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APRIL 2018

Meet the

2018 Class

of

Oklahosmiav'se impres

g youn ers lead

s k r o w e r From Fi eration to Desp ioid Exploring okplahoma addiction in O

on i t a v o n e R lution

as Evos become Older home uality dwellings showcase-q


NAMED AMONG THE BEST IN OUR REGION. Saint Francis Hospital is proud to play a vital role in improving the overall health and wellness in the community. As the flagship facility for Oklahoma’s largest healthcare system, Saint Francis Hospital provides patients and families with outstanding medical care and a broad range of services, including trauma and emergency care, cardiac care, pediatrics, oncology, orthopedics, labor and delivery, surgical services and more. We are grateful to the physicians, nurses, employees and volunteers of Saint Francis Hospital for their dedication to the mission of Saint Francis Health System: To extend the presence and healing ministry of Christ in all we do.

Healthcare for life. saintfrancis.com SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL | THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | WARREN CLINIC | HEART HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL SOUTH | LAUREATE PSYCHIATRIC CLINIC AND HOSPITAL SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL MUSKOGEE | SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL VINITA | SAINT FRANCIS BROKEN ARROW | SAINT FRANCIS CANCER CENTER | SAINT FRANCIS HOME CARE COMPANIES


First in his class at the academy Third trip to international space station Forgot to turn off his bedroom light

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Features APRIL

2018 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XXII, No. 4

42 40 Under 40

Oklahoma Magazine’s 2018 class of 40 Under 40 represents the best the state has to offer in virtually all fields of business; they work as doctors and lawyers, chefs and sommeliers, educators and artists.

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From Fireworks to Desperation Opioid addiction, called an epidemic by law enforcement, is one of the leading causes of drug-related deaths in Oklahoma.

WANT SOME MORE? APRIL 2018

April 2018

66 Renovation as Evolution

Older homes become showcase-quality dwellings in two Oklahoma City enclaves.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

Read expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MORE PHOTOS

View expanded Scene, Style, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

Meet the

of 2018 Class

ma's Oklahosiv e impres

g younrs leade

ON THE COVER: eworks From Fireration to Desp oid Exploring opihoma addiction in Okla

Visit us online. MORE ARTICLES

vation Renool ution

as Ev become Older homes lity dwellings showcase-qua

THIS YEAR’S OUTSTANDING 40 UNDER 40 CLASS IS A GROUP FILLED WITH ENERGIZED, CREATIVE, TRAIL-BLAZING PIONEERS.

MORE EVENTS

The online calendar includes more Oklahoma events.


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Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

11 State 14 16 18 20 22 24

The Gathering Place will soon be the hottest spot in Tulsa for locals and tourists alike.

Looking Back As the number of Holocaust survivors dwindles with each Yom HaShoah, teachers keep their voices alive. Clubs People Nature Business Insider

27 Life and Style 28

Interiors A long-married

32 34 36 38

FYI Health Destinations Style Vibrant, vivid, vivacious

39 40

Scene Spotlight

couple redo a wooded home in midtown Tulsa with centerpieces they’ve collected over the years.

38

14

28

– we love spring’s bright new looks.

75 Taste 76 77 78 79

Brookside’s staple sushi restaurant in the raw retains its Xfactor, even after 20 years in Tulsa.

Local Flavor In Season/Herbs/ Gadgets/Try This Quick Tips/Wine Traveling Taste New

81

York’s Nusr-Et Steakhouse is home to Salt Bae, both a culinary and internet sensation.

81 Where and When 82 86

Step back in time and welcome the Medieval Fair to Norman for its 42nd year.

In Tulsa/In OKC Film and Cinema

88 Closing Thoughts

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

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CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOT T MILLER, DAN MORGAN, DAVID COBB, MARC RAINS, SCOT T JOHNSON, CHARLIE ROSENTHAL , LUKE OPPENHEIMER

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Your wedding – refined – Let Oklahoma Magazine help plan your special day! The Oklahoma Wedding Show and issue in January have everything you need all in one place. Also look for the wedding guide in the June issue.

Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com

www.okmag.com

Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2018 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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“We were so impressed with our mortgage experience, we moved everything to TTCU.” – Matt N., TTCU member

After moving five times to five different cities, Matt came home to Tulsa – and TTCU. He said, “A mortgage is the largest purchase you’ll probably ever make. You need a friend, someone who watches out for your best interest. Choosing TTCU for our mortgage was the best decision ever.” To learn more about our 100% local mortgages and our 100% financing option, call, click or come by.

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Votes THE

ARE IN!

CHECK OUT THE JULY ISSUE TO SEE THE BEST OF THE BEST FOR 2018!

LET TER FROM THE EDITOR April brings beauty in spring rains, joy as the Easter bunny visits children across the state, and sadness in remembrance of tragic events, such as the anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing. We’ve tried to bring you a magazine full of beautiful stories, joyous occasions and a serious issue or two, as well. In our State section this month, you’ll meet actor and artist Gary “Litefoot” Davis (a Tulsa native) and you’ll hear from one of the few remaining Holocaust survivors in Oklahoma, Eva Unterman. Learn about Oklahoma’s seven venomous snakes, amateur radio clubs and their role in severe weather outbreaks, and the latest album from Oklahoma State University jazz students. In our Taste section, we have a crave-inducing story about in the raw, a popular Tulsa and Oklahoma City eatery, and a guide to wine-tasting by Master Sommelier Randa Warren. We also bring you an exploration of Oklahoma’s opioid addiction problem. You’ll hear from someone who has struggled, recovered and will never forget how it almost destroyed her life. On a joyous note, we’re excited about this year’s 40 Under 40 class, an interesting group of young professionals from diverse backgrounds and careers who are making strides in their fields, donating their time and energy to their favorite causes, and, overall, making Oklahoma a better place to work and live. We hope you enjoy this month’s issue of Oklahoma Magazine – we certainly enjoyed crafting it for you. Sincerely, Wendy King Burton Managing Editor

FOR ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES, EMAIL ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM OR CALL 918.744.6205.

OKMAG.COM S TAY CONNECTED

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COMING UP IN APRIL AT OKMAG.COM

OKLAHOMA 2018 OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

Each year, Oklahoma Magazine collects nominations from all around the state for our annual 40 Under 40 feature. We celebrate the best and brightest community leaders from Vinita to Boise City, who have made it their purpose to positively impact the lives of the people around them. Meet a selection of Oklahomans who go the extra mile and strive to make a difference. For this year’s feature, we’ve asked the class of 40 Under 40 to send in videos telling readers more about their passion to make change, why they do what they do, and what makes Oklahoma a place they are proud to call home. For this and much more web-exclusive content every month, visit okmag.com/web. WEB-EXCLUSIVE VIDEO STICK AROUND AND WATCH ALL OF OUR WEB-EXCLUSIVE VIDEOS AT OKMAG.COM/WEB.


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State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Growing the Gathering Place Students experience parts of Tulsa’s newest development before its grand opening.

B TULSA STUDENTS ENJOY A PLAY DAY AT GATHERING PLACE, A NEW 100-ACRE PARK SET TO OPEN OVER SUMMER. PHOTOS BY JOSH NEW

illions of words in millions of books – and the schoolchildren who read the books – provide the very magic that grows leaves on The Reading Tree. A majestic cottonwood tree in an enchanted 100 acres called Gathering Place, The Reading Tree is the heart of a park blending nature with an urban setting and brimming with adventures. There will be boats to paddle, a zipline to conquer, misty mountain water features, winding nature trails, a fairyland, a skate park, a pirate ship and two land bridges over Riverside Drive. All of this will be unveiled on the eastern bank of the Arkansas River, where The Reading Tree resides. “Plans are on track for the park to open this summer,” says Amanda Murphy, vice president of marketing for Gathering Place and Guthrie Green.

Some Tulsa County students have already taken field trips to The Reading Tree and participated in a reading challenge by logging the books they read online (tusareadingtree.org). With each book, another leaf appears, with nearly one million so far and a goal to double that number. Kirsten Hein, vice president of programming for Gathering Place, says the reading challenge is for kindergarteners through third graders. It is augmented by The Reading Tree’s magical story (told via animation) and hosted by a local fourth grader in an engaging, all-ages video, highlighted on the website. “The Reading Tree is already a celebrity, and it’s our first real program, even before the park has opened,” Murphy says. “Since last summer, we’ve worked with the library system and public schools in Tulsa County to provide curriculum and activities centered around The APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

11


The State Tree. The website is already a great resource for educators and parents to promote reading in our area and help increase test scores. It’s not too late to join the reading challenge, and so many kids are working hard to read many books in order for the tree to grow all of its leaves.” Community partnership with the Tulsa City-County Library in the form of a mobile library will be a park feature that allows visitors to check out books that they can return to any TCCL branch. Excitement builds as plans for events and educational activities progress in tandem with what Hein describes as an active volunteer program increasing in members daily. Once Gathering Place opens, many will begin experiencing the park with the Williams Lodge, which, Hein says, “is the wide open arms of the park giving a hug.” There are many ways to enter the park, but the lodge will be the main entrance, eas-

ily accessible and the place to get information. “Hanging out is easy with eclectic, movable outdoor furniture in this meet-up spot with views into Chapman Adventure Playground,” Hein says. “You’ll enjoy the three-story fireplace and, in all seasons, the incredible views.” She adds that the volunteer program has different levels of involvement, ranging from single, one-time events to ongoing opportunities where interests and skills of the volunteer are matched to park needs. Eventual offerings such as camps and classes require strategic planning, so that everyone who wants to participate may do so. Highlights on the horizon include concerts by in-state artists and nationally recognized performers, festivals and cultural events. “So many amazing things are ahead and much of it will be a surprise to the public,” Murphy says. “We are working on a website to launch leading up to opening day with a calendar of events and all the information and updates needed for people to choose

what appeals to them. We want to be sure that the people of Tulsa and Oklahoma have the first chance to visit Gathering Place.” A project of George Kaiser Family Foundation, Gathering Place is funded by a mix of corporate and philanthropic organizations and is the largest private gift to a public park in U.S. history. The first phase of the park contains 66.5 acres of an eventual 100-acre project. Park director Tony Moore says Gathering Place is one example of how the state of Oklahoma has “a lot of great momentum and energy in its transformation.” “I really like the phrase that ‘Oklahoma is no longer a fly-over state.’ From an outsider, who recently moved to the state, in many instances Oklahoma, to me, seems like the best kept secret of the Midwest,” Moore says. “There is just so much potential wrapped in the beauty in the state’s natural assets, the hospitality of its people and, last but definitely not least, in the generosity of its philanthropic community.” TRACY LEGRAND

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: TULSA STUDENTS PLAY ON GATHERING PLACE’S PLAYGROUND. STUDENTS GATHER AROUND THE READING TREE DURING A SPRING TRIP TO GATHERING PLACE. A CHILD CLIMBS UP A ROPE LADDER INTO A WOODEN PLAY STRUCTURE AT GATHERING PLACE. A LITTLE BOY RUNS THROUGH GIANT GRASS AT GATHERING PLACE’S PLAYGROUND.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018


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Meet your Oklahoma team. What matters to you, matters to us. Our team of experienced professionals will work to help you reach your unique goals. We offer the dedicated attention of our local team backed by the strength, innovation, and resources of Wells Fargo. To learn more about how your local Wells Fargo Private Bank team can help you, contact us at 405-607-7189. (left to right): Peter Harlin, Financial Advisor, Wells Fargo Advisors; Teresa Wiggins, Wealth Advisor Client Associate, Wells Fargo Private Bank; Chris Chandler, Sr. Investment Strategist, Wells Fargo Private Bank; Gina Volturo-Ellis, Wealth Advisor, Wells Fargo Private Bank; Jerry Morris, Wealth Advisor, Wells Fargo Private Bank

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The State HISTORY

Carrying the Torch

As the number of Holocaust survivors dwindles with each Yom HaShoah, teachers keep alive their voices, such as that of Tulsan Eva Unterman.

E

ABOVE: EVA UNTERMAN STANDS IN FRONT OF A 1940 PHOTO OF THE JEWISH GHETTO SHE LIVED IN BEFORE BEING SENT TO THE LODZ CONCENTRATION CAMP. THE WOMAN ON THE RIGHT HOLDING A BUNDLE IS HER MOTHER. FACING PAGE: EVA UNTERMAN DISPLAYS PRE-HOLOCAUST FAMILY PHOTOS AT THE SHERWIN MILLER MUSEUM OF JEWISH ART. PHOTOS BY LUKE OPPENHEIMER

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ven for those who have endured atrocities, time leads to mortality. Firstperson accounts of horrors and survival ebb year after year … until voices go silent. Also known as Holocaust Remembrance Day, Yom HaShoah is making the transition to that reality. The observance – April 11 this year – recognizes the lives and heroism of 6 million Jews exterminated by Nazis between 1933 and 1945. Ceremonies for Yom HaShoah, on the 27th day of the Hebrew month of Nisan, often feature some of the approximately 3 million Jews who survived the genocide. But that number dwindles. In 2016, the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany reported 100,000 living survivors worldwide; two years before, the number was 500,000. Eva Unterman, founder of Holocaust education at the Jewish

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

Federation of Tulsa, is one of three known Holocaust survivors living in Oklahoma. She speaks candidly about life – and death – but is confident that educators will maintain the mantra of “Never Forget – Never Again” long after she is gone. “Teachers are my closest friends,” says the 85-year-old, who came to Tulsa in 1961 with her husband, U.S. Army veteran Herb Unterman. “Teachers are my heroes. Teachers take the information to the next generation. That’s a victory for us.” Unterman was 7 when her family was forced into the Lodz, Poland, ghetto. She hid in a dry well during one sweep for children. She and her parents wound up in a series of concentration camps before the war ended. For decades, Unterman did not speak about the Holocaust. She credits her mother for not dwelling on it. “It’s an American obsession to think about who you are,” she says.

“Somewhere along the line – I think it was in the water well – I became numb. I didn’t think about my feelings. Years later, I didn’t want to burden my son and daughter with these stories.”

No More Silence

In 1978, history teacher John Travers had a section in his course about the Holocaust and wanted a survivor to visit his classes. Phone calls led to Unterman. “It took every ounce of my substantial debate skills to persuade Eva to come talk with my students,” says Travers, who has taught at Okmulgee, Jenks and Sapulpa high schools, Tulsa Community College and Spartan College of Aeronautics. “After that first time, she spoke at every presentation that I ever made. It became the John and Eva Show.” Unterman found her voice and has not stopped telling students about the Holocaust. “I feel more empowered than ever


at my age,” she says. “It’s my obligation to tell all this. Most survivors are dead or dying. There are not many of us left.” Within two generations, the last Holocaust survivor will die, but eyewitness accounts will resonate through teaching and documentation. Travers, still teaching three courses at TCC, wants more young people to major in and devote their lives to history. “To teach about the Holocaust,” he says, “educators have to have functional historical knowledge and prepare with accurate, substantial information.” The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington has extensive online resources, from lesson plans to short films, for teachers. “We rely on our teacher-partners across the country in our mission,” says Gretchen Skidmore, the museum’s director of education initiatives. “Teachers raise questions about issues facing students today, especially about human dignity.” The museum has 270,000 records, photos, textiles and artifacts, many of which match survivors’ first-person video and audio recordings at the facility. “We want to build a support network of teaching,” Skidmore says. “We have a cadre

of 380 teachers across the country who discuss Holocaust education.” Jesse Ulrich, director of Holocaust education at Tulsa’s Jewish federation, encounters teachers and students daily. “Our work is in anticipation of the day when there are no longer living Holocaust survivors,” Ulrich says. “All the work with school districts throughout Oklahoma and with all different kinds of minority groups is based on the single mission of ‘Never Forget.’”

Always Positive

A common denominator springs from Skidmore, Travers, Ulrich and Unterman: optimism. “She’s my hero,” Travers says of Unterman. “She’s one of the greatest human beings I’ve ever known.” Working with teachers leaves Skidmore in a perpetual state of learning and assessing the museum’s educational curriculum. She feeds off teachers’ enthusiasm “because they’re professional and know their craft. They’re also learners.” Ulrich says he has “always been a positive person because I believe [in a quote from] Martin Luther King Jr.: ‘Let us realize the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.’ Instead of always thinking about those that perished in the Holocaust, I think about those righteous people who helped save those who they didn’t know, putting their own families at risk.” And Unterman disregards vengeance. “I have always just wanted the world to be one,” she says. “I wanted Esperanto [invented in 1887 to foster global peace and communication] to be the world language. It’s all about our common humanity. I inform kids of what we humans do and have done to each other. They won’t go through what I went through, but they can see what they do with each other in their interpersonal relationships. “We go on. We live. This is my life.” BRIAN WILSON ONLINE EXCLUSIVE: FOR EXTENDED INTERVIEWS WITH UNTERMAN, TRAVERS AND SKIDMORE, VISIT OKMAG.COM/WEB.

YOM HASHOAH IN TULSA

In conjunction with Yom HaShoah, the Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education and the Tulsa City-County Library feature Patrick Desbois. The Catholic priest and Vatican consultant is the author of The Holocaust by Bullets: A Priest’s Journey to Uncover the Truth Behind the Murder of 1.5 Million Jews, which won the 2008 National Jewish Book Award for its exclusive documentation of execution sites in Ukraine. Debois’s talk, “A Voice of Conscience,” is at 7 p.m. April 9 at Tulsa Community College’s VanTrease Performing Arts Center for Education. He is part of the 21st annual Yom HaShoah Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration, which includes an original elegy by Joseph Rivers, a professor of music and film at the University of Tulsa. For more information about this free event, go to jewishtulsa.org or call 918.495.1100.

DIMINISHING

NUMBERS

It’s a matter of age. Eventually, the last Holocaust survivor will die. The same will happen with World War II veterans. According to the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, fewer than 558,000 remain of the 16 million Americans who served in that war. In 1956, the last Civil War veteran – Union soldier Albert Woolson – died at age 106. In February, the last World War I service member – Florence Green of the British Women’s Royal Air Force – died two weeks before turning 111; the last combat veteran of that war – British sailor Claude Choules – died last year at 110. APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State CLUBS

Hamming It Up Amateur radio clubs provide essential information during emergencies … and lots of global chatter at other times.

H

JOHN CARR, FIRST VICE PRESIDENT OF TULSA AMATEUR RADIO, WORKS IN THE OPERATIONS CENTER. PHOTO BY LUKE OPPENHEIMER

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am radio – formally known as amateur radio – operators basically have two reasons to participate in their hobby: provide emergency communication during a disaster and have fun talking with people worldwide. “Ham radio operators provide a critical communications link during natural disasters,” says Don Doyle, a Broken Arrow Amateur Radio Club member. Ham operators are essential during severe weather and provide critical information to the National Weather Service, he says. John Carr, first vice president of the Tulsa Amateur Radio Club, adds: “We’re more concerned about giving the NWS a clear view of what’s actually happening. We’re not doing it for TV ratings.” Bart Pickens, president of the Tulsa Amateur Radio Club, says that “if there is a breakdown of the communication system, then ham radio systems can become the backup

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

that will support either emergency communications or logistical communications.” During weather emergencies, spotters go out on their own, Carr says. “Say you have 10 guys living in the Stroud area,” he says. “Those 10 guys call stuff in as it comes close to them, and their positions can be stationary or mobile.” When these ham operators aren’t participating in emergencies, they enjoy their global capability. Doyle says some people even become pen pal radio operators. Doyle says he’s talked to people all over the United States, South America and Canada. Ham operators can also reach Europe and Japan, but that largely depends on atmospheric conditions. “I think of it as a sport – no different than any other sport,” Connie Marshall, trustee of the Muskogee Amateur Radio Club, says. “For example, a contest might last 24 hours and you try to make as many ham contacts with other hams all

over the world.” In one such competition, Marshall says he talked to 1,200 people in the United States. Carr says seeing how far a ham operator can talk with how little power is also a fun challenge. “My best … is 30 watts talking with someone in Belgium,” says Carr, adding that English is the international language for ham operators. “It’s really cool to play the game on how far you can transmit on how low a power.” Purchasing a ham radio can cost as little as $100 or as much as you want to spend, Pickens says. A $100 ham would allow the operator to connect to a repeater site, but the operator would have a limited range due to the low power. “If you want to go from there to a more powerful radio not limited in range or worldwide frequencies and you shopped real well, it could cost you between $300 and $500,” says Pickens, adding that some brands can cost up to $1,000. MARK HUGHES


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The State PEOPLE

Marketing His Journey

Gary ‘Litefoot’ Davis – a Native American actor, rapper, artist and entrepreneur – works to inspire others.

W

hen Tulsa-born Gary “Litefoot” Davis began his career as a musician and actor, he knew

GARY “LITEFOOT” DAVIS, ACTOR, ENTREPRENEUR, MUSICIAN, POSES FOR A PICTURE IN TULSA – HIS HOMETOWN.

PHOTO BY LUKE OPPENHEIMER

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he took a chance. “I resolved myself to this truth: that no matter how hard it got on my journey to success, that betting on myself would be the best bet I could ever make,” Davis says. That bet has led to a years-long career spanning multiple media and disciplines, including TV and film acting, writing and credit as the first major Native American rap artist. “Over the years, people who have come to know me have done so mostly through my music or movies,” says Davis, who is Cherokee. His successes include roles such as Little Bear in The Indian and the Cupboard as well as albums like 2008’s Relentless Pursuit – but what people haven’t seen, Davis says, is the marketing and entrepreneurial work that propelled him to success in the first place. “What they might not know about me is that, from day one, I was also the person behind the scenes figuring out how to market and promote my musical endeavors,” he says, “as well as how to self-capitalize my dream, placing time frames around what I endeavored to accomplish and prioritizing my goals.” While promoting a message through his art has always been “vitally important to me,” Davis says, it was equally important to make sure people could find out about him. To that end, his very first business was cre-

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

ated: Red Vinyl Records. “I knew from early on, in order for people to hear my message, I had to figure out how to get it out there so that it could be heard,” he says. “So for longer than I have been a rapper, I’ve been an entrepreneur. For longer than I’ve been an actor, I have been an entrepreneur.” In addition to his artistic career, he’s responsible for a range of operations, including a media consulting group (Davis Strategic Group, which he manages with his wife, Carmen), a clothing line (Native Style Clothing), and authorship and self-publication of his book, The Medicine of Prayer. He also serves as the executive director of the Native American Financial Services Association. His business ventures have taken the front seat lately, Davis says. “My involvement with leading national Native American business organizations has stemmed from my desire to contribute to growing and sustaining economic prosperity for future generations of Indian Country,” he says. “I know what entrepreneurship has done for me, and I want to see thousands more Native entrepreneurs become masters of their destinies.” That drive to promote and support Indian Country fuels much of his work and provoked what he describes as his most arduous endeavor. The Reach the Rez Project, announced in 2004, was a yearlong, 54,000-mile trip to provide more than 200 motivational and musical events. The project also produced educational magazines and a weekly radio program, which Davis uploaded to reservation radio stations as he traveled.


“For perspective, one time around the earth is 24,901 miles and we did that over two times and never left the country,” Davis says. The goal, put simply, was to spread hope among Native American tribes, he says. “The idea was to be proactive versus reactive to the issues we are constantly faced with – to stop someone from committing suicide or doing drugs instead of reacting to someone’s suicide or overdose,” he says. The effort became simultaneously “the hardest thing I’ve ever set out to do, and the most worthwhile thing I’ve ever accomplished,” Davis says. For all the focus on business, his artistic side remains active – Davis has announced an upcoming album, his first in 10 years. “Music is a part of me; it never leaves me,” he says. “The creative aspect of who I am has been welling up inside me for quite some time. I’m constantly hearing melodies and I’m always having lyrics come to me. That creative space for me is where I find my release and it’s always been hard to put that on the back burner – but it’s always been on the stove, just simmering and simmering.” Davis says the album would initially serve as the soundtrack to an upcoming documentary about his life and career called Vision Quest. Seeing the way his work has helped other Native Americans makes it worth doing, Davis says. “When I believe in something, the energy of taking it from nothing and successfully bringing it into reality is great,” Davis says. “But what I really love about it is all the people that are benefited by it once it becomes real.” CHESLEY OXENDINE

APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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N AT U R E

Dodge the Vipers

Common sense, respect and watching your steps should keep you safe around the state’s seven poisonous snakes.

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ven a snake lover like Mike Porter acknowledges that fear can be real when encountering a slithering sack of venom on a tromp in the woods this spring. A senior wildlife and fisheries consultant at Noble Research Institute in Ardmore, Porter spends much of his time admiring and learning about the 46 types of snakes in Oklahoma, especially the seven that are poisonous. He “loves just watching them [because] all snakes do a lot of good. They all have an ecological purpose.” Porter understands that some can get the heebie-jeebies because “people are either fascinated by snakes or scared of them. There tends to be no in-between.” He encourages people to learn about the poisonous snakes “because the more education they have, the less fear they have.” All of Oklahoma’s venomous snakes are pit vipers – the copperhead, the cottonmouth (or water moccasin), and five rattlesnakes (western diamondback, timber, prairie, western massasauga and western pygmy). Narrowing them down into those three groups may lessen apprehensions, Porter says.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

Snakes are active in the spring after hibernation, because they’re hungry and the warm weather heats up their cold-blooded bodies. “They’re all predators; none is a herbivore,” Porter says. “Some eat small things like termites; others eat bigger prey, like rabbits or fish.” Some ferocious nonvenomous species, like the bullsnake and the rat snake, can perform some dirty work for humans. “Rat snakes keep down rodents and bullsnakes are immune to pit viper venom, so they can eat poisonous snakes,” Porter says. He advises that people use common sense when they are in the woods or other parts of snakes’ habitat. “Watch where you put your hands and feet,” Porter says. “Don’t stick your hands in holes or under logs. Watch where you’re climbing. Remember that a snake can’t strike more than half its length, so that’s only about 4 feet at most in Oklahoma. Just give the snake a wide berth and don’t provoke it.”

Copperhead: Alternating, hourglass-shaped bands of darker and lighter copper, reddish-brown and pinkish colors; not a rattlesnake because it has no rattles Cottonmouth: (or water moccasin) Black streak or mark on the side of the head from the eye to the corner of the mouth; more mass than nonvenomous water snakes and floats higher and holds head higher; also found up to a mile away from water Western diamondback rattlesnake: May not always have rattles; varying colors with alternating dark and light bands on the tail and diamond shapes on the back Timber rattlesnake: Gray with black bands and an orange stripe down the back, or gold with black bands with gold stripe down the back Prairie rattlesnake: A black band close to the rattle and light stripes down the side of the face Western massasauga rattlesnake: Gray with black spots and a red stripe running the length of the back, and rattles that sound like a mosquito Western pygmy rattlesnake: A row of dark brown splotches running the length of the back with three smaller rows of lighter colored splotches along each side Sources: Oklahoma State University Department of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources; Noble Research Institute

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The State

“Historically, those [panels] have had different performance characteristics and cost, but in the last few years the performance and cost have come together where there isn’t Technological improvements and declining costs a lot of difference make solar power a serious consideration between those two technolofor Oklahoma homeowners. gies,” says Steve Wilke, owner of Delta Energy + Design, a Norman provider of renewable energy eople rely on electricity. solutions. “Whether the panels are poly (blue) or mono (black), you are Nearly every modern person going to get very similar performances.” needs it for even the most Another important impact on the solar power industry has been the basic of daily functions, from emergence of module-level monitoring. cooking dinner and reading a “We can now see how an individual solar panel in an array is doing book at night to binge-watching shows and so that we know every system is performing to spec,” Wilke says. “The using various technology. With an ever-growing need for more power panel-level monitoring allows customers to dig down into their data.” Anyone interested in a solar array should start with a site assessment and a desire to lower our carbon footprints, from an expert to determine how big of a system is needed and what some have started to turn to renewable energy the initial and long-term costs will be for it, Wilke says. The timeline options like wind, water, geothermal and solar. varies with each project. Installation has multiple In particular, solar power continues to rise in popularity, thanks to the increase in affordabil- stages and standards that have to be met before the system is complete. ity and technology. “These systems have a long operational history,” Monocrystalline and polycrystalline are the he says. “The operation phase is 25 years, and most common types of solar panels; both are that’s the system making electricity for the owner.” made of crystalline silicon. In the past, mono There are three main options for erecting an silicon panels had a higher function rate; enarray, Wilke says: roof mounts, which often have hancements, however, have changed the game. the lowest installation cost and are a space saver; ground mounts, which need a relatively large space; and shade structures, which are usually multipurpose, like a backyard pergola or a carport. Solar power systems are relatively low maintenance. The panels occasionally need cleaning, but often, if the slope of the modules is steep enough, they can be self-cleaning. “There is very little service associated with solar and the maintenance that is required is something that we build into our client’s expectations and cash-flow model,” Wilke says. Most residential solar installations in Oklahoma include about 20 panels and each module is 3 feet by 5 feet. Aside from the panels, the equipment needed is simple. The solar panels are conductors that collect direct current and an inverter is needed to convert that power to typical household electricity or alternating current, Wilke says. “Beyond that equipment, it’s monitoring,” he says. “Inside the inverter, you have electronics …

BUSINESS

A Sunny Investment

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BELOW: ROOF MOUNTED SOLAR PANELS OFFER THE LOWEST INSTALLATION COST WHILE USING THE LEAST SPACE. PHOTO COURTESY STEVE WILKE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018


THE LATEST SOLAR TECH capable of seeing what the panels are doing and talking to the internet, so you can pull out your phone and see how your solar system is doing at any given time.” As solar technology continues to improve and the cost to produce it decreases, more people see solar energy as a legacy for their families. “It is important that people take control of their own energy production to protect themselves from the everincreasing cost of electricity and provide themselves energy security when they retire,” Wilke says. “Solar is an incredible investment for Oklahomans and I think they’re starting to realize what a great investment it can be.” To stay up-to-date or learn more about solar power, visit energy.gov/sunshot. ALAINA STEVENS

BELOW: TESLA SOLAR ROOF TILES OFFER A CLASSIC ROOF LOOK, WITH ENERGY SAVINGS. PHOTOS COURTESY TESLA SOLAR ROOF

Solar energy technology has significantly improved, technologically and aesthetically. In 2016, electric carmaker Tesla introduced solar shingles made of glass that look like normal composite shingles. Tesla offers smooth, textured, slate or terracotta tiles, which contain photovoltaic (solar) cells. While a solar roof isn’t new to the industry, Tesla’s less obvious tiles provide an alternative to the more noticeable 3-foot-by-5-foot solar panels often used in solar power installations. According to tesla.com, the estimated cost for a Tesla solar roof includes materials, installation and the removal of your old roof. Any taxes, permit fees and additional construction costs are not included. The estimate is also based on the square footage of your home as well as the portion of your roof covered with the solar tiles. Because of building regulations, your entire roof is not eligible to be covered with solar tiles. However, you don’t need an entire roof of Following are some important solar shingles to generate enough electricity numbers to consider in a for your day-to-day energy usage. rooftop solar array, accordYou’ll have to contact Tesla or visit the ing to solarpowerrocks.com/ website at tesla.com/solarroof to find out oklahoma: if the technology is available in your The installation of a 5-kiloarea and what the cost will be – but watt system is about $20,000. EnergySage.com estimates a Tesla Oklahoma offers no state Solar Roof costs about twice as much rebate, but there is a federal as adding traditional solar panels to one. The federal solar tax credit your roof, but only about a fourth is based on out-of-pocket exmore than replacing your entire roof penses. You get about $6,000, and adding solar panels. or 30 percent, of the cost back as a tax credit. You can roll over the credit if you don’t owe $6,000 in federal taxes the year that you install the system. With the savings from your energy bill, you can estimate that your system will pay itself back after about 16 years. You then will start to see even more savings per year until the end of the system’s life, which is about 25 years. Using solar power and not using energy generated by fossil fuels create the carbon equivalent of planting 117 trees a year. While there are many benefits to solar energy, Oklahomans should know if they plan to use it, there is a surcharge. Senate Bill 1456 allows utility companies to charge a fee to customers using distributed power generation, which includes wind and solar. The surcharge is typically used for grid maintenance, and varies by company.

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APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State INSIDER

Retro Rockets Roll A new group draws inspiration from the rock ‘n’ roll revival with its ‘nostalgia show about a nostalgia show.’

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ABOVE: DENISE HOEY, LEFT, GAYLE WOLFE AND ANNA NEAL ARE SOME OF THE VOCALISTS FOR RETRO ROCKETS. PHOTO BY ANASANDRA AZLIN

FACING PAGE: MIKE BUCKENDORF, LEFT, DAVID BAGSBY, MICK CASPER, DENISE HOEY, GAYLE WOLFE AND ANNA NEAL ARE THE RETRO ROCKETS.

PHOTO BY MICKAELA CASPER

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ecause there are always stirrings and rumblings before something bursts into the mainstream, it’s often difficult to pinpoint the beginning of a pop-culture trend. Some say, for instance, the musical movement known as the rock ’n’ roll revival actually began in the late ’60s among people who preferred the relative innocence of ’50s tunes to the more threatening hard-rock and psychedelic songs of the time. Many others, however, point to the 1973 hit movie American Graffiti as the revival’s real kickoff. Sporting the tagline, “Where were you in ’62?,” director George Lucas’ first big hit successfully brought back the zeitgeist of the late ’50s-early ’60s by using plenty of songs in conveying the ambiance of the era. Soon, in addition to providing new work to old rock ’n’ rollers who were still around and functioning, the American music scene became populated with new acts playing what were then referred to as “golden oldies.”

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

These rock ’n’ roll revivalists included such successful groups as Sha Na Na, and Flash Cadillac and the Continental Kids. A few years later, in the summer of 1980, Tulsa came up with its own spin on the trend. That’s when American Theatre Company first presented Eddie & the Ecclectics, a musical full of classic rock ’n’ roll tunes that centered around the character of Eddie Edwards (played by Bob Bethel), a performer who claimed to have written many, if not most, of the era’s greatest hits. After a sleepy beginning, the live show took off on an amazing run of nearly two decades. That brings us to the Retro Rockets, a new group drawing generally from the rock ’n’ roll revival and more specifically from Eddie & the Ecclectics. In fact, if you’d seen these vocalists and musicians a few months ago, you would have actually seen them as Eddie & the Ecclectics. In February, according to Retro Rockets director David Bagsby, the group “blasted off in a new direction as the Retro Rockets,” leaving the auspices of American Theatre Company but continuing to perform at Tulsa’s Studio 308, where the members had just finished a sixmonth run of Eddie. “The Retro Rockets are a secret division of the USO who were sent to Skylab in 1976 to entertain the astronauts,” says Bagsby, setting up the premise of the new production. “However, on the return flight, a freak solar storm created a time dilation, which threw the crew forward into the future of 2018. The Retro Rocketeers

realize this conundrum but are still only aware of history from their origin point. So there’s a lot of talk about things like Space Food Sticks, Billy Beer and Grit newspapers.” He adds that the Retro Rockets were a rock ’n’ roll revival group in the ’70s. So what the production offers, in essence, is a double twist. It’s not just a nostalgia show – it’s a nostalgia show about a nostalgia show. And while it’s not Eddie & the Ecclectics, it does utilize the same cast members and much of the same musical palette in conjunction with its very different backstory. Given all that, it’s not surprising to find that most members of the Retro Rockets band have a long history with the ATC production. “This is pretty much the same [Ecclectics] band I joined in, I believe, 1983,” keyboardist Jim Downing says. “They’re all first-call players, and we’re even better than we were 35 years ago.” “It’s like finding out your prom tux still fits,” he adds with a laugh. Bagsby was also with Eddie in the early days, playing bass and rhythm guitar during the production’s first two years. An actor as well as a musician and composer, he was appearing in ATC’s Caine Mutiny Court-Martial in March 2017 when he saw something from the company that mentioned “the return of the Ecclectics,” he recalls. “So I asked, ‘Hey, what’s the deal with this?’ And they said, ‘Well, we’re just seeing what kind of a reaction we’ll get.’ I said, ‘If you need a guitar player, I’ll do it.’ And then later I said, ‘If you need a music director, I’ll do it,’” Bagsby says. When the company decided to do an Eddie & the Ecclectics reboot as a fundraiser, it took Bagsby up on both of his offers. And Bagsby, a veteran Tulsa music figure with his own record label, knew the musical direction he wanted to pursue. “After I left the [Eddie] show, I didn’t see it again until its last year, I think, and they were doing all kinds of stuff, like ‘Love Shack’ and all this music from the ’70s,” he says. “They had definitely exploded the filter beyond what it had been. “I thought the reason the show was successful was because it was rooted in the [rock ’n’ roll] era. So, when they asked me to do the benefit, I said I’d like to go back to the concept of pre-Beatles rock ’n’ roll and do the


surf-music set and ‘The Peppermint Twist’ and all the stuff they had done originally that made the show great.” That’s what he did, working with some of the performers from Eddie’s original run who reunited for this special event, including Karl Krause, Greg Roach, John Riggs and Melanie Fry, who directed the special show as well. “It was such a success that we carried it over a second night, an encore on Sunday,” Downing says. That, in turn, led to a re-formed Eddie and band beginning a run at Studio 308 with actor-vocalist Mike Buckendorf stepping into the lead role and Bagsby taking over as director. Publicity material indicates that the Retro Rockets may expand on the Ecclectics’ repertoire by including material from the ’70s, but indications are that reviving golden oldies is still the name of the game for the new production, which carries the tagline of “Space Age Rock ’n’ Roll.” “We do a couple of songs that came along after the Beatles, like ‘Chain of Fools,’ and ‘Devil with A Blue Dress On’ and Good ‘Golly Miss Molly,’ but most of it is pre-British Invasion,” Downing says. “That’s the general focus of it. Dave wanted to do a lot of doo-wop to begin with, and while we haven’t quite mastered that yet, we do things like ‘Get A Job’ and ‘I Only Have Eyes for You.’”

friday APRIL 13

“They’re all first-call players, and we’re even better than we were 35 years ago.”

Bagsby adds: “I do want to be doo-wop-centric. And I’m hoping to do some Beach Boys songs, really super-complex harmony stuff that I think we can pull off.” In addition to Buckendorf, vocalists include Denise Hoey, Anna Neal, Gayle Wolfe, Mick Casper and Bagsby himself. Kara Steiger is featured in some of the group’s performances. “The singers we have are really quite adept,” Downing says. “The girls all have tremendous voices, and Mickey Casper is a magnificent tenor.” As is the case with Bagsby, who plays bass and appears as a character in the production, and Downing, the rest of the band is made up of well-known Tulsa music figures. They include Bagsby’s brother Steve on steel guitar and fiddle, Scott Mariner on drums and Tom Hanford on guitar. Both Hanford and Mariner have spent time with Downing in the long-lived Tulsa band the Zigs. The Retro Rockets’ next performance is set for April 21 at Studio 308. Ticket information can be found at studio308tulsa.com or by calling 918.329.0224. Other planned shows include Utica Square’s Fifth Night on June 14 and Broken Arrow’s Tuesday in the Park on June 19.

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Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

PHOTO BY JOSH NEW; STYLING AND DECOR BY RICHARD NEEL INTERIORS

Brighten Your Space

When you’re looking for lighting options for your home, turn to the experts.

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hoosing lighting fixtures for your home can be challenging, so Lance Cheney of Richard Neel Interiors in Tulsa says to start with the basics: splitting your lighting options into categories. “First, there’s task lighting, which illuminates work spaces, like countertops and shelving,” he says. “Second, accent lighting – adjustable, recessed lights to use as wall washers or spots to light art. Third, decorative lighting. This is the fun stuff: table lamps, chandeliers and sconces. And fourth, ambient lighting, which is more subtle, general lighting. Consider dimmers on all your lights, even lamps;

most quality lamps today come pre-wired with dimmers and/or high low settings.” Cheney says to use these categories as a way to determine where your lighting piece will land in your home. “The type of lighting you need will help you make decisions as to what style to purchase,” he says. “You should definitely know how you plan on using a room so you can determine what type of light is required. Asking where and how much light you want in a room is a good place to start.” If you want to keep up with the trends, Cheney has noticed that fixtures made of natural materials are

hot in 2018, especially alabaster. “It is translucent; it glows and reduces glare. Alabaster can be found on most every type of lighting, from lamps, pendants, flush-mounted ceiling lights, as well as chandeliers and sconces,” he says. “Also, fixtures are not as traditionally round as in the past. We are seeing different shapes – fixtures that are square and organically shaped.” Most importantly, Cheney says to look at the areas you want to light with a critical eye, and do some research before heading to the lighting store – knowing what types of fixtures you need when you shop is key to a good experience, and a beautiful result. APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

LEFT: SITUATED IN A SECLUDED MIDTOWN AREA, THIS HOME OFFERS ALL THE AURA OF COUNTRY LIVING IN A QUIET, URBAN SETTING. A BEAMED PYRAMID CEILING IS A DRAMATIC FEATURE IN THE LIVING ROOM.

INTERIORS

Joining the Present with the Past A long-married couple redo a wooded home in midtown Tulsa with centerpieces they’ve collected over the years.

By M.J. Van Deventer Photos by Scott Johnson, Hawks Photography

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. Claudette Williams and her husband take pride in the furnishings they carefully chose early in their 45-year marriage. Many of these are centerpieces in the midtown Tulsa home they bought a year ago. The home also reflects Claudette’s 20year career as a designer who shuns trendy themes, favoring instead looks that make a dwelling comfortable. As an abstract and figurative artist for the past 10 years, she also enjoys featuring her art in her home and the homes of her clients in Dallas, Chicago and San Diego. Williams had ambitious ideas in mind for the 10,000-square-foot home, even though the vintage 1970s house was renovated four years ago. She and her husband are drawn to its wooded setting, accented by mature sycamore, oak, redbud and dogwood, she says.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018


APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

An impressive foyer introduces the goldand-cream color palette featured throughout the home. Since the couple has a large family, including six grandchildren, the ample, dramatic living room comfortably seats 22. A vaulted ceiling, accented by oak beams, twin iron chandeliers and an arched window overlooking the home’s front lawn, adds visual and architectural interest. Williams designed four custom sofas for two seating areas near a 24-foot-tall stone fireplace. Two high-backed chairs and a pair of 6-foot-tall wall sconces are other enticing visual elements in the living area, where the couple often entertains family, friends and business associates. “This is our favorite room,” Williams says. “I love large, interesting accents. That’s one of the joys of being a designer. When I’m on the hunt for clients’ homes, I often find things for my home, too.” In the large dining room, guests might be surprised to learn that the table, which has a parquet design wood top, was purchased early in the couple’s marriage. (Another dining table, of Duncan Phyfe vintage, is in the entry foyer.) While the couple prefer furnishings that they have acquired, the glass-and-gold chandelier in the dining room is a spectacular, custom-made original that Claudette commissioned from the Murano factory near Venice, Italy, two years ago.

Adjacent to the kitchen, wood floors anchor the 35- by 22-foot kitchen, which is two stories high. A fireplace, another gathering place, is flanked by white leather contemporary chairs. Williams says this room reflects her love for “the art of the mix,” blending new and old in style. In the kitchen’s informal dining area, she has arranged the chairs from the original dining room suite with a taupe contemporary glassand-acrylic table. Renovation of the wet bar allows guests to move around freely. “The wet bar was really a traffic trap,” she says. “It was cave-like and did not function well for entertaining.” By removing a wall and reconfiguring space, they have a wet bar easily accessed from the living area, kitchen, pool and patio. The master suite is a vision of elegance. A period antique poster bed, dressed in luxurious fabrics, and a Patagonia marble fireplace are the starring attractions. The master bath is equally as elegant. The view of the pool from the master suite is especially pleasing. In this U-shaped home with many windows, all eyes turn to the pool, a waterfall and a spacious outdoor living area. The outdoor setting, nestled among native trees, is a focal point. From almost every room, nature’s ever-changing charm adds warmth and beauty to this elegant residence.

LEFT, TOP TO BOTTOM: AMPLE WINDOWS IN THE HOME GIVE BEAUTIFUL VIEWS. SITUATED BETWEEN THE KITCHEN AND OUTDOOR LIVING AREAS, THE ONCECRAMPED AND ODDLY SITUATED WET BAR CAME INTO ITS OWN WITH THIS RENOVATION. THIS POOLSIDE AREA IS A PERFECT PLACE FOR THE WILLIAMS’ GRANDCHILDREN AND FRIENDS TO ENJOY THE COUPLE’S LOVE FOR OUTDOOR, POOLSIDE ENTERTAINING. THE WILLIAMS’ PENCHANT FOR MIXING UNUSUAL FEATURES IS EVIDENT IN THE EXPANSIVE KITCHEN.

ABOVE: A PERIOD-STYLE FOURPOSTER BED, PURCHASED 20 YEARS AGO, IS NOW THE STAR IN THE MASTER SUITE. LUXURIOUS FABRICS ACCENT THE BED AND TWO SEATS FLANK IT. LEFT: THIS SUITE INCLUDES A FLOATING FIREPLACE BETWEEN THE BEDROOM AND AN ADJACENT SITTING ROOM. TWO ROOMS ADJOINING THE BEDROOM WERE REARRANGED TO CREATE THIS HAVEN OF REST FOR THIS COUPLE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018


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Life & Style F YI

Designer

Details

Jennifer Welch of Jennifer Welch Designs in OKC shares tips on hanging art around your home.

The most important component to hanging art is to not place it too high. This piece works perfectly above the antique Italian buffet. Hanging a modern piece of art above an old piece of furniture provides a blended, curated contrast.

Hanging art in unexpected areas can add warmth. The first object you see when you walk into this home, styled by Welch, is the staircase. The team chose a long linear piece at the landing, and a smaller painting in the same color palette for the stairway niche. Both add texture and set the tone for this homeowners extensive art collection.

To break up the monotony of a wall with floorto-ceiling shelves, hang artwork directly onto the shelves, says Welch. It adds intrigue and an unexpected pop. For one particular project, Welch and her team lacquered the home’s shelves black and hung a Joan Miro lithograph to update the room and give it a well-rounded, curated look.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

PHOTOS BY JOSH WELCH

A muted painting from the owner’s collection was selected to be placed above a black console table. The soft, layered color palette of this painting juxtaposes the console.

For the Hollywoodglam master bedroom corner, pops of color were integral. It is important for art pieces hung close together to blend. In this area, the greens in each painting complement each other.


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Life & Style

H E A LT H

Aack of the Allergens Typical culprits, such as common tree pollens in the spring, can make some outdoor enthusiasts suffer.

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DR. RICHARD HATCH CHECKS A PATIENT FOR A REACTION AFTER AN ALLERGY SKIN PRICK TEST.

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA ALLERGY AND ASTHMA CLINIC

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hile spring usually draws us outdoors, Oklahoma’s tree and grass pollens can keep allergy sufferers inside. Dr. Gregory Metz, with Oklahoma Allergy and Asthma Clinic in Oklahoma City, says common tree pollens in the spring include mountain cedar, red cedar, pecan, oak, cottonwood and elm. “Mountain cedar is an invasive tree that is a regional allergen in Texas and Oklahoma,” he says. “It can lead to severe allergy symptoms, often referred to as ‘cedar fever,’ that occur in the winter and early spring.” With summer come grass pollens, while weed allergens are typical in autumn. Mold allergens are present all year, and indoor allergens include pet dander, dust mites and roaches. Metz says common allergy symptoms include sneezing, a runny nose, congestion, post-nasal drip, ear-popping and itchy eyes. “Allergy testing is an important part of treating allergies, whether symptoms are year-round or episodic. It can help identify what you are allergic to so that environmental changes can be made to reduce exposures,” says Metz, adding that testing can identify when medications are needed or if immunotherapy would help. Dr. Lodie Naimeh, with Allergy Clinic of Tulsa, says it’s important to treat allergies promptly to prevent complications, such as sinus and ear infections, and bronchial and asthma symptoms. She says steroid shots given once or twice a year are not allergy shots.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

They are high doses of steroid to help relieve acute symptoms; these can last in the body as long as three months and excessive use of these shots can be detrimental – and they are not without serious side effects. Naimeh adds, “Allergy shots, on the other hand, are prepared at allergy offices based on allergy testing, and these are given in incremental dosing to build up immunity against the allergens and eventually get rid of the allergies.” Chris Baranano, an otolaryngologist and head and neck surgeon with Integris in Oklahoma City, says inflammation and infection are the two primary issues affecting the nose and sinuses that cause people to experience congestion, facial pressure, blockage and drainage. He says that while medical management may control the underlying issues of sinus inflammation, an individual’s anatomy of the nose, the surrounding cavities and the pathways connecting them may limit treatments that would resolve an otherwise temporary inflammation or infection. For example, it’s not unusual for a patient to have polyps

in the sinus cavities, causing medication and sprays to be less effective. Ignoring sinus-related symptoms carries a low risk of missing a disease that could worsen or be more serious than expected, Baranano says. “Chronic sinusitis, nasal symptoms such as congestion or blockage or face, eyes or head symptoms such as pressure should be evaluated if they last more than three months or have recurred multiple times throughout the year, requiring multiple antibiotics,” he says. “Any person with sinus symptoms that are worsening and associated with vision loss, seeing double, high fevers or severe neck pain should consider going to the emergency room for evaluation of their sinuses. “When there is a new mass in the face, ulcers within the roof of the mouth or near teeth, numbness over the upper lip or distortion of the cheek bone, you should move quickly and not delay an evaluation, as this area can be affected by diseases or tumors that start within the sinuses.” REBECCA FAST


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like Dr. Mons, and most importantly, to his patients. “We’ve always been committed to bringing innovative technology to our center,” added Dr. Mons. “With tools like the Flex Robotic System, Cancer Treatment Centers of America has yet another way to help improve the lives of our patients—and that’s really what it’s all about.” Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) is a network of five hospitals across the U.S. offering an integrative approach to cancer care. CTCA combines advanced technologies to fight cancer and evidence-informed therapies to help manage side effects.

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Life & Style D E S T I N AT I O N S

A Capital Time to Visit

New retail areas and museums, the cherry blossom festival and iconic monuments make D.C. an ideal spring vacation.

T

he nation’s capital will knock your socks off, whatever your politics. After more than a dozen visits, I am still bowled over by Washington. There are even more reasons to make the trip now. Ideally, plan to spend a week – there’s that much to see and do. Bring good walking shoes. The monuments unfailingly inspire awe, the art galleries constantly showcase the best the world has to offer, and the museums have no comparisons. Fly into Reagan National Airport. It costs a few extra dollars, but the views coming in low over the Potomac River to the District of Columbia are worth it: Georgetown, the Watergate, the Mall, then the Lincoln, Washington and Jefferson monuments with the Capitol in the distance. If you’re on the other side of the plane, the mammoth Pentagon sprawls.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018


What’s New

A major setting for National Cherry Blossom Festival activities this year is the new Wharf, a one-mile stretch on the Washington channel of the Potomac between Interstate 395 and North Street Southwest. It’s filled with waterfront parks, shops, restaurants, a concert venue and hotels, including the Wharf Intercontinental with its view-friendly, 5,000-square-foot rooftop lounge. This rite of spring festival runs until April 15, but when the thousands of cherry tree blooms rimming the Tidal Basin hit their peak always depends upon the weather. We won’t know until about 10 days before. In 2017 and 2016, it was March 25; in 2015 and 2014, it was April 10.

Museum of the Bible

Oklahoman and Hobby Lobby president Steve Green opened this museum in November. This self-described attraction, “dedicated to a scholarly and engaging presentation of the Bible’s impact, history and narrative,” has earned a spot on your don’t-miss list. Two blocks from the National Mall and three blocks from the Capitol, the museum features biblical art and antiquities, treasures from the Vatican Museum, biblical manuscripts, printed Bibles, narratives from the Hebrew Bible, a New Testament Theater and a remarkable journey above Washington, which reveals how some of the District’s landmarks were influenced by biblical texts and imagery. The museum is open daily.

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Part of the Smithsonian Museum complex on the National Mall, this culmination of decades of planning (back to Woodrow Wilson’s presidency) has hit a home run. Opened in September 2016, the stunning, architecturally iconic, $540 million, eight-story, 400,000-square-foot building is filled with a dozen exhibitions housing 183 videos, 13 interactive exhibits and 3,000 pieces. The museum tells the emotional, often heartbreaking, but also often triumphant stories of

African-Americans. Artifacts range from the coffin of Emmitt Till, the 14-year-old whose lynching in Mississippi in 1955 helped propel the civil rights movement, to Harriet Tubman’s shawl, Muhammad Ali’s terry-cloth boxing robe and Nat Turner’s Bible. Open daily with free admission, the popular museum requires timed passes to enter. Visit etix.com to get your tickets.

Other Suggestions

Stop for a peek at the recently unveiled portraits of Barack and Michelle Obama in the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery. Also, swing by the National Gallery of Art; after three years, the fabulous renovations inside the East Building are complete. There are many great hotels in the District; my favorite is the Willard Intercontinental Washington, the city’s grand dame, a block from the White House. Massive security in Washington is mostly unseen; the District is surprisingly open and accessible. Mass transit is clean, safe and efficient via the Metro, which offers both rail and bus service. CHUCK MAI

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: THE DISPLAYS AT THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE ARE VISUALLY STUNNING.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALAN KARCHMER FOR THE SMITHSONIAN’S NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE

VISITORS EXPLORE THE HISTORY OF THE BIBLE DISPLAY LOCATED ON THE FOURTH FLOOR OF THE MUSEUM OF THE BIBLE.

PHOTO COURTESY MUSEUM OF THE BIBLE

WASHINGTON D.C. IS KNOWN FOR ITS BEAUTY DURING THE SPRING, AND ITS NATIONAL CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL.

APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

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SCENE

Tabitha & Raymond Felton; Taste of Oklahoma City, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma, OKC Ashley Witby, Darci Hoff, Drew Kropff; Best of Brunch, DVIS, Tulsa

Alice & Dave Hager, Polly & Larry Nichols; Snowflake Gala, United Way of Central Oklahoma, OKC

Greg Weber, Sarah Coburn-Rothermel, Chris Rothermel; 70th Anniversary Gala, Tulsa Opera, Tulsa

William & Christine Po, Debbie & Larry Gill; CASA Casino, Tulsa CASA, Tulsa Robin & Larry Faulkner, Wendy & Mike Gray; Giving Spirits Dinner, Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma, Tulsa

Adam Edwards, Jennifer & Chris Salyer; Chocolate Decadence, Automobile Alley Association, OKC

Tammy Been, Melissa Minshall & Stephen Paulsen, Sally Minshall; Cooking Up Compassion, Catholic Charities, Tulsa

Dana Weber, Lori McGinnis-Madland, Todd Martin; Street Party 2018, Street School, Tulsa

Tucker, Shannon, Katherine, David and Ashley Hill; Heart Ball, American Heart Association, OKC

Cathy Campbell, Susan Harris, Andres Franco, Jane Primeaux, Marcia Brueggenjohann; Overture: A Speakeasy Experience, Signature Symphony, Tulsa John Hewitt, Linda Johnston, David Hentschel, Lisa McLarty; Live United Awards and Luncheon, United Way Tulsa APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

SPOTLIGHT

RED RIBBON GALA

Philanthropists, activists, donors and storytellers dressed to the nines on March 3 for the annual Red Ribbon Gala hosted by Tulsa CARES – a nonprofit that delivers social services to people affected by HIV and AIDS.

More than 600 guests donned red-accented attire to honor the nonprofit and the evening’s theme of SHIFT: changing perspective, raising awareness and cultivating compassion. Guests raised more than $750,000 for the cause.

Martin Martinez, Teri Burnstein, Dan Burnstein Jay Krottinger, Pat Chernicky, Ryan Tanner

Greg Holt, Matt Wallace Bob & Joy Frame

Andy Kinslow, Russ Kirkpatrick

Cody Brewer, Caty Smith Dixie Busby, Ken Busby Daisi & Sam Owens

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN

Catherine Seger, Patrick (P.S.) Gordon, Marjorie Atwood

Rebekah Tennis, Raj Basu

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

Gerry & Betsy Jackson

Bill & Leah Bowles, Jeff Pounds, Jordan Simpson

Jeff & Jane Matulis


Ben Stewart, Michele Semin, Chris Murphy

Christy Craig, Phil Long, Dustin Thames

Warren Kruger, Lisa & Steve Antry, Trent Beaver Tamra Sheehan, Blane Snodgrass Steve & Marla Bradshaw

Matt & Jackie Hanna Tonya & Chris Holley

Daniel & Vida Schuman

Don & Susie Wellendorf

Eric Green, Devin Fletcher, Cedric Mims, Kimani Love

Sid & April McAnnally

Blake Loveless, Nancy Van Doren

U.S. District Judge Terence Kern & Jeanette Kern

Perry & Jessica Farmer, Zahidah & Bill Hyman APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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2018

40 Under 40 honorees are unranked and presented in no particular order. William Lyle Stanna Brazeel Kristin Richards Joshua Vicena Jodi Finer Anna Rangel Clough Patrick Smith Maria Copp Susan Crenshaw Lindsay Beth Farr Amy L. Howe Elizabeth Frame Ellison Josh D. Lee Jared Jordan Audrey Chambers Vahid Farzaneh Shannon Lynne Hillier Victor Acosta Serna Matt Lay Maren Minnaert Lively Tyler McManaman Lauren Brown Tonya Ratcliff Amanda Jo Wyatt Paige Buxton Graham Caron Davis Christopher A. Grate Kara Berst Cassandra Lawrence Carter Chrissi Ross Nimmo Hilda De Leon Xavier Maurianna L. Adams Houda Elyazgi Roy Boney Jr. Payton Guthrie Kanwaljit “Vick” Aulakh Collin Henry Aaron “AJ” Johnson Lysbeth “Liz” George Andrew Ralston

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

PHOTO BY JOSH NEW

Young leaders in Oklahoma set the pace for progress moving forward. In a state on the cusp of massive transformation, business leaders under 40 are our brave pioneers. Oklahoma Magazine’s 2018 class of 40 Under 40 represents the best the state has to offer in virtually all fields of business; they work as doctors and lawyers, chefs and sommeliers, educators and artists. Their occupations differ, yes, but their passions remain the same: to put Oklahoma on the map as a state of the future.


William Lyle

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Tulsa Executive Chef, The Summit Club Chef William Lyle takes great pride in overseeing a meal’s long journey to a Summit Club member – from meeting with farmers and developing the menu to preparing the dish. But Lyle is more than just a planner – he’s a leader. “I manage a staff of 25, including three sous chefs,” says Lyle, adding that “watching young men and women grow in my kitchens, emotionally and professionally” is what makes him the proudest. When he’s not at the club, Lyle enjoys volunteering, most recently with the March of Dimes, Feed Communities, Chase Family Foundation and Lifesource. He also loves staying active: kayaking, mountain biking, disc golf and snowboarding. “Give me two consecutive days off and I will be on my way to Colorado,” he says. Another of his loves? Food, of course. “I share citizenship with the UK and spent a lot of my childhood in Northern England,” he says. “This might be why I am so infatuated with Indian food.”

To see an ONLINE EXCLUSIVE VIDEO with members of the 2018 40 UNDER 40 CLASS, visit okmag. com/40under40. APRIL 2018| WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PHOTO COURTESY S. CRENSHAW

PHOTO BY JOSH NEW

Susan Crenshaw

Jodi Finer

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Tulsa Creative Director, S. Harris, a division of Fabricut Inc. Jodi Finer is on a mission: to make Tulsa a city of the future. Since moving back from Los Angeles in July 2017, Finer has taken on the title of creative director as S. Harris, a wholesaler of luxury home furnishings and a division of Fabricut, a fabric distributor. “My day to day involves marketing and brand strategy, building community, and designing and merchandising textiles, wall covering and accessories,” Finer says. Alongside her day job, Finer is also heavily invested in Tulsa Tomorrow. “A group of Tulsans had this idea about three years ago … which aims to bring young entrepreneurs with innovative ideas to Tulsa,” she says. “When I learned about all the exciting things happening in Tulsa, my fiancé and I decided to move back, too, so I consider myself a Tulsa Tomorrow person.” In November, the group hosted 58 young entrepreneurs from around the world to show them the ample opportunities Tulsa has to offer. Finer says of that group, five to eight are moving here, with several others seriously considering it. “Every week we host people coming in to do a more focused trip around Tulsa, tailored to their specific career,” she says. When asked about the secret to her success, Finer showcases her continued tenacity. “What success?” she asks. “I’m still in building mode and won’t stop until I’ve made my dreams a reality.”

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Tulsa Energy Management Leader, ONEOK Susan Crenshaw has been a loyal employee of ONEOK for eight years – and along the way, she’s garnered massive authority within the company. “I lead a small team responsible for purchasing and efficiently consuming the energy ONEOK uses to run its operations in 17 states,” she says. “Our group does both finance and engineering work and works with about 200 energy providers. We also explore some new energy technologies, as well, as our business needs require. We have a lot of fun doing this – it’s fun to optimize and be efficient.” Crenshaw wastes no time being idle outside the office; she gives her time to the Tulsa Regional STEM Alliance, Tulsa Area United Way, Girl Scouts of Eastern Oklahoma and several other nonprofits. “I have a lot of very rich relationships across this community and this state as a result of volunteering and meeting like-minded people,” Crenshaw says.


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Vinita Lawyer, Ward Lee & Coats Josh D. Lee is a lawyer, yes – but maybe not one you’ve heard of often. “I am an attorney who focuses my practice on fighting the government,” he says. “I am a unique breed of lawyer known as a lawyer-scientist who handles criminal defense cases that involve forensic science applications.” His proudest work-related moment to date? “Walking out of the Tulsa County Jail with Malcolm Scott when he was exonerated after spending 22 years in prison for a crime he did not commit,” he says. “It doesn’t get any better than the feeling all of us had who were involved in Malcolm and Demarchoe Carpenter’s exonerations.” Lee, in his off time, spends time with his wife, Jacki, and volunteers at the Vinita Fire Department as a certified firefighter and registered Emergency Medical Technician.

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Norman Project Manager, Manhattan Construction Company Tyler McManaman works closely with clients of Manhattan Construction to ensure their architectural dreams become reality, in turn enriching the community with quality public structures. “Turning the keys over to a new building that meets [the client’s] expectations make the challenges throughout the project all worth it,” he says. Outside the office, McManaman serves on the Resource Board for Big Brothers Big Sisters Oklahoma in Norman, and is a member of the Community Activism Team through Norman Next. The University of Oklahoma graduate is also an avid outdoors man alongside his wife and two children. “Being active and outdoors is so much a part of my life that I proposed to my wife on a camping trip in Arkansas and moved to Colorado after college, specifically for the Rocky Mountains,” he says. He and the family moved back to Oklahoma in May 2016, but McManaman has no qualms about leaving Colorado. “As much as we miss Colorado, we are very happy being back home, where our children can grow up with our families in such a great community.” PHOTO BY CHARIS KOBZA

Owasso Vice Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Medical Director of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine Outpatient Clinic; Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, OSU Center for Health Sciences Shannon Lynne Hillier has lived a lot of life in her 36 years – she served in the U.S. Navy for eight years on active duty, had four children 4 or younger during her medical residency, and now wears many hats at Oklahoma State University’s Center for Health Sciences. When she’s not with patients, she’s teaching residents and researching new concepts. Although her job is complex, her favorite aspect of it is simple: She likes helping patients. “I love sinking my teeth into an evaluation of a complex patient who has never had a chance to tell their story,” she says. “I love sorting out the biology, psychology, interpersonal and spiritual strings – then painting a picture of their lives into an assessment using my medical knowledge to make a treatment plan. Most of all, I love, love, love seeing patients get better, living their lives happily, and knowing that I was able to contribute to this. There is nothing else like it in medicine.”

Tyler McManaman

Paige Buxton Graham

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Jones Senior Tax Accountant, HoganTaylor LLP When Paige Buxton Graham isn’t preparing and reviewing tax returns at HoganTaylor, her warm personality and financial savvy allow her to play the mentor role to new staff members and interns. Graham says, for her, the job never gets old. “I love that there are always opportunities to learn more and grow more,” she says. “I am a lifetime learner and working in public accounting, especially at HoganTaylor, meets that need for me.” Off the clock, she enjoys cooking, reading, spending time with her husband and pets and volunteering at Family Builders and Positive Tomorrows. “Honestly, I am a better person because of volunteerism,” she says. “I appreciate more, I offer more, and I love more because of volunteerism.” Graham says her sunny disposition and determination are the reasons for her continued success. “I never give up on myself or my goals,” she says. Another component of her routine includes maintaining a strict schedule when it comes to her sleep. “I go to bed super early,” she says. “I was born an old lady and am very serious about my bedtime.” In fact, if her life were a movie, she’s say it would be titled Ride or Die ... Until 8 p.m. PHOTO COURTESY P. GRAHAM

PHOTO BY JOHN O’CONNOR, MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY

Shannon Lynne Hillier 36

PHOTO BY ALEX COWAN

Josh D. Lee

APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PHOTO COURTESY C. HENRY

Collin Henry

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Tulsa Vice President, Warren Clinic Operations and Physician Recruitment, Saint Francis Health System At 30 years old, Collin Henry already oversees the operations of Warren Clinic – Saint Francis Health Systems’ multi-specialty physician group. He spends the other chunk of his working hours recruiting physicians for the health system, which includes the clinic and Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital. “I love that my job exposes me to a variety of highly skilled individuals with whom I can learn and collaborate with to improve healthcare delivery in Oklahoma,” Henry says. Outside the office, Henry volunteers with Night Light Tulsa, the Tulsa Area United Way and other local nonprofits. “Volunteering and giving back has helped place my own personal goals in perspective,” Henry says. “After specifically working with those who are marginalized in society, it really made me take inventory of ... the non-material things in life that are important to me.” He and his wife also have an interesting hobby. “I have found that I enjoy the reality dating show The Bachelor. My wife and I are in a group where we watch the show on Monday nights,” he says. “I will keep the names of the other males in the group confidential in order to protect their manhood.”

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Bixby HR Senior Director, Total Rewards T.D. Williamson, Inc. Stanna Brazeel’s main goal is to make absolutely sure the employees of T.D. Williamson are happy right where they are. “I lead a team of top-notch HR professionals, and together we are bringing employee-centric solutions – integrating career and talent development, working environment, compensation and benefits – into a complete package of what TD Williamson has to offer desired employees.” Although she takes her job seriously, she’s a fan of the occasional prank. “I am a practical joker,” she says. “I have heard, a time or two, that I have this persona of being intense and ‘all business.’ This is true,” she says. “But my HR team and others who know me well, know that I have a fun side as well.” On top of demanding work, Brazeel is also a wife and mother of three kids – all boys.

PHOTO BY LOGAN WALCHER, SAXUM

Stanna Brazeel

PHOTO BY MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO BY WESTERN DOUGHTY

Tulsa Managing Funeral Director and Licensed Embalmer, Stanley’s Funeral & Cremation Service A funeral director does much more than you’d imagine – just ask Cassandra Lawrence Carter. Along with planning the services for Stanley’s Funeral & Cremation Service, she deals with transportation of the deceased, helps grieving families and takes on managerial duties to boot. “Death doesn’t follow a schedule,” Carter says, “so I am on call 24 hours a day, most every day.” Carter doesn’t stop caring for people when the work day is over: She also finds time to volunteer for many fundraisers and organizations. Although her job revolves around sadness, she finds joy in making a family’s transition easier. “It’s such an amazing win when you’ve made things better for people,” she says. Carter also notes that her age and gender make her stand out in her field. “Holding such a position, especially as a young woman in a male-dominated field, makes me quite proud.”

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Oklahoma City Social Good and Issues Practice Lead, Saxum In every aspect of her job, Houda Elyazgi fights to enact social justice in any way possible – whether that’s by participating in her company’s Step Up Program or joining the board of the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee. “I’ve had the opportunity to work on important issues like addressing our state’s high rates of incarceration, working to break the cycle of poverty, and supporting social impact, philanthropic and diversity and inclusion efforts,” she says. Elyazgi’s unique name also set the pace for her later career. “My first name, Houda, means ‘guidance’ in Arabic. My last name, Elyazgi, has a Turkish origin and means ‘the writer,’” she says. “I work in PR, which is all about guiding others through persuasive communications, so I get a kick out of the connection between my name, its meaning and the work I do.”

Anna Rangel Clough 35

Norman Attorney, OJJDP Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance Center Anna Rangel Clough wants to protect and encourage at-risk youth – and does so through the Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance Center, a branch of the Indian Country Child Trauma Center. “TYTTA Center offers training and support for Tribal juvenile justice and intervention programs across the country,” she says. “I respect all areas of the law, but my hope is that I can use my education to support increased access to justice services for low-income or other high-need populations.” Clough also boasts vocal talent and was even nominated for a Native American Music Award alongside her friend, Marcus Briggs-Cloud. “We were nominated for a compilation of hymns and songs on the album Pum Vculvke Vrrakuecetv, To Honor Our Elders.”

PHOTO BY JOSH CLOUGH

Houda Elyazgi

Cassandra Lawrence Carter 36


2018


Lindsay Beth Farr

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PHOTO BY LINDSAY MCDANIEL PHOTOGRAPHY

Tulsa Interior Designer, KKT Architects Take a look around Tulsa and it’s likely you’ll find a building Lindsay Beth Farr helped to design. As an interior designer at KKT Architects, Farr has the opportunity to strengthen Tulsa’s skyline – but she has a soft spot for certain areas of her work. “At KKT, I’ve worked on several types of projects, including commercial, healthcare and education,” she says. “But my favorite projects have been for nonprofit clients, such as when I worked on a project for Safe Net Services, a women’s shelter in Claremore. I felt exceedingly committed to creating a safe place for women and their families to heal.” In her spare time, Farr is a member of the International Interior Design Association and the International Facilities Management Association. She also volunteers at Redeemer Covent Church and Jenks Public Schools, and is a proud mother. Her favorite stress reliever? “Watching my girls dance,” she says. “My oldest daughter does competitive dance, and my youngest daughter participates in recreational dance classes.”

PHOTO BY JOSH NEW

Jared Jordan

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Tulsa General Manager, The Summit Club Overseeing every aspect of Tulsa’s most exclusive club is, for general manager and sommelier Jared Jordan, all about the bottom line: pleasing the customer. “Working in hospitality and fine dining is, at its core, about making people happy,” he says. “So I guess the thing I love the most is the satisfaction of providing our members with a truly unique and exceptional experience every time they come to the club.” When Jordan isn’t coordinating at The Summit Club, he enjoys giving back to Tulsa by helping out at both Philbrook Museum and Family and Children’s Services. “I think that it’s very important to give back to your community in any way that you can,” the transplant from Muskogee says. “I fell in love with Tulsa when I moved here almost 20 years ago, and being able to give back in any way I can, given that this city has been so good to me personally and professionally, means a lot to me.” Jordan often turns to a colleague’s tried and true advice when it comes to his job. “A friend of mine in the business once told me to ‘stop taking what we do so seriously; we are just serving food and drinks and trying to make people happy. It’s not any more complicated than that.’ For some reason, this stuck with me, and believing it allowed me to fall in love with what I do on a level I didn’t know was possible.”


Echols and Associates would like to congratulate Amy 2018

Howe, our Senior Associate for being selected as one of Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40.

Amy represents the bright future of Echols and Associates. Her broad experience and talent in the preparation and presentation of family law cases is of the highest order. She is the singular leader of our family law practice. She is courageous and zealous in her representation of those going through the difficult and challenging litigation of family law issues. Clients have the knowledge and confidence in Amy that she is aggressively pursing the best result for them. This knowledge brings comfort and relief to clients, who appreciate that they are receiving the best representation possible. Amy is not only a knowledgeable and compassionate attorney, she is a remarkable manager of myself, the law firm, and all the attorneys and employees that she works with everyday. Echols and Associates is very privileged to have Amy leading the way.

9925 South Pennsylvania Avenue, Suite 100 Oklahoma City, OK 73159 WWW. ECHOLSLAWFIRM.COM

Telephone (405) 691-2648


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Lauren Brown

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Oklahoma City Attorney, Doerner, Saunders, Daniel & Anderson, LLP Lauren Brown spends her days resolving legal issues as they regard to real estate, probate, business, start-ups, construction, insurance and trademarks. “My firm is over 100 years old and the attorneys here are truly outstanding,” Brown says. “I get the opportunity every day to work under excellent mentors and I get to work on very challenging cases.” Brown also uses her legal skills to mentor students through the Federal Bar Association and volunteers with Suited for Success. Although she has a number of reasons to be proud, she believes staying humble and being kind are the keys to success. “I practice the Golden Rule, and I treat others how I would like to be treated. I admit when I am wrong and I take responsibility for it,” she says. “Yes, I also have to-do lists and goals for this month and five years from now, but my true secret to my success is that I am kind to others, I care about others, and I try to always do the right thing.”

Caron Davis

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Tulsa Director of Regional Development, Cancer Treatment Centers of America Whether she’s juggling advertising and operations or budgets and planning, Caron Davis has her plate full at Tulsa’s branch of CTCA. “I love the mission and purpose behind treating cancer patients with the Mother Standard of care,” Davis says. “I have many personal experiences with cancer in my own life, so it truly feels good to work for a company that is very focused on offering options to patients they may not have been aware of.” Davis, who once taught English abroad in Spain, takes the philanthropic nature of her work to several nonprofits, including the The Colon Cancer Coalition and The Tulsa Regional Chamber. Davis operates on the advice that one should “always wear your accountability glasses, not your victim glasses” when dealing with others in any situation. PHOTO COURTESY CTCA

PHOTO COURTESY V. ACOSTA

Oklahoma City Graphic Designer and Co-Owner, The Paper Box Crafts and Designs Victor Acosta Serna wants to make every client’s dream a reality through his designs. As the co-owner of The Paper Box Crafts and Designs, he gets that freedom. “My work helps to define and illustrate my client’s purpose,” he says. “My style of design keeps me busy, as it takes time to craft product for each client, and for each I try and make an original idea.” Serna’s success stems from ability to grow from rejections. “All of those times that I was told ‘no’ also motivate me to prove to myself that I can and will be someone,” he says. His parents, to whom he dedicates the honor of being named to 40 Under 40, taught him the most important lesson of all. “My parents always told me to be humble with anyone, no matter where they come from,” he says. Serna has a long list of causes he supports and organizations he volunteers for, as well. “I like to help others and to give back some of what I have been given in my life,” he says.

PHOTO BY RYAN LASSITER, DEFINING IMAGE

Victor Acosta Serna

PHOTO BY JOSH NEW

Chrissi Ross Nimmo

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Tahlequah Deputy Attorney General, Cherokee Nation Chrissi Ross Nimmo has weighty responsibility: She’s the supervising attorney for the largest Native American tribe in the country. This means she wears a lot of hats. “I have done everything from representing the Nation before the United States Supreme Court to reviewing internal policies, all while having three babies in as many years and still representing my tribe and my community of Cherokees and Oklahomans,” she says. Off the clock, Nimmo uses her skills as an attorney for pro bono work. “People generally only need lawyers at the best and worst moments of their lives - helping with both is special.” As for the secret to Nimmo’s great success? “No secret – I work hard, have lots fun and my husband of 15 years helps make it relatively easy,” she says. “I love to learn, am the first college graduate on either side of my family and take education seriously as it has changed my life.” Something people might be surprised to learn: “I had my own public access cooking show – Now You’re Cooking, with Chrissi Nimmo.”


2018

Congratulations,

Elizabeth Frame Ellison! As CEO of the Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation, Ellison is impacting the Tulsa community by providing innovative vision for projects like the upcoming Mother Road Market.

Mother Road Market, Tulsa’s first food hall, will give food entrepreneurs an affordable place to scale their businesses along historic Route 66. Learn more at: www.MotherRoadMarket.com 23087 Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation.indd 1

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Aaron ‘AJ’ Johnson

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PHOTO COURTESY A. JOHNSON

Bixby Executive Director, Tulsa Dream Center Aaron Johnson believes that his work “offers hope to the broken.” The Tulsa Dream Center, a faith-based organization, exists to meet the needs of people in North Tulsa, whatever those needs may be. “If you can change the way you think, you can change the way you live,” he says. “That is what I feel my job encompasses – that is, to help people experience a new normal in life. Whether it is offering hope, medical care, or help with their educational needs – we help people win.” Philanthropy, an important aspect of Johnson’s life, continues after work at First Responders Fire and Rescue, Tulsa Community Foundation board, Tulsa Housing Board and his church. “Success is not how high you’ve climbed, but how you make a positive and impactful difference in the world,” he says.

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Tahlequah Language Program Manager, Cherokee Nation Education Services Roy Boney is passionate about preserving the Cherokee language and does so by overseeing the Cherokee Nation’s office of translation, community language class program, language technology program and language scholarship program. His job brings him to dozens of unique people passionate about the same things he is. “I have the honor of working with a wide variety of people, from revered Cherokee elders to students, who are enthusiastic about revitalizing the Cherokee language and culture,” he says. “Working for tribal government means my job is more than just management and administrative paperwork. I get to collaborate with creative and passionate people whose goal is the sharing and perpetuation of our culture and values.” Boney’s not all business; he also harbors an artistic streak. “While my day job is in service to my tribe, my other passion is art. I do lots of drawing and painting, and I do illustrations for books, magazines, and comic books. I would be a full-time illustrator if I was not working in language revitalization for Cherokee Nation. I often do talks and workshops about Cherokee storytelling through art for various community events,” he says.

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Maria Copp

PHOTO BY KENNON BRYCE

Roy Boney Jr.

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Yukon Attorney, Hammons, Gowens, Hurst & Associates Kristin Richards fights for a safe and productive work environment for all employees, and represents victims of workplace discrimination and harassment. “Practicing employment law allows me to provide a voice to victims who feel helpless in their workplace environment,” she says. “My goal is to make sure every client I represent understands that I am advocating for their best interests, and I am in their corner fighting for them 100 percent of the time.” Along with advocating for her clients, Richards trains for half-marathons with her husband and also volunteers with the Junior League of Oklahoma City, Institute for Economic Empowerment of Women and City Rescue Mission. “Volunteering has allowed me to make a meaningful difference in the lives of others, and my own. It has made me more aware of the world and is an integral part of who I am,” she says.

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Tulsa Reading Specialist, Tulsa Public Schools Maria Copp’s job is, in her own words, to “trick middle schoolers into liking to read.” As a reading specialist at Tulsa Public Schools, Copp works closely with struggling readers in low-income areas to help them succeed. “Watching a reluctant reader transform into an eager reader is the absolute best,” she says. “My kiddos typically dislike reading, but I love finding the perfect book for a certain student and convincing them otherwise.” Copp is so dedicated to the job that she bought a home right behind her school. “I made the decision primarily because I want to be a part of the community where my students live,” she says. “The best thing about my job is that I believe in the work I do so strongly. I see teaching – especially in low-income schools – as mission-based work. That said, traditional volunteering is great too. I did a volunteer year at a residential facility for teen boys in Chicago. It was amazing.” PHOTO COURTESY M. COPP

PHOTO BY JOSH NEW

Kristin Richards


We wish to congratulate shareholder

Crowe & Dunlevy Congratulates Oklahoma Magazine 40 Under 40 Honoree Lysbeth L. George.

Maren Lively

on her election to the 2018 professional class of

We commend Lysbeth L. George on this befitting recognition. She is an integral member of our Bankruptcy & Creditor’s Rights and Banking & Financial Institutions Practice Groups. We look forward to her bright future at the firm.

2018

3800 First Place Tower 15 East Fifth Street • Tulsa, OK 74103-4309 • 918.581.8200 Fax 918.583.1189 www.jonesgotcher.com

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We applaud you.

3/2/18 11:21 AM

crowedunlevy.com

Audrey Chambers

Account Supervisor, AcrobatAnt

We are delighted, of course, that Audrey was selected for this prestigious honor. But neither her fellow Ants nor the clients she serves with such passion and professionalism are the least bit surprised. She truly is a rare breed, one who can juggle a ridiculous number of tasks and details while staying cool and collected, even when the heat is cranked on full. She’s not superhuman, just a super-fan of life, and with good reason. Audrey is admittedly very blessed and grounded by her loving husband (Dell, AcrobatAnt senior art director) and their kids Nola and Kai, and between work and family she manages to carve out time to support several causes near and dear to her oversized heart. Congratulations, Audrey.

1336 East 15th Street Tulsa, OK 918-938-7901 AcrobatAnt.com

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Tulsa/San Francisco President and CEO, Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation Elizabeth Ellison is determined to make Oklahoma the absolute best it can be – and uses the Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation as her vehicle. “I get to wake up every day and work with an incredibly smart and inspired staff who all believe, like me, that we are making our community a better place to live, work and play.” Ellison heads up a wide variety of projects with her seven-employee operation that aims to grow and nurture the entrepreneurial ecosystem in Tulsa. Among those is Kitchen 66, an incubator that provides essential mentorship to up-and-coming restaurateurs, and the Mother Road Market, set to open this spring at 11th Street and Lewis Avenue, which will feature 16 small shops, pop-up restaurants and more. Ellison also dedicates a great deal of personal time to community service. “I’ve been lucky enough to support several causes through my volunteer work, from serving on the school board for Tulsa Technology Center to working on projects as the chair of the collaborative committee within the Tulsa Area United Way that spearheaded innovative programs like A Way Home for Tulsa and Impact Tulsa!,” she says. She’s also a mother to two young boys and a fisher. “I maintain street cred as the only female in our family by reeling in the big ones, cutting worms in half without squirming much, perfecting my cast and reeling in catfish, leopard sharks and … even a 180-pound marlin.”

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Moore CEO, Freestyle Creative Partner, Home Creations At heart, Vahid Farzaneh is an entrepreneur. His company, Freestyle Creative, allows him to work with dozens of imaginative people to build growth in Oklahoma and deliver a client’s message through smart strategy and inspired marketing. “What I love most about my job is I learn new things all the time, I’m able to be creative, I meet new people and build new relationships,” he says. Farzaneh also contributes to Oklahoma City real estate by acting as partner at Home Creations, a home-building company. He helps to create and foster innovate start-ups in Oklahoma City and produces local, independent films. In total, he has produced more than 30 Oklahoma-made films that have won numerous awards. His list of volunteerism is exhaustive – from the American Heart Association and Big Brothers Big Sisters to Oklahoma Tomorrow and Rotary Club 29. “It feels good knowing that I’m helping the community that has helped our family for many years,” he says. In his spare time, Farzaneh fosters his love of cars. “I like sleepers; the less flashy the car and the more performance it has, the more I like it.”

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PHOTO BY JOSH BIVENS

Vahid Farzaneh

PHOTO COURTESY E. ELLISON

Elizabeth Frame Ellison


SAINT FRANCIS HEALTH SYSTEM CONGRATULATES

JOSHUA VICENA, D.O. WARREN CLINIC UROLOGY AND

COLLIN HENRY

VICE PRESIDENT, PHYSICIAN RECRUITMENT AND OPERATIONS WARREN CLINIC

ON BEING NAMED AMONG OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE’S 40 UNDER 40.

918-494-2200 | saintfrancis.com

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2018

CONGRATULATIONS, CHRISSI ROSS NIMMO. Cherokee Nation celebrates your being named one of Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40. Thank you for your legal representation and advocacy for Cherokee Nation citizens everywhere.

© 2018 Cherokee Nation. All Rights Reserved.

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Tonya Ratcliff

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PHOTO COURTESY T. RATCLIFF

Guthrie Executive Director, Peppers Ranch Foster Care Community Tonya Ratcliff is the epitome of the phrase, “Don’t just talk the talk – walk the walk.” As the executive director at Peppers Ranch, Ratcliff fights tooth and nail for the thousands of children in Oklahoma foster care – and especially the 100 children who call Peppers Ranch home. “I build the foundation for the future of foster children who will one day be our future leaders and caretakers,” she says. “I love seeing ‘orphans’ find homes as ‘sons and daughters.’” But her love for foster children doesn’t stop there. “I’m a mother to 10 amazing children, all ages 13 and under,” she says. “My husband of 17 years and I have adopted eight children through DHS [Department of Human Services], and have had two children the old-fashioned way.” Her key to success is simple: be kind. “Give all you can – and with an intoxicating spirit – so that a broken heart might come to realize they are loved,” she says.

Matt Lay

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Jenks Fire Equipment Operator, City of Tulsa Matt Lay ensures firetrucks and all equipment aboard are ready to perform when residents need them most. Through floods, ice storms and tornadoes, Lay presses on. “I always knew I wanted a job helping people … being a firefighter made that such a tangible thing: put the fire out and save the home, stop the bleeding and save a life.” It seems Lay is fearless now, but it took advice from his dad to become this way. “When I was young, I spent a lot of time tying myself in knots – fearful of things that would never happen,” he says. “During one of the moments, my father told me: ‘Run to the sound of the guns.’ In other words, don’t run from trouble – face it. It’s not that you won’t be scared, but you’ll be moving toward the mission.” Lay serves as chairman of the board for the Oklahoma Firefighters Pension and Retirement System and volunteers at his church and the American Lung Association.

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Hilda De Leon Xavier

PHOTO COURTESY C. GRATE

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Oklahoma City IT Analyst I, OU Center for Public Management As an IT analyst at the University of Oklahoma, Chris Grate works within a small group, creating test plans and scenarios for product improvements and reporting his findings. “My job can be very challenging, so it helps me work on becoming more efficient,” he says. “I also really enjoy the people on my team.” He finds his success, he says, in his failures. “Never be afraid to admit to a shortcoming or failure and always try to learn from it,” he says. In his off time, Grate enjoys volunteering at Suited for Success, the Young Professionals Board and for political campaigns. “A simple or benign act can have a substantial impact on someone else,” he says of his volunteerism.

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Oklahoma City Client Access Specialist Bi-Lingual, Oklahoma City County Health Department Hilda De Leon Xavier, originally from Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, is passionate about helping people from all backgrounds, preventing disease and promoting health to Oklahomans. “I feel proud when I translate for clients that have a language barrier. I help and guide them and explain services provided in their native language,” she says. “Overall, I am proud to serve the public sector.” Advocating for disenfranchised people doesn’t stop at 5 p.m. for Xavier – she spends ample time raising funds for immigrants, victims of human trafficking, single moms and tornado victims. When she’s not volunteering, Xavier spends time with her family. “My husband is from India; we have been married for 10 years. We have a daughter, Adalyn, who is 6 years old,” she says.

PHOTO COURTESY H. XAVIER

PHOTO BY JOSH NEW

Christopher A. Grate


CONGRATULATIONS!

Congratulations

L I NDSAY F ARR, RI D, I I DA A N D A L L 40 U N D E R 40 H ON ORE E S

to the 40 Under 40 Young Professionals Class of 2018.

2018

We are proud to have Susan Crenshaw on our team of talented employees who support ONEOK’s integrated network of midstream assets and share our mission to give back to the communities where we live and work. We are focused on attracting, developing and retaining high-caliber employees who fit our culture and align with our business needs. Our continued commitment to a diverse workforce and inclusive workplace is integral to our business strategies and critical to our continued success. Congratulations again to Susan and the rest of the 2018 class!

2018

www.oneok.com/careers

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2018

CONGRATULATIONS, ROY BONEY JR. Cherokee Nation celebrates your being named one of Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40. Thank you for your remarkable efforts preserving Cherokee language and culture.

© 2018 Cherokee Nation. All Rights Reserved.

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Payton Guthrie

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Durant Video Production Director, Choctaw Nation Payton Guthrie is a storyteller, and he uses his directing and producing skills to create multimedia content for the Choctaw Nation. “I love being able to shine a light on native stories and their importance to the history of Oklahoma and the United States of America,” he says. “I feel it is extremely important that Native American stories are told through the eyes of the tribes.” To unwind, Guthrie participates in Crossfit, volunteers for Choctaw Nation’s yearly races to support local youth groups and watches college football. If he weren’t using his skills for video production, he would “be working as a professional actor. My college degree is in acting and directing, and I would have given that a real shot if the Choctaw Nation hadn’t called my name.”

Blanchard Attorney, Crowe & Dunlevy Lysbeth George represents clients in a wide array of issues – from bankruptcy to creditor’s rights. “When my kiddos ask what I do, I tell them that I help people whose problems are complicated enough that they need to pay someone to help them fix it,” she says. George says Crowe & Dunvley encourages her to become a better citizen and volunteer. “I am proudest of Crowe & Dunlevy’s commitment to invest in our community through its support and encouragement of our attorneys to raise funds for various causes, serve on community boards and provide pro bono legal services through incredible organizations,” she says. Taking on law school and all its subsequent responsibility is a huge decision to make – luckily, George had the perfect council: her grandma. “When discussing whether or not to go back to law school she would say, ‘Either way, three years from now you’ll still be 28. Wouldn’t you rather be 28 and a lawyer?’” The answer was yes. George serves her community, as well. “I ran for the District 42 seat for the Oklahoma House of Representatives in 2016. I didn’t win, but turned around a week after that election and ran for my local school board. I’ve been serving on the Blanchard School Board since February of 2017,” she says. PHOTO BY LENAE PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO BY DEIDRE ELROD

Lysbeth ‘Liz’ George 34

PHOTO BY SHANE BEVEL/SHANE BEVEL PHOTOGRAPHY

Joshua Vicena

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Tulsa Physician/Urological Surgeon, Warren Clinic Joshua Vicena splits his time as a urological surgeon for the Saint Francis Health System between office and surgical practice, and his specialty lies in robotic and minimally invasive surgery. “I enjoy the precision and technicality required to perform minimally invasive and advanced surgical techniques,” he says. “I appreciate the patient population in urology, especially the older generation. I am enthralled by continued medical advancements and learning newer and better techniques.” Vicena also volunteers at his local church, hosts Bible studies, serves on several hospital committees and provides food and supplies to at-risk youth at McLain High School. “It is rewarding to extend yourself beyond your career and help people in need in ways that are unique and challenging. Some of my most impactful experiences have happened outside of health care,” he says. Vicena credits his success to a few factors: “hard work, God’s grace, my incredible, supportive wife and more hard work.” He also believes in the power of positive thinking. “Stop selling yourself short,” he says. “If you want it, go get it.”


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PAIGE GRAHAM We join Oklahoma Magazine in saluting Paige Graham and all of the other young leaders recognized as this year’s “40 Under 40” honorees.

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Tulsa Director of Advanced Technology, TMA Systems At 34, Patrick Smith has an exhaustive list of TMA Systems clients for whom he’s creating world-class software. Creating technologically advanced solutions for thousands of businesses around the world – including Microsoft, QuikTrip, American Airlines, the U.S. Supreme Court, Yankee Candle and Walgreens – means Smith has carried a lot of responsibility on his shoulders during his 12-year run at TMA, but he doesn’t see it that way. Instead, he believes that he’s simply “developing software that makes work easier for people. I always look for changes we can make that might improve someone’s day.” Although he’s young himself, he enjoys volunteering with his alma mater, the University of Tulsa, at its Tandy School of Computer Science on the advisory board, fostering the growth of young STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) minds. “It’s been exciting to see the kind of work students are doing now,” he says. “It’s rewarding to work with the other board members to improve the CS curriculum and attract new students to STEM programs.” In his spare time, Smith participates in a weekly Dungeon and Dragons session at work, and says he feels “most comfortable sitting in front of a screen.” When asked what profession he would be if he weren’t in his current profession, Smith proves he’s right where he needs to be. “I would probably just be trying to solve problems as another type of engineer,” he says.

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PHOTO BY JOSH NEW

PHOTO BY CATY SMITH

Patrick Smith

Amy L. Howe

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Blanchard Senior Associate, Echols & Associates Amy Howe spends her time at Echols & Associates assisting clients in the area of family law by bringing a fresh energy and unmatched intensity to every case. Although every lawyer has a different story about what inspired him or her to attend law school, Howe’s is unique. “My undergraduate degree in art history drove me to go to law school in the hopes of securing a profession working with Holocaust survivors and families to recover stolen artwork,” she says. While Howe understands that emotions run high during trials, she’s learned to remain calm under pressure. “I hope that this characteristic gives our clients confidence, that while they are struggling to work through the emotional aspect, I am staying on task to find a resolution, a light at the end of the tunnel,” she says. “The most rewarding aspect of working in family law is understanding that while our clients come to us at the most difficult times in their lives, we are able to be by their side while we all work together to find what is best for them in the long run. Often times I get to watch a transformation from fear and grief to relief and clarity.” After a long day at work, Howe loves “sitting on my back porch with my dog, watching the birds and deer in my yard. The quiet at the end of day is peaceful and relaxing.”


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Maren Minnaert Lively

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PHOTO BY SHANE BEVEL/SHANE BEVEL PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO BY LEZLIE GLASS

Tulsa Attorney and shareholder, Jones, Gotcher & Bogan, P.C. As the head of a family law group, Maren Lively represents clients in a wide array of personal affairs – from divorce and custody hearings to domestic violence, deprived children and adoption cases. Lively plays the role of champion for her clients. Although some cases spawn negativity, Lively finds real joy in others. “I am most proud of my representation of individuals seeking to expand their families by adopting a son or daughter,” she says. “Nothing is better than witnessing the pure joy that shines on the faces of both parents and children alike when the adoptions are finalized.” Along with plenty of after-work volunteering, yoga, and spending time with her family, it seems ‘no’ isn’t a word in Lively’s vocabulary. “I understand that we only have one chance at this life and that we must make the most of it,” she says. “Also, my husband and I are equal partners, which makes me being a lawyer and shareholder of my firm, a wife, and a mother to my two sons possible.”

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Sand Springs Advertising Account Supervisor, AcrobatAnt Audrey Chambers communicates objectives, drives strategies, builds relationships and handles all the marketing needs of her many clients at AcrobatAnt. “I love the people I work with and how no two days are the same,” she says. “Advertising is an ever-changing, challenging field in some ways, but constant in other ways as well.” Chambers lives a well-rounded life outside the office through volunteerism at Talking is Teaching, Metropolitan Baptist and Women in Recovery. “I think volunteering is one of the most important things we can do in life,” she says. “Giving of one’s time, arguably the most precious gift we have, is crucial.” Chambers is also an avid outdoorswoman and checked off a major bucket list item in Texas last year. “I hiked to the top of a mountain carrying a 40-pound pack with two of my girlfriends,” she says. “We camped under the snow and climbed to Guadalupe Peak at sunrise.”

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Audrey Chambers

Amanda Jo Wyatt

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Jenks Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, Muscogee (Creek) Nation Department of Health As a registered nurse for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Amanda Wyatt establishes powerful partnerships with her many high-risk patients – and she works to better their lives. “I am responsible for creating a model of diabetes care that encompasses cultural humility, innovation and effectiveness in the delivery of sustainable diabetes healthcare,” Wyatt says. “I am also an active duty Commissioned Officer in the U.S. Public Health Service.” Her care for others doesn’t stop when she leaves the office. Providing clothes, vaccinations and meals to children fleeing the cruelty of their home countries is one instance of volunteerism Wyatt recalls vividly. “I felt it was my duty as a human being to extend compassion and kindness to such a vulnerable population,” she says. “ I have never been more honored to wear and represent the U.S. Public Health Service uniform than I was during that time.”


JUNE 2018 2018

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2018

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Top Doctors The leading physicians in their fields, brought to you by Castle connolly. Advertising opportunities available. Contact advertising@okmag.com 918.744.6205

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OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

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PHOTO COURTESY K. BERST

Kanwaljit ‘Vick’ Aulakh

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PHOTO COURTESY K. AULAKH

Tulsa Physician, Pathology Laboratory Associates During working hours, you can find Kanwaljit Aulakh behind a microscope, examining tissues to find out what, exactly, is medically wrong with any number of patients. He also directs labs in both Oklahoma and Kansas and works as a cancer liaison physician at St. John Medical Center. “Physicians and patients alike understand that an accurate diagnosis is the foundation of excellent medical care,” Aulakh says. “As a pathologist, our role is crucial in establishing the diagnosis that many medical professionals will base their care of the patient on.” When he’s not playing detective in the labs, Aulakh harbors an interesting hobby. “People would probably be surprised to learn that I dye my wife’s hair pink and purple, and that I give my son very hipster haircuts,” he says. “Being bald, this allows me to live vicariously through others.”

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Maurianna L. Adams

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Bethany President, Community Alliance of Oklahoma Maurianna L. Adams is in the business of connecting people – specifically, grassroots organizations with partners that can help them achieve their goals through her company, the Community Alliance of Oklahoma. “I enjoy meeting and creating space for diverse individuals and industries to build rapport, build thought and build strategies that will improve our communities,” she says. Adams is also passionate about volunteering – issues near to her heart include homelessness, domestic violence, police reform and child hunger. “I grew up in a single-parent home, where mental health and drug abuse problems existed,” she says. “I am very aware of social and economic issues within local, state, private and public affairs. It is a reminder that there is much work to be done for and with the majority, to shape a better future for our children – but also how resilient and resourceful communities are.”

PHOTO COURTESY M. ADAMS

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Ada Executive Officer, Business Sustainability and Auxiliary Services, Chickasaw Nation Kara Berst works to keep the nation clean, safe and in compliance while bettering communication to all employees. “I love making a difference, and my job allows that by ensuring we protect our lands, water and people,” she says. “Historically, the environment, particularly water, has been such an integral part of the Chickasaw culture, it makes me proud to help with those efforts today.” Berst is also a mother to three children, a Crossfit fan and a volunteer at the Community Food Bank and the American Heart Association. Her annual ocean-side family vacations are a bright spot in her year, she says. “We travel to a beach at least once a year and love every second of it.” In fact, if she weren’t at the Chickasaw Nation, she would be “living at the beach, saving all the ocean creatures.”

Andrew Ralston

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Tulsa Director of Existing Business and Energy for the Economic Development Department, Tulsa Regional Chamber Always looking to improve the job prospects and infrastructure of Tulsa, Andrew Ralston spends his time visiting companies around the city, assessing their needs and connecting them to resources. “I love Tulsa. It is a privilege to help our community in a big-picture way and make sure that there are solid job opportunities for everyone in the Tulsa region,” he says. But Ralston’s interests range far beyond his job at the Tulsa Regional Chamber. “I am a classically trained cellist and professional jazz bassist. I’ve been playing with a jazz/swing band called The Zuits since I moved to Tulsa nine years ago,” he says. He also volunteers with Signature Symphony, Rotary Club of Tulsa, TYPros and other nonprofits, and is a self-proclaimed Trekkie.

Do you know an impressive young professional

COURTESY OF JOE METZER, KELLY FORD

Kara Berst

who leads by example, not only in the workplace, but in the community as well? If so, take the time to nominate your candidate for our 40 Under 40 Class of 2019!

Visit okmag.com/nominate40under40 to get started.


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One of Arkansas’s six state park lodges.

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BY M. J. VAN DEVENTER

RENOVATION

Two older homes become showcase dwellings in Oklahoma City enclaves. Older houses can present challenges to owners, architects and designers. Sentiments and desires connected to the homes may have prevented technological and aesthetic upgrades. However, massive renovations may not fit the look and feel of the neighborhood. With care, extensive remodeling jobs can yield stunning results. Following are two such examples in Oklahoma City.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: AN UNUSUAL DOUBLE ARCH – ORIGINAL TO THE HOME – GIVES THE ILLUSION OF DIVIDING THE LIVING ROOM FROM THE KITCHEN. THE LIVING ROOM BEAMS AND TRUSSES DEFINE THE LIVING AREA CEILING, AND THE UNUSUAL ARCHITECTURAL ARCHES ENHANCE THE VIEW OF BOTH REDESIGNED ROOMS. THE EXTERIOR’S PEACH COLOR WAS PAINTED A BRIGHT, WARM WHITE THAT NOW COMPLEMENTS THE INTERIOR DESIGN. “I CONSIDER THE ALL-WHITE AND WALNUT RENOVATED KITCHEN THE EPITOME OF THE PROJECT,” HELGESON SAYS. IN THE CENTER OF THE DINING ROOM, A 6-FOOT ANTIQUE TABLE, WITH CHAIRS UPHOLSTERED IN PEACOCK BLUE VELVET, IS A STRIKING ACCENT USED FOR A CONVERSATION AREA. THE LIVING ROOM OPENS EASILY TO THE KITCHEN AND IS ADJACENT TO A SMALL BREAKFAST ROOM WITH A FASCINATING CHANDELIER.


FROM DARK AND DATED TO LIGHT AND EXPANSIVE Valerie Helgeson discovered her passion for interior design nearly three decades ago while working for a Southern California property management firm furnishing and decorating model apartments. Helgeson worked with talented designers and quickly realized her affinity for the profession. After moving to Oklahoma City 15 years ago, she established Design Directions. Those early experiences became valuable when she had the opportunity to renovate a 1980s home in the exclusive Val Verde enclave. “I love walking into a space that needs updating or remodeling and seeing its potential,” Helgeson says. “I think that’s my gift – my super power. I see into the future of a home.” To say it was a massive renovation is an understatement. No room was spared as the 4,200-square-foot home was transformed from a dark, outdated residence into one with a light, airy spirit and an enviable design personality. “Every new project is a learning experience,” Helgeson says. “There were some updates through the years and it had been loved and well cared for by the wife’s grandparents. Still, it was very ‘last century.’ “The home suffered from a lack of light. It had a maze-like quality with walls and doorways – a lot of them – that didn’t make sense. The interior was typical of the home’s era – confined, confusing spaces, lots of medium, dark built-ins, no smooth flow throughout the home. “I knew instantly I wanted to take out some walls, create an open floor plan and embrace the beautiful views.” Helgeson’s vision was ambitious. She had

After Before Before

AFTER-PHOTOS BY CALEB COLLINS, NESTED TOURS; BEFORE PHOTOS COURTESY VALERIE HELGESON

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After

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After Before

walls and windows moved; doorways closed or eliminated; impressive beams with ceiling lighting added in the main living area; and rooms – once like rabbit warrens – opened to become expansive and functional. The original bland color palette changed with crisp white walls. Hidden spaces became bright and usable. She respected the sentiments her clients had for the home; she wanted to keep it in the family as a gathering place. “My clients wanted me to create a comfortable, updated, vibrant and unique living space,” Helgeson says. “It was gratifying to know I gave them what they were hoping for. I’m still thrilled with the project. It’s warm, inviting, comfortable, with just a touch of flash. I’m really proud of the work our team did on the home. We poured our hearts into it, and it shows.”

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: THE VANITY IN THE MASTER BATH DOESN’T TOUCH THE FLOOR. IT IS LIGHTED FROM BENEATH, GIVING IT THE ILLUSION OF FLOATING IN SPACE. A WINDOW BEHIND THE TUB WAS REMOVED AND COVERED WITH FLOOR-TO-CEILING CUSTOM TILE. WHAT WAS ORIGINALLY THE FORMAL DINING ROOM BECAME THE HUSBAND’S HOME OFFICE, FACING THE KITCHEN AND OVERLOOKING THE FRONT LAWN. ONE WALL NOW FEATURES A BANK OF FLOOR-TO-CEILING CABINETS IN A STAINED MAPLE. “THE CHANGES IN THE MASTER BATH LOOK BRIGHT AND BREATHTAKING,” HELGESON SAYS.


AFTER-PHOTOS BY ERIC SCHMID PHOTOGRAPHY; BEFORE PHOTOS COURTESY SMITH DESIGN COMPANY

FROM TINY BLOCK HOUSE TO ROOMY TREASURE

After

Before ABOVE: THE ADDITION OF A CONTEMPORARY SECOND STORY CHANGED THE FACE AND CHARACTER OF THIS ONCE SMALL, CONCRETE BRICK HOME IN THE BROOKHAVEN CONCLAVE IN OKLAHOMA CITY. RIGHT: THE WHITE KITCHEN ISLAND HAS AN UNUSUAL PATAGONIA GRANITE TOP. IT IS ENHANCED WITH A COMBINATION OF QUARTZ AND BLACK MICA WITH COLOR HUES OF WHITE, GRAY AND A TOUCH OF RED.

After BELOW: A SUBTLE COLOR PALETTE ENHANCES AND MAGNIFIES THE MODERNISTIC ARCHITECTURAL THEMES IN THE RENOVATION OF THIS HOME. BELOW RIGHT: FROM A LARGE PICTURE WINDOW IN THE SECOND STORY LOFT, ADRIENNE AND DAVE HUSTED HAVE A GREAT VIEW OF THEIR BACK LAWN, FILLED WITH MATURE TREES.

Before

A simple, 1950s concrete block house has evolved into a treasure nearly 70 years later, thanks to an extensive renovation. The house, bought as a rental property 10 years ago, is a hidden gem in the secluded Brookhaven addition. A thin ribbon of the North Canadian (or Oklahoma) River runs through the area. Adrienne Husted grew up in this quiet neighborhood and fully intended to keep the home as her personal residence later in life. She and her husband, Dave, called her longtime friend Erin Smith, a licensed architect, to turn the small house into a wonder. “We demolished most of the existing structure, but kept the exterior walls and windows and built a second floor,” says Smith, who worked with her husband, Ryan, a building contractor, on the project. “The existing footings could not support the second floor, especially with the cantilevered balcony. A new steel frame supports the second floor. We in-filled the first floor with framing around the existing concrete blocks.” For drama, Smith kept a lot of the steel structure exposed inside the house. “It’s nice to look at what holds the house up because it goes back to the mid-century style of architecture, which originated in Europe,” she says. “In that style, exposed structures were celebrated rather than hidden.” The renovation increased the size of the house from 1,212 square feet to 2,344 square feet. A new guest house has an additional 1,580 square feet. A Big Ass (trademark name) ceiling fan is a surprising visual feature, as is the staircase leading to the second-floor master suite, bath and study. “The biggest challenge was creating the doublecantilevered balcony,” Smith says. “The structural engineer wanted to just add columns to simplify the job. That would have been easier. “What we did was so much more appealing. It’s now twice as large as the surrounding houses, but it still reflects the neighborhood’s same design language. We kept the architectural style while making the home useful for the family. This house was perfect for what Adrienne and Dave wanted us to do.”

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From Fireworks to

Desperation By Tara Malone

OPIOID ADDICTION, called an epidemic by law enforcement, is one of the leading causes of drug-related deaths in Oklahoma.

“It was like fireworks going off in my brain.” This is how Nicole Crestmont recounts the first time she took oxycodone. In Spring 2008, Crestmont struggled with depression and thoughts of suicide. When a co-worker offered her the drug, everything seemed to turn around. “Oxy made all of my emotional pain completely disappear,” says Crestmont, a Norman resident who asked that her real name not be used. “It began as something I was in control of, but it spun far out of my control in only a few months.” Crestmont describes the highs of opioid addiction as “floating in a warm ocean,” but the with

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drawals as “utter hell.” “Coming down off opioids is like being in a car that is about to slam into a brick wall and you can’t find the brakes … because there are no brakes,” she says. “Being without opioids after you have taken them for a while feels like vomit, lots of vomit, and pain in places you didn’t know could hurt – your teeth, your hair, every single muscle between your ribs. “I first knew I was an addict when I started throwing up first thing every morning. Or maybe it was when I started crawling around on my knees digging through my carpet for a piece of a pill that I ‘might have dropped.’ Being an addict feels like sheer desperation.” Crestmont has been clean for almost 10 years, but she’ll never forget how addiction nearly destroyed her life.


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“My life is so much better than I ever could have imagined back then,” she says. “I’m glad I stuck around to see these days. I very nearly didn’t.” Crestmont made a clean break. She never returned to her job or saw that coworker, who introduced her to the drug, again. She embarked on a new career, a new relationship with someone to whom she is now married, and a new life. Count her as lucky. Methamphetamines cause the majority of drug-related deaths in the Oklahoma, but the opioid epidemic has garnered much attention, in part to the dramatic increase in usage, according to an analysis from the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control. According to the Oklahoma Commission on Opioid Abuse, the state consistently ranks near the top in the nation in painkiller abuse. Between 2007 and 2016, overdose deaths increased by 68 percent. Many Oklahoma children are born with neonatal abstinence syndrome and spend their first moments of life suffering withdrawals after being exposed to opioids in utero. Some users, like Crestmont, begin using illegally as a way of self-medication. Many others begin their dark journeys with valid prescriptions. “Those who have not experienced opioid dependence need to understand that legitimate prescriptions for legitimate pain still cause dependency,” says Justin Wedman, who holds a doctorate in pharmacy. “Opioid dependence is not necessarily a result of drug abuse.” Wedman has interacted with many patients whose appropriate opioid prescriptions have escalated to increased needs for the drugs. “The experience with opioid-dependent patients varies greatly,” he says. “Opiates are prescribed for pain, so you mostly see a patient’s consumption increase over time as tolerance builds. Eventually, they reach a limit set by either their prescriber or their insurance company and, due to tolerance, find that they are taking medicine but still experiencing pain. As a group, opioiddependent patients are frustrated with their inability to find relief.” Addiction can arise quickly. “It’s important to understand that many individuals who become dependent upon opioids may not have had any prior history of substance use or dependence,” says Frannie Pryor, a licensed clinical social worker and project director of the

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THE RISE OF

FENTANYL

Fentanyl is an exceptionally deadly opioid – easy to manufacture and potentially fatal upon minute contact. The increase in overdoses from such drugs has prompted the Tulsa and Oklahoma City police departments to issue naloxone (commercially called Narcan), a drug that can save the life of someone who has overdosed if it is administered quickly enough. Capt. Bo Mathews, with the OKC police department, says officers used naloxone kits 12 times in 2017. In Tulsa, since Anthony First initiated the police department’s program to provide officers with kits in 2014, officers have saved 50 lives with Narcan. “We’ve had to adjust the dosage recently in these kits because of the potency of fentanyl,” says Capt. Mark Wollmershauser Jr., with Tulsa police’s special investigations division. “We not only have these kits for citizens who overdose, but also in case of exposure to our officers who are handling these drugs. It is a huge officer safety concern throughout the country and in Oklahoma on how to avoid exposure while dealing with fentanyl, which can be absorbed through the skin and is 30-50 times more potent than heroin, and 50-100 times more potent than morphine. Two milligrams, just an amount the size of a few grains of salt, can be a lethal dosage.”

Community Health Centers of Oklahoma’s Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment program. The initiative, funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, emphasizes early intervention with primary-care screenings. If struggles with substance use and/or depression are identified, a patient is offered up to 12 free behavioral health sessions a year and a referral to a higher level of treatment if necessary. “Opioids are substances with a very high ability to lead to physical dependence, regardless of someone’s state of mind or history,” Pryor says. “More awareness and education about the potential issues related with these substances could go a long way toward helping individuals be proactive and communicate with their medical provider if they begin to notice any indications that they are developing issues.” Understanding and catching problems early make a difference. “Education and prevention are huge,” says Capt. Mark Wollmershauser Jr., with the Tulsa police department’s special investigations division. “We must stop addiction before it begins. Otherwise, we will be fighting a never-ending battle. Doctors in all medical fields can better educate their patients as to the risk of addiction with these legally prescribed opioids.” Prescription opioids account for a large number of addicts, but legally available drugs are far from the only problem facing Oklahoma’s social workers, doctors, law officers and families. Between 2015 and 2016, Tulsa police saw a 300 percent increase in heroin arrests, largely due to increased trafficking by Mexican drug cartels. A recent bust yielded 18 pounds of heroin, and law officers have seized record numbers of other opioids as well. “Whether it is the illegal sale of hydrocodone and oxycodone, the influx of heroin from cartels, or even illegally made pills of fentanyl and other forms of this extremely potent drug, our officers see the entire spectrum of opioids,” Wollmershauser says. “One search warrant … resulted in the recovery of 8,000 pills that appeared to be oxycodone, but were actually clandestinely made cyclopropyl fentanyl. This is a synthetic opioid that was not scheduled at the time but, because of its appearance nationwide and its cause of so many fatal overdoses, was quickly placed by


the DEA [Drug Enforcement Administration] in the Schedule I category of controlled drugs, along with heroin.” Cooperation is needed between law enforcement, legislators, medical personnel and the community to halt the flood of opioids into Oklahoma’s streets and help those who have become dependent. “As a community, we need to work together to provide opportunities to assist individuals to defeat alcohol and drug addiction,” says Capt. Bo Mathews, public information officer for the Oklahoma City police department. “Together, police and the community need to find a way to provide services for inpatient detoxification, outpatient detoxification, assessment and referrals. The citizens of Oklahoma City work well with the police. The continued assistance from the community – being ‘an extra set of eyes and ears’ to report drug activity – is extremely helpful in planning proactive practices and apprehensions if needed.” In Tulsa, officers work with the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services to provide Narcan, a crucial drug to reverse opioid overdoses. And they’ve not stopped there. “We have been working with Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter and his commission on opioid abuse to make recommendations to our state legislators,” Wollmershauser says. “We have also been working

with Tulsa County Social Services and other non-governmental partners in support of legislative actions. The biggest recommendation we made to the commission … for legislators to pass immediately is the electronic prescription requirement. “There are thousands of pills that flood the streets of Tulsa and Oklahoma daily because of individuals forging prescriptions and then selling those pills to addicts. The electronic prescription requirement would almost end that ability. Pharmaceutical companies also have a role in this....They must take a more responsible role in their business practices.” Wollmershauser also advocates tough sentencing for opioid traffickers. “This is not a victimless or nonviolent crime,” he says. “Just ask the family members of those who have had a loved one die from an overdose.” Oklahomans should be cautious about making assumptions, he says. “This epidemic knows no boundaries,” Wollmershauser says. “No matter the demographic, or socioeconomic status, this is affecting us all. While aggressively pursuing the drug traffickers that prey on these victims of the epidemic, we’ve served search warrants in all parts of Tulsa, neighboring suburbs and other parts of Oklahoma. Every Oklahoman should be aware and concerned.”

BREAKING FREE FROM ADDICTION Nicole Crestmont, a former opioid dependent, has personal advice to those who want to stop the cycle of addiction. “You have to make a complete break,” says the Norman resident, who asked that her real name not be used. “If it’s people you work with, get a new job. If it’s people you hang out with, find a new crew. They might be nice people, but they are not your friends. Real friends don’t drag you into emotional

hell or try to kill you.” For those taking opioids to deal with traumatic emotional pain, she recommends seeing a therapist, if possible, as part of recovery. Above all, she says: “You need to be honest … most of all with yourself. I am super great at rationalizing any decision I want to make, but it does me no favors in the long run. It is excruciatingly hard sometimes, but it is worth it.”

EMPATHY AS A SOLUTION

According to Frannie Pryor of Community Health Centers of Oklahoma, a crucial part of addressing the rising use of opioids is empathy. “I think it’s important to keep in mind that any people struggling with opioid-related issues are human beings,” she says. “These are people who have lost a very important connection to others. In many cases that connection could be love and acceptance, a sense of belonging or a sense of purpose. Also, it’s important to remember that each person is an individual. How they got to where they are is individualized. Treating everyone in the same way is ineffective; we have to tailor our response to each person in a unique way that fits their specific set of issues.” Pryor says society must reach out to those struggling with dependence. “I think the answer lies in the way we approach the problem and in changing the way that substance dependence is perceived as a personal character flaw rather than a larger social issue,” she says. “Empathy is key. The amazing thing about empathy is that we can all utilize it. It doesn’t take specialized training or a degree to feel empathy for people going through substance dependence. Imagine being cut off from everyone who is supposed to love you, care for you and treat you with humanity. How important would it be to you to then be treated with kindness and respect?”

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS FINANCIAL ADVISOR The most sweeping tax reform legislation in decades was enacted into law at the end of 2017. What do I need to know?

DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC®

If you pay federal income taxes, you are likely to see an impact this year. As you plan your 2018 tax strategy, here are three key changes to know about the tax reform law:

1. The new tax code reduces most of the ordinary tax rates and adjusts the tax brackets, applicable from 2018 to 2025. The highest ordinary income tax rate, which was previously 39.6 percent, was reduced to 37 percent, for example. 2. The standard deduction is nearly doubled. Under the new law, the standard deduction has increased to $12,000 for a single taxpayer and $24,000 for a married couple filing a joint return.

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST With summer almost here, I am becoming self-conscious about all my freckles and sun damage. What can I do to get rid of them quickly? Years of sun damage is a hard issue to deal with for most of us. Thankfully there are several great solutions out there to help; most of them come MALISSA SPACEK in the form of a prescription-based skin care line, such as Obagi®. But if you’re a little behind in the game and want to see results in days rather than weeks, an IPL photofacial is the best solution for you. IPLs use intense, pulsed light to target dark spots, such as freckles, sun spots and veins in the skin, and remove them within 7 to 10 days following a treatment. Other benefits of IPL are tighter, firmer, and more youthful looking skin. To find out more about IPL or to schedule a complimentary consultation give us a call at 918.872.9999.

LEGAL SERVICES What is a restrictive covenant as it pertains to land? A restrictive covenant limits the use of a tract of land. It may prohibit certain uses or limit such use to specific uses such as for a park. The owner of a tract of land may impose a restrictive covenant on the land and provide that the covenant “runs BRAD BEASLEY with the land,” meaning it applies to future owners of the land. Restrictive covenants generally are valid and enforceable. However, not all restrictive covenants are enforceable. Many older neighborhoods had restrictive covenants restricting the right of ownership based upon race. Those covenants universally have been declared to be unconstitutional and are unenforceable.

3. Personal exemptions are suspended and the child tax credit is increased. If you have children, you may qualify to claim a $2,000 tax credit per qualifying child – double what was allowed in prior law.

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Prime Wealth Management A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.primewealthmgmt.com

PERSONAL TRAINER Should I use a weight belt when lifting weights? The weight will help with intraabdominal pressure while lifting. Optimal support depends on the type of exercise and load intensity. It’s recommended for weight exercises that stress the lower back during heavy or maximal lifting. JOHN JACKSON However, the weight belt will limit some of the core stability within your exercise movement. Weight belts are basically used for back squats and deadlifts; no weight belt is needed for exercises that don’t stress your back. Have a health professional assess your specific weight belt needs.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

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Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 510 N. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

Bradley K. Beasley Boesche McDermott LLP 110 W. 7th St., Suite 900 Tulsa, OK 74119 918.858.1735 (Direct Dial) 918.583.1777 telephone 918.592.5809 facsimile

HOSPICE CARE

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL Are the toys in your garage insurance ready with summertime just around the corner? Oklahomans enjoy a variety of outdoor activities like boating and operating off road vehicles. While these activities are fun, they come with their share of personal and financial risk. Despite continual RUSS IDEN crashes causing injuries and fatalities, Oklahoma still does not require boat and off-road vehicle owners to be insured. So before you hit the lake or the trails, take the following steps to protect your family and your pocketbook when it comes to insuring your toys. While some homeowners’ policies offer limited liability coverage for small, low horsepower or non-motorized boats, a separate boat policy will provide broader coverage protection, similar to your auto policy. For off-road vehicles, your homeowners’ will cover it on your premises but it won’t when you take your ATV on a hunting trip. Decrease the cost of this new policy with a multi-policy discount that may be offered by your current auto and home insurer. If you have questions about insuring boats, ATVs, or any other insurance needs, call a AAA agent near you.

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.748.1034 800.222.2582, x1034 russ.iden@aaaok.org

My father has Parkinson’s disease and my mother is his main caregiver. My sister and I try to help as much as possible, but we worry she is not taking care of herself very well. Any advice on how we can help her find time for herself? There is a special bond when you care for a loved one – especially a spouse – but it can take its toll on the caregiver. She could bring in a home health aide or work with one of the other professional services that can provide companion support care once or twice a week. That will give your mother a chance to run errands or get some much needed “me time.” At Grace Hospice, we often assist our patients and their caregivers in finding resources for respite and other care options. For more information on caregiver stress and our free support groups, call Grace Hospice at 918.744.7223.

KATHY FLANAGAN, BSN RN

Kathy Flanagan, BSN RN Director of Nursing Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

Still Got It

Brookside’s staple sushi restaurant retains its X-factor, even after 20 years in Tulsa.

T IN THE RAW IS KNOWN FOR ITS FRESH SUSHI AND SASHIMI. PHOTO BY LUKE OPPENHEIMER

here’s a bit of a hip California feel to in the raw in Tulsa’s Brookside (its copyrighted name is, indeed, all lower case). Wiry, relaxed, and radiating contentment, owner Greg Hughes sits near the entrance as crowds pour in. “I was trying for a west coast water vibe, popping with color,” he says. “It’s lively; there’s music. It’s sushi with a pulse. Some of them are the children of my first regulars.” It’s been 20 years since in the raw opened, and what seems like a sure-fire bet now was a long-shot gamble then. Something must have possessed a University of Southern California business graduate to open a cuttingedge sushi restaurant in what used to be a strictly meatand-potatoes town.

“I remember those first years like it was yesterday,” Hughes says. “I’d work every day till midnight and then sleep on a bean bag in the dining room. Wake up and it was time for work again. I’d drag out the garbage just before bed and it just wasn’t working. Sometimes I’d be close to tears. Month after month, I lost 35 pounds, and then suddenly we were a success.” Reasons vary. “Well, we appeal to everyone,” he says. “Meat people from Dallas stop by just to try our steak. I love to go to Cabo [San Lucas, Mexico] and our fish tacos are based on my favorite restaurants there, where you eat fish fresh off the docks. Our fish is flown in overnight. “Our sushi rolls are nontraditional, flamboyant and extremely taste-filled. We have 22 on the menu and over a hundred others available. Some of our regulars have a roll APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

created just for them. And as for connoisseurs of traditional sushi, we can accommodate them. Joseph Moodoh, for example, is as good as any sushi chef in the Midwest.” Seven miles away, at the second branch of in the raw, high on a hill with a dramatic view of the skyline, Moodooh is hard at work. He’s soft-spoken and scholarly outside the kitchen, but put a fillet knife in his hands and he moves with the grace and assurance of an Olympic gymnast. “My wife was surprised how quickly I learned,” he says as he gently slices the belly of a hefty yellowtail flown in from Okinawa, Japan. “But I have been studying all my life.” A few quick slices and the skin is gone. “I grew up in a tiny seacoast town in [South] Korea and spent my childhood days watching the fishermen fillet their catch, watching my mother prepare sushi,” he says. Quick delicate slices remove waste parts and bone, and all that’s left are four long, glistening fillets and a smooth white piece on top. “Later, I came to Los Angeles to study business management,” he says. “But I realized that cooking was what I loved to do.” A few deft cuts and the white piece (“It’s the neck, the best part of the yellowtail”) becomes sashimi. Two smaller sticks, with Moodooh’s hands working quick as a flash, are draped over sushi rice and, just for variety, quickly seared with a blowtorch. Neatly placed on a plate with little spheres and flowers made of wasabi, of ginger, of bright orange carrot, they become a work of art that you hesitate to touch. But when you do, the clear, sharp

GREG HUGHES OPENED HIS FIRST RESTAURANT 20 YEARS AGO. BELOW: FRESH INGREDIENTS MAKE THIS BENTO BOX A DELICIOUS CHOICE. PHOTOS BY LUKE OPPENHEIMER

flavors burst in your mouth with the essence of ocean. By now, Moodooh has left tradition behind as he crafts the large, dashing California-style sushi rolls for which in the raw is best known; many are his own invention. “For this roll, I use cucumber instead of nori [seaweed] – crisper flavor,” he says while peeling an unbroken cylinder of cucumber and stuffing it with long slices of bright red tuna, salmon and yellowtail. These become shiny green circles surrounding colorful triangles of white, orange and red, each with a wood skewer. “We call this the lollipop,” he says of his bright, whimsical creation. Meanwhile, at the saute station (yes, there is that), a line cook simmers a sauce for another sushi creation, and now Moodooh gently pours it on top. This A-list dish has tiny discs of crab cake, cream cheese and jalapeno, each topped with a big chunk of lobster (a whole lobster in

each roll) and now with the rich bubbling gravy, a classic French sauce made with chilis and fresh cream. The sauce and lobster dominate and melt into a luxurious blend – California sushi that a classic French chef would love. Back in Brookside, Hughes makes his way home. “I was full of fire back then. Now, I’m content with my three daughters,” he says. “I named a sushi roll after one and she’s never tried it. Maybe one day. So it worked out. Still, I fantasize about writing a book. The title: How to Open a Restaurant: DON’T.” BRIAN SCHWARTZ

LO C A L F L AV O R

CHANNELING PICASSO

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

This charming cafe is a Paseo District haven for meat-lovers, vegetarians and lovers of local art.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

Family and pet friendly, wine and brew friendly, and even vegan friendly, Picasso Cafe in the Paseo District of Oklahoma City offers a relaxing, colorful atmosphere that Pablo himself would push away from his table at 4 Gats in Barcelona to join. A late 1920s structure filled with natural light, dark wood, Spanish tiling and local artists, Picasso’s does what it sets out to do: foster, feed and water a community. When it comes to the menu, chef Ryan Parrot, “Master and Commander” of the kitchen, consistently nails it. Having a 50 percent meat-based menu tied in with a 50 percent

vegetarian offering, Parrot and crew deliver everything – from the house black (Angus) and blue burger, creative hand-tossed pizzas and salads to amazing flavors and familiar favorites from around the world, like the jackfruit tikka masala. Picasso himself said, “Give me a museum and I will fill it.” Picasso Cafe, in turn, says, “Give us a community and we will nurture it.” And that is exactly what Parrot and company do. Visit picassosonpaseo.com for information on the joint’s monthly, five-course, veggieand-wine dinner, slated next for April 17. SCOTTY IRANI


HERBS IN SEASON

CARROTS: HEALTHY AND DELICIOUS Carrots are a perfect source of beta-carotene, which is converted to vitamin A in the body. Plus, these orange veggies offer a healthy amount of fiber, but rank low on the glycemic index scale – meaning they can lower blood sugar levels and promote a healthy gut. Best of all, carrots can be cooked a delightful number of ways; crunchy, caramelized, creamy or just perfectly cooked, carrots are a simple but tasty meal addition.

PLANT SIBERIAN CHIVES

Siberian Chives are much like the chives you sprinkle on your baked potato any other day, but these have a buttery, onion flavor and the round, mauve flowers attract bees and flowers to your garden.

TRY THIS

MAKE YOUR OWN EGG ROLLS

Egg rolls are a classic addition to any Asian dish at your favorite restaurant. But have you tried to make them at home? Here’s a super-easy recipe, with easily changed ingredients to make your dish vegetarian, southwestern, cheesy or sweet. Ingredients 1 package 1 small head 1 roll 1 1/2 cups 1 cup 1/2 cup

GADGETS

CAMPING PIZZA? HECK, YES!

Outdoor cooking and camping meals just became delightfully delicious for everyone with the BakerStone Pizza Oven Box. This gift from the pizza gods converts most three-burner and larger gas grills into a gourmet pizza oven, though it can also cook a variety of other foods. The company just launched an indoor version for the gas-top stove in your kitchen. Visit bakerstonebox.com to learn more.

egg roll wraps raw cabbage, shredded favored breakfast sausage raw bean sprouts shredded, raw carrots soy sauce

Instructions Cook sausage in frying pan until thoroughly done; drain. Mix shredded cabbage, carrots, sausage and bean sprouts together. Add soy sauce to taste. Don’t let the filling get too juicy. Place about 1/4 cup of filling inside egg roll wrapper, fold both ends over, then

roll. Use a dab of water to seal the edges.

Deep fry until golden brown. Drain on paper towels, and serve fresh and hot.

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APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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1/23/18 8:54 AM


WINE

A Sommelier’s Method

Taste

Navigate a tasting like a pro with these suggestions.

PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

L

QUICK TIPS

ROASTED VEGGIES WITH A TWIST

Vinegar is the secret to tender, tasty goodness.

Roasted vegetables have been a love of many home cooks for generations, but like other “common is cool again” trends (thanks to foodie websites and enterprising chefs), roasted “vege” sides and entrees show up on many home and restaurant dining tables. Here’s a quick tip for your next round of roasted vegetable goodness: vinegar. It doesn’t matter what vegetable you roast. From butternut squash and Brussels sprouts to cauliflower and rutabaga, adding a splash or two of any kind (or flavor) of vinegar brightens the taste of that vegetable and brings out natural deliciousness. Besides tossing the “vege” with the standard olive or grapeseed oil and some seasoning (plug with a wink: In The Kitchen With Scotty’s Cook’s Line Seasoning), a zhoosh of vinegar – with its sharp initial twang – cooks away and leaves a sweet, forwardtasting finish. Give it a try. Scotty Irani is a personal chef, award-winning food writer, host of a weekly cooking segment on OKC’s KAUT 43, and chef/owner of In The Kitchen With Scotty.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

et’s cover how to taste wine like a master sommelier. Once you have an idea of what your eyes, nose and palate should take in on a personal level, follow a few guidelines and tips about navigating a public wine tasting or event. First, note the appearance of the wine. Look at its exact color and memorize it for later tastings. With white wines, a golden color might indicate a grape like chardonnay, a wine aged in an oak barrel, or an older white wine. As white wines age, they gain more golden color. In contrast, red wines tend to lose color with age and transform from black/purple or red in their youth to mahogany or brown in their maturity. Next, smell the wine for its intensity or subtlety. Identify what fruits you think you smell. For a white wine, they could be apple/ pear/lemon, apricot/nectarine, or tropical fruit, like melon and pineapple. Warmclimate wines, such as those from Napa Valley, often fall into the tropical area. For red wines, determine if you smell more red fruit or black fruit, or a combination. Solely red fruit can signify a cooler climate. Black fruits can signify a warm climate or some maceration. Then, taste the wine. Detect any acid, which is tart-

ness in your mouth, and assess the body, which is the weight of the wine in your mouth. Light wines should remind you of skim milk, while a heavy body feels more like 2 percent milk. Perceive any tannins. If your mouth has a sandpaper feel on the top of your tongue, the wine has a high amount of tannins. Wait for the wine’s finish, which is how long you taste the vintage after you swallow it. The longer the finish, the better the wine. RANDA WARREN, MS, CWE, DWS

TIPS FOR NAVIGATING A PUBLIC WINE TASTING 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Find the list that has all the wines and their prices. Bring a pen to take notes. Find a spit cup within reach of you at each station. Taste the wine without swallowing, then spit the rest out. If there is a water pitcher on each table, use it to rinse your glass when you switch between white and red wines. It’s unnecessary to rinse after each wine you taste. Don’t congregate too long at each wine station. Taste the wine(s), visit with the representative pouring the wine for no more than 2 minutes, then move on to allow others to taste the sample(s). It’s perfectly fine to go back and re-taste your favorite wines. Just don’t be a wine hog. If you have time before the tasting, research the wineries or their areas of origin. Have some fun. Don’t feel like you have to write every little nuance down.


T R AV E L I N G TA S T E

SALT BAE DOESN’T DISAPPOINT

While I’ve lived in New York for nearly eight years, I do not consider myself a New Yorker – except when it comes to food. I admit that I am a food snob and generally avoid restaurants frequented by tourists. However, when my mom was in town recently, she kept mentioning that she wanted to try Nusret Gökçe’s Turkish steakhouse, Nusr-Et. If you haven’t heard about this man, also known as Salt Bae, you must check him out on social media. He is known for his cutting skills and his technique for salting meat with a flair for the dramatic. He has restaurants throughout the world, including Miami and the United Arab Emirates. I was hesitant to try this restaurant because I thought it’d be flooded with tourists. We went on a Tuesday night and I was pleasantly surprised with the entire experience. The service was exceptional, and the interior was inspired with beautiful, Turkish decor. Salt Bae came to our table (after my mom and I motioned him over to us), and I asked him for his recommendations. We ordered the lokum beef fillet and the nusret spaghetti, per Salt Bae’s suggestion, both of which were seasoned to perfection. For dessert, we had the baklava, which was an experience in itself. It was served tableside and stuffed with ice cream in the middle. This is a must try.

CLOCKWISE: NUSRET GÖKÇE, KNOWN ALSO AS SALT BAE, IS RENOWNED FOR SEASONING STEAKS WITH FLAIR. NUSR-ET IS ALL ABOUT STEAK COOKED TO PERFECTION. THE POPULAR EATERY OFFERS SPECIALTY BURGERS. THE DELECTABLE BAKLAVA IS A HIGH POINT OF THE MENU.

PHOTOS COURTESY NUSR-ET STEAKHOUSE NEW YORK

NINA SCHUMAN

APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SCOTT THOMPSON METEOROLOGIST KIRSTEN HORNE METEOROLOGIST

LISA JONES

WORKING FOR BRETT ANTHONY OUR COMMUNITY EVERY WEEKDAY BRANDON WHOLEY

CHIEF METEOROLOGIST

METEOROLOGIST

TODAY 4:30a - 7:00a


Where & When

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

PHOTO COURTESY THE MEDIEVAL FAIR

S

A Blast from the Past The Medieval Fair returns to Norman – bring the magic of the Middles Ages with it.

tep back in time and welcome the Medieval Fair to Norman for its 42nd year. Enjoy live musical entertainment, human chess games, jousting, artisan booths, sword fights, food and drink vendors, and an immersion into the Middle Ages. Get into the spirit by dressing up – you won’t be alone among the minstrels, knights, kings and mermaids. During the whimsical weekend, guests can learn all about this fascinating period of history through educational displays, since the fair is hosted by the self-supporting Medieval Fair department within the University of Oklahoma Outreach. “There are blacksmiths teaching their an-

cient craft as well as spinners, weavers, jewelers, potters, glass blowers and more,” says Ann Marie Eckart, the fair’s coordinator. “Organizations such as the Arthurian Order of Avalon, the Society for Creative Anachronism and [the University of Central Oklahoma] Medieval Society have educational displays on daily life, games and pastimes, weapons, clothing, armor and other interesting subjects. The Cleveland County Medical Reserve Corps has a fabulous educational booth about the black plague and if it happened today. Our mission is to ignite the spark of curiosity that leads to lifelong learning through educational entertainment.” The fair is now a highly anticipated spring event, but it had humble beginnings. It started as a one-day fundraiser in April for the OU

English department, in part to honor William Shakespeare’s birth and death dates (both widely recognized as April 23). Due to popularity, the event outgrew its space at OU and landed at Reaves Park, where it has been since 2003. Eckart’s priority is entertaining the fair’s visitors. “For me, the best part of Medieval Fair is seeing the smiles on people’s faces as they take a moment to step away from the worries and troubles of today to just be in the moment and enjoy the myriad sights and sounds of the fair,” she says. The April 6-8 event is free to the public. For details, visit medievalfair.org. MARY WILLA ALLEN

APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

81


Where & When

IN TULSA

CONCERT

INFINITY AND BEYOND Get interstellar with the Tulsa Symphony at its newest Pops concert, Voyage of Discovery: Space, The Final Frontier. Led by guest conductor Ron Spigelman, the orchestra transports audiences to another galaxy … through music. “Viewers hear music from Star Wars, Star Trek, and [Gustav] Holst’s The Planets with live video projections featuring NASA images,” the symphony’s Annie Chang says. “Movie music is always a big hit with our audiences. There is a wonderful kind of synergy that comes out when the entire hall recognizes a familiar tune from one of their favorite films and relives it together.”

Doug Fletcher, artistic director at the symphony, says much thought has gone into making this performance enjoyable for concert-goers. “We wanted to make all of this as relatable as possible to an audience that already shows an interest in astronomy, cosmology and science generally, and sci-fi is a perennial favorite in that regard,” Fletcher says. “We spent quite a bit of time discussing and listening to excerpts that would present an engaging storyline of their own with plenty of musical contrasts and varied subjects.” The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. April 14 at the PAC. For tickets, visit tulsasymphony.org.

PERFORMANCES CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS PRESENTS: THE SOUND OF MUSIC April 3-8 TULSA PAC The hills are

around the globe.

celebrityattractions.com

a flop. They needed a clue. Two Broadway producers discover they can make more money with a disaster than a hit in this hysterical musical.

alive. A brand-new production of The Sound of Music comes to town.

JAY LENO April 5 HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO TULSA See hardrockcasinotulsa.com

SIGNATURE SYMPHONY PRESENTS: TULSA SINGS! 100 YEARS OF SONG April 6 TCC VAN TREASE PACE The

future of Tulsa talent takes the stage in the season’s Pops finale. signaturesymphony.org

production from Theatre Pops’ local actors. tulsapac.com

PHOTO BY NASA COURTESY TULSA SYMPHONY

TULSA BALLET PRESENTS: TBII – EMERGING CHOREOGRAPHER’S SHOWCASE April 13-15 TULSA BALLET See

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

SIGNATURE SYMPHONY PRESENTS: CLASSICS - MAHLER & FAINGOLD

April 21

TCC VAN TREASE PACE Noam Faingold,

director of Tulsa’s bART Conservatory, has the world premiere of his work Others. The symphony also plays Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 5. signaturesymphony.org

CHAMBER MUSIC TULSA PRESENTS: TAKACS QUARTET April 21-22 TULSA PAC For more

than four decades, the Takacs Quartet has epitomized excellence.

chambermusictulsa.org

TULSA OPERA PRESENTS: TURNADOT April 27 TULSA PAC Enjoy the

closer of Tulsa Opera’s season. tulsaopera.com

CONCERTS THOMAS RHETT April 5 BOK CENTER Thomas Rhett,

a multi-CMA nominee and ACM Awards Male Vocalist of the Year, kicks off his Life Changes Tour. bokcenter.com on their Love and Savage Tour.

exposquare.com

THE DOOBIE BROTHERS April 21

RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT The Doobie

Brothers’ legacy is not just a bunch of hit records, but an unrivaled commitment to musical integrity and a steadfast allegiance to fans. riverspirittulsa.com

MISTERWIVES April 25 CAIN’S BALLROOM See

SLEEP April 10 CAIN’S BALLROOM See

trio Sleep with special guest SubRosa. cainsballroom.com

TEDESCHI TRUCK BAND April 19

BRADY THEATER Let Me Get

Misterwives on the Let The Light In Tour with Flor and Flint Eastwood. cainsballroom.com

JUDAS PRIEST April 26 BOK CENTER One of heavy

metal’s legendary acts hits the road in support of its new studio album, Firepower.

By is the band’s third studio album, featuring 10 original songs. bradytheater.com

bokcenter.com

THREE DOG NIGHT April 19 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT Legendary Three

THE 16TH ANNUAL ’80S PROM April 28 CAIN’S BALLROOM Get a

Dog Night celebrates nearly five decades together.

new wave haircut and prepare for the raddest concert in the city. cainsballroom.com

38 SPECIAL April 19 HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO See Florida-based

VANCE JOY April 28 BRADY THEATER See indie

hardrockcasinotulsa.com

bradytheater.com

riverspirittulsa.com

rock band 38 Special.

PHOTO COURTESY THE COLOR RUN

Get fit, and have fun doing it, at The Color Run, coming to Tulsa. The run, pegged as “the happiest 5K on the planet,” blasts runners with colored paint at every kilometer. Less about beating your personal best time and more about having fun, The Color Run has become the world’s largest running series, experienced by novice and experienced runners alike in more than 35 countries. The fun doesn’t stop at the finish line, either – the Finish Festival greets all participants after the race. This party, with dancing, music and even more colored paint, concludes your whimsical day at the races. This year’s theme is “The Hero Tour.” A participant can dress the part and, according to the company’s website, “celebrate the hero in you, in a realm where nothing is impossible and you are unstoppable.” The Color Run takes place April 7 at River West Festival Park. Register at thecolorrun. com/locations/tulsa.

tomorrow’s stars of ballet today. Tulsa Ballet II, the second company of Tulsa Ballet, has some of the most promising young dancers from

TANK & JOE April 7 EXPO SQUARE See this duo

Get Colorful

THEATRE TULSA PRESENTS: THE PRODUCERS April 13-21 TULSA PAC They wanted

theatretulsa.org

the long-time comedian, talk show host and actor.

THEATRE POPS PRESENTS: DISGRACED April 6-8, 13-15 TULSA PAC Enjoy the newest

SPORTS

tulsaballet.org

singer-songwriter Vance Joy on his Nation of Two World Tour.

ART PAC GALLERY PRESENTS: RECENT EXPLORATIONS April 3-30 PAC GALLERY Rhonda Davis

works in drawing and painting media as a means of finding and expressing rhythm and

composition. tulsapac.com

FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL

April 6

TULSA ARTS DISTRICT This

year-round, monthly event features all of the galleries,


studios, museums and part-time galleries of various shops opening their doors.

thetulsaartsdistrict.org

NATURE, FASHION, AND WAR: JULIE PEPPITO April 6-26

LIVING ARTS See

mixed-media tapestries and large-scale charcoal drawings in Nature, Fashion, and War. livingarts.org

NORMAN ROCKWELL: BEHIND THE CAMERA

Through June 10

GILCREASE Norman Rockwell: Behind the Camera is the first exhibition to explore, in depth, Rockwell’s richly detailed study photographs, created by the artist as references for his iconic paintings. gilcrease.org

ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY HOME BASEBALL GAMES

RENA DETRIXHE: RED DIRT RUG Through June 30 PHILBROOK Rene Detrixhe

uses Oklahoma red dirt in order to connect her project with the land and the people who live on it. philbrook.org

ROTUNDA SERIES: RACHEL HAYES Through Nov. 1 PHILBROOK Acclaimed

artist Rachel Hayes transforms the Philbrook Rotunda with fabric structures that vibrantly explore quilt making, architectural space, light and shadow. philbrook.org

TO ENDURE IN BRONZE Through Dec. 31

GILCREASE The permanence of bronze, from antiquity to the present, has artistic immortality. gilcrease.org

Explore the Southwest

Jump into the American Southwest this month through Gilcrease Museum’s newest exhibition, Seasons of the Desert: Landscapes of the American Southwest. Featuring works from the collection of Gil Waldman and Christy Vezolles, the exhibition showcases art that aims to change perceptions of this region. “Seasons of the Desert explores shifting views of the Southwest in the winter, spring, summer and autumn,” says Lacy Wulfers,

SPORTS April 3, 13-15, 27-29

J.L. JOHNSON STADIUM

ORU starts the month against rival University of Oklahoma before entering Summit League play. oruathletics.com

TULSA ROUGHNECKS VS. PORTLAND TIMBERS 2 April 4

ONEOK FIELD Enjoy

the spring weather at a Roughnecks soccer match against the Portland Timbers 2 team. roughnecksfc.com

TULSA OILERS GAMES

Aquarium Run has grown into a premier race with more than 2,000 runners expected. okaquarium.org

TULSA ROUTE 66 SPRINTS INVITATIONAL April 7 ROGERS POINT, CATOOSA

Teams from Oklahoma, Arkansas and Texas compete in this annual rowing regatta. okrowing.org

April 12-17, 21-22, 27, 30

ONEOK FIELD Kick off baseball season with the Drillers. milb.com

BOK CENTER Watch the bokcenter.com

COLLINS FAMILY SOFTBALL COMPLEX See the Golden

Oilers take on East Coast Hockey League teams.

AQUARIUM RUN April 7 OKLAHOMA AQUARIUM The

April 13-17

Hurricane take on American Athletic Conference foes, plus the University of Oklahoma. tulsahurricane.com

COMMUNITY COMMUNITY DANCE LESSONS April 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 THE CLUBHOUSE ON MEMORIAL Dance lessons

in a variety of styles are held every Sunday. Your first lesson is free. tulsaswingdanceclub.net

FOOD TRUCK WEDNESDAYS April 4, 11, 18, 25

GUTHRIE GREEN Grab

some tasty eats by the lawn. guthriegreen.com

TULIPS AND TUNES April 5 TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN

Visitors enjoy live music while strolling through the garden. Beer, wine and food trucks are available. tulsabotanic.org

KENDALL WHITTIER FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL April 7 KENDALL WHITTIER DISTRICT This sixth annual event is the longest-running food truck festival in town.

historicwms.com

TULSA TOWN HALL PRESENTS: PIPER KERMAN

her 13-month stay in a federal prison after being convicted of money-laundering.

tulsatownhall.com

SPRINGFEST GARDEN MARKET AND FESTIVAL April 13-14

TULSA GARDEN CENTER This annual event is a must-see for all gardeners.

tulsagardencenter.com

SECOND SATURDAY ARCHITECTURE TOUR April 14

633 S. BOSTON AVE. Join local architects for their monthly architectural walking tour. tulsaarchitecture.org FUEL 66 DOG PARK GRAND OPENING April 14 FUEL 66 The Humane

Society of Tulsa and Fuel 66 have teamed up with Tito’s Vodka to bring you a community wide “dog day,” with low cost vaccinations, $20 micro-chipping, adoptable animals, drink specials, food trucks and more!

April 13

tulsapets.com

best-selling memoir Orange Is the New Black chronicles

TULSA ROOTS GLOBAL BASH April 14 GUTHRIE GREEN This

TULSA PAC Piper Kerman’s

communications manager at Gilcrease. “Works in this exhibition shatter the notion of the desert as a place of monochromatic desolation. By showing the cycle of the seasons in the Southwest, this exhibition explores how artists helped change impressions of American deserts and inspired an appreciation for the unique southwestern landscape. “The works in the exhibition range from realist scenes to heavily abstracted modern portrayals of the landscape. These paintings cover the past 100 years, from artists working in the 1910s to contemporary artists working today. Each painter in this exhibit depicts the desert as a vibrant place, worthy of an artist’s brush.” Seasons of the Desert runs until June 10 in the Sherman Smith Family Gallery. For details, visit gilcrease.org.

TULSA DRILLERS HOME BASEBALL GAMES

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA HOME SOFTBALL GAMES

April 4, 6-7

GENE KLOSS, ARROYA HONDO, TAOS, OIL ON CANVAS, 1937; COURTESY GILCREASE

ART

free, eclectic, roots-music festival kicks off the Guthrie Green concert season.

tulsarootsmusic.org

TULSA GARDEN TOUR

April 21

TULSA GARDEN CENTER

Tulsa Garden Club showcases local horticulture, landscape and hardscape

beauty in private gardens.

tulsagardenclub.org

TULSA’S STORY TELLING COMPETITION GRAND SLAM April 28 IDL BALLROOM The 11

monthly winners compete for the title of Best Storyteller in Tulsa. facebook.com/oksotulsa

CHARITABLE EVENTS METRO CHRISTIAN ACADEMY DINNER AND AUCTION April 5 DOUBLETREE WARREN PLACE This social event

for families and supporters celebrates Metro and the spirit of the school. metroca.com

OYSTERS AND ALE April 5 GREENWOOD CULTURAL CENTER This casual,

come-and-go, all-you-can-eat oyster buffet raises money for Hospice of Green Country. hospiceofgreencountry.org

ST. PHILIP NERI SOCIETY GALA April 5 DONALD W. REYNOLDS CENTER This gala honors

the Ritchie family and benefits the students and programs of the St. Philip Neri Newman Center at the University of Tulsa. tu-newman.org

WOMEN OF THE YEAR LUNCHEON April 6 TULSA COUNTRY CLUB

Tulsa Panhellenic’s annual luncheon honors the accomplishments of women in sorority and community life.

tulsapanhellenic.org

SUPERHERO CHALLENGE April 8

POSTOAK LODGE Benefiting

the Child Abuse Network, this fun, family-friendly event gives your inner superhero a chance to shine. childabusenetwork.org

TULSA TOWN HALL AFTER DARK April 12 CASCIA HALL PERFORMING ARTS CENTER This event

features Piper Kerman, author of Orange Is the New Black and criminal justice reform advocate, before her speaking event the next day. tulsatownhall.com

BOTANICAL! April 13 TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN

Savor the flavors of modern French bistro cuisine in a one-of-a-kind gastronomical fete at Tulsa Botanic Garden’s first Botanical! fundraiser. tulsabotanic.org

GARDEN PARTY April 13 A NEW LEAF Guests enjoy

live entertainment, an auction, delicious cuisine, a wine pull and a beautiful array of spring plants ready for your flower beds or vegetable garden. anewleaf.org

BATTLE OF THE BANDS April 13

CAIN’S BALLROOM High

school musicians compete in an event presented by the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma’s Junior Ambassadors.

okfoodbank.com

CARE PACKS AND COCKTAILS April 13 COTTER RANCH TOWER

The highlight of the night is an empowering fashion show featuring cancer fighters and survivors from all different backgrounds. tteal.org

THE SYMPOSIUM AT BOTANICAL! April 14 TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN

This event includes speakers on French cuisine throughout history, with a tasting led by David Robinson. tulsabotanic.org

11TH ANNUAL OKLAHOMA NONPROFIT EXCELLENCE AWARDS April 14 RENAISSANCE HOTEL AND CONVENTION CENTER The Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits honors 24 organizations in eight categories. okcnp.org

CANDLELIGHT BALL April 20

MAYO HOTEL The gala raises funds for the Child Abuse Network and children involved in child-abuse investigations.

from this country’s No. 1 and No. 5 killers – heart disease and stroke.

tulsaheartwalk.com

EMPTY BOWLS April 24 COX BUSINESS CENTER

This gathering of Food Bank friends and supporters has a dinner, live and silent auctions, a raffle, live entertainment and artisanal keepsake bowls for all guests. okfoodbank.org

RHINESTONE COWBOY

April 27

CAIN’S BALLROOM

Volunteers of America Oklahoma’s Rhinestone Cowboy celebrates 25 years of service to the state. woaok.org

PHILBROOK WINE EXPERIENCE: VINTNER DINNER-AUCTION April 28 PHILBROOK An energetic

cocktail hour and silent auction lead into a world-class dinner among 40 top winemakers and winery owners, followed by a live auction, all to benefit Philbrook. philbrook.org

PHILBROOK WINE EXPERIENCE: GRAND WINE TASTING April 29 PHILBROOK MUSEUM OF ART Renowned vintners

childabusenetwork.org

from around the world and regional restaurants create an unparalleled wine tasting experience. philbrook.org

CELEBRATE CASCIA April 21 CAIN’S BALLROOM This

13TH ANNUAL WISH UPON A PAR GOLF TOURNAMENT

night consists of dinner, dancing, and live and silent auctions. casciahall.com

TULSA HEART WALK

April 21

DOWNTOWN TULSA This American Heart Association event raises funds to save lives

April 30

THE OAKS COUNTRY CLUB

This event features a lunch, tournament, awards ceremony, dinner and happy hour while spreading the mission of Make-A-Wish Oklahoma.

oklahoma/wish.org

APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

83


NORMAN Stephanie Mills

PERFORMANCES OKC PHIL PRESENTS: CLASSICS 7 – PHILIPPE QUINT, VIOLIN April 7 OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Philippe Quint has

carved an unconventional path with his impassioned musical desire for re-imagining traditional works. okcphil.org

OKC PHIL PRESENTS: DISCOVERY 3 – SUPER KIDS AND SUPERHEROES April 8 OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL See super kids who

inspire with their talent and heroes whose superhuman abilities save the day. Celebrate music that unites and lifts us all. okcphil.org

CITYREP THEATRE PRESENTS: GREATER TUNA Through April 8

OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Back by popular demand, Oklahoma’s award winning professional theater, CityRep, opens a can of side-splitting comedy with the smash hit Greater Tuna.

cityrep.com

LYRIC THEATRE PRESENTS: FUN HOME April 11-29 LYRIC AT THE PLAZA

Winning five Tony Awards in 2015, this critically acclaimed musical gives a refreshing, honest look at seeing your parents through grown-up eyes. lyrictheatreokc.com

OKC BALLET PRESENTS: PETITE MORT – A TRIPLE BILL April 13-15 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Petite Mort has become

an international sensation and inspired many in contemporary ballet. okcballet.org

HERBERT W. ARMSTRONG COLLEGE CHORAL UNION April 19

ARMSTRONG AUDITORIUM

In this new oratorio by college music director Ryan Malone, the history of biblical patriarch Abraham is brought to life in this accessible choral-orchestral work. armstrongauditorium.org

CONCERTS THE OAK RIDGE BOYS April 7

RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Four-part

harmonies and upbeat songs have spawned dozens of country hits. riverwind.com

RONNIE MILSAP April 13

RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Ronnie Milsap

ranks as the preeminent country soul singer of his generation. riverwind.com

STEPHANIE MILLS AND FREDDIE JACKSON April 14 RIVERWIND CASINO,

COMMUNIT Y

HONORING THE FALLEN

The Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon and Day of Remembrance serve to honor and remember those killed, injured or affected by the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building on April 19, 1995. The Day of Remembrance can be observed anywhere, but to understand the depth of the tragedy, guests can attend the Oklahoma City Memorial Museum on the anniversary for free. Alongside 168 seconds of observed silence for those killed and a reading of their names, guests can explore the interactive museum and the outdoor memorial. The Memorial Marathon, which began in 2001, brings 24,000 runners to OKC. “The start and finish lines of the Memorial Marathon are unlike any other race,” says Kari

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

has one of the most distinct voices in contemporary music and Freddie Jackson is a noted soul singer from the late 1980s. riverwind.com

DAVID BYRNE April 25 THE CRITERION See the

FOREIGNER April 27 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN With 10

multi-platinum albums and 16 Top 30 hits, Foreigner is one of rock music’s most popular acts. riverwind.com

VANCE JOY April 29 THE CRITERION See

Talking Heads’ frontman on his American Utopia tour.

singer-songwriter Vance Joy on his Nation of Two World Tour.

criterionokc.com

criterionokc.com

FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK April 6 PASEO DISTRICT Art

ART

some of the work of Dylan Bradway, co-owner of DNA Galleries. dnagalleries.com

opening receptions showcase the new work of the gallery/ studio owners or the work of guest artists. thepaseo.org

THE NEW ART: A MILESTONE COLLECTION FIFTY YEARS LATER

IN THE PRINCIPLES OFFICE: TOM RYAN THE ART STUDENT April 7-Nov. 11 NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM Step into the

OKCMOA View an array

classroom as Tom Ryan takes “General Illustration” with famed teacher Frank Reilly. nationalcowboymuseum.org

DYLAN BRADWAY April 12-May 6

DNA GALLERIES See

only major professional sports team. chespeakearena.com

have the opportunity to learn and refine floodwater rescue techniques in still water and class III/IV rapids.

riversportokc.org

OKC ENERGY FC HOME MATCHES April 7, 21 TAFT STADIUM Enjoy

of styles, including abstract expressionism, post painterly abstraction, color field painting, minimalism and pop art, at this anniversary celebration. okcmoa.com

THE ART OF OKLAHOMA Through Sept. 2

OKC MOA The Art of

Oklahoma celebrates the museum’s diverse collection of art created by or about Oklahomans. okcmoa.com

April 10-11, 13-15,

L. DALE MITCHELL

April 11, 13-15, 27-29

MARITA HYNES FIELD, NORMAN See the soonersports.com

barrel races with some of the best competitors in the nation. betterbarrelraces.com

COMMUNITY UCO SPRING POWWOW

April 1

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA, EDMOND

Powwows are Native American gatherings with dancing, singing and socializing. sites.uco.edu

YOGA IN THE GARDENS April 3, 10, 17, 24

MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS This is an all-levels class led by Lisa Woodward from This Land Yoga.

NATIVE CROSSROADS FILM FESTIVAL April 5-7 SAM NOBLE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, NORMAN Native Crossroads

Watkins, executive director of the museum and race director. “Whether you are running, volunteering or cheering along the course, it’s a memory you’ll cherish.” If you’re trepidatious, know you don’t have to be a seasoned marathoner. Options include a half marathon, a relay, a 5K and a kids’ marathon, all on April 29, beginning at the museum. The 26.2-mile race is also a Boston Marathon qualifier. For information on the museum, visit oklahomacitynationalmemorial.org. For marathon details, visit okcmarathon.com.

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HOME SOFTBALL GAMES

BETTER BARREL RACES WORLD FINALS April 25-29 STATE FAIR PARK Enjoy

1701 S. WESTERN AVE.

wheelerdistrict.com

soonersports.com

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HOME BASEBALL GAMES

energyfc.com

WHEELER CRITERIUM Each week, the Wheeler Crit provides an exciting cycling outing for families across the community.

Enjoy a bevy of games for the University of Oklahoma’s baseball team.

reigning NCAA champions, the OU Sooners, against Big 12 Conference foes.

oklahomacitybotanicalgardens. com

April 3, 10, 17, 24

BASEBALL PARK, NORMAN

regular season soccer matches with the OKC Energy FC.

Through May 13

SPORTS OKC THUNDER HOME GAMES April 3, 11 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA Enjoy the state’s

HIGH WATER 2018 April 6-8 RIVERSPORT RAPIDS WHITEWATER CENTER Participants

is a unique film festival and symposium that focuses on international indigenous media. cas.ou.edu

ACM@UCO METRO MUSIC FEST April 6 BRICKTOWN Every year,

the Academy of Contemporary Music at the University of Central Oklahoma partners with sponsors and businesses in Greater OKC to put on this festival. acm.uco.edu

OPEN STREETS OKC April 8 UPTOWN 23RD DISTRICT

This event is all about reclaiming the streets of OKC for active, healthy communities. openstreetsokc.com

SOUTHWEST STREET ROD NATIONALS April 13-14 STATE FAIR PARK The

majority of this car show takes place outside, all across State Fair Park. okstatefair.com

OKC JAZZ FEST April 20-21 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Local and national

artists perform on both indoor and outdoor stages during the festival. okcjazzfest.com

FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS April 24-29

BICENTENNIAL PARK OKC’s

annual rite of spring celebrates the visual, culinary and performing arts.

sw29okc.wordpress.com

NORMAN MUSIC FESTIVAL April 26-28

MAIN STREET The festival features performers from different genres at both indoor and outdoor venues.

normanmusicfestival.com

CHARITABLE EVENTS REACH FOR THE STARS!

April 5

THE CRITERION This

annual event raises money for services helping at-risk and homeless youth in Oklahoma County. ywoc.org

STARLIGHT SUPPER April 5 BICENTENNIAL PARK This

MUSEUM The gala benefits

emergency services at Integris. It includes dinner, drinks, dancing and the opportunity to have a impact on families in the community.

integrisgala.org

BALLET BALL April 7 CHEVY BRICKTOWN EVENTS CENTER Experience

multiple-course meal under the stars is prepared by top chefs to benefit Downtown Oklahoma City Initiatives.

OKC Ballet’s black-tie ball with dinner, dancing and drinks.

April 6

CLEATS AND COCKTAILS

ARTINI April 13 OKC FARMERS PUBLIC MARKET ARTini is one

COUNTRY CLUB Enjoy an evening with the Wes Welker Foundation raising money for Oklahoma City Public Schools’ athletic programs.

artiniokc.com

downtownokc.com

OKLAHOMA CITY GOLF AND

weswelkerfoundation.org

INTEGRIS GALA April 6 NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE

okcballet.org

of the year’s most popular events, bringing together local restaurants, entertainers and artists for a night of fun and fundraising for Allied Arts.

WALK MS OKLAHOMA CITY April 14

MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS Friends, loved

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL & MUSEUM

Where & When

IN OKC


LUNG FORCE GALA April 20 OKLAHOMA HISTORY CENTER The gala is the

American Lung Association’s black-tie event to raise money to fight lung cancer. lung.org

EXCELLENCE IN LEADERSHIP GALA April 21 THE SKIRVIN HILTON HOTEL

See leaders in the OKC community receive recognition for their leadership oklahoma. leadershipoklahoma.com

CENTRAL OKLAHOMA HEART WALK April 21

a great cause. zoofriends.org

OKC HOPE GALA April 28 GAILLARDIA COUNTRY CLUB The Hope Gala offers a

night of great food, wine and a live and silent auction. Funds benefit JDRF and research for type 1 diabetes. jdrfokc.org

PERFORMANCES

show features more than 20 of Buddy Holly’s greatest hits and showcases his meteoric rise to fame.

bartlesvillecommunitycenter. com

BARTLESVILLE CHORAL SOCIETY PRESENTS: MY FAVORITES April 8 BARTLESVILLE COMMUNITY CENTER Sit back and relax as you listen to hit after hit from the choral playbook.

bartlesvillecommunitycenter. com

AWAKENING EVENTS PRESENTS: CHONDA PIERCE, GETTING BACK TO FUNNY, FEATURING KARYN WILLIAMS April 13 BARTLESVILLE COMMUNITY CENTER A stand-up comedian, TV hostess, author and actress, Pierce channels her life

experiences into positivity.

bartlesvillecommunitycenter. com

BROKEN ARROW COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE PRESENTS: HAPPY DAYS April 20-29 BROKEN ARROW COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE

hits the Global Event Center stage. winstarworldcasino.com

CHISHOLM TRAIL ARTS COUNCIL LIVE PRESENTS: WOODIE & THE LONGBOARDS April 13 SIMMONS CENTER, DUNCAN Performing a

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY HOME SOFTBALL GAMES

bacptheatre.com

JAY LENO April 21 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO AND RESORT, THACKERVILLE See

longtime comedian Jay Leno on his stand-up tour. winstarworldcasino.com

BARTLESVILLE CIVIC BALLET PRESENTS: TCHAIKOVSKY’S SLEEPING BEAUTY April 21-22 BARTLESVILLE COMMUNITY CENTER See the beloved story come to life.

bartlesvillecommunitycenter. com

COWGIRLS STADIUM, STILLWATER Cheer on the

Cowgirls during their regular season games. okstate.com

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY HOME

variety of hit music from the ‘50s to ‘80s, the group has kept fans happy by mixing professional music with a highly interactive, entertaining show. chisholmtrailarts.com

FOREIGNER April 29 CHOCTAW CASINO AND RESORT, DURANT With

10 multi-platinum albums and 16 Top 30 hits, Foreigner is a popular rock act. choctawcasinos.com

SPORTS April 4, 10, 13-15

Greet the blooming flora at Honor Heights Park, a 132-acre oasis in Muskogee and home to the annual Azalea Festival. This celebration, which began in 1967, highlights the 625 varieties of azaleas in the park, along with dogwoods, redbuds and an assortment of other plants. Kimbra Scott, spokeswoman for the city of Muskogee, says that while the flowers are the focal point of the festival, it offers much more. “We have craft events, car shows, parades, chili cook-offs, dances, and the list goes on,” she says. “So what started as a two-week event in Honor Heights Park has now grown to a citywide, highly anticipated, monthlong event that attracts residents and visitors, all races and ethnicities, all income levels, and all ages. It is truly Muskogee’s event.” The festival has activities throughout the city at varying times. For more information, head to visitmuskogee.com.

Goodbye gray skies; hello blue. Happy days are here again with Richie, Potsie, Ralph Malph and the unforgettable Arthur “The Fonz” Fonzarelli.

CONCERTS JIM JEFFERIES April 13 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO AND RESORT, THACKERVILLE Jim Jefferies

IN BLOOM

SAFARI SOIREE April 27 OKC ZOO AND BOTANICAL GARDEN Go wild at night for

AROUND THE STATE BROADWAY IN BARTLESVILLE! PRESENTS BUDDY: THE BUDDY HOLLY STORY April 6 BARTLESVILLE COMMUNITY CENTER The

COMMUNIT Y

non-competitive walk brings together 10,000 people from across central Oklahoma to raise awareness for heart disease, stroke and the importance of a healthy lifestyle. okcheartwalk.org

PHOTO COURTESY MUSKOGEE PARKS AND RECREATION

walkms.org

INNOVATION DISTRICT This

BASEBALL GAMES April 1, 10, 17, 20-22

ALLIE P. REYNOLDS STADIUM, STILLWATER See the Cowboys as they take on other teams in the Big 12 Conference. okstate.com

SWOSU RODEO April 12-14 DON MITCHELL RODEO ARENA,

PHOTO BY JULIETA CERVANTES COURTESY OKC BROADWAY

ones and co-workers team up to change the lives of those affected by multiple sclerosis.

PERFORMANCE

The Book of Mormon Returns

Perhaps one of the best-known musicals of the 21st century is The Book of Mormon – and it returns to Oklahoma City thanks to OKC Broadway. The story follows two incompatible missionaries sent to Africa “to spread the Good Word.” “The Book of Mormon was a huge hit the first time it came to Oklahoma City,” says Bethany Rohlmeier, director of marketing for OKC Broadway. “Some of the strongest feedback we’ve received from patrons is that they either missed it the first time around or wanted to see it again. The mission of OKC Broadway is not only to bring the newest

hits direct from Broadway … but to include added season events that are huge Broadway successes or that our patrons have asked to see again.” The raunchy musical is perfect for adults on a night out – just leave the kids at home and get ready to guffaw, “I laughed through the entire show,” Rohlmeier says. “From ‘Hello,’ the opening number, to ‘You and Me (But Mostly Me),’ really, I was in stitches through all of it.” The show runs April 24-29 at the Civic Center Music Hall. Get your tickets at okcbroadway.com. APRIL 2018 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

85


swosuathletics.com

BEAVER’S BEND KAYAK CLASSIC April 14 BROKEN BOW LAKE Put

your skills to the test during this unique angling tournament.

neaversbendkayakclassic.com

TOUR DE TRYKES CRITERIUM April 21 DOWNTOWN ENID This

bicycle tour has routes of 2, 14, 26 and 42 miles, along with a 100k ride. tourdetrykes.com

ART TRAIL OF TEARS ART SHOW April 7-May 5

CHEROKEE HERITAGE CENTER, TAHLEQUAH

Featuring Native American work, this is one of the state’s oldest art shows. cherokeeheritage.org

FORT SMITH LEGEND JOHN BELL Through April 22 FORT SMITH (ARK.) REGIONAL ART MUSEUM

This year marks the

bicentennial of one of the oldest cities in the country, Fort Smith. This event features John Bell Jr., a Fort Smith legend. fsram.org

SOUL OF A NATION Through April 23

CRYSTAL BRIDGES, BENTONVILLE, ARK. Soul

of a Nation shines a bright light on the vital contribution of black artists to an important period in American history. crystalbridges.org

COMMUNITY FUR TRADE RENDEZVOUS April 4-7

FORT WASHITA HISTORIC SITE, DURANT This living

history reenacts a fur trade rendezvous, a center of commerce on the frontier. okhistory.org

MONTMARTRE CHALK ART FESTIVAL April 5 UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND ARTS OF OKLAHOMA, CHICKASHA USAO’s

annual Montmartre, a judged sidewalk chalk art festival, is held in conjunction with the USAO Scholastic Meet and Droverstock Music Festival. usao.edu/events

SCISSORTAIL CREATIVE WRITING FESTIVAL April 5-7 EAST CENTRAL UNIVERSITY, ADA Accomplished poets Jeanetta Calhoun Mish and George Bilgere headline the event.

ecuscissortail.blogspot.com

SPRING MOUNTAIN MAN ENCAMPMENT April 6-7 WOOLAROC MUSEUM AND WILDLIFE PRESERVE, BARTLESVILLE Hosted by

Woolaroc’s Mountain Men, Wes and Roger Butcher, the camp has become a favorite for traders and re-enactors from across the country. woolaroc.org

WAYNOKA RATTLESNAKE ROUNDUP April 6-8 DOWNTOWN WAYNOKA The

annual roundup began in the 1940s when area ranchers tired to rid ranch land of rattlesnakes. travelok.com

CORVETTE EXPO April 7 CHISHOLM TRAIL EXPO CENTER, ENID Don’t miss

Corvettes of Enid’s annual fundraiser. corvettesofenid.com

MADE IN OKLAHOMA FESTIVAL AND CAR SHOW

86

Another Look at Griffith The director of the controversial The Birth of a Nation also made the delightful Way Down East, playing at the Circle.

April 7

SEMINOLE MUNICIPAL PARK Support local vendors

and creators at this outdoor festival. seminoleokchamber.org

CRAFT BEER FORUM OF OKLAHOMA April 7 OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, STILLWATER This informative, hands-on educational event features seminars and tastings.

travelok.com

DOGWOOD DAYS FESTIVAL April 7

DOWNTOWN IDABEL

Celebrate the beautiful blooms of thousands of dogwood trees. travelok.com

GRAND LAKE BOOTLEGGER’S BALL

April 14

CHEROKEE YACHT CLUB, AFTON Break out your best

overalls and put on your nicest flannel. It’s that time again.

grandlakechamber.org

89ERS DAYS CELEBRATION April 17-21

DOWNTOWN GUTHRIE

Celebrate the birth of Oklahoma Territory, which began with a cannon shot at noon on April 22, 1889. 89ersdays.com

EL RENO CHOCOLATE FESTIVAL April 19 220 N. BICKFORD AVE., EL RENO Get ready for

a glamorous night of live music and delicious samples.

travelok.com

FOR MORE EVENTS IN TULSA, OKC AND AROUND THE STATE, HEAD TO OKMAG.COM.

FILM AND CINEMA

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

Around Town

D.W. Griffith might be the most influential director in film history. He helped to move cinema from novelty entertainment, built on films under 10 minutes, to the featurelength behemoth we know today. Along the way, he transformed and recodified cinematic language through experiments with camera placement and editing. Griffith is best known as the director of the notorious The Birth of a Nation, whose racial politics are every bit as ugly as its cinematography is beautiful. Griffith, a complex man, regretted the film later, and his other, more humane, films should not be forgotten. One of the best of these is Way Down East, a delightful melodrama featuring Griffith favorite Lillian Gish, one of the most expressive actresses of the silent era. Circle Cinema has Way Down East as part of its monthly showcase of silent films, as always accompanied by a live score by organist Bill Rowland, and I highly encourage you to seek it out April 14. Gish breaks your heart as a country girl seduced and abandoned by the lures of the big city before carving out a space for herself in a new community. Plus, it climaxes in a riproaring race down an icy river, one of the most complex and costly scenes in silent film history.

At Home

Leo McCarey belongs among the first rank of Golden Age comedy directors, along with contemporaries Frank Capra and Preston Sturges. His screaming divorce farce

The Awful Truth – also known as the film that introduced Cary Grant to the world – is one of his best – a hilarious, head-spinning tale of a couple with too much money and not enough sense. Grant is great and tempers his usual charm with his (underrated) knack for physical comedy, but he meets his match in Irene Dunn, who bends the film in her direction through sheer force of personality. If you love classic screwball comedies, and have already seen Bringing Up Baby too many times, check out the new Criterion release of The Awful Truth.

In Theaters

You can either go big or go small this month, with films from a perfectionist auteur and straight-from-Hollywood assembly line. Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs opens in limited release, and it should bring another helping of that meticulously curated sensibility craved by Anderson fans (and loudly bemoaned by his detractors). I count myself among the former, though I didn’t love everything about his last stop-motion, animated film, Fantastic Mr. Fox. His use of the medium itself was impeccable, so I’m stoked to see what he does this time around with an original story. Meanwhile, Dwayne Johnson continues his quest to be in every movie by starring in an adaptation of the arcade game Rampage. The game features three monsters smashing buildings, and the film looks about on that level – in other words, tons of dumb fun. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS

PHOTO COURTESY FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES. © 2018 TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX FILM CORP., ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Where & When

WEATHERFORD Watch top collegiate cowboys and cowgirls from across the region compete in traditional rodeo events.


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CLOSING THOUGHTS

Rodger Randle

R

odger Randle is a professor in the University of Oklahoma’s Department of Human Relations, director of OU’s Center for Studies in Democracy and Culture, and an honorary British consul for Oklahoma. Randle joined the Peace Corps before being elected to, in 1970, the Oklahoma House of Representatives and, in 1972, the state Senate, where he served four terms. He became Tulsa’s mayor in 1988 and served two terms. We caught up with Randle and got his thoughts on …

… Oklahoma’s education crisis.

… a public servant’s life.

In the era in which I grew up, public service was one of the most noble of callings. John Kennedy became president while I was in high school. Many of us were filled with optimism for what was possible in the world, and we had leaders who inspired us with the idea that each of us had a personal duty to making the world a better place. Joining the Peace Corps was a reflection of this idealism, but also an expression of a sense of adventure. Seeking public office was never one of my aspirations, but … as it turned out,

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2018

opportunities opened up to serve in elective office. In high school and college, I thought a university faculty position as the finest thing to which a person could aspire. It has been a circuitous route to get here.

… getting youth involved politically.

Many young people are attracted to getting a good job, earning a lot of money, and buying a lot of fancy stuff that will impress friends. Later in life they will discover that real inner satisfaction comes from the good they do for others. We live in a world today that is so interdependent and so interconnected that we simply do not have the option to ignore the policies that our government is making. Getting involved in politics and public service [has] an influence on the policies that determine the kind of world in which we are all going to live.

… his affability.

In my years in public life, a lot of time was spent in difficult meetings where ev-

eryone was on edge. Humor helped. I come across as someone very serious, and I am … but not really so serious as I seem. My humor comes from the gift, or curse, of being able to see things from unexpected angles. It is more of an ironic humor, not the backslapping, joke teller sort of humor. One of the nicest compliments I have received came when I was on an academic panel in Brazil (where Portuguese is the language), and one of the other professors complimented me on my “refined” sense of humor. It is nice to show humor in more than one language.

… being an honorary British consul.

My appointment was just being at the right place at the right time. We had a consul general for our region of the country who had decided that there should be an honorary consulate in Oklahoma. When he created the post, he did not have anyone particular in mind to fill it, and then a mutual acquaintance recommended me to him.

PHOTO BY JOSH NEW

From the beginning of our country, public education has been a hallmark of our democracy. Access to quality, publicly-funded education for everyone has been a key to our success. In Oklahoma, sadly, we are in retreat from this fundamental commitment. In those states with strong support for public schools, standards of living are higher and quality of life is better. Study after study proves this. In Oklahoma, our failure to invest in public education is closing the door on our future. The companies we want to attract to our state won’t come and more young people will leave. The most insidious [element] is that … by the time we see the actual damage … we will be a decade too late to correct our error.


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Oklahoma Magazine April 2018  
Oklahoma Magazine April 2018