burning fat. Fat contains more calories per pound than glycogen, meaning it takes longer to lose fat. After the first couple of weeks into your diet, it is crucial that you exercise. This is because your body will start to convert protein from lean tissue into energy, actually burning up muscles for energy. Exercise will keep your muscle mass from diminishing, furthermore a nutrient rich food program will keep you healthy and energized.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

FINANCIAL ADVISOR How do I put my affairs in order after losing my spouse? The passing of a spouse can take a heavy emotional toll on anyone. Especially early on, newly bereaved widows or widowers may find it difficult to get through each day, much less focus on items that involve paperwork and investments. But, it is important DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC® for those who’ve suffered the loss of a spouse to get their financial affairs in order – and the sooner, the better. You’ll need to start by gathering documentation such as your spouse’s death certificate, will, your marriage license and life insurance policies. You’ll need to consult an attorney to begin the process of settling the estate, and you’ll need to get your financial affairs in order. But remember you don’t have to face your financial decisions alone – now is the time to consult a financial advisor to help you look at your overall financial picture and determine the next steps.

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Prime Wealth Management A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.primewealthmgmt.com Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

How to Dough It Right

Tulsan James Shrader’s new venture, a pizza joint featuring ciabatta-like crusts, contrasts his usual fine-dining gig.

THE CRUST OF A PRAIRIE FIRE PIE PIZZA ISN’T MODELED AFTER OLD-SCHOOL PIZZA, BUT INSTEAD AFTER A BREAD, CIABATTA. PHOTO BY LUKE OPPENHEIMER

S

ometimes, standing by the austere yet elegant gray walls of his Palace Cafe – one of Tulsa’s most revered fine-dining establishments on the corner of Cherry Street and Peoria Avenue – chef James Shrader reminisces about his grade-school trip to Seattle’s Pike Place Market, where his young, astonished eyes went wide due to the panoply of spices and flavors spread before him. If you want to catch a glimpse of that happy child, just go next door to Prairie Fire Pie. There’s a big, plate-glass window and through it you’ll see a bright, pleasant space

with white oak walls, track lighting and long, casual, plank tables made for sharing and family dining. Chances are you’ll see a youthful, agile man, bearded and wearing a T-shirt and baseball cap, probably in motion, often smiling, and as excited as a young boy on Christmas morning. That’s Shrader, too, at his other establishment. Pizza, it seems, has undiscovered health benefits. Shrader has always loved baking and, in recent years, has become fascinated by pizza. Making the dough seems easy, but it took him many months of experiments before he got it right. JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste “Now this is what I’m looking for,” he says as he breaks the soft, pillowy edge of a gleaming slice. “Look at those bubbles in the crust. It should be airy, light and crunchy with a little chew.” It’s not like traditional New York or Naples pizza. “We’re West Coast, and that means innovation,” says Shrader, noting that the crust isn’t modeled after old-school pizza, but instead after a bread, ciabatta. “We use more water in the dough, and that makes it much more delicate and hard to work with, but it’s worth it.” Making the dough for a Prairie Fire Pie pizza arguably takes more time, skill and effort than a fine-dining entree. It takes two days. To start, Shrader says, “we make a bubblylooking wet goo” called a biga. It has some sourdough starter and gets wild yeast from the air. “We throw flour on it and then fold it every 20 minutes for two hours. That’s what gives us the lovely bubbles.” Then it sits in the refrigerator overnight. It must be used the next day

44

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

or discarded. The dough is carefully shaped and pulled into an oval. Toppings are added. Then the pie goes into the wood-burning oven. “The oven is pretty straightforward,” Shrader says. “But I haven’t quite mastered it yet. After I’ve had a thousand hours of practice, I’ll be competent.” The pizza comes out as a gleaming, bubbly beauty. The toppings shine. Plus, this isn’t your grandma’s pizza. Yes, some have tomato sauce and sausage. But others have potatoes and sunny-side-up eggs. “I’ve paired a different cheese to each topping,” Shrader says. “Sausage has pecorino because sausage demands a robust cheese. But potato is more delicate, so I gave it mild mozzarella.” Prairie Fire is not just about pizza. You can start your meal with a delicious oven-baked fondue of fontina cheese and crusty bread for dipping, or a plate of roasted carrots dusted with harissa.

“We also have chicken wings,” Shrader says. “I included them to show the world that this is not a prissy, fine-dining place; it’s casual. I’m trying to please a whole new demographic and that’s why our pies are priced so low, mostly $15 and under.” And why pizza? “I love it. You can never do a standardized, perfect pizza,” he says. “Each pizza is different; each pizza bakes differently from the last. It’s a challenge. It’s fun.” BRIAN SCHWARTZ

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: THE OPEN FLOOR PLAN AT PRAIRIE FIRE PIE CREATES A WELCOMING ATMOSPHERE FOR DINERS. THE OVEN-BAKED FONDUE IS ONE OF MANY APPETIZERS AT THE PIZZA JOINT. EACH PIE IS METICULOUSLY OVEN-BAKED AND CUT TO PERFECTION.

PHOTOS BY LUKE OPPENHEIMER


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45

11/27/17 10:43 AM


Taste

C H E F C H AT

In the Driver’s Seat Jason Campbell at Mary Eddy’s in OKC revs his way toward national recognition.

W

ith a name like Mary Eddy’s Kitchen x Lounge, today’s musteat place in Oklahoma City, one might think that Mary is quite the restaurateur. But the actual driver of this eatery, found inside the old Ford Motor Co. assembly plant, is chef Jason Campbell. The late Mary Eddy Jones, the restaurant’s eponym, was the wife of Fred Jones, the legendary Oklahoma City and Tulsa automobile dealer. Mary Eddy’s is a nod to vehicular history in both name and location. Mary Eddy’s, sharing space in the old auto plant with the beautifully renovated, art-filled 21c Hotel, is a taste and site experience not to be missed, because Campbell has revved up new ideas during an already exciting time for OKC’s gastro-conscious diners. The 32-year-old native of Orlando, Florida, had introduced vibrant dishes for the 21c Hotel chain at its Cincinnati, Ohio, property as chef de cuisine before he got a figurative call: “Head south, young man, and do great things.” As executive chef for Mary Eddy’s and the OKC Hotel 21c, Campbell has the freedom to explore menu ideas and flavors that express himself. “I wanted to do something that had more than a steakhouse feel for sure,” he says. “We want guests to come and be comfortable and relaxed and enjoy themselves as they eat and not feel bad about picking up a charred pork rib or going head on into a Tin Lizzy burger. We want the guest experience to be that what they are eating is made with care; it is fresh and made on site, and as local as we can be.” Menu items and house specials teem with abundant flavors from Moroccan, French, Greek influences that Campbell

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

learned from chefs he has worked with. He also offers a personal touch from his southern and Florida roots when it comes to seafood and comfort food. Oklahoma City craves that kind of mold-breaking thinking from chefs. The city’s most creative, talented chefs thrive in this environment – and kudos to OKC for embracing new styles. “I feel the food scene in OKC is going through some awesome growth,” he says. “It’s starting to have a lot more options for the city to go out and try something new. I do feel OKC is trying to break free from the southwest vibe and steakhouse scene, and we are seeing a lot more smaller concepts that focus on the food and the guest, and not just on how pretty the place is.” This OKC adopted son plans to continue growing Mary Eddy’s by training the best cooks and passing that love of food and creative talent forward. He will maintain involvement in the community, and maybe, just maybe, there might be a James Beard Award winner from Thunder City. “The James Beard would be a dream come true for me,” Campbell says. “It’s the Oscars for chefs. I honestly think about it on a daily basis. I ask myself, ‘Is this dish Beard worthy?’ and train my team to cook and think that way. It would be an honor if I could achieve that here in OKC.” Yes, 21c, this young man came back down south and has done great things. May he bring home the gold. SCOTTY IRANI


L O C A L F L AV O R

HUMMUS

WITH BURNED HONEY, ROASTED SQUASH PUREE AND EVERYTHING SPICE Hummus 1 cup 2 tsp. ½ cup 1 tsp. ¼ tsp.

dried chickpeas baking soda tahini salt ground cumin

Soak chickpeas in water overnight with 1 tsp.

of the baking powder; make sure to double the amount of water to cover the chickpeas because they absorb water.

Drain and rinse the peas the next day and place

in a larger pot. Add the other teaspoon of baking powder.

Cover with water (at least 4 inches above the peas), bring to a boil, skim any foam that comes to the top of the pot, reduce the heat to medium low, cover again and simmer for about 1 hour. Make sure the peas are completely tender, then

cook for another 30 minutes; it’s OK if they get overcooked and mushy (it helps make the hummus creamy).

Drain in colander. Mix peas, tahini, salt and cumin in a food

processor. Puree for 5 minutes or until super creamy; if needed, add a little water to help get it to proper texture.

To serve, put hummus into a bowl, make a

small indention in the hummus, add simple roasted squash puree, sprinkle with everything spice, and drizzle with burned honey. Eat with grilled pita, naan or crunchy veg-

etables.

Burned honey 1 cup

orange blossom honey

Pour honey in a high-sided sauce pot and put

over medium heat, let come to a bubble and watch for the color to change to a light amber. Set aside until cool, then place in airtight container.

Everything spice

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

2 tbsp. 2 tbsp. 2 tbsp. 2 tbsp. 1 tbsp.

poppy seeds white or black sesame seeds dried minced garlic dried onions flake salt

Mix all together, spread on cookie sheet or small pan and toast for 5 minutes in a 350-degree oven. Add to an airtight container once cooled (it will

Soupendous

The winter months call for hearty and delicious soup from area restaurants.

Vast – Oklahoma City Chicken noodle

This delicious soup evokes memories of playing in the snow all day, then running into mom’s kitchen, shucking cold, wet mittens and grabbing a steaming bowl of savory broth and soft noodles.

Ti Amo – Tulsa Shrimp and lobster bisque

After a morning of fun making snow angels and building snow people, you can wrap your frozen fingers around a porringer of this savory, seafood delight for a satisfying meal.

OU TO C PHO

R TE

SY

S VA

T

Hammett House – Claremore Matzo ball

This traditional matzo ball soup is comfort food at its finest – you’ll feel like you’re having a nosh at home with your feet in fuzzy slippers on the ottoman, a cozy quilt wrapped around you and snow lightly falling outside your window.

L PHOTO BY NATA

Bill & Ruth’s – Tulsa Potato

S PHOTO COURTE

With this heartwarming, creamy potato soup, loaded with delectable ingredients ready to warm your belly on a cold winter day, you’ll reminisce about those glorious snow days from school that you spent at Grandma’s house.

MET T Y H AM

Stella Modern Italian Cuisine – Oklahoma City Italian wedding

Phill’s Diner – Tulsa Santa Fe

This creamy, cheesy bowl of heaven is like a cross between chili and soup – and its heartiness is sure to fill the hollow spot inside you after a long day of shoveling snow or dodging snowballs.

SE HOU

S PHOTO COURTE

Made with housemade beef meatballs, pulled chicken, orzo and spinach, this simple, delectable soup is sure to defrost you from the tip of your icicleladen nose to the tips of your frozen toes.

O PHOT

PHO TO C O

UR T E

EN IE GRE

Y BILL

& RU

TH’S

COURTESY PHILL’S DINER

E SY STELL A ODERN CUISIN M

keep at room temperature for a week).

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

47


SCOTT THOMPSON METEOROLOGIST KIRSTEN HORNE METEOROLOGIST

LISA JONES

WORKING FOR BRETT ANTHONY OUR COMMUNITY EVERY WEEKDAY BRANDON WHOLEY

CHIEF METEOROLOGIST

METEOROLOGIST

TODAY 4:30a - 7:00a


Where & When

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

Bring on the Bright Smiles

PHOTO COURTESY PINNACLE PRODUCTION GROUP

T

Amazing lights and sights await families at the Tulsa Lantern Light Festival.

he Lantern Festival, marking the 15th day of the first Chinese lunar month, traditionally ends the culture’s New Year period. Families have enjoyed lanterns, traditional lantern riddles, eating tangyuan or yuanxiao (spherical dessert dumplings in soup), and lion and dragon dances as part of this holiday for more than 2,000 years. The Tulsa Lantern Light Show, held at River West Festival Park through Jan. 14, replicates this traditional celebration with offerings of delectable Chinese food, “lion” and “dragon” rides, fireworks and the For-

bidden City Maze. Live entertainment, including Chinese acrobats, and lantern making are also part of the sights and sounds of the traveling event. Activities for children abound, including mining for emeralds, face painting and miniature golf. The lanterns, however, are the must-see attraction – enormous, glowing spectacles custom-built by Chinese artisans. Each lantern takes four weeks and a team of seven to complete, according to Tulsa Lantern Light Festival’s website. The lanterns are made from hundreds of pieces of silky cloth and can measure up to 30 feet high and 300 feet long.

Designs include everything from holidays and architecture around the world to creatures of the land and sea. As a special nod to Tulsa, this festival features a glowing Golden Driller. Show hours are 5-10 p.m. each Thursday and Sunday, and 5-11 p.m. each Friday and Saturday. Tickets are $20 for adults and $16 for children ages 3-12 ($12 on Thursdays). The festival has VIP packages and military, group and senior citizen discounts. Activities and food are not included in the ticket prices. To avoid lines, the Tulsa Lantern Light Festival recommends buying tickets online at lanternlightfestival.com/tulsa. JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

49


Where & When

COMMUNIT Y

PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON

The Oklahoma Wedding Show If you’re looking for wedding inspiration for your flowers, cake, venue or the all-important gown, the Oklahoma Wedding Show, presented by Oklahoma Magazine, is your one-stop shop. It runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 13 at Expo Square Central Park Hall in Tulsa. Receive expert advice from top wedding professionals in an array of specialties – attire, decor, registry, lighting, photography – and get one-on-one face time to discuss your special day. Caterers and bakers offer samples of their work, making for a productive and delicious day. You can catch a runway show featuring the latest fashions, including wedding gowns, bridesmaids dresses and tuxedos. Shows take place at 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. as local and national designers display wedding attire from their collections. For more excitement, enter to win more than $12,000 in prizes in the Dream Wedding Giveaway. A highlight of the collection is the Mikimoto pearl and diamond earring set from Bruce G. Weber, valued at over $2,000. Expo Square Central Park Hall is at 4145 E. 21st St. For more information, visit oklahomawedding.com.

IN TULSA PERFORMANCES THEATRE TULSA PRESENTS: EVITA Jan. 12-14, 18-21

TULSA PAC Experience the spectacle of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s saga about political leader Eva Peron. theatretulsa.com TULSA SYMPHONY PRESENTS: AN EVENING WITH ERIC WHITACRE

PHOTO COURTESY OKC THUNDER, NBAE/GETTY IMAGES

Thunder Up

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

About halfway through a tumultuous regular season, the Oklahoma City Thunder has struggled at times in the NBA’s Western Conference. However, the additions of forwards Paul George and Carmelo Anthony to a lineup with perennial all-star Russell Westbrook have led to some standout moments, especially a long-anticipated 108-91 victory against the Golden State Warriors in November. January offers 14 Thunder games, six at home at Chesapeake Energy Arena: Jan. 9 vs. the Portland Trailblazers; Jan. 15 vs. the Sacramento Kings; Jan. 17 vs. the Los Angeles Lakers; Jan. 23 vs. the Brooklyn Nets; Jan. 25 vs. the Washington Wizards; and Jan. 28 vs. the Philadelphia 76ers. For tickets, times and more information, visit nba.com/thunder.

Experience the works of Georges Bizet, Claudio Monteverdi, Wolfgang Mozart, Giacomo Puccini, Giuseppe Verdi and Richard Wagner.

signaturesymphony.org

Jan. 13

TULSA PAC TSO welcomes Grammy Award-winning composer and conductor Eric Whitacre as a guest conductor and featured composer.

tulsasymphony.org

CHOREGUS PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS: ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET Jan. 26-27 TULSA PAC Aspen Santa

Fe Ballet’s bold vision — top global choreographers, distinct groundbreaking repertoire, virtuoso dancers — has fostered a dance company jewel in the American west. choregus.org

CHAMBER MUSIC TULSA PRESENTS: ENSEMBLE 4.1 Jan. 28 TULSA PAC Ensemble 4.1

offers a rare opportunity to hear the unusual quintet combination of piano, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn.

chambermusictulsa.org

BROKEN ARROW PAC PRESENTS: GOBSMACKED Jan. 30 BROKEN ARROW PAC

Featuring the reigning world champion beatboxer Ball-Zee and an international cast of vocalists, Gobsmacked weaves stories through all forms of a cappella. brokenarrowpac.com

CONCERTS HANGOVER BALL 2018 Jan. 1 CAIN’S BALLROOM Ring

in the new year with Cody Canada, Evan Felker and Jason Boland. cainsballroom.com

JOHN HIATT AND THE GONERS Jan. 14 BRADY THEATER Featuring Sonny Landreth, this concert celebrates the 30th anniversary of Slow Turning, John Hiatt’s breakout album.

AN EVENING WITH 2CELLOS Jan. 20 BRADY THEATER Two men,

two cellos, one amazing night. Don’t miss out.

bradytheater.com

the country charts with songs like “Stay a Little Longer” and “Rum,” the Brothers Osborne grew up in Deale, Maryland, a small fishing town on the Atlantic. riverspirittulsa.com

largest annual tours in the world, this event showcases some of the biggest names in Christian music. bokcenter.com

AVENGED SEVENFOLD Jan. 29

BOK CENTER Avenged

THE MOODY BLUES Jan. 23 BOK CENTER 50 years of

music, one iconic band. The Moody Blues are on their historic Days of Future Passed 50th

TREE Jan. 4-30 PAC GALLERY This show

Anniversary Tour. bokcenter.com

BROTHERS OSBORNE Jan. 27 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO AND RESORT Before they climbed

WINTER JAM Jan. 28 BOK CENTER Among the

bradytheater.com

SPORTS

SIGNATURE SYMPHONY PRESENTS: A NIGHT AT THE OPERA Jan. 27 TCC VAN TREASE PACE

Sevenfold is on its North American tour with guests Breaking Benjamin and Bullet For My Valentine.

bokcenter.com

ART

was inspired by a drawing by a 6-year-old girl. Captivated by her choice and arrangement of elements that, in her mind, composed a tree, curator Kristal Tomshany began to wonder how her grown artist friends would visually conceive of a tree. tulsapac.

com

FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL

TULSA The corporate

logo-emblazoned backdrop at red carpet events lures the public to gaze at a site “to-be-seen.” livingarts.org

THE CHRYSALIS PROJECT Jan. 5-25

LIVING ARTS OF TULSA

Transparent interior walls and solid exterior walls create a voyeuristic feeling.

livingarts.org

Jan. 5

SECOND SATURDAYS Jan.

This year-round, monthly event features all of the galleries, studios, museums and part-time galleries of various shops opening their doors.

PHILBROOK The second Saturday of each month has free art activities, tours and scavenger hunts.

BRADY ARTS DISTRICT

thebradyartsdistrict.com

TO BE SEEN Jan. 5-25 LIVING ARTS OF

13

philbrook.org

GAME ON! Through Feb. 4 PHILBROOK DOWNTOWN In the fast-paced, video-centric world of


MUSEUM CONFIDENTIAL

Through May 6

PHILBROOK This

groundbreaking exhibition turns the museum inside out by revealing practices,

ART

archives, stories and an unprecedented number of never-before-seen works of art. philbrook.org

THE QUESTION OF BEAUTY

TO ENDURE IN BRONZE

Through Dec. 31

The Oklahoma City Museum of Art examines the complexity of what it means for objects to be considered beautiful in its newest exhibition, The Question of Beauty. Becky Weintz, the museum’s marketing and communications director, says the exhibition “presents art that is conventionally beautiful as well as art that rejects this ideal.” Sections of the exhibition include “Assaulting Beauty,” “Ignoring Beauty” and “The Power of Beauty,” and focus on aesthetics in contemporary art. The exhibition invites viewers to experience an array of reactions to the art – from joy to disgust. Walking through the gallery, one finds works from Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, James Rosenquist and other modern and contemporary artists. Weintz is moved by one piece in particular. “You cannot help but be drawn to INXIT by Alfonso Ossorio when you enter the gallery – love it or not,” she says. “Don’t miss a chance to see this work in person.” The exhibition runs until Feb. 11. For more information, visit okcmoa.com.

GILCREASE The permanence of bronze, from antiquity to the present, has artistic immortality. gilcrease.org

SPORTS Jan. 6-7, 10, 12-13, 19-21, 30-31

ROPING Jan. 1 EXPO SQUARE Enjoy

Oilers take on the Colorado Eagles, Wichita Thunder and other East Coast Hockey League teams. bokcenter.com

CHILI BOWL NATIONALS

BOK CENTER Watch the

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA WOMEN’S BASKETBALL GAMES Jan. 3, 6, 13, 27, 31 REYNOLDS CENTER See

the Golden Hurricane host five opponents. tulsahurricane.com

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA MEN’S BASKETBALL GAMES Jan. 3, 13, 20 REYNOLDS CENTER Enjoy a

night of hoops as TU continues its season. tulsahurricane.com

WORLD’S RICHEST CALF

professional calf roping and barrel racing at this New Year’s blowout. johnsonsportline.com

Jan. 10-13

EXPO SQUARE Two weeks after Christmas, the Chili Bowl Midget Nationals arrive like a gift from Santa Claus.

chilibowl.com

WORLD OF WRESTLING FLO TULSA NATIONALS Jan. 18-20

EXPO SQUARE Experience one of the oldest, most prestigious junior wrestling events in the world.

worldofwrestling-roller.com

COMMUNITY THE OKLAHOMA WEDDING SHOW Jan. 13 EXPO SQUARE CENTRAL PARK HALL Let Oklahoma

Magazine help plan your big day. The Oklahoma Wedding show is your go-to guide for wedding planning. oklahomawedding.com

WINTERFEST Through Jan. 7 DOWNTOWN TULSA This

seasonal celebration gives everyone a chance to enjoy skating beneath the skyline.

and get in free to the Tulsa Air and Space Museum all day. tulsaairandspacemuseum.org

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. PARADE Jan. 15 DETROIT AVE. AND JOHN HOPE FRANKLIN BLVD. Honor one of America’s

greatest heroes at this annual parade. mlktulsa.com

GREEN COUNTRY HOME AND GARDEN SHOW Jan. 26-28

Jan. 13

TULSA FAIRGROUNDS This extravaganza features nearly 175 unique exhibitors from Green Country and the United States. coxradiotulsa.com

local architects for their monthly architectural walking tour. tulsaarchitecture.org

TULSA BOAT, SPORT AND TRAVEL SHOW Jan. 29-Feb. 4 EXPO SQUARE Get

tulsawinterfest.com

SECOND SATURDAY ARCHITECTURE TOUR 633 S. BOSTON AVE. Join

RUNWAY RUN Jan. 13 TULSA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT Run on the tarmac

a jump-start on the boating and recreational seasons. tulsaboatshow.com

CHARITABLE EVENTS CASCIA HALL TRIVIA NIGHT

Jan. 19

CASCIA HALL Enjoy pizza, beverages, games and prizes to help out the school. casciahall.com

DVIS: MONARCH BALL, THE WONDER OF IT ALL Jan. 26 SOUTHERN HILLS COUNTRY CLUB Make plans to be

whisked away to Domestic Violence Intervention Service’s Monarch Ball. dvis.org

BEST OF BRUNCH Jan. 27 THE MAYO HOTEL Hosted by

Domestic Violence Intervention Service’s associate board, this is the only event of its kind in Tulsa. Try delicious bites from top brunch spots and vote for your favorites dvis.org

IN OKC

HALL This uplifting story

about a young woman’s journey to love and triumph in the American South has conquered Broadway.

okcciviccenter.com

OKC PHILHARMONIC PRESENTS: JOSHUA ROMAN Jan. 13 OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Join the new music director designate for his first concert of the season, with Joshua Roman on cello. okcphil.org

ARMSTRONG AUDITORIUM PRESENTS: BELA FLECK AND BROOKLYN RIDER Jan. 16

ARMSTRONG AUDITORIUM Legendary banjo virtuoso Bela Fleck teams with the unsurpassed inventive string quartet Brooklyn Rider

and guest James McMurtry perform. criterionokc.com

TRAVIS LEDOYT Jan. 6 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Travis LeDoyt has

been called the “World’s Best Young Elvis.” riverwind.com Jan. 13

PURPLE Jan. 2-7 OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC

to play stunning works.

armstrongauditorium.org

OKC PHILHARMONIC PRESENTS: CIRQUE MUSICA – HEROES AND VILLAINS Jan. 26-27 OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Cirque Musica blends

the grace and thrill of some of the world’s greatest circus and acrobatic performers with stunning symphonic music. okcphil.org

ARMSTRONG AUDITORIUM PRESENTS: MOSCOW FESTIVAL BALLET Jan.

29-30

ARMSTRONG AUDITORIUM The Moscow Festival Ballet commemorates its unparalleled commitment to classical work.

armstrongauditorium.org

CONCERTS JASON ISBELL Jan. 4 THE CRITERION Jason Isbell

RANDY ROGERS BAND

PERFORMANCES OKC BROADWAY PRESENTS: THE COLOR

PHOTO COURTESY OKCMOA

TULSA OILERS GAMES

RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Every note on the

Randy Rogers Band’s new album rings with authenticity, making each song linger with the listener long after the music fades. riverwind.com

JONNY LANG Jan. 27 DIAMOND BALLROOM

Jonny Lang takes the stage with Blue Water Highway.

diamondballroom.com

RECKLESS KELLY Jan. 27 TOWER THEATRE Reckless

O N T H E S TA G E

COUNTRY AND COMEDY

Buckle up for a busy month at Choctaw Casinos and Resorts. The Durant and Pocola locations deliver music and comedy gold. In Durant, the notorious Kid Rock takes the Grand Theater stage Jan. 25-27. The 46-year-old rocker-rapper has found commercial success with his genre-bending tunes; his newest release, Sweet Southern Sugar, adopts a Southern rock and country sound. Each concert begins at 8 p.m. In Pocola, Tiffany Haddish hits the stage at 8 p.m. Jan. 27. It’s been a big year for the 38-year-old Los Angeles native, who made history in November by becoming the first African-American female comedian to host Saturday Night Live. Haddish has published her first novel, The Last Black Unicorn, and is touring nationally. For tickets and more information, head to choctawcasinos.com.

Kelly is an Americana band from Austin. towertheatreokc.com

TOBYMAC Jan. 30 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA TobyMac is back with another star-studded lineup for this year’s Hits Deep Tour. chesapeakearena.com

PHOTO BY JASON SQUIRES

professional sports, Philbrook curators Catherine Whitney and Sienna Brown invite visitors to take a seat on the sidelines. philbrook.org

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

51


Where & When

grantees. alliedartsokc.com

COMMUNIT Y

METAL-CRUSHING MAYHEM

Rev your engines and get ready for destruction at the Mad Dog Demolition Derby, where cars face off until only one is left running. The cars battle in a pit by smashing and crashing into each other until all but one become inoperable. For kids and adults alike, the event is a wildly entertaining (and cathartic) experience. The derby, equally fun for participants

FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK Jan. 5 PASEO DISTRICT Art

opening receptions showcase the new work of the gallery/ studio owners or the work of guest artists. thepaseo.org

RESOLUTIONS GROUP SHOW Jan. 11-Feb. 4 DNA GALLERIES Enjoy

this group show that revolves around New Year’s Resolutions.

dnagalleries.com

ARTNOW Through Jan. 19 OKLAHOMA CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER ArtNow is an

annual exhibition of Oklahomabased contemporary artists. oklahomacontemporary.org

Feb. 25

CURRENT STUDIO SHIFT

MASTER STROKES Through Jan. 21

OKCMOA Traveling outside

of Great Britain for the first time, this exhibition presents some of the most important works from the Victoria and Albert Museum’s collection of Dutch and Flemish drawings.

okcmoa.com

3, 9, 13, 23, 20

LLOYD NOBLE CENTER, NORMAN The Sooners men’s

OKLAHOMA CITY AUTO RACERS AUCTION AND SWAP MEET Jan. 5-6 STATE FAIR PARK Find

to 1945, these small drawings provide a snapshot of Tom Ryan’s high school and Coast Guard ears. nationalcowboymuseum.

AS LONG AS GRASS GROWS Ongoing EDMOND HISTORICAL SOCIETY AND MUSEUM Indian removal

from the eastern United States began in earnest in the 1830s and continued until the 1870s. The exhibit depicts the struggles and triumphs. edmondhistory.org

opponents from the Big 12 Conference soonersports.com

INTERNATIONAL FINALS RODEO Jan. 19-21 OKLAHOMA STATE FAIRGROUNDS Watch some

of the best rodeo athletes compete at the finals. ifrodeo.

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA WOMEN’S BASKETBALL GAMES Jan.

PBR OKLAHOMA CITY INVITATIONAL Jan. 20-21 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA The Professional Bull

Sooners host five

52

MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS Bring your

CARTOONS AND COMICS: THE EARLY ART OF TOM RYAN Through April 1 NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM Dating from 1936

basketball team continues its season with five home games. soonersports.com

4, 14, 20, 24, 31

READING WEDNESDAYS Jan.

3, 10, 17, 24, 31

youngster for story time each Wednesday at 10 a.m. Books have nature themes and match the season.

SPORTS UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA MEN’S BASKETBALL GAMES Jan.

COMMUNITY

takes participants on a journey through human consciousness – from dreamy introspection to high-energy creativity and all points in between. currentstudio.org

org

LLOYD NOBLE CENTER, NORMAN See the

and onlookers, comes to the Claremore Expo Center on Jan. 21. If you’d like to participate, there are four classes of vehicles: full-size modified, full-size stock weld, full-size chain/bolt and compact. Kids can also take part in the less rowdy but extraordinarily cute Power Wheel Derby. Don’t miss the mayhem; visit motorheadevents.com to snag tickets.

ART FACTORY OBSCURA PRESENTS: SHIFT Through

com

Riders group returns for a wild invitational. chesapeakearena.

com

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

PHOTO COURTESY MOTORHEAD EVENTS

UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA’S SNOWFLAKE GALA Jan. 26 NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM This event

oklahomacitybotanicalgardens. com

hard-to-find merchandise for your vehicle. raceshow.net

OKLAHOMA WINTER BEAD AND JEWELRY SHOW Jan. 5-7

STATE FAIR PARK This

show features jewelry, beads, beading supplies, buttons, findings, silver, charms, designer cabochons, gemstones and pearls. aksshow.com

EDMOND OUTDOOR ICE RINK Through Jan. 7 MITCH PARK The park

annual event allows consumers to experience what’s new in gardening, remodeling and home decor. oklahomacityhomeshow.

com

OKLAHOMA CITY BOAT SHOW Jan. 26-28 OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR PARK The show

has the largest gathering of boat dealers and offers in one building in the state. okcboatshow.com

GARDENS WALKING TOUR Jan. 27 MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS Join us to expand

2ND FRIDAY NORMAN ART WALK Jan. 12 WALKER ARTS DISTRICT This free

Jan. 28

com

transform the seasonal plaza into the Devon Ice Rink, making for a winter wonderland set in a bustling downtown.

OKLAHOMA TACKLE, HUNTING AND BOAT

oklahomacitybotanicalgardens. com

DEVON ICE RINK Through MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS The Gardens

oklahomacitybotanicalgardens. com

CHARITABLE EVENTS ALLIED ARTS CAMPAIGN KICKOFF Jan. 18 NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE

com

KRAIG PARKER Jan. 7 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO AND RESORT, THACKERVILLE See this

celebrated Elvis impersonator. winstarworldcasino.com

okctackleandhuntingshow.com

your plant knowledge and get great ideas for your yard.

celebration of arts and creativity is held monthly downtown. 2ndfridaynorman.

takes the Global Event Center stage. winstarworldcasino.

THE DOOBIE BROTHERS Jan. 12 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO AND RESORT, THACKERVILLE Enjoy

OKLAHOMA CITY HOME AND GARDEN SHOW Jan. 19-21 STATE FAIR PARK This

MUSEUM This annual

fundraising campaign features performances and speakers from member agencies and

A PERFECT FINISH Jan. 27 DEVON BOATHOUSE Enjoy a night of wine and beer tasting, an auction, food and fun benefiting the OKC Riversport Junior Crew. riversportokc.org

PERFORMANCES DANE COOK Jan. 1 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO AND RESORT, THACKERVILLE Dane Cook

CRISS ANGEL Jan. 19 WINSTAR WORLD

show is host to a variety of boats, recreational vehicles, tackle dealers, outdoor entertainment, hunting products and good family fun.

Ball benefits the Allied Arts Foundation and is sponsored by the Winter Charity Ball. alliedartsokc.com

AROUND THE STATE

SHOW Jan. 12-14 STATE FAIR PARK This

transforms into a winter wonderland. edmondoutdooricerink.

com

celebrates the work achieved during the 2017 annual fundraising campaign by volunteers and donors. unitedwayokc.com

A WINTER’S BALL Jan. 27 OKLAHOMA CITY GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB A Winter’s

CASINO AND RESORT, THACKERVILLE See the

storied magician and illusionist on his Mindfreak Unplugged Tour. winstarworldcasino.com

CHISHOLM TRAIL ARTS COUNCIL LIVE PRESENTS: SKATETACULAR: DREAMS ON ICE Jan. 19 THE SIMMONS CENTER, DUNCAN Join an all-star cast of world-famous professional ice skaters, singers, dancers and cirque acts as they glide across the stage in an ice experience like no other. chisholmtrailarts.com

CONCERTS FIRST COUNCIL CASINO, NEWKIRK See masterful

entertainer, singer and songwriter Alan Parsons.

firstcouncilcasinohotel.com

the rock tunes of the legendary Doobie Brothers. winstarworldcasino. com

GLADYS KNIGHT Jan. 20 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO AND RESORT, THACKERVILLE Gladys

CHARLIE WILSON Jan. 13 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO AND RESORT, THACKERVILLE After

Knight comes to the Global Event Center stage. winstarworldcasino.

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT Jan. 13

Worldwide.

com

winning numerous awards, Charlie Wilson isn’t planning to slow down anytime soon. winstarworldcasino.com

PITBULL Jan. 26 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO AND RESORT, THACKERVILLE See Mr. winstarworldcasino.com

SPORTS CHAMPIONSHIP BULL RIDING: BATTLE ON THE GREAT PLAINS Jan. 6 CENTRAL NATIONAL BANK CENTER, ENID Championship

GALLAGHER-IBA ARENA, STILLWATER Catch some of

OSU men’s Big 12 Conference contests. okstate.com

OKLAHOMA STATE COWBOYS WOMEN’S BASKETBALL GAMES Jan.

Bull Riding promotes and preserves the sport’s best elements. cnbcenter.com

7, 17, 24, 27

OKLAHOMA STATE COWBOYS MEN’S BASKETBALL GAMES Jan. 6, 13, 20, 30

GALLAGHER-IBA ARENA, STILLWATER Catch the OSU

women’s basketball team with four home games. okstate. com

ART

STUART DAVIS: IN FULL SWING Through Jan. 1 CRYSTAL BRIDGES, BENTONVILLE, ARK. This

special exhibit features

more than 80 paintings and drawings by American original Stuart Davis. crystalbridges. org


PHOTO COURTESY CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS

FILM AND CINEMA

PERFORMANCE

Love, Murder and Farce

Celebrity Attractions brings A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder to the Tulsa PAC in January. The farcical musical follows the story of Monty Navarro, a distant heir to a massive fortune. Through various schemes and tricks, Navarro aims to jump the line of succession in order to garner the riches – by killing all his luckier relatives. “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder is a very fast paced comedy that will keep the audience on their toes,” says Kristin Dotson, Celebrity Attraction’s CEO. “The show is a classic musical comedy farce. It will definitely be the funniest production our audiences will see this season.” During Navarro’s murderous schemes and dodging of authorities, he juggles two love interests: his mistress and his betrothed. With the action, romance and comedy, this musical is a can’t-miss, Dotson says. “A good musical comedy takes a special recipe to succeed,” she says. “With one actor playing eight hilarious roles, genius staging, quick British wit and a clever score –[this musical] is nearly perfect.” The show runs Jan. 23-28. Visit celebrityattractions.com for tickets.

FOR MORE EVENTS IN TULSA, OKC AND AROUND THE STATE, HEAD TO OKMAG.COM.

A Panoply of Offerings

A festival for high schoolers, The Breakfast Club, Paddington 2 and The Phantom Thread comprise this month’s choices.

Around Town

Catch ’em young – that’s the best way to develop a love of film in people. Oklahoma City University is doing its part by hosting the High School Film Festival on Jan. 12 at The Venue in OKC. Students from Oklahoma and surrounding states may enter films of 10 minutes or less into the competition, with the winners receiving scholarships to the university. This should be an extremely fun event; the films might not be polished, but they should be full of energy and invention, and a great way to support young talent.

At Home

The Breakfast Club has reached the point in its cultural life cycle where it is almost impossible to evaluate it on its own merits. It has become a touchstone, a byword for Gen-Xers and others who strongly identify with its depiction of life in high school. Its status as an ’80s classic means it shares many warts of that decade’s dominant mainstream film style, but it also stands out as an example par excellence of a smart comedy with heart. An almost too well-balanced cast of characters – the jock, the nerd, the bad girl, the good girl and the clownish bad boy – gathers in a scenario only made possible by the vagaries of public school: a Saturday morning detention. They grate on each other at first, but the characters gradually learn to appreciate each other’s differences as they cut through the surface and reach their shared humanity underneath. Yes, it’s a little silly and didactic, but the plot speaks powerfully to the experience of a typical American teenager –

the insecurity, the desire and the capacity for goodness. Writer-director John Hughes gets the most out of his young cast, especially from Judd Nelson. And don’t forget about the earworm of a theme song.

In Theaters

Two vastly different recommendations come this month … one for adults, one for kids. Its final release was jeopardized by the exposure of Harvey Weinstein’s predatory behavior, but Paddington 2 was rescued from purgatory by Warner Bros., which has taken over American distribution of this sequel. The original film was far better than it had any right to be with its whimsy and abundance of comically inventive set pieces. Sequels are rarely as good, but a strong returning cast and excellent newcomers (Hugh Grant, Brendan Gleeson) promise to make Paddington 2 a winning enough family affair. A good bet to be the best film of the year, Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Phantom Thread technically came out Christmas Day, but it likely won’t make its way to Oklahoma until January. The mid-century London fashion scene might seem like a strange setting for Anderson, who specializes in characters of extreme passion and obsession, but he always produces stellar work, and his last effort with star Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood, is arguably the best film of the century. Thread is purportedly Day-Lewis’ last work before retirement, so there’s even more reason to check it out in theaters. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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C LO S I N G T H O U G H T S

Tim Faltyn

T

im Faltyn, Ph.D., is the 15th president of Oklahoma Panhandle State University in Goodwell. A teacher by trade, he has worked his way up the ranks of academic leadership. His accomplishments include all-time highs in fundraising, multi-million-dollar campus renovations, and national recognition for record increases in enrollment and graduate production. We caught up with Faltyn and got his thoughts on …

The family farm will never die, but it is evolving into something completely different. No longer the sole source of income or family employment, the small, family operation is almost always in addition to another vocation. Thirty years ago, my grandfather told me I needed to go to college and learn a different trade because our ranch wasn’t big enough to support our whole family. He was right. To this day, everyone in my family is still involved in the ranch, but we all have careers that provide a quality of life we wouldn’t have if we were all still trying to live and work on the ranch. The good news is there will always be a way for family farms to exist thanks to local and global markets. At Panhandle State, we encourage students to take courses in everything from welding to accounting, from soils or animal science to web page design, so they are prepared to adapt to what has been and will always be an ever-evolving agriculture industry.

… the value of agricultural education.

The most common misconception about agriculture education is that it is just about crop or animal production. In fact, the highest paid and most plentiful agricultural jobs exist in the support, application and research sector of the industry. Climate science, computer/satellite technology, equipment sales/repair, biochemical, plant and animal nutrition research/sales, insurance, accounting, marketing/communications and youth

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

education are just a few that come to mind. This is a positive realization for many students because you don’t have to have several sections of land to live, work and be prosperous in the ag industry.

mitment to this way of life for our distinct brand of student. Our geography, the people we serve and the culture we represent make us one of the most unique regional universities in America.

… Panhandle State’s ag heritage.

… Panhandle State’s students.

Almost every student takes one or more agrelated courses on their way to their degree. We estimate 94 percent of our students come from rural communities across Oklahoma and seven other western states. Most people don’t know that Texas County is the most productive agricultural county in Oklahoma, and I’m told the seventh most productive agricultural county in America. For my family and the families we serve, ag is a way of life. At Panhandle State, there is a genuine com-

Forty-nine percent of our students come to us from Oklahoma and 51 percent come from outside our state. When you realize half of our students are bringing revenue into our state from other states, and often joining our workforce as well-prepared employees after graduation, it’s a favorable relationship for our state. Besides, as I tell people all the time, our purpose is to positively transform our region, regardless of state lines. As Americans, we have to be in this together.

PHOTO COURTESY PANHANDLE STATE UNIVERSITY

… the future of family farms.


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YOU SHOULD BE HERE. Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa is the ideal location for your special day. With complimentary event space rental during the months of January, February, July and November in 2018 and 2019, and an on-site bakery for bride and groom wedding cakes, we know exactly how to cater to your every whim and desire. Let us help you plan the perfect party to celebrate the newest chapter of your lives! I-44 Exit 240 | 918.384.7462 | HARDROCKCASINOTULSA.COM


Oklahoma Magazine presents

Saturday, Jan. 13 From 10 A.M. to 4 P.M. Expo Square Central Park Hall Tulsa, OK

Everything you need to plan your big day in one place!

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Gowns Wedding Guide Accessories Bridesmaids/Wedding Attire Real Weddings Designer Gowns Flowers Cakes Food Honeymoons Wedding Service Directory

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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GOWNS

Secure the Spotlight The most talked about part of any wedding? The gown, of course. Photography by Nathan Harmon

MODELS COURTESY THE LINDA LAYMAN AGENCY HAIR BY SHAWNA BURROUGHS, JARA HERRON SALON AND SPA MAKEUP BY STARLA WARD, STUNNINGBYSTARLA MAKEUP ARTISTRY GOWNS AND HAIR PIECES COURTESY ALYSSA’S BRIDAL AND TUXEDOS, DAVID’S BRIDAL AND BRIDAL COUTURE BY SONNI FINE JEWELRY COURTESY BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS BACKDROP COURTESY ABCO RENTS BRIDAL BOUQUETS COURTESY MRS. DEHAVEN’S FLOWER SHOP SHOES AND HANDBAGS COURTESY SAKS FIFTH AVENUE MILLY ‘I DO’ RHINESTONE BOX CLUTCH FEATURED ON THE COVER, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

Truly Zac Posen horsehair tier skirt wedding dress, $1,458; Oleg Cassini embellished lace walking veil, $199.95, David’s Bridal. Penny Preville 18k white gold long deco drop diamond earrings, $9,990; Penny Preville 18k white gold necklace with sapphire and diamond

drops, $2,795; David Yurman sterling silver albion bangle with pave set diamonds, $2,250; Clear Quartz Ippolita sterling silver rock candy constellation ring, $395, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Jimmy Choo Emily ankle-strap pumps, $750, Saks Fifth Avenue.


Bellisima embellished gown, $3,589.88; En Vogue embellished veil, $159, Alyssa’s Bridal and Tuxedos. Penny Preville 18k white gold pearl and diamond drop earrings, $2,995; David Yurman sterling silver albion bangle with pave set diamonds, $2,250; David Yurman sterling silver Wellesly bangle with diamonds, $2,500; Clear Quartz Ippolita sterling silver rock candy constellation ring, $395, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Jimmy Choo silver and dust blue Romy fireball pumps, $675, Saks Fifth Avenue. JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Katarina sleeveless gown, $1,980.88, Alyssa’s Bridal and Tuxedos. Pesavento rosegold over sterling pearl drop earrings, $170; Pesavento rosegold over sterling necklace with drop pearls, $360; Precision Set 18k white gold 3-stone engagement ring with halo, price upon request, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels.

Melissa Sweet trailing floral lace wedding gown, $1,158; Once tier tulle cathedral veil with pencil edge, $99.95, David’s Bridal. Marco Bicego 18k yellow and white gold lunaria earrings with pave diamonds, $4,200; Marco Bicego 18k yellow gold lunaria necklace with single diamond station, $3,580; Marco Vicego 14k yellow gold lunaria ring with Mother of Pearl, $2,240; Clear Quartz Ippolita sterling silver rock candy constellation ring, $395, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels.

Oleg Cassini beaded lace wedding dress with pleated skirt, $1,858; Deco leaf crystal tiara, $99.95; Oleg Cassini embellished lace walking veil, $199.95, David’s Bridal. David Yurman sterling silver chatelaine earrings with blue topaz, $2,500; David Yurman sterling silver Wellesly bangle with diamonds, $2,500; David Yurman albion ring with blue topaz and diamonds, $2,250; Precision Set 18k white gold engagement ring with double scalloped halo and wide band, price upon request, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Manolo Blahnik Hangisi 70 crystal-embellished satin pumps, $965, Saks Fifth Avenue.

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Long-sleeved Anisa gown, $2,899.88, Alyssa’s Bridal and Tuxedos. Penny Preville 18k white gold deco drop diamond earrings, $9,990; Clear Quartz Ippolita sterling silver rock candy constellation ring, $395, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Jimmy Choo champagne Marvel 85 GFI crystalembellished pumps, $950, Saks Fifth Avenue.

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Ari trumpet gown, $4,200, Bridal Couture by Sonni. Penny Preville 18k white gold long deco drop diamond earrings, $9,990; Penny Preville 18k white gold necklace with sapphire and diamond drops, $2,795; Clear Quartz Ippolita sterling silver rock candy constellation ring, $395, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels.


Keren mermaid gown, $5,500; Keren hairpiece, $150, Bridal Couture by Sonni. Clear Quartz Ippolita sterling silver large faceted teardrop earrings, $550; Clear Quartz Ippolita sterling silver rock candy constellation ring, $395, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels.

FOR EVEN MORE LOOKS FROM OUR WEDDING GOWN SHOOT, VISIT OKLAHOMAWEDDING.COM.

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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WEDDING GUIDE

From ‘Will You?’ to ‘I Do’

Between the question and declaration, whether you have months or years, no matter the size or venue of the nuptials, get organized by using Oklahoma Magazine’s start-to-finish checklist. By Mary Willa Allen and Wendy King Burton

Money, money, money When and where Whether the bride’s or groom’s family pays for the wedding or you fund the big to-do yourself, knowing how much you have to spend from the get-go eases the stress of making decisions later and gives you a good idea of what you can and cannot do.

Pick your party

Who is the maid or matron of honor? Who is the best man? Before bestowing such honors on best friends, the newly engaged couple should discuss how much those special people should be involved in the wedding planning. From “not at all” to “enthusiastic wedding planner,” let them know your expectations up front to avoid conflict down the road.

To plan or not to plan?

Perhaps one of the biggest choices you make is your planner. Your eager Aunt Margaret may offer to do it all for you, and you might take her up on it. You might also eye that upscale planner who rocked your best friend’s wedding. Or you might want to do it all yourself. Choose wisely and early.

Who’s coming?

Make a rough draft of your guest list before you pick your venue to ensure that you’ve got enough space. Revisit the guest list just before mailing invitations.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018

Select a date and choose a place. Popular wedding venues in Oklahoma include the rustic Pecandarosa Ranch outside Claremore, the elegant Campbell Hotel ballroom in Tulsa and the iconic Mayo Hotel. Get ahead of the curve – these places book up quickly.

Other reservations..

When you book your venue for the ceremony, reserve other spaces at the same time, especially if your rehearsal dinner, reception and farewell brunch are in different places.

Sealed in stone

You and your fiance might consider traditional gold bands, or you might look at a trendier set, such as the leaf garland band from the Penny Preville collection at Bruce G. Weber. Either way, don’t put off buying rings until the last minute.


Yourgetaway romantic

Consider a travel agency to book an all-inclusive trip and utilize its expertise, like that of Warren Place Travel in Tulsa, an award-winning Preferred Sandals agency.

Eats and treats

Formal sit-down dinners and the more recent fad of food trucks are still viable meal options – but the trend of small plates, including fine dining cuisine, is another alternative to a buffet.

Special cocktails

If serving alcohol, consider creating one or more signature cocktails that capture the personality of the bride and groom – fun, attractive, affordable and more easily manageable than an open bar. Thank us later.

Let them eat cake!

Tastes and styles of cake range far and wide, but emerging trends include deconstructed cakes, fruit-covered cakes, ruffled cakes and metallic cakes.

Flower power

Silk or real, cascade or posy – it’s time to hire the florist. These creators of magic abound in Oklahoma. Try Toni’s Flowers and Gifts or Stems for floral creations.

Who will marry you?

A pastor, preacher, priest, rabbi, imam or justice of the peace needs plenty of time to prepare, so choose that person sooner rather than later. Plus, some officiants require you to take part in premarital counseling. If you have a friend or

relative marry you, make sure she or he gets the proper certifications.

I do!

Ask your officiary to give you a script of what he or she plans to say. That way you can make changes that suit your beliefs or write vows of your own. Plus, you can pick when to throw in a special song or two.

Capturing the day

If you’re lucky enough to have a professional photographer in the family, then you’re set. If not, ask to see samples of a photographer’s work in different lighting situations before choosing. Also, your photographer should jibe well with you and your partner; the experience should be fun for all. Snatch up a great videographer as well, if your photographer doesn’t offer both.

Jam out

Yes, your little brother can set the dance floor on fire with an accordion, but you might consider a DJ spinning a variety of songs or a live band to keep everyone’s toes tapping instead. Just make sure your musthave songs are on the playlist.

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Your closeups

As part of the deal to document the wedding, your photographer may throw in an engagement photo shoot. Blast those shots on social media – and get likes, likes, likes.

Read all about it

Now that you have photos of you and your gorgeous fiance, place an engagement announcement in the newspaper, build your wedding registry, create savethe-date cards and design your wedding invitations.

On the web

Build a wedding website with a free service so you can post your gift registry, photographs and other information. Include the web address on your savethe-date cards and invitations.

Mailing time

Send the save-the-date cards at least six months before the wedding and after you’ve set up your registry and website. Mail the invitations six weeks before the ceremony to give travelers time to plan. Don’t be afraid to get strict on RSVPs; that food isn’t cheap.

Ambience

Now’s the time to lock down any other furniture or decor you need for your big day. ABCO Rents has a

variety of chairs, tables, backdrops and accessories to create a fresh ambience that fits any budget.

Playing dress up

Come to your wedding dress appointments with photos and style ideas in hand to avoid the stressful rigmarole of trying on a bunch of dresses that you know won’t work for you. Shoes, lingerie and jewelry can be purchased together. Fellas, you’re not off the hook. Get those tuxedo appointments locked down to ensure your ensemble fits to perfection.

Wedding party duds

Once you’ve secured the dress and tux, make sure your wedding party walks down the aisle in style. One trend is mismatched/ombre-style bridesmaids dresses so the ladies don’t look like a clamor of clones. Either way, have fun and let the bridesmaids and groomsmen have some input.

Gettin’ pretty

The makeup artist and hair stylist are key. Have them do a test-run on you before the wedding to ensure they nail the exact look you want – whether it’s high drama or a natural, sun-kissed vibe. Now is a good time to get with your hair stylist if you want a new color or cut for the wedding.

Booking your accomodations

For a bunch of out-of-town guests, reserve a block of hotel rooms long before the wedding. Pick a hotel that’s close to the venue and easy to find. You don’t want frantic phone calls on your wedding day from lost family members.

Stay in favor

Your party favors are not something you want to put off to the last minute. Chocolate is always a good idea. Glacier Confection specializes in customized, hand-crafted chocolates that everyone will love. Pro tip: Give your longdistance travelers something a little extra for coming all that way.

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Take a seat

After locking down your RSVPs and guest list, make seating arrangements and place cards. Put those in the family with a propensity to bicker far away from each other, especially if you have an open bar.

Pre-wedding shindigs

Get that paper

Getting your marriage license should fall toward the end of all your duties. Get it about a week before the big day. Usually, it needs to be acquired at least a few days before the wedding, but it also has a 30to 90-day expiration date.

Throwing the highly anticipated shower or engagement party is a good chance for the maid of honor or best man to shine. By letting her or him take the reins, you can relax and enjoy all the gifts. Get with your pal to select fun games, drinks, the guest list and venue.

Treat yourself

Whether you go for an all-out, fully choreographed, Broadway-esque performance or opt for a simple, sweet, slow sway, the first dance as bride and groom is a tear-jerker moment. Lock down the song and mood of the number.

Sit back and enjoy

Boogie shoes

Moms and dads

Boys and girls, find your zen the day before or the morning of your wedding with a spa treatment, manicure/pedicure or facial. Don’t take that day to try a new hair color or style – those wedding pictures will stay with you forever.

Need some help? The Oklahoma Wedding Show, Saturday, Jan. 13, at Expo Square Central Park Hall, is your go-to show for all things wedding! Swing by from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. to make your wedding dreams a reality.

The planning and stress are over. Now go get hitched and dance the night away.

The wedding of a child is emotional for any parent, so parents should feel involved and appreciated. Letting them take over some tasks and planning will ease stress for you and delight them.

Lovin’ on the crew

Sometimes, appreciating the work and money your wedding party puts into the day can fall by the wayside. Get each one something special as a thank you. Customized jewelry to wear at the wedding is always a good idea.

Don’t re-enact The Hangover

Bachelor and bachelorette parties don’t have to be wild. Renting a cabin or beach house and getting wine drunk works just as well. If you want a blowout, have at least one person who can keep everyone vertical.

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PENNY PREVILLE EMERALD SHAPE BLUE SAPPHIRE ART DECO NECKLACE, $10,145, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

ACCESSORIES

Wedding Day Essentials Don’t let your shimmering add-ons get tossed by the wayside.

MIKIMOTO SPLASH COLLECTION EARRINGS, $19,000, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

MIKIMOTO CELEBRATION COLLECTION PEARL NECKLACE, AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

PENNY PREVILLE CLASSIC EMERALD SHAPE BLUE SAPPHIRE EARRINGS, $2,380, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS PENNY PREVILLE BLUE SAPPHIRE ROUND AND MARQUISE BANGLE, $6,185, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

Something Blue

As the saying goes, add a pop of whimsy to your resplendent ensemble with cerulean, sapphire or cobalt.

MIKIMOTO CELEBRATION COLLECTION BRACELET, AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE COLLECTION LONG RECTANGULAR CRYSTAL CLUTCH, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

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PENNY PREVILLE PEAR SHAPE AQUAMARINE EARRINGS, $4,195, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

MIKIMOTO M COLLECTION WHITE SOUTH SEA CULTURED PEARL EARRINGS, $10,500, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

JIMMY CHOO EMILY ANKLE-STRAP PUMPS, $750, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JIMMY CHOO ROMY FIREBALL PUMPS, $675, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

MIKIMOTO BLOOM COLLECTION EARRINGS, $12,000, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

PENNY PREVILLE PEAR SHAPE AQUAMARINE NECKLACE, $3,490, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

JIMMY CHOO CLOUD CRYSTAL CLUTCH, $3,095, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

FINE JEWELRY IMAGES PROVIDED BY BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS; SHOES PHOTOGRAPHED BY NATALIE GREEN; CLUTCH IMAGES PROVIDED BY SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

MIKIMOTO SPLASH COLLECTION RING, $14,000, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS


BRIDESMAIDS

Maid to Shine KELLY FAETANINI

HAYLEY PAIGE OCCASIONS

JENNY YOO

AMSALE

JENNY YOO

KELLY FAETANINI

HAYLEY PAIGE OCCASIONS

Don’t make your friends’ dresses an afterthought; let what they wear contribute to the ambience of the big day.

W E D D I N G AT T I R E

Dress to Impress

BERTA

NAEEM KHAN

BERTA

NAEEM KHAN

BERTA

AMSALE

BERTA

Whether you opt for sheer, lacy, modest or sparkly, the mother of the bride and the guests can shine on this special day, too.

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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REAL WEDDINGS

Unforgeable Nuptials Shelby Snyder and Justin Hendrick’s mutual love of family made for a warm, delightful wedding celebration. Shelby Snyder, of Tulsa, and Justin Hendrick, of Scottsdale, Arizona, were married Oct. 21 in Tulsa. Their story, however, began five years prior at the historic Mayo Hotel, which has deep roots in the Snyder family. “My parents were the ones to purchase the building and save it from being torn down in 2001,” Shelby says. “We have done a complete

renovation of the hotel and it has been the place for all of our favorite family memories.” Justin moved to Tulsa in 2012 and met Snyder through a mutual friend. The connection was instant, and Shelby says their mutual love of family made the proposal all the more special. “He proposed in front of my entire family at our Christmas dinner,” Shelby says. “I was completely surprised.” The black-tie wedding ceremony, held at Holy Family Cathedral, signified Shelby and Justin’s commitment to their faith, while also providing a venue filled with sentiment for Snyder. “This cathedral is extra special to me, as it’s where my sister was mar-

ried and my nieces and nephew were baptized,” she says. Father Bernie Scianna, Shelby’s headmaster at Cascia Hall, married them. The reception kicked off in the Crystal Ballroom at the Mayo. A 7-foot “H,” made of 600 white roses, adorned the Grand Hall staircase all weekend. The night quickly became unforgettable with delectable eats, great tunes and dazzling party favors. Shelby’s parents provided an original Mayo Hotel door as a quirky version of the guest book – so attendees could “sign a piece of Mayo history.” The axis upon which the celebrations turned, Shelby says, was the hotel itself. “It is the heart of my family and where we share all of our memories. It is where I met Justin, where we spend our celebrations, and where our family on both sides gather for special occasions,” she says. “The Mayo is a piece of Tulsa history, but it is also the center of our family history.” PHOTOGRAPHY BY PICTURESQUE PHOTOS BY AMANDA

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THE LOWEST PRICES ON THE MOST BEAUTIFUL DIAMONDS

icing on the cake

1700 Utica SqUare | tUlSa, OklahOma | BrUcegweBer.cOm


Nestled in the lush gardens of Woodward Park, Tulsa Garden Center offers picturesque and graceful style for any event. Carry on a family tradition, or create something uniquely you, in the romantic and timeless setting of our iconic 1920s estate.

This is what Style Tastes like! 2017

Featuring the trendsetting culinary talents of Chef Christine Dowd

405.942.4000

www.auntpittypatscatering.com Setting the Standard in Events for over 35 years!

TulsaGardenCenter.com•2435 S Peoria, Tulsa 918.576.5153•Events@TulsaGardenCenter.com 22971 Tulsa Garden Center.indd 1

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5/9/17 9:32 AM

DOWNTOWN TULSA AT ITS FINEST SINCE 1967

Begin Here. LIFE’S MOST SPECIAL CELEBRATIONS

BANK OF AMERICA CENTER | 30TH, 31ST AND 32ND FLOORS

15 W. 6TH ST, TULSA, OK | 918.582.3821 | SUMMITTULSA.COM

THE SUMMIT CLUB REQUIRES MEMBERSHIP TO HOST AN EVENT. CONTACT US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT BECOMING A MEMBER. 22978 Summit Club.indd 1

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11/20/17 2:42 PM


DESIGNER GOWNS

White Haute

BERTA BRIDAL

PRONOVIAS

NAEEM KHAN

Ballgown? A-line? Mermaid? Trumpet? Turn to high-end designers for inspiration for your big day.

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018 BERTA BRIDAL

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

JIM HJELM BRIDAL

REEM ACRA

BLUSH BY HAYLEY PAIGE

BERTA BRIDAL

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

PRONOVIAS

Wedding

ALON LIVNE WHITE

WHITE BY VERA WANG

PRONOVIAS

INES DE SANTO

OKLAHOMA


JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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HAYLEY PAIGE

BERTA BRIDAL

TRULY ZAC POSEN

KELLY FAETANINI

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

MUSE BY BERTA

BERTA BRIDAL

NAEEM KHAN

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

PRONOVIAS

INES DE SANTO

PRONOVIAS


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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2018 WHITE BY VERA WANG

BERTA BRIDAL

REEM ACRA

LAZARO

LELA ROSE BRIDAL

JIM HJELM BRIDAL

BERTA BRIDAL

TARA KEELY

Wedding

WHITE BY VERA WANG

TRULY ZAC POSEN

BERTA BRIDAL

TI ADORA BRIDAL

OKLAHOMA


1 W. 81 st Street, Tulsa OK

Where lifetime memories are created….

WhiteHouseMansion@gmail.com 3549 South Harvard, Tulsa 918-742-9027

(918) 313-0808 (Julia) 23003 White House Mansion.indd 1

12/14/17 22987 1:18 PM Toni's.indd 1

11/27/17 11:30 AM

Tahlequah, OK | FranklinCastleOK.com | 918.346.3210

Book the Ti Amo banquet facility for your next event. Holiday Parties • Work Functions • Wedding Rehearsals Birthday Celebrations • Bar/Bat Mitzvahs Ti Amo Downtown 918.592.5151

219 S. Cheyenne Ave.

23002 Ti Amo.indd 1

Ti Amo South

918.499.1919

61st & Sheridan (NW Corner)

Rehearsal | Ceremony | Reception

12/14/17 22999 8:46 AM Franklin Castle.indd 1

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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F LO W E R S

Petal Power Whether simple and classic, bright and bold or wonderfully quirky, wedding bouquets should perfectly suit the bride. Tulsa bouquets photographed by Natalie Green OKC bouquets photographed by Brent Fuchs

UNIQUE BOUQUET WITH LAVENDER SCABIOSA, VIBURNUM, ORCHIDS AND CLEMATIS

Toni’s Flowers and Gifts Tulsa

OKC

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CLASSIC BOUQUET WITH PEONIES, ROSES, PHALAENOPSIS ORCHIDS AND SWEET PEA

CLASSIC BOUQUET WITH ROSES, VERONICA AND WHITE CYMBIDIUM ORCHIDS

New Leaf Florist OKC

Toni’s Flowers and Gifts Tulsa

COLORFUL BOUQUET WITH ROSES, PEONIES AND RANUNCULUS

Toni’s Flowers and Gifts Tulsa

CLASSIC BOUQUET WITH HYDRANGEAS, MONDIAL ROSES, SPRAY ROSES AND MAGNOLIAS

Messages Floral Design Studio

CLASSIC BOUQUET WITH PEONIES, SPRAY ROSES AND HYDRANGEAS

Ted and Debbie’s Flower Garden Tulsa

Tulsa

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COLORFUL BOUQUET WITH PEONIES, ALLIUM, GARDEN ROSES, DAHLIAS AND YARROW

Ted and Debbie’s Flower Garden

UNIQUE BOUQUET WITH GARDEN ROSES, DUSTY MILLER, CAMELLIA, PRIVET BERRIES AND PEPPER BERRIES

Ted and Debbie’s Flower Garden Tulsa

Tulsa

COLORFUL BOUQUET WITH GARDEN ROSES, PEONIES, PEPPER BERRIES AND STOCK

CLASSIC BOUQUET WITH DAHLIAS, ROSES, ERYNGIUM, NIGELLA, DUSTY MILLER AND EUCALYPTUS

Whole Foods Market

Whole Foods Market Tulsa

Tulsa

UNIQUE BOUQUET WITH SEASHELLS, SUCCULENTS, THISTLE, ORCHIDS AND KALE

Messages Floral Design Studio Tulsa

CLASSIC BOUQUET WITH ROSES, LOTUS PODS, PINECONES, AIR PLANTS AND HYPERICUM BERRIES

Stems Floral Tulsa

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$

EACH TUXEDO RENTAL When you join our Bank Account rewards program. Prices starting at $39.99.

15407999JABT_V6

22425 Jos. A. Bank.indd 1

12/19/16 22969 11:12 AM Tulsa Botanic Garden.indd 1

11/14/17 4:00 PM

Sanctuary Asia NEW Premier Event Space! Be one of the first to host your wedding reception in the Zoo’s spectacular new event space, Sanctuary Asia, with stunning floor to ceiling windows overlooking the elephant, Asian rhino and komodo dragon habitats. Enjoy the expansive outdoor patio for an even closer look at the Zoo's precious wildlife and exotic settings.

Contact Catina at: (405) 425-0289 saltandsurrey.com 22992 Lancer Hospitality.indd 1

11/29/17 9:17 AM

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COLORFUL BOUQUET WITH ROSES, HYDRANGEAS, CARNATIONS, SUCCULENTS AND EUCALYPTUS FOLIAGE

Messages Floral Design Studio

COLORFUL OMBRE BOUQUET WITH TULIPS, ROSES, ONCIDIUM ORCHIDS AND CHARM PEONIES

New Leaf Florist

Tulsa

OKC

COLORFUL BOUQUET WITH KALE, KING PROTEA, HYPERICUM BERRIES AND SWEETHEART ROSES

UNIQUE BOUQUET WITH PINCUSHION PROTEA, HYDRANGEA, SILVER DOLLAR EUCALYPTUS, SEEDED EUCALYPTUS, BIRDS OF PARADISE AND HYPERICUM BERRIES

OKC

OKC

Tony Foss Flowers

Tony Foss Flowers

UNIQUE BOUQUET WITH MONSTERA, TI LEAVES, DRACAENA, ASPIDISTRA, KING PROTEA AND ANTHURIUM BLOOMS

New Leaf Florist OKC

COLORFUL BOUQUET WITH ROSES, GERBERA DAISIES, ANEMONES AND EUCALYPTUS

Stems Floral Tulsa

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For even more wedding bouquet inspiration, visit oklahomawedding.com.


WEDDINGS | RECEPTIONS REHEARSAL DINNERS | HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS

WEDDINGS | RECEPTIONS | REHEARSAL DINNERS | EVENT PLANNING AND DESIGN | HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS

Make it perfect.

Make it The Mayo.

918.582.6296

events@themayohotel.com

themayohotel.com

22989 Al's Formal Wear.indd 1

11/27/17 22998 5:07 PM Mayo Hotel.indd 1

12/12/17 9:09 AM

Wedding Wedding & & Gift Gift Registry Registry

ChrisHumphreyPhotographer.com 22990 Richard Neel Interiors.indd 1

11/28/17 22991 1:15 PM Chris Humphrey Photographer.indd 1

| 918.625.4630

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CAKES

Slices of Art

Amy Cakes Norman

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PHOTO BY SARAH LIBBY, FLORALS COURTESY SOUTHWIND HILLS

As delicious as they are beautiful, these tasty creations will sweeten your special day.


Andrea Howard Cakes OKC

PHOTO BY JORDAN GARRETT

PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWARD

PHOTO BY JANET ROSEBEARY

PHOTO BY MICHAEL WEIDEMANN, CACTI AND PALM COURTESY THE PLANT SHOPPE, FLORALS COURTESY EVERYTHING BEAUTIFUL

PHOTO COURTESY ANN’S BAKERY

PHOTO BY KEVIN PAUL PHOTOGRAPHY

Brown Egg Bakery

OKC

Madison’s on Main Norman

Ann’s Bakery Tulsa

Merritt ’s Bakery

Tulsa

Rosebeary’s Bakery

OKC

For additional cake creations, visit oklahomawedding.com.

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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FOOD

TOP: NIRVANA ROLL WITH CRAB CAKE, BLACKENED TUNA, AVOCADO, CREAM CHEESE AND JALAPENO ROLLED IN MASAGO

Culinary Delights

BOTTOM: KEATON ROLL WITH GINGER-MARINATED FRESH SHRIMP, AVOCADO, SPICY SAUCE AND CREAM CHEESE ROLLED IN SOY PAPER

in the raw

From short ribs and chicken satay to beet salad and arancini, your wedding guests will gladly tuck into these enticing dishes. Tulsa dishes photographed by Natalie Green OKC dishes photographed by Brent Fuchs

CRISPY ARANCINI (ITALIAN RICE BALLS) FILLED WITH CREAMY MOZZARELLA, SPRINKLED WITH PARMESAN AND OREGANO

Oren

APPLEWOOD SM0KED BACON MAC ‘N’ CHEESE BITES WITH CREAMY PARMA ROSA SAUCE

Aila’s Catering

CRISPY AND TENDER POTATO LATKES WITH SHORT RIBS AND BLACKBERRY BARBECUE

Aila’s Catering SKEWERED CHICKEN SATAY ON A BED OF CRISP LETTUCE WITH A CRUNCHY VEGETABLE GARNISH

Keo

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TENDER BABY BACK RIBS AND BURN CO.’S HOUSE-MADE, SWEET BARBECUE SAUCE

Burn Co. Barbecue

CAPRESE SKEWERS WITH TOMATO, HOUSE-MADE FRESH MOZZARELLA, ROASTED RED PEPPERS, KALAMATA OLIVES, BALSAMIC GLAZE AND ITALIAN EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

Andolini’s Pizzeria

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: MINI ‘CHARCUTERIE’ BOARDS WITH PUMPERNICKEL CROSTINI, PROSCIUTTO, DIJON, SHALLOTS AND GRUYERE; SHAVED ROAST BEEF ON FRESH BAGUETTE SLICES WITH HORSERADISH CREAM; MINI CRAB CAKES WITH SRIRACHA AIOLI

624 Catering

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SAVORY MEATLOAF SLIDERS ON SOFT DINNER ROLLS, TOPPED WITH SWEET-HOT TOMATO JAM

Bramble Breakfast and Bar

INDIVIDUAL VEGETABLE CRUDITES WITH CREAMY RED-PEPPER AOLI DIP

Aunt Pittypat’s Catering

CAPRESE WITH FRESH MOZZARELLA, ROMA TOMATO AND SWEET BASIL IN EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL, TOPPED WITH A BALSAMIC VINEGAR REDUCTION

Dalesandro’s

CHILLED SHRIMP, LOBSTER AND CRAB DIP WITH SEASONED, TOASTED CROSTINI

Ti Amo

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P i c t u r e s q u e Tu l s a . c o m

Customize your wedding with chocolate & sweeten up your special day.

22982 Picturesque.indd 1

11/21/17 11:37 AM

15 E. MB Brady Street Tulsa, OK glacierconfection.com | 918 938-6368 Stone Creek Bend | Muldrow, OK | 479.629.1473 | Facebook.com/StoneCreekBend 22993 Stone Creek Bend.indd 1

ering! For the perfect gath

12/4/17 22967 2:02 PM Glacier Confection.indd 1

11/17/17 10:27 AM

Located in the trendy East Village neighborhood, the brick walls, original tin ceilings, and large sunny windows create a timeless venue perfect for any event!

Book with! us today

TIFFANY TURNER-COATS Catering Director 608 E 3RD ST | TIFFANY@MCNELLIES.COM | 918 442 2993 | THEBONDTULSA.COM

23004 Bond Event Center.indd 1

12/14/17 22997 2:07 PM Omni Lighting.indd 1

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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WOOD-GRILLED SHRIMP SKEWERS WITH HONEYCHILI GLAZE, SERVED ON ASIAN COLESLAW

Palace Cafe

HOUSE-SMOKED SCOTTISH KING SALMON MOUSSE SERVED WITH TOAST

Amelia’s

TWO-BITE GRILLED CHEESE AND TOMATO BISQUE SERVED IN A CAFE CUP

Palace Cafe

HIBISCUS-CURED, COLD-SMOKED SALMON LOX WITH CREAM CHEESE AND CAPERS ON SOURDOUGH CROSTINI

Amelia’s

SASHIMI 9, A CHEF’S CHOICE OF NINE TYPES OF FRESH FISH SERVED WITH GINGER AND WASABI

in the raw

HOMEMADE GUACAMOLE MADE WITH FRESH, IMPORTED HASS AVOCADOS, TOMATOES AND CRISP TORTILLA CHIPS

Ted’s Cafe Escondido

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For more great menu ideas, visit oklahomawedding.com.


Plan Your Happily Ever After at...

8720 E. 21st Tulsa, Oklahoma 918.978.9044

Located on Historic Route 66 and The National Register of Historic Places www.thecampbellhotel.com 918-744-5500 • 2636 E 11th St, Tulsa OK

www.VittersCatering.com 23023 Vitter's Catering.indd 1

Twenty-Six Boutique Guest Rooms

Outside Catering Permitted

Two Spacious, Unique Event Centers

Now Booking Weddings for 2018

12/20/17 22413 9:50 AM The Campbell Hotel & Event Center.indd 1

11/27/17 11:47 AM

Let us do all the work and you can just sit back and enjoy the deliciousness!

Springs AS Arrow Wedding Chapel Sheila@ServingHandsWeddings.com Sheila@ServingHandsWeddings.com www.ServingHandsWeddings.com www.ServingHandsWeddings.com www.ArrowSpringsChapel.com www.ArrowSpringsChapel.com 918.519.7818 918.519.7818 23021 Serving Hands.indd 1

For catering information, contact Darla Dickens 918.254.8337 • ddickens@tedscafe.com

TedsCafe.com 12/19/17 22996 4:51 PM Ted's Cafe Escondido.indd 1

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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HONEYMOONS

From Cable Cars to Coral Reefs Here are five destinations across the globe for newlyweds to consider.

First meals as married mates are memorable, whether it’s caviar at the Ritz, filet mignon at Turtle Creek in Dallas or, as it was for my wife and me in 1983, blackbottom pie at Pennington’s Drive-In in Tulsa. Likewise, the honeymoon destination is equally significant. Here’s a quintet of suggestions.

New Zealand

In a land mass the size of Colorado, New Zealand packs in two main islands and numerous smaller ones. There are glacier-carved mountains, lakes, beaches and thermal springs. And because of the islands’ location, many plants and animals are unique to the country, such as birds that can’t fly (16 species), giant snails and 1,000-year-old trees. Three-quarters of the population lives on the North Island, home of the capital, Wellington. It’s on the Cook Strait and is our honeymooners’ choice for its waterfront promenade, sandy beaches, working harbor and colorful hillside homes made of native timber. Stay at the Lighthouse and the Keep, a warm, romantic bed and breakfast on wave-washed Houghton Bay.

San Francisco

Yes, it’s the real deal with endless charm: the Golden Gate Bridge/Park, Alcatraz, Fisherman’s Wharf, Chinatown, cable cars – a city renowned for its chilly summer fog, steep rolling hills and eclectic mix of Victorian and modern architecture. Tourism is the backbone of San Francisco’s economy and the city never loses sight of that. The welcoming attitude is strongly felt in many world-class museums, restaurants and neighborhoods. Stay at the historic Ritz-Carlton, the city’s only AAA Five Diamondrated property. It’s on Nob Hill, a short distance from diverse palate-teasers, the waterfront, as well as several popular parks and beaches.

PHOTOS COURTESY TOURISM NEW ZEALAND

New Zealand

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San Francisco


PHOTO COURTE

CISCO LTON, SAN FRAN SY THE RITZ-CAR

Orkney, Scotland

A hot new up-and-comer for honeymooners, Orkney is an archipelago of 70 islands north of Scotland’s mainland. Already well-known for its rugged cliffs and dramatic sea stacks, fantastic wildlife and historic preservation, it’s becoming recognized for its culture. Creativity reigns in the port town of Stromness with many crafty gift shops and art galleries along its old, winding streets. The larger Kirkwall, also a port, is the ancient capital of Orkney, known for its Viking cathedral, a distillery and being one of the most attractive, wellpreserved towns in Scotland. Stay in Kirkwall at the centrally located Castaway Guesthouse. All rooms include a TV, free Wi-Fi and a kettle (these are, after all, the British Isles).

PHOTOS COURTESY BARBARA KRAFT

The Grand Canyon

PHOTO COURTESY XANTERRA PARKS & RESORTS

Bora Bora

The Grand Canyon

Don’t be like me. I used to think, “Big hole in the ground – big deal.” Then I went and was blown away. Yes, it’s a big hole in the ground … but the constantly changing shadows and colors, layers upon layers of historic rock, wildlife and the sheer massiveness of the canyon are unforgettably mesmerizing. See it from the air in a helicopter, see it from a trail while riding a mule or hiking on foot, or see it while rafting down the Colorado River at its base. Just see it. Ordinarily, stay at the El Tovar or Maswik Lodge, but both Grand Canyon National Park properties will soon close for renovations. Instead, choose Kachina Lodge, perched on the rim.

Orkney, Scotland

Bora Bora

Author James Michener called Bora Bora “the most beautiful island in the world.” The lush patch of heaven in French Polynesia abounds with loveliness matched only by the friendliness of its inhabitants. The small South Pacific island is surrounded by sand-fringed islets and a turquoise lagoon protected by a coral reef – diver’s paradise. Stay at the Four Seasons, situated on its own private islet amid lavish tropical landscaping. A pristine white-sand beach leads to the lagoon and the resort also features an inner lagoon sanctuary, home to more than 100 enchanting species. CHUCK MAI

JANUARY 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Bridal, Formal Attire

David’s Bridal Visit David’s Bridal to find out how to receive $50 off your bridal gown, or visit us online at davidsbridal.com. 10123 E. 71st St., Tulsa 877.923.BRIDE davidsbridal.com

Cakes/Bakeries

Ann’s Bakery Wedding cakes are Ann’s specialty. The bakery offers a wide variety of sizes, styles, flavors and fillings for you to choose from. Let Ann’s help you create the wedding cake of your dreams. 7 N. Harvard Ave., Tulsa 918.834.2345 annsbakery.com The Red Rooster Bistro and Bakery Enjoy custom cakes designed to fit your every need and budget,

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plus wedding and rehearsal dinner catering! 220 E. Cherokee St., Wagoner 918.207.9412 theredroosterbistro.com

Catering

Aila’s Catering Events Started by owner/operator and chef Aila Heiskanen Wimpy – who has over 25 years of fine food business experience – and her husband, Johnny, Aila’s Catering Events serves the Tulsa and Northeast Oklahoma Community. 6205 New Sapulpa Rd., Tulsa 918.859.8786 ailascatering.com Andolini’s Andolini’s catering can please any crowd or budget. Pizza, pasta,

Entertainment

Brava Quartette This company offers string quartet music for weddings, receptions and parties. 6904 E. Forest Ridge Blvd., Broken Arrow 918.230.6695/918.520.0086 boxtalent.com Reflections Photo Booth Rentals We use the newest in photo

booth technology to provide you and your guests the ultimate experience. 13059 E. 31st St., Tulsa 918.732.9687 reflectionspbr.com

Event Planner

Complete Weddings and Events Tulsa Complete Weddings and Events offers a wide array of services including photography, video, DJ, photobooths, event lighting and more. 7107 S. Yale Ave #274, Tulsa 918.947.9295 completeweddingstulsa.com

Florist and Decor

Ever Something Event Styling Whether you come into our shop for a celebratory arrangement or allow us to plan your wedding, you will be treated with respect and kindness. Our team can’t wait to meet you! 2306 E. Admiral Blvd., Tulsa 918.794.4492 eversomething.com Stems Fresh wedding flowers for your wedding party and table decor. 1702 Utica Square, Tulsa; 510 W. Rogers Blvd., Skiatook 918.742.1410; 918.396.4147 tulsaflorist.net Toni’s Flowers & Gifts Complimentary consultation by appointment. Toni’s serves all your wedding needs. 3549 S. Harvard Ave., Tulsa 918.742.9027 tonisflowersgifts.com

Gift Registry

Glacier Confection We are a local company that specializes in high-end chocolate truffles, with the option to customize those truffles, as well as custom packaging. 15 E. Brady St., Tulsa 918.938.6368 glacierconfection.com Richard Neel Home Create your perfect wedding registry at Richard Neel Home, which features a wide array of upscale designer furnishings, including new, vintage and one-of-a-kind lighting and art. 3742 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa 918.742.4777 richardneelhome.com Williams-Sonoma Williams-Sonoma’s wedding and gift registry – from the big day to everyday! 2016 Utica Square, Tulsa 918.742.5252 williams-sonoma.com

Health, Beauty and Wellness

CryoMed Clinic of Tulsa Medical Spa Whole Body Cryotherapy stimulates the reboot your body needs. Push your reset button today. 4785 E. 91st St., Tulsa 918.394.2796 cryomedclinic.com No Kiss Like This (Lipsense) LipSense is the premier product of SeneGence and is unlike any conventional lipstick, stain or color. 8900 N. 152nd E. Ave., Owasso lipsense.com

PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

2018 Wedding Service Directory

salad, cocktail hour, appetizers and more! Contact us for a complimentary tasting at catering@andopizza. com. 1552 E. 15th St., Tulsa 918.728.6111 andopizza.com Aunt Pittypat’s Catering For more than 20 years, Aunt Pittypat’s has been Oklahoma City’s most trusted caterer for attention to detail and commitment to quality food and service. Specializing in formal and casual weddings and reception dinners. 1515 N. Portland Ave., Oklahoma City 405.942.4000 auntpittypatscatering.com Celebrity Restaurant For nearly 50 years, Celebrity Restaurant has been a Tulsa favorite for its award-winning menu and fine dining experience. 1309 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa 918.743.1800 celebritytulsa.com Freddies Bar-B-Que and Steakhouse Whether your occasion is formal, family, business or whimsical, our gifted staff will create the appropriate mood and menu that will delight your guests. 1425 New Sapulpa Rd., Sapulpa 918.224.4301 freddiesbbq.com Ted’s Cafe Escondido From rehearsal dinners to receptions, we can do it all! Just ask for information about our catering and banquet room services. 3202 W. Kenosha St., Broken Arrow 918.254.8337 tedscafe.com Ti Amo Ristorante Italiano Spacious meeting rooms, flexible table layouts, beautifully paneled rooms, limitless menu options, state-of-the-art audiovisual system, portable bar and removable dance floor in two locations. 219 S. Cheyenne Ave, Tulsa; 6024 S. Sheridan Rd., Tulsa 918.592.5151; 918.499.1919 tiamotulsa.com Vinita FFA Catering Team Enjoy delicious farm-totable catering from this spectacular team. 801 N. Adair St., Vinita 918.244.0864 vinitaffa.com Vitter’s Catering Vitter’s Catering provides full service catering with no limitations in cuisine. From buffet style to plated meals, light to heavy hors d’oeuvres, passed or stationary, we can handle any size or type of event. 8720 E. 21st #201, Tulsa 918.978.9044 vitterscatering.com


OrangeTheory Fitness Orangetheory Fitness is a one-of-a-kind, group personal training workout. The result is more energy, visible toning and extra calorie burn for up to 36 hours. 1551 E. 15th St. Suite 103, Tulsa; 9118 S. Sheridan Ave., Tulsa 918.900.2727; 918.612.4364 orangetheoryfitness.com Skin Care Institute Skin Care Institute was established in 1999 with the goal of providing both men and women with products and services to address all of their skin care and wellness needs. 6565 S Yale Ave. Suite #110, Tulsa 918.948.9639 skincareinstitute.net Sky Fitness Center We want to surprise, thrill and inspire our members with truly exceptional service. We understand that an exceptional experience is not a goal, it’s an ongoing process. 4103 S. Yale Ave, Tulsa; 10121 S. Sheridan Rd., Tulsa; 1205 E. Kenosha, Broken Arrow 918.641.5501; 918.299.5500; 918.994.4422 sky-fit.com Utica Square Skin Care Offering medical skin care and a variety of services and therapies to help you look and feel your best. 1325 E. 35th St., Tulsa 918.712.3223

Hotels and Venues

Battle Creek Golf Club Thank you for considering Battle Creek for your ceremony and reception venue. You’ve found your perfect fit in your beloved, and now it’s time to determine your ideal location. 3200 N. Battle Creek Dr., Broken Arrow 918.355.4850 battlecreekgolf.net

Bellissima Ranch

Surrounded by the beautiful Osage Hills, Bellissima Ranch is twenty acres of lush farm land with a breathtaking ceremony barn and a separate barn for

your reception. 4833 W. 88th St. N., Sperry 918. 361.1541 tulsaweddingvenue.com The Bond Event Center Located in the trendy East Village neighborhood, the brick walls, original tin ceilings and large sunny windows create a timeless venue. 608 E. Third St., Tulsa 918.442.2993 bondtulsa.com The Campbell Hotel & Event Center We are a uniquely designed boutique hotel with 26 rooms, attached to Maxxwell’s Restaurant. We can offer catering for events and have two event centers. 2636 E. 11th St., Tulsa 918.744.5500 thecampbellhotel.com Franklin Castle The Franklin Castle is an architectural gem that rests high on a ridge with a commanding view. The Castle is the ideal location for a one-of-a-kind wedding or celebration. 415 N. College Ave., Tahlequah 918.346.3210 franklincastleok.com Golf Club of Oklahoma At The Golf Club of Oklahoma, we specialize in creating one-of-a-kind weddings and special events that reflect your personal style and create memories to last a lifetime. 20400 E. 141st St., Broken Arrow 918.486.6575 golfcluboklahoma.com Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa We offer a variety of event spaces for wedding receptions. Your out-of-town guests will enjoy our luxury hotel with a golf course and spa. Our in-house bakery specializes in all styles of wedding cakes from simplistic to elaborate designs. 777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa 918.384.7814 hardrockcasinotulsa.com Hidden Porch Weddings When you choose The Hidden Porch Wedding Chapel – a stunning venue with rustic elegance at an affordable price – you won’t be disappointed. 4883 OK-266,

Catoosa 918.850.6330 hiddenporchweddings.com Lancer Hospitality/Oklahoma City Zoo Oklahoma City Zoo is a spectacular setting to host corporate events, weddings and company picnics. Our new event space, Sanctuary Asia, overlooking precious wildlife is set to impress. 2000 Remington Pl., Oklahoma City 405.425.0289 saltandsurrey.com/oklahoma-city-zoo The Mayo Hotel One of the most iconic places to see and be seen in Tulsa, this uniquely luxurious wedding venue offers nine individual event spaces, gourmet catering, state-of-the-art audio-visual capabilities and a full-time wedding planning team. 115 W. Fifth St., Tulsa 918.582.6296 themayohotel.com Oklahoma Aquarium Imagine wedding vows being exchanged in the beauty of our underwater world. Receptions in the aquarium are equally stunning, providing one-of-a-kind photo opportunities and comfort and beauty for your guests. 300 Aquarium Dr., Jenks 918.296.FISH (3474) okaquarium.org Pecandarosa Ranch From roping lessons to a gorgeous wedding venue, or even visiting the bed and breakfast, Pecandarosa is a great environment to relax and have fun. 23606 S. Keetonville Rd., Claremore 918.630.7092 pecandarosaranch.com Shangri-La Resort Shangri-La Golf Club, Resort and Marina is located at the tip of Monkey Island in the center of northeast Oklahoma’s beautiful Grand Lake O’ the Cherokees, and provides the ultimate escape. 31000 OK-125, Afton 918.257.4204 shangrilaok.com Stone Creek Bend Experience a brand new barn and beautiful location with a rustic touch. The venue is completely climate controlled and perfect for weddings, parties, showers or any special event. 105758 State Hwy. 64B,

Muldrow 479.629.1473 facebook.com/pg/stonecreekbend Summit Club Our premier banquet services, elegant atmosphere and exceptionally attentive staff combine to create a truly magical experience for you and your guests. 15 W. Sixth St., Tulsa 918.582.5243 ext. 23 summittulsa.com Tatanka Ranch Your ultimate wedding fantasy transforms into reality at the Tatanka Ranch. Say ‘I do’ lakeside under a floral-adorned arch at sunset or in the intimate ambiance of our rustic-style barn. 820343 S. 3480 Road, Stroud 918.368.2251 thetatankaranch.com Tulsa Botanic Garden Celebrate your wedding among gorgeous plants and flowers in a sustainable and harmonious environment. 3900 Tulsa Botanic Dr., Tulsa 918.289.0330 tulsabotanic.org Tulsa Garden Center This beautiful Italianate mansion in Midtown is perfect for weddings, receptions, parties, corporate and nonprofit events surrounded by a natural park area. 2435 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa 918.576.5155 tulsagardencenter.com White Barn Events Pure rustic elegance is what you will find at White Barn Events! Rolling hills and a beautiful pond are the perfect backdrop to your perfect day! 12875 S. 305th W. Ave., Bristow 918.605.3900 whitebarnevents.net White House Mansion The White House Mansion, a historic, charming mansion situated on 10 acres of land, boasts a wide open ballroom with indoor and outdoor options, along with flexible catering and ample parking. 1 W. 81st St., Tulsa 918.313.0808 whitehousemansiontulsa.com

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Jewelers

Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels At Bruce G. Weber, you get personalized service from professionals within your community, and a collection of world-renowned brands encompassing the finest jewelry and watches available. 1700 Utica Square, Tulsa 918.749.1700 brucegweber.com

Lighting

Omni Lighting Omni Lighting is your one-stop shop for all your lighting and expendable needs. We’ve been around since 1986 and know what you’ve come to expect from us: nothing less than creative and professional service with a smile. 1333 E. Fourth St., Tulsa 918.583.6464 omnilighting.com

Photography

PECANDAROSARANCH.COM

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Chris Humphrey Photographer I approach your wedding day as an observer, not the director. I capture the big moments, the little moments, the smiles, the laughter, the tears, and of course, the fun. 12324 E. 86th St. N., Suite 250, Owasso 918.625.4630 chrishumphreyphotographer.com My Treasured Memories Photography This full-service wedding photography studio provides a unique luxury experience for each couple. Our premier collections are all-inclusive. “Let us capture your love story.” 19735 E. 43rd St., Broken Arrow 918.805.6012 mytreasuredmemories.net Picturesque Photos by Amanda I’m Amanda – I started as a photojournalist, turned wedding photographer and never looked back. I live for capturing genuine moments on your wedding day. 189 W. Hollandia Road, Sand Springs 918.694.9944. picturesquetulsa.com

Rentals/Supply

ABCO Rents Complete wedding and party rental for rehearsal, ceremony and reception needs. 2033 E. 11th St.,

Farm Fresh with Finesse Homegrown produce and meats are matched with elegance and taste in mind. The products are grown in a local chapter garden and the FFA members fashion into delightful entrees. The produce and meats are grown clean for healthy food options at your event. The catered items are designed with the customer in mind and personal preference is first and foremost. Contact Vinita FFA - 918.244.0864 | Carolyn Piguet - FFA Advisor

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Tulsa 918.583.6557 abcoparty.com

Transportation/Travel

Vincent Vacations and Destination Weddings Whether you’re looking for a short getaway close to home or a family reunion in Africa, Vincent Vacations will guide you to the vacation that’s perfect for you. 11302 Quail Creek Rd., Suite 205, Oklahoma City 405.418.4180 vincentvacations.com Warren Place Travel Warren Place Travel is a full service, award-winning travel agency specializing in honeymoon and destination weddings worldwide. 6100 S. Yale Ave., Suite 100P, Tulsa 918.492.4724 warrenplacetravel.com

Tuxedos

Al’s Formal Wear The premier tuxedo and suit shop providing world class customer service and the highest quality outfits for rental or purchase. 7029 S. Memorial Dr., Tulsa 918.250.1441 alsformalwear.com Jos. A. Bank What makes Jos. A. Bank unique is a heritage of quality and workmanship, an extensive selection of tailored and casual clothing, and prices typically 20 to 30 percent below competitors. 1744 Utica Square, Space 15, Tulsa; Woodland Hills Mall, 8247 E. 71st St., Tulsa 918.749.2604; 918.252.2799 josbank.com

Video Production/ Photography

Captain Video Production and Photography For over 30 years, Captain Video and Photography has produced wedding videos with state-of-theart equipment. 1429 N. Umbrella Ave., Broken Arrow 918.521.4726 captainvideoinc.com


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Profile for Oklahoma Magazine

Oklahoma Magazine January 2018  

Oklahoma Magazine January 2018