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FORTY OKLAHOMANS SHAPING THE FUTURE OF OUR STATE

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FLYING HIGH WITH THE OKLAHOMA AIR NATIONAL GUARD

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CAN AN INNOVATIVE PROGRAM SAVE LIVES AND MONEY?

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GETTING SMART ON CRIME AprilUntitled-3 2011 Cover.indd 1 1

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LONG LIVE YOUR BRAND. It’s your name. Your business. You’ve built it with intelligent decision making, determination and financial foresight. And you have ambitious plans to ensure continual growth in the future. We understand. Let’s keep your business strong, together.

Business Banking | Treasury Services | International Banking | Retirement Plan Services | Private Banking Oklahoma City: 405.272.2386 | Tulsa: 918.588.6932 | www.bok.com © 2011 Bank of Oklahoma, a division of BOKF, NA. Member FDIC. Equal Opportunity Lender

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V O L . X V, N O . 4

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40 Under 40

April 2 0 1 1 O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

From musicians to attorneys, brewmasters to surgeons, state senators to district judges, we introduce you to 40 individuals under the age of 40 who are making a difference in Oklahoma through their professional and personal lives. In this, our fifth class of 40 Under 40, we salute these individuals and their commitment to their communities and state. The Class of 2011 is moving and shaking, and the sky is the limit for these 40 young professionals. Photographer John Amatucci shot each of the 40 in a marathon two-day photo shoot. View video interviews with the 40 online at www.okmag.com.

FEATURES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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An Eye in the Sky Oklahoma Magazine contributing photographer Jeremy Charles flies the friendly skies with the 138th Fighter Wing, the flying unit of the Oklahoma National Guard. We meet some of the military men and women who serve in the Wing and take a ride in an F-16C fighter jet. We also learn about the colorful history of the fighter wing, including its heroic mission during the Battle of the Bulge.

Playing It Smart With one of the highest incarceration rates in the country, Oklahoma is known for its no-nonsense approach to crime. A new initiative introduced by the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services hopes to increase funding for programs that will help reform those who suffer from mental illness and addiction to keep them from going back to prison.

ON THE COVER: DR. YOGESH MITTAL, ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON AND PARTNER WITH THE ORTHOPAEDIC CENTER, IS ONE OF OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE’S 40 UNDER 40 CLASS OF 2011.

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2011 FIVE STAR Wealth Managers 2011 INDEPENDENT SURVEY OVERALL SATISFACTION

Š 2 0 1 1 Cres cend o B us ines s S er v ices

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Special Advertising Section

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Five Star Wealth Managers An independent survey identifies top wealth managers in Oklahoma.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

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Contents

DEPARTMENTS 11

14 16 18 20 22

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The State Hit List Issues & Ideas OK Then People Culture

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Imagine drive-in movie theaters, drive-in burger joints, horns honking on Saturday night as high schoolers take to the Tulsa streets to show off their cars and say hello to friends. Dragging the strip is as essential to the high school experience as football games and first loves.

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The Talk The Insider Scene Spotlight Oklahoma Business Finance

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Life

46 Living Spaces

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Interior designer Christopher Murphy has created a living space for himself and his partner that pairs elegant with eclectic, upscale with humorous and subdued with over the top. The result is a three-level condo that tantalizes the eye at every glance with bright colors, rich fabrics and collectibles with stories.

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Accessorize Style Nutrition Prevention Destinations

Taste

The Waterfront Grill is a new restaurant opened by restaurateur Jim Blacketer where the water meets the cuisine. Fresh seafood, sushi and steaks highlight a diverse menu that will satisfy even the pickiest eater.

124 What We’re Eating 125 In The Kitchen 126 The Pour

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Entertainment

She’s one of the most fascinating and controversial entertainers to take the stage in decades. Now, Lady Gaga brings her Monster Ball Tour to the BOK Center. The entertainer, known best for elaborate costumes and dramatic performances, will surely raise eyebrows and, above all, entertain the sell-out crowd.

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Calendar of Events Critical State Music In Person

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

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OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN EDITOR THOM GOLDEN

February 6 – May 15, 2011

SENIOR EDITOR MICHAEL SASSOR ASSOCIATE EDITOR JAMI MATTOX CONTRIBUTING EDITORS CHRIS SUTTON JOHN WOOLEY EDITORIAL ASSISTANT KAREN SHADE GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN GRAPHIC DESIGNER CHRIS SANDERS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, JEREMY CHARLES, DAN MORGAN, SCOTT MILLER, MARK TORRANCE, JOHN AMATUCCI ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE AUDRA O’NEAL OFFICE/ADVERTISING ASSISTANT MELISSA JARUTOWICZ INTERNS MALLORY SCHRADER, BETH WALLER, REBEKAH WARREN CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM

Designer unknown, Mercury Flyer Toy Train Engine, Designed c. 1938. Stewart Program for Modern Design, gift of Eric Brill. This exhibition was organized and is circulated by The Liliane and David M. Stewart Program for Modern Design, Montreal.

EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2011 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

Member

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Wish It! Win It! Drive It!

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR It never fails. Whenever we begin accepting nominations for each year’s 40 Under 40 class or when the feature hits stands, we hear from readers who say, “Why not do a 50 Over 50?” or, “How about 60 Over 60?” Those would undoubtedly be great features including some of the state’s most fascinating people, but there’s a reason we choose to pay special attention to Oklahoma’s young professionals each April. Collectively, these individuals are the future of our state. In most cases, they could live anywhere in the country, maybe even make more money and enjoy all the things that big city life affords. However, the 40 we honor each year have chosen to stay in Oklahoma, or in some cases come back home, to contribute to the economy, get involved in their communities and make the state a more vibrant, prosperous place for all of us to live. For decades Oklahoma was a place that our brightest and most talented couldn’t wait to leave. And we weren’t necessarily high on anyone’s list of places to move. As the saying goes, “It’s a great place to raise a family.” True. But is it a good place for a young person to build a career, to reach his full potential? Does the state embrace young professionals and diversity in general? The answer to that question may be yes and no, but what’s clear is that the situation has dramatically improved. More of our best students are opting to build a life in Oklahoma and a job offer in Tulsa or Oklahoma City gets serious consideration. The 40 individuals we recognize each year play a crucial role in this progress. They’re making Oklahoma stronger. That’s good for everyone.

THE 6TH ANNUAL LEXUS RAFFLE Benefiting The Make-A-Wish Foundation® of Oklahoma

Thom Golden Editor

Presented by Lexus of Tulsa and Eskridge Lexus of Oklahoma City

Tulsa photographer John Amatucci photographed Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40 Class of 2011 (p. 72). He was given the challenge of photographing 40 accomplished young professionals, all on the same backdrop, and encouraging their own personalities to shine through. “It’s always an honor to photograph 40 successful people,” he says. “It takes a lot of energy to photograph 40 people in only two days, but the results were very rewarding.” Amatucci’s previous shoots for Oklahoma Magazine have included the 40 Under 40 Class of 2009.

GRAND PRIZE 2011 Lexus CT 200h

Approximate retail value: $31,000 Or at the winner’s request: $20,000 in lieu of the car.

2ND PRIZE 50” HDTV Plasma Television Provided by Lexus of Tulsa Approximate retail value: $1,500

3RD PRIZE Apple iPad with Wi-Fi 16GB ®

Provided by Lexus of Tulsa Approximate retail value: $500

TICKETS $100

OKLAHOMA CHAPTER

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Contributors

Only 1,600 Will Be Sold

Winner will be selected on or before June 10, 2011 Order by phone: 918.492.9474 or 405.286.4000 Download your registration form at www.oklahoma.wish.org

Senior editor Michael W. Sasser caught up with media strategist and Tulsa native Fred Davis to talk about his reputation as the right wing’s ad man (“Marketing Magician,” p. 20). “Fred was remarkably easy to reach and willing to chat, and he was much more candid and down to earth than most people I have spoken to from the political arena,” says Sasser. “He’s quite charming, has a warm and easy humor about him and it’s clear he has Oklahoma still in his blood – he

hobnobs with the most powerful people in the country, but he is clearly not all that impressed with himself.” Tulsa photographer and regular Oklahoma Magazine contributor Jeremy Charles took a February ride in an F-16 with the Oklahoma Air National Guard for this month’s “Eye In The Sky” photo essay (p. 65). The project took more than three months to complete, from inception to the once-in-a-lifetime ride. “Once I was in the plane, confined in a tiny cockpit and breathing through an oxygen mask, reality began to set in,” Charles says. “As we left the ground, it felt like a normal, albeit fast, airplane ride, then the pilot pulled back on the stick. Wow. There is no way to describe the raw power behind the craft. “It was a blast, a roller coaster times a thousand, but as we approached the landing strip back in Tulsa, I knew I was ready to have my feet back on the ground.”

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/22/11 12:38:40 PM


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The State ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

George and Shirley Hazlett took up square dancing as a hobby and for exercise.

(Not So) Dirty Dancing PHOTO BY DAN MORGAN.

Think square dancing went out with the Civil War? Think again.

When Shirley Hazlett’s children moved out of her home, she and her husband, George, found themselves at a loss for activity. Shirley felt restless and urged George to take dancing lessons with her, but he hated to exercise. After reading about the many health benefits of square dancing, he reluctantly agreed to taking classes. And what started out on a whim for the couple became a passion. “I love the dancing and the fellowship,” Shirley says. “You meet so many neat people. And it’s good exercise.” The Hazletts are the past presidents and current insurance chairmen of the Oklahoma Square Dance Federation, a conglomerate of nine districts and some 75 individual square dancing clubs from across the state. Since 1947, members of the federation dosado’d their way across the dance

floors of Oklahoma, and have picked up some serious devotees along the way. No one can quite agree where square dancing originated. Many credit English and French dances of centuries past, while the Scots, Scandinavians and Spanish are also said to have made contributions. The term dos-a-dos is French in origin, meaning “back-to-back.” Regardless of the roots, it has indisputably become a fixed part of American – and Oklahoman – heritage. “They call a square dance in English, no matter what country you dance in,” jokes Ray Mills, co-president of the Oklahoma federation. Jim Reese credits the family atmosphere of the gatherings and the friendliness of Oklahomans for square dancing’s popularity in the state. APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

“Oklahomans are naturally a social people and this is a very sociable activity,” he says. Reese and his wife, Julia, are the immediate past presidents of the Oklahoma Square Dance Federation. They have attended three out of the past four national square dancing conventions that the Oklahoma federation has hosted, and have been active in the group for more than 30 years. “We started dancing in 1976,” he says, “and plan on many more years of fun and fellowship.” Mills agrees with Reese that the familyfriendly nature of square-dancing gatherings – no drinking or misbehaving – is part of the attraction for so many Oklahomans. “They’re good, wholesome activities,” he says. “You can even bring your children and teach them to dance.” Many, like the Hazletts, join their local square dancing clubs for the numerous health benefits, such as reduced risk of heart

disease, bone-loss, depression, diabetes and even memory loss. The physical dancing itself keeps the body active and in shape, while the intricate calls of the dance – 32 in just the most basic set – helps keep the mind sharp. In addition, the camaraderie of the groups keeps participants happy and socially fulfilled. “Many doctors recommend square dancing as a form of exercise and a way to deter the aging process,” Reese says. “It’s one of the healthiest activities a person can participate in.” While everyone seems to have his or her own reason to join, this fall, the lure will be all about the car. During the first week of November, the Oklahoma Square Dance Federation will host its annual shindig at the Biltmore Hotel in Oklahoma City. Citizens are invited to dance, take one of the many classes offered, or just to watch. And one lucky attendee will drive away with the

prize from this year’s classic car giveaway – a 1978 white Corvette – an annual tradition at the event. This year’s theme is as down-to-earth and heartfelt as many of the federation’s members seem to be: “From Our Hearts to Yours, We Hope You Dance.” In the summer of 2013, the Oklahoma square-dancing scene will heat up even more as the federation hosts the 62nd annual National Square Dance Convention. Dancers and callers from around the nation will converge on Oklahoma City for four days of clogging, sashays and allemandes. Mills says that during the last convention, most of the hotels in Oklahoma City were booked; he anticipates a similarly large gathering in 2013. “It’s a whole lot of work to get everything put together on the national level,” he says, citing the help of the Oklahoma City Convention and Visitors Bureau. TARA MALONE

SHOUT OUT

VIEW MASTER

John Wooley takes us to the movies in two new books.

Readers have seen John Wooley’s take on everything from Red Dirt music to drive-in movies. The writer and Oklahoma Magazine contributing editor next takes his audience through cinematic history in two new books this spring. Our Insider columnist looks at a horror flick legend in Wes Craven: The Man and his Nightmares, released last month by John Wiley & Sons publishers. The book’s prologue opens on a startling scene involving two kidnapped teenagers before asking the question, “Why?” The answer lays between the first chapter, in which Craven – the man who created the nightmare known as Freddy Krueger and the Scream movies – opines that his evangelical Christian upbringing gave a “kick start” to his youthful imagination, and the book’s back cover, where author Ron Wolfe credits Wooley for writing a richly textured biography on one of the industry’s most interesting and controversial filmmakers. Shot in Oklahoma: A Century of Sooner State Cinema is scheduled for release from University of Oklahoma Press this month. Wooley zooms out from Hollywood horror and refocuses his view on movies filmed in Oklahoma. Like his well-known book From the Blue Devils to Red Dirt: The Colors of Oklahoma Music, a fascinating scan of the state’s vast musical contributions and the people behind them, Shot in Oklahoma highlights the more humble beginnings of film history all the way to untold stories from more recent shoots in the state. Did you know Thomas Edison filmed Oklahoma’s 101 Ranch in Kay County three years before statehood? Thanks to Wooley, you do now, and there are more fascinating reads inside. Look for both titles at area and online booksellers. KAREN SHADE

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The State

The Hit List Plug these events into this month’s agenda.

Tulsa Start! Heart Walk

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The Tulsa Opera presents Bellini’s bel canto masterpiece about a Druid priestess who engages in a secret affair ir with the leader of the he Roman Army, which ch results in two children. This production, n, created by Stanley M. Garner exclusively for Tulsa Opera audiences, will be a premiere for the company. www.tulsaopera.com

This annual event, sponsored by the American Heart Association, encourages folks of all ages and fitness levels to walk together to raise funds for research of heart disease. The Tulsa walk will be held April 2 at ONEOK Field; disease year’s goal is to raise $660,000. For more information, or to this yea register for this year’s event, visit www.americanheart.org.

A Conversation

T University of Tulsa’s 2010-2011 PresidenThe titial Lecture Series concludes April 7 with a conversation between Swedco ish novelist and playwright is Henning Mankell (best known H as the author of the Kurt Wallander detective series) and author Michael Ondaatje (The English Patient). www.utulsa.edu www

OKC Home Show

He’s handy and has an appeal of his own. Chip Wade of HGTV’s Curb Appeal, which gives needed faceelifts to the outside look of homes, will be at this year’s OKC Home Show, w, April 1-3 at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. homeshowokc.com

Herb Festivals

Thomas & Friends Live

April is the optimal time to begin planning summer garden; the festivals tell us so. the su Check out Tulsa Garden Center’s Springfest Garden Market and Festival April 9, www. tulsagardencenter.com; Brookside’s Herb Fest tulsaga April 9; Sand Springs Herbal Affair April 16, www. herbalaffairandfestival.com; or Jenks Herb and herbala Plant Show Sh April 23, www.jenksgardenclub.com.

The little train engine that has delighted children around the world for more than two decades pulls into the Expo Square Pavilion with a new live show, Thomas Saves the Day, April 30-May 1. www. exposquare.com

ONLY IN OKLAHOMA The life of Myra Maybelle Shirley, better known as Belle Starr, has been romanticized since before her death. According to legend, Starr was the “Bandit Queen” – a lovely, feminine figure who ruled outlaw gangs with her guns, her will power and her charm. In addition to being associated with the James boys and the Younger gang, Starr has been immortalized as a Robin Hood-like figure that stole from the rich to give to the poor. Her marriage to Cherokee Sam Starr provided her shelter as she moved into the territory with him. During her time there, Starr learned ways for organizing, planning and fencing for the rustlers, horse thieves and bootleggers. Her illegal enterprises proved lucra-

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tive enough for her to employ bribery to free her cohorts from the law when ever they were caught. Though her younger years still remain her most famous, Starr’s murder remains unsolved. Just two days before her 41st birthday in 1889, the outlaw queen met her tragic end as she was shot down in Eufaula, Okla. Although she spent much of her life between Missouri and Texas, Starr’s gravesite remains just outside of Eufaula to this day.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/22/11 12:38:56 PM


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ISSUES & IDEAS

Packing It Up Oklahoma agencies are working diligently to snuff out tobacco in Oklahoma.

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ith more than 700,000 members of the adult population hooked on tobacco, Oklahoma has one of the highest smoking rates in the nation. According to Sally Carter, interim service chief at the Tobacco Use Prevention Service with the Oklahoma State Department of Health, tobacco-related costs total up to $750 for every Oklahoman each year – even those who do not smoke. For every $60 the tobacco industry spends per person to promote smoking in the state, only $6 is spent on prevention. On average, smokers miss 50 percent more work days than non-smokers, and each pack of cigarettes sold costs the state economy $7.62 in medical costs and lost productivity due to premature death and disease. Do these numbers sound scary? They should. But agencies in Oklahoma are hard at work to change all of this. “The Oklahoma State Plan for Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation has established a goal to reduce the prevalence of tobacco use in Oklahoma to the national average,” Carter says. The plan focuses on three areas: cessation, prevention and protection from second-hand smoke. In addition, Carter lauds the aims of House Bill 2135, which would allow Oklahoma communities to pass smoking legislation that is stricter than current state requirements. The bill also is supported by numerous national organizations, including the American Cancer Society, American Heart Association 16

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and American Lung Association. The Tobacco Use Prevention Service is not the only organization in the thick of the state’s ongoing battle with tobacco addiction. The Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, or TSET, has taken funds the state received as part of the tobacco companies’ settlement and invested them in Oklahoma’s future. According to Sjonna Paulson, TSET’s director of communications, the interest and earnings of the dual endowment and trust have increased from $500,000 in FY 2003 to $18.5 million in FY 2011. TSET uses the results of their investments for smoking prevention programs, such statewide initiatives as Tobacco Stops With Me, community grants and cutting-edge research on cancer and tobaccorelated diseases with the Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center at the Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center. In addition to fighting tobacco addiction – like the Tobacco Use Prevention Service, they aim to bring Oklahoma smoking down to the national average – TSET plans in the future to extend their efforts into improving the overall nutrition and health of every Oklahoman. “When our goal is accomplished, there will be 200,000 fewer tobacco users in Oklahoma,” Carter says of the state’s efforts. “That’s 200,000 more tobacco-free Oklahomans living healthier lives.” Oklahomans interested in quitting tobacco can call the Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline at 1.800.QUIT.NOW, where many free resources are available, or visit www.stopswithme.com. TARA MALONE

AN EDMOND SUCCESS After almost five years since its adoption, Edmond’s Social Host ordinance appears to have succeeded as a deterrent to adult-assisted underage drinking. “It’s working well in Edmond because we enforce it and the word gets out,” says Edmond Police spokesperson Glynda Chu. Edmond’s law was the first of its kind in Oklahoma when enacted beginning in 2007. It places responsibility for underage drinking on the adult host of a party. Violators face a $500 fine or up to six months in jail. “Pretty much people just pay the fine,” says Chu. “We don’t usually have repeat offenders. That’s a lot of money for college students.” Chu says that these days offenders are typically college students hosting events at which someone is drinking and under 21 years of age. But recently, there are far fewer offenders than in the past. In 2007, there were 71 arrests on account of the Social Host ordinance. The number has dropped each subsequent year and was down to 10 in 2010. Parents and bar operators have generally been helpful in implementing the law. Chu says that after-hours fraternity and sorority parties at bars have virtually ended since the business would risk punishment. “Having a university in town means we have to get the word out every year, but it’s been very successful,” Chu says. More than 30 other municipalities in Oklahoma have adopted similar ordinances.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

The State

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3/21/11 3:45:18 PM


Lisa Zaidle Clark, CFP™ & Brian C. McKinney, CIMA® Receive Family Wealth Director Designation Tulsa, January 31, 2011 – Morgan Stanley Smith Barney announced today that Mrs. Lisa Zaidle Clark, CFP™ Financial Advisor and Senior Vice President, Investment Management Consultant and Brian C. McKinney, CIMA® Financial Advisor and First Vice President, Investment Management Consultant in the Firm’s Wealth Management office in Tulsa, OK have earned the Family Wealth Director (FWD) designation. The FWD designation is granted to those Financial Advisors who have successfully completed a rigorous high-end accreditation program focused on skills required for comprehensive wealth management across a range of disciplines important to wealthy individuals. There are less than 200 Family Wealth Directors out of over 18,000 advisors at the firm who have earned this prestigious designation. “This is an exceptional achievement for Lisa and Brian and an attestation of their commitment to today’s high net worth families. Lisa and Brian have demonstrated a sophisticated approach to the management of significant wealth that helps to set them apart from others within the industry,” said Greg Gangas, Complex Manager in Tulsa, OK. Designated Family Wealth Directors must demonstrate professional knowledge and experience in a range of specialties including estate planning, traditional and alternative investments, control and restricted securities, lending, hedging and monetization and investment banking. The FWD designation also entitles Lisa and Brian to specialized access to a variety of family advisory services such as, family governance and dynamics, philanthropic services and customized reporting. Lisa and Brian have been a member of the financial services industry for a combined 35 years. As Financial Advisors with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, they offer a full suite of financial planning and investment services to individual clients, institutions, foundations and endowments. Lisa earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Finance with minors in Economics, International Business and Accounting from Oklahoma State University. She is a Certified Financial Planner and is a member of Smith Barney’s prestigious Chairman’s Council, President’s Council and Century Council. Brian earned a Bachelor of Science Degree concentrating in finance and economics. He has been designated a Certified Investment Management Analyst by the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. Brian is a member of the Investment Management Consultants Association (IMCA). Brian and Lisa are part of the Wealth Management team- The Clark/ McKinney/Tramontana Group. In addition to Brian and Lisa are Mike Tramontana- Senior Vice President, Financial Advisor who has been with the firm 34 years and Amy Munsell and Jeana Keeter.

Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, a global leader in wealth management, provides a range of products and services to individuals, businesses and institutions, including brokerage and investment advisory services, financial and wealth planning, credit and lending, cash management, annuities and insurance, retirement and trust services. Morgan Stanley is a leading global financial services firm providing a wide range of investment banking, securities, investment management and wealth management services. The Firm’s employees serve clients worldwide including corporations, governments, institutions and individuals from more than 1,200 offices in 42 countries. For further information about Morgan Stanley, please visit www.morganstanley.com.

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Investments and services offered through Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC, member SIPC. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and its Financial Advisors and Investment Representatives do not offer tax or legal advice. Individuals should consult their personal tax and/or legal advisors before making any tax- or legal-related investment decisions. © 2009 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC.

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3/20/11 3:37:40 PM


The State

SMART MOVE

RED DIRT RODENTS

OK THEN

Battlefield Oklahoma

O

Beginning this month, Oklahoma observes its unique role in Civil War history.

klahoma, still Indian Territory, never officially joined the Confederacy. But its sympathy for the Confederate cause was strong and its citizens, including Native Americans, fought alongside Confederate troops in the Civil War. Several skirmishes and battles took place on what is now Oklahoma soil. Events are planned across the nation to mark the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, and the Oklahoma Civil War Sesquicentennial

nation,” says Cody Joliff, coordinator for the Oklahoma Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. Oklahoma’s Civil War sesquicentennial kicks off on April 29 with a re-enactment of the Battle of Honey Springs in Rentiesville. Cannons, muskets and sabers will commemorate the pivotal battle where the Confederacy lost control of Indian Territory, opening the western front to Union invasions. The Oklahoma History Center will host Call To Arms, a living history exhibit. An an-

Oklahoma’s Civil War sesquicentennial kicks off on April 29 with a re-enactment of the Battle of Honey Springs in Rentiesville. Commission wants to make sure Oklahoma’s role in this chapter of our nation’s history isn’t forgotten. From now until 2015, the Commission will host and sponsor events commemorating Indian Territory’s participation in the Civil War. “The issues surrounding Oklahoma’s involvement in the Civil War were different here than they were anywhere else in the 18

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nual event, this year’s presentation will feature a strong emphasis on the Civil War. The event, scheduled for May 21, will feature 20 stations with actors bringing Oklahoma’s past alive. The Oklahoma Communities Council will sponsor a unique opportunity for 20 teachers to learn about Oklahoma’s part in the Civil War up close and personal. The Oklahoma

Civil War Sesquicentennial Teachers’ Institute will focus on helping these teachers bring the Civil War to their students with classroom materials, field trips and other tools. “Here in Oklahoma, a lot of people had ancestors that fought in the Civil War. We keep those ancestors alive by remembering them. And, also, there’s the saying, ‘If we don’t remember the past, we’re doomed to repeat it.’ That’s true of the history of states’ rights, the Civil Rights movement and the state’s involvement in the Civil War,” says Matt Reed, curator of American Indian and Military History Collections at the Oklahoma Historical Society. PAUL FAIRCHILD

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

Re-enactors interpret the Battle of Honey Springs, which gave control of Indian Territory north of the Arkansas River to Union Soldiers.

Oklahoma is set to host a horde of African giant pouched rats, and they are invited guests, although their future could be bleak. Thanks to a $740,000 federal grant, an Oklahoma State University researcher will soon explore techniques to transform these rats – which can reportedly grow to be three feet long – into bomb-sniffing super-soldiers. To be fair, the idea didn’t originate in Oklahoma. In fact, African giant pouched rats have successfully been used elsewhere to detect land mines. Rats have distinct advantages when it comes to the growing field of explosive detection. They can cover a lot of ground fast, their keen sense of smell enables them to sniff out land mines, and they are too light to actually set off explosives. On the down side, researchers say that it isn’t always easy to motivate a rat to scurry off and find a land mine – unlike dogs, that like people and have that handy “fetch” instinct. The research at OSU is designed to try to determine genetic and/ or behavioral traits that might make specific rats good candidates for bomb squads. The grant recipient, Alexander Ophir, a professor at OSU’s Department of Zoology, heads up the project.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/19/11 3:51:21 PM


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3/18/11 3:57:23 PM


Marketing Magician

Fred Davis successfully applies commercial marketing strategies to political campaigns. product.” That sense of creative input reminds Davis of his early days as “the kid in the neighborhood who was always putting on plays.” “I’m doing exactly the same thing today, only I get paid and the productions are more

“You don’t have much say in what’s in a Burger King burger. In politics you have more input into the actual product.” elaborate,” Davis quips. In a field in which risky and daring are anathema, Davis and his cohorts at Strategic Perception, Inc. have garnered success and

Fred Davis has worked with some of the top republicans in the nation, including John McCain.

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Davis’ penchant for theatrics could have been confined to theater. At 19, his father died and Davis took over his public relations firm. The firm had grown dramatically with big-name corporate clients, when his uncle, Oklahoma Congressman James M. Inhofe asked Davis to help save his ailing U.S. Senate bid. “He couldn’t afford to pay me, so the deal was that I would do it but that he wouldn’t get much say in what was in the ads,” Davis says. “I wanted to apply corporate marketing strategies to politics.” After a dramatic ad featuring dancing felons, Inhofe claimed a 30-point swing in the polls – and victory. “The phone started ringing off the hook,” he says. Davis says that he has no regrets for his work’s colorful nature – even the controversial “I am not a witch” ad that was lampooned nationally. “It was a success,” he says. “(O’Donnell) was down 17 points before it and we cut that to 11 points in four days. It was supposed to be the first in a series of ads, but she decided she needed to attack her opponent instead.” Davis credits his success largely to being in the right place at the right time – which today still includes offices in Tulsa. “I’ve got the greatest job in the world – it’s all luck,” he says. “I’ve been in the right place at the right time, like Forrest Gump.” MICHAEL W. SASSER

PHOTO COURTESY STEPHANIE HOGUE.

T

he way that Fred N. Davis III sees it, there isn’t much difference between promoting burgers and promoting potential presidents. “I’ve said that there is no difference between marketing products and marketing political candidates, but that’s an overstatement,” says the Tulsa-born media strategist. “They are very, very similar. In both cases, research shows what people like and what they don’t like about a product. You then find a striking way to make people focus on what they like and overlook what they don’t.” There are some differences. “You don’t have much say in what’s in a Burger King burger,” Davis illustrates. “(In politics) you have more input into the actual

acclaim for applying corporate marketing techniques to the staid world of political campaigns. As chief creative consultant to John McCain’s presidential campaign, Davis tailored the commercial featuring Barack Obama as “the biggest celebrity in the world,” comparing him to Paris Hilton and Britney Spears, which went viral online. Davis was also responsible for Carly Fiorina’s “demon sheep” ad in California and Christine O’Donnell’s “I am not a witch” effort in Delaware, among numerous others. The industry takes notice of Davis’ work. He’s garnered numerous industry awards. “The thing I like about politics is the immediacy,” says Davis. “In politics, you write it at 4 a.m. and it gets on television at 6 p.m. Contrast that to a (commercial) campaign I’ve been working on for a year and a half.” MICHAEL HELMS

The State

PEOPLE

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/20/11 3:42:06 PM




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April Master.indd 21

3/18/11 3:57:52 PM


The State

For Jerry Conrad, cruising the Restless Ribbon in his ’68 LeMans was as good as it got in high school.

C U LT U R E

Dragging The Strip

G

o down any popular cruising strip in Oklahoma – say, Tulsa’s Memorial Drive – on any given weekend after the sun goes down, and the lanes are crowded with kids cruising and parking lots full of teens just hanging out. It’s not a new thing. The technology’s changed, but except for smaller cars and bigger speakers, it is a scene that would be right at home on Brookside’s Restless Ribbon in the ‘60s and ‘70s, or around burger shacks and drive-in theaters in the ‘50s. Jerry Conrad stops at a red light on Brookside in Tulsa. His powerful V-8 hums its soothing rumble. A car pulls up beside him and the light turns. “That light turned green and away you’d go, laying rubber all the way,” Conrad says. Except he doesn’t. Conrad takes off at a reasonable, law-abiding pace. He’s in a Dodge Ram pick-up now, and it’s not a crowded Brookside strip in the 1960s and ‘70s – the old Restless Ribbon days. Back in high school at Central in Tulsa, 22

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Conrad could be found making the loop on Brookside. Cars would cruise back and forth, trying to see who was driving what and who was riding with whom, and turn around and do it all over again. He drove a 1968 LeMans back then. Still has it. “Almost anybody you talk to is going to tell you there were no better times for muscle cars than the ‘50s and ‘60s,” Conrad says. Cars were part of the equation for cruising back then, cruisers say. The friends were the other part. Hank Moore’s cruising days spanned much of the 1950s. High school kids would hit their particular hangout – nearly always a Pennington’s drive-in restaurant, for some good food, sodas and to see who else was out. The soundtrack of their Friday nights was provided by KAKC, Moore says. “The music of the time was absolutely huge – very much a part of young people’s culture,” he says. “The drive-in restaurants were pretty

much the hub of the social activity at night.” But they weren’t the only spots. Drivein movie theaters would draw a crowd and were fine places for a date. A movie and snacks, followed by dinner at Pennington’s, would only cost a fellow about $5 at that time. “If you had a half tank of gas, a nice lady and a six-pack of beer in your trunk, you were in heaven,” Conrad recalls. Moore left Tulsa, and his cruising days, in 1960. Conrad went away to college in 1972, leaving behind the scene to the high schoolers behind him. Pennington’s owners closed up the driveins. Judy Pennington died in 2010. The last drive-in theater, the Admiral Twin, burned to the ground in 2010. All signs, for some, the era of their cruising has passed. But it’s not over. Somewhere, some weekend night, some kid is keeping the tradition, changed though it has, alive. DUSTIN HUGHES

PHOTO BY DAN MORGAN.

Fast cars, pretty girls, tallboys, good burgers and Tulsa asphalt all surround the city’s cruising culture.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/19/11 1:21:19 PM


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April Master.indd 23

3/18/11 3:58:07 PM


The State

T H E TA L K

Lead Teacher

Oklahoma City superintendent Karl Springer wants to change the culture of schools.

Oklahoma Magazine: Everyone has opin-

ions about education: why it works, why it doesn’t; what needs to be fixed, what doesn’t. What’s your big deal with Oklahoma City Public Schools? What does Karl Springer see as priorities? Karl Springer: What we need to do first is change the culture of the school district and also the expectations of the community about how our students are going to perform academically. There’s nothing wrong with the students. We need to work to provide a structured environment and create expectations for our students and help them to be successful. OM: If a student travels from start to finish through our public school system, what are some of the things he should have when he leaves and goes out into the real world? KS: Our students should be ready for careers and colleges when they graduate from our comprehensive high schools. I think that they need to be critical thinkers. They need to have very developed abilities to communicate – in writing and verbally. They need to be able to solve problems with groups of people. They should be good citizens that make good decisions for the future of this country. They should have a well-rounded education so that when they graduate from high school, their potential is up to them. OM: Were you ever suspended or expelled from high school?

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

KS: Not in high school, but in elementary school I was suspended five times. OM: An early troublemaker? KS: Actually, in high school, too, now that I think about it. I really liked school. But I had a tendency to pull pranks that weren’t good. OM: I won’t ask you to elaborate. KS: I hope you don’t ask me to elaborate. OM: You’ve been superintendent for almost three years now. Looking back, what are some of the district’s biggest accomplishments during that time? KS: I feel that the culture of our district is changing. We’re implementing a continuous learning calendar, where we’re going to shrink the length of the summer and give children more opportunities to be remediated. The expansion of our pre-K program this fall is also a good sign. We now have 100 percent of our students in full-day kindergarten. Our movement to make our secondary programs more rigorous, making our students more into subject mastery and problem solving and less into skill and drill behavior. Those are the kinds of things that are going to have a long-lasting effect on schools. OM: How long will it take before we start seeing a serious impact from Oklahoma City’s new continuous learning program? KS: I would hope this next school year. The idea is to take the summer and spread it out over the school year. During those new breaks or intercessions, we’ll bring in

students that need to be remediated. We’ll give them the help that they need early in the school year, not waiting until the end of the school year when it’s really too late for them. We’re giving them a just-in-time remediation. I’m hoping this has an effect, but I think it’ll snowball, too, as we use it year after year. We’re one of the only school districts in the U.S. where the whole district is on the continuous learning calendar all year. It’s going to be more of a continuous calendar with opportunities for children all year round to learn and grow. PAUL FAIRCHILD

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Karl Springer has served almost three years as the Superintendent of Oklahoma City Public Schools. For the past decade, that’s a record. For years the position was a revolving door, with superintendents being ousted at amazing speeds, one even resigning in the face of a corruption scandal. But Springer must have the touch, because his name is still on the door. In his short time as superintendent, he’s introduced a number of progressive and new ideas to Oklahoma City schools, including the continuous learning calendar. He refers to himself as “Lead Teacher for the Oklahoma City Public School District.”

PHOTO COURTESY WWW.TRAVELOK.COM.

3/21/11 3:19:09 PM


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April Master.indd 25

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3/18/11 3:58:17 PM


The State THE INSIDER

and Dub Campbell came down and saw the band and was interested in playing with us. He plays great fiddle and guitar. So he signed up with us.” Unfortunately, London Records didn’t make a deal with the group, and neither did any other record company. Although the band, dubbed Pearly Hawkins, was getting plenty of work on the West Coast, Crossley opted to return to Oklahoma City, where he soon joined another rock outfit, Ringes. After several personnel changes, Ringes would become Oklahoma. “The original Ringes members were Dwight Trahern on drums, Ben Blakemore on bass and vocals, Danny White on vocals and percussion, Speedy West Jr. on guitar, Joe Intrieri on keys, and myself, with Michael Slack and Lynn Bailey as our sound engineers,” Crossley says. “We made a demo, and I played it for Dub. Dub knew Mark (Lindsay) and got it to him somehow, and upbeat, he seemed happy to talk about and then Mark and Terry Melcher came and the group and its brief turn on the national saw us. They really liked it, went back to stage. L.A., and brought Mike Curb back with ‘em. Interestingly, Crossley says that OklaWe did a showcase for Mike at the old Long homa’s formation was tied to the end of anBranch Saloon in Oklahoma City. They were other major-label act from the Sooner State excited and signed us to a deal. – Buckwheat, a group out of Erick, Okla., “Whenever they got the money to do the that recorded four albums for London deal,” he adds, “they moved back here (to Oklahoma City) for about a month, and we cut that stuff over at the old Producers Workshop, most of it. Curb was just starting Curb Records at that time, and he subbed us out to Capitol.” While Curb (who’s not credited on the disc) was on his way to becoming a famous music-business executive, and Melcher was a very well-known producer, the star name in the production team The 1970s group Oklahoma. belonged to Lindsay, the voice on such rock ‘n’ roll classics as “Kicks” and “Hungry.” Records in the late ‘60s/early ‘70s. Its perAt the time of his affiliation with Ringes, sonnel included a young woman who would Lindsay’s last charted single as a solo act become one of Tulsa’s best-known pop was several years behind him (although he vocalists, the late Debbie Campbell, along continues to tour and record to this day). with her then-husband, Dub Campbell. For Oklahoma, he was all over the place, In the mid-‘70s, after Buckwheat split not only co-producing, but also singing up, “their drummer, Sonny Ray Griffiths, background vocals, engineering and mixing came back to Oklahoma City, supposthe record. edly looking for a replacement band for “Oh, he was really working hard,” recalls London Records,” Crossley remembers. Crossley. “He’d quit refined sugar, gotten “So I moved out to L.A. with him. We got a on this hopped-up diet, and he had a lot of house gig in Costa Mesa at the Lucky Lion,

The Long-Lost Oklahoma

I

f you enjoy this story, you have Samantha Powell and her mother, Leigh Powell, to thank. A student in one of my American Studies classes on Oklahoma music and movies at OSU’s Tulsa campus, Samantha brought a Capitol Records album titled Oklahoma to school one night. It belonged to her mother, who had purchased the disc the year it came out – 1977 – while attending OSU in Stillwater. I was stumped. Even though I’ve written about our state’s music for somewhere around three decades, I’d never heard of this band. (It’s instances like this that keep you from thinking too highly of yourself and your “expertise.”) The liner notes told me that the production end was handled by a couple of West Coast heavyweights: Terry Melcher – who produced the Byrds, The Mamas and The Papas and Paul Revere and the Raiders, among many other acts – and Mark Lindsay, the vocalist on all of Paul Revere and the Raiders’ ‘60s hits, as well as a successful early ’70s solo artist. As far as I knew, neither Melcher nor Lindsay had any ties to our state. Here was a mystery that demanded answers. And luckily, I found just the guy who could provide them. He’s guitarist-vocalistsongwriter Steve Crossley, formerly of the band Oklahoma, who’s still a busy performer in and around Oklahoma City. Engaging

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/19/11 1:13:31 PM


energy. The neat thing was that when those guys came back here for a month, staying at the house of a friend of ours, we got to know them pretty well, and pretty quickly. We became pretty good buddies. It was cool.� But the producers also made some changes, cutting the band to four members: Crossley, Blakemore, guitarist Don Juntunen (who also continues to perform music around Oklahoma City) and drummer Sam Flores. They also changed the name of the group “because they thought Ringes sounded too much like Wings,� Crossley notes with a chuckle. He believes the new moniker may also have been influenced by the band Kansas, which was becoming hot at the time. Unfortunately, nothing similar happened with Oklahoma. Capitol released a single from the disc, the Crossley-penned “What You Treat Me So Bad For,� and then the album; neither made much of a showing. Talk of a national tour fizzled, and Oklahoma played only a handful of dates. As often happens in these sorts of situations, frustration and unmet expectations led to friction within the group, and Crossley left after a

Oklahoma’s formation was tied to the end of another major-label act from the Sooner State – Buckwheat, a group out of Erick, Okla., that recorded four albums for London Records in the late ‘60s/early ‘70s. New Year’s Eve date in Oklahoma City at the end of 1977. Although the band went on for a while with replacement members, including Steve Hardin, the noted keyboardist and songwriter from Bartlesville, Capitol Records soon dropped the act and it broke up for good. “You know how it is, with egos and everything,� says Crossley with another chuckle. “It just goes from, ‘We’re on top of the world’ to ‘Hey, man! You’re not playing the right notes!’ Some of the guys kind of got ‘egoed’ out and thought it should have been way bigger than it was. I was lucky to know guys like Dub (Campbell) and Michael Smotherman, who’d already had major-label deals. If I had a question about something, I could call ‘em and say, ‘Here’s what’s going on,’ and they could tell me pretty much what to expect.� Crossley ended up playing with Smotherman, another Buckwheat alumnus who went on to make his own significant mark in the industry. That job led to a songwriting and performing deal with Glen Campbell, and Crossley worked with a number of other music stars as well, returning to Oklahoma City for good in 1982, when his son, Steven, was born. These days, he’s getting plenty of gigs both as a solo artist and with OKC bands like the Blue Cats and Hoppy Niles’ One-Armed Bandit. He even played a couple of jobs with Mark Lindsay when Lindsay’s touring brought him to the area. Obviously, Crossley harbors no ill feelings toward his former producer – or, it appears, about the one-off performance of Oklahoma as a big-time recording act. “Because I was getting that advice (from Smotherman and Campbell),� he reflects, “I think I was a little bit cooler about it than some of the other guys. It was just hard for them to understand why the wheel wasn’t turning as fast as it should’ve been. I really didn’t know either, but I was a little bit more prepared, because I knew a little more about the reality of it.� JOHN WOOLEY

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The State

SCENE

The Tulsa City-County Library recently held its 2011 Festival of Words Author Award at Central Library. Attending were Mary Shaw, LeAnne Howe, author award winner; Teresa Runnels and Gary Shaffer.

Committee members of the fifth annual Fondue Fandango, which will be held May 12 at Harn Homestead, recently gathered for a Peep Party. Attendees included Johnny and Sheryl Pribyl, David Leader and Scott Davis.

The chairs for this year’s Celebrate Cascia, which will be held April 30, are Nikki Rhoades, Leigh Ann Fore, Doug DeJarnette and Ketrin Boone.

Mark Graham, Becky Frank, Andie Doyle and Don Walker gathered for the Tulsa Area United Way 2011 Annual Meeting.

The Tulsa Juliette Low Leadership Society Celebration will be held April 27 at Southern Hills Country Club. Committee members for this year’s celebration include Debbie Luthey, Marcia Lybarger and Tracy Kyle.

Sara Freedman, Lou C. Kerr, Gov. Mary Fallin and Larry Crosby attended the 20th annual Women’s Business Leadership Conference.

Single in the City- Bachelors and bachelorettes from Oklahoma City recently gathered at Skky Bar to raise money for Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oklahoma. The event was sponsored by Oklahoma Magazine.

Lisa Riley, Lindsay Rubac and Jessica Webb.

Jacqueline Sit and Jane-Ann Stinchcomb.

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Don Thomas, Jan Massey, Robin Walker and Patty Horn.

Kevin Joseph and Josh Litsch.

Angie Mock and Liz Hyatt.

Clinton Simon, Laila Aydi, Corinne Simon and Floyd Simon.

Teresa and Mike Seabolt and Jack and Betty Lorenz.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/21/11 8:34:06 AM


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3/18/11 3:58:30 PM


The State

SPOTLIGHT

Oklahoma Magazine Celebrates 15 Years Oklahoma Magazine recently held a celebration marking the magazine’s 15-year anniversary at Waterfront Grill in Jenks.

Oklahoma Magazine President Daniel Schuman proposes a toast while Jimmy Blacketer and magazine founder and Publisher Vida Schuman look on.

Mary Ann Doran, Sheila Golden and Keith Sturtevant.

Barbara and Don Thornton.

James and Laurie Koehler.

Bill and Rozann Knight.

Frank and Mary Shaw.

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Mahala Mittal and Ryan Jude Tanner.

Raj Basu and Rebekah Tennis.

David Chernicky, Tara Vreeland and Robin and Tim Cargile.

Macy and John Amatucci.

Travers and Laurie Mahan.

Chera Kimiko, Daniel Schuman, Jimmy Blacketer and Vida Schuman.

Jessica and Russell Barr.

Shawn and Jennifer Combs.

Rania Nasreddine and Adam Leavitt.

Jo Ann Cardwell and Amanda Stone.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/21/11 8:33:33 AM


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3/18/11 4:02:13 PM


The State

SPOTLIGHT

Red Ribbon Gala Guests of the 14th annual Red Ribbon Gala enjoyed dinner, dancing and a silent auction at this year’s event. Proceeds from the gala benefited Tulsa CARES, an organization that provides support and education to those affected by HIV and AIDS. Jay Kottinger, Marston Smith and Ryan Jude Tanner.

David and Tamra Sheehan.

George and Rita Singer.

Greg Holt and Eugenia Johnson.

Charles Faudree and Liz Haskins.

Vida Schuman, Yogesh and Mahala Mittal and Daniel Schuman.

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Tim Kincaid, Ty Kaszubowski and Mike Keys.

Phil Long, Kimberly Feger, Wes Steinbach and Robin McEver.

Bill and Susan Thomas.

Bill Carpenter, Charles Faudree, Rebekah Tennis and Raj Basu.

John Daw and Doug Campbell.

Don and Megan Zetik, Eugenia Johnson and Jana Boyd.

Jhonny Cisneros, Emily Cary and Marcos Portieiro.

Ron and Robin LaButti.

Larry and Marilyn Lee.

Kari Culp, Ryan Jude Tanner and Pat Chernicky.

Piper and Deacon Turner and Megan and Don Zetik.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/21/11 8:33:03 AM


Never underestimate the value of your network. Congratulations to Tim Jenney from your colleagues at Cox Business for being named to the 40 under 40 list. We’re glad to be connected with you, and enjoy working side by side with you each day. Your success is more proof that hard work and an excellent network can really pay off.

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3/18/11 4:02:30 PM


The State

SPOTLIGHT

Wine, Women and Shoes It was a foot fashion frenzy at the Tulsa Convention Center as crowds gathered to enjoy two days of wine, food and shoes to raise money for the YWCA.

Sharon King Davis and Marylee Robison.

Janet McGehee and Lucinda Rojas Ross.

Joanie Barnard, Susan Thomas and Maria Carlota Palacios.

Isaac Rocha, Colleen McCarty, Vanessa Gillingham and Shari Alexander.

Liz Hagans, Jane Weber and Taheerah Salim.

Deb Krumme and Insung Kim.

Patricia Samuels, Altricia Foster and Jacqueline Caldwell.

Margo Dunbar, Brenda Pritchard, Cathey Harned and Renee Bussell.

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Kate Thomas, Cindy Marshall, Shelly Willman and June Patton.

Elaine Honig and Andrea Nielsen.

Diane Gawey-Riley, Judy Claudette-Williams and Cindy Marshall.

Mary and Frank Shaw and Marla and Steve Bradshaw.

Claudia Abernathy, Donna Clack, Belynda Spitzer, Billie Barnett and Charlotte Edmondson.

Jessica Nasreddine, Mahvash Khosrowyar, Rania Nasreddine and Jana Boyd.

Doug Campbell, Georgenia Van Tuyl and John Daw.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

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The State

High-speed rail is widely available throughout much of the world.

OKLAHOMA BUSINESS

Trainspotting High-speed rail remains a long-term goal in Oklahoma.

W

hen the Oklahoma Department of Transportation awarded a bid in March to replace Interstate 244’s westbound Arkansas River bridge with a double-decker structure, many hailed the planned $64 million project. After all, the bridge had been constructed in 1967, is considered structurally deficient, and with its eastbound twin, still carries more than 50,000 cars on average per day. But perhaps fewer noted the details of the composition of the bottom lane of the bridge, slated for completion in 2013. Rail infrastructure for both high-speed rail and commuter light rail is included in the plans. “We’re designing for the next 75 years so why not be ready for high-speed rail?” says ODOT director of engineering David Streb. “That bridge is anticipated to be part of a high-speed system. It will also be ready in case light rail (is ever developed in Tulsa).” The introduction of high-speed rail to Oklahoma, though, remains elusive. After missing out on a piece of a huge cash pie made available by the federal government, 36

April Master.indd 36

the state is taking baby steps in the process of long-term planning. “In 2001, 10 high-speed corridors were designated nationally including the southcentral corridor (connecting Texas and Oklahoma),” Streb explains. “But after the

Oklahoma City to Fort Worth route – as well as creation of a true high-speed line connecting Tulsa and Oklahoma City. Streb explains the difference between emerging high-speed rail and the true highspeed rail coveted by many today. “Emerging means trains run on existing rail that is shared with cargo rail,” he says. “For example, the Heartland Flyer’s top speed is 79 miles per hour. True high-speed rail, such as was proposed to connect Tulsa and Oklahoma City would be on new rail,

“True high-speed rail would have a top speed of 150 miles per hour.” designation, nothing happened. There was no funding, and even though Oklahoma conducted some studies, nothing else was done.” However, the Obama administration announced plans for a national highspeed rail program and made funds available to state governments. “Oklahoma submitted a proposal for its part of the south central rail corridor,” Streb says. The proposal called for billions of dollars in operational improvements on the Heartland Flyer –Amtrak’s

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/19/11 3:27:38 PM


wouldn’t be shared with cargo and would have a top speed of 150 miles per hour.” Oklahoma appears to be a logical market for rail if the success of the Heartland Flyer is any gauge. “Ridership on the Flyer continues to grow and to be strong,” says Marc Magliari, Chicago-based spokesman for Amtrak. “Our last full one-year period for which we have statistics shows ridership up 11 percent over the previous year. From October 2010 to February 2011, there has also been an 8.8 percent increase in ridership for the period.” Magliari explains that the Heartland Flyer is funded by the states of Oklahoma and Texas, but that another state government might end up participating as well. “Kansas is studying a plan to extend the Flyer to Newton, Kan., or to Kansas City,” he says. “Or they might look at separate trains connecting. The three states are talking about it.” Unfortunately, despite the increasing popularity of Oklahoma’s existing passenger rail route, the state’s proposal for federal high-speed rail development funds was denied and the money went to other states, Streb says. Efforts to raise smaller sums of federal money for specific efforts were more successful.

“We applied for funding to do an environmental impact study and research the impact of an Oklahoma City to Tulsa route and also to do a services development plan – basically a feasibility study,” Streb says. The proposal was approved and the state awaits receipt of the funds. Secondly, Oklahoma was also awarded $1 million for minor switch improvements to the Heartland Flyer route that will improve travel time slightly. Texas, meanwhile, was also awarded funding for its side of Heartland Flyer, and planned improvements there are expected to take a full 15 minutes off the route time. Third, and arguably most importantly, Oklahoma has just launched its effort to create a comprehensive state rail plan. “States are actually required to do it and we have just completed our first outreach meetings,” Streb says. The state rail study is expected to take approximately 36 months and is not specifically focused on high-speed rail. “Passenger rail is just one component of the state rail plan,” Streb says. He adds that the state is likely to get a consulting engineer on board for the Oklahoma City to Tulsa route study, and that there will be a series of meetings in communities around the state.

“We’ve done a lot of engineering but we haven’t looked yet at the environmental impact and we haven’t really looked at the impact on communities,” he says. Streb adds that residents should expect to hear about public meetings as Oklahoma forges ahead with its master rail plan preparation and also with its now-funded study of a potential Oklahoma City-Tulsa high-speed connection. What Oklahomans shouldn’t expect is high-speed rail tracks to be set in the earth any time soon. “We’re still a long way from having highspeed rail,” Streb says. “There has been a lot of talk about it and many states are pursuing it because the federal government had money available for it.” He adds that he doesn’t know if Washington will offer another round of funding for high-speed rail in the future. “We think it is in our best interest to be prepared so if federal funds become available again, we’re ready to move forward in the best interest of the state,” he says. Amtrak isn’t making any predictions either. “The president said his goal is to have 80 percent of the population (serviced) by highspeed rail, but I don’t think the map looks like that will be the case as it stands now,” Magliari says. MICHAEL W. SASSER

Northern New England Pacific Northwest Empire Chicago Hub Network

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APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

SAVE EARLY, SAVE OFTEN

FINANCE

The Route To Retirement

I

It’s never too early to save; what’s the best tool to help you retire comfortably?

f someone asks, “When should I start planning for retirement?,” the answer is always, “Now.” It’s never too early to begin, and there’s never a downside to saving for your future. The big question is how you should save. Do you opt for your employer plan and invest in a 401(k), or do you open an IRA? “When deciding if investing in a 401(k) plan or an IRA is right for you, there are four differences that come to mind,” says Brent Suchy, retirement plan specialist at Arvest Asset Management. “First, employer match. Any time your employer will give you money to save for retirement, you have to take advantage of it. Secondly, maximum contribution limits – a 401(k) plan allows you to save more money per year than an IRA.” For a 401(k), the maximum allowed contribution per year is $16,500 plus a $5,500

catch-up contribution. For an IRA, the maximum contribution per year is $5,000 with a $1,000 catch-up contribution. Suchy also points out required minimum distributions (RMDs) and Roth 401(k)s. At age 70.5, participants in a 401(k) or traditional IRA are required to take minimum distributions – unlike a Roth IRA. However, Roth IRAs have income limitations while a Roth 401(k) does not. “If you would like to save more for retirement than your 401(k) or IRA allow, then a tax-deferred annuity could be an option as well,” says Suchy. Ken Etheredge, senior vice president of Retirement Plans Practice Leader with Bank of Oklahoma, encourages everyone to seek out tax advantages. “Traditional IRAs work more like a 401(k) in that you receive a tax break on the contributions made to an IRA,” says Etheredge. “For Roth IRAs, you pay taxes

Planning and preparing for your retirement is smart at any age. According to Ken Etheredge, senior vice president of Retirement Plans Practice Leader with Bank of Oklahoma, here are a few steps you should consider: • Determine your retirement needs. Factors to consider are age, investment horizon and amount of money needed. A good rule of thumb is to estimate that you will need 75 to 80 percent of your current income to maintain your current lifestyle. • Take advantage of your current employer’s retirement plan or establish an IRA. Employer retirement plans sometimes offer a match – take advantage. A match is free money. If your employer does not offer a retirement plan, then establish a traditional or Roth IRA. Start saving early. • Determine your asset allocation strategy. Choose the right mixture of stocks, bonds and cash. Factors to consider are age and risk tolerance. Younger individuals should focus on capital appreciation while older individuals should focus on capital preservation. • Review your portfolio annually. Ensure your portfolio is diversified. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.

now and will not have to pay taxes later. Withdrawals from a Roth IRA are tax free.” While saving for retirement is important, Suchy emphasizes that everyone must find a financial balance. “Reducing debt, establishing an emergency savings and taking advantage of college savings plans for your children are examples of other savings opportunities that need to be considered depending on your situation,” he says. “Putting together a financial plan with an advisor is always a smart idea.” REBECCA FAST

SIGNS OF LIFE

T-TOWN TAXIS

In March, it got easier for visitors to one of Tulsa’s chief entertainment areas to catch a cab and it might get easier in other city entertainment districts as well. The taxi stand at 18th and Boston, was unveiled last month in response to local business operator requests. Perhaps strangely, city ordinances empower the mayor to estab-

38

April Master.indd 38

lish taxi cab stands. In addition to potentially benefitting area businesses, advocates hope easier access to taxis can help curb drunk driving. City officials claim to be working with the Blue Dome District to bring a second stand there, and they have said they hope to work with other areas such as the Brady District, Brookside, Cherry Street and Cain’s Ballroom.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/19/11 3:26:47 PM


CongratulationsZach ZachWeldon! Weldon! Congratulations Express Employment Professionals honors Zach Weldon for Express Employment Professionals honors Zach Weldon for being named one of Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40. being named one of Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40. A self made leader, Zach has accomplished many things. A self made leader, Zach has accomplished many things. Among becoming an owner of a cattle business in his youth Among becoming an owner of a cattle business in his youth he is also the founder and president of Precision Therapy he is also the founder and president of Precision Therapy Services, L.L.C., and a member of the board of directors Services, L.L.C., and a member of the board of directors for both Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma City and for both Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University’s Meinders School of Business. Oklahoma City University’s Meinders School of Business. Congratulations Zach for receiving such a prestigious award. Congratulations Zach for receiving such a prestigious award. With 30 locations across Oklahoma to serve you, Express Employment Professionals With 30put locations across Oklahoma to servetoyou, Express Employment Professionals has more than 19,000 Oklahomans work in 2010 in a variety of different hasindustries. put more Express than 19,000 Oklahomans to work in 2010 in a variety of different provides expertise in evaluation hire, temporary staffing, industries. Express provides expertise in evaluation hire, temporary staffing, professional search, and human resources. professional search, and human resources.

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Life

THE BEST OF LIVING WELL

Bumbershoots are the New Black

A

pril showers usher in the official weather of spring. Puffy gray clouds give way to afternoon storms, and we throw an old newspaper over our head and hope we somehow stay dry in a torrential downpour. But what if, instead or rummaging around the car

or house for a plastic shopping bag or other barrier to keep us from getting wet, we would invest in an umbrella? And not just an ordinary black (read: boring) umbrella, but a fabulous, colorful, stand-out-ina-crowd type of umbrella? After all, during spring, the umbrella is the ultimate accessory.

APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

April Master.indd 45

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PHOTOS BY NATHAN HARMON.

Life A mirrored wall encases a mounted fireplace, which serves as a strong focal point for the colorful living area.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/20/11 3:47:49 PM


L I V I N G S PA C E S

Living in Color

A Tulsa-based designer finds inspiration in juxtaposed designs. A good designer has to know who his client is at the core; it’s arguably a great designer who can be his own client. “For many designers, their own home is the hardest project to tackle,” says Christopher Murphy of Christopher Murphy Designs. The three-level townhouse he shares with partner Benjamin Stewart tells a story of those who make their life there. An array of striking art, unique figures and pops of color fill the spaces of each room.

APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life

“It’s my style,” Murphy says. “It’s not Oriental or retro-inspired. It’s just wholly my own aesthetic.” It’s with self-awareness and sense of humor that Murphy has created this Midtown Tulsa haven. “We like to entertain, but we love our quiet time, too. This place is like a cocoon. It’s comfortable while being inspiring,” he says. Murphy finds color and juxtaposition energizing, which explains the combination of a vintage hot-pink rug against white pebble flooring in the entryway. That love of playfulness and humor is a common theme that can be seen in the furniture choices for the third-floor terrace that features a traditionally shaped sofa and seat that are made of plastic for year-round use. One of Murphy’s favorite pieces in the house is the red Craftsman tool chest that holds French silverware. “I love the fun and play of it. And it’s perfect for the silverware because of the separate drawers,” he says. “People are tickled by it.” The second floor opens up into a living, dining and kitchen area. A mirrored wall with a mounted fireplace serves as an anchor in the living room. The high-style Italian furniture pieces, such as the sofa and ottoman, both from B&B Italia, and the boiled leather custom colored chairs serve as the serious side juxtaposed with the giant pick-up-sticks game located next to the ottoman. “It’s that new and old, humor and seriousness, that I like to mix together,” Murphy says of his choices. The walnut cabinetry, Caesarstone quartz countertop and stainless steel appliances help make the galley-style kitchen functional yet attractive. Extending from the kitchen, the dining room holds an Italian table and new captain’s chairs that are sleek and modern and work wonderfully with recovered 1970s conference chairs that line each side. Lighting plays a big part in design, and of Murphy’s design in particular. “I believe lighting should create highs and lows; (I enjoy) mixing recess with direct lights and blending ambient and reading lights,” he says. Ambient lighting, such as the two snake candle sconces in the master bath, highlights a five-piece square art feature, which is part of a collective artistic endeavor. Throughout the room, Murphy created a pattern of squares to please the eye that coincide with the square window and painting as well as the Italian glass mosaic tiles in neutral shades. 48

April Master.indd 48

A sleek Italian dining room table is flanked by vintage conference room chairs.

A red Craftsman tool chest serves as a chest of drawers to hold the couple’s French silverware collection.

Murphy employs Philippe Stark’s whimsical take on the classic sofa, rendered in plastic, on the third floor terrace.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/19/11 1:48:50 PM


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Life

A figurine collection found on a nightstand tells the story of the trips the couple have taken. “These are from our travels, but they also mean something,” Murphy says of the figurine collection that ranges from cultures such as ancient Egypt and 15th-century Mexico to little trinkets given out at a new sushi restaurant. “Each and every piece holds a special memory of either the place I got it or the people I was with,” he says. “It’s great. I’ll walk by and get a smile because it triggers a memory.” No matter the art form, Murphy recommends that people not just try to find something to fill a space. “Buy what you love,” Murphy says of art choices. “Edit carefully. The trick is that sometimes less is more, and showing something in an unexpected way can be even more interesting.”

Exuberant use of color and an artful mix of furnishings set the tone for this Midtown Tulsa condo’s design aesthetic.

CORRIE MCGEE

A buttery camel-colored leather upholstered bed creates a haven in the master suite, which features a private patio.

50

April Master.indd 50

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/19/11 1:49:08 PM


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Life ACCESSORIZE

Right hand: John Hardy bangle, $850; Alexis Bittar acrylic and gold bangle, $250; John Hardy coil bracelet, $850; Alexis Bittar acrylic and gold cuff, $350; Roberto Coin gold link bracelet, $2,480, all from Saks Fifth Avenue. Ippolita white acrylic ring, $95, Saks Fifth Avenue; Claudia Lobao zebra jasper and wood ring, $152, Miss Jackson’s; Kendra Scott turquoise dome ring $80, Miss Jackson’s; Susan Shaw gold coin ring, $24, J. Cole. Left hand: Stephen Dweck bronze ring with pearl, $595; Kendra Scott large stone coral ring, $70; Lisa Karen olive branch ring, $100, all from Miss Jackson’s. Ippolita white and gold bracelet, $695, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels; Ippolita black and white bangle, $195, Saks Fifth Avenue; Ippolita knife-edge bracelets in white, $595, and black, $595 and $495, and black and gold bracelet, $695, all from Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels . Kotur leather snakeskin print clutch, $595, Saks Fifth Avenue. Roberto Coin gold link necklace, $8,740, Saks Fifth Avenue; Claudia Lobao five-strand gold rope necklace, $370; Claudia Lobao rose gold flattened-link chain necklace, $360, both from Miss Jackson’s.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SCOTT MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY.

Strike Gold

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/23/11 9:15:57 AM


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Life ACCESSORIZE

Left hand: David Yurman diamond and quartz ring, $1,495, Saks Fifth Avenue; Kara Ross bar ring, $185, Miss Jackson’s; David Yurman sterling silver and gold cuff, $2,100, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels; silver bangles, $15, Bella Dames; Sibilia multi-chain bracelet, $130, Miss Jackson’s; Black vinyl and silver cuff, $12.99, Target; Sibilia patina cuff with chains, $148, Miss Jackson’s. Right hand: Elyssa Bass gold cuff with charm, $451, Miss Jackson’s; John Hardy silver and black sapphire cuff, $2,495, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels; John Hardy silver and black sapphire cuff, $1,995, Saks Fifth Avenue; Melissa Joy Manning black sterling silver and gold bracelets with white opal and black druzy agate stones, $295 each, Nattie Bleu; Stephen Dweck bronze chain bracelet, $680, Miss Jackson’s; Lisa Karen “caterpillar” bracelet, $250, Miss Jackson’s; gold and gemstone ring, $1,025, Saks Fifth Avenue; Kendra Scott faceted chalcedony ring, $70, Miss Jackson’s. Badgley Mischa black handbag with gold chain, $455, Saks Fifth Avenue. Claudia Lobao silver microdisc necklace, $389, Miss Jackson’s; David Yurman sterling silver ball necklace, $975, and sterling silver and black onyx necklace, $875, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels; David Yurman black onyx necklace, $650, and sterling silver ball necklace, $995, Saks Fifth Avenue; multi-chain necklace, $24.99, Target.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SCOTT MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY.

Dark Lady

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

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STYLE

Life

Full Bloom

Maria Bonita Extra tulip skirt, $345, Rope.

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Spring up your wardrobe with bold floral patterns and fabulous us accessories.

Chanel black sunglasses with white floral detail, $399, Visions Unique Eye & Sunwear.

Pale blue and gold stretchable ring, $12, Bella Dames.

Hot pink Kate Spade shoulder-length handbag, $295, Saks Fifth Avenue.

Alexis Bittar lucite bangles, $265 each, Saks Fifth Avenue. Free People floral print tap shorts, $58, Miss Jackson’s.

Lisa for Donald J. Pliner wedge, $275, J. Cole.

Nanette Lepore cotton dress, $298, Saks Fifth Avenue.

Johnny Was silk floral tunic, $158, Donna’s Fashions.

Bindya floral scarf, $145, Saks Fifth Avenue.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SCOTT MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY.

Joie sheer floral tunic, $208, Saks Fifth Avenue.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/22/11 9:14:37 AM


O K L A H O M A S U R G I C A L H O S P I TA L

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Dedicated to Providing You Outstanding Medical Care. According to HealthGrades, OSH has the #1 Spine Surgery Program in Oklahoma and is Rated Best in the Region for Joint Replacement Surgery. HealthGrades is the largest independent hospital ratings organization in the nation and analyzes nearly 5,000 hospitals in all 50 states to objectively assess clinical outcomes. For more information go to www.healthgrades.com

At Oklahoma Surgical Hospital we are physician-owned, patientfocused and dedicated to providing you outstanding medical care.

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Life NUTRITION

Go Fish

Adding omega-3 to your diet can foster a healthy heart.

O

mega-3 fatty acids pack a powerful punch in improving and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Recommended for improving heart function, the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and certain nuts facilitate lowering triglycerides and cholesterol, reduces inflammation and even helps depression. “There are three types of omega-3 fatty – EPA, DHA and ALA. Fish oil contains EPA and DHA,” says Sonja Stolfa, registered dietician with Saint Francis Health System. “You really need a good balance between all three of the different types of fatty acids.” According to the American Heart Institute, which recommends at least two servings of fatty fish a week, omega-3 decreases the risk of arrhythmias, or abnormal heartbeats, which can lead to sudden death, slow the growth rate of atherosclerotic plaque, and help lower blood pressure. Additional

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studies are showing that these mighty acids may also be helpful in autoimmune disorders such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.

ment Institute. “I usually tell my patients to try to eat two servings of cold-water fatty fish, such as halibut, wild Alaskan salmon, cod, mackerel, trout and haddock, per week.” “Eating fish is always a better option to achieve the maximum benefit,” agrees Stolfa. “However, some people just don’t like the taste of fish or can’t eat enough fish to reach the levels of omega-3 they need to be beneficial so they may need to add in the supplements.” Stolfa recommends for the patients who are past the point when they are able to achieve a high enough level of omega-3 from food alone, such as those with coronary heart disease, that it is best to consult with a physician about the amount of supplements to incorporate into their daily routine. Additional concerns about the levels of mercury found in fish have some rethinking the amount they incorporate into their diets. While all fish has some level of mercury in it, shark, swordfish and king mackerel have the highest concentrations, while tuna, salmon and catfish have some of the lowest concentrations. Consuming a variety of fish can also help to minimize potential adverse effects. Pregnant women and children are generally advised to limit the amount of fish they consume due to mercury concerns – one to two cans of tuna or 12 ounces of fish once a week is typically advised. For the rest of the population, most of the readily available fatty fish is fair game. “As far as the concern with consumption of fish and mercury levels, I believe the benefits of fish far outweigh the potential risk of mercury poisoning,” says Forsberg. “In fact, a study from Purdue University in 2005 found that drinking green or black tea or eating soy protein or wheat bran with fish reduces the bioavailability of any possible mercury in the fish.” “You have to look at the benefits of an overall diet. I believe that fish oil supplements are safe,” adds Stolfa. “The FDA has to approve them but you have to be sure to

“I usually tell my patients to try to eat two servings of cold-water fatty fish, such as halibut, wild Alaskan salmon, cod, mackerel, trout and haddock per week.” Supplements vs. Whole Food Experts and studies agree that consuming fish or other omega-3 rich foods is the best way to receive the maximum benefits. However, the waters become slightly more muddied on the usage of fish oil supplements. “I personally am not a big fan of fish oil supplements, mainly because of the lack of regulation by the Food and Drug Administration,” says Suzanne Forsberg, registered dietician with the St. John Weight Manage-

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read the labels to see exactly what you’re getting.” Stolfa also cautions that if using supplements to pay attention to the storage instructions and expiration dates since fish oil can spoil. As government and food guidelines embrace fish as a type of super food, more physicians are trying to follow the guidelines to get their patients to the right levels of omega-3. The Mediterranean diet focuses primarily on good fresh foods that are packed with beneficial fats. So the next time you’re strolling down the vitamin aisle or by the meat counter, consider throwing in some fish oil or fresh salmon to round out a healthy routine. KATIE WILLIAMS

NOT SO FISHY NOT-SO-FISHY ALTERNATIVES Think eating fish stinks? Try these foods rich in fatty acid to supplement your omega-3 intake. Walnuts: Walnuts contain ain alpha-linolenic acid or ALA, an omega-3 -3 fatty acid similar to those found in n heartsmart fish, such as salmon. mon. In addition to essential ALA/ LA/ omega-3 fatty acids, walnuts alnuts rank high in antioxidants ts and provide a convenient source of protein and fiber. Sunflower seeds: Omega-3 a-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are both present in sunflower seeds – there are 34 milligrams of omega-3 in one cup of seeds. Sunflower seeds are also a particularly good source of vitamin E, thiamin, manganese and folate. Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant and may reduce symptoms of asthma, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Flax seeds: One of the most nutrient-laden foods known, flax seeds are high in alphalinolenic acid, or ALA, in addition to a host of other beneficial components. Flax seed is high in most of the B vitamins, magnesium and manganese. One would also be hardpressed to find a food higher in fiber. This fiber is probably mainly responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effects of flax. Fiber in

and,, the diet also helps stabilize blood sugar, an of course, promotes proper functioning of the intestines. Avocados: Avocados are rich in nutrients – vitamins A, B-complex, C, E, H, K and folic acid – plus the minerals magnesium, copper, iron, calcium, potassium and many Avocados provide all other trace elements. Avoca essential amino acids of the essenti (those that must be provided by our prov diet), with 18 die amino acids in all, am plus seven fatty plu acids, including ac omega-3 and 6. omeg Avocados are also high in protein. Kale: Kale is from the same e ffamily as cabbage and collard greens. It is considered a nutritional powerhouse because ecause it has more nutritional value e (for fewer calories) than almostt any other commonly found foods. ds. In addition to omega-3 fatty acids, cids, some of the vitamins and minerals kale has to offer include ude vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium m and beta carotene. Spinach: A well-known “super food,” spinach is a nutritional and preventative powerhouse. In addition to omega-3 fatty acids, spinach is extremely rich in antioxidants, especially when fresh, steamed or quickly boiled. It is a rich source of vitamin A (and

especially high in lutein), vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, magnesium, manganese, folate, betaine, iron, vitamin B2, calcium, potassium, vitamin B6, folic acid, copper, protein, phosphorus, zinc, niacin and selenium. Brussels sprouts: Brussels sprouts get a bad rap, but the tiny cabbage heads Rich in are nutritional giants. R omega-3 fatty acids, acids brussel sprouts also have hav high concentrations of concentr vitamins vitamin K and C, vitamin A, folate, vitam potassium, potas thiamin, vitamin thiam magneB6, m sium, ccopper calcium. Cut and calciu oft-maligned down on the oft-m ffragrance while hil cooking ki bby tossing i in olive oil and roasting in lieu of the stinkier boiling preparation; or toss raw in a salad. A tablespoon of canola or soybean oil added to a leafy green salad can also boost your healthy fat intake.

APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life PREVENTION

Make ‘Em Laugh Laughter can keep you happier and healthier.

L

aughter can be a lifesaver. Awkward moments are relieved by a good chuckle and memories are made because “the funniest thing happened.” There’s simply nothing better than a good laugh – the kind that makes your face hurt and your eyes tear up. It’s no surprise, then, to learn there’s truth in the adage that laughter is the best medicine. Psychologist Gerald J. Ellison, Ph.D., of Tulsa’s Cancer Treatment Centers of America believes his patients bring several powerful resources with them to their treatment process, laughter being one of them. “When we engage in laughter, especially the deeper belly laughter in response to something funny or we simply simulate the behavior of such laughter, we stimulate the immune system to produce cells that help keep the body healthy or help it heal,” says Ellison. “Such experiences create a state of eustress, which is a state that produces positive or healthy emotions.” According to Ellison, research associates these emotions with a variety of health benefits including an increase in T-Cells that fight bacteria and an increase in the production of immunoglobulin “A”—an antibody that helps fight upper respiratory infections.

Laughter also decreases stress hormones, which suppress immune functions. “To say the least, there’s a lot of data that tell us several physiological and psychological factors are in play when we have those belly laughs that make laughter a ‘medicine’ that is free, enjoyable and effective,” says Ellison. “Laughter does not replace appropriate cutting-edge medical technologies, which we use, but it can be an important personal resource in a patient’s healing journey.” To help patients along, CTCA offers them a weekly laughter class to not only boost their spirits but also to reduce anxiety, which wastes precious energy and suppresses the immune system. “Remember, life sometimes throws us a lemon. Whether or not the sour taste of the lemon dominates will be determined by our perspective on the possibilities available to us,” says Ellison. “Laughter can be an important force in helping us cultivate an optimistic perspective and practices that foster health and healing, and will help turn that lemon into lemonade.” REBECCA FAST

Y O U R H E A LT H

GIVE YOURSELF A BREAK

You may offer kindness and support to others, but how about to yourself? Being able to answer yes to this question may be the key to living a happier, healthier life. According to a study conducted by Wake Forest University, even exhibiting a small amount of self-compassion can help influence eating habits. Two groups of women were asked to eat doughnuts, but one group of women was told that there was nothing to feel bad about, as everyone in the study was eating the doughnuts. Later, the two groups were offered candies. The study showed that women who were assured that they shouldn’t be ashamed about indulging in the doughnuts ate smaller amounts of the candy. Researchers have suggested that going easy on yourself may be an important component to adopting a healthy diet and lifestyle change.

FAKE VS. REAL

What may surprise you is that whether you’re genuinely laughing or just going through the motions, you still get the same health benefits. “Our body doesn’t seem to know the difference between simulated laughter and stimulated laughter. We experience the benefits of laughter whether it is simulated or actually stimulated by something funny,” says Dr. Gerald Ellison of Cancer Treatment Centers of America. “In fact, if you begin to simulate or go through the motions of laughter, including making the sounds and generating the movements, it is likely to result in actually causing yourself to begin genuinely laughing.” Ellison suggests setting aside a “laughter room” or area in your home to help permanently establish laughter into your daily life. Also, consider reading and sharing funny stories and jokes or watching funny movies to help lighten the mood. “We encourage patients and caregivers to actually decide on times they want to enjoy laughter and to engage in both simulated and stimulated laughter,” he says. “Getting the benefits of the behavior is the real focus.” – RF 60

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

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Life

The natural wonder of the Rocky Mountains surrounds Aspen, including the nearby Maroon Bells.

AT A G L A N C E Nestled high in the Elk Mountains branch of the Rockies, Aspen and its sister town of Snowmass Village service four major ski areas – Aspen Mountain, Aspen Highlands, Snowmass and Buttermilk – the highest concentration anywhere in Colorado. Access: Several airlines service AspenPitkin County Airport. Aspen is a four-hour drive from Denver. Population: Approx. 6,000 Climate: Rocky Mountain high altitude, low humidity, intense sunshine, temperature varies by season. Main attraction: Outdoor sports year round, considered a ski mecca, busy festival season including the Food and Wine Classic in June.

D E S T I N AT I O N S : W E E K E N D I T I N E R A R Y

Warm Weather Aspen

Colorado’s winter wonderland is rich in spring and summer. When many people think of Aspen, the first thing to pop into their minds is probably skiing. Being one of the most popular ski resorts in the country, that makes sense. However, in the late spring and summer, Aspen is less crowded and nestled in one of the most beautiful settings in the West. Arriving just prior to sunset on a Friday afternoon, acclimate yourself to both the 62

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climate and the scenic setting with a ride on the Silver Queen Gondola to the top of Aspen Mountain and enjoy sunset from the high-altitude sundeck. Afterwards, enjoy fine dining and good wine al fresco at Pacifica Seafood Brasserie (www.pacificaaspen. com), at the sophisticated Syzygy (www. syzygyrestaurant.com) or the long-time local favorite Pinons (www.pinons.net).

Saturday’s agenda emphasizes Aspen’s outdoor splendor. Take it all in on a sunrise tour aboard a hot air balloon in an hourlong experience offered by Above it All Balloon Company (www.aboveitallballoon. com). After enjoying the gorgeous views, you are treated to a champagne brunch. By the time you’re back in town, you can walk off the bubbly and baked goods at the Aspen Saturday Summer Market. Pick up some fresh picnic makings and enjoy them while on one of the myriad easily accessible scenic hikes. In the late afternoon, stroll downtown’s pedestrian-only streets or widen your circle for eclectic shopping. Grab a table at one of Aspen’s fine restaurants early to avoid crowds, and plan to spend the later hours at a nightlife venue like Jimmy’s (www.jimmysaspen.com), with its regular Saturday night hot Latin dance music, or at BellyUp Aspen (www.bellyupaspen.com) with its high-energy and eclectic array of live performers. Enjoy sleeping in a little Sunday morning before heading back out to explore the majesty of Aspen. If you’re a golfer, there are several public courses around, and of course, the scenery is outstanding. However, if you can get an invite to the semi-private Snow-

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HOT PICKS

Skiing is clearly the main event in Aspen, but warm weather months offer many outdoor activities.

Drive: Summer is the only time to traverse Independence Pass from Denver to Aspen, and it provides spectacular views and can be a bit faster than the longer route through Glenwood. To take this route, travel south from Copper Mountain exit off I-70 through Leadville. Stay: Visitors will be lining up to see the elegant, newly renovated St. Regis Aspen Resort when it re-opens in mid-June. Must See: John Denver Park features lyrics from the most popular songs of the country/folk music artist and one-time resident, inscribed in the creekside boulders. The namesake aspen trees are a beautiful sight year round.

mass Club (www.snowmassclub.com), the setting and particular challenges make for a distinct experience. There is also limited public admission in the afternoon, which is worth exploring. Otherwise, opt for an afternoon of your favorite outdoor activity be it mountain biking, fishing, hiking or photography. Aspen has it all. Close out your weekend away with an early dinner, preferably on a patio with a view, and you’ll wrap up The Little Nell a memorable trip.

designer Holly Hunt have only accentuated its elegance. Spectacular accommodations abound, ranging up to a selection of different suites, and all promise views from this unique slope-side setting. The Little Nell’s level of customer service is legendary. www. thelittlenell.com Aspen Square Hotel: These condo rentals

PHOTOS COURTESY COLORADO.COM AND THE LITTLE NELL.

S TAY I N STYLE Aspen offers a wide variety of accommodations for a relatively small area, but here are a few options you might want to consider. Hotel Jerome: The lavish, AAA Four Diamond Award-winning Hotel Jerome features 94 richly appointed guest rooms and suites, several restaurants and the ever-popular J-Bar. Built in 1889 to emulate the great European hotels such as London’s fabled Claridge’s, it has retained that elegance. www.hoteljerome.rockresorts.com The Little Nell: The Little Nell is Aspen’s only Five Star hotel, and recent renovations featuring the designs of famed

offer convenient location directly across the street from Aspen Mountain’s Silver Queen Gondola, as well as comfortable condominium suites. A well-equipped kitchen, wood-burning fireplace, deluxe king or queen bedding, flat screen TV, central air-conditioning, private balcony and more highlight each unit. www. aspensquarehotel.com

A well-known haven of the rich and famous, Aspen offers world class shopping.

VISIT ONLINE www.colorado.com/aspen

MICHAEL W. SASSER APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Oklahoma Magazine contributing photographer Jeremy Charles flies along with the Oklahoma Air National Guard. PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEREMY CHARLES

Since 1993, the men and women of the 125th Fighter Squadron and the 138th Fighter Wing have continued their tradition of excellence in service to Oklahoma and the United States flying the Lockheed F-16C Fighting Falcon â&#x20AC;&#x201C; unquestionably the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier multirole fighter. APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Lt. Colonel Tray Siegfried helped train Oklahoma Magazine contributing photographer Jeremy Charles before the flight.

The rigors of flying the F-16C require perfectly tailored flight suits to combat the effect of multiple-g-force speed, and considerable redundant safety gear.

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The F-16C Fighting Falcon, also referred to as the “Viper,” is lightweight and extremely versatile, which is why it has been an important component of US military air power since production was approved more than 30 years ago.

Oklahoma Air National Guard pilots keep their skills sharp with exercises simulating potential conflicts.

MANY FACES OF THE OKLAHOMA AIR NATIONAL GUARD The Oklahoma Air National Guard’s 138th Fighter Wing’s organization consists of numerous units. These include the 125th Fighter Squadron, the 138th Medical Squadron, Operation Group, Maintenance Group, Maintenance Squadron, Mission Support Group, Logistics Readiness Squadron, Civil Engineering Squadron, Security Force Squadron – plus the 219th Engineering Installation Squadron. Sr. Airman Renee Dennisson serves with the 219th Engineering Squad while also attending school in the Tulsa area. But the small-town girl from southeast Oklahoma has seen plenty of action overseas. “I just returned in November from my second deployment – in Afghanistan,” Dennisson explains. Dennission is a CAD engineer, a graphic designer who draws layouts and site surveys. Working out of perilous Kandahar and at forward operating bases, she has twice spent months operating in the Afghan war theater. These days, Dennission is hoping for more shortterm temporary duty assignments around the country. “There are no plans for us to go back to Afghanistan,” she says, but also acknowledges the possibility that she could be deployed again.

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Oklahomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Air National Guard has two missions. One is to maintain combat forces ready for mobilization, deployment and employment as needed to support national security objectives. Its state mission is to support the governor of the state of Oklahoma with units organized, equipped and trained in the protection of life and property, and preservation of peace, order and public safety. When not deployed, the 138th trains regularly to keep skills sharp to be ready to pursue either of their missions.

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A frameless bubble canopy allows spectacular views from the F-16C.

APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Organized in December 1940 as Oklahoma National Guardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first flying unit in Tulsa, the 125th Observation Squadron was federally recognized in January 1941. For the next three and a half years, the squadron remained in the United States before arriving at Liverpool, England, on D-Day in 1944. After moving across the English Channel to France in August 1944, the 125th Liaison Squadron was attached to the Ninth Army until V-E Day, participating in the campaigns of northern France, Ardennes, Rhineland and central Europe, and was awarded the Belgian Fourragere for gallantry during the Battle of the Bulge in July 1945. The squadron underwent numerous changes in designation and duties in the decades that followed, including the transport of cargo to Vietnam and around the world. In October 1972, the 125th Tactical Fighter Wing resumed its rich heritage of tactical fighter operations. After conversion to the F-16, the 138th Fighter Wing has participated in both Operation Provide Comfort and Operation Northern Watch, enforcing the NoFly Zone in northern Iraq.

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AHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 2

40

UNDER EDITED BY JAMI MATTOX

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN AMATUCCI

What do four doctors, two attorneys, two mayors, a musician and a

brewmaster have in common? They, and countless others, are

blazing a trail for

young professionals

in Oklahoma. We present the 40 Under 40 Class of 2011,

a survey of 40 individuals under the age of 40 who are making this state

a better, richer, more exciting place to live. MAGGIE MCCLURE, 24 Singer/Songwriter AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2 011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA A ZIN

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INE 2011 2 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • O O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0

DR. STE VEN KENDRICK, 37 Dentist, Midwest Dental Center; Educational Director/Lecturer, The Tulsa Institute

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H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 •

DI A N E L . DAV IS, 3 8

CHAIRS PROVIDED BY SR HUGHE S.

Managing Partner and Director of Creative Services, AcrobatAnt, LLC

MAGA A ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40

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™ AHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 2

40

UNDER

AVA C A UGH R E A N , 3 8 Executive Director, Grace Hospice of Oklahoma

CASSIE REESE, 33 Director of Development, TCC Foundation O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 •

O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A

M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 •

OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0

• O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11

STEPHEN HIGHERS, 28 Field Representative, U.S. Congressman Dan Boren

AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2 011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA A ZIN

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INE 2011 2 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • O OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HO M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AGA Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L AH O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N DE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • O K L A HOM A M AG A Z IN E 2 0 11 4 0 U NDER 4 0 • O K L A HO M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AGA Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 •

OKLA-

H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N DE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 •

M I C H E L L E L O C K H A R T, 3 1

O K L A HOM A M AG A Z IN E 2 0 11 4 0 U NDER 4 0 • O K L A HO -

Senior Director of Admissions,

M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AGA Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

Oklahoma City University

2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L AH O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A

T I M J E N N E Y, 3 7 Director of Sales, Cox Business

JE RE MY MOR TON, PH.D, 3 4 Adjunct Assistant Professor, Oklahoma State University Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; President and CEO, Expert TA, LLC MAGA A ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40

APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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™ AHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2 O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 •

40

OKL AHOMA UNDER

M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 •

TE SS MACK, 26 Executive Director, Capitol Chamber of Commerce

ZACH L. WELDON, 27 Founder and President, Precision Therapy Services OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0

BROOKE TOW NSEND, 3 3 Manager, Oklahoma Caring Foundation, Inc.

U N D ER 4 0 •

OKL AHOMA MAGA-

Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L AHOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L AHOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L AHOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L AHOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L AHOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UN D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGAZ I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A-

AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2 011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA

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OCU Congratulates

INE 2

Michelle Lockhart Senior Director of Admissions on being selected as one of Oklahoma Magazine's 40 Under 40!

www.okcu.edu

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 40 UNDER 40 SELECTION

Adam K. Marshall Member

CO OU UNS U NSE NS EL L FO FOR TH THE BU US S SIN INES IN ESS O OF F LIFE IFE IF Established in 1976, Barrow & Grimm, PC is a commercial practice law ďŹ rm serving a wide variety of corporate, partnership, and individual clients. 110 W. 7th St., Ste. 900 | Tulsa, OK 74119 918.584.1600 | www.barrowgrimm.com MAGA

APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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™ AHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 2

40

UNDER

D R . YO G E S H M I T TA L , 3 8 Orthopedic surgeon and partner, The Orthopaedic Center

E R IN M E R R Y W E AT HE R , 3 9 Director of Programs, Red Earth, Inc.; Chick-in-Charge, The Girlie Show LLC

R I S H A D . G R A N T, 37 CEO, Xposure, Inc. and X Out Exclusing! Inc. AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2 011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA A ZIN

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INE 2011 2 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • O

ERIC MARSHALL, 29

T HE HON . R U S S E L L VAC L AW, 3 8

Brewmaster and Founder, Marshall Brewing Company

Associate District Judge, Washington County

ADAM MARSHALL, 36 Attorney, Barrow & Grimm, PC; Co-founder and General Counsel, Marshall Brewing Company

S T E P H A N I E C O N D U F F, 2 7 Strategic Investment Associate, Cherokee Nation Businesses

MAGA A ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40

APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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™ AHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2 OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HO M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG-

40

AZINE UNDER

2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0

SE AN KOUPLE N, 37 President and CEO, Regent Bank

UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L AH O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N DE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • O K L A HOM A M AG A Z IN E 2 0 11 4 0 U NDER 4 0 • O K L A HO M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AGA Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 •

OKLA-

H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N DE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 •

GR E G SH AW, 3 7 Project Superintendent, Manhattan Construction Company

DR. CHE MILLER, 35 Surgeon

AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2 011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA

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INE 2

Congratulations

Amanda Blair                

Selected Oklahoma Magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 40 Under 40 Class of 2011. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud of your accomplishments and all your hard work. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Your Expo Square Family

The University of Oklahoma Salutes

Jabar Shumate Member of the Oklahoma House of Representatives and 1998 OU Alumnus

for receiving the 2011 40 Under 40 honor. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

- THE PRIDE OF OKLAHOMA MAGA

APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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™ AHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2

40

UNDER

D R . D A N L A N G L E Y, 3 7 Ophthalmic Surgeon and Entrepreneur

MARY KREIDER, 32 Principal/Director of Interiors, TriArch Architecture

SEN. ANDRE W RICE, 38 State Democratic Leader, Oklahoma Senate

AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2 011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA

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  "$#$"$$&"#$( "$%$# $! "#      %"    !              !     !! " ! "  "" $& !    !!#% ! ! !"! &  !!#    !!#   !"   $ "! !  !! ! #%%!" !   "! ## "!%"  

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Congratulations to Grace Hospice Executive Director Ava Caughrean for being chosen one of Oklahomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;40 Under 40.â&#x20AC;? WE

Ava Caughrean is the Executive Director of Grace Hospice of Oklahoma, LLC.

ARE PROUD OF YOU!

The management and staff of Grace Hospice 4PVUI-FXJTt4VJUFt5VMTB 0LMBIPNBt1IPOFt5PMM'SFF  tXXXHSBDFIPTQJDFDPN /PUBGGJMJBUFEXJUI(SBDF-JWJOH$FOUFST APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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™ AHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 2

40

UNDER

H E A T H E R P I N G R Y, 31 Executive Director, Tulsa International Mayfest

M AY O R M I K E F I N A , 3 9 Associate, Brewster and Associates; Mayor, City of Piedmont

BO DAV IS, 2 9 Vice President of Operations, United States Beef Corporation, Inc. AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2 011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA A ZIN

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3/22/11 11:16:04 AM


INE 2011 2 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • O

M AT T F O S T E , 2 8 Senior Business Process Analyst, Williams Companies

BRANDON RIGGS, 34 President and CEO, Terra Pad Recreation Solutions

M AY O R R I C K M I T C H E L L , 3 5 Fire Chief and Emergency Management Director, City of Okmulgee; Mayor, City of Beggs

MAGA A ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40

APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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™ AHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2

40

UNDER

R E P. J A B A R S H U M A T E , 3 5 State Representative, House District 73

AMANDA N. BL AIR, 29 Executive Manager, Sales and Marketing, Tulsa State Fair OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HO M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AGA Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L AH O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N DE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • O K L A HOM A M AG A Z IN E 2 0 11 4 0 U NDER 4 0 • O K L A HO M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AGA Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 •

OKLA-

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L I S A S T I E R W A L T, 3 7

• OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A-

Campus Director, Clary Sage College

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AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2 011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDE R 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA

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The physicians and staff at The Orthopaedic Center would like to congratulate Dr. Mittal’s selection in Oklahoma Magazine's 40 under 40! The Orthopaedic Center is dedicated to improving patients’ quality of life through orthopaedic excellence and compassionate care.

918.301.3137, www.toctulsa.com follow us on © 2011 The Williams Companies, Inc.

Congratulations, Matt for leading by example.

Ingenuity takes leadership. For Williams employee Matt Foste, community involvement is serious business. Every year, Matt visits the University of Tulsa campus to share his experiences with college students who are exploring their career options. It’s just one way Matt gives back by volunteering where he can make a difference. And it’s an example worth following.

Ingenuity takes energy.®

(800) WILLIAMS | www.williams.com

MAGA

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J. TE RRELL SIEGFRIED, 31 Attorney, Hall Estill

SCOT T CHAPMAN, 36 Entrepreneur

K I M H AY W O O D , 3 3 Chief Operating Officer and Festival Director, deadCENTER Film Festival

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INE 2011 2 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • O

C H A R L A VA R DE M A N , 3 5

GINNY ALBERT BULLOCK, 28

Procurement Specialist, Schlumberger

Landman, New Dominion, LLC

OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HO M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AGA Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L AH O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N DE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • O K L A HOM A M AG A Z IN E 2 0 11 4 0 U NDER 4 0 • O K L A HO M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AGA Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N DE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • O K L A HOM A M AG A Z IN E 2 0 11 4 0 U NDER 4 0 • O K L A HO M A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDER 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AGA Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L AH O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E 2 0 1 1 4 0 U N D ER 4 0 • O K L A H O M A M A G A Z INE 2 0 11 4 0 UNDE R 4 0 • OK L A HOM A M AG A Z INE 2 0 11

RICHARD RICHARDSON, 28 President and Creative Director, Quantus Brand Consultancy

MAGA A ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40 UNDER 40 • OKL AHOMA MAGA ZINE 2011 40

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MAGGIE MCCLURE, 24 Singer/Songwriter Norman

Maggie traces her musical beginnings back to the age of 5 when her parents enrolled her in piano lessons. By middle school, she was singing and writing her own songs. Maggie is currently touring the country to promote her latest CD, Good Morning & Good Night. Her songs have been featured on MTV series The Hills and The City as well as CBS’s The Young and the Restless. She also had the opportunity to perform “The National Anthem” at the first playoff game for the Oklahoma City Thunder against the L.A. Lakers in 2010. Just 24, Maggie has no plans to slow her touring and recording schedule. “My goals for the future are to keep pressing on, no matter what,” she says. “As far as I’m concerned, I will have failed only if I stop doing what I love.” DR. STEVEN KENDRICK, 37 Dentist, Midwest Dental Center; Educational Director/Lecturer, The Tulsa Institute Choctaw

Upon graduating dental school, Steven set up his dentistry practice in Midwest City. In 2008 he joined Dr. David Wong to begin teaching at the Tulsa Institute where he instructs dentists on techniques in periodontal surgery. In his downtime, Steven spends time with his wife and three daughters. He also volunteers to provide dental care at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church Dental Clinic. For those who hope to achieve success, Steven recommends thinking for yourself, being consistent and working with people you can trust. DI A N E L . DAV IS, 3 8 Managing Partner and Director of Creative Services, AcrobatAnt, LLC Tulsa

As one of five managing partners of AcrobatAnt – the little marketing services agency that could – Diane serves as director of creative services, which means she needs to know every account, every job, every deadline and where all the work is at any given time. “I am the liaison between the account service team and the creative department, in charge of keeping the peace,” she says of her position. In her free time, Diane likes to hang out with her family and spend time developing her artistry skills. She hopes to one day be able to display and sell her artwork.

CASSIE REESE, 33 Director of Development, TCC Foundation Tulsa

“My friends like to joke that I am a professional panhandler,” Cassie says of her position as director of development for TCC Foundation. “A large part of my job is simply developing relationships on behalf of the Foundation. I assist the administration in identifying funding needs and developing long and short term funding goals.”When not on the clock, Cassie donates her time to several organizations around Tulsa. She is the 2011 Chair of the Tulsa Young Professionals and Barre Society, a member of the Tulsa Ballet Board of Directors, Mayoral Appointee to the Tulsa Economic Development Commission, Tulsa Metro Chamber Board of Directors and Visit Tulsa Advisory Board. She says she relieves stress with either her running shoes and iPod or stilettos and champagne. AVA C A UGH R E A N , 3 8 Executive Director, Grace Hospice of Oklahoma Tulsa

As executive director for Grace Hospice, Ava is responsible for the administration, management and day-to-day operations of the organization, which provides end-of-life care. She says what began as an interest in providing quality end-of-life care quickly became a passion. “After working in various healthcare organizations, including hospitals, dialysis clinics, senior health, rehabilitation and home health, I decided that I could best use my skills in end-of-life care. I believe passionately in the holistic approach to hospice care and am heartened to watch the positive outcomes when it is done well,” she says. Off the clock, Ava enjoys taking her dogs for walks, antiquing and watching movies. She also donates much of her time to volunteering for PEO Sisterhood, Great Plains Mastiff Rescue and Case Management Society of Eastern Oklahoma. STEPHEN HIGHERS, 28 Field Representative, U.S. Congressman Dan Boren Tahlequah

Good things are happening in Stephen’s life. He has been married for four years and is anticipating his first child later this year. He also has a job he enjoys, being the eyes and ears for Congressman Boren while he is away in Washington, D.C. He travels to and corresponds with residents of a sevencounty area, working with constituents and

committees to help make sure the people are connected, and informed and that issues are being solved. Additionally, Stephen is the chair of the Young Professionals Club of Tahlequah and is active in the Tahlequah Area Chamber of Commerce and a member of its board of directors. He also serves on the Northeastern State University Alumni Association board of directors. JEREMY MOR TON, PH.D, 3 4 Adjunct Assistant Professor, Oklahoma State University Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; President and CEO, Expert TA, LLC Tulsa

In addition to teaching at OSU, Jeremy founded his own company, Expert TA, LLC, a provider of educational software that is based on technology he developed during the course of completing his Ph.D. work at North Carolina State University. Jeremy also volunteers with Tulsa Young Professionals, Big Brothers Big Sisters and First Robotics, a national campaign to help students become interested in science and technology at an early age. He says the advice he offers to those hoping to achieve success may sound cliché, but it still rings true. “Make sure you pursue something that you are passionate about,” he says. “Don’t choose a career path because it’s what your father did or exclusively because of salary.” T I M J E N N E Y, 3 7 Director of Sales, Cox Business Tulsa

In his position, Tim heads up a team of managers and account executives responsible for selling telecommunications solutions to small and medium sized businesses as well as to Fortune 500 companies. His career with Cox Business has afforded him unique opportunities to meet with well-known leaders such as Condoleeza Rice and Jack Welch. When he’s not on the job, Tim volunteers his time by serving on the boards of the American Heart Association, Bixby Metro Chamber and Junior Achievement. He also enjoys playing a round of golf. M I C H E L L E L O C K H A R T, 3 1 Senior Director of Admissions, Oklahoma City University Oklahoma City

Michelle has quickly risen through the ranks of academia and is currently one of the youngest university admissions directors in the nation. Her job description includes overseeing all aspects of recruiting

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Congratulations to Mary Kreider for being selected for Oklahoma Magazine's 40 Under 40!

Brooke Townsend Congratulations on being recognized! Through your leadership, over 46,000 Oklahoma children have received 84,527 life saving immunizations.

oklahomacaringfoundation.org A Non-Profit Organization Administered by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma, a Division of Health Care Service Corporation, a Mutual Legal Reserve Company, an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.

71902.0311



APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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domestic students to OCU’s undergraduate and graduate programs and designing recruitment strategies and policies that work towards OCU’s strategic plan and enrollment goals. She has been recognized by both regional and national admissions organizations, including the Great Plains Association for College Admission Counseling. A competitive cheerleader and dancer in college, Michelle also helped begin OCU’s competitive cheer squad.

she found herself eager to impact the lives of children in a different way. Upon graduation from Oklahoma State University, she began work at the Oklahoma Caring Foundation, a nonprofit organization that provides children in low-income families access to preventive health services. And as a working mom, she hopes to show her daughter, Laine, the value of compassion and the importance of healthy relationships. She advises those who are hoping to achieve professional success to look for opportunities where they are not obvious. “If you keep your eyes open, you will meet people and make connections that will benefit you much later in your career,” she says.

ERIC MARSHALL, 29

TESS MACK, 26

D R . YO G E S H M I T TA L , 3 8

Brewmaster and Founder, Marshall Brewing Company

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Executive Director, Capitol Chamber of Commerce Midwest City

A love of social media led Tess to create her own career as owner of a marketing firm, Social Media Mack.com. She began working closely with Capitol Chamber of Commerce as a media developer, and by fall 2009 she was serving as the organization’s executive director. In her position with the Capitol Chamber, Tess works closely with the City of Oklahoma City and business owners in the northeast part of the city to plan, organize, manage, control and sustain the business district, the keys to economic growth and development in the area. ZACH L. WELDON, 27 Founder and President, Precision Therapy Services Norman

Founder and president of Norman-based Precision Therapy Services, Zach oversees a full-service practice management firm that provides physical, occupational and speech therapy services to home health agencies. Zach also spends a considerable amount of time at his family’s ranch. “The ranch is where I learned the value of a hard day’s work,” he says. In addition to owning his own business and working on the ranch, Zach participates with Big Brothers Big Sisters and serves on the board of directors of the Meinders School of Business at Oklahoma City University. He is also a member of Allied Arts’ Circle Club and volunteers with World Neighbors. BROOKE TOW NSEND, 3 3 Manager, Oklahoma Caring Foundation, Inc. Edmond

Though Brooke’s love for school always pointed her in the direction of becoming an educator,

Orthopedic surgeon and partner, The Orthopaedic Center Tulsa

Moving to the United States from India at age five was not an easy experience for Yogesh, but it was the confidence to achieve instilled by his parents that drove him to become an orthopedic surgeon. Whether he’s replacing an arthritic joint, fixing a sports injury or mending a broken bone, Yogesh spends most of his time in the operating room. Outside of the office, he travels around the world lecturing to surgeons in and outside the U.S. He is also working on a new surgical implant and technique development. Off the clock, Yogesh volunteers with animal rescue organizations, international medical mission work, free clinics and patient education. E R IN M E R R Y W E AT HE R , 3 9 Director of Programs, Red Earth, Inc.; Chick-in-Charge, The Girlie Show LLC Oklahoma City

Erin wears many hats. Not only does she oversee several programs for Red Earth Museum, she is also a co-founder and producer of The Girlie Show, an Oklahoma City-based all-female art event that is currently in its eighth year. Also a crafty gal, Erin is continuously cultivating her personal art career of jewelry and knitwear design and hopes to one day open her own retail yarn and fiber arts shop. Another future goal of Erin’s is to continue to change the face of the Oklahoma City art community, making art the norm in every person’s life, no matter his or her age or lifestyle. R I S H A D . G R A N T, 3 7 CEO, Xposure, Inc and X Out Exclusing! Inc. Tulsa

Risha has accomplished a lot at a young age; but she says her greatest accomplishment is beginning Oklahoma’s first

diversity communications firm and receiving approval from former Gov. Brad Henry to develop Oklahoma’s first diversity and inclusion plan that is designed to help the state reap economic benefits and improve its perception nationally. Risha offers this advice to those who hope to achieve success: “Success is a planned event. You put together your plan for how you can achieve your definition of success and then you work that plan in a habitual way. There is no hard and fast way to achieve success. It doesn’t choose whom it will bless with its presence. Anybody can achieve it who really wants it.”

Tulsa

Prior to Marshall Brewing’s opening, there hadn’t been a production brewery in Tulsa since the 1940s. That’s a streak that Eric was proud to break. A fourth-generation Tulsan, Eric briefly moved from his hometown to Germany to study and apprentice brewing. He then worked for a brewer in Pennsylvania before moving back to Tulsa in 2007 to open Marshall Brewing. And he has high hopes for the brewery, which continues to grow its annual sales at astounding rates. “I want Marshall Brewing Company to continue to grow as long as we do not have to sacrifice quality for mass production,” he says. “Most importantly I want to be able to take care of my employees and use the brewery to do more good in the community.” ADAM MARSHALL, 36 Attorney, Barrow & Grimm, PC; Co-Founder and General Counsel, Marshall Brewing Company Tulsa

Adam’s inspiration for specializing in business law came after watching his mother begin, grow and manage a successful small business. Family also inspired his second career as the vice president of Marshall Brewing Company, which also takes advantage of his legal opinions. “Some people live to work and others work to live,” Adam says. “Both orientations can produce successful careers, but I prefer the latter. A diligent work ethic, while valuable, can only get you so far. Satisfaction and happiness with your life and career should be the ultimate goal. In reality, satisfaction and happiness will ebb and flow from time to time; however, if you honestly enjoy waking up and doing whatever it is you call work, chances are you are following a career and life path that is right for you.”

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T HE HON . R U S SE L L VAC L AW, 3 8 Associate District Judge, Washington County Bartlesville

Born and raised in Bartlesville, Russell returned to his hometown after graduating from law school in 2000 to practice at a small firm. In 2006, at the age of 33, Russell won election as an Associate District Judge of Washington County, making him one of the youngest judges to ever be elected in the state. He easily won re-election in 2010. As a judge, Russell hears all manner of cases from their beginnings to trials, including felony, civil and divorce cases. “I truly enjoy what I do for a living,” he says. “I have great appreciation for what it means to be a lawyer and a judge and the role those positions have in our society.” S T E P H A N I E C O N D U F F, 2 7 Strategic Investment Associate, Cherokee Nation Businesses Tulsa

Stephanie has worked all over the globe, but it was her hometown of Tulsa that beckoned her back. She currently works for Cherokee Nation Businesses as part of a group of strategic investors that lead the diversification of the organization. Stephanie focuses on contacting businesses in all types of sectors, including security and safety, information technology and health, which are interested in joining the Cherokee Nation Businesses team. “Together we are designing an economy in northeast Oklahoma and throughout the Cherokee Nation that is creating jobs and changing lives,” she says. Currently enrolled in law school at the University of Tulsa, Stephanie has aspirations of one day being a Cherokee Nation Supreme Court Justice.

chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association and is active with Domestic Violence Intervention Services, Boys and Girls Club of America, The Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges, Tulsa Technology’s Youth Build Program and Mental Health Association in Tulsa. SE AN KOUPLEN, 37

State Democratic Leader, Oklahoma Senate

Tulsa

Oklahoma City

As president and CEO of Regent Bank, Sean has overseen the original acquisition of the Nowata-based bank as well as the opening of a second location, in Tulsa. He also oversees the strategic growth and direction of Regent Bank and still makes time to visit clients and stay involved in the community. Sean is involved with the Tulsa Chamber Small Business Council, Young President’s Organization, Riverfield Country Day School, Bixby Community Church and Junior Achievement Board of Directors. Sean hopes, along with his team, to make Regent Bank the premier community bank in Oklahoma. DR. CHE MILLER, 35 Surgeon Duncan

GR EG SH AW, 3 7 Project Superintendent, Manhattan Construction Company

MARY KREIDER, 32

Though Greg is a Tulsa transplant, moving to the city six years ago with his wife Caroline, he is deeply vested in the community. His first project with Manhattan was the construction of the new Morton Health Care in north Tulsa. He has also overseen the creation of the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame in the historic Union Depot and more than $50 million worth of work on the BOK Center. Greg also believes in giving back to the community and serves on the board of directors of the Oklahoma/Arkansas

SEN. ANDREW RICE, 38

President and CEO, Regent Bank

As a general surgeon at Duncan Regional Hospital, Che performs a little bit of everything, including vascular, pediatric, trauma and gastroenterology procedures. He says he enjoys the variety offered by practicing at a rural hospital. A family man, Che is married to his high school sweetheart and has two daughters. His advice to others hoping to achieve success? “Marry somebody who is brighter, funnier, more disciplined, more driven, more compassionate, more empathetic and more creative than yourself. It will always give you somebody close-by to inspire you,” he instructs.

Tulsa

makes it so completely fulfilling.” Off the clock, Mary enjoys running – “it seems to be the best stress relief I have discovered so far” – and vacationing. She also has recently discovered a love for listening to jazz music.

Principal/Director of Interiors, TriArch Architecture Tulsa

During her time at TriArch Architecture, a full-service architecture firm headquartered in Oklahoma, Mary has developed an interior design division for the firm as well as added a furniture, fixtures and equipment component to the business. “Business ownership is fun and extremely challenging,” Mary says. “It takes everything that I have physically, psychologically and emotionally to succeed, and that’s what

Though Andrew is outnumbered in the Oklahoma Senate, he says one of the most valuable lessons his leadership position has taught him is to be respectful. “Personal relationships in the legislature are crucial, even when you disagree on policy,” he says. “If I am doing my job well, I will inevitably make someone, or some group, unhappy. It’s unavoidable.” He says a typical day on the job is anything but. “One day can be very hectic with many meetings, constituent calls and fires to put out. The next day can be a slow trudge of ‘hurry up and wait’ bureaucracy.”

D R . D A N L A N G L E Y, 3 7 Ophthalmic Surgeon and Entrepreneur Bixby

He serves as co-owner and president of EyeCare Associates of South Tulsa, medical director of TLC Laser Eye Center and co-owner of Preventative Medical Services and Vascular Solutions. But what it boils down to is that Dan helps people see. As one of the youngest board-certified ophthalmic surgeons in Oklahoma, he surgically and medically diagnoses and treats diseases of the eye and vasculature. And when he’s not treating patients in Oklahoma, he can be found performing surgical and medical mission work for Santissimo Sacremento in Peru. To relieve stress, Dan enjoys working out and spending time with his wife and infant son William. BO DAV IS, 2 9 Vice President of Operations, United States Beef Corporation, Inc. Tulsa

Bo began his career with U.S. Beef Corp., which operates Arby’s franchises, by working on a crew in Jenks during summers in high school. After graduating college, he began working his way up in management and in his current position provides direction and guidance to the operational activities of the organization. When he’s not on the clock, Bo likes to take risks. He has been skydiving in the Swiss Alps and swam with sting rays. He lends his time to causes such as Street School and Leadership Tulsa.

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M AY O R M I K E F I N A , 3 9 Associate, Brewster and Associates; Mayor, City of Piedmont Piedmont

Years of experience working for elected state officials led Mike to his current position with Brewster and Associates, where he works with a variety of companies and professional entities to provide government consultation. He is also a politician himself; in 2006, Mike was elected to the Piedmont City Council, and in 2007 was named mayor of the Oklahoma City suburb. The Oklahoma Municipal League recognized him as Mayor of the Year in 2010. Mike offers valuable advice to those who wish to achieve future success. “Leave the politics at the door,” he says. “People who are consumed with social and office politics rarely achieve true success.” H E A T H E R P I N G R Y, 3 1 Executive Director, Tulsa International Mayfest Tulsa

Every May, Heather throws a party in downtown Tulsa for around 350,000 attendees. No small feat, but all in a day’s work for this young professional. She is responsible for overseeing all aspects of the production of Mayfest, from securing sponsorships and nonprofit partnerships to organizing pre-festival special events and planning the budget. But she’s not all business. Off the clock, Heather volunteers with Leadership Tulsa as well as Trinity Episcopal Church. She also enjoys spending time with her husband, Stephen, and daughter Claire. M AT T F O S T E , 2 8 Senior Business Process Analyst, Williams Companies Tulsa

After graduating from college, Matt made the decision to move back to Tulsa not only because of the job opportunity that awaited him at Williams, but also because the emphasis that the city places on arts and culture. He also enjoys being part of a community of young, committed professionals. “The root of my passion stems from young professional involvement in the community,” Matt says. “The biggest thing I hope to accomplish through participation on civic boards is to demonstrate that young professionals can be as impactful as existing

business leaders in preserving governance, values and missions of organizations.” BR ANDON RIGGS, 34 President and CEO, Terra Pad Recreation Solutions Tulsa

It was a project that Brandon worked on as a graduate student at the University of Tulsa that led him to start Terra Pad, a company that designs, plans, constructs, sells and installs commercial play environments, aquatics, pavilions, site furnishings and architectural shade systems throughout the U.S. The creation of the business is Brandon’s claim to fame. “I have created a real, working business that contributes to the community, employs great people and adds value for our customers, all from a graduate-level economics exercise class,” he says. M AY O R R I C K M I T C H E L L , 3 5 Fire Chief and Emergency Management Director, City of Okmulgee; Mayor, City of Beggs Beggs

Rick began his training by assisting the Beggs Fire Department at just 16 years old. At 24, he was hired as a full-time firefighter by the City of Okmulgee and was promoted to fire chief at 29. At 27, he was elected mayor of the City of Beggs, a position he still holds. Besides juggling these two careers, Rick also finds plenty of time to spend with his 3-year-old daughter, Kai, and volunteer with the American Red Cross and Muscular Dystrophy Association to help the organizations raise funds. Rick’s advice to others who hope to achieve success reflects his own success at such a young age. “Life is short, so go after your dreams and don’t wait for it to be your turn,” he says. “Never let anyone tell you that you are too young.” AMANDA N. BL AIR, 29 Executive Manager, Sales and Marketing, Tulsa State Fair Jenks

A self-described purveyor of fun, Amanda is charged with producing an annual event where memorable experiences are made and Tulsa’s Expo Square facilities are marketed to achieve a significant financial impact for the community. Her childhood spent as a competitive gymnast made a lasting impact on who she is today by teaching her to be a hardworking,

committed team player. Amanda supports the United Way and Salvation Army through volunteerism. Though Amanda says she hopes to continue to excel in her position, she ultimately hopes to become an instrumental advocate for quality of life in Tulsa. R E P. J A B A R S H U M A T E , 3 5 State Representative, House District 73 Tulsa

Jabar has come a long way since his first job as a waiter at Tulsa’s Casa Bonita restaurant. As the state representative for Oklahoma’s House District 73, he serves as the vice-chair of the Education Committee and serves on the subcommittee on Education for the Appropriations and Budget Committee. His future goals include using his experience in government to help lowincome families have as many educational options as possible. The advice he shares with others hoping to achieve success is that we are all planted here to enhance others without the expectation to be recognized for those deeds. L I S A S T I E R W A L T, 3 7 Campus Director, Clary Sage College Tulsa

Lisa’s different life experiences have influenced her, making her the young professional she is today. A former Marine Corps Staff Sergeant, Lisa is currently the chief administrator for Clary Sage College’s Tulsa campus, responsible for daily operations as well as providing key leadership for the growth and direction of the institution. Lisa has managed to strike a balance between professional and personal life and enjoys spending time with her husband and three children. Lisa also loves to sing and is a classically trained vocalist. J. TERRELL SIEGFRIED, 31 Attorney, Hall Estill Tulsa

An attorney at Hall Estill, Terrell specializes in corporate and commercial transactions, tax law and trusts and estates. It’s a far cry from his first job, as a ranch hand at Stone Bluff Ranch. Terrell attended the University of Tulsa as an undergraduate and was elected captain of the TU football team by his teammates; following graduation, Terrell postponed attending law school to spend time with his father, who was ill at the time.

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He enjoys spending time with his wife and two children, hunting with his siblings and rooting for his alma maters: Cascia Hall, TU and Notre Dame. SCOT T CHAPMAN, 36 Entrepreneur Ardmore

Growing up on a ranch in rural Oklahoma instilled a small-town spirit in Scott. After spending time in Dallas, Scott moved back to Oklahoma, settling in Ardmore with his wife, Adisha. He currently oversees multiple family businesses, managing oil and gas interests and negotiating leases, pipelines and surface damage agreements. He also manages lease hunting operations in Oklahoma and Texas, commercial real estate holdings in and around Ardmore and an ice vending business. When Scott needs to relieve stress, he heads to the great outdoors and his hunting cabin. K I M H AY W O O D , 3 3 Chief Operating Officer and Festival Director, deadCENTER Film Festival Oklahoma City

Though science was always her first love, Kim could never quite shake the film bug. After graduating from the University of Oklahoma with a degree in film studies, she took to producing commercials in the Oklahoma City metro. After volunteering for a few years for the

deadCENTER Film Festival, held annually in Oklahoma City, she was hired as the festival’s first staff member in 2006. She has since helped in the transformation of the film festival from a small, volunteer-run festival into a year round, internationally recognized event. In addition, Kim is an independent film producer and has worked on several Oklahomabased films, including Sweethearts of the Prison Rodeo, Okie Noodling 2 and Rainbow Around The Sun. C H A R L A VA R DE M A N , 3 5 Procurement Specialist, Schlumberger Bartlesville

Charla’s deep roots in Bartlesville eventually brought her back to the community in which she grew up. She began her career with Schlumberger six years ago and was able to be involved with organizations and meet people that helped foster her passion for service for her community. Through volunteerism, Charla supports the Bartlesville Regional United Way, Oklahoma Indian Summer Festival, Young Professionals of Bartlesville and Ray of Hope Advocacy Center and Elder Care. Charla encourages anyone wishing to achieve professional success to remain diligent in his or her goal. “Hard work and determination always pay off, even if the success you find is not what you had planned on,” she shares. GINNY ALBERT BULLOCK, 28 Landman, New Dominion, LLC Tulsa

Ginny’s role as a landman means that she is primarily responsible for negotiation and

administering agreements and analyzing and securing title for the development and exploration of oil and gas minerals. A lifelong Tulsan, her roots in the community have allowed her opportunities to support causes such as Family and Children’s Services and the Laura Dester Shelter. Ginny stays busy with juggling her career, volunteer work and a young family, but she still manages to find time to bake. In fact, she says her claim to fame is her excessive cookie baking and subsequent sharing. RICHARD RICHARDSON, 28 President and Creative Director, Quantus Brand Consultancy Oklahoma City

A natural athlete, Richard grew up playing football, baseball and basketball. He continued the tradition, attending the University of Oklahoma and playing on their famed football team. He eventually shifted his focus from athletics to business, beginning Quantus Brand Consultancy, an “ideas to market” company that works with entrepreneurs and athletes to form businesses. Quantus also helps companies and organizations find their brand identity. Richard encourages anyone striving for success to keep at it. “Don’t give up,” he says. “And once you reach your goals, help someone else reach theirs.”

LE ARN MORE ABOUT THIS YE AR’S CL ASS.

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BY MICHAEL W. SASSER

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S

tephne Snipes tried to enter a homeless shelter that also offered an addiction treatment program, and her life – already in tatters – went from bad to worse. “They did a background check and found I had a warrant, so I ended up in Oklahoma County jail,” says Snipes, 52. Snipes says that the warrant was issued when she did not pay fines and fees stemming from her second DUI. It was not a freak occurrence for Snipes, who has a master’s degree in social work and who has struggled with alcohol addiction for decades. A 30-day treatment program and a 12-step

program had helped Snipes stay sober from 1988 to 2001. “After that, I had a lot of different losses in my life, including both my parents and a divorce,” Snipes says. “My life started falling apart again and I didn’t do the things I needed to do to help with my recovery. I was under a lot of stress. It doesn’t take long to fall back. Within five years, I had lost everything.” Snipes had spent 10 days in jail when representatives of Oklahoma City’s NorthCare Day Reporting Center contacted her. The NorthCare Day Reporting Center is a pre-trial program that is designed to serve

County Sheriff and are awaiting sentencing for appropriate criminal offenses. NorthCare’s program permits clients to live in the community and helps them enter programs to face their challenges – so long as the client checks in regularly in person, phones in several times a day and continues to follow program parameters. “I thought, ‘Why not try it?’” Snipes says. “At first I thought that I couldn’t check in every day in person and call three times a day. But it was very, very helpful.” Today Snipes has undergone treatment, is sober, has reformed her relationship with three grown children and is working on rebuilding her life. “It was a real blessing,” Snipes says of the program. Snipes isn’t the only one who has benefited from day reporting – not by a long shot. “The day reporting program has about an 87 percent success rate,” says Randy Tate, chief executive officer of NorthCare. Tate describes the parameters for potential

Seventy-nine percent of female inmates and 46 percent of male inmates have been diagnosed with a mental illness. mentally ill persons and individuals with cooccurring mental health and addiction disorders that are in the custody of the Oklahoma

clients for NorthCare’s pre-adjudication programs. “The program excludes anyone with a APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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violent criminal history,” he says. “We have staff that go to the jail every day to see if new admissions meet the criteria for the program and if they want to participate. We have the D.A. release them to us, we evaluate them, get them into the programs they need and create a schedule for them. “A lot of times, if they do well in the program, the charges go away,” Tate adds. Blake Tabler, 19, also knows how the program works. He’s come a long way in a short period of time. “I was 15 when I started smoking, and I fell in with the wrong crowd,” Tabler says. “That led to drugs, and I used meth when I was 17. I was hooked from the first time.” Tabler says his parents knew he had developed a drug habit and that he moved away from home as soon as he turned 18. Shortly thereafter, Tabler was arrested and charged with two counts of possession of meth and marijuana. “My parents were relieved when I got arrested, because they thought I was going to die,” he says. Tabler was headed toward a youth boot camp-type program in the state prison system when he too was offered the opportunity to enter NorthCare’s day reporting program. After eight months in a sober living environment, Tabler has now moved back in with his family. He just earned his GED and is looking forward to starting college in June to study nursing. “I’m really excited about school, and things have been going great,” Tabler says. “The day reporting program has been very helpful. It gets you into routines and helps you discipline yourself.” Tate says that only one thing prevents the 30-year-old nonprofit agency from contributing to the success stories of more Oklahomans like Snipes and Tabler: money. “There absolutely is demand, but it takes funding,” Tate says. unding is exactly what the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services is looking for in its current budget proposal, to enable a Smart on Crime initiative that has garnered near-universal support from around the state. Smart on Crime, endorsed by the Oklahoma Sheriff ’s Association and the Oklahoma District Attorney’s Council, proposes to use evidence-based programs in the areas of criminal justice diversion, pre-sentencing engagement and reintegration to reduce recidivism and decrease demand for correctional beds. If fully enacted as proposed by ODMHSAS, Smart on Crime would dramati-

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ODMHSAS Commissioner Terri White wants Oklahoma to be smart on crime and she has plenty of support.

cally expand funding for myriad programs to try to take the pressure off the state’s prison system, save taxpayer dollars and save lives. Programs would include the expansion of day reporting opportunities, drug courts and those that specifically address Oklahoma’s shocking rate of women in prison. Those in the penal system would receive the treatment needed for mental health and addiction issues; and those leaving the system would warrant “soft landing” programs to help with reintegration into society. Oklahoma Commissioner of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Terri White makes a strong argument for the wisdom of Smart on Crime. “Programs like these are extremely successful in Oklahoma,” White says. “With the money we have, we do incredible work. We were one of only six states to earn a ‘B’ grade from the National Alliance on Mental Illness in terms of services – and no one got an ‘A’. Our drug court is a national model. Oklahoma City has an amazing day reporting program, but it’s only in Oklahoma City. Our 24/7 first responders program has a 97

percent success rate in keeping people from being arrested – but it’s only in Tulsa. “What Smart on Crime does is to make these many services available statewide, or at least widely available,” White continues. “We want to expand these programs into local communities that don’t now have access to them. We want to make sure they are available at the local level.” White points out that Smart on Crime is not about being soft on crime. “No one is saying that no one belongs in prison,” White says. “There are people who are scary and dangerous and need to be in prison.” However, there are also many people in the criminal justice system that are better serviced by mental health and addiction treatment – and it is this group that causes prison overcrowding. “We’ve realized that there is a much more efficient, less expensive way to deal with people with criminal justice for non violent and mental health issues,” White says. Evidence strongly supports the Smart on Crime approach. Out of 25,000 inmates, the Oklahoma Department of Corrections estimates that nearly 12,000 have a history of – or are currently exhibiting – symptoms of severe mental illness. Seventy-nine percent of female inmates and 46 percent of male inmates have been diagnosed with a mental illness. Of these individuals, 57 percent were incarcerated for non-violent offenses. Out of all inmates in DOC custody, 33 percent were imprisoned for drug and alcohol offenses, and at least 50 percent were incarcerated for a crime related to substance abuse. The average cost to maintain an inmate in prison is $48 per day. For someone in a prison mental health unit, the cost jumps to approximately $175 per day. Providing appropriate mental health services to someone in the community to keep them from entering the criminal justice system costs approximately $25 a day; and, providing appropriate substance abuse services to someone in the community to keep them from entering the criminal justice system costs less than $15 a day. White says that the demonstrated cost savings is a key reason why Smart on Crime has the support of law enforcement and political leaders. “Oklahomans are fiscally conservative, and this is a fiscally responsible way to deal with non-violent offenders,” she says. “Why spend $19,000 a year keeping a non-violent offender

“My parents were relieved when I got arrested, because they thought I was going to die.”

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

3/22/11 9:20:51 AM


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in prison when a program costs an average of $5,000 a year?” The price tag for the entire slate of Smart on Crime Stephne Snipes meets with Supporting Technician Kimberly Nauert at NorthCare, where programs have initiatives is more helped Snipes reclaim her life. than $95 million. But supporters assert that savings would offset the cost in just three years and that those savings would only continue to increase as more appropriate clients were reached. Consider just the savings provided by NorthCare’s prison alternative programs. “We looked at a five-year period and just lock people up and throw away the key’, counted the number but today you can’t afford that,” he says. of jail bed days we’d saved the county,” “And these are people who don’t need to be says NorthCare Chief Operating Officer in prison. There are a lot of women in prison Clark Grothy. “We deducted the cost of who don’t need to be there, and who other services and found that we’d saved the states would not have incarcerated.” county $850,000. If you looked at Smart on Ownbey says he learned a lot in meetings Crime in the same way, the savings would be with Texas officials. tremendous.” “Texas has been a model for prison reBut it isn’t just the financial prudence of form,” Ownbey says. Smart on Crime that engenders support for When White and her staff initially introit. duced the Smart on Crime proposal, Ownbey “Sure, we look at the stats, we see the was impressed and pleased. He’s been a money that can be saved,” says State Rep. vocal supporter ever since. Pat Ownbey (R-Ardmore). “But it’s a chance “When you look at the success of the proto save lives, to save families and to save grams, whether it’s drug court or psychiatric children. Children with a parent in prison are intervention – they work,” Ownbey says. more likely to go to prison themselves. It’s a “You can’t help but be impressed with the cycle we haven’t been able to break.” stats.” Ownbey prompted a study last year on Indeed, based on statistics compiled by prison reform and was stunned with what he ODMHSAS, Smart on Crime programs are discovered. effective. The re-arrest rates for drug court “Some politicians might feel like, ‘Let’s

graduates after four years are less than half those of released inmates. Mental health courts have reduced jail bed days by some 90 percent. Smart on Crime also is structured to reach individuals at varying points of contact – from early interception to reintegration after incarceration. White says the proposal is like a menu. “If we’re given a certain amount of money, we will have a dialogue with the governor and legislature about what to invest in,” White says. “They will be able to look and see that if they invest in this, the return will be this. We’ve been able to show them what the returns are.” That cafeteria approach to funding Smart on Crime is likely to come in handy. White and Ownbey say that Gov. Mary Fallin has proposed investing $3 million in it this year. “Ninety-five million was not realistic, but I am encouraged that we will see some investment in Smart on Crime,” White says. While Ownbey says he also thinks $3 million is possible, he also would like to see the legislature look at the bigger picture of the whole fundamentals of the budget. “I wish we could look at it like, ‘Do we really need government to do this?’” he says. “We really need to ask tough questions about what we want government to do.” In the meantime, supporters hope for some funding to start the process of Oklahoma becoming smart on crime. “We’re 46th in the country in per capita funding,” White says. “The challenge is are we doing enough?”

“We deducted the cost of services and found that we’d saved the county $850,000.”

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2011 FIVE STAR Wealth Managers 2011 INDEPENDENT SURVEY OVERALL SATISFACTION

©2011 Cre scen d o Bu sin ess S er vices

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Meet your Oklahoma 2011 FIVE STAR Wealth Managers We surveyed consumers and financial services professionals to find wealth managers in the Oklahoma area who scored highest in overall satisfaction. Here they are.

W

ell over half of the consumer responses in the Oklahoma area indicated it is difficult to find a wealth manager they trust and rely on.(1) Wealth managers, broadly defined, are those individuals who help you manage your financial world and/or implement aspects of your financial strategies. Common examples of wealth managers are financial advisors, financial planners, investment advisors, tax advisors, estate planning attorneys, etc. With more than 5,080 wealth managers(2) in the Oklahoma area, how do you find someone who listens to you, represents your interests and operates with an emphasis on integrity and service? Oklahoma Magazine can help. The magazine formed a partnership with Crescendo Business Services to find out which wealth managers scored highest in overall satisfaction. The Selection Process Crescendo administered a survey, by mail and phone, to approximately 1 in 4 highnet-worth households(3) (more than 57,000 households) and more than 3,200 registered financial services professionals within the Oklahoma area. On the surveys, recipients were asked to evaluate only wealth managers whom they know through personal experience and to evaluate them based upon nine criteria: customer service, integrity, knowledge/ expertise, communication, value for fee charged, meeting of financial objectives, post-sale service, quality of recommendations and overall satisfaction. Both positive and negative evaluations were included in the scoring, and

only wealth managers with more than five years of experience in the financial services industry were considered. Next, each wealth manager was reviewed for regulatory actions, civil judicial actions and customer complaints as reported by FINRA, the SEC, the State Board of Accountancy and the State Bar. Then, before finalizing the list, wealth managers were reviewed by a panel of industry experts comprised of individuals from within the financial services industry. Although panelist comments were incorporated into the final score, safeguards were built into the review process to reduce the ability of panel members to influence the composition of the final list on the basis of company affiliation. A Select Award The resulting list of 2011 FIVE STAR Wealth Managers is a select group, representing less than 4 percent of the wealth managers in the Oklahoma area. For a more user-friendly listing, wealth managers have been grouped based upon their primary financial service. Each wealth manager was also able to list up to three additional financial services that they provide their clients. Although this list will certainly be a useful tool for anyone looking for help in managing their financial world or implementing aspects of their financial strategies, it should not be considered exhaustive. Undoubtedly, there are many other excellent wealth managers who, for one reason or another, are not on this year’s list.

R E S E A R C H D E C L A R AT I O N S : As with any research or recognition program, it is important that we provide you the following declarations: tThe 2011 FIVE STAR Wealth Managers do not pay a fee to be included in the research or the final list of FIVE STAR Wealth Managers. t5IFPWFSBMMFWBMVBUJPOTDPSFPGBXFBMUINBOBHFS reflects an average of all respondents and may not be representative of any one client’s experience. t5IF'*7&45"3"XBSEJTOPUJOEJDBUJWFPGUIF wealth manager’s future performance. t8FBMUINBOBHFSTNBZPSNBZOPUVTFEJTDSFUJPO in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets. t5IFJODMVTJPOPGBXFBMUINBOBHFSPOUIF'*7& STAR Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Crescendo Business Services or Oklahoma Magazine. t8PSLJOHXJUIBFIVE STAR Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Crescendo in the future. tThe research process for the FIVE STAR Wealth Manager Program, managed by QMI Research, incorporates a statistically valid sample in order to identify the wealth managers in the local market who score highest in overall satisfaction. QMI Research does not include wealth managers on the list unless their score is statistically valid. At least 50 percent of the wealth managers in the market have a statistically valid score. For more information on the FIVE STAR Award and the research/selection methodology, go to: fivestarprofessional.com/wmresearch.

(1)

2010 Consumer Survey, QMI Research FINRA registered representatives, IARs, CPAs and attorneys who provide estate planning and trust services (3) Defined as the upper 1/3 of all households based on net-worth (2)

FS – 2 | ©20 11 C rescen d o Bu sin ess S er vices

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2011 F I V E S TA R W E A LT H M A N AG E R S

List compiled by Crescendo Business Services. Names in boldface also appear in the profiles that follow. Wealth manager additional financial services: BP=Business Planning; EP=Estate Planning; FP=Financial Planning; IN=Insurance; IV=Investments; TS= Trust Services; TX=Taxation BUSINESS PLANNING

BUSINESS PLANNING Glenda Bridges Profit Solutions TX, EP David Paulson DP Financial & Tax FP, TX, EP John Symcox First Fidelity Bank IN, IV, EP James Tack Robertson & Williams EP

ESTATE PLANNING Whitney Alvis Whitney R.B. Alvis TX, BP, TS James Beauchamp James Beauchamp, Attorney at Law BP, TX David Carpenter Carpenter Law Office TS Brent Coldiron Brent D. Coldiron Richard Farris Richard L. Farris, PC TX, BP Mark Fitch Mark K. Fitch, Attorney at Law TX Dawn Hallman Hallman & Associates BP, TS Page 9 Richard Holmes Hanson & Holmes BP, TX, TS Donna Jackson Donna J. Jackson, CPA TS, BP, TX Ann Morris Ann H. Morris, Attorney at Law Bruce Robinett Brewer Worten Robinett BP Jerry Shiles Parman & Easterday TS, TX, FP

ESTATE PLANNING

FINANCIAL PLANNING

FINANCIAL PLANNING

FINANCIAL PLANNING

Jeff Steen Steen Jeff Law BP

Charles Flinton Raymond James Financial IV, EP, BP

John Mansfield Wymer Brownlee Mansfield TX, IV, EP Page 9

FINANCIAL PLANNING

Jim Fortune MetLife Senior Financial Planner IV, IN, EP Page 9

Julie Marks Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Pete Shurow, Sr. Moorestreet Financial Group IV, EP, BP

Philip Mooberry Morgan Stanley Smith Barney IV, EP, TS Page 8

Lance Skalnik Raymond James Financial IV, IN, TS

William Newhouse Vineyard Financial Group IV

Gary Stanislawski Regent Financial Services IV, IN

Daryl Osmus Thrivent Financial IN, IV, EP

Glenda Suchy Morgan Stanley Smith Barney

Dian Peacock Peacock Financial Services IV, IN, TX

Nancee Thonn Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. IV, EP, BP

Gailynn Phelps Waddell & Reed IV, IN

Randy Thurman Retirement Investment Advisors IV Page 10

Tracy Atwood Retirement Investment Advisors IV Page 9 David Bize Investment Concepts TX, IV, EP Joseph Bowie Retirement Investment Advisors TS, IV, BP Page 9 Jim Brock Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. BP, IV, EP John Burns Burns Advisory Group IV, EP, TS

Trish Goodman Partners in Financial Planning IV, IN David Gottschalk Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. IV, EP, TX Barbara Hess Morgan Stanley Smith Barney IV, EP, BP Page 7 Kevin Jacobs Step By Step Tax & Financial Planning TX, IV

Mickey Butler Premier Advisors Group IN, BP, IV

Bruce Jennings First Command Financial Planning IV, IN

Mark Butterworth Butterworth Financial Advisory IV, EP, BP

Troy Jones Access Financial Resources IV, BP, EP

Jerry Clack Merrill Lynch IV, EP

Sylvia Karimian Karimian & Associates/ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. IV, IN, EP Page 8

Carrie Coles Arvest Asset Management EP, TS, BP William Copenhaver Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. IV, IN Betty DeHart SWS Financial Services IV, IN Jerry Dickinson FD Thompson & Company IV, TX, EP J. Kenneth Early Early & Means, CPAs EP, BP, TS Alan Erickson Alan Erickson, CPA TX, BP

John Keown Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. IV, EP, IN Jack Kimbler Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. IV, BP, EP Julia Klammer Merrill Lynch IV, EP, IN Jeremy Lott Raymond James Financial IV, EP, BP James Lowry Morgan Stanley Smith Barney IV, EP, IN

Christi Powell Falcon Financial of Oklahoma IV, EP Michael Price Integrated Financial EP, IN, IV Camille Quinn Camille M. Quinn, P.C. EP, IV, TS Page 9 Joshua Randolph Arvest Asset Management IV, EP, TS James Redman Gibraltar Capital Management IV, EP, BP Stephen Regouby Union Financial Advisors IV, EP, IN Stephen Rimmer Rimmer Retirement Advisors/Raymond James Financial IV, EP, IN Paul Rowlett Legend Group IV, EP, IN Sky Rylant Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. IV, BP, EP

Gary Shaw Shaw Financial Services IV,

Mark Woody Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. IV, EP, IN Dennis Zeimet Raymond James Financial IV, IN

INSURANCE Gregory Huffman Huffman Insurance & Financial Services IV, BP Deborah Lederman Lederman Financial Strategies IV, BP, EP Darren Telford Advanced Financial Concepts IV

INVESTMENTS James Aldag Merrill Lynch Lance Baker Stifel Nicolaus FP, BP, IN Nate Barns Edward Jones IN

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2011 F I V E S TA R W E A LT H M A N AG E R S

List compiled by Crescendo Business Services. Names in boldface also appear in the profiles that follow. Wealth manager additional financial services: BP=Business Planning; EP=Estate Planning; FP=Financial Planning; IN=Insurance; IV=Investments; TS= Trust Services; TX=Taxation FINANCIAL INVESTMENTS PLANNING

FINANCIAL INVESTMENTS PLANNING

Jeri Barrientos Edward Jones IN

Casey Harrah Merrill Lynch TS

Beverly Barry Barry Investment Services IN, EP

Doane Harrison Harrison Financial Services FP, TX, IN

Steven Bennett Edward Jones IN

Douglas Haws Tom Johnson Investment Management

Brad Bertrand Bertrand Wealth Strategies FP, EP, BP Page 5

Mark Heinrich Arndt & Heinrich Financial Services FP, EP, IN

James Boaz James Boaz Financial Group FP, EP

Paul Hood Hood & Associates TX, FP

Terrilyn Brownfield Integrity Financial & Tax Advisory Services BP, FP, TX William Burks Sanders Morris Harris Amy Cady Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Page 5 Bo Connor Merrill Lynch FP, EP, IN James Eagleton Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Matthew Eklund Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Robert Elms LPL Financial FP, IN Dennis Foegen Prospera Financial Services FP, EP, IN Richard Gardner Gardner’s Tax Services TX, BP, IN Louis Gasbarra, Sr. Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Keith Goddard Capital Advisors FP Douglas Goss Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Jeff James Edward Jones Dave Jensen MetLife EP, IN, BP J. David Jensen Stifel Nicolaus FP, EP, BP Gary King Stifel Nicolaus FP, IN Andy Knight Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Mark Kosir BOSC McCrary Lowe Gibraltar Capital Management BP, FP, TX Maureen Lynch Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Faye Marlowe Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Page 7 G. DeWayne McAnally The Advisory Group FP, BP, EP Greg Melia Melia Advisory Group EP, IN, TS Brian Mitchell Sanders Morris Harris FP, TS, IN

INVESTMENTS

INVESTMENTS TAXATION

Douglas Oliver Capital Asset Management FP

Robert Castleberry Castleberry & Associates IV, FP, BP Page 6

Valery Oswald Arvest Asset Management FP, EP, IN

Sheryl Colton Colton & Associates BP, EP

Thompson Phillips T.S. Phillips Investments FP Jeff Pilkington Republic Investment Services FP, IN, TS Brian Puckett Align Wealth Management FP, TX, EP Louise Hamilton Short Hamilton Financial Partners FP, IN, EP Page 6 Thomas Simpson Morgan Stanley Smith Barney FP, EP, BP Neal Sperry Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Daniel Stith Wealth Management Group FP, EP, IN Sang Tran Edward Jones IN Terry Vanlandingham T.S. Phillips Investments EP, FP

Mark Davidson Mark S. Davidson, CPA EP Bob Fitzgerald Bob Fitzgerald, CPA FP, BP Phil Goss Phil Goss, CPA BP, FP, EP Kelley Grace Eide Bailly BP, EP Billy Hebblethwaite Billy R. Hebblethwaite, PC Mark Helland Elliott, Dozier & Helland, CPAs FP, EP, BP Steve Holden BKD BP, EP Page 9 Jerald Isaacs BKD Janice Jansing Janice Jansing, PC BP, FP

Sidney Rhame Rhame & Company Ralph Richey Ralph B. Richey, CPA BP, FP Richard Robinson Richard T. Robinson, CPA BP Stephen Schaus Schaus & Company BP, EP Sandy Siegfried Stanfield & O’Dell EP, BP, FP Rob Sorum Rob Sorum, CPA BP, FP John Sternweis John A. Sternweis Alan Switzer Alan Switzer, CPA IV, BP, EP Robert Waters Waters & Seifried, CPA EP, BP David Womack David B. Womack, CPA EP, BP

Paul Kallenberger Hartog, Kallenberger & Swarthout EP, BP Page 9

TAXATION

Rodney Kaufmann Kaufmann, CPA BP, EP

Cynthia Baker Cynthia Pogue Baker, CPA BP

George Louthan George R. Louthan III, CPA BP, EP

David Bott H.D. Vest Financial Services IV, BP, FP

Marvin Morse Morse & Company IV, FP, BP Page 10

Larry Burchett Larry Burchett, CPA

INVESTMENTS TAXATION

James Reed Moran & Reed EP, BP

Lurene Ockerman F & L Bookkeeping & Tax Service BP Page 10

Michael Burke Helen Rambo Briscoe, Burke & Grigsby Matthew Monger ARC Consulting BP, EP Merrill Lynch BP, FP FP, TS Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER ™ and the federally registered CFP (with flame logo) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. The Chartered Financial Consultant credential [ChFC®] is a financial planning designation awarded by The American College.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2011 F I V E S TA R W E A LT H M A N AG E R S

BRAD BERTRAND Trust | Expertise | Stability r3FDFJWFEUIFm3FBEFST$IPJDF"XBSEGPS5PQ'JOBODJBM Advisor in Daily Oklahoman, Oklahoma City r/FBSMZZFBSTPGFYQFSJFODFIFMQJOHDMJFOUTBDIJFWFUIFJSGJOBODJBMHPBMT Areas of Focus: Retirement and Income Planning, Absolute Return Investment Strategies, Wealth and Estate Preservation, Employer-Sponsored Plans

A

t Bertrand Wealth Strategies (BWS), we offer select clients personalized financial planning that builds and protects their individual and corporate assets. Especially in these challenging times, we help our clients secure and enjoy certainty in an uncertain world. Individuals and families can expect customized retirement and wealth accumulation plans that map required sources of income for a lifetime. For businesses, we provide qualified plans with actively-managed, absolute return strategies in addition to ongoing employee education programs. Our team of financial, legal and tax professionals are committed to helping our clients make the right financial decisions that align with their unique circumstances and goals. Rest assured, we offer stability by drawing upon our in-depth knowledge and experience, fostering confidence in a world of uncertainty and delivering the most optimal investment solutions that meet all of your financial needs.

Bertrand Wealth Strategies 4PVUI1FOOTZMWBOJB"WFOVFr0LMBIPNB$JUZ 0, 1IPOF   CSBE!CFSUSBOEXFBMUIDPNrXXXCFSUSBOEXFBMUIDPN

AMY D. CADY Turning Retirement Dreams into Reality r 1SPWJEFTPVOEBEWJDFGPSDMJFOUTPGBMMCBDLHSPVOET r8PSLJOHGPSDMJFOUTBUJTGBDUJPOBOEMJGFMPOHQBSUOFSTIJQTJTPVSHPBM r$BSFGVMMZEJWFSTJGZSJTLBOENPOJUPSQFSGPSNBODFGPSUIFMPOHUFSN Areas of Focus: Retirement, Trust and Estate Investment Planning Titles/Designations: First VP â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Investments, CFPÂŽ, Certified Trust Financial Advisor

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y areas of concentration include preparation for retirement through in-depth analysis of your portfolio, which may include stock options, highly appreciated stocks, asset allocation, and estate and trust planning techniques. I have access to executive services for those who need advanced planning, and we will design a portfolio for your unique situation. Whether saving for a small goal or a larger one, like retirement, I can help you attain your dreams. Nest eggs come in all sizes, and my clients have diverse and unique needs. My plan is to help each and every family attain their goals.

Cady Wealth Management Group of Wells Fargo Advisors 4PVUIFBTU"EBNT3PBEr#BSUMFTWJMMF 0, 0GGJDF  r5PMMGSFF   BNZDBEZ!XGBEWJTPSTDPNrXXXXGBEWJTPSTDPNBNZDBEZ Advisor selection is not reflective of individual client satisfaction or future performance. Please see the introduction section for important information on the scope of the award and the FIVE STAR selection process. Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Member SIPC. [CAR 0111-5064A].

Left to right: Carolyn Glass, FIVE STAR Wealth Manager Amy Cady, Matt Murphy

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2011 F I V E S TA R W E A LT H M A N AG E R S

ROBERT M. CASTLEBERRY Personal Service | Customized Results r 5BYQMBOOJOHBOEQSFQBSBUJPO r3FUJSFNFOU UBYFTBOEFTUBUFQMBOOJOH r#VTJOFTTWBMVBUJPO Areas of Focus: Individual and business taxation Designations: CPA/ABV, CVA, CSA, CSRP, PFS

R

obert has more than 25 years of experience serving individuals, corporations, partnerships, trusts and estates. He specializes in areas of taxation, including employment, sales and retirement plans. He listens and works with his clients to help them achieve their tax, retirement and estate goals. He develops relationships with his clients that last a lifetime. Call today for your complimentary initial consultation. There is a lot more to taxes than preparation; let us show you what it is like to work with people who truly care.

4PVUI#FSSZ3PBEr/PSNBO 0, 0GGJDF   SDDQB!DBTUMFCFSSZDQBDPNrDBTUMFCFSSZDQBDPN

HAMILTON FINANCIAL PARTNERS Financial Management for Discerning Clients r *OEFQFOEFOUBEWJDFCBTFEPOZPVSHPBMTBOEPCKFDUJWFT r-BTUJOHDMJFOUSFMBUJPOTIJQTUIBUTQBOTFWFSBMHFOFSBUJPOT r&OUIVTJBTUJDBOEFYQFSJFODFEQSPGFTTJPOBMTXIPXPSLBTBUFBN Areas of Focus: Asset Management, Retirement Planning, Stock Option Planning

H

amilton Financial Partners brings together nearly 50 years of investment experience and is dedicated to giving clients the resources, support and confidence they need to provide for the life and the legacy they desire. Our advisors draw on their personal experiences and expertise to advise clients on the strategies needed to meet their needs and objectives. Discerning families seeking financial guidance choose Hamilton Partners because of our commitment to client goals, our high-quality advice, and our enthusiastic and collaborative approach to financial management.

4PVUI:BMF 4VJUFr5VMTB 0, 1IPOF  r5PMMGSFF   MTIPSU!IBNJMUPOGQDPNrXXXIBNJMUPOGQDPN Securities and advisory services offered through First Allied Securities, Inc., a Registered Broker/Dealer. Member: FINRA/SIPC.

Left to right: Kathy Beckham, Geoff Curran, Katy Stephens Seated: FIVE STAR Wealth Manager Louise Hamilton Short (Not Pictured: Ryan Kruger)

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2011 F I V E S TA R W E A LT H M A N AG E R S

BARBARA K. HESS Wealth Management Through Life Transitions r $PNQSFIFOTJWFTUSBUFHJFTGPSUIFMJGFDZDMFPGXFBMUI r$PNNJUNFOUUPTFSWJDFFYDFMMFODF r'JOBODJBMBEWJTPSUPGBNJMJFTBOECVTJOFTTFTTJODF Areas of Focus: Financial, Retirement and Estate Planning CFPÂŽ, First Vice President, Investment Management Consultant, Financial Advisor

I

focus on developing relationships where goals are defined and strategies are implemented to provide financial comfort for clients. Working together to preserve and grow wealth, you will have access to some of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most seasoned and respected investment professionals, a premier trading and execution platform, and a full spectrum of investment choices. The use of the firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vast array of resources, coupled with the collaborative interface of other professionals, allows me to become your comprehensive financial advisor.

4PVUI6UJDB1MBDF 4VJUFr5VMTB 0, 1IPOF   CBSCBSBLIFTT!NTTCDPNrXXXGBTNJUICBSOFZDPNIFTT © 2011 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC.

FAYE S. MARLOWE Personal, Professional, Trusted Advice r 6OEFSTUBOETDMJFOUTTFFLDPOGJEFODFBOEUSVTUJOJOWFTUNFOUQSPDFTT r"DUTBTZPVS'BNJMZi$'0u r)FMQTZPVQSPUFDU QSFTFSWF HSPXBOEUSBOTGFSGBNJMZXFBMUI Areas of Focus: Families, Retirees, Retirement Planning and Women in Transition Title: Vice President â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Investments

M

y mission is to build lifelong client relationships based on trust and client confidence. I aspire not only to give you superior advice, but also to work with you to create a personalized investment plan based on what is important to you. I do this by listening and communicating with you on a regular basis to address and accomplish your goals. My responsibility is to retain the confidence and trust of my clients through a total commitment to integrity, a declaration of professionalism and excellence, and a promise to always place my clientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; financial well-being before my own.

"EBNT3PBE 4VJUFr#BSUMFTWJMMF 0, 1IPOF   &YUr1IPOF   &YU GBZFNBSMPXF!XFMMTGBSHPBEWJTPSTDPNrXXXXGBEWJTPSTDPNGBZFNBSMPXF Advisor selection is not reflective of individual client satisfaction or future performance. Please see the introduction section for important information on the scope of the award and the FIVE STAR selection process. Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Member SIPC. [CAR 0211-3904]

X X X G J WF T UB S QSP GF T TJ POBM DPN]' 4 m

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2011 F I V E S TA R W E A LT H M A N AG E R S

PHILIP A. MOOBERRY Earning and Keeping Your Trust r 5SVTUFEBEWJDF r3JTLNBOBHFNFOUTUSBUFHJFT r)PMJTUJDQMBOOJOHBQQSPBDI Areas of Focus: Investment Management and Financial Planning Titles: Second Vice President â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wealth Management, Financial Advisor

T

rust, integrity and client relationships inspire everything I do. Clients rely on my 10 years of financial planning experience and an approach that serves each clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique circumstances and retirement goals in a way that is right for them. In this profession, success is measured not only by performance, but also by the quality of client relationships and the referrals and introductions that follow. Thank you to all my clients whose strong relationships have allowed me to continue to be an important part of their lives, both professionally and personally.

4PVUI6UJDB1MBDFr5VMTB 0, 1IPOF  

Š 2011 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC.

JIM FORTUNE

SYLVIA KARIMIAN

J Fortune Financial Group an office of MetLife 1601 NW Expressway, Ste. 1310 0LMBIPNB$JUZ 0,

4:BMF"WF 4UF 5VMTB 0,

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jfortune@metlife.com www.fortune.metlife.com

For the if in life.ÂŽ

sylvia.j.karimian@ampf.com

Passionate and Precise Financial Advice

r 4FOJPS'JOBODJBM1MBOOFS 4'1  r4QFDJBM/FFET'JOBODJBM1MBOOFS r3FUJSF8*4&1MBO4."35XPSLTIPQQSFTFOUFS

r )FMQJOHDMJFOUTGPSNPSFUIBOZFBST r0OFPOPOFGJOBODJBMQMBOOJOHSBQQPSU r"EWJDFUBJMPSFEUPFBDIDMJFOUTHPBMT

Title: Senior Financial Planner (SFP) Financial Services Representative

Areas of Focus: Plan for retirement, charitable giving and estate planning Designations: CFPÂŽ, ChFCÂŽ and CLUÂŽ

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A

e contribute our being honored as 2010 Financial Planner Of The Year, for MetLife of the Southwest, to the assisting of our clients with their financial plans to meet their long-term goals. We are pleased to work with The MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning SM, which helps families plan for the financial future of those with special needs. This along with MetLifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Delivering the PromiseÂŽ program allows us to assist beneficiaries during their time of loss. Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (MLIC), New York, NY 10036. Securities and investment advisory services offered through MetLife Securities, Inc. (MSI)(member FINRA/SIPC), a registered investment adviser. MLIC and MSI are MetLife companies.L0311164119(exp0312)(OK).

s a Senior Financial Advisor, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll work with you to define your retirement dreams and apply a disciplined financial planning approach, considering all aspects of your finances. Together weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll create a plan that works for you with the products and strategies that are right for your goals. Working with this financial advisor is not a guarantee of future financial success. Investors should conduct their own evaluation of a financial professional. Brokerage, investment and financial advisory services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. Some products and services may not be available in all jurisdictions or to all clients.

'4m] Š2011 C rescen d o Bu sin ess S er vice s

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2011 F I V E S TA R W E A LT H M A N AG E R S

CAMILLE M. QUINN Camille M. Quinn P.C. 4$JODJOOBUJ"WF 5VMTB 0, 1IPOF   1IPOF   camille@camillequinn.com www.camillequinn.com

TRACY A. AT WOOD

JOSEPH W. BOWIE

3001 United Founders Blvd., Ste. A 0LMBIPNB$JUZ 0, 0GGJDF   www.TheRetirementPath.com

2952 Via Esperanza &ENPOE 0, 0GGJDF   www.TheRetirementPath.com

Title: Executive Vice President

Titles: Co-President, CEO

T

J

My Clientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Success Is My Business r &YQFSJFODFEFTUBUFBOEUBYQMBOOJOHBUUPSOFZ r*OUFHSBUFTDMJFOUTMFHBMBOEGJOBODJBMQMBOT r1SPGFTTJPOBMTFSWJDFTJOBDPNGPSUBCMFFOWJSPONFOU Focus: Personalized legal, securities and insurance recommendations Designations: JD, Ed.D., Series 6, 7, 63 Insurance Licensed

C

amille, an experienced estate and tax planning attorney, earned her securities licenses 11 years ago to add value to her clients, and now provides each client with unique tools to create a â&#x20AC;&#x153;comprehensive life plan.â&#x20AC;? Camille partners with her clients to construct appropriate blueprints for their legal and financial goals. Teaming with Camille, clients are confident that their needs come first. Camille M. Quinn, Esq., offers securities through SICOR Securities, Inc., Member FINRA, SIPC, MSRB, 6500 Poe Ave., Suite 105, Dayton, OH 45414, 937.890.3101.

DAWN D. HALLMAN

STEVEN K. HOLDEN

Hallman & Associates, P.C. 2230 McKown Dr. /PSNBO 0,  IPOF   1 customerservice@hallmanlawoffice.com

www.hallmanlawoffice.com Focus: Estate Planning, Trust and Estate Administration and Litigation

D

awn Hallman has been a leader in estate and business planning for more than 10 years. Dawnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attention to detail and customer service is exceptional.

racy has more than 22 years of financial experience and is a fee-only financial planner. She provides her clients with retirement solutions through a customized planning approach emphasizing long-term relationships.

oe Bowie is a C ERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERâ&#x201E;˘ with more than 24 years of retirement management and planning experience. He specializes in alternative investments and is a retirement and estate planning expert.

PAUL C. KALLENBERGER

JOHN MANSFIELD

Hartog, Kallenberger & Swarthout, PLLC 4:BMF"WF 4UF 5VMTB 0, 0GGJDF   sholden@bkd.com

1560 E 21st St., Ste. 300 5VMTB 0, www.hks-cpa.com Areas of Focus: Income tax, estate tax and succession planning

john.mansfield@wymerbrownlee.com

www.wymerbrownlee.com CFPÂŽ, Life Agent

Certified Public Accountant

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he BKD experience is a promise of unmatched client service in delivering consulting, tax and accounting s olut ions . B K D del ivers experience and service with a deep understanding of your business and your needs.

#BSUMFTWJMMF 0,  GGJDF   0

H

artog, Kallenberger & Swarthout, PLLC (HKS) is a full-ser v ice CPA and consultancy firm of three partners and 15 staff members providing accounting, auditing and tax services for a large variety of industries in Tulsa.

J

o h n a n d t h e Wy m e r Brownlee Mansfield team are uniquely qualified to work with families and business owners to potentially create, a cc u mu l ate , prote c t a n d transfer wealth.

w w w. f i ve s ta r pro fe s si onal. com | F S â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2011 F I V E S TA R W E A LT H M A N AG E R S

Need a Great Wealth Manager?

MARVIN MORSE

LURENE OCKERMAN

Morse & Co., PLLC

F & L Tax Service, PLLC

6950 S Utica Ave. 5VMTB 0, 0GGJDF   &YU $FMM   marvin@morseandco.com www.morseandco.com

2000 N 10th St. #SPLFO"SSPX 0, %JSFDU   lurene@cox.net www.fandlcpa.com

Income tax, trust and estate taxation Certified Public Accountant

Individual and Business Taxation with Emphasis on Startup Businesses CPA, EA

T

I

hanks to my clients for your loyalt y. I offer taxation services for individuals, trusts and estates. Investment advisory services are offered through Morse Capital Management, Inc. All services are fee-based.

n business since 1986. I have worked in many industries and pride myself on the quality of my work. I like start-up businesses because of the vision entrepreneurs have and the positive energy they project.

OKLAHOMA S

TOP DOCTORS June 2011

DEDICATEDTO

YOUR HEALTH

To reserve advertising space, contact an account representative at 918.744.6205 or advertising@okmag.com.

RANDY L. THURMAN

3001 United Founders Blvd., Ste. A 0LMBIPNB$JUZ 0, 0GGJDF   www.TheRetirementPath.com

Look for Wealth Managers displaying this logo

Titles: Co-President, CFO

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it h 2 5 ye a rs of a ss e t management and retirement planning experience, Randyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passion is helping retirees and those about to retire stay financially independent through time-tested tax and investment strategies.

Wealth Managers interested in learning more about the FIVE STAR Program, please call PSWJTJU our website at: fivestarprofessional.com

Finding

the Right Fit

Learn how to find the senior living option that is right for your situation. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss Oklahoma Magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expanded Senior Living coverage also in September, December and February.

June 2011 Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss this exclusive opportunity. Reserve your space today! Call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com.

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PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN. PHOTO COURTESY CANCER TREATMENT CENTERS OF AMERICA.

FIGHTING COLON CANCER More than 90 percent of all colon cancers occur in people over age 50, and there are often no symptoms in the early stages. The American Cancer Society considers both men and women age 50 and older to be at an average risk for developing colon cancer, and everyone should begin their yearly screenings at this age if there are no other risk factors involved. Dr. Leon Yoder, gastroenterologist at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Tulsa, encourages everyone to stay on top of their screenings and be cognizant of other contributing factors. “Colonoscopies have proven their value – we’ve seen a decrease in cancer incidence over the last 20 years thanks to increased screenings. The occurrence of colon cancer also decreases when you engage in other preventative measures, such as maintaining a healthy weight, diet and activity level,” he reports. Screening enables doctors to detect and treat pre-cancerous polyps before they develop into cancer, and benign polyps can be removed during the screening process. Examinations may include a colonoscopy or a sigmoidoscopy. A doctor might recommend additional tests for anyone experiencing symptoms of colon cancer to help better understand what may be causing those symptoms. CTCA offers a number of treatment options for colon cancer patients, including surgery, chemotherapy and cutting-edge options in radiation. In addition, CTCA patients work with a registered dietitian, rehabilitation services and other complementary therapies to maximize their health during treatment and to cultivate ongoing habits for a healthy life. To learn more about CTCA, visit cancercenter.com.

ADVERTISERS’ NEWS

Wardrobe, Please!

T

A Tulsa eyewear shop has Hollywood influence.

hink all the box office fashions are straight from the runways or Rodeo Drive? You might be surprised to learn that Visions Unique Eye & Sunwear of Tulsa provided the eyewear worn in an upcoming movie filmed in Bartlesville this past fall. Carla Hill, frame buyer with Visions, says representatives of the starstudded cast chose their store because of its local reputation. “We were recommended as a quality fashion shop,” explains Hill. “They were told we have the best selection in the hottest styles.” Visions provided the eyewear wardrobe for the cast, which included Academy Award-winning actors Javier Bardem and Ben Affleck. Actresses Rachel Weisz, Rachel McAdams, Amanda Peet and actor Barry Pepper are also slated to appear in the film. “The cast came to our store and had a relaxed shopping experience,” says Hill. “They were excited to be able to shop like normal people where no one was following them around. And we were excited to have some Hollywood influence.” The unnamed film project was written and directed by Terrence Malick, writer of The Thin Red Line, and is currently scheduled to be released sometime in 2012. “It’s all been quite hush, hush so far,” comments Hill. “It has created quite a buzz.” In business since 1979, Visions Unique Eye & Sunwear has a long standing reputation for providing exclusive styles mixed with the latest in innovative eyewear, says Hill. “Our vision is to bring innovative eyewear collections to our customers. We try to seek

out designs that aren’t everywhere in the market,” explains Hill. “We want to provide that celeb look for everyone.” The boutique offers a long list of designers, the newest being Robert Marc of New York and Lindberg. Bardem chose several rimless styles from their Lindberg collec-

Diana Cheek is owner of Visions Unique Eye & Sunwear.

tion. Chanel and Cartier are two of their most popular designers. They are the only store to have Cartier in Oklahoma, says Hill. “We offer all the technology with all the style,” says Hill. “We want our customer to be pleased both functionally and with the look of their eyewear. We have something for everyone.” Visions Unique Eye & Sunwear has two locations in Tulsa at 6837 S. Memorial, north of the Woodland Hills Mall, and at 2139 E. 21st St., north of Utica Square, that are both open Monday through Saturday. LINDSAY CUOMO APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Special Advertising Section

the professionals SKINMEDIC How do I make sure I look good in photographs? Wear colors flattering to your skin color and steer clear of wearing black, white or busy prints. Take a picture of yourself before the final selection. Contour your face with lighter and Pam Brewer, darker powders and foundations. R.N., M.S. Cameras flatten the face, so you need to add depth. Make sure to accent your eyes – the camera may flash your eyes away – use liner, shadows and eyelashes. And remember to smile!

Pam Brewer, R.N., M.S. SkinMedic 1727 S. Cheyenne Ave. Tulsa, OK 74119 918.587.7546 www.skinmedic.com

COSMETIC & IMPLANT DENTISTRY I am missing my upper teeth and have worn a denture for 11 years. I am on my second pair and before I buy another one, am I a candidate for dental implants? Many times when a patient has worn a denture for a number of years they have significant bone loss thus, why the denture has to be replaced every five years or so. That being said, the more permanent fix is to have implants placed, it retains the bone and gives stability to the denture to maintain fit and function. Patients can proceed for years with a well fitting and stable denture and eat what they love.

Dr. Chris Ward D.D.S.

Chris Ward, D.D.S. 12814 E 101st Pl N, Suite 101 Owasso, OK 74055 918.274.4466 www.ChrisWardDDS.com

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ATTORNEY AT LAW

HOSPICE CARE

I was hit by a driver that did not have insurance. Can I use my health insurance to pay my medical bills? Yes, you can and should use your health insurance to pay your bills, even if the other driver did have Esther M. Sanders insurance. You have paid for the coverage and therefore are insured whether you need treatment as a result of sickness or accident. Your health insurance company may be entitled to reimbursement if you receive payment on behalf of the at-fault person. To determine whether you are required to pay the health insurance company back, you should obtain a complete copy of your insurance policy and contact an attorney to assist you with the law that applies with regard to your particular contract.

Attorney at Law Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. Tulsa, OK 74120 918.745.2000 Telephone 918.745.0575 Facsimile 800.745.2006 Toll Free

BOARD CERTIFIED OPHTHALMIC SURGEON What causes frown lines? Those vertical lines that appear between your brows result from muscle contractions. When you concentrate, squint or frown, the muscles between your brows contract, causing your skin to furrow and fold. Botox is a simple, non-surgical Dan Langley, D.O. treatment that can temporarily smooth moderate to severe frown lines between the brows and may be performed on people age 18 to 65. Just one 10-minute treatment involving a few tiny injections can result in a significant improvement that can last up to four months. The area may be numbed with a cold pack to minimize discomfort. We care about you and the health of your eyes. EyeCare Associates is a comprehensive eye care facility, and when it comes to Botox, who better to inject near and around your eye than an eye surgeon?

Dan Langley, D.O. EyeCare Associates of South Tulsa 10010 E. 81st St. Tulsa, OK 74133 918.250.2020 www.southtulsaeye.com

Our physician has recommended that my mother go on hospice care. Is this covered by insurance? If not, what are the options available to us? Most private insurance companies and Medicare include hospice services in their plan, and we are happy to check your benefits for you. If you do not have coverage, no need to panic. At Grace Hospice, we are committed to providing services to all patients, regardless of their ability to pay. That is the mission behind The Grace Hospice Foundation, which is a 501(c)(3) organization. The Foundation subsidizes care to make sure that every individual and family has the same opportunity for hospice care and support. Grace Hospice is locally owned and operated and we have a vested interest in the community. You can call our office any time at 918.744.7223 for more information.

Ava Caughrean

Ava Caughrean Executive Director Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR Do I really need to be medicated for depression and anxiety? Considering the possible physical side effects and (in some cases) psychological dependency upon some of these mediations, this question is one that should be asked more Courtney often. Depression is a serious health Linsenmeyerconcern and one that should not be O’Brien, PhD taken lightly; 25 percent of adults will have a major depressive episode sometime in their life, as will eight percent of adolescents. It is encouraging to know that people are getting the treatments they need, but discouraging to see individuals are increasingly being medicated for unhappiness. There is a difference between treatment for clinical depression and anxiety such as trauma, phobias or ongoing issues that interfere with daily functioning as opposed to feeling sad, mad or angry because your spouse won’t balance the checkbook at the end of the month. For many people, psychological counseling can be just as effective as taking medications. Lifestyle changes such as stress reduction, nutritional changes and regular exercise can make a difference. Many people benefit most from a combination of treatments.

Courtney Linsenmeyer-O’Brien, PhD 1723 E. 15th St., Suite 250 Tulsa, OK 74104 918.639.0570 run4funz@sbcglobal.net www.drcourtneyobrien.com

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205.

3/18/11 4:23:33 PM


Special Advertising Section

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

REAL ESTATE

What is the straight talk about braces? It seems like more children and adults are having their teeth straightened. We live in a world where people are more conscious of health and appearance. Braces Dr.Gary GaryFisher, FisherD.D.S. D.D.S. or other orthodontic appliances can help straighten your teeth and correct your jaw alignment. But do you know the other benefits? Crooked and crowded teeth are hard to take care of and clean, which may lead to tooth decay, gum disease and possibly tooth loss. Uneven tooth alignment can also cause difficulty in speaking and chewing, abnormal wear on tooth surfaces and problems with bones, jaw joints and gum tissue. Correcting these problems can make your mouth healthier. Plus, you will have a truly great smile.

How do we benefit from home ownership? This is an extremely important question. As a nation, we believe that owning a home is a core value. Today, many groups from charitable entities to government agencies support affordable home ownership. Owning Janet Youngblood a home not only gives pride to the home owner but in the long run builds individual net worth. Home ownership helps provide stability in the community and create jobs in the local community. Today is one of the best times in history to afford a home for first-time home buyers and for current home owners making transition to another home. Home mortgage interest rates may never be as favorable and especially in Oklahoma home values are among the best in the nation. Now is the best time to invest in your community.

President Obama recently announced that he supports amending the 2010 health care law to allow states to opt out of its most burdensome requirements three years earlier than currently permitted. The earlier date is when Paul Boullion many of the act’s central provisions take effect, including requirements that most individuals obtain health insurance and that employers of a certain size offer coverage to workers or pay a penalty. The problem is that each state that would like to opt out will have to meet very strict waiver requirements. This move by Obama is not giving state’s more flexibility, the requirements are still considered by most to favor the single-payer health care system.

Janet & Mark Youngblood Chinowth & Cohen REALTORS 9190 S. Sheridan Road Tulsa, OK 74133 918.740.3717 – 918.810.4527 www.TulseyTownHomes.com

Paul Boullion Principal, Catalyst Benefits Group, LLC 4200 E. Skelly Drive, Suite 352 Tulsa, OK 74135 918.524.6304 www.thecatalystgroupllc.com

Gary Fisher, D.D.S., P.C. Pediatric Dentistry 1203 E. 33 St. Suite 100 Tulsa, OK 74105 918.744.1555

PHYSICAL THERAPY

PERSONAL TRAINER Do I really need to take vitamins and mineral supplements? It is popular opinion in the health professional community that eating a well-balanced diet can help you achieve your recommended daily allowances of nutrients. John Jackson However, many nutritionists counter that opinion, stating few people eat an adequate diet on a consistent basis in order to achieve these levels of nutrition. Moreover, food processing, storage and poorly nourished soil rob foods of vitamins and minerals. As we grow older, the body loses its efficiency to absorb, assimilate and digest food. Many of these health issues can be prevented with an intelligent approach to supplementation. For best results , the dosage of each vitamin should correspond with the actual need of each individual. Activity levels, age, sex and potential prescription effectiveness all come into play. The body is a balanced machine; too much or not enough of certain supplements can cause nervous and muscular system malfunction. This can be limited with a proper assessment from a health professional.

Can physical therapy help me with my elbow pain? Ah, spring! Returning to outdoor chores and activities can cause muscles to be sore. Soreness in the shoulders and back will sometimes resolve quickly, but forearm and Shawn Mayes, PT elbow pain can linger. This pain is most evident over the outside of the elbow and can be triggered by gripping or extending the wrist and bending the elbow, for example, by simply opening a door. You have probably heard of “tennis elbow” – or lateral epicondylitis – a common condition in the elbow where you develop tendonitis by deterioration and overuse rather than an acute injury. Exercises, stretching and manual therapy would be utilized to resolve the painful symptoms. Tennis elbow can be treated in physical therapy. Take the time to see your doctor and discuss your symptoms. Ask if physical therapy might be a good option for you.

John Jackson Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St. Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.

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HEALTH INSURANCE Will states now be able to opt out of recent health care laws?

Shawn Mayes, PT EXCEL Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine 2234-B West Houston Broken Arrow, OK 74012 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT How important is video within a marketing strategy? Video is a must-have marketing tool. The presence of video on a website is a critical factor for optimization for improved ranking on search engines. A website with video is 53 times more likely to be found. You Jessica Dyer can create a high impact message for e-mail, presentations, websites, social media and internal outlets fairly inexpensively. When you produce a video it needs have a call to action. Don’t underestimate the power of humor! Be sure to utilize popular video sites, such as YouTube and Vimeo for the most exposure.

Jessica Dyer Emerge Marketing & PR 11063-D S. Memorial Dr. #445 918.794.3555 Jdyer@emergempr.com APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Special Advertising Section

the professionals THERAPIST/LIFE COACH

STRENGTH TRAINER

Why can’t I ever seem to be as happy as others around me? Happiness comes from a variety of factors; some you can control and some you cannot. Understanding that we needn’t spend our efforts on things we cannot control puts you in Lynn Loebner a great place to focus your energy LCSW on controlling the parts of happiness that you can. You cannot change the weather, news or natural disasters; worrying about such things takes time and energy from your being in charge of your own life. Focus on those things you can impact: smiling at a stranger, treating others with compassion and understanding, paying compliments when they are due. Also, go out of your way to do something nice for yourself regularly. If you still feel unhappy or unfulfilled, contact a life coach who can help you identify and develop a happiness strategy. The life coach will then help you cultivate a plan and execute it, so that you and everyone around you will benefit.

Lynn Loebner, LCSW Life Coaching of Tulsa 1221 East 33rd Street Tulsa, OK 74105-2043 918.584.1144 or 918.607.1133 www.lifecoachingtulsa.com

ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON When am I a candidate for total knee arthroplasty to treat my arthritic knee? Total knee arthroplasty is indicated OKLAHOMA | MAY 2009 when the painMAGAZINE caused by the arthritis is great enough to justify the risks of surgery and when conservative non-operative treatment has failed Clio Robertson, MD to relieve the pain. Conservative treatment is always the first line of treatment and includes activity modification, walking aids, physical therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (such as Advil or Aleve) and occasional steroid injections into the joint. It is important to be sure the pain is actually arising from the knee and not referred from another source such as the back or hip. Prior to proceeding with surgery, the patient must be in optimal health and any needed dental work completed. Total knee arthroplasty can be very helpful in reducing pain from arthritis and thus significantly improving the quality of life by allowing you to resume activities of daily living. Consult an orthopedic surgeon to discuss your unique situation.

Clio Robertson, MD Orthopedic Surgeon Central States Orthopedic Specialists 6585 S Yale, Suite 200 Tulsa, OK 74136 918-481-CSOS (2767) www.csosortho.com

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Amy Ory

I've been working out with light weights, using cardio machines and trying to lose weight for months. I don't seem to be making any progress and am getting frustrated. What's the best way to jumpstart my fitness program?

Lifting light weights with high repetitions (15-20 reps) does not burn more fat than a heavier weight with moderate repetitions (8-12 reps). It takes 20-30 minutes of continuous aerobic activity with large muscle groups (glutes and quads) to burn even 50 percent fat because fat requires oxygen to burn. Working with light weights without increasing the load won't increase your capacity to burn fat. It takes sweat, determination and a little pain to attain your next level of fitness, which is why most beginners quit their strength training program within one month. Remember that muscle eats fat, but you have to build the muscle with hard work. An intense strength program combined with cardiovascular training and focused nutrition is absolutely the fastest route to fat loss. Are you ready?

Women’s Issue

Don’t miss the 2011 edition of our popular Women's Issue. This special issue includes the stories of women who are making their mark on Oklahoma plus information on women's health and the Women In Business advertising section. Don’t miss this exclusive opportunity. Reserve your space today! Call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com.

Amy Ory Strength Trainer 918.430.4792 aory@att.net www.strengthbyamy.wordpress.com

1 1 0 2 l e Trav

Coming in June

HOME BUILDER There are so many builders' advertisements out there; how do I know which one to choose? When selecting a builder, there are multiple ingredients that contribute to the whole. To only use this one measure would be the same as judgBrian Wiggs ing recipes based on the amount of one ingredient. Two cups of sugar might be perfect for one recipe, but another would call for much more. To really get enough information on any given builder, you must do your homework. Talk to at least three of his past clients and ask these questions: 1) Would you use him again? 2) Did he meet the budget? 3) Did he exceed your expectations? 4) Did he finish on time? 5) Were you satisfied with his knowledge? 6) Was he available and attentive throughout the process? 7) Were his organizational skills adequate?

The

Coming in May

Oklahoma Magazine takes a look at great things to do in the Sooner State and well beyond our borders.

If you get more than one no, then keep looking.

Brian Wiggs 302 W. Main St. Jenks, OK 74037 918.518.5678 www.briandwiggs.com

Don’t miss this exclusive opportunity. Reserve your space today! Call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com. To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205.

3/20/11 3:33:57 PM


Spring-proof

BY RON TERRELL

Your Home Small steps can equal huge savings in a home’s upkeep. Springtime in Oklahoma means many things: more outdoor activities, photo ops in Woodward Park and, of course, severe weather. If you’ve lived in Oklahoma for any amount of time, you know the weather can wreak havoc on your home and your patience. But there are some ways to spring-proof your home and make sure you’re prepared for anything. Let’s start with the roof over your head. We’ve had some rough winters and springs the past few years, and if you really think

about it, your roof is the most abused part of your house. It’s like an umbrella that protects all of the contents, including you and your family. After the winter we had, now would be a good time to have an expert look at your roof and see if it might be time to replace your shingles. This can get somewhat costly, but in the long run, it’s better than having a flooded home. When the weather is nice is the time to treat any exposed wood on the exterior of your

home, be it part of a deck, a fence or a gate. As temperatures grow warmer, you also want to make sure all of your doors and windows are sealed properly so your air conditioner doesn’t have to work overtime. Window caulk or weather-stripping will do the trick. The same goes for your doors. Now for the air conditioner itself. In addition to being important for spring-proofing, there are a couple of things you should do year round: Make sure your A/C unit is clear of any debris and change your air filters at least every three months. Also, if you have an older unit, it’s a good idea to have an expert make sure everything is in working order. If you have a garage, you’ll want to make sure it’s fully protected from the elements as well. You can purchase a garage door seal to help with this. It will help keep the elements out, and it may also encourage a spider or two to seek shelter elsewhere. Nothing can ensure problems won’t crop up with your home this spring, but springproofing is a good first step.

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PET GUIDE

Plan For Your Pet Knowing what to expect when welcoming a four-legged friend to the family can make a big difference.

Deciding to own a pet is a big decision. You will be welcoming a new family member who depends on you for food, water, shelter and medical care, in return for unconditional love. A few simple guidelines provided by Dr. Dan Danner of the Animal Medical & Surgical Hospital and Darrin Hough, general manager at Tulsa’s Southern Agriculture, can help make sure that you and your pet will share many healthy, happy and loving years together.

What about food? Is there really a difference between pet food brands? Both Hough and Danner say you get what you pay for when it comes to pet foods. “You can‘t get a quality cut of meat for 39 cents,” Danner says.

To insure or not? Most people have health insurance to cover medical costs, so why not our pets? Just like human insurance companies, there’s a huge difference between insurance plans available for pets, Danner says. Some do well, some do not. Check out the company and talk to your veterinarian, Danner says.

What should I expect when bringing home a pet? It will take some time for your new pet to feel comfortable in your home, says Danner. Your new dog or cat is in a strange place with unfamiliar people, and may have just been taken away from its mother and litter mates. That said, he notes that it is very important to set the rules starting on day one, beginning with potty training. So what kind of pet is best for me? Hough says there are many factors in finding just the right pet. First of all, know your space. A large breed dog may not be happy in a small apartment, while a smaller breed dog or cat will be perfectly content. Danner says people should also think about their activity level. Daily joggers who want to take their dogs with them won’t be able to do so with a chihuahua, he notes. “A pet should get the same dedication and consideration as when bringing a child home,” Danner says. 118

“There’s a big difference between ‘nutritionally complete’ and ‘completely nutritious,’” Danner says. “It’s a word game the manufacturers play.” Danner recommends consulting with your veterinarian to find a quality diet for your pet.

“There is a huge difference between some of the cheap grocery store brands and the super premium diets,” Hough says. “A lot of it is what you don’t want in the ingredients. We tell people to stay away from corn, wheat and soy. You want to see more meat in ingredients.”

What type of health care should I expect to provide my pet? The plan is to live a long, happy, healthy life with your pet. Just like with people, regular checkups are vital as your pet gets older, Hough says. “Preventative care for animals is the key to catching (potential problems),” he says. Nutritional requirements can change as your pet ages, Danner says. Concerns can shift from urinary tract requirements to osteoporosis. A proper balance of diet and exercise can help your pet live a long, happy time. Hough and Danner both say pet owners should check with professionals and veterinarians about proper care for their animals. “The more you understand your pet, the better lifestyle you’re going to have with it,” Danner says. DUSTIN HUGHES

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Taste

FOOD, DRINK, AND OTHER PLEASURES

Co-owner and Chef Jimmy Blacketer scoured the country to bring the best recipes to Waterfront Grill.

A Riverfront Gem

PHOTOS BY MARK TORRANCE.

A restaurateur sees his dream of a casual, upscale grill on the shore of the Arkansas River come to life. “I had this hand-made in Mexico,” says Jimmy Blacketer, pointing to an exquisitely veneered wooden podium. It’s a few days before opening at Waterfront Grill and he’s excited. “And over here, the wine rack”– he shows off a tall, elegant vitrine – “the necks are lined with leather to protect the bottles.” He’s planned every detail, from the umbrellas on the huge outdoor deck, designed to weather an 85 mile-per-hour gale, to the elaborately molded dishes designed to serve just one appetizer, Oysters St. Charles. But Blacketer despises pretension. “We want a guy to come straight off the golf course, grab a burger

at the bar and feel welcome. And we want a couple dressed up for Saturday night to come for a romantic dinner, and not feel out of place. “Restaurants are in my blood,” he says while helping workers install the pipes feeding a vast waterfall on the east side of the building. He was born to the business. His father is Jim Blacketer, who has owned almost a hundred restaurants in his career, and the younger Blacketer, now 43, started working at 15. He soon went off on his own. He bussed tables, managed a Chili’s and later ran the Tulsa outposts of his father’s Atomic Burritos chain. Then came the wildly popular Los Cabos on the Riverwalk in Jenks. He teamed with his father to create “an atmosphere that makes you feel like you’re on vacation.”

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Taste F E AT U R E D R E S TA R A N T The Prime Rib at Waterfront Grill is served medium rare with a baked potato.

waterfrontgrilljenks.com BRIAN SCHWARTZ

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BRENT FUCHS

They succeeded. Just south of Los Cabos was the only privately owned piece of vacant land on the river. When it came up for sale, the Blacketers grabbed the chance. After $5.5 million in building costs, Waterfront Grill was set to open. Meanwhile, Blacketer toured the country, stopping in restaurants coast to coast. He took notes. He made contacts. He took Rob Lowe’s personal chef back from the coast to prepare California-style sushi. (The Bonzai Roll, the chef’s own creation, has spicy tuna, jalapenos and avocado, topped with warm eel.) He got a supply contract for steaks from famed Allen Bros. in Chicago. One bite of those steaks and you’ll know they are USDA Prime. Bread comes fresh from a nearby artisan baker, Farrell’s. With sushi, a wide variety of sandwiches, inventive salads, juicy burgers and flatbread pizzas as well as more elaborate appetizers and entrees such as the artfully constructed Crab, Avocado & Mango Stack, there’s something to please every palate. A few days before opening night, there’s a preview party at Waterfront Grill. It’s a dress rehearsal for the staff. Attentive yet unobtrusive, they make sure the diners feel cosseted and welcome. At the long bar, set beside a wall of glass overlooking the river, guests order Stag’s Leap merlot by the glass and locally-brewed Mustang Ale. The bar is packed and clamorous, but beneath a ceiling of intricately woven mahogany strips, the dining area, though full, is spacious and calm. One wall is a counter overlooking the kitchen. It has six separate stations where a bevy of chefs work with rapid, trained precision. Steaks sizzle on the wood-burning grill. Blacketer stands at the counter, pointing, gesturing, and calling out orders. He feels like the father of a newborn baby: nervous, anxious and, with good reason, proud. 120 Aquarium Drive, Jenks. 918.518.6300. www.

The cheesecake is drizzled with a berry sauce.

Waterfront Grill had special plates made just to serve Oysters St. Charles.

What do you want to eat? Check out our online restaurant guide at www.okmag.com

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Taste

WINE NOTES Chardonnay is America’s most popular white wine. It’s also the most maligned. Many wine drinkers, even those with more educated palates, have come to shun the wine as inelegant and just plain bad. Chardonnay is a victim of its own success. It’s one of the more easily grown wine grapes, easy to drink and very versatile. And once the varietal became popular in California, demand grew exponentially. As such things go, when there is demand, someone will provide the supply. The chardonnay market became saturated with cheap, inferior product. However, true oenophiles know there are many wonderful chardonnays to be found, and a good chardonnay can be transcendent. We asked Tulsa wine educator Gary Vance to recommend a chardonnay that might redeem the wine for those who’ve been turned off. The recommendation: Vance says Martin Ray Russian River Valley Chardonnay changed his mind about chardonnay. Coming in under $16, the wellbalanced, oak-aged wine is also a real bargain. If you like this, try: The fruit forward Kim Crawford Marlboro Unoaked Chardonnay ($15) is hard to beat. If you can find it, Auntsfield Estate Unoaked Chardonnay ($25) is a winner. For a special occasion, consider Newton Unfiltered Chardonnay ($55). – Thom Golden

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S I M P LY H E A LT H Y Foods that are versatile are my favorite. Those that are high in protein with zero fat and no added sugar or chemicals are even better. A great example of this is non-fat plain Greek yogurt. With approximately 15 grams of protein, 50 milligrams of sodium and only 90 calories per six ounces, it can be made savory or sweet, served hot or cold, textured or creamy. According to The Great Food Almanac contributor Dr. Khem Shahani, yogurt is a natural probiotic containing the live cultures, lactobacillus bulgaricus and streptococcus thermophilus, which combat diarrhea and food poisoning. Greek yogurt can be utilized in every meal. For a quick and easy dinner, I throw together Chicken Enchiladas Ole’ by combining a mixture of shredded chicken, onion, Greek yogurt and salsa (I use fire-roasted), wrapping the mixture in a corn tortilla, then smothering them with enchilada sauce and baking. Finally, I garnish with fresh green onion. For a taste of Italy, I mix the yogurt with W H AT W E ’ R E E AT I N G

BREAKFAST MUESLI 1 c. non-fat Greek yogurt 1/2 c. cooked cold oatmeal 1 large chopped apple 1/4 c. chopped walnuts Lots of cinnamon Honey (optional) Mix together well and chill.

spaghetti sauce and pour it over cooked pasta to bake with freshly grated Parmesan cheese, which creates a thick mock-cheesy type sauce. For dessert, this yogurt is made delicious by stirring in coconut extract, blueberries, raspberries and bananas and topping with dark chocolate shavings. Greek yogurt also makes a great dip. Mix salsa, jalapenos and salt-free seasonings into the yogurt and serve with jicama sticks. Or, puree onion, garlic and mix with yogurt, stirring in chives and grated carrots for a savory dip. This one is excellent served with thin breadsticks.– Suzanne Forsberg, RD/LD, CDE, St. John Healthy Lifestyles

Sonic Drive-In

Beef Jerky Emporium Imagine a small store that offers exotic jerkies – alligator, salmon, turkey and buffalo included. Now imagine this store also offers some of the best traditional beef jerky around. Wouldn’t it be a thin slice of dried meat heaven? Beef Jerky Emporium offers all this and more, including sausages, meat rubs and dry seasonings, an assortment of cures and other snacks. Beef Jerky Emporium has three locations in the Oklahoma City area and also peddles its meat snacks online. 9346 N. May and 4405 SW 3rd St., Oklahoma City, and 810 W. Danforth Rd., Edmond. www.tbje.com

We all know about Sonic’s juicy burgers and crispy French fries. We also know about their daily happy hour drink specials. But Sonic can now add another feather to its cap with the introduction of its new premium beef hot dogs. The plump, juicy franks are served inside warm buns and topped with condiments that reflect geographical areas of the United States: spicy mustard, sauerkraut and grilled onions on the New York Dog; pickle, relish, tomato, spicy peppers, celery salt and mustard on the Chicago Dog; ketchup, yellow mustard, relish and chopped onions on the AllAmerican Dog; and of course, Sonic’s classic Chili Cheese Coney, topped with warm chili and melted cheddar cheese. www. sonicdrivein.com

Duke’s Southern Kitchen The taste of the South can take many different forms: fried chicken, grits, fried green tomatoes, Mint Juleps. At Duke’s you can enjoy all these tastes with gourmet flair. The signature fried chicken is cooked up in a cast iron skillet and served with mashed potatoes topped with bourbon cream gravy and green beans. The BBQ Salmon, served with cornbread panzanella salad with avocado and green tomato is a more sophisticated dish with a Southern twist. End the meal with a satisfying cocktail, such as a Mint Julep or an Old Fashioned, and you would swear you were sitting on the front porch of an antebellum home. 10441 S. Regal Blvd., Tulsa. www.dukestulsa.com

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April in Oklahoma means fresh strawberries – sweet, juicy and red, never better than when plucked straight from the ground. Take your family to a local UPick farm for a little adventure and fun. Amongst others, Sun Berry Orchard opens on April 5, and Berry Creek Farm opens on April 15. For a complete list of UPick farms sorted by county, visit www. pickyourown.org/OK.htm Berry Creek Farm 1021 S. Tyler Ave., Blanchard www.berrycreekfarm.us Sun Berry Orchard 5665 N. Luther Rd., Harrah 405.454.1415

Taste

FRESH BERRIES

IN THE KITCHEN

Thirsty Cake A popular Caribbean dessert can be easily recreated in the home cook’s kitchen.

A

proper Tres Leches cake is thirsty. Really thirsty. Each dry pocket of cake crumb soaks up more milk than a stray kitten. A basic 11-by-13-inch cake can absorb more than three cups of milk as it sits in the fridge overnight. While the texture is decidedly moist, a good Tres Leches cake will never be soggy or mushy. It will – against all odds – retain a discernible crumb in spite of the milk within. The secret is a long, slow soak. The unexpected benefit? Fussfree entertaining. You can wake up in the morning, frost the cake and be on your way. Creamy white and delicate, the cake begs to be served at baby and wedding showers. Choose the prettiest pan you have because this cake is never unmolded – the weight of all the liquid makes it impossible. Instead, slice and serve straight from the baking pan –

either on the buffet table or in the back room. While often thought to be uniquely Mexican, the truth is Tres Leches cakes are popular all over the Caribbean and Latin America. Each community makes their cake slightly different, with their own unique twist. In Central America they like to soak the cake with sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk and heavy cream. This is probably the most common version. There’s also the Drunken Tres Leches cake, which is soaked with a mixture of water, rum and sugar. Thus far, my favorite is the Caribbean Tres Leches cake – made with a shot of rum and healthy dose of coconut milk, as well as the traditional evaporated and sweetened condensed milks. Part of the fun is deciding on the toppings. While I recommend toasted, shredded coconut, it is also incredible with maraschino cherries and fresh berries. SASHA MARTIN

Are you looking for the perfect cake for your next potluck? One bite of this ultra moist cake and your friends will soak up the flavors of the Caribbean – coconut milk and rum – and they’ll think they’re lounging on a beach. While easy to make, the cake does need an overnight “bath” in the three milks, so plan your time accordingly. Keep refrigerated and serve cool. For the milk mixture: Topping: For the cake: 12 oz. can evaporated milk 2 c. heavy cream 6 eggs, separated 5.5 oz. can coconut milk 1/4 c. sugar 2 c. sugar for 35-40 minutes. Let cool for at least 30 1/4 c. shredded, toasted 2 c. flour 1 c. heavy cream or minutes. coconut or fresh berries 1 tbsp. baking powder sweetened condensed In a medium bowl, whisk together three to taste Pinch of salt milk milks. Using a fork or toothpick, prick holes 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 shot rum all over the top of the cooled cake. Pour 2/3 c. milk milk mixture evenly across the top, cover Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Whisk together flour, baking powder and salt. In the bowl of a standing mixer, beat egg whites on medium until soft peaks form. Stream in sugar until stiff peaks form. Incorporate

egg yolks, one at a time. Add vanilla extract to milk. Alternate between incorporating milk mixture and flour mixture into the egg mixture, about one-third at a time. Pour into greased 11-by-13-inch baking pan. Bake

and refrigerate. The milk will soak in overnight and virtually disappear. The next day, whip up the cream with sugar and spread on top of the cake. Top with toasted, shredded coconut or fresh berries. Slice and serve. Keep chilled.

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NATALIE GREEN

PHOTO BY SASHA MARTIN.

CARIBBEAN TRES LECHES CAKE

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Taste

MICHAEL COOPER

VERMOUTH VERITAS

THE POUR

I

Black Magic Woman Old Black Magic weaves its spell.

t’s good to have talented friends. It’s better to have friends who are talented at developing good cocktails. And having friends who develop good tiki cocktails? Well, now you’re just asking for the gods, tiki or otherwise, to smite you with a long string of Old Fashioneds made with Canadian Whiskey, a maraschino cherry muddled at the bottom and enough soda to make a vaudeville entertainer blush. But, such is my luck that I can name a small and talented contingent of folks along the western seaboard steeped in tiki culture and cocktail lore my friends. Sometimes, fortune smiles. The Dark Magic is a drink that evolved over time but started by building on the shoulders of the Mai Kai’s Black Magic cocktail. The Mai Kai restaurant, one of the few surviving bordellos of 1950s and 1960s Polynesian funk and kitsch, is unexpectedly located in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. And let’s face it; knowing the Mai Kai is still around increases the number of reasons to visit Florida to three. Tiki drinks, mired in their own complexity and calling for distinctive and mostly obscure rums, are not the most accessible. The Dark Magic, however, strikes a balance of DIY gumption, rewarding treasure-hunting and fine flavor that makes it worth the effort.

The Dark Magic

2 oz. dark Jamaican rum (Coruba or Appleton V/X preferred) 1 oz. fresh lime juice 126

1/2 oz. unsweetened pineapple juice 1/2 oz. coffee syrup 1/4 oz. passion fruit syrup 1/4 oz. vanilla syrup 8 drops Herbsaint or Absinthe verte 1 dash Angostura bitters Blend ingredients with eight ounces of ice for five seconds with intermittent pulses. Pour into a hurricane or Collins glass. The divine progenitor of this drink is Craig Hermann, a tikiphile and erstwhile bartender in Portland, Ore., who developed this drink and has featured it in Tiki Kon, a celebration of tiki culture, artistry and cocktails he helps produce each year. The heart of the Dark Magic is the coffee syrup. It provides a bitter and tannic base on which the tart, sweet and molasses flavors can bound and frolic. The passion fruit and lime elements bring tart acidity while the pineapple and vanilla syrup give cover through their sweet characters and heavy bodies. The Herbsaint (or absinthe), as usual, is present to give a high but complex note to the drink that is present throughout. Make a visit to tradertiki.com to find quality passion fruit and vanilla syrup, get your coffee syrup ready and enjoy a drink that will leave you and your guests speechless. Or, at the very least, unintelligible. GABRIEL SZASZKO

Gabriel Szaszko writes at cocktailnerd.com and enjoys visiting Craig Hermann and his family at their home and reading his website Colonel Tiki’s Drinks at coloneltiki.com.

I have had to go out of my way to find interesting vermouths. Sure, there are your Martini & Rossi’s, your Cinzanos, your Noilly Prats and a whole host of other vaguely unsavory looking vermouths of unsure origins but those aren’t satisfactory when there’s a host of revelatory vermouths to shape and influence the texture of a cocktail. I’ve recently seen several vermouths creeping onto shelves that are worth your time and money to purchase and explore and may yet convince you that the Manhattan well-deserves a spot in the pantheon of humankind’s greatest accomplishments. Vya Sweet ($15): Vya is the rare California vermouth product. They are careful about the varietals blended to create its base and use a blend of muscat, colombard and veldepenas varietals, along with a dash of port (unusual in a vermouth), to create a very rich and fullbodied base. Carpano Antica ($32): Carpano Antica is the granddaddy of vermouths. The Carpano brand was the first to commercially produce and distribute a vermouth product and their Formula Antica, while not the original recipe, is based on the classic formula. Carpano Antica comes across as sweeter than the Vya but has a depth and complexity that is unmatched. Punt e Mes ($18): Punt e Mes is also a Carpano product but bridges the gap between an amaro (Italian bitter aperitif) and a vermouth. It is traditional, in the Torino area, to blend vermouth with an amaro as a pre-dinner drink. Punt e Mes takes that concept and bottles it so that you have a bitter vermouth that greatly changes how it affects a drink calling for sweet vermouth. – GS

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Entertainment G R E AT T H I N G S T O D O I N O K L A H O M A

L

Under Your Skin Lady Gaga takes Tulsa to the (Monster) Ball.

ady Gaga recently made entertainment news after parting ways with Target stores over political contributions and gay rights. The corporation had financially backed politicians running on a platform opposing gay marriage. The pop artist disagreed, wanting Target to discontinue such support. Fans were left without a Target-exclusive release of her new Born This Way album – at least, that’s how things looked. By the time of its scheduled May release, things will undoubtedly change. As with everything within the Haus of Gaga, the universe turns a little faster than usual, and every sight and sound is amped up beyond “acceptable” levels. When a woman wears a dress made of shredded meat or glues pearls to her skin or covers half her face above a skimpy taped-up

onesie, you can expect extreme opinions from the general public. People love her or love to tear at her for the same reason: Lady Gaga makes us a little uneasy. How will Tulsa greet Gaga when she continues her mega Monster Ball Tour with a stop at the BOK Center, April 4? If her July reception at Oklahoma City’s Cox Convention Center is anything to go by, T-Town is about to go, well, ga-ga for the woman who is arguably the biggest music act in the world at the moment. How can we help but get swept up in the masquerade, both beautiful and grotesque? How can we not be curious about her musicianship, displayed in crafted performances at piano. Most importantly, how can those shoes be comfortable? For tickets and details, go online to www.bokcenter.com

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Entertainment

PERFORMANCES

Calendar

IN CONCERT

SPORTS

FAMILY

ART

CHARITABLE EVENTS

COMMUNITY

to write masterpieces. The program includes works of Rossini, Liszt and Shostakovich. OKC Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcphilharmonic.org.

Ghazal Ka Safar April 9 The South Asian Performing Arts Foundation presents the language of South Asian poetry set to music in a program at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.sapaf.org Boeing Boeing Thru April 9 A bachelor juggles three flight attendants (he’s engaged to all) in the flighty farce presented by Lyric Theatre at the Plaza. www. lyrictheatreokc.com Angie Cockrell

April 10 The versatile singer performs jazz, blues, pop, country and gospel with the Chuck Gardner Trio at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame. www.okjazz.org

Home Lands, the Surprising Women of the West April 10 Broadway, film and television

actress Lynette Bennett shares the stories of women who brought about transitions in history in this musical theatrical monologue at Gilcrease Museum. www. gilcrease.org

Months on End April 15-23 The Tulsa Community College Theatre Department production will be in the TCC VanTrease Performing Arts Center. www.tulsacc. edu Tulsa Symphony April 16 The symphony and Tulsa Oratorio Chorus celebrate the Joy and the Brotherhood of Man with Beethoven’s Egmont and Symphony No. 9 under guest conductor Gerhardt Zimmermann at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsasymphony. org

PERFORMANCES Avenue Q As children we asked how to get to Sesame Street. As adults with children, we’re more likely to find ourselves living on Avenue Q. On Avenue Q, people live next door to Internet-addicted monsters and neighbors of many colors, including green, blue and pink. One thing is certain: This Broadway musical sensation is unlike anything you’ve seen before. The live show first ran in 2003 before making an impressive six-year run on Broadway. Actors playing the puppet roles don’t even attempt to hide from the audience. And since the audience has grown up, so have the characters, who discuss (and sing about) racism, homosexuality, alcohol and the traverses of adulthood. The words have become more adult, too, so consider yourself enlightened. Avenue Q will be at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center April 1-2. www.tulsapac.com

Performances Avenue Q April 1-2 Puppets aren’t just for children in the 2004 Tony Award-winning musical and comedy about surviving and succeeding in New York City. Avenue Q, set for the Tulsa Performing Arts Center, is recommended for adults only. www.tulsapac.com Irving Berlin’s America: From Ragtime to Ritzes April 1-2 Oklahoma City Philharmonic plays

val Thru April 3 The Oklahoma City Theatre Company presents new works and readings of plays by Native American playwrights from the U.S. and Canada at the OKC Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcciviccenter.com All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten Thru April 3 Presented at the Charles Page High School Performing Arts Auditorium by Sand Springs Community Theatre. www.pageplayers.com

music from the great American songwriter Broadway performers Ashley Brown, Tony DeSare, Hugh Panaro and NaTasha Yvette Williams at the OKC Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcphilharmonic.org

April 5-10, 12-17 Special effects, acrobatics, jazz, modern dance, puppetry, lighting and aluminum costumes collide in a dazzling theatrical experience that has been a hit all over the world. Tulsa Performing Arts Center (April 5-10), www.tulsapac. com. OKC Civic Center Music Hall (April 12-17), www. okcciviccenter.com

April 1-10 Musical play based on the Adam Sandler hit comedy film set in 1985 New Jersey about a spurned wedding reception singer. www.soonertheatre.com

TU Presidential Lecture Series April 7 Best-selling novelist and playwright Henning Mankell has a conversation with Michael Ondaatje, author of The English Patient, to conclude the 2010-11 series at University of Tulsa’s Allen Chapman Activity Center. www.utulsa.edu

Morning’s at Seven

April 1-10 The family comedy will be performed at Broken Arrow Community Playhouse. www.bacptheatre.com

Just Some Good Ol’ Boys Thru April 2 The Midwestern Theater Troupe brings back an original play exploring the mythological elements found in the television show The Dukes of Hazzard. www. nightingaletheater.com Primal Swing

April 3 The jazz ensemble performs at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame. www.okjazz.org

Native American New Play Festi-

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Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet April 5-6 Elegance and athleticism combine in startling, new choreography and performances with this company of 15 distinguished dancers under the artistic direction of Benoit-Swan Pouffer. Choregus Productions brings the company to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www. choregus.org The Aluminum Show

The Wedding Singer

Tartan Terrors April 2 Celtic music meets attitude with this youthful band that takes bagpipes and drumming in a whole new direction. Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com

venues. Bartlesville Community Center, April 4. www. bartlesvillecommunitycenter.com. Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center, April 5. www.thepacba.com

The Aluminum Show

Man from Nebraska

Thru April 3 Before there was August: Osage County, there was Tracy Letts’ play of a middle-aged man who wakes up and no longer believes in God. Theatre Pops brings the play to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.myticketoffice.com

A Chorus Line

April 4, 5 Enjoy the singular sensation from Broadway twice when it plays at two area

Signature

Symphony Classics April 9 Guest conductor Murry Sidlin leads the next Williams Signature Symphony Classics performance, The Defiant Requiem: Verdi at Terezin, at the TCC VanTrease Performing Arts Center for Education. www.signaturesymphony. org

Progressive Madness April 9 Oklahoma City Philharmonic salutes those more eccentric composers who lived by their own rules, were subject to the craze of audiences and governments and still managed

Quartet San Francisco

April 17 The chamber music ensemble was rescheduled from the original February performance due to snow. Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com

Eldar

April 17 Top jazz pianist Eldar brings smooth brilliance to the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame. www. okjazz.org

David Sedaris

April 18 The author, humorist and NPR contributor shares stories from books past (Me Talk Pretty One Day) and current (Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk) along with other anecdotes at Rose State Performing Arts Center, Midwest City. www.myticketoffice.com

Mike Bennett Band April 19 Vocalist Sharon Moguin joins for Third Tuesday Jazz at Gilcrease Museum. www.gilcrease.org Bobby Watson

April 21 The Kansas City saxophonist and recording artist performs with the TU Big Jazz Band at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame. www. okjazz.org

OCTC New Voices April 21-May 1 Oklahoma City Theatre Company presents Seven Interviews and Family Funeral, two new plays to be staged at OKC Civic Center Music Hall. Also look for new play readings through the festival. www.okctheatrecompany.org The Search for Intelligent Life in the Universe by Jane Wagner April 22-May 7 A

performance of the one-woman comedy written by Lily Tomlin’s collaborator and writer. Nightingale Theater. www.nightingaletheater.com

Easter Sunday Gospel Brunch

April 24 Dr. Joey Crutcher heads an ensemble of gospel singers to celebrate the holiday at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame. www.okjazz.org

Fame April 28-May 1 Encore Tulsa Theatre Arts performs the musical about dance students at Tulsa Little Theatre. www.encoretulsa.com Swimming in the Shallows April 28-May 8 Odeum Theatre Co. continues to run strong with Adam Bock’s comedic play that puts a group of Rhode Islanders in outlandish situations. Can romance exist between a man and a shark? Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www. odeumtheatrecompany.com Signature Symphony Pops

April 29-30 Last season’s crowd favorite returns with A Night at the Movies Part II, featuring the Signature Chorale at the TCC VanTrease Performing Arts Center. www.signaturesymphony. org

Jane Monheit

April 29-30 The elegant jazz vocal-

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ist brings a vintage charm to the OKC Civic Center Music Hall for two performances with the Oklahoma City Philharmonic. www.okcphilharmonic.org

Tulsa Ballet: Creations in Studio K

April 29-May 8 New choreography created especially for Tulsa Ballet breaks out at Tulsa Ballet Studio K in Brookside. Look for world premieres of work by Ma Cong, Michael Corder and Tony Fabre. www.tulsaballet.org

Tulsa Opera: Norma

April 30-May 8 Bellini’s drama of the Druid priestess, her secret affair with a Roman centurion and their children is set in an ancient world in the bel canto masterpiece. www.tulsapac.com

In Concert Martin Short April 1 Stand-up comedy at the SpiritBank Event Center. www.spiritbankeventcenter.com Three Days Grace

April 1 Brady Theater.

www.bradytheater.com

Kenny Chesney

bokcenter.com

April 2 BOK Center. www.

Bill Cosby April 3 Tickets for the stand-up comedy show at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center are on sale. www.tulsapac.com Lady Gaga April 4 BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com Bassnectar April 6 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Kings of Leon

bokcenter.com

April 8 BOK Center. www.

Heart

April 8 Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. www. hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Cage the Elephant

April 10 Cain’s Ballroom.

www.cainsballroom.com

A Day to Remember www.bradytheater.com

April 11 Brady Theater.

Sam Bush Band April 14 The Grammy Awardwinning musician, vocalist and King of Newgrass plays the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com The Malford Milligan Band

April 15 All Soul Acoustic Coffeehouse. www.allsoulcoffeehouse.com

Jason Boland & the Stragglers

April

15 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

David Crosby and Graham Nash

April 15, 16 Lucky Star Casino (April 15) in Concho. First Council Casino Hotel, Newkirk. www.zooamp.com

Sawyer Brown

www.riverspirittulsa.com

April 15 River Spirit Casino.

Gold City Quartet April 16 Gospel at the Mabee Center. www.mabeecenter.com Pete Yorn April 17 Diamond Ballroom, OKC. www. diamondballroom.net The National cainsballroom.com

April 19 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

Avalanche Tour

April 19 Stone Sour, Theory of a Deadman, Skillet. Tulsa Convention Center. www. bokcenter.com

Interpol com

IN CONCERT Kings of Leon The Kings of Leon finally seem to have what they wanted. Beginning as a Southern rock and blues-inspired group, the Nashville band hit it big in Britain with its first albums, Youth and Young Manhood and Aha Shake Heartbreak. They were fast stars across the Atlantic, but it wasn’t until their fourth venture, Only by the Night, that the Followill clan could come home as certifiable rock stars. Now brothers Caleb, Nathan, Jared and cousin Matthew are making a track back to Tulsa as U.S. gold- and platinum-selling artists to a stage where their hit-making sound belongs – on the BOK Center stage, April 8. But will it feel like a homecoming of sorts? Two of the brothers (Caleb and Nathan), as fans will know, were born in Oklahoma (City, to be specific). Most will agree, however, that the Kings’ ever-evolving sound will always have a home. www.bokcenter.com Craig Ferguson April 30 The Late, Late Show host performs at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com Tuesday Noon Concerts

Ongoing Set aside 30 minutes on your Tuesday lunch hour to visit the Sandy Bell Gallery and listen to concerts performed by OU faculty and students. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Sports

www.dcfconcerts.com

Umphrey’s McGee

Dodge National Circuit Finals Rodeo Thru April 3 Events in bareback riding, bronc riding, barrel racing and steer wrestling continue at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.dncfr.net

Championship Bull Riding

April 9 Only the best can beat the eight-second countdown on the back of an irritated bull. CBR comes to the SpiritBank Event Center. www.spiritbankeventcenter.com

April 21 The Marquee.

April 23-24 Blue Door, OKC. www.

Luke Bryan

April 23 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

cainsballroom.com

Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band April 28 BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com Bowling for Soup April 28 Cain’s Ballroom.

www.cainsballroom.com

Social Distortion

www.cainsballroom.com

Fab Four

April 29 Cain’s Ballroom.

April 29 The Ultimate Tribute at River Spirit Casino. www.riverspirittulsa.com

on the bright side. www.oklahomachildrenstheatre.org

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day April 8-10 Play-

house Theatre brings Judith Viorst’s book about a boy and his daily dramas to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center in feisty, entertaining adaptation. www. playhousetheatretulsa.com

Children’s Poetry Festival April 16 The 11th annual celebration that asks children to recite their favorite poems in English or Spanish will be at Tulsa’s Martin Regional Library. www.tulsalibrary.org ScienceFest

www.bricktownbrawlers.com v. Colorado April 3 v. Sioux Falls April 23

Big Adventure

OKC Barons Hockey www.okcbarons.com v. Rockford April 1 v. Texas April 2

April 1-2 The well-known children’s book by Munro Leaf about a gentle bull and a reluctant matador comes to the stage in a ChildsPlay Production at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www. tulsapac.com

Kid Flix

April 2 Island of the Blue Dolphins at Gilcrease Museum. www.gilcrease.org

April 21 Fourth and fifth graders head to the Oklahoma City Zoo for fun at one of the state’s largest Earth Day events. www.okczoo.com

Thru May Interactive exhibit challenges participants mentally and physically at the Tulsa Children’s Museum at the Tulsa Historical Society. www.tulsachildrensmuseum.org

Art Inversion April 1-30 Works by Kristen D. Gentry and Michelle Himes-McCrory on display at the Tulsa Artists’ Coalition Gallery. www.tacgallery.org Batista - Wilson

April 1-30 Paintings of Thomas Batista and the sculpture of Holly Wilson go on display at the JRB Art at the Elms Gallery, OKC. www. jrbartgallery.com

Byron Shen April 1-30 The work of board member of the Oklahoma Visual Artist Coalition and Holland Hall Upper School art teacher exhibits works at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center Gallery. www.tulsapac.com

Aladdin

The Bowie Knife: Icon of American Character April 1-Nov. 20 This exhibition at the Na-

Bark in the Park April 23 Bring your furry pals to enjoy a Drillers game at ONEOK Field. www. tulsadrillers.com

Kids Dig Books April 7 Program is for ages 3-6 years. Children must be accompanied by a caregiver. Gilcrease Museum. www.gilcrease.org

Tea & Immortality

Better Barrel Races World Show April 28-May 1 The world finals show features three days of quick and nimble competition plus other activities at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.betterbarrelraces.com

April 8 This live performance follows two Starfleet Academy cadets who learn to survive a Romulan attack in this interactive show featuring special effects and onscreen appearances from Captain Kirk and Spock at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com

Ke$ha

Hall. www.okcciviccenter.com

April 28 Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Planet of the Perfectly Awful People Thru April 8 A girl teaches extraterrestrials to look

Bricktown Brawlers

Ferdinand the Bull

Ke$ha April 25 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com James Taylor April 26 OKC Civic Center Music The Oak Ridge Boys

www.tulsatalons.com v. San Jose April 16 v. Iowa April 23

April 1, 8, 21, 22, 28, 29 Art Parts II at Gilcrease Museum. Program is for ages 3-6 years. Children must be accompanied by a caregiver. www. gilcrease.org

hardrockcasinotulsa.com okctickets.com

www.oklahomacity.redhawks.com v. Albuquerque April 15, 16, 18 v. Round Rock April 19-22

Mini Masters

George Thorogood & the Destroyers April 22 Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. www. Arlo Guthrie

OKC Redhawks

Family

April 21 Cain’s Ballroom.

www.cainsballroom.com

www.tulsadrillers.com v. Corpus Christi April 7, 9 v. San Antonio April 10-12 v. Springfield April 20, 21, 23

Tulsa Talons

April 20 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.

William Fitzsimmons

Tulsa Drillers

OKC Thunder www.nba.com/thunder v. L.A. Clippers April 6 v. Denver April 8 v. Milwaukee April 13

Thru April 3 Presented by Spotlight Children’s Theatre. www.spotlighttheater.org

Mad Science: Star Trek Live

Tower Tots April 5, 19, A morning story hour for children 3-6 years with an accompanying adult. Go online to see scheduled activities. www.pricetower.org

tional Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum glimpses the history, art and legacy of the Bowie knife. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org

April 2-May 15 A collection of beautifully and uniquely designed stoneware clay teapots from China reveals the sophistication of culture and tradition during this exhibit at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Art Under the Oaks

April 3-30 Work by Native American artists in a variety of media go on exhibit at Muskogee’s Five Civilized Tribes Museum. www. fivetribes.org

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SPORTS OKC RedHawks

Entertainment

The ballpark is calling – the Oklahoma City RedHawks are slated to play the Albuquerque Isotopes in their first home game of the season on April 15 at RedHawks Field. As in every spring, the air around Oklahoma City’s vibrant Bricktown District becomes filled with the smells of hot dogs and popcorn and with the sound of clinking baseball bats followed by cheers. That’s baseball season, and now that the RedHawks have become the Triple A-affiliate of the Houston Astros, fans have more to rave about. The franchises agreed to a player development contract in September, which could mean that Oklahoma City will see some of the best up-and-coming pitchers and hitters get the homefield advantage. For a complete schedule and tickets, go to www.oklahomacity. redhawks.com. Tulsa Art Studio Tour April 9-10 The Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition event opens the doors of Tulsa artists working in many media. www.ovac-ok.org Rendezvous April 14-July 10 The annual Artists’ Retrospective Exhibition and Art Sale this year features the works of Veryl Goodnight and Curt Walters at Gilcrease Museum. Artist demonstrations, workshops, artist talks and other special events are scheduled prior to and throughout the event. www.gilcrease.org Steven Poster: Photography Exhibition Thru April 2 Cinematographer Poster exhibits his

work in still images at Mainsite Contemporary Art, Norman. www.mainsite-art.com

Etchings by Gene Kloss

Thru April 3 The landscapes and people of the Southwest are the subjects of etching works by the celebrated artist. Philbrook Museum of Art. www.philbrook.org

Purim Mask Invitational

Thru April 15 Students’ works celebrating the holiday of Purim are on display at the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art. www.jewishmuseum.net

on the career of the late Colorado artist, illustrator and muralist. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

American Streamlined Design: The World of Tomorrow Thru May 15 Sleek, modern

beauty of 1920s-1950s design is on exhibit at Philbrook Museum of Art. Look for work by Norman Bel Geddes, Raymond Loewy and more. www.philbrook.org

Stare Stare Stereo

Thru May 15 Opening reception for exhibit of work by student artists at Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, Norman. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Home Lands: How Women Made the West Thru May 15 This major exhibition at Gilcrease

Museum explores the role of women throughout the American West’s history. The collection includes textiles, pottery, clothing, paintings, photography and sculpture. www.gilcrease.org

Mad Science: Star Trek Live

Tour de Quartz

Thru April 24 A selection of work created by students of the Quartz Mountain two-week art residency program are displayed at the Oklahoma Museum of Modern Art. www.okcmoa.com

American Indian Printmakers

Thru May 8 The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum’s first exhibit dedicated solely to printmaking of Native American fine art www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Mediterranea

Thru May 15 Exhibition explores the cultures and art of the Mediterranean world through works by American artists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, Norman. www. ou.edu/fjjma

Allen True’s West

Thru May 15 The traveling exhibit organized by the Denver Art Museum focuses

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First Friday Gallery Walk Ongoing The galleries of OKC’s Paseo Arts District welcome all each month. www.thepaseo.com 2nd Friday Circuit Art Ongoing A monthly celebration of arts in Norman. www.2ndfridaynorman.com Weekends on Us Ongoing Free admission to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum the first full weekend of every month. www.nationalcowboymuseum. org

Charitable Events Relay for Life

April 1-2 Join in or sponsor a participant at the University of Tulsa campus to help the American Cancer Society and its works to support patients and families and research. www.cancer.org

Tulsa Start! Heart Walk

April 2 Join the American Heart Association walk at ONEOK Field and through downtown Tulsa followed by activities for children, pet zone, a shoe clinic and entertainment. www. heart.org

Art 365 Thru May 7 Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition presents its biennial exhibit of innovative works by invited artists at [Artspace] at Untitled, OKC. www. artspaceatuntitled.org

Jill Downen: Counterparts Thru May 8 The exhibit features architectural sculptures blending human anatomy with the constructed environment. This is the third installment of the New Frontiers series of contemporary art at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa.com

Ongoing Fritz White, Clark Kelley Price, Jim Gilmore, Linda Besse and Jim Smith are just a few of the artists with works on display. www.scissortailart.com

marked 87 percent off retail continues and benefits Family & Children’s Services in Tulsa. www.fcsok.org

the Tulsa talent scout and the clients he took to fame. okhistorycenter.org

Museum of Art presents the first retrospective of work by the iconic American designer. www.okcmoa.com

Scissortail Gallery

Abersons & Friends Warehouse Sale Thru April 1 The warehouse sale with items

Starmaker: Jim Halsey & the Legends of Country Music Thru April A look at the life of

George Nelson: Architect, Writer, Designer, Teacher Thru May 8 The Oklahoma City

www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

MDA Hunt for a Cure

Artist-Illustrators from the Permanent Collection Thru May 15 The National Cowboy &

Western Heritage Museum pulls original sketches, paintings and books for a unique exhibit by western illustrators. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

April 2 Proceeds benefit the Muscular Dystrophy Association. Event will include live music, auctions and dining at the Hyatt Regency, Tulsa. www.mdausa.org

Fairy Tale Ball

April 2 Celebrate Oklahoma Children’s Theatre with Princesses, Dragons & One Magical Knight, this year’s theme of annual benefit for the arts organization from the OKC Petroleum Club. www. oklahomachildrenstheatre.org

America: Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of a Nation Thru Aug. 21 This epic show at Gilcrease

ONE Awards

Art and the Animal

Racing on the River April 2 The 10k time trial bicycle event will be on Riverside Drive and benefits the Homelife Association. www.homelifeok.org

Museum explores three centuries of American history through art, artifacts and archival materials from the museum’s collection. www.gilcrease.org Thru Sept. 5 More than 100 works of animal-themed art from the Society of Animal Artists on display at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History. www.snomnh.ou.edu

Fact & Fiction: Popular Western Imagery from the Glenn D. Shirley Western Americana Collection Ongoing National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum’s Dickinson Research Center.

April 2 The Oklahoma Nonprofit Excellence Awards will be given at Southern Hills Country Club to the best of the state’s nonprofit organizations. www.oklahomacenterfornonprofits.org

Fight for Air Climb

April 2 Climb up BOK Tower in downtown Tulsa for the American Lung Association. www.breathehealthy.org

MS Style Movement April 5 Cocktails are served at the Glass Slipper in Utica Square for the annual fashion show benefiting the National Multiple Scle-

rosis Society. www.nationalmssociety.org/ok

Resonance Center for Women Annual Brunch April 7 Event will honor an area woman who has worked to improve the life of her community. www.resonancetulsa.org

Green Leaf Gala April 7 The evening includes cocktails, appetizers, dinner and auctions for goodies to help the urban tree-planting organization. www.upwithtrees.org SpringFest Garden Market & Festival April 8-9 Enjoy the Tulsa Garden Center

in the bloom of spring at this market with natural and sustainable products, plants and seeds. www. tulsagardencenter.com

Street Party 2011: A Night of Glee April 9 Tulsa’s Street School students ben-

efit from a benefit serving dinner, live entertainment and Glee-ful fun at the Tulsa Convention Center. www.streetschool.org

Pop! ARTini April 9 Oklahoma’s largest martini tasting event also benefits Allied Arts and its support for the city’s arts groups. OKC’s top restaurants serve up appetizers, and live music entertains at the OKC Farmers’ Market. www.alliedartsokc.com FTS Designer Showcase Gala

April 9 Proceeds from the dinner and auction go to the Foundation for Tulsa Schools to promote creativity and innovation in education, incentives for high performance, scholarships and grants in Tulsa classrooms. www.foundationfortulsaschools.org

Oklahoma City Bag Lady Brunch

April 9 The American Cancer Society event hosts lunch and a chance to win designer handbags. Clarion Meridian Hotel, OKC. www.cancer.org

Redbud Classic

April 9-10 Walk, run or both at the 29th annual event which brings together fitness, fun and philanthropy to benefit this year CASA of OKC. It all begins at the Waterford complex, OKC. www.redbud.org

National Volunteer Week April 1016 The Tulsa Area United Way honors volunteers and holds a Volunteer Recognition Reception. www. tauw.org Bella Foundation Golf Tournament April 11 Help the foundation helping loving pets find good homes with a drive, play and prizes at Greens Country Club, OKC. www.thebellafoundation.org Arts! Arts! Arts!

April 12 The University of Oklahoma Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts holds its 20th annual benefit funding scholarships and grants for students and faculty. www.ou.edu/ finearts

William Booth Society Annual Benefit Dinner April 14 NFL Player of the

Decade Peyton Manning is the guest of this year’s elegant event at the Tulsa Convention Center. www. uss.salvationarmy.org

Sip for Sight Patron Dinner and Gala April 15-16 Prevent Blindness Oklahoma

brings back its big wine tasting event with a special patron dinner (April 15) and the big gala benefit (April 16) in the Main Hall of OSU-Tulsa. www. preventblindnessok.org

Crisis Pregnancy Outreach Gala

April 15 The seventh annual fundraising banquet will be at Southern Hills Country Club and include silent and live auctions. www.crisispregnancyoutreach.org

Garden Fest and Kick-off Party

April 15-16 Proceeds benefit the Broken Arrow nonprofit A New Leaf, which helps people with developmental disabilities. The VIP party (April 15) includes entertainment and hors d’ouvres. April 16 is open to all. www.anewleaf.org

Promise Ball April 16 The Greatest Treasure is the theme of this year’s event for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at the Tulsa Convention Center. David Jelley and the Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center will be honored. www. jdrf.org/tulsa-green Italian Getaway Ladies Brunch

April 16 Dress for a vintage tea party and join the American Cancer Society for a spring pre-party to the Tulsa Cattle Baron’s Ball. A designer handbag auction, jazz music and raffles are scheduled at Circle Cinema Gallery. 918.477.5419

Walk MS Tulsa

April 16 Walk for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society will begin at Temple Israel. www.nationalmssociety.org/ok

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Mirror Ball 2: Rewinds April 16 Domestic Violence Intervention Service holds a fundraiser event to support its work providing counseling, shelter and advocacy for families affected by domestic and sexual violence. The gala will be at Southern Hills Country Club. www.dvis.org Gospel, Grits & Gershwin April 16 Tulsa entertainers join Booker T. Washington High School students over grits and more to help the BTW Foundation purchase teaching equipment and education field trips. www.btwfoundation.net Dance of the Two Moons April 16 Dinner, dancing and the Native Nations Youth Council drum group will be at the Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel and Casino benefiting Indian Health Care Resource Center of Tulsa. www.ihcrc.org 2 Minute 5k

April 16 The race at Regatta Park and Pavilion will be held during Sexual Assault Awareness Month and raise money for YWCA Oklahoma City programs for assault victims. www.ywcaokc.org

MDA Baby Pageant

April 16 The annual Muscular Dystrophy Association hosts the 27th annual fundraiser pageant open to boys and girls ages infant to four years at Bishop McGuinness High School, OKC. 405.722.8001

Holland Hall Auction 2011

April 16 The auction benefiting Holland Hall School will be held in the renovated Primary School on campus. The theme: Back to the Future. www.hollandhall.org

Artscape April 17 Art and festivities benefiting the Tristesse Grief Center liven the atmosphere along with live music at the Silo Event Center at Redberry Farm. www.thegriefcenter.org Women Against MS Luncheon

April 21 Fundraiser benefits local programs of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Look for a keynote speaker and raffle of exquisite items a Johnathan Kayne Gillaspie gown, jeweled earrings, a fur jacket, evening handbags. www.nationalmssociety.org/ok

Dine with Us on Main Street, DSA

April 22 Dinner and a choir show benefit the Dove Science Academy in OKC. www.dsaokc.org

Oklahoma City Heart Walk April 23 Join the American Heart Association walk at Bricktown Ballpark, OKC. www.heart.org Calm Waters’ Golf Classic

April 25 The annual outing for Calm Waters Center for Children and Families will be held at Quail Creek Golf and Country Club. www.calmwaters.org

Juliette Low Leadership Society Celebration Luncheon April 27 The event, which

benefits Girl Scouts of Eastern Oklahoma, will be at Southern Hills Country Club. www.gseok.org

Dining Out for Life April 28 Dine at participating Tulsa area restaurants, and fight AIDS with H.O.P.E. of Tulsa. www.diningoutforlife.com/Tulsa Bishop Kelley Dinner and Auction

April 29 Bishop Kelley High School Foundation goes live at 31 Club with its annual auction supporting student educational field trips and special materials for study. www.bkelleyhs.org

Philbrook Garden Party

April 29-30 Enjoy the Friends of the Garden Brunch plus Cocktails & Coolers Young Masters Event on the first day, but don’t forget the party on April 30, all at Philbrook Museum. www.philbrook.org

Aviator Ball

April 30 The annual fundraiser for the Tulsa Air and Space Museum & Planetarium this year honors American Airlines for the company’s contribution to the community. Dinner, appetizers and beverages from some of Tulsa’s hippest restaurants and live music fill the evening at American Airlines Hangar 80. 918.834.9900

ART Gilcrease Rendezvous Art is an adventure, and Gilcrease Museum is the destination for all who appreciate the fine work that goes into fine art. Sculptor Veryl Goodnight and painter Curt Walters are the featured artists at Rendezvous Artists’ Retrospective Exhibition and Art Sale, open to the public April 14-July 10, the annual show at Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa. The sale is scheduled for April 15, but works that are not sold in the opening will be available for purchase through the summer. Walters and Goodnight teach classes, demonstrate their processes and will hold artist talks during the opening weekend. For more information, go online to www.gilcrease.org. “Cascia Celebrates 85 Years Past, Present and Future,” says it all. The annual Cascia Parent Faculty Association event will take place at the school. www. casciahall.org

Bowl for Kids’ Sake

Thru April Teams raise money in the lanes to benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma. www.bfkstulsa.org

Community Muskogee Azalea Festival

April 1-30 Honor Heights Park becomes even more picturesque as thousands of azalea buds bloom in an explosion of color. The festival continues through April with a run, parade and powwow on April 9, chili cook-off cook’s party (April 8), Flower Power bike ride (April 23) and more. www. cityofmuskogee.com

Norman Medieval Fair

April 1-3 The Middles Ages were never as festive as this annual event featuring arts, jousting tournaments, human chess games, wandering minstrels and costume contests, to name just a few. It all takes place at Reaves Park. www. medievalfair.org

OKC Home Show

April 1-3 Learn how to do all those home and garden projects plus meet Chip Wade of HGTV’s Curb Appeal at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.homeshowokc.com

The Art of Healing

April 2 Join in a day of laughter, encouragement and wisdom for cancer patients. The speaking event will be at Monte Cassino School, Tulsa. 918.744.0123

Oklahoma Reining Horse Association Show April 2-3 Horse and rider compete together to

demonstrate precision, agility, discipline and teamwork

Equality Gala April 30 The black-tie affair for Oklahomans for Equality will take place at the Tulsa Convention Center. www.okeq.org April 30 Find Miracles in the Garden at the annual fundraiser for the Little Light House school for special needs children. Brunch and silent/live auctions take place at Renaissance Tulsa Hotel. www. littlelighthouse.org

April 12 The Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce networking trading show includes live music, networking activities, food and more at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okcchamber.com

April 2-3 QuikTrip Center at Expo Square. www.tulsaarmsshow.com

MET Household Pollutant Collection Event April 2-3 Discard of old paint, pool

chemicals, cooking oil, batteries, fluorescent light bulbs and other refuse too dangerous for the average trash can at Expo Square where the Metropolitan Environmental Trust will collect if for proper disposal. www.metrecycle.com

Southern Plains Farm Show

April 7-9 Livestock equipment demos, farming equipment, gentle horse training and more at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.farmshowsusa.com

Oil Can Classic April 8-10 Not wheels, but hooves storm Expo Square’s Ford Truck Arena for big prizes in roping competition. www. markharrellhorseshows.com Herb Day in Brookside

April 9 Spring comes to Tulsa, and the annual event in one of the city’s favorite districts has what gardeners want at 41st Street and Peoria Avenue. www. brooksidetheplacetobe.com

ARF & Craft Fair

April 9 The juried arts and crafts show also highlights adoptable pets with the Animal Rescue Foundation (ARF) of Tulsa. www. peaceloveandcrafts.com

Norman Garden Festival

April 9 Gardeners gather to learn from one another trade plant seeds and learn about the latest in making the garden grow at the Cleveland County Fairgrounds. 405.321.4774

April 9-10 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okcgunshow.com

Symposium on the American Indian April 11-16 The 39th annual event carries

March for Babies

April 30 Join the walk that funds research to end premature births. Walk will be at the Mabee Center. www.marchforbabies.com

William Booth Society Annual Benefit

Collie Club of America National Specialty April 12-16 The 125th CCA anniversary

areas are doing to reduce petroleum dependence in transportation at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okcleancities.org

OKC Gun Show

April 30 Walk for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society will begin at Oklahoma City Zoo. www.nationalmssociety.org/ok

Schmooza Palooza Party

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Vehicle Fair April 7 Learn about what urban

at Gaston’s White River Resort in Lakeview. www. gastons.com

Walk MS OKC

April 30 This year’s theme,

and more. www.cts.nsuok.edu

Tulsa Gun Show

Gaston’s April Fly-Fishing School April 9-10 The two-day course will be

Garden Party

Celebrate Cascia

in a competition at Expo Square. www.okrha.com

the theme Hands Across the Nation: Smart Legacies, Strong Spirits. Symposium includes seminars on native language. Also look for art, a powwow

Norman Medieval Fair show takes A Stroll Down Memory Lane to the QuikTrip Center at Expo Square for a special show. www. collieclubofamerica.org

Oklahoma Centennial Horse Show April 13-16 The only multi-breed show of its

size in Oklahoma goes into its 23rd year at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okcentennial.com

Jon Meacham

April 15 The Pulitzer Prizewinning author and former editor of Newsweek is the guest of the next Tulsa Town Hall lecture. Media’s Secret Bias: Liberals, Conservatives and the Truth About the News will be at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsatownhall.com

Biting the Apple: Silk-Stocking Sirens and Beefcake Boys April 15-16 This

gallery reception and Grindhouse Party hosted at IAO Gallery is a juried art weekend for adventurous artists and connoisseurs exploring burlesque and pin-up culture. www.iaogallery.org

World Heritage Weekend April 15-16 The VIP reception and dinner (April 15) celebrates Price Tower’s nomination to become a UNESCO World Heritage Site while the public forum (April 16) shares how the public can help achieve status. pricetower.org 50th Western Heritage Awards Weekend April 15-16 Prestigious awards for excel-

lence in American Western literature, music, film and television will be given out during the annual awards

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Great Southwest Home Show April 28-May 1 The Manufactured Housing Association of Oklahoma showcases options for homeownership that are from the metal boxcars of the 1970s. Expo Square. www.mhao.org PrimeTime Seniors Expo April 29-30 Information, demonstrations for seniors. www.okstatefairpark.com

Entertainment

Red Fern Festival

April 29-30 This festival takes visitors back to the days of marble games, crawdads in streams and hounds in downtown Tahlequah to celebrate the novel Where the Red Fern Grows. www. redfernfestival.com

Art on the Hill Festival April 29-30 Rogers State University in Claremore showcases outstanding art works by high school and college students in a one-of-a-kind annual event with live music and art work demonstrations. www.rsu.edu Kids Closet Connection Consignment Sale April 29-May 1 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okstatefairpark.com

Art in the Vineyard

NIGHTLIFE Trivia Night at 51st Street Speakeasy If you’re a Facebook friend of Oklahoma City’s 51st Street Speakeasy, you’re already acquainted with Tuesday’s Team Trivia Night with The Lost Ogle. If not, you should be. Prohibition went out decades ago, so don’t be shy about forming your own team to compete at this weekly ritual at one of the city’s favorite pubs. Patrick of www.thelostogle.com says you don’t have to be a scholar to compete and go far, although scholars are welcome. He writes the questions for each week’s game night querying on subjects from U.S. presidents to Jersey Shore characters. Teams can have any number of players they want, but dividing the prize money is sweeter with fewer players – the winning team receives $75, second place $50 and $25 for third. Last place gets a coupon for free appetizers. How’s that for teamwork? 405.463.0470

April 30 The festival of fine art, fine wine and great music returns to Tidal School Vineyards near Drumright. www.tidalschool.com

Metcalf Gun Show

April 30-May 1 Exchange Center at Expo Square. metcalfgunshows.com

Oklahoma TICA Cat Show April 30-May 1 The International Cat Association looks for the best in breed in the 15th anniversary show featuring the championship and household pet cat show in 14 rings. www. thunderkatz.org ONA Coin & Currency Show

April 30May 1 The Oklahoma Numismatic Association will be open for business at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okstatefairpark.com

R.K. Gun Show

April 30-May 1 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.rkshows.com

Oklahoma Renaissance Festival April 30-May 30 Musicians, madrigals, knights and ladies walk the grounds of the Castle in Muskogee for this fete fit for a king. www.okcastle.com

CAN’T MISS EVENTS BOK Center

Kenny Chesney: April 2 Lady Gaga: April 4 Kings of Leon: April 8 Stone Sour, Theory of a Deadman, Skillet and more (Tulsa Convention Center): April 19 Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band: April 28 Foo Fighters: May 17 Lisa Lampanelli (Tulsa Convention Center): May 20 Josh Groban: May 21 OK Play! Children’s Expo (Tulsa Convention Center): June 18-19 New Kids on the Block, Backstreet Boys: July 17 Def Leppard with Heart: July 19 Professional Bull Riders: Aug. 12-13 Keith Urban: Aug. 18 Taylor Swift: Sept. 21 Cirque Du Soleil’s Michael Jackson, the Immortal: Feb. 18 Tulsa Talons: April 16, 23; May 7, 21; June 11, 25; July 9, 16 Tulsa Shock: June 10, 18, 21, 23, 30; July 8, 15, 26, 28, 30; Aug. 5, 21, 23, 28, 30; Sept. 2, 11 Tickets: www.bokcenter.com

Grieving the Loss of a Spouse Ongoing Support group taking place every Monday at Grace Hospice, 6400 S. Lewis, Tulsa. www.gracehospice.com Tulsa Barn Dance

banquet at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

All American Mule & Donkey Congress April 15-17 All mules and donkeys are eli-

gible to compete in the event challenging notions that only horses are show-worthy. Expo Square. www. muleanddonkeycongress.com

Southwest Street Rod Nationals

April 15-17 Cars and trucks from across the decades go on display in a street-rodding enthusiast’s dream come true at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.nsra-usa.com

The Oklahoma Arabian Show April 15-17 Oklahoma State Fair

okstatefairpark.com

Horse Park. www.

Hispanic Heritage Run

April 16 The fourth annual 5k event takes place in downtown Tulsa and also includes a fun run. www.tulsahispanicchamber.com

ily with the award for their service to the country and for humanitarian causes. His daughters Barbara Pierce Bush and Jenna Bush Hager will accept the award at the museum. www.oklahomacitynationalmemorial.org

GO Tulsa Spring Show April 20-24 Greater Oklahoma Hunter Jumper Association event at Expo Square. www.goshow.org eARTh Picnic

April 23 Living Arts of Tulsa hosts a day of entertainment and art. Bring a picnic and join in the fun. www.livingarts.org

Jenks Herb & Plant Festival

April 23 More the 100 vendors are headed to Jenks for the festival that includes music, locally-grown herbs and more warmweather enjoyment. www.jenksgardenclub.com

OKC Computer Show & Super Sale

April 23 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefairpark.com

Oklahoma Appaloosa Horse Show

Symposium: Bruce Goff in Theory and Practice April 23 Architects, scholars and histori-

Stillwater Arts Festival

Motorcycle Swap Meet April 24 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefairpark.com

April 16-17 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefairpark. com April 16-17 The premiere springtime event of the region brings outstanding artists and entertainment to town. stillwater.org

Oklahoma Paint Horse Show April 1617 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefairpark.com Art Under the Oaks Market & Festival April 17 Muskogee’s Five Civilized Tribes Museum

celebrates heritage and art such as pottery, knapping, basket weaving, textile art, fine art and more by native artists. The festival has a line-up of storytellers and more to add to the fun. www.fivetribes.org

OSU Sustainable Enterprise Conference April 20 Energy executive legend T. Boone

Pickens and environmental leadership crusader Robert F. Kennedy Jr. are the keynote speakers at this Tulsa Business Forum event focused on enterprise and environment. spears.okstate.edu/cepd/

2011 International Reflections of Hope Award April 20 The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum will present George W. Bush and his fam-

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ans discus the architects work and place in architectural history at Price Tower. pricetower.org

Bare Bones International Independent Film Festival April 25-May 1 Films by local and in-

ternational filmmakers are shown during on of Muskogee’s biggest events. Go online for an event schedule and other details. www.barebonesfilmfestival.org

Ongoing A contra and square dance at Dance Pointe on Cherry Street from 7:30-10:30 p.m. the first Saturday of every month. All dances are taught and called to live music. $5.

Walking Tour: Blanchard Springs Caverns Ongoing Wednesdays through Sundays, 9:30

a.m.-4:15 p.m. One-hour guided walking tour through the upper level of Blanchard Springs Caverns in Little Rock, Ark. 501.975.7230. www.blanchardcavetours.com

International Gymnastics Hall of Fame Ongoing Celebrates the athletic and artistic

elements of the sport while honoring its most accomplished athletes at Science Museum Oklahoma. www. sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

Destination Space

Ongoing Revealing the amazing science that allows us to travel beyond the confines of earth. www.sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

Walking Tour Ongoing Take a walking tour of historic downtown Tulsa. www.tulsahistory.org Gilcrease Films Ongoing See various films throughout the month. www.gilcrease.org OKCMOA Films www.okcmoa.com

Ongoing OKC Museum of Art.

Philbrook Museum Films

ous films. www.philbrook.org

Ongoing See vari-

Planetarium Shows

Ongoing Science Museum Oklahoma. www.sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

Oklahoma Writers Hall of Fame Induction April 26 Author P.C. Cast will be inducted into the company of other honored writers at Philbrook Museum. 918.594.8215

Hostas, Friends and More

April 26 Hosta growers get their springtime fix at this hosta plant sale and lecture on tips to make the shade-loving plants thrive. Tulsa Garden Center. www.tulsagardencenter. com

Festival of Arts April 26-May 1 Oklahoma City ushers in spring with visual, performing and culinary arts to delight the senses. Children’s activities will also be available around the festival grounds Festival Plaza, Stage Center and the Myriad Botanical Gardens in downtown OKC. www.artscouncilokc.com

Foo Fighters

Play Arkansas!

Gaston’s April Fly-Fishing School: The two-day class (April 9-10) teaches basics and technique at Gaston’s White River Resort in Lakeview. www.gastons.com Oaklawn Live Racing: Some of America’s best thoroughbred racing hits the Spa City of the South, Hot Springs. The fun runs through April 16. www.oaklawn.com 49th Annual Arkansas Folk Festival: Folk, mountain and bluegrass music fans better mark their calendars for this celebration of frontier life, crafts and sounds April 15-18 in Mountain View. www.ozarkgetaways.com

Tulsa Business Forums

To be considered for inclusion in our calendar, information must be submitted a minimum of two months in advance of the event date. E-mail to events@okmag.com or mail to P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204

Robert F. Kennedy and T. Boone Pickens visit Tulsa to speak at Tulsa Business Forum’s OSU Sustainable Enterprise Conference April 20 at the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel. The environmental rights activist and business legend share how enterprise meets sustainability. spears.okstate.edu/cepd/

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APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

C R I T I C A L S TAT E

D

Consider The Cadbury

epending correctly on my 10th try. on when Our resident wiseacre ponders his favorite Easter traditions. Now if only I can teach my you’re pet rabbit to cluck like a reading chicken. this: Tell people this is the admit it: When I go to church, it’s usually on • April is almost here. Cubs’ year. I have a lot of faults. I drink too one of three major church holidays: Easter, • April is here. much beer, spend too much time on Twitter Christmas or Mother’s Day. That’s why I • It’s August and you’re reading this and still watch Big Brother. But perhaps always think it’s fun to listen to the little old magazine while sitting in a dentist’s office, my biggest fault is that I’m a Cubs fan. The lady up front complain about all the noncar dealership waiting room or my parents’ Cubs know winning about as well as Charlie church-going people in attendance. That’s den. Sheen knows sobriety. That being said, April kind of like the mall complaining about too Anyway, April is one of my favorite is the best time to be a Cubs fan because many customers. months. It’s when flowers bloom, raindrops they are usually only a couple of games out Open a Cadbury Crème Egg to fall and your grandpa dozes off during the of first by the end of the month. perfection. Have you ever wondered why final round of the Masters Golf Tournament. Have a birthday party. My birthday is the drug store always has a box of Cadbury It’s also the season of Easter (yeah, I know April 13. Just about every other year or so it Crème Eggs next to the cash register? Well, Easter sometimes occurs in March, but it’s falls on or around Easter Sunday. This kind it’s for people like me. What’s odd, though, at its best during April). Easter is one of my of stinks, because 1) people usually frown is that I don’t really like Cadbury Crème favorite holidays, which probably explains upon someone having a wild birthday party Eggs. They are too rich and sweet, plus I’m why I’m pre-diabetic. Because I like it so at McNellie’s the night before Easter Sunday, always a little bit worried that the yellow much, I thought it would be fun to share and 2) I have to do something that requires part may have salmonella. some of my favorite Easter traditions with sobriety. Also, my grandmother always buys In fact, the only reason I really buy them you. me pastel-colored shirts for my birthday. is so I can practice opening one up like they Play “Put the Easter Eggs in a Shoebox Pastels are lame. do in the commercials. Seriously, in every and Hide them in Your Sister’s Closet.”

This tradition is always fun, especially when the second week of May finally rolls around. Going to church and listening to regulars complain about crowds. I’ll 134

commercial they show some hand model opening up the egg and the bright yellow cream is always perfectly in the center. It takes a while, but usually I can open it

PATRICK NELSON

If you’d like to wish Patrick a happy Cadburycracking, visit him at www.thelostogle.com.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

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Entertainment

The Raveonettes, Raven In The Grave – According to legend, when members of this Danish indie rock outfit learned that Rolling Stone editor David Fricke would be at the SPOT festival, they went all out to get on the roster. In a nutshell, they succeeded, Fricke raved about them and a record company bidding war ensued. Critics and indie music lovers love to love The Raveonettes, and their mainstream popularity seems to grow with each release. April 5. Alison Krauss & Union Station, Paper Airplane – The reigning queen of bluegrass is back with her follow up to her 2007 Album of the Year collaboration with Robert Plant, Raising Sand. It’s her first album with Union Station since 2004. The 11-track Paper Airplane exhibits an artist in her prime backed with a band she knows like family. She’s likely to add a few more Grammy’s to her collection – she already has 26; more than any other female performer. April 12. k.d. lang and the Siss Boom Bang, Sing It Loud – By this point k.d. lang has just about done it all: country, pop, jazz and big band music and performances with the likes of Roy Orbison, Elton John, Loretta Lynn and Tony Bennett. After 25 years in the business, lang presents an album with her own band, the first time since her early recordings with the Reclines – the Patsy Cline tribute band that got the singer her start. The mostly original tracks, co-written by lang, range from retro pop to jazz. April 12. Architecture In Helinski, Moment Bends – The offbeat Aussie – no, they’re not Finnish – indie pop group captured the attention of music lovers with their 2003 debut, Fingers Crossed. Known for their unique blend of modern indie musical elements with a healthy dose of 80s pop, the group is a music festival regular, and they’ve opened for everyone from Deathcab for Cutie to Polyphonic Spree. Their fourth studio effort offers plenty of the catchy pop they’re known for, but it also marks the evolution of the band’s sound in a more mature and mysterious direction. April 19.

MUSIC

A New ‘Age’

Stephen Speaks releases its first major studio album.

A

s an artist, it’s safe to say that there’s nothing more exhilarating than watching your long-envisioned, creative brainchild come to life. Such is the case for Tulsa’s Stephen Speaks, with the release of their first major studio album, Age of the Underdog, set for this month. “I’ve had the idea for this album since 2007, and once I heard it in my head it was a matter of finding the right players. The musicianship overall is much more professional than previous albums. Although the musicians have played with the best in the world, they were chosen for specific sounds, not their big names,” explains Stephen Speaks’ driving force, Rockwell Ryan Ripperger. “The album is quite different from anything I’ve done in the past. I wanted a hip-hop foundation with real instruments, with a dirty slide guitar. It’s more rock and roll and pop.” Producing under his own label, Rippley Records Inc. since age 15, Ripperger founded Stephen Speaks in 2000 with a couple of friends. Many years and numerous albums later, he estimates that he has had more than 100 different friends and musicians come in to the band and play with him.

The band’s changing dynamic has become a central hub in its individual appeal and sound, leaving it open as a project beyond just one specific group of people. “I try to work with anyone I meet that’s talented. As I’ve evolved as a musician, so have the musicians around me, so there is always opportunity to get with older guys who are better, but at the same time, I like to work with people who are coming into their own,” he says. “The mix of experienced and new people gives Stephen Speaks a sense of familiarity and innocence – and I always want to keep it that way.” Within his writing, Ripperger expresses a yearning to connect with others, an aspect that he believes is one of the most crucial parts of music. “I think it’s important to be in touch with the center of human emotion, and what I think is that there are certain universal truths. I really try to focus on those when I write,” Ripperger says. “I want to create something that other people can relate to. Almost all the songs on my albums before Age of the Underdog have been predominantly love songs, and I believe that this new album branches out on much more.” NATALIE GREEN

PHOTO BY MARY ELLEN MATTHEWS.

FRESH MUSIC

MEIKA YATES HINES

APRIL 2011 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

IN PERSON

Art Ambassador

136

“I was a ballet dancer in my late teens and early 20s, but I did it exclusively to meet girls and keep in shape.”

intellectually, but they get what’s going on. We put on good work, and people respond to it. We want to keep building the repertory of the Oklahoma City Ballet. People may not associate Oklahoma City with a home of

good art, yet there is good art here. This is not just an oil and gas state, this is not just a sports state. Art is a cultural necessity to the growth of Oklahoma.” AS TOLD TO JAMI MATTOX

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

“M

y first foray into the arts was playing cello in the second grade. I was inspired to play by an abstract painting by (Gustave) Moreau that had a cello in it. I can still picture that painting. I played in the youth orchestra, but I was not very good because I didn’t practice enough. The only thing I was dedicated to when I was very young was writing. I wrote my first novel in fourth grade. It was a take off of James Bond called James Bored; his secretary was named Laura Nails. The villain, Spector, had stolen the Eiffel Tower and was selling off the pieces as erector sets. I still think it was a pretty clever novel, especially for a fourth-grader. I was a ballet dancer in my late teens and early 20s, but I did it exclusively to meet girls and keep in shape. I didn’t have the (body) to be a ballet dancer. Professionally, I worked in a CPA firm and created business management practices that were almost exclusively for the entertainment industry. I then went to work at Panavision (manufacturer and distributor of camera equipment for the film industry) and helped grow the company’s presence in the independent film industry. I joined the Oklahoma City Ballet as executive director in 2009. It was a bit of an adventure. I’m from the West Coast and had never lived in the Midwest except as a small child. I have found it a tremendous learning experience, and there are wonderful people in Oklahoma. One of the reasons that I came to the Oklahoma City Ballet and one of the biggest challenges of this job is to make ballet relevant to the 21st century. We’re trying to do this by bringing in some of the best choreographers in the country, and it’s inspired the audiences here. Whether it’s Oklahoma or any other place, people always say they don’t know anything about dance or don’t understand it, but if you put good art in front of them, they’ll get it. They may not understand it

John Krasno is the executive director of the Oklahoma City Ballet. Prior to his arrival in Oklahoma and his current position, Krasno lived in Los Angeles and worked in the film industry. He is, admittedly, an awful ballet dancer.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2011

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2011 April Oklahoma Magazine  
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