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Dear
Contest
Judges:
 
 In
2012,
The
Graham
Leader
adopted
the
cleanup
projects
of
the
newly
reorganized
 Keep
Graham
Beautiful
organization.
From
the
group’s
new
beginnings,
we
were
 there
to
promote
the
events
and
encourage
the
local
citizens
to
participate.
 
 The
Graham
Leader’s
coverage
of
the
KGB’s
activities
included
news
articles,
 editorials
(3‐25,
5‐13
and
9‐16),
columns
(3‐18
and
9‐30),
photos
and
ads
(4‐11,
9‐ 30,
10‐03,
10‐07
and
others
that
were
similar).
 
 The
KGB’s
two
main
cleanup
events
were
great
successes,
and
their
projects
 continue
in
2013.
 
 Sincerely,
 
 Carla
McKeown
 Special
Projects
Editor/Associate
Managing
Editor
 The
Graham
Leader
 Graham,
Texas



cyan magenta yellow black

GRMC Auxiliary has come a long way

Steers, Lady Blues prepare for district

Page 7A

Page 1B

THE GRAHAM LEADER Oldest business institution in Young County • Established August 16, 1876

VOL. 136, NO. 62 • SINGLE COPY 75¢

WEEKEND EDITION • SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012

www.grahamleader.com

Abandoned dogs finally find a home One dog killed, two others rescued thanks to the efforts of many BY JULIANNE MURRAH gninews@grahamleader.com Two dogs abandoned on the outskirts of Graham are safe and sound thanks to the efforts of many local animal lovers. Three dogs were found roaming along Bunger Highway at the beginning of March. When Debbie Shubert decided to submit a letter to the editor about the abandoned dogs that was published in the Sunday, March 11, edition of The Graham Leader, the dogs became a concern for many. “I first saw the dogs on March 1,” said Shubert. “They were running along Highway 1287. There was a pickup there with a man and woman trying to catch them. Several cars stopped at that time, but the dogs would take off running full speed if you got near them. I tried many times to befriend the dogs, but they would always take off running. They looked so frightened.” Shubert said that being unable to help the dogs fueled her to write a letter to the editor. “I became very frustrated because I could not catch them,” she said. “The more frustrated I got, the angrier I became at

people who dump their dogs for whatever reason. I needed to vent I guess, so putting an ad in the paper helped me do so. I was hoping desperately that some kind soul with better ‘catching dog abilities,’ would read the article and would help with their rescue.” Many citizens heard and read about the situation and wanted to do something about it — including Kathy Riggins (Shubert’s sister-in-law) and Crystal and Ricky Castro. Riggins saw the dogs and attempted to catch them. “When we saw them there it just broke my heart,” said Riggins. “I set three live traps out to try to catch them or call them. It was so sad because I have never seen anything like it. They were extremely scared.” Riggins and her daughter stayed late into the night trying to capture the terrified dogs. “There was the one little brown dog, and when I tried to pet him, he would freak out and run,” said Riggins. “I was out of town for four days so I didn’t do anything this weekend but keep calling and checking on See DOGS, Page 2A

Safe at last Lucky and Odie rest peacefully in their new home. The duo, victims of abandonment and separation, were happy to be reunited in the home of a loving family on Monday. (Courtesy photo)

Campaign to keep Hoping the third time’s the charm Graham beautiful gets under way BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com Keep Graham Beautiful seeks to make Graham’s beauty everyone’s duty with a cleanup campaign to be launched next month. Keep Graham Beautiful began in 1993 but became inactive in 2008. A group of nine local residents have sought to revitalize the organization to help shake the dust off the town. “We want to create a challenge to the pride of the folks who live here,” said President Roy Robinson. The steering committee considered numerous options to restore the community’s appearance and recapture some of the scenic charm lost as a consequence of neglect. After careful deliberation, the committee narrowed its goals to two for this year — general cleanup and street and curb appearance. Robinson said a general cleanup of the community and its entrances can succeed only with widespread participation from residents and organizations. “There’s been plenty of letters to the editor,” he said. “Plenty of people agree, somebody needs to go clean up.” Robinson said that somebody is all of us as community members. Keep Graham Beautiful is looking for members, but unlike in the past, no membership fee is required. “We’re not looking for a fee. We want people who will roll up their sleeves and help,” Robinson said. The Keep Graham Beautiful group enlisted the support of the Graham City Council at Thursday’s regular meeting at City Hall and received approval for use of the Downtown Square for a public kick-off of the week long Clean Up Graham 2012. “Whatever we can do to help that we can fit within the See BEAUTIFUL, Page 9A

Your Local Weather Local Forecast Sat

Sun

Mon

Tue

3/17

3/18

3/19

3/20

74/60

73/60

70/50

67/44

Windy, isolated thunderstorms. Highs in the mid 70s and lows in the low 60s.

Cloudy. Highs in the low 70s and lows in the low 60s.

A few thunderstorms possible. Highs in the low 70s and lows in the low 50s.

A few thunderstorms possible.

©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service

A national finalist Zach Berru gives an impromptu speech on “The Great Gatsby” to an English class. Berru will travel to Indianapolis this summer to compete in international extemporaneous speaking in the National Forensic League’s national competition. (Photo by Cherry Rushin)

Berru earns third straight trip to national finals BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com Graham High School senior Zach Berru has done it again. For the third time he will be competing at the national level as part of the National Forensic League. “It’s his third year in a row to qualify for nationals,” said teacher and speech/ debate sponsor Paul Mattis. “I don’t

Weather High Low Rain Friday, 3/9 65 43 0 Saturday, 3/10 43 41 1.89 Sunday, 3/11 63 48 0 Monday, 3/12 75 50 0 Tuesday, 3/13 73 61 0 Wednesday, 3/14 68 59 0 Thursday, 3/15 72 61 0.07 Rain: Month 1.96 • Year 8.46 Lake Graham at capacity: 1,075.00 Current level: 1,075.23 Temperatures and rainfall provided by the National Weather Service.

know of anyone in our NFL district that’s done that. It’s also been in three different events.” Berru’s first time at nationals, he competed in congressional debate which is debate in the form of a mock U.S. Congress. His second year was in policy debate. This year, he will compete in international extemporaneous speaking. “It’s been pretty clear that’s he’s had a talent for it since his freshman year,”

said Mattis. For this competition, Berru has had to prepare himself by learning as much as possible about global topics. “It focuses more on what’s going on in the world more than it does anything to do with the U.S.,” Berru said. Berru is one of three out of 54 competiSee THIRD, Page 2A

NEWS BRIEFS Relay for Life car show to be held Saturday Graham’s Relay for Life will gear up for its 2012 relay season starting off with an open car and motorcycle show beginning at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, March 17, on the Graham Downtown Square. Citizens may enjoy a full day of fun and beautiful cars, trucks and motorcycles. Different relay teams will have food and activity booths

available to kick start their team fund-raising. All cars, trucks and motorcycles should be in place by 10:30 a.m. Judging will begin at 11 a.m., and awards will be presented at 3 p.m. First-and second-place awards will be given in 25 different classes. Special awards include Best of Show, Distance Traveled, Club Participation and People’s Choice. The People’s Choice award will be selected by audience participation.

Inside Calendar .............................. Page 5A Obituaries ............................ Page 6A Lifestyles .............................. Page 7A Police Blotter ....................... Page 9A Sports ....................................Page 1B TV ..........................................Page 2B Entertainment ......................Page 2B Classified ..............................Page 4B

68872


OPINIONS

4A • THE GRAHAM LEADER

SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012

THE GRAHAM LEADER KGB campaign hopes to scare off the Litterbug WEEK’S END www.grahamleader.com A MediaNews Group newspaper USPS 225 240

William Dean Singleton President Robert L. Krecklow Publisher/Vice President David Rupkalvis Editor

EDITORIALS Requiring bids the right decision Just a few months ago, Young County commissioners voted to change the way the county purchases bulk fuel. Instead of allowing commissioners to purchase fuel on their own, commissioners court as a whole chose a new system. Under the new rules, any time a large fuel purchase is needed, commissioners must get at least two fuel suppliers to fax bids to the county auditor’s office and use the company with the lowest bid. Last week, Commissioner Matt Pruitt asked commissioners court to reverse course. Pruitt said the new system was proving onerous and should be done away with. To prove his point, Pruitt said the sheriff’s office tried to purchase fuel but could only get one bid. Under county rules, the sheriff’s office was not allowed to purchase fuel. Pruitt said returning to a system that trusted commissioners to buy on their own would make things easier for all. Pruitt was joined in his view by Commissioner John Hawkins. The two made the claim that if voters trust them enough to put them in office, they should be trusted to buy what they need without someone looking over their shoulder. While we do not question the integrity of Pruitt or Hawkins, we disagree. There are several reasons to ask for bids and to keep the process of purchasing fuel open and transparent. No. 1, in 2011 Young County purchased 65,000 gallons of fuel. At an average of $3 a gallon, that means Young County spent $195,000 on fuel. That is a significant amount of taxpayer money. In recent years, a growing number of taxpayers have shown a keen interest in how every dollar is spent at the local, state and national levels. Those taxpayers have heard too often, just trust us. They no longer do. By requiring bids and using the lowest bidder, Young County commissioners ensure that taxpayer money is being spent in the best way possible. With the bids on record, taxpayers can check any time they wish and find proof that no extra money was spent. No. 2, requiring bids protects the elected officials in the county. One fact of being an elected official is some people support you fully while others watch closely hoping you will fail. Giving commissioners complete control over any major purchases gives their political opponents an opportunity to claim something improper was done. Under the new rules, no one can question the elected officials. Every time fuel is purchased, the county will have the bid sheets and can prove the lowest price was used for the purchase. With that information on record, there will never be a debate over what company was used and why. Perhaps the biggest reason the county should require bids is because Commissioner Jimmy Wiley, who properly abstained from the discussion and vote over fuel, owns one of the three companies that provide bulk fuel in Young County. With one of the five members of the board owning a fuel supply company, elected officials should take every step possible to ensure no one can question who they purchased fuel from. The bids protect Wiley and every other elected official from any accusations, fair or not. Pruitt and Hawkins made the argument that purchasing fuel was a matter of trust. This is not about trust, it’s about trust and verify. American business now has multiple obligations for conduct. Our county and city government should take similar steps. We commend County Judge John C. Bullock and Commissioner Stacey Rogers for voting to maintain a level of transparency that protects the county and its elected officials. Every elected official has earned a level of trust. But in today’s political world, trust alone is not enough.

History is about to repeat itself in Graham, Texas. Here’s a little quiz to aid your recall. What do the KGB and the Litterbug have in common? If you answered that both were prominent players during the country’s Cold War era, you would be wide of the mark in this case. That’s because KGB is short for “Keep Graham Beautiful,” and just about everyone born before the nation’s Bi-Centennial observance knew the Litterbug as the champion of the Keep America Beautiful campaign. As children, we ran around to the Litterbug song, pointing fingers and friends, parents, and neighbors who dared to toss onto the ground a gum wrapper, napkin, piece of paper, or cup. And we called them, “Litterbug” to their face. I suppose it’s fair to say we were obnoxious, but after all, the Pennsylvania Resources Council, which created the Litterbug, and the founders of Keep America Beautiful, which borrowed the figure, made the whole effort so doggone appealing. That’s exactly what Graham’s KGB hopes to do. Created in 1993, the organization fell inactive in 2008. It made a return appearance this week before Graham city council members to get their OK to revive the beautification campaign.

BY ROBB KRECKLOW And it’s certainly timely because the community has grown a little shaggy around the edges and a little sloppy with its trash. Last week, I was following a pickup down a main thoroughfare when out of the window came an entire fast-food bag of litter. I turned the corner a few blocks later only to witness a live cigar butt exiting a car in front of me. A week later, quite by accident, I learned that Texas has a litter abatement program. To report a Litterbug, all I had to do was go to the Internet and pull up www.dontmesswithtexas.org and turn in the offender. The Texas Department of Transportation would have matched up the license plate number and forwarded a polite reminder not to trash the state’s roadways. Oh, and they’ll include an official Texas litterbag with the note of encouragement. If you don’t think this is a problem, check out these bits of trivia. Half of all Texans admit to surveyors they litter, and consequently, Texas roadways catch 827 million pieces of litter every

year. Tobacco-related trash takes top honors for litter in Texas, but more than a quarter of all litter is related to food and fast-food packaging. A majority of Texans don’t seem to know littering is unlawful and can carry a $500 fine. On the positive side of the ledger, the Don’t Mess with Texas antilitter campaign research concluded that if every citizen picked up just six pieces of litter each, the state could rid itself of the unsightly and unhealthy litter problem. There’s an old 1970s environmental phrase that goes like this, “Think globally; act locally.” That’s exactly what the new KGB is counting on to succeed, when they launch their rejuvenated efforts with a big community rally on April 14. We’ll be telling you all about the new program prior to then here in The Graham Leader, on our website and on KWKQ 94.7 FM and KSWA 1330 AM. And we’ll keep the information coming and recognize the program’s volunteers all along the way. As we move forward with the campaign, we should keep in mind something Steer athletes and supporters like to say, “This is our house!” The streets and cityscape belong to all of us, so hey, let’s take care of business. Remember, “Graham’s Beauty Is Our Duty. Support a Cleaner Graham.”

Letters to the Editor A bit much I just read the editorial on the new housing code the City Council is thinking about adopting. I hope the council members look at this code very closely. I agree that making someone paint their house is a little overboard. The idea of having a window for every room is a bit much too (I like my privacy in the bathroom). Is the city going to inspect every home for a working toilet? Is the city going to evict a elderly woman from her home that has lived there for 50 years and no where else to go? Surely not.

Bow and arrow a near-perfect weapon During the Battle of the Little Bighorn, about half the warriors — Lakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho — used bows and arrows, and the others used repeating rifles to fight the 7th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army. How many of the undermanned 7th Cavalry died by arrows is not known. The Comanches arrows used against Texans were among the best and designed down to the last detail for strength and accuracy. U.S. Army officers and soldiers and North Texas ranchers in range of Comanche arrows faced great danger. From the middle 1700s onward, the Comanches had firearms, but they continued to use bows and iron-tipped arrows from horseback during day-time raids and night-time attacks. Comanches found it easy to shoot from running animals, a skill they had practiced and perfected since boyhood. Bow and arrows enabled Comanches to ambush their enemies from a concealed position and leave the scene before their locations could be detected. The weapons were so light that they were far easier to carry and more useful at close-quarters. Comanches kept a ready supply of bows and arrows made by the experts, the old retired warriors. Authors Ernest Wallace and E. Adamson Hoebe’s devote an entire chapter to bow and arrow making in “The Comanches; Lords of the South Plains.” Comanches preferred three-foot wooden bows from the “bois d’arc,’ common trees with the hardest wood growing along Texas rivers. Buffalo or deer sinew (sometimes horse-hair or bear gut) was attached to bows and arrows in two stages with a remarkably fail-safe formula for glue — clippings from the rawhide of a buffalo bull’s neck or from horns and hoofs. During the drying, the fresh sinew shrunk tightly to the wood, making them both strong and tough.

NORTH TEXAS TALES

Kenneth “on my soap box” Palmer Graham

Do the research

BY GAY SCHLITTLER STORMS Ordinary bows could be made in three days, and their craftsmen were rewarded with one horse per bow — more horses for a fancy one. Arrows, next to bows, ranked among the most precious possessions of Comanche warriors. A perfect arrow demanded great skill, patience and judgement. Although there were many types of arrows, the proportions between the shaft, head and feathers had to be perfect. If the right proportions were not maintained, even an expert marksmen could not shoot accurately. The two types of metal arrows, one for game and one for war, struck an animal or man faster and more accurately than a rifle. Comanches relied almost entirely on metal arrows after white settlers arrived. They confiscated barrel hoops, bindings for boxes, even frying pans. After the metal tip was sharpened , it was hardened by heating it in a fire and then dropping it red hot into cold water. Comanche also used iron for arrow points supplied by Mexican traders. Occasionally, Comanches poisoned arrow points for war by an unknown plant extract or by sticking them in a dead skunk. The Comanche arrow shot from a good bow would travel as much as 300 yards. Surviving the wound from a Comanche arrow was a lucky achievement unless the victim disliked the odds — recovering versus enduring a long, agonizing death.

The article in the March 4 edition of The Graham Leader by the editor about John Brown gave me a “feel good” about Graham. The article on the front page of the same edition concerning stricter property codes did not give me the same feeling. It gave me a bad feeling. And this is why. Very simply put, the International Code Council is associated with the ICLEI International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives. The ICLEI is part of Agenda 21. Agenda 21 is part of the New World Order wherein we the citizens of Graham lose our property, are herded into metropolitan enclaves and are subject to complete control by a one world government. This is being done over a period of time. Your sons and daughters, grandchildren and future generations will be saddled with this slavery. Should you doubt this I ask that you, the reader, do a little research on your computer on the above organizations. If you do not have a computer See LETTERS, Page 5A

I may not have been born in Ireland, but at least today I’m Irish I hope on this St. Patrick’s Day that all of you are “wearing the green.” After all, on that day all of us have a little Irish in us. Those Irish, who were a prolific bunch, were also full of a lot of blarney, and whether we have the “green” DNA in us or not, we are drawn to the festivities. Maybe it’s because the Irish are known for fun and gaiety and mischief that once a year we all want to jump on board. If you haven’t been “Irish” before, today is the day. However, don’t jump into it without a little training. Most of us reached third grade ignorant of the whole process. It was in true third grade style that we were allowed to “legally pinch” our fellow third-graders who were

not wearing green. It was so much fun, that some of us never grew out of the third-grade-Irish-spirit which we learned from some real experts: Bobby-the-poker, Jimmy- the-pinchand-twister, and the only real Irish kid in the class, Sean-the-liar. So, what’s with the green? For some of us who have never visited Ireland, we may not realize that the landscape there is about as far from Throckmorton in July as can be. Every field is supposedly green. Every hill gives off a green glow. Every lake reflects it, and every river flows in green swirls. Known as the Emerald Isle, Ireland must be green year round. At least that’s what Sean-the-liar told me in third grade. Americans … notably Walt Disney

BETH BEGGS is given credit for the generous Leprechaun story. The Leprechauns of Irish lore were little peoplycreatures who lived in the wood … the green wood wearing green costumes and stealing children. To prevent it, the Irish believed they should wear green so they could blend in and not be “pinched” by the Leprechauns. They were crafty, felonious tricksters. No gold at the end of the rainbow. No twinkling eyes. No shamrocks in their hands.

Speaking of shamrocks, the little clovers had nothing to do with good luck back in the beginning. Supposedly St. Patrick, who drove all the snakes out of Ireland … even the green ones, used the three leaf clover to demonstrate the Holy Trinity: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It was one leaf, but it was made up of three leaves. I always liked teachers with good visuals. Of course I’d believe anyone with a snake story. The good luck came along later. I guess if you were wearing your green clover on your shoulder and didn’t get kidnapped by a bunch of unruly little people, you were lucky. We Americans took over the St. Patrick’s Day celebration early on. Of course it’s not a surprise. There

was an Irish parade in New York City in the late 1700s and during the Potato Famine of the mid 1800s many of our ancestors hopped the first green boat out of there and came to America . The parade in Dublin was probably copied after ours. Many cities really get into it. New York still parades, as does Chicago, Philadelphia and others. Chicago even dyes the river green on St. Patrick’s Day. Although my ancestors hailed from Switzerland, Holland and even Scotland where the most boisterous celebration is a rousing game of golf, today, I’m Irish. I’ll eat some corned-beef, raise a glass and make myself available for a little Blarney kissing. Join me.


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012

THE GRAHAM LEADER • 9A

www.grahamleader.com

POLICE BLOTTER to Graham Regional Medical Center. 6:05 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from the Graham Regional Medical Center to Wichita Falls. 6:09 p.m.—Information reported in the 800 block of Montgomery Street. 6:18 p.m.—Close patrol requested in the 900 block of Cherry Street. 6:34 p.m.—Information reported in the 800 block of Montgomery Street. 6:36 p.m.—Cattle reported loose on Highway 114 East. 6:41 p.m.—Dog bite reported at Hamilton Hospital. 6:59 p.m.—Dog bite reported at Hamilton Hospital was turned over to SPCA. 7:19 p.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported. 7:21 p.m.—Sewer reported backed up in the 1400 block of Avenue D. 7:31 p.m.—Burglar alarm reported in the 900 block of Cherry Street. 7:38 p.m.—Close patrol requested in the 100 block of Timberview Drive. 7:49 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from Graham Regional Medical Center to Decatur. 7:52 p.m.—Close patrol requested on Timber Ridge Road. 10:25 p.m.—Suspicious subject reported on Highway 380 Bypass. 10:42 p.m.—Suspicious vehicle reported in the 1300 block of First Street. 11:19 p.m.—Information reported in the 1400 block of Avenue A. 11:28 p.m.—Suspicious subject reported in the 400 block of West Grove Street in Olney. 11:50 p.m.—Attempted suicide reported. Tuesday, March 13 Jail count: 54 2:55 a.m.—Close patrol requested in the 1300 block of Third Street. 3:35 a.m.—Ambulance assistance requested in the 400 block of Pennsylvania Street. 4:46 a.m.—Burglar alarm reported in the 1700 block of Highway 16 South. 5:18 a.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 100 block of West Church Street, and patient transported by ambulance to Hamilton Hospital. 7:52 a.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from Hamilton Hospital to Graham Regional Medical Center. 9:08 a.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 100 block of Chapparal Street, and patient transported by ambulance to Graham Regional Medical Center. 10:18 a.m.—Ambulance assistance requested in the 200 block of Belknap Circle. 10:45 a.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported on Highway 16 South. 11:00 a.m.—Ambulance assistance requested in the 1000 block of Cliff Drive. 12:02 p.m.—Criminal mischief reported in the 600 block of Commerce Street in Newcastle. 12:45 p.m.—Caller reportedly saw a man steal an electric box in the 800 block of Lubbock Street. 1:23 p.m.—Caller reported she and her neighbor cannot get along in the 1200 block of Brazos Street. 1:31 p.m.—Identity theft reported in the 100 block of Country Club Drive. 1:37 p.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported. 1:47 p.m.—Suspect arrested on out-of-county warrant. 1:55 p.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1300 block of Circle Drive, and

patient transported by ambulance to Graham Regional Medical Center. 2:04 p.m.—Civil matter reported in the 900 block of South Avenue C. 2:38 p.m.—Information reported. 2:38 p.m.— Patient transferred by ambulance from Graham Regional Medical Center to Abilene. 2:49 p.m.—Stolen property reported recovered. 3:15 p.m.—Suspect arrested for evading arrest in Olney. 4:29 p.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 5200 block of Highway 16 South, and patient transported by ambulance to Graham Regional Medical Center. 4:29 p.m.—Water leak reported in the 1300 block of Corvadura Street. 4:55 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from Graham Regional Medical Center back to a residence. 6:16 p.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 600 block of West Payne Street, and patient transported by ambulance to Graham Regional Medical Center. 6:29 p.m.—Householder assistance requested in the 1100 block of South Avenue C. 7:01 p.m.—Ambulance assistance requested in the 500 block of West Main Street in Olney. 7:12 p.m.—Caller reportedly thought there was a snake under her mother’s bed in the 1300 block of West Oak Street in Olney. 8:22 p.m.—Ambulance assistance requested in the 6000 block of Highway 16 South for a subject who hit a pole while riding on a bicycle. 8:37 p.m.—Information reported in the 400 block of Tennessee Street. 8:47 p.m.—Suspicious vehicle reported in the 1000 block of Fourth Street. 9:02 p.m.—Suspicious subject reported on Red Top Road. 9:36 p.m.—Information reported on Highway 79 in Olney. 9:41 p.m.—Ambulance assistance requested in the 900 block of Texas Street. Wednesday, March 14 Jail count: 56 12:43 a.m.—Suspicious circumstances reported in the 900 block of North Avenue G in Olney. 12:50 a.m.—Disturbance reported in the 900 block of Hillcrest Drive. 2:25 a.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1500 block of South Rogers Drive, and patient transported by ambulance to Graham Regional Medical Center. 2:39 a.m.—Ambulance assistance requested in the 1300 block of Circle Drive. 8:08 a.m.—Outside agency assistance requested at Graham Regional Medical Center. 8:11 a.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported. 8:38 a.m.—Livestock complaint reported on Highway 67. 8:56 a.m.—Vehicles reported vandalized in the 500 block of First Street. 10:05 a.m.—Burglar alarm reported in the 1300 block of First Street. 10:21 a.m.—Officer requested to check welfare check of a subject in the 1900 block of Allison Street. 11:02 a.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from Graham Regional Medical Center to Vernon. 11:35 a.m.—Suspect arrested on county warrant. 12:52 p.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1000

budget constraints, we’ll be happy to,” said Mayor Barry White. “We just thank you for taking the initiative,” said Pam Scott, council member. The kick-off for the effort is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 14, on the Downtown Square with

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Tickets: $12.00 Purchased prior to event, either from a church or online

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Beautiful Continued from Page 1A

block of Cliff Drive, and patient transported by ambulance to Graham Regional Medical Center. 1:15 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from the 1200 block of Corvadura Street to Graham Regional Medical Center. 1:34 p.m.—Silent 9-1-1 emergency calls reported. 1:35 p.m.—Burglar alarm reported in the 1300 block of Highway 380 Bypass. 2:35 p.m.—Verbal disturbance reported in the 900 block of Virginia Street. 3:48 p.m.—Officer requested to check welfare of a subject in the 1500 block of Carolina Street. 4:18 p.m.—False fire alarm reported at Third and Oak streets. 5:41 p.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1300 block of First Street, and patient transported by ambulance to Graham Regional Medical Center. 6:32 p.m.—Suspect arrested on JP-1 warrant in the 700 block of Indiana Street. 7:34 p.m.—Utility complaint reported at highways 380 and 67. 8:40 p.m.—Suspicious subject reported sleeping behind the library with a duffle bag. 9:32 p.m.—Utility complaint reported in the 100 block of Ragland Street. 10:25 p.m.—Loud music reported in the 1100 block of Privado Street. 10:42 p.m.—Suspect arrested on JP-1 warrant in the 700 block of West Payne Street in Olney. 10:50 p.m.—Suspicious circumstances reported. 11:17 p.m.—Information reported in the 1200 block of Blewett Street. 11:25 p.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 200 block of Pennsylvania Street.

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Monday, March 12 Jail count: 61 12:10 a.m.—Suspicious subject reported in the 1900 block of Crawford Street. 5:28 a.m.—Livestock complaint reported on FM 1287. 6:03 a.m.—Theft reported in the 1100 block of Fourth Street. 6:43 a.m.—Horse reported loose on FM 1287. 7:21 a.m.—Theft reported in the 400 block of East Main Street in Olney. 7:44 a.m.—Cow reported loose at Highway 114 and Wilson Road. 7:57 a.m.—Burglar alarm reported in the 700 block of Tennessee Street. 8:04 a.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported on Highway 67. 8:46 a.m.—Suspect arrested on out-of-county warrant in the 1200 block of Maple Street. 8:49 a.m.—Building reported burglarized in the 1200 block of Highway 16 South. 9:45 a.m.—Shoes reported stolen in the 2100 block of Highway 16 South. 9:49 a.m.—Civil matter reported in the 1500 block of Old Jacksboro Road. 10:08 a.m.—Silent 9-1-1 emergency call reported. 10:11 a.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 800 block of Texas Street, and patient transported by ambulance to Graham Regional Medical Center. 10:46 a.m.—Outside agency assistance requested in the 100 block of Fourth Street. 11:36 a.m.—Criminal mischief reported on Fourth Street. 11:42 a.m.—Cow reported loose on Highway 114. 11:47 a.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from Graham Regional Medical Center to Wichita Falls. 11:55 a.m.—Vehicle accident reported with no injuries in the 1200 block of Highway 16 South. 1:20 p.m.—Ambulance assistance requested in the 1000 block of Cliff Drive. 1:25 p.m.—Theft reported in the 1000 block of South Street. 2:24 p.m.—Civil matter reported in the 900 block of Carolina Street. 2:31 p.m.—Suspect arrested on county warrant in the 300 block of Cliff Drive. 2:38 p.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported. 2:55 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from Graham Regional Medical Center to Fort Worth. 2:59 p.m.—Abandoned vehicle reported on Highway 380 East. 2:59 p.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported. 3:08 p.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported on Main Street. 3:15 p.m.—Information reported at Carolina Street and Thomas Lane. 3:36 p.m.—Suspect arrested on district court warrant on Fourth Street. 4:20 p.m.—Theft reported in the 1100 block of Second Street. 4:32 p.m.—Suspect arrested on county warrant in the 1300 block of Corto Street. 4:51 p.m.—Information reported on Pine Tree Road. 4:59 p.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1500 block of South Rogers Drive, and patient transported by ambulance to Graham Regional Medical Center. 5:23 p.m.—Grass fire reported southwest of Olney. 5:26 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from the 1400 block of West Elm Street to Hamilton Hospital. 5:49 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from the 1000 block of Cliff Drive

volunteers serving hot dogs and cold drinks to those willing to dive in and get their hands dirty. Trash bags will be distributed along with yard signs and posters declaring “I Support a Cleaner Graham.” Although the citywide cleanup will be ongoing throughout the year, a concentrated effort is set to take place among all

participants from April 14 through 22. The Keep Graham Beautiful committee is coordinating the effort, so if you have a location to cleanup in mind, call (940) 549-2211 or e-mail grahambeautiful@gmail.com to sign up as an individual, family, business, club or church group to take on a particular area.

www.grahamleader.com

Changing lives through Bible Study, Prayer & Fellowship Sunday Children & Youth Sunday School – 9:45 A.M. Children’s Church – 11 A.M. Children & Youth Bible Study – 5:30 P.M.

Wednesday Meal – 6 P.M. Team Kids – 6:35 P.M. Children’s Choirs – 6:35 P.M. Youth Bible Study – 6:35 P.M.

68662


OPINIONS

4A • THE GRAHAM LEADER

SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

THE GRAHAM LEADER Press on Main Street, your cause is noble, right WEEK’S END www.grahamleader.com A MediaNews Group newspaper USPS 225 240

William Dean Singleton President Robert L. Krecklow Publisher/Vice President David Rupkalvis Editor

EDITORIALS Graham’s beauty is our duty For generations, Graham has stood out in North Texas for many reasons — wonderful outdoor opportunities, great people, affordable living, wonderful housing and a clean, scenic view from almost any point. As the city has matured and grown in recent years, the outdoor opportunities, people and housing have remained things we can all be proud of. Unfortunately, the scenery has slowly been replaced with mounds of trash. If you think we’re exaggerating, drive up Pine Tree Road and look at the mounds of trash waiting to be picked up. Look at almost any of the entrances to the city. What was once a proud entryway is now littered with trash. Over the last few months, The Graham Leader has received several letters with the same complaints — why is there so much trash littering the city? Why are fast-food bags, aluminum cans, boxes, feed sacks and more piled up along the sides of roads? Why do so many people think it’s OK to throw their household garbage out for the rest of us to clean up? Last week, a small group of Graham citizens announced they were uniting to fight back against the increased garbage seen in the city. Keep Graham Beautiful, which has been quiet since 2008, is back in business. In 2012, the organization has two goals. The primary goal is to clean up the city. Secondarily, the group hopes to improve streets and curbs. We applaud the nine men and women who revitalized Keep Graham Beautiful. We will work with you to make the city the shining light so many of us remember when we first moved in. Roy Robinson, who is serving as president of Keep Graham Beautiful, said a general cleanup of the community and its entrances can succeed only with widespread participation from residents and organizations. “There’s been plenty of letters to the editor,” he said. “Plenty of people agree, somebody needs to go clean up.” That somebody needs to be all of us. Nine people are willing to lead the effort, but nine people could never do the work alone. Over the years, neglect from all of the community has allowed the trash to pile up. There are always individuals trying to make a difference, but it is time for a group effort — it is time Graham as a community stood up and said enough is enough. A kick-off for the effort is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 14, on the Downtown Square with volunteers serving hot dogs and cold drinks to those willing to dive in and get their hands dirty. Trash bags will be distributed along with yard signs and posters declaring “I Support a Cleaner Graham.” Service cubs, church groups, youth organizations and anyone who wants to make a difference in the city we call home are encouraged to attend. If enough help arrives, Keep Graham Beautiful hopes to break the city down into sectors with different organizations and people assigned to clean different areas. The goal is to have the organizations do the work between April 14 and 22. In one week, we can fight back. It’s just the first step, but it may be the most important one. Join us next month and let’s all work to keep Graham beautiful.

Main Street! The very name conjures up visions of a downtown; a street bustling with traffic, lined by a variety of businesses and teeming with foot traffic. It may create memories of parades, and brightly colored lighting, accompanied by store fronts with marquee names, inviting entrances and picture windows decorated in merchandise. Or, it may create images much less attractive; one of broken down, old buildings dotted by vacancies and scarred by neglect, where a few merchants and service providers put on their game face to compete with more modern facilities and large parking lots elsewhere in town – if in the same community at all. Graham doesn’t have a main street, of course, either in name or in singular presentation. Rather, it boasts an entire square, centered by active feeder streets and populated by halls of local government; multiple venues of commerce, finance and entertainment; and cultural voices in the forms of a museum of history and art, and a remodeled performance auditorium. Enter the Main Street Program, a registered trademark of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, operating in the Lone Star State under the umbrella of the Texas Historical Commission and its Heritage Development Division. Graham is one of only 85 Texas communities or commercial neighborhood areas participating officially in the coun-

BY ROBB KRECKLOW try’s and state’s benchmark program for redeveloping and sustaining these mostly historic districts. Since its beginning in 1981, Main Street communities in Texas have witnessed more than $2 billion in reinvestment, recovered at least 27,000 jobs and sprouted nearly 7,000 emerging small businesses. And some of them, including Graham, still host longtime business establishments and entrepreneurs. It is a proud, but small club, sadly, because many cities and towns won’t take the pledge, so to speak, and make the commitments to preserve their economic and historic corridors. Graham has done so, and I enjoyed the privilege this week of attending my first Main Street meeting here – not just as a member of the news media, but a vested participant as a building owner on the Square. Like the Main Street programs I’ve been associated with elsewhere, I found a passionate group of people, earnest about their business interests as well as their concurrent role in the community at large. I was pleased to find more attributes in play here than I have witnessed

elsewhere. They include empathy, collaborative spirit, and sensitivity to every member’s operating condition. Absent were the harsh and shrill voices of entitlement and demand, replaced in Graham by cautious voices of hope and partnership and accompanied by the reassuring, active participation of both city government and chamber of commerce. The National Main Street Center has a formula for achieving success, something it calls the Four-Point Approach. It includes organization (we’ve got that), promotions (we’ve got those), design (we’re working on that), and economic restructuring (we’re under way). I’ve witnessed success and failure. I’ve seen success come at the expense of friendships and a decade of higher than average building vacancies, and I’ve seen failures leave a handful of pioneers frustrated and disappointed in their “I’ll lead the way” investments. Well, in Graham, the “I’ll lead the way” investments have been made, and there are tough choices – always self-imposed when it comes to the Main Street program – still to be made. They include financial and emotional investments. But I’m going to bet on this group with its cautious and “steady-as-she-goes” approach. Success may take a little longer, but the journey should be much more pleasant. Press on Main Street Graham. The cause is noble and right.

TEXAS TALES BY MIKE COX

Editor fought back with the pen and his guns

Luster fought back and won — twice Sarah Jane Luster’s story of abduction by Indians is not at all typical. NORTH The brave Texas beauty made two escapes from Indians, which few female captives would TEXAS have attempted, much less succeeded. The Comanches hated Texas settlers, but they were not opposed to stealing their women T ALES and children. If females or males were taken as children, they were cherished and adopted into the tribe. Luster’s beauty would have qualified her to be the wife of a Comanche chief to our way of thinking. But Comanches did not follow the same code that modern romance novels describe in glowing details. The pretty Confederate widow endured numerous vicious assaults when abducted by Comanches and later Kiowas. When Luster was taken to a Comanche camp above the Red River, she enlisted the help of a fellow boy captive, Dot Babb, to help her escape. She resolved to escape whatever the cost, but the odds were greatly stacked against her. Horsemen and trackers like the Comanches were rarely outsmarted. But Luster with Babb’s help snuck out of the camp and rode off at night. At daybreak, a party of angry Comanches headed out after the woman but eventually gave up the search. Luster rode hard back toward the Red River and managed to cross it despite high waters and darkness. She was exhausted, but she felt so much safer on Texas soil that she fell asleep. Unfortunately, Luster soon ran into a band of Kiowas. Instead of trying to run, she rode up to them, putting on a brave front. The Kiowas didn’t kill her, but she was again “subjected to all the inhumanities of the tribe,” according to Babb. She stayed with the Kiowas for nearly a month before she saw the first chance to

BY GAY SCHLITTLER STORMS

escape. One night during a rainstorm, she slipped out of camp somewhere in the north Texas Panhandle. The rain wiped out her tracks, and she rode night and day except for short periods. When she rested, she kept the horse’s lariat tied around her body. In late November 1866 after four days and nights, she reached Running Turkey Creek east of Fort Dodge. She had ridden through the area occupied by Satanta and his Kiowas — it would be hard to pick a riskier area. But he and his warriors were at Fort Dodge, ransoming captives while she traveled. A ranch owner took Luster in, let her rest, fed and clothed her. He contacted Jesse Leavenworth, and the agent made arrangements for her to be taken to Council Grove, Kan. She stayed for a time with the town’s postmaster. On Dec. 10, although the postmaster contacted Texas Gov. Throckmorton, Luster found herself in the same plight many other captives were — exiled with no money or way to get home. She didn’t return to Texas right away but continued to live in Council Grove. As Dot Babb so quaintly says, Luster “being unusually attractive and blushing with the beauties of young womanhood, was soon wooed and won by a Mr. Van Noy.” They married in June 1867 and established a home in Galena, Kan.

As a pioneer newspaper editor, David E. Lawhon may have subscribed to the belief that the pen was mightier than the sword, but as a Texas Ranger he never saddled up without his rifle and pistol. Born in Tennessee in 1811, he came to Nacogdoches in early November 1835 from Natchitoches, La. Like many coming from the United States that fall, Lawhon arrived looking for a fight. Texas had begun its pull away from Mexico and a bloody revolution lay ahead. A tall, barrel-chested, hamfisted man, Lawhon signed up to serve in the nascent Texas army shortly after hitting East Texas. But when it became known he was a printer, local businessman William G. Logan talked the young Tennessean into editing a newspaper instead. With a hand press and type that had been used in 1829 to produce a short-lived Nacogdoches newspaper called the Mexican Citizen, the 24-yearold Lawhon brought out the first issue of the Texian and Emigrant’s Guide on Nov. 28, 1835. Family legend has it that as editor of one of the province’s only two newspapers, Lawhon was on the reception committee greeting former Tennessee Congressman David Crockett as he passed through Nacogdoches on his way to San Antonio and what proved to be immortality. That winter Lawhon also printed legal forms and ofSee TALES, Page 5A

Clovers, flowers, star-shaped leaves will give me yard of the week Spring is here and the race is on. Those little old ladies with the pink gardening gloves and knee pads had better watch out. From the looks of my front yard, I’m a shoe-in for the Yard of the Week this year. Some of those women have had so many little signs in their yards that the signs have become part of the landscaping plan. Large rock monuments have been built with snap-in holders for the signs. Rose gardens have been planted, fertilized and pruned so that the YOW sign will blend in. Well, too bad, so sad, it’s going to be mine this year. My yard is already green. Here it is March, and I have a green yard.

I have plants in my front yard that I’ve never seen before. I guess they are a gift from Mother Nature. Bright green clumps of clover dot the spaces that last year only produced St. Augustine grass. I spent a fortune watering that grass, and as soon as it got cold, that grass just turned yellow. It’s already March, and the St. Augustine has yet to pop up. Of course, I haven’t watered it much. It’s been raining, and I’m letting the Lord take care of that part right now. Not only do I have clover, I had it just in time for St. Patrick’s Day. I also have flowers. Tiny little white flowers and medium sized little purple ones dot the surface of some parts of

BETH BEGGS the yard. Some of those little purple flowers have grown overnight into foot-tall displays. It’s amazing. I fertilized last year and got nothing … and this year I did nothing and got big results. I even mowed a few times, and those clumps of clover and spring flowers just pop back up. The kid across the street keeps mowing his down. The way he’s doing it, the vines carrying those

little yellow flowers will die out and never produce any seeds. I tried to say something to him about it, but the mower was roaring so loud that he couldn’t hear what I said. He yelled something back to me about “stickers,” but those little flowers don’t stick to anything. I haven’t even told you about the star-shaped plants that have come up from the cracks in my drive and all around the deck in the back yard. They start out as a delicate star, with pointy leaves coming out in five points. Then they grow … really fast. They start to stretch up like a child’s toy, each level smaller than the one below until it sprouts

a cluster of flowers at the top. The flowers are rather wispy and don’t last long. They blow away if you don’t pick them and take them in the house. One warning, the leaves are spiny, so you should wear gloves. I probably shouldn’t take those in the house. I may be allergic. I’ve got a rash and have been coughing some. I don’t want to be sick for the first presentation of the year, so I think I’ll just double up on the antihistamines. Wouldn’t it be a shame for the Committee for the YOW to come by with their camera, and there I’d be standing in the middle of my “spring bounty” with a red nose? Next year should be even better.


cyan magenta yellow black

Spring fever gripping Graham

Steers win PK Relays, Blues second

Page 3A

Page 1B

THE GRAHAM LEADER Oldest business institution in Young County • Established August 16, 1876

VOL. 136, NO. 65 • SINGLE COPY 75¢

MIDWEEK EDITION • WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012

www.grahamleader.com

Records show commissioners have fuel favorites BY DAVID RUPKALVIS editor@grahamleader.com Since 2000, Young County commissioners have spent $1.46 million on fuel, oil and other fuel supplies according to information released by the Young County Auditor’s Office.

Precinct 3, which includes Olney and much of the northern part of the county, led the way with purchases of around $475,000. Precinct 4 had purchases of $347,000 in fuel, Precinct 2 paid out $342,000, and Precinct 1 had the lowest expense with $297,000 spent on fuel. The records show most of the

individual commissioners prefer using an individual company when purchasing bulk fuel. Only Precinct 1 has had the same commissioner for the entire time, with John Hawkins serving the precinct. Over the last 12-plus years, Hawkins has made all of his bulk fuel purchases from two suppliers

— Young County Butane and Olney Fuel and Supply. Hawkins has purchased other items such as oil from companies such as Asa Smith Oil Company and Quick Slick and Lube, but bulk fuel purchases have been between just two companies. Early in the decade, Hawkins pur-

chased all of his fuel from Young County Butane, using no other company until June 2007, when he purchased 300 gallons of unleaded from Olney Fuel and Supply. Since that purchase, Hawkins has made 33 bulk fuel purchases, 30 from See FUEL, Page 6A

Working hard to keep Graham beautiful Rain creates a perfect storm for gardeners BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com

Keep Graham Beautiful supporters have already started pounding the pavement and removing litter from the streets and entrances to Graham. Graham Rotary and Interact clubs adopted Highway 380 East from the Young County Arena east and cleaned up that area this past weekend. Lonestar 4-H has adopted Highway 16 north of Cliff Drive, and Eddleman Real Estate will clean up FM 3003. KGB President Roy Robinson said neighborhood groups are needed to adopt a street or block in town like the Streetwalkers. The Streetwalkers is a walking club comprised of Fannie Logan, Nann Hale, Ellen Morris, Nancy Hays, Mary Braddock and five others. The ladies have opted to change the club’s name to the Streetcleaners. They’ll be rolling up their sleeves and cleaning up the particularly littered area along Pine Tree Road across from Walmart and on the cul-de-sac on Westwood. Hale said the group walks two to four miles six days a week, and they wanted to pitch in. “We walk the streets, and it gets nasty and dirty, and we decided it’s something we can do to help beautify Graham,” she said. Graham’s beauty is your duty, and no one knows that better than former Graham mayor and member of the KGB board Ed Hinson. He coined the phrase. Hinson, Robinson, Jay Gober, Dortheia Henderson, Eva Hoffman, Carter Pettit, Jerry Schultz and two other former mayors, Bruce Street and Doug Stroud, make up the nineperson committee seeking to dust off the See BEAUTIFUL, Page 6A

BY DAVID RUPKALVIS editor@grahamleader.com

recourse as provided by law.” Fields said the city already has that authority and presented an example. “We see a vacant house. We can’t locate the owner. We can’t just go in to make a determination,” he said. “We may need JACK GRAHAM to get a warrant.” Under the new code, a warrant would still be needed to enter the home without permission. The code allows the code official to grant modifications to the code for individual cases. Cottongame said that allows for him to

After scorching North Texas with extreme heat and almost no rain a year ago, Mother Nature has done an about face in 2011. Steady rains have turned the landscape from a tinderbox into a perfect place to grow — almost anything. Young County Extension Agent Brad Morrison said the rains over the last few months have made conditions perfect for yards, gardens and flower beds. And one other thing not so welcome — weeds. “The big deal from a homeowner’s standpoint, No. 1, they’re going to want to deal with these broadleaf weeds,” Morrison said. “There’s three primary ones, storksbill, henbit and burr clover.” Morrison said the onslaught of weeds is in part due to the drought. “Last year we had the drought, and it opened up the soil,” he said. “These broadleaf seeds were already in there. We got some good moisture, and they grew up.” Morrison said there are a few steps people can take to limit the weeds. The first is to keep the weeds mowed. When the weather warms up, the weeds will die naturally. Until then, keeping them mowed will limit the number of seeds they make and limit the number of new weeds. “If you keep them mowed, that will do some good,” Morrison said. “Another thing people will want to do is use broadleaf weed killer. There’s two methods. The No. 1 way is a weed and feed fertilizer. That is fine as long as people follow the directions. If you don’t, you may put it down where trees and shrubs can get them. The best thing to do is keep it out from under the canopy of the trees. “A better form is liquid 2-4-D. You’re going to put that in a pump-up sprayer and spray your yard. I recommend using the week killer first and then come back with nitrogen for fertilizer.” Once the yard is taken care of, Morrison said people can turn their interest to gardens and flower beds. The average date for the last freeze has already passed, so Morrison said it may be OK to plant. “We’re seeing mesquite trees start to bud, so it’s probably OK,” he said. “We do have a late Easter, so don’t be surprised with anything.” For those planting a garden, Morrison said 2012 may be a great year.

See CODE, Page 6A

See RAIN, Page 2A

A beautiful Graham The walking club, The Streetwalkers, are temporarily changing their name to the Streetcleaners to help Keep Graham Beautiful. Fannie Logan, Nann Hale, Ellen Morris, Nancy Hays and Mary Braddock are getting a jump start on the cleanup campaign by picking up litter along Pine Tree Road. To adopt an area of town for your club, church group or family to clean up or find out more about how you can join in the effort, call (940) 549-2211. A kickoff for the cleanup campaign is set for April 14 on the Square with volunteers handing out hot dogs, drinks, yard signs and trash bags. A community-wide garage sale, open to all residents, will be arranged on sidewalks outside the American Legion Building. (Photo courtesy of Harrell Braddock)

Council takes look at new property code BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com Graham City Council met in a workshop Thursday to discuss adopting the International Property Maintenance Code. Before beginning, Mayor Barry White wanted to emphasize that the code was merely being discussed. The code or any version of it has not been adopted by the city. City Inspector Jason Cottongame was on hand and told the members of the council he recommends the 2006 code. “There’s a big difference between the 2006 and 2009 version … even the state said some of what’s in the 2009 version had to be thrown out,” Cottongame said. City Manager Larry Fields said the city does have similar codes and ordinances in place to what the International Property Maintenance Code addresses, but in less

enforceable language. “We do already have the authority to enforce 90 percent of what’s in here, but it’s not as clearly and specifically written as this code,” Fields said. “It takes the personal opinion out of every situation you’d be faced with,” added Cottongame. “Instead of one person’s definition over another person’s definition, it takes the guesswork out of (it).” Council members Jack Graham, Pam Scott and White went over the code page by page, discussing various items. Some include the code official having right of entry. It reads: “The code official is authorized to enter the structure or premises at reasonable times to inspect subject to constitutional restrictions on unreasonable searches and seizures. If entry is refused or not obtained, the code official is authorized to pursue

Your Local Weather Local Forecast

Weather

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

3/28

3/29

3/30

3/31

78/56 Scattered clouds with the possibility of an isolated thunderstorm developin.

73/56 Mix of sun and clouds. Highs in the low 70s and lows in the mid 50s.

74/53 Partly cloudy with a stray thunderstorm.

82/56 Mostly cloudy. Highs in the low 80s and lows in the mid 50s.

©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service

High Low Rain Tuesday, 3/20 59 34 0 Wednesday, 3/21 54 37 0.56 Thursday, 3/22 54 37 0 Friday, 3/23 76 55 0 Saturday, 3/24 77 52 0 Sunday, 3/25 77 52 0 Monday, 3/26 77 55 0 Rain: Month 3.67 • Year 10.17 Lake Graham at capacity: 1,075.00 Current level: 1,075.13 Temperatures and rainfall provided by the National Weather Service.

NEWS BRIEFS City begins effort to clean parks City crews led by Jim Helvey, park and cemetery department head, have begun a clean-up campaign in Fireman’s, Shawnee and Shawnee Springs parks in anticipation of increased spring and summer use. Helvey stated that his crews started with the restroom facilities at the ball park. They will then be moving to the restrooms near the

old water plant. The restrooms are being painted and new electrical and plumbing fixtures are being installed. Any volunteers wanting to help with painting can call Helvey at 521-2316 to schedule the areas and the times. Paint and brushes will be furnished. Volunteers would be asked to furnish labor. “Our parks are like the front porch of our city. We want them to be clean and welcoming for residents and visitors,” Helvey said.

Inside Lifestyles .............................. Page 3A Entertainment ..................... Page 4A Calendar .............................. Page 4A Obituaries ............................ Page 5A Police Blotter ....................... Page 6A Sports ................................... Page 9A TV ....................................... Page 10A Classified ............................Page 11A

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6 • THE GRAHAM LEADER

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012

www.grahamleader.com

Code

POLICE BLOTTER

make a judgment call. “With the code now, everything is a judgment call,” he said. One section allows the city to require the removal of occupants of any structure in violation of the code. Fields said the city has struggled for years with the removal of squatters. “There’s been a situation of a house occupied by two teenage boys and two guys in their 20s with no restroom and no permission,” he said. “That’s when I first discovered that we didn’t have a regulation that covers that.” He said people living without an operable bathroom comes up every now and then along with other unsanitary

living conditions. “Every once in a while, we’re involved with an individual because of mental issues living in absolute filth. We’ve had a person living in a house with dead animals, several of them, cats,” Fields said. “The city had no authority to do anything about it. This isn’t to pester anybody.” Scott’s reaction was Graham can do better than to let any of its citizens live like that. “My desire is that if we come across someone who physically or mentally can’t take care of that, we would step up as a community,” she said. “If we can build a new house through Habitat every year, surely we can help people like this.” Another highlight men1113 Hwy. 16 S 940-521-9847 potterspizza.com

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“It’s like we’re passing judgment, but that’s not it,” he said. “It’s to keep the exposed wood from rotting. It will rot. We need to seal the exposed wood.” Fields said the only way to enforce is if after notice a resident fails to come into compliance is to have the city paint the house and attach a lien to the property like the city does now with mowing. “If you’re going to adopt this, you’ve got to be willing to attach a lien,” Fields said. “That’s the only way it can be done.” White was concerned about residents on a fixed income. “What about the little, old lady with a house that needs to be painted. She’d paint it every week if she had the money,” White said. “The majority of people living in homes in disrepair, it’s not because they like it. They can’t afford to fix it.” Graham said letting a house stay in disrepair isn’t doing the owner any favors. “But if you make this rule, you force them to prioritize because their house is just going to get worse,” he said. There was some discussion about the peeling and flaking paint requirement being used in a discriminatory fashion. The code requires habitable rooms be a minimum size, 70 square feet for bedrooms and 120 square feet for living rooms, and minimum width. Several alterations were discussed for the code as written, but no draft was agreed upon.

KGB organization which has been inactive since 2008. “There were some of us talking, and we wanted to clean up Graham so we decided to start a movement, and it’s taken off pretty good,” said Hinson. The two primary goals for this year are general cleanup of the community and its entrances along with improving street and curb appearance. “The curbs are full of dirt and plants are starting to grow on them. We haven’t had a street sweeper in years, and we really need one,” said Hinson. “We’re hoping the city can get one in the budget. They have agreed to help us get the streets cleaned up and fix the curbs. We just planted a seed, and it’s started growing.” Although the clean-up is already underway, the official kickoff to clean-up week is set for April 14. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., KGB will be giving away hot dogs, drinks, trash bags and yard signs with “I support a

Olney Fuel and Supply. Two of the purchases, both in 2007, came from Young County Butane and the most recent purchase in February was from AllStar Fuel. Since the county required two bids for bulk fuel purchases, Hawkins has purchased fuel just one time — from AllStar Fuel. In Precinct 2, two commissioners have held the position

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Tuesday, March 20 Jail count: 60 12:38 a.m.—Suspicious subject reported in the 900 block of Carolina Street. 1:52 a.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported in the 1300 block of Second Street. 5:35 a.m.—Suspicious vehicle reported in the 1300 block of West Payne Street . 6:26 a.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1400 block of West Elm Street, and patient transported by ambulance to Hamilton Hospital. 6:34 a.m.—Vehicle accident reported with no injuries on Highway 380 East. 6:43 a.m.—Disturbance reported in the 1400 block of West Elm Street in Olney. 6:58 a.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported in the 1300 block of Second Street. 9:33 a.m.—Reckless driving

reported on Highway 67. 10:31 a.m.—9-1-1 emergency call transferred to another agency. 11:10 a.m.—Suspect arrest on municipal court warrant in the 700 block of Virginia Street. 11:32 a.m.—Horse reported loose on Highway 67. 11:39 a.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from GRMC to another facility. 12:01 p.m.—Close patrol requested to do criminal mischief reported in the 1500 block of Fourth Street. 12:09 p.m.—Aggravated sexual assault reported. 12:12 p.m.—Vehicle accident reported with no injuries on Elm Street. 12:55 p.m.—Burglar alarm reported in the 700 block of FM 3329. 1:59 p.m.—Funeral escort reported from Oak Street to Pioneer Cemetery. 2:24 p.m.—Patient transferred by air ambulance from GRMC to Wichita Falls. 2:30 p.m.—Vehicle reported repossessed. 2:31 p.m.—Air transport reported outbound from GRMC. 3:25 p.m.—Patient transported by ambulance from a facility to GRMC. 3:46 p.m.—Suspect arrested for possession of alcohol on FM 3003. 3:47 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from GRMC to Wichita Falls. 3:49 p.m.—Vehicle accident reported with no injuries on Calaveras Street between Cherry and Plum streets.

clean Graham” on them for volunteers. Also a community yard sale will take place on the sidewalk in front of the American Legion Building. “This is a community-wide activity that all citizens can help by not littering, not having trash and debris either blown out or thrown out of their vehicle, but also with maintenance and upkeep of individual property — citizens having pride in their property,” said Stroud. “We hope to enhance overall community appearance by having all citizens participate.” During clean-up week from April 14 through 22, the city and IESI will position large construction-size Dumpsters around town. “There’s going to be Dumpsters in five locations throughout town, and you don’t have to haul it to the transfer station,” said Hinson. “So if you have an old washing machine or television, you can throw it in there.” Hinson said if you’re an older person and can’t lift something to be dumped,

contact KGB for assistance. “It’s a lot better than hauling it to the transfer station which is closed on Saturdays,” he added. Also, KGB is working with the city and K&K Motors to help remove junk cars in yards. “They’ll pick up any car and give a price for them,” Hinson said. “The price of steel is so high, they’ll pick it up for free and give them some money for it if they have a title for it.” Hinson said there’s an ordinance against cars without a current registration or inspection sticker. KGB is hoping owners will participate voluntarily. Although a concentrated effort is set for next month, organizers want the campaign to be ongoing. Hale said her group is in for the long-haul. “We’re going to keep it up. We have our little area, and we’re going to keep working on it and keep it picked up,” she said. To sign up to help or learn more about the effort, call (940) 549-2211.

since 2000. Now County Judge John C. Bullock served until the end of 2010, and Matt Pruitt has served the last two years. During Bullock’s tenure, he used all three companies with Young County Butane and AllStar Fuel providing most of the fuel. During Bullock’s last decade as commissioner, he purchased bulk fuel from Young County Butane 90 times. During the same time, he purchased fuel from AllStar Fuel 52 times. Bullock used Olney Fuel and Supply only three times. Since Pruitt took over as commissioner in January 2010, he has used Young County Butane 11 times, AllStar Fuel five times and Olney Fuel and Supply 16 times. Since the county changed its rules for purchasing fuel, Pruitt has purchased fuel three times from Olney Fuel and Supply and three times from Young County Butane. Since 2000, Precinct 3 has made most of its fuel purchases from Olney Fuel and Supply. Former Commissioner R.L. Spivey never used another company from 2000 until he left office in 2006. Commissioner Stacey Rogers followed that trend early in his tenure.

For the first two years he was in office, Rogers made all of his fuel purchases from Olney Fuel and Supply. In December 2009, Rogers changed, opting for AllStar Fuel for two bulk purchases. Since then, all of his bulk purchases have come from AllStar Fuel. While Precinct 3 has made many smaller purchases from Olney Fuel and Supply, all of the bulk purchases have come from AllStar Fuel. Rogers has not made a bulk fuel purchase since the new county rule went into effect in December 2011. In Precinct 4, almost all of the fuel purchases have come from Olney Fuel and Supply. Former Commissioner David Yoder used Olney Fuel and Supply for every bulk fuel purchase except one from 2000 until he left the seat at the end of 2005. In December 2003, Yoder made a purchase of 2,500 gallons of fuel from AllStar Fuel. Since he took over in 2006, Commissioner Jimmy Wiley, who owns Olney Fuel and Supply, has used his company almost exclusively. In six years, Wiley has used AllStar Fuel two times. Since the new rules went into effect in December, Wiley has purchased fuel from his own company three times.

Fuel Continued from Page 1A

YOUNG COUNTY FAMILY CLINIC Sick Visits Well Baby Checks Geriatrics Texas Health Steps ADHD Immunizations Annual Physicals Women’s Health Home Health Patients Chronic Disease Management

Monday, March 19 Jail count: 63 8:39 p.m.—Suspect arrested on district court warrant at Fourth and Virginia streets. 9:16 p.m.—Sewer reported backed up in the 1300 block of Remington Street. 9:18 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from Hamilton Hospital to Wichita Falls. 9:39 p.m.—Close patrol requested in the 1400 block of Avenue C. 10:51 p.m.—Suspect arrested on JP-1 warrant in the 200 block of Elm Street. 11:24 p.m.—Threats reported in the 500 block of Big Sandy Road.

Beautiful Continued from Page 1A

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tioned is the code allows the city to demolish a structure “where there has been a cessation of normal construction of any structure for more than two years.” According to the code, those affected by a decision of the official or a notice or order issued under the code may make an application for appeal. Fields recommended if the code was adopted, the council be the appeals authority. Property owners may also appeal to a court of law. “You’re more likely to end up in a district court with the current codes than with this,” Cottongame told the council. The code requires vacant structures and land be maintained in a clean, secure and sanitary condition “so as not to cause a blighting problem or adversely affect the public health and safety.” The most discussion occurred over the part stating “exterior wood surfaces, other than decay resistant woods, shall be protected from the elements and decay by painting or other protective covering or treatment. Peeling, flaking and chipped paint shall be eliminated and surfaces repainted.” Cottongame said the section is not for aesthetic reasons.

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Continued from Page 1A


cyan magenta yellow black

Canvas by Canvas coming to Graham

Steers win pair, move up in standings

Page 7A

Page 1B

THE GRAHAM LEADER Oldest business institution in Young County • Established August 16, 1876

VOL. 136, NO. 69 • SINGLE COPY 75¢

MIDWEEK EDITION • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2012

www.grahamleader.com

9-year-old girl loses ear in dog attack BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com A 9-year old girl was mauled by a dog in the 1200 block of Carolina Street on Thursday evening. Kim Shawver, Graham Police Department’s animal control officer, said the girl was playing in the front yard of the residence with some other children when a brown lab walked up.

“The dog started chasing one of the littler kids around, and they don’t know if he was wanting to play with her or what. When they told the dog to go away, the dog just latched on to the little girl, bit her ear and took part of her ear off,” said Shawver. She said the dog then took off, but officers were able to find the dog after 30 to 45 minutes of chasing it. “We chased the dog approxi-

mately three miles up and down alleys and streets,” said Shawver. “There were probably six or seven citizens just out in their vehicles after they found out what happened helping us look for it, and I really appreciate that. This town is awesome. Anytime I really need help, this town is right there in the big middle of it to help me.” Shawver said the dog was an intact male chocolate Labrador

retriever that neither the victim or anyone else at the home had seen before. “It was just wandering around the neighborhood,” she said. She talked to the owners of the dog who were stunned their dog would do this. “They never once asked what the little girl did to the dog because they knew it was totally unacceptable that their dog would do this,

so that’s why the signed the dog over to us,” said Shawver. The dog was surrendered to Shawver and submitted for rabies testing. The test results were negative for rabies. “It’s just a bad disease, rabies is something that you don’t get over. Since we were able to get the dog, we’re pretty safe there,” Shawver See ATTACK, Page 2A

Working to Keep Graham Beautiful Former POW

to speak at Aggie Muster

Cleanup campaign to get under way Saturday BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com

basis in front of the American Legion Building. Those with useful castoffs can turn them into cash. Animals, firearms and ammunition are prohibited from the open-air sale. “Our goal is to motivate Graham residents, businesses and property owners to take responsibility to spruce up their properties and to encourage volunteer groups to provide assistance to residents physically unable to participate in the cleanup,” Roy Robinson, Keep Graham Beautiful president, explained. “We also encourage residents and organizations to adopt blocks, streets, neighborhoods and entrances into the community.” To help with the disposal of litter, the city of Graham and IESI will position 30-yard commercial Dumpsters at five convenient locations throughout the city. A map with this article pinpoints their location. City Manager Larry Fields said the Dumpsters will be emptied as they fill up

Keep Graham Beautiful is gearing up to kickoff a 10-day community wide cleanup campaign. The recently reorganized committee will host a kickoff celebration from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday on the Downtown Square. The launch will coincide with the statewide Don’t Mess With Texas Trash-Off, the state’s largest one-day litter cleanup event. The local effort is in partnership with Keep Texas Beautiful and the Texas Department of Transportation. KGB will serve free hot dogs and cold beverages throughout Saturday’s festivities on the Square. Yard signs will be available to clean up supporters along with trash bags for volunteers planning to dig in and help during the April 14-22 effort. Graham High School cheerleaders and other cleanup supporters will entertain kickoff participants. Spaces for a sidewalk rummage sale will be provided on a first-come, first served

See CLEAN, Page 2A

BY DAVID RUPKALVIS editor@grahamleader.com

Helping out Lone Star 4-H picked up 25 bags of trash along the stretch of Highway 16 northeast of Graham adopted by the local Knights of Columbus. It is one of several groups and individuals who have helped in the community cleanup campaign. The official kickoff is Saturday. (Photo courtesy of Teresa Stewart)

Two Olney officers County to post injured; suspect jailed records online BY MINDI KIMBRO MediaNews Service Two Olney Police Department officers are recovering from injuries sustained when they were assaulted by an Olney man during an arrest Friday. Olney Police Chief Barry Roberts said the victims in the incident were C.H. Wright, reserve officer, and Charles Wright, a regular member of Olney PD. According to Roberts, Bobby Joe

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Mayes of Olney had been involved in a domestic disturbance earlier that day. He had been taken from the scene by another individual, and the other party involved in the disturbance was relocated to the Pipeliner Inn. At approximately 10:32 p.m. Friday, Officer C.H. Wright was dispatched to the Pipeliner Inn in reference to Mayes showing up at that location and having an alter-

Young County commissioners voted unanimously to put many county records online during a regular meeting of commissioners court Monday. By a 4-1 vote, commissioners voted to spend $27,000 to put records from the county clerk’s office and the Precinct 1 Justice of the Peace office on the Internet. The move will enable those searching for county records or trying to pay traffic tickets the ability to

See OFFICERS, Page 2A

See RECORDS, Page 6A

Weather High Low Rain Tuesday, 4/3 68 45 1.05 Wednesday, 4/4 68 43 0 Thursday, 4/5 68 46 0 Friday, 4/6 72 52 0 Saturday, 4/7 77 54 0 Sunday, 4/8 61 50 0 Monday, 4/9 72 55 0 Rain: Month 1.05 • Year 11.22 Lake Graham at capacity: 1,075.00 Current level: 1,074.94 Temperatures and rainfall provided by the National Weather Service.

BY DAVID RUPKALVIS editor@grahamleader.com

Just two years after he graduated from Texas A&M, Jim Ray found himself flying through North Vietnam when his life changed forever. On May 8, 1966, Ray was flying his 13th mission over Vietnam, flying from a base in Thailand to North Vietnam to shoot out bridges and railroad crossings. It AT A GLANCE was also the last mission ■ What: Aggie Muster he would fly. Ray never ■ 6:30 p.m., Saturday, made it back to Thailand April 21 that day after being shot ■ Where: The Alley down and taken prisoner House in Graham by the Vietnamese. For ■ You Should Know: more than six years, Ray Col. Jim Ray (Ret.) was held as a prisoner will speak about the of war, suffering torture six-and-a-half years he few can imagine. But Ray was held as a POW in survived, relying on the Vietnam. Tickets cost training he received in $25. To make reservathe Air Force and the tions, e-mail Michael@ training he received at DFWNetworking.com Texas A&M. On April 21, Ray will be visiting Graham to tell his story at the Young County A&M Club’s Aggie Muster. The muster will get under way at 6:30 p.m. at the Alley House. “I remember every detail of that day,” Ray said. “It was a mission that was going to last five or six hours. We were flying from a base in southern Thailand.” During his time as a prisoner, Ray said he tried to stay upbeat. But several times he was certain he was going to die. “I thought so a few times during the rope torture,” he said. “There was a few times it got so bad I was afraid I was going to live.” Despite the hardships, Ray did survive by leaning on everything he had learned in life. “My Christian values, my understanding of our form of government and my understanding of the Communist system got me through it,” Ray said. “I understood our history and the sacrifices the people before me went through. That didn’t give me a lot of time to feel too sorry for myself. I figured it was my time.” Ray said he was also able to lean on the lessons he learned as a student at Texas A&M. “If you know anything about A&M or the military academies, the freshman year there’s a lot of psychological harassment and hazing,” he said. “The hazing is actually good for you. It has a toughening effect. That all goes together to toughen you up.” In fact, Ray jokes that the first Vietnamese to interSee POW, Page 6A

NEWS BRIEFS Wildcatter Superstar to kick off Saturday The Wildcatter Superstar singing competition will get started with the first 16 finalists performing Saturday at the Wildcatter Ranch and Resort. Sixty-four singers were chosen to compete in the competition. In each of the four beginning rounds, 16 singers will perform one song. Four semifinalists will be chosen

during each of the preliminary rounds. The 16 semifinalists will perform over two weeks in May with the top eight advancing to the finals. The Wildcatter Superstar, which is sponsored in part by The Graham Leader, is offering cash prizes of $2,500 to the top singers in the competition. For more information, visit Facebook and search Wildcatter Superstar.

Inside Lifestyles .............................. Page 3A Calendar .............................. Page 4A Obituaries ............................ Page 5A Police Blotter ....................... Page 7A Sports ....................................Page 1B TV ..........................................Page 2B Entertainment ......................Page 3B Classified ..............................Page 4B

70639


2A • THE GRAHAM LEADER

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2012

www.grahamleader.com

Officers

Graham Girl Scouts pose with bags of trash they picked during a cleanup effort along Pine Tree Road. The Girl Scouts will continue to help beautify Graham. Below, this map indicates where the 30-yard rollout Dumpsters will be located from April 14-22 as part of the Keep Graham Beautiful cleanup campaign. The Dumpster locations are 1500 block of Old Jacksboro Road, 600 block of Indiana Street, 200 block of Second Street, 1100 block of Carolina and the 1600 block of Lindy Street. The city of Graham and IESI will provide the Dumpsters at no cost and will be emptied as they fill up during the campaign. (Top photo courtesy photo, bottom illustration by Cheryl Adams)

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Several groups and organizations have initiated early starts of next week’s cleanup including the Street Walkers, consisting of Mary Braddock, Nann Hale, Fannie Logan, Ellen Morris, Nancy Hays, Teresa Matney and Wanda Knox, who have adopted Pine Street Road and Westwood Drive. The Lone Star 4-H Club and leaders Teresa Stewart and Kris Camp picked up 25 bags of trash March 28 along two miles of Texas Highway 16 from Cliff Drive northeastward. The section of highway is adopted by the Graham Council of Knights of Columbus, but Lone Star 4-Hers clean it up twice a year. The Rotary Club of Graham and the GHS Roteract Club adopted two miles of U.S. Highway 380 from the Young County Arena entrance two miles eastward and picked up more than 30 bags of trash on March 24. Volunteer Betty Carey picks up litter each day on exercise walks. Dionna Carr has cleaned stretches of Lindy and Alford streets in the Pitcock addition. George and Tina Robertson,

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said. “I think if we hadn’t gotten the dog that night they might have started the girl on the shots. We found out he was current on his rabies shot. He was vaccinated June of last year.” Although the dog was current on his shots, Shawver said that doesn’t mean it wasn’t still at risk of carrying the disease so all precautions are taken when a dog attack occurs outside of the dog

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Main Street, CVB to spruce up downtown Graham Main Street and the Graham Convention and Visitors Bureau will team up with city crews to spruce up the Downtown Square by refurbishing the planter boxes, cleaning gutters, sweeping sidewalks and repainting curbs around the Square. This effort is to help im-

prove the look and feel of the Downtown Square for our residents and visitors to enjoy. The cleanup will kick off on April 11. In an effort to minimize costs, as many of the existing plants will be as used as possible. New plants and trees will be purchased locally from J Appleseed.

Tooter Ford and Dan and Carol McMillan have adopted three miles of Rocky Mound Road from the Loving Highway turnoff. Mike Sipes and his grandchildren, ages 5, 7 and 9, cleaned along Eastside Lake Road in March. Girl Scout Troops 8308 and 8328 and leaders Amanda Townley and Marva Thomas conducted a sweep of Pine Tree Road and will next work at Shawnee Springs Park. The Graham Savings and Loan staff, coordinated by Brenda Harrelson, has ad-

opted the 700 block of Elm St. for an initial cleanup next week and monthly cleanups throughout the ensuing year. “We’re very much appreciative of clubs who have already taken initiative to start clean up efforts. We hope its an indication that concern about the community’s appearance is widespread enough to motive more residents to join in,” said Robinson. KGB welcomes adoption of additional target areas. For information about the effort, attend the kickoff or call (940) 549-2211.

owner’s yard or home. After investigating the incident, it is believed the children’s actions were not the cause of the attack. “After talking to the little girl and talking to the kids, really she did nothing,” said Shawver. “The big factor in this is that the dog is unaltered, running the streets. What happens is a male dog gets out and marks their territory and when someone else comes out, they’re encroaching on their territory.”

She added that having a dog that is not neutered is fine, but owners must have a fence that will keep it secure. The girl was taken to Cook Children’s Hospital in Ft. Worth, but the lower half of her ear could not be reattached. She was released late Thursday night or early Friday morning. “It’s probably right up there with one of the worst attacks we’ve ever had. I’ve been doing this for 20 years, and it still shocks me,” Shawver said.

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throughout the cleanup campaign. Since its reorganization two months ago, Keep Graham Beautiful has targeted two specific goals for this year’s cleanup project. Foremost is a general cleanup of the properties and entrances to the city. Removal of inoperable and unlicensed vehicles visible from the streets is also a goal of the cleanup. K&K Motor and Salvage will support the removal project by offering cash for titled vehicles. The second focus is to improve curb appeal throughout the city. KGB is asking residents to clear overgrowth from curbs fronting their properties and to remove clutter and growth buildups from gutters. City crews, under the direction of Public Works Director David Casteel, will tackle heavily blocked gutters along main thoroughfares. Cleanup organizers suggest a low-cost, seven-point program for homeowners and rental tenants to support the cleanup: • View your property or area with a stranger’s eye — pick up and clean up the yard, fence line and curb and gutter. • Do not blow grass cuttings into the street or gutter — bag or mulch instead. • Clean out flowers beds, mow and edge your property. • Haul off debris and anything non-working that does not belong in a yard. • Trim trees and shrubs — call the city to ask for brush pick-up. • Clean behind your property in the alley. Large items not picked up by trash removal service can be taken to the convenience station or to Dumpster locations during the April 14-22 cleanup. • Wash the outside of your home with a light power washer and repaint the front door.

Willow St

Clean Continued from Page 1A

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ing him to the ground with an injury. Ultimately, Roberts said Mayes was tazed and taken into custody without further incident. Deputies from Young County Sheriff’s Office transported Mayes to Young County Jail. “We turned the investigation over to the sheriff’s office,” Roberts said. “That’s just customary in cases involving officers.” C.H. Wright was hospitalized Friday evening with a severe concussion and was released Sunday afternoon. Charles Wright is recovering at home from a cracked pelvis. Mayes was charged with two counts of aggravated assault on a public servant, a third degree felony, with bond amounts set at $30,000 and $25,000. Roberts said Mayes posted bond and was released from jail Sunday.

Tanglewood

cation with the second party from the earlier disturbance. “Mayes attacked him,” Roberts said. “As (C.H.) Wright was trying to get back, Mayes pushed him, and he fell back and hit his head on the pavement.” Another reserve officer, Dean Burdick, arrived for back-up and he and C.H. Wright were able to get Mayes contained and put into the back of the reserve officer’s vehicle. When Officer Charles Wright arrived on the scene, the decision was made to transfer Mayes to his vehicle for transportation to OPD and, ultimately, to the Young County Jail. Roberts said that Mayes lashed out as the transfer between vehicles was taking place, and he kicked Charles Wright in the pelvic area, forc-

Corvadura St.

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8B • THE GRAHAM LEADER

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2012

Sixth-grade band

Graham Junior High School sixth grade band earned first division at the 42nd annual Sandy Lake Fun Fest Music Festival. Pictured are, first row, from left, Yagaira Martinez, Alejandra Fuentes, Grace Reed, Ali Alvidrez, Cameron Parker, Evan Stewart, Paxton Whitaker, Hiram Fuentes, Mikayla Tyson and Gage Bozeman. Second row, Tyler Cook, Laren Rogers, Sydney East, Donovan Barrett, Anaine Cervantes, Andi Franklin, Ezekiel Huerta, Luis Alejo, Nohemi Garcia, Audrey Tyson, Shayne Lopez, Amanda Bynum, Jacci Smith, Azlynn Withrow, Tabitha Pesch, Adri Ustick, Nicholas Stevens, Alicia Olvera, Rikki Roman and Haylee Bradshaw. Third row, Kevin Armstrong, Taylor Marsh, Vanessa Huerta, Karli Ballew, Gracie Carr, Callen Mills, Jake Lanham, Wesley Martin, Luke Norman, Cy Holt, Carlos Fuentes, Armando Herrera, Bryan Sierra, Libby Johnson, Katherine Riggins, Kody Keeter, Cody Henderson, Jeffery Hazlett, Peyton Johnson, Joel Jones, Adam Groves and Kolton Carmichael. Fourth row, Jristin Spring, Riley Wyatt, Codie Fields, Jeb Curry, Shanna Gleason, Ryan Bond, Blake Mead, Makayla Henderson, Ryan Karper, Cade Smith, Emily Schaefer, Ali Dragoo, Emma Ray, Kaitlyn Spurlin, Lainey Choate, Ashton Hay, Scott Vicars and Kenzie Graham. Fifth row, Ashley Gallaway, Breann Mayes, Hallie Morgan, Taylor Imotichy, Elizabeth Routon, Kimberly Pruitt, Izzy Maberry, Hunter Wardrup, Mackenzie Crow, Gustavo Ramirez, Colt Hopkins, Claytin Moody, Austin Bahl, Will Holmes, Cady VanDyke, Buddy Strawbridge and Camrie Baca. Not pictured Isabel Avila and Nicole King. (Photo courtesy of Hugh Grubbs)

Railroad Commission: If you’re going to dig, call 811 first April marks the fifth annual National Safe Digging Month, and Texas Railroad Commissioners urge Texas residents to always to make a free call to 811 before any digging project.

9

A call to one-call notification centers will prompt pipeline operators to mark their underground pipelines in the area requested, making springtime digging projects in gardens and yards safe.

In Texas, the top cause of pipeline accidents occurs when someone is digging or excavating. Fortunately, the commission’s efforts to spread the word about the importance of calling 811 before

digging is resulting in fewer pipeline damage incidents each year. Excavation-related pipeline damage incidents have dropped since the inception of the Commission’s Damage Prevention program

from 12,847 in 2007 to 8,503 in 2011, a 34 percent decrease in excavation related damage incidents. “As April marks the traditional start of digging season, we are getting the word

Support a Cleaner Graham…

Saturday, April 14 • Downtown Square 10 A.M. ’til 2 P.M.

2012 Clean-Up Kick-Off Free Hot Dogs • Free Cold Beverages Free Yard Signs Free Trash Bags for Clean-Up Volunteers

Community-Wide Sidewalk/Garage Sale No Fee for Space Positions Available First Come, First Served No Animals • No Guns • No Ammunition

Volunteer Clean-Up Campaign Saturday, April 14, through Sunday, April 22 Commercial Dumpsters Will Be Strategically Placed Throughout the City • No Fee for Disposal

Graham’s Beauty Is Our Duty!

out this month to strongly encourage individuals and companies to call 811 before they begin digging,” said Commission Chairman Barry Smitherman. “Excavationrelated damages account for 76 percent of all Texas pipeline accidents.” By calling 811 to have the underground utility lines in their area marked, homeowners and contractors are making an important decision that can help keep them and their communities safe. “Building a deck, installing a mailbox and planting a tree or garden are all examples of digging projects that should only begin a few days after a call to 811,” said Commissioner David Porter. “We at the Commission reinforce the ‘Call Before you Dig’ message by conducting pipeline damage prevention educational programs across the state. With a pipeline network of more than 300,000 miles in Texas, every digging project, no matter how large or small, warrants a call to 811.” When calling 811, homeowners and contractors are connected to a local one-call center which notifies the appropriate utility companies of their digging plan. Professional locators are then sent to the requested digging site to mark the approximate locations of underground lines with flags, paint or both. Striking a pipeline can result in injury, repair costs, fines and inconvenient outages. In Texas, not calling 811 before digging or incorrectly marking a pipeline can result in fines of up to $10,000 per day per violation. Since the Railroad Commission’s Pipeline Damage Prevention Program began in Sept. 2007, almost 45,000 pipeline damage incidents due to digging have been reported to the Commission. During that same time, the commission has collected more than $4.7 million in penalties for damage prevention violations — dollars that go directly into the state’s General Revenue Fund. For additional Damage Prevention Month activities and safe digging practices, visit www.call811.com or www.rrc. state.tx.us.

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Gourds turned into a form of art

Lady Blues close in on playoff berth

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THE GRAHAM LEADER Oldest business institution in Young County • Established August 16, 1876

VOL. 136, NO. 71 • SINGLE COPY 75¢

MIDWEEK EDITION • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2012

www.grahamleader.com

Inventor hopes engine ends fuel crisis BY DAVID RUPKALVIS editor@grahamleader.com After he retired and moved to Graham, Crews McCulloch found himself busier than ever. As an ambassador to the Army Reserve, national commander of the American Volunteer Reserve, county Republican chairman and more, McCulloch worked harder to volunteer than he did while getting paid. All that work also put McCulloch on the road a lot, driving through Texas and across the country for meeting after meeting. Four years ago while on those trips, McCulloch began to be concerned with the price of fuel. When gas prices hit close to $4 a gallon, McCulloch had an idea — someone needed to invent a new engine that would not use as much fuel. A former engineer with four

patents under his belt, McCulloch was certain he could come up with something. The problem was he had no time. “I had the idea for this cam drive about four years ago,” he said. “I made a little old model, and I saw it had the potential to work. But I had so much going on that it sat as is.” Two years ago, one of the worst times in McCulloch’s life gave him the time he needed. When his wife, Marjorie, suffered a stroke, McCulloch was forced to stay home and become a caretaker. When he wasn’t taking care of his wife, McCulloch found time to work on his engine. Last Tuesday, that work was concluded when McCulloch filed an application for a patent for what he calls the “McCulloch engine.” The engine, which can run anything from a lawnmower to an 18-wheeler, uses no gasoline and has almost no

emissions. “After Marjie had her stroke, I had time to get really serious,” he said. “I did one, and it wasn’t what I wanted. I did a second one, and it wasn’t what I wanted. I used those experiments to make the third one.” When the third engine worked, McCulloch had created an engine that might be the answer to fuel prices, oil shortages and more. McCulloch’s engine is powered with either compressed air or steam, and it eliminates many of the parts needed in a traditional engine. McCulloch said his invention has just 13 moving parts — four pistons, four valves, four electric switches and a drive shaft with a drive cam and switch cam attached. Traditional parts not needed include a crank shaft, fly wheel, crank case, See ENGINE, Page 2A

Eating up, cleaning up

Invention that could save the world Crews McCulloch has created an engine that runs off either compressed air or steam and runs with almost no fuel. McCulloch filed for a patent for the engine last week. (Photo courtesy of Crews McCulloch)

Superstar

Council discusses parking issues BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com

Cleaning up Carter Pettit, left, and Jay Gober fuel the clean-up campaign with grilled hot dogs Saturday. Below, Emilio Almenas, 4, throws away a bag of trash he picked up around the Square. (Photos by Cherry Rushin)

Keep Graham Beautiful campaign gets under way BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com Keep Graham Beautiful celebrated the kickoff of its clean-up effort Saturday on the Square. Supporters came out to enjoy hot dogs, grab some trash bags and yard signs then hopefully headed off to get busy ridding the town of unsightly litter. The Graham High School cheerleaders and Ol’ Blue got the event under way with special cheers written just for the cause. One young man who was in town visiting his

Hannah Reeves performs during the first week of the Wildcatter Superstar competition. The first 16 finalists competed Saturday with three advancing to the semifinals. The second week of competition will be April 28 with singing beginning at 7:30 p.m. (Photo courtesy of Scene Marketing)

See BEAUTIFUL, Page 2A

Your Local Weather Local Forecast Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

4/18

4/19

4/20

4/21

79/53 Mainly sunny. Highs in the upper 70s and lows in the low 50s.

81/53 Abundant sunshine. Highs in the low 80s and lows in the low 50s.

68/45 Times of sun and clouds. Highs in the upper 60s and lows in the mid 40s.

75/51 Sunshine. Highs in the mid 70s and lows in the low 50s.

©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service

Weather High Low Rain Tuesday, 4/10 77 48 0 Wednesday, 4/11 82 63 0 Thursday, 4/12 79 64 0 Friday, 4/13 72 52 0 Saturday, 4/14 81 54 0.11 Sunday, 4/15 77 46 0 Monday, 4/16 72 45 0 Rain: Month 1.16 • Year 11.33 Lake Graham at capacity: 1,075.00 Current level: 1,074.94 Temperatures and rainfall provided by the National Weather Service.

Graham City Council discussed parking, carports, gas service and more at its regular meeting Thursday. Stan Edwards addressed the council concerning parking along Victory Street. Because it’s near the high school, there are signs that say no parking from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. He said he has a one-car drive and a one-car garage, and it’s inconvenient that he and his wife are unable to park on the street. Edwards was cited for parking on the street last Monday because he believed the sign only applied to non-residents. He requested that homeowners be exempt. City Manger Larry Fields suggested he speak with his neighbors, and it would be possible for the city to provide a decal for the cars of Victory Street residents. Carl Bushman stated he opposes the International Property Maintenance Code. “It is an action of agenda 21, part of the United Nations,” he said. “We have a U.S. code. We should not follow the UN.” Council members approved a variance for the addition of a carport at a house in the 1400 block of Oak Hills. The emergency water contract See COUNCIL, Page 2A

NEWS BRIEFS Cars and Stars planned Saturday The second annual Cars and Stars event will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday on the Downtown Square. The event includes a car show, a cruise and a movie at 5 p.m. at the Graham Drive In. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. The judged car show will have more than 40 classes available for entry including motorcycles and

rat rods. There will be vendors, a spark plug hunt for kids ages 12 and under, a fan belt toss contest, a 50/50 cash raffle and a variety of items to be raffled off and live music from Austin musician Ratliff Dean Thiebaud. The Graham Police Department will lead an hour-long cruise on Highway 16 north, returning on Highway 380 south. At 5 p.m., the Graham Drive In will open its gates.

Inside Lifestyles .............................. Page 3A Calendar .............................. Page 4A Obituaries ............................ Page 4A Police Blotter ....................... Page 6A Sports ....................................Page 1B TV ..........................................Page 2B Entertainment ......................Page 3B Classified ..............................Page 4B

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Best of all, the engine is very simple. As traditional combustion engines get harder and harder to work on, McCulloch said his engine is the exact opposite. “The thing is so dog gone simple you can take a pair of pliers and a crescent wrench to take it apart,” he said. McCulloch said the easiest of the two versions of his engine is an air-powered system run by a tank of compressed air. The air is slowly released to drive the pistons which propels the engine.

with the city of Throckmorton was also renewed. Fields said the contract was changed to require the use of a minimum amount of water monthly to keep the system flushed.

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In the steam engine, a boiler would be heated by propane, using heated air to run the engine. “It would create steam almost instantly,” McCulloch said. “In the boiler, it’s created into steam and it drives the engine. It then goes through a radiator that cools it back into a liquid. It works sort of like your home air conditioner. It’s closed cycled and it goes from liquid to gas and liquid to gas.” The steam engine would use a combination of water and methanol.

Natural gas rates may soon increase. “Texas Gas Service is allowed to file cost adjustment each year requesting an annual increase,” explained Fields. He said no action is required and the increase will go into effect. “If you deny it, you must prepare a rate case before the Texas Railroad Commission,” he said. Texas Gas Service is also requesting to change the language which would allow them to get more of an increase. Right now, there is a consumer price index cap that doesn’t allow them to recapture the cost of doing business, said Fields. “The issue is not going to

be settled until August. I’ll visit with other cities about it,” he said. He said the average user’s gas bill would increase a dollar a month. There was some discussion over RVs at Firemen’s Park. Fields said not all of the hookups were working properly. “If we want to continue with the RV park we need to spend some money on it,” said Fields. “We need to fix the hookups and make some surfaces to identify spaces as an RV park.” He said it would cost from $4,500 to $6,000 to put in six spaces. “We call it an RV park, but it’s really not,” said Mayor Barry White. “My suggestion would be to eliminate it as an

RV park and spend our money somewhere else.” Also, there was some discussion about putting up a shade at the pool just west of the splash pad for $7,000. “It’s not a budgeted item, and pool revenues won’t pay for it,” said Fields. “The pool doesn’t ever get close to breaking even.” Councilman Jack Graham suggested possibly passing the additional cost on to the user. “It’s a money loser every year. It’s great we have it, but maybe increase the fee just for this year for the people who use it,” he said. Fields said a rate increase is something to consider. The pool averages 350 swimmers every day it’s open.

Council Continued from Page 1A

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“If you equate this to a hybrid car, the air chamber would be about the same size as the battery,” he said. McCulloch said once the engine was turned on, the air would enter the valves at 200 PSI to fire the first piston. As the piston is fired, the selflubricated cam would rotate 90 percent to fire the second piston. The air system could be run with no fuel, although a vehicle could be made into a hybrid system where a small engine kicks on as the air runs out and refills the air tank.

“Based on my calculations, I should be able to get 75 to 100 miles from a gallon of propane to drive a mid-sized car,” he said. In his life, McCulloch has patented four items. Based on that experience, he said he expects it to be around a year before his engine is patented. In a worldwide search, no similar projects were found. “In the meantime, it’s patent pending which means no one can come in and file over me,” he said. Once he gets his patent, McCulloch said he would be open to selling the concept. “I’m hoping it will,” he said. “I’ve already been approached by a Middle East operation. “At my age, I’m not interested in running a manufacturing operation. I’ve done that before.”

“I’m hoping it will. I’ve already been approached by a Middle East operation. At my age, I’m not interested in running a manufacturing operation. I’ve done that before.” Crews McCulloch Inventor

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Clean team

¤ Committed to being a Full-Time Commissioner ¤ Experienced in managing employees and operating heavy equipment ¤ Honest and loyal to the citizens of Young County ¤ Working for taxpayers to balance the budget and spend OUR tax dollars wisely ¤ Committed to maintaining our roads, bar ditches and bridges (Political ad paid for by the Supporters of BJ Cook)

Lillian, Jack and Mary Lyndell Graham picked up trash bags and a yard sign at Saturday’s Keep Graham Beautiful event in support of the effort. (Photo by Cherry Rushin)

Beautiful Continued from Page 1A 9

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oil pump, fuel pump, starter, transmission, spark plugs and fuel injectors. When powered by compressed air, the engine has no emissions. When powered by steam, the emissions are limited. “With this engine, you have constant power from the beginning of the piston strike to the end of the piston strike,” McCulloch said. “There’s always a constant push. As a result, you don’t have to have a fly wheel and you don’t have to have a transmission.” McCulloch said his air-powered engine works in a simple manner. With the air moving the pistons forward, the engine runs almost silently but with consistent power. The sample he built at home creates about 15 horsepower, but it can be increased in size and power to run almost anything. “I had the idea and kept at it until I got what I wanted,” he said.

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Graham City Council member Jack Graham chose to lead by example. He and his children, Jack, Lillian and Mary Lyndell, stopped by the event to pick up some trash bags before heading out to pick up some trash. Jim Fields of Jersey Village was just passing through after a visit in Breckenridge and said he was very impressed with the effort. “I’m looking for a place to retire, we saw this and were so relieved. So many places nowadays, there’s no civic pride,” he said. “You have people who have saved all their lives and want a place that takes pride in their community.” He has been working with city leaders for 10 years to clean up his town of approximately 5,000. “What you enjoy today, you can’t take for granted. That’s why we’re here today,” Fields added. “We enjoy these amenities but it takes leadership and effort.” The concentrated effort will continue throughout the week with roll off Dumpsters out and available for those looking to ditch bulky items. The Dumpster locations are the 1500 block of Old Jacksboro Road, 600 block of Indiana Street, 200 block of Second Street, 1100 block of Carolina and the 1600 block of Lindy Street.


cyan magenta yellow black

Antique tractor show on tap Saturday

Steers clinch district championship

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THE GRAHAM LEADER Oldest business institution in Young County • Established August 16, 1876

VOL. 136, NO. 73 • SINGLE COPY 75¢

MIDWEEK EDITION • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012

www.grahamleader.com

All American Girl to be crowned Saturday BY JULIANNE MURRAH gninews@grahamleader.com Twenty-two beautiful and talented Graham High School girls will compete for the All American Girl title Friday and Saturday. GHS students in grades nine through 12 will show off their skills in a talent competition at 7:30 p.m. Friday followed by an evening gown competition at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Both events will be at Graham Memorial Auditorium. Each performing girl was selected by a club or organization at Graham High School to represent them, be it student council, Key Club or more. Showing off talent boosts esteem and morale of each student. “It’s very important to a lot of the girls because without the pageant they wouldn’t be able to show these talents to other people,” said Courtney Bobo, Graham High School drama teacher. “People in gymnastics or dance have the opportunity to show their talent in a big group, but it doesn’t showcase the performance of the girl by herself. The spotlight is on them.” In the talent competition, girls will exhibit their forte and be judged accordingly. Abilities vary from student to student. “Expect the unexpected,” said Bobo. “You never know what the girls are going to do. We have a lot of singers, great dancers, gymnasts, actors and anything they want to do that they consider a talent that they are able to do.” The theme this year is reflection, because

AT A GLANCE ■ What: 2012 All American Girl show ■ When: Talent competition at 7:30 p.m. Friday, finals at 7:30 p.m. Saturday ■ Where: Graham Memorial Auditorium ■ You Should Know: Twenty-two Graham High School girls will compete to be the 40th All American Girl. 2011 winner Anna McGee will return to perform and crown the new winner. Tickets cost $5 for the talent show and $7 for the finals. 2012 marks 40 years that the pageant has occurred. “We are taking a look back on the pageants we have done so far over the last 40 years, and we are reflecting and getting a look ahead on the next 40 years,” said Bobo. At 7:30 p.m. Saturday, students will display their beauty in evening gowns. After the evening gown competition is complete, finalists will be selected to re-perform their talent. The Graham High School Thespian Society will perform a variety show with skits after each finalist performs. Skits will be based on the “reflection” theme. “This year we are going through each decade with a sketch, to kind of poke fun at decades,” said Bobo. “Everyone knows looking back on the decades is something to laugh at and have fun with. It’s a neat See GIRL, Page 6A

All American Girl All American Girl Anna McGee, right, reacts in shock while 2010 winner Carly Nunn is all smiles as McGee was named the 2011 All American Girl. McGee will return to Graham this weekend to crown the 2012 winner. (Photo by David Rupkalvis)

A tale of survival, American pride Ray recalls six years as a POW BY DAVID RUPKALVIS editor@grahamleader.com

BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com

Forty-six years after he became a prisoner of war in Vietnam, James Ray told fellow Texas A&M graduates and students that he does not regret his service to the United States. While speaking at the Aggie Muster, a time to remember Aggies who died in the past year, Ray recalled the day he almost gave his life for his country — May 8, 1966. “It all started back in 1966,” Ray said. “I was flying an F-105 Thunderchief. We were flying a mission in North Vietnam. We were bombing a railroad line up there.” By disabling the rail line, the Americans were trying to prevent supplies from entering Vietnam from China. Ray said as he was approaching his target, anti-aircraft fire became intense. “My airplane got hit right as we got to the target,” Ray said. “I knew I was hit, but my navigation system still worked so I continued my roll in, dropped the bombs and turned out.” Because the plane was still flying, Ray said he planned on flying to safety. But another pilot flew up beside him and told him the plane was on fire and he had to eject. “I thought, ‘Not so quick,’” Ray said. “The flight leader called again, ‘Bamboo 2, you’re on fire, get out, get out.’” That time Ray listened, ejecting over Vietnam. “My first thought was how quiet it was,”

Your Local Weather Local Forecast Sat

Sun

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76/61

74/47

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Scattered thunderstorms possible. Potential for severe thunderstorms.

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70/48

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©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service

Clean-up effort to continue in Graham

turned around, Ray realized he was nearly on the ground. Relying on his training, Ray ejected some of the survival gear and prepared to hit the ground.

The Graham Clean Up 2012 week is wrapping up, but the work continues. Keep Graham Beautiful President Roy Robinson said the effort was an overwhelming success. “I don’t know how many tons of debris were removed, but it exceeded anyone’s expectations,” he said.” He said all of the rollout containers provided by IESI placed at five locations throughout the city were completely full as of Sunday afternoon, so KGB said the Dumpsters will be around a little longer. “Keep Graham Beautiful has agreed to spend $3,500 to keep the containers. We agreed to pay one haul for each container,” said Robinson. “The containers are back out, but they will not be there indefinitely.” Members of the recently reorganized KGB were pleased with the success of the campaign. “Keep Graham Beautiful would like to express its sincerest thanks both to the city and IESI for their cooperation in this thing,” Robinson said. City workers were busy throughout the week cleaning curbs, gutters and public spaces. Director of Public Works David Casteel said more than 100 cubic yards of dirt and debris has been removed from Graham’s gutters using city tools and a street sweeper the city has rented for a month. “We’ve had our skid steer out and our dump trailer. KGB gave us a list of streets to concentrate on,

See POW, Page 2A

See CONTINUE, Page 2A

An American hero James Ray takes a few minutes to talk to, from left, Andrea Ray, Emma Ray and Mary Jane Byerly before the Aggie Muster on Saturday. James Ray was a prisoner of war in Vietnam for more than six years before being released. (Photo by David Rupkalvis) he said. “I could heard the wind, but I couldn’t see anything.” Ray soon realized he couldn’t see because the force of the ejection spun his helmet around, leaving the eye holes in the back. When he finally got the helmet

Weather High Low Rain Tuesday, 4/17 79 55 0 Wednesday, 4/18 82 61 0 Thursday, 4/19 88 59 0.26 Friday, 4/20 80 52 0 Saturday, 4/21 77 50 0 Sunday, 4/22 79 43 0 Monday, 4/23 77 48 0 Rain: Month 1.31 • Year 11.48 Lake Graham at capacity: 1,075.00 Current level: 1,074.94 Temperatures and rainfall provided by the National Weather Service.

NEWS BRIEFS Last day to register to vote approaching Voters interested in casting ballots in the May 29 primary election must be registered by Monday, April 30. In Young County, the easiest way to register is to go to the Young County tax assessor/collector’s office in the county courthouse and fill out a registration card in person. In addition to voting for candi-

dates running for president, Young County electors will cast ballots for U.S. senator, U.S. congressman, state representative and state senator. On the local scene, voters will choose candidates to run for sheriff, district attorney, Precinct 1 commissioner, Precinct 3 commissioner, Precinct 1 constable, Precinct 3 constable, tax assessor/ collector, county attorney and district judge.

Inside Lifestyles .............................. Page 3A Calendar .............................. Page 4A Obituaries ............................ Page 5A Police Blotter ....................... Page 9A Sports ....................................Page 1B TV ..........................................Page 2B Entertainment ......................Page 3B Classified ..............................Page 4B

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POW “I landed, rolled over and everything seemed OK,” he said. “I took off, trying to find a gully where I could hide. I put all my survival training to use for six and a half minutes. I was surrounded and captured. That began an odyssey that lasted six years and six months, from the age of 25 to 32.” After he was taken prisoner, Ray did his best to maintain some control.

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“They took me to several different places and finally got me to a military camp,” Ray said. “That night I faced an interrogation team. I gave them my name, rank, serial number and date of birth and nothing else. After 15 or 20 minutes, they brought the goon squad in and introduced me to the rope torture for the first time.” In the rope torture, Ray’s hands were tied by ropes and slowly pulled together. The Vietnamese pulled the ropes as tight as possible and walked away. “In addition to the pain, a

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couple of other things happen,” Ray said. “Your shoulders are separated and even your rotator cuff is separated. It feels like your arms are in hot coals or scalding water. They leave you like that until you answer their questions.” After hours of suffering that night, Ray agreed to talk. The Vietnamese wanted to know military plans, information about the airplanes and more. “As I began to recover my wits, I gave them a cover story,” he said. “I told them I was on my first mission and was playing follow the leader and didn’t know much else.” After surviving the first torture, Ray continued to move, eventually reaching the famed Hanoi Hilton. “In the Hanoi Hilton, we went into a solitary confinement cell, and every day you were met with an interrogation,” Ray said. “Gradually they shifted to less military questions and more propaganda.” Ray said after several weeks in Hanoi, he was told to confess to war crimes and to speak out against the military effort. When he refused, he was given the rope torture again. Ray finally consented, but as he wrote a confession he used terminology and spellings in an effort to show the confession was forced. “Those were the only two times I experienced the rope torture,” he said. While in Hanoi, Ray also began to communicate with other American prisoners. “The next chapter was trying to link up with other Americans,” he said. “Gradually I made contact with other Americans. They taught us a tap code so we could tap on the wall. Using that code, we could communicate things. It was slow, but we had a little bit of time to waste.” Ray said the code placed the alphabet in four rows. By tapping on the wall between cells, the prisoners could dictate a row and then a letter to gradually spell words.

Still an Aggie James Ray talks about the time he spent as a prisoner of war in Vietnam. He told the crowd at the Aggie Muster that his training at Texas A&M helped him survive the six years behind bars. (Photo by David Rupkalvis) “The Vietnamese never did break that code,” he said. While Ray was finally able to talk to other Americans, his parents in Texas heard nothing for a long, long time. “The first letter my parents got from me was over three years after I was captured,” he said. “The first letter I got from them was over three and a half years after I was captured.” Ray said during his time in captivity he did his best to understand that while times were tough, he had little to complain about. He said having an understanding of American history let him know many people had given up much more to preserve the American way of life.

“If they did that, why should I whine now,” he said. “I was doing my duty, I got caught and I can persevere.” In the middle of his suffering, Ray also had help from another source. “In my case, my Christian faith helped me a lot,” he said. “The thing I tried to do was focus my anger on the system of communism and the system of brutality and not focus my anger on our guards.” After suffering for six and a half years, Ray’s nightmare ended when the U.S. and the Vietnamese finally signed a peace agreement. Ray said he was one of the first group of prisoners to leave Hanoi.

Decades later, he speaks about his experiences because he loves his country and is concerned with the path it is taking. “Our country may need a change in its future,” he said. “One of the reasons I take the opportunity to talk about being a prisoner of the Communists is because if things don’t change, our children might have to live under the oppression of communism, socialism and a top-down government.” Ray admitted his feelings are somewhat controversial, but he refused to apologize. “You wonder why I’m sometimes a little more outspoken?” he asked. “Well, I kind of earned the right to do that.”

Commissioners begin healthcare battle

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Continued from Page 1A and we’ve hit Indiana, Third Street, Tennessee, Fairview, Brazos and Hillcrest,” Casteel said. “We’ve come up behind that with our sweeper unit. We still have 15 or so streets to go. We’ve swept around the Square three times now, and I think we’ve got that cleaned up pretty good.” The city is trying to get the most out of its street sweeper rental period. Frank Herpeche, street department supervisor, has been coming in at 4 a.m. to start running the sweeper, and someone relieves him in the afternoon. That’s where Casteel was found Monday afternoon.

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require counties to participate in a regional cost-sharing effort — yet. “At this point, all we’re looking at is picking our region,” she said. “There’s more to come, believe me.” Hawkins said the regions were the beginning of an effort by the state to take away local control. “I’m not in favor of it, but we don’t have a choice right now,” he said. “I don’t like this any more than I did 10 or 15 years ago. It boils down to an unfunded mandate.” Precinct 4 Commissioner Jimmy Wiley said the county would join a region, preferably one linked with Wichita Falls, but the next step might be harder. “We’ll fight those battles each time they come,” Wiley said. “We’ll fight them one at a time.”

“We’re a little short on guys, so we’re down to our worst operator,” he said. The street cleaning has been slow-going in some areas. “Some blocks are so filled up he can go about a half block before he has to dump it, others we can go about three blocks, but I think we’re making a difference,” Casteel said. He added that the Dumpsters around town were emptied a couple of times each, and city crews evened out the load in some of those boxes with the front-end loader. “We’ve had an overwhelming response to the free dumping in those courtesy boxes,” Casteel said. The city workers will continue the clean-up effort in the

coming weeks, pausing only for other planned projects. “Tuesday and Wednesday most of the guys will be paving Ballpark Road, then we’ll get back to cleaning intensely Thursday and Friday,” said Casteel. Robinson said he hopes the momentum will continue throughout Graham. “Keep Graham Beautiful did not end on the 22nd,” he said. “We’re going to continue it throughout the year, and we’re going to try and prevent the build up of refuse and trash that occurred over the last several years. It was several years of neglect, and 10 days isn’t going to clean up all that neglect, so we’re going to keep it going.”

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from the Legislature as part of a requirement from the new national healthcare law. The national law followed by state requirements are designed to control health spending at all levels, Precinct 1 Commissioner John Hawkins said. “I think this is just the beginning of this,” Hawkins said. “It could go either way depending on what the Supreme Court does. We fought this 15 years ago because the state wanted the counties to turn over all the indigent healthcare funds, and they would run it. “That might have been good for some counties, but it would have been very expensive for rural counties.” Sumpter said the law passed by the Legislature last year requires every county be part of a region but does not

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from a health care region linked to Abilene to one linked with Wichita Falls. “Staying in the north region is best for Young County,” Indigent Health Coordinator Marsha Sumpter said. “We don’t go to Abilene. Staying with who we have now is just best for us.” County Judge John C. Bullock said both Graham Regional Medical Center and Olney Hamilton Hospital requested the change. Since the county offers indigent health services, often through the two hospitals, making the move would benefit all three organizations. While the vote Monday was not controversial, commissioners said the changes made by the state are just the beginning of many that are expected. The changes in healthcare regions came

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WEEKEND EDITION • SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

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Inmates to assist in effort to clean up Graham BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com Keep Graham Beautiful and the city of Graham have worked out a deal to keep the ball rolling and add a big boost to the clean up initiative. At Thursday’s City Council meeting, members agreed to have the

city enter into a contract with the Walker-Sayle Unit’s inmate worker program. KGB President Roy Robinson said members of his group approached the Breckenridge detention center about providing labor to spruce up the town. “The warden is interested, he said they need more projects but they

can only work out agreements with governmental entities,” Robinson said. To have the workers come to Graham, the city would be required to provide transportation, tools, a cell phone to the supervising officer while they are on the job and rest room facilities. Robinson said Kent Pettus has

donated the use of a bus, so the biggest hurdle has been overcome. “I see this as one of the best opportunities available as far as our initiative,” he added. Director of Public Works David Casteel provided the council with a list of possible projects including cleaning Shawnee Creek from Cherry Street to Salt Creek, cleaning

Schools rise to the challenge

parks, painting picnic tables and park facilities, building a walking trail at Fireman’s Park, removing dead tree limbs from the cemeteries and many more. Casteel said in his work for TxDot, he worked with such programs through the Texas Department of See INMATES, Page 2A

Early voting to get under way Monday BY DAVID RUPKALVIS editor@grahamleader.com

mitting them to meeting the challenge that was set before them. The challenge was to look for positive ways to serve others, either individually or through a series of campus clubs. At Crestview, the Kind Cool Kids took the lead by meeting after school once or twice

After what seems like a never-ending election cycle, voters will begin to have their say Monday. Early voting for the Texas primary election begins Monday and continues through May 25. Election day is May 29. The Texas primary was supposed to be held in March but due to legal wranglings over redistricting plans, the election was pushed back more than two months. That led to an extended campaign for those running for office, many who announced their plans as early as October. But the lengthy campaign is almost over. On Monday, the first votes will be cast, and winners in most races will be known by the end of the month. In Young County, early voting will be held at two locations — the Young County Courthouse and Olney City Hall. Voting will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Those wishing to vote early can stop by the courthouse or Olney City Hall. Once inside, each voter must declare which primary they are voting in. After signing in, voters will be given a ballot to make their choices. In Young County, the local decisions will be made on the Republican side. The four contested local primary elections include: • District attorney — Brenda Gray and Dee Peavy. • Sheriff — Bryan Walls and Joe Siskar. • Precinct 1 Commissioner — B.J. Cook, Mark Shepard and Mike Sipes. • Precinct 1 Constable — Jason Hearne, Tommy Martin and Joey Parker. Republican voters will also cast ballots in un-

See CHALLENGE, Page 3A

See VOTING, Page 2A

A helping hand Crestview Elementary students filled 37 boxes with canned goods to go to Bastrop as part of Graham Independent School District’s district-wide Friends of Rachel project. Pictured are, back to front, Lilly Cusenbary, Reese Echols, Austin Bryant, Easton Wolfe, Austin Ulrich and Victoria Lowery. (Photo courtesy of Peter Reed)

Students embrace the spirit of Rachel’s Challenge BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com Last fall, Graham students were challenged to begin a “chain reaction” of kindness and caring. Friday, they’ll all come together to see exactly how big the chain has grown. Shortly after the start of school, stu-

dents were introduced to Rachel’s Challenge through a district-wide assembly. Rachel Scott was a student killed in the Columbine High School shooting. Her acts of kindness and compassion together with her journaling inspired her family to create the school program. Graham students accepted the challenge and signed a banner, visually com-

A close call Graham Fire Rescue firefighters Jared Self, left, and Lt. Cole Epperson put out a small grass fire that burned between homes on Candlestick and Berry. Assistant Chief Jerry David said the fire started when wind pushed the electric lines together, creating sparks. With high winds and a lot of dead grass in the area, firefighters worked quickly to keep the blaze away from the homes. (Photo by David Rupkalvis)

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Weather High Low Rain Friday, 5/4 93 70 0 Saturday, 5/5 93 70 0 Sunday, 5/6 91 68 0.85 Monday, 5/7 81 63 0.53 Tuesday, 5/8 77 60 0 Wednesday, 5/9 77 62 0 Thursday, 5/10 74 63 0.75 Rain: Month 2.13 • Year 113.61 Lake Graham at capacity: 1,075.00 Current level: 1,074.47 Temperatures and rainfall provided by the National Weather Service.

NEWS BRIEFS GHS Students excel in UIL press conference Budding journalists at Graham High School were recently honored at the UIL Interscholastic League Press Conference in Austin. Several students placed in the statewide competition. Zach Berru received second place for sports column, and Callie George placed second for sports action photo. Kaitlin Kramer received

third place for portrait photo. Kirstin Thayer received third place and an honorable mention for sports feature. Jamie Bryant received third place for editorial cartoon, and Brian Sides received an honorable mention in the sports column category. The Stampede was also ranked the second highest paper and received the Award of Achievement from the Interscholastic League Press Conference.

Inside Obituaries ............................ Page 6A Lifestyles .............................. Page 7A Calendar .............................. Page 8A Police Blotter ..................... Page 12A Sports ....................................Page 1B TV ..........................................Page 3B Entertainment ......................Page 4B Classified ..............................Page 6B

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Once again, Vaughan steals the show As she has for decades, Alwana Vaughan stole the show Monday night. During the Graham High School Scholarship Ceremony, Vaughan handed out five awards. As each of the students walked up to get their scholarship from Vaughan, she joked with every one. “The check is the mail,� she said to laughter from the audience. “You can get your money tomorrow,� she told others. After handing out her last scholarship to Zach Berru, Vaughan broke out in song, singing in a clear voice. Despite being 96 and using a wheelchair to get around, Vaughan still has that twinkle in her eye that has captivated Graham for generations. As Jack Cody introduced Vaughan, he told the audience she has been performing on stage since she was 3. Cody told the audience that Vaughan is the “Queen of Graham� and no one seemed to disagree. While Vaughan’s age has slowed her down, it was clear that when she moved in front of the crowd, the performer

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she has always been came through. After she finished singing, Vaughan said a new verse had recently been written for the song. She promised to learn it and come back in 2013 to sing again. While Vaughan had the biggest laughs Monday, the real stars were the members of the senior class who are primed to graduate in a few weeks and move on to bigger and better things. My job Monday was to hand out four scholarships. The Edward B. Harris Jr. Memorial Scholarship went to Robyn Marsh. Awarded each year by The Graham Leader to a senior who is pursing a degree is journalism, the Harris Scholarship honors the man who served as publisher of The Graham Leader for 40 years. For the Graham Lions Club, the two PK Relays scholarships went to Bonni Peeks and Dusty Rae, and the Lions Club academic scholarship went to Hayley Turpin. All four winners were deserving and evidence of the quality of students we have in Graham. The scholarship program is something I have not seen before in other places I’ve lived. On Monday, more than 75 scholarships were awarded. In 1972, Pauline Jones was appointed dean of students. At the time, Graham High School only had one scholarship, the I.T. Gilmer Scholarship. Jones was tasked with finding more local scholarships. By first talking to the Graham service clubs and then businesses, Jones was successful. In that first year, the number of scholarships grew to 25. Since then, the number has continued to climb. In 2012, there was one scholarship that I was happy to see handed out. The Graham Kiwanis Club created the Donny Choate Memorial Scholarship, and Shirley Choate was at the ceremony to give out the first three scholarships. Many in Graham knew Donny. With his personalty and passion, he was loved by many and disliked by many. I certainly had my run ins with him through the years, but once I got past the occasional disagreements with Donny, I was able to see a guy who excelled in life because he worked harder than most. I also saw a guy who gave back, often without any fanfare. Donny and Shirley consistently supported Turning Point and other organizations that help others.

Remembering Donny Choate Shirley Choate, right, awards Shelby Coppersmith with one of the first Donny Choate Memorial Scholarships. The scholarship will be given out each year to a student planning to attend a trade school. (Photo by David Rupkalvis)

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The Donny Choate scholarship is neat to me because it is designed to help a student going to a trade school. While most of the awards every year go to a small group of students who excel academically, there is a need for those who choose an alternate path to a career. Through the Donny Choate Memorial Scholarship, the Graham Kiwanis Club will meet part of that need beginning this year and moving forward. Reading through the history of the scholarships, it was interesting to me to see the people who have impacted others through the years in Graham. The Graham High School classes of 1954, 1955 and 1956 give a pair of $2,000 scholarships each year. The money raised for the scholarships comes from an auction held at class reunions every three years. Most of the money is raised from one auction item, a ruler used by Juanita Baird when she was a teacher at Graham High School. During her years, Baird kept order in her classroom by rapping the knuckles of students who were out of line. At each reunion, the ruler is auctioned off to a team of bidders. While only one team gets the ruler, each group that bids pays their highest bid to help fund the scholarships. The Ed B. Johnson Jr. Scholarship is named for a Graham High School graduate who at-

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a drug rehab center,� Casteel said. He said they work five days a week, but might work three in Graham and two elsewhere. Council members voted to authorize City Manager Larry Fields to enter into a contract with the detention center. The contract will be for 90 days with work beginning as soon as June 1. Council members also voted to demolish the structures at 711 Cherry Street. Ken Walls, the previous building official, condemned the structures March 12, 2009. “It was declared to be demolished and then squatters moved in for a year and a half,� said Jason Cottongame, city inspector. The property owner, Mae McFadden of Jourdanton, has been notified three times

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tended Texas A&M. Johnson lost his life in the line of duty while serving in the U.S. Navy. In his honor, First National Bank administers the scholarship that is awarded each year to a Young County graduate who is attending Texas A&M. The H.A. and Dorothy Hefner Scholarship is named for two longtime Graham ISD educators. H.A. and Dorothy joined the district in 1942 and retired 27 years later, H.A. as superintendent and Dorothy as librarian at Graham Junior High. Both H.A. and Dorothy earned their degrees at the University of North Texas. Their children and two grandchildren also attended UNT. The Hefner Scholarship is awarded to GHS graduates who plan on attending UNT. The Kenneth G. Knox Class of 1952 Memorial Scholarship keeps alive the memory of Knox, a GHS student-athlete who suffered a severe head injury during a football game. Knox was treated at the then Graham Hospital and Baylor Hospital in Dallas, but he never regained consciousness and died within days. Every year, the Kenneth Knox scholarship is awarded to the senior football player who best exemplifies the quality and character of Kenny Knox. That is just a sample of the scholarships awarded Monday. Each one has a purpose, and many have memories associated with them. I hope the GHS seniors who received the scholarships use the assistance as the first step toward future success. Whether you are attending a major university or NCTC in Graham, the opportunity to learn is one that should be cherished.

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and the city published public notices. “We have heard nothing from them in three years,� said Cottongame. The council voted to issue a demolition order. Council also voted to raise commercial garbage rates. The city was losing money, approximately four percent of the rates on the IESI provided service. Members voted to increase the rates by six percent. Also at City Council, Neal Blanton, as a representative of the Graham Community Foundation, presented the city with a check for $7,000 to cover the cost of the new awning at the city pool. “The city was struggling with how important it was and considering raising the prices at the pool and our board met and decided that would be a good thing to contribute to,� Blanton said.

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4A • THE GRAHAM LEADER

THE GRAHAM LEADER www.grahamleader.com A MediaNews Group newspaper USPS 225 240 William Dean Singleton President Robert L. Krecklow Publisher/Vice President David Rupkalvis Editor

EDITORIALS Work to clean Graham just starting By any account, the Keep Graham Beautiful campaign was a resounding success. With a little urging by a group of community leaders, individuals and groups in Graham did a mammoth job of cleaning up the city. In 10 days, Graham residents collected and threw away at least 110 tons of trash. Think about that for a moment — in 10 days, 220,000 pounds were removed from Graham. In addition to the trash being removed, individuals spent time cleaning out gutters, picking up debris and cutting grass. Yards were spruced up, houses cleaned and flower beds were filled with beautiful blooms. In the downtown area, city crews did a mammoth job cleaning up debris and brightening the view around the Downtown Square. There is no doubt the city as a whole is much cleaner than it was just a month ago. We are also excited that the Keep Graham Beautiful campaign led to a recycling effort in the city. Allowing people to recycle metals, paper and glass will not only preserve the city’s beauty, but it will also protect the environment. Well done. We applaud everyone who participated. It was a nice start. Start? Yes. Cleaning up the city is something that was moved to the forefront in peoples’ minds thanks to the work of Keep Graham Beautiful. But the key to the phrase is “keep.” Making Graham cleaner and a little more beautiful took a lot of work from a lot of people. Keeping it that way as we move forward will be just as hard. If we stop now and celebrate the campaign’s success, it won’t take long before litter will again fill the main thoroughfares, before grass in the gutters will be overgrown and before debris begins to pile up in alleyways and beside homes. Cleaning up Graham at a time when everyone was on board was easy work. Keeping it that way will permanently require those who live in the city to change the way they think. For way too long it has been easy and accepted to toss trash out of vehicles. It has been the norm when feed bags blow off trucks or when cigarettes fly out the window of smokers. For way too long, it has been the norm to blow yard clippings into the street and to pile up debris around the Dumpsters. If Graham is to remain beautiful, that must stop. Keeping Graham beautiful is not about a week of cleaning. That is nice, and we applaud the effort. But if Graham is to remain a shining jewel in North Texas, it will take a mindset of the city as a whole that litter and debris are not allowed. We may never stop everyone from absentmindedly tossing debris out into the street, but we can make a decision to pick trash up when we see it. Only when picking up trash becomes more popular than throwing it out will we know that Graham will remain beautiful. The cleanup campaign was a wonderful start. When more than 200,000 pounds of trash permanently leaves the city, we can all be grateful. But if the cleanup campaign is the end, within weeks the clean streets and parks will again be covered in trash. As former Mayor Ed Hinson has said for years, Graham’s beauty is our duty. We encourage all Graham residents to accept that duty as we work to keep Graham beautiful.

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

Mother’s Day has changed a lot in the last 104 years Mother’s Day has both an interesting history and an even more interesting psychology. Born in the USA, the Mother’s Day observance was the brainchild of Anna Jarvis, who created special events in Grafton, W.Va., and Philadelphia to honor the value of motherhood to the family and the nation. The date was May 10, 1908. Six years later, with the observance growing in popularity around the country, Mrs. Jarvis successfully convinced Congress to designate the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day. As American’s celebrate the country’s 98th official observance of the day, numerous countries have adopted the same — not only in May but all over the calendar. Unlike many such observances, however, Mrs. Jarvis did not create Mother’s Day as a commercial activity. She was not bashful in telling supporters she wanted to create a day for reflection and prayers of thanksgiving for all that mothers do for their families. She even filed a lawsuit to halt the growing commercial response to the new observance. She lost. There are a lot of interesting facts to mark the psychology of the special day, After all, mothers seem to find their way into all facets of American life, including presidential politics, as the nation witnessed recently when an opposing camp claimed the wife of the GOP candidate, and mother of five boys, had never “worked” a day in her life. So, let’s begin there with fun facts to know and tell about Mother’s Day, cour-

WEEK’S END BY ROBB KRECKLOW tesy of reports from several government agencies and a variety of Mother’s Day websites. Approximately 55 percent of new mothers each year are in the labor force. Stay-at-home moms, meanwhile, number 5 million, and according to the Census Bureau reports are more likely to be younger, Hispanic, foreign-born and living with children under age 5. All total, demographers estimate there are 85.4 million mothers in the United States. Ten million of them are single moms. Four million of them have given birth during the past year. More than 400,000 of them were teens and nearly 8,000 of them were women between 45 and 54 years of age. Turning the statistical table slightly, about 20 percent of all women in America between 15 and 44 have two children, 17 percent have delivered one child, 10 percent have three children, and 5 percent have delivered four or more children. That leaves about 47 percent who have borne no children. Here is some trivia about mothers. Linguistically speaking, a substantial majority of world’s languages spell their respective words for “mother,” begin-

ning with the letter M. The youngest, authenticated mother in history was Lina Medina, of Lima, Peru. Records there claim she delivered a baby at age 5 years and 7 months. Her family raised the boy as her brother. The oldest mom on record honor goes to a 65-year-old retired school teacher in India. She and her husband were celebrating their golden wedding anniversary. The baby boy was their first child. On Nov. 19, 1997, Bobbie McCaughey gave birth to the world’s first and only, surviving set of septuplets. The story of the four boys and three girls can be accessed easily on the Internet. The story of Elizabeth Ann Buttle is equally unique. The Wales resident holds the record for the lengthiest interval between two children. Her daughter was born May 19, 1956, and her son arrived 41 years, 185 days later, on Nov. 20, 1997. Mrs. Buttle was 60 years old when she delivered her son. From a calendar standpoint, who really can interpret the meaning of such things. Nonetheless, vital statistics records say Tuesday is the most popular day of the week on which to have a baby, and August is the most popular month. Perhaps the latter can be explained by the revelry of the Thanksgiving holiday, or perhaps the first cold snap. (Go ahead, make your own guess. Then, ask a mom.) Whatever the age, whatever the circumstances, mothers hold a premium spot in the hearts and minds of all Americans. No further interpretation is in order. Happy Mother’s Day!

GUEST VIEWPOINT There is a lot going on in Young County BY JOHN C. BULLOCK County Judge

Despite helping, Tonkawa got no favors The writing was on the wall. Coexistence between Native Americans and Texans were impossible. From the Indian’s perspective, they hated the settlers for stealing their lands and destroying their way of life. The majority of Texans opposed living next to people they labeled “savages.” Partly because of fear, greed and prejudice, Texans were not willing to give one acre of land to Native Americans, people who had inhabited the land for centuries. Pioneers’ accusations and attacks upon Brazos River Reservation Indians — despite their success at keeping their end of the bargain — made Texan’s wishes clear. While Texas was a Republic, Tonkawas aided Texas Rangers and hoped that their cooperation would be rewarded and gain them protection They joined white soldiers in fighting Texans’ most powerful Indians, the Comanches, After Texas became a state, the U.S. Army stepped in with its superior resources, and the Tonkawas’ services were not needed. Due to settlement expansion from the 1820s to 1854, Anglo settlement left little land for Texas Indians. In the 1850s, Texans realized that friendly Indians needed to be put on reservations, or as historian Walter Prescott Web said, force the Indians “to choose between stealing and starving.” Food, clothing and protection could be provided for the Tonkawas and other peaceful tribes on land apart from settlers. Head Indian agent Robert S. Neighbors talked the friendly Indians into moving to Young County on the Brazos River Indian Reservation and Pentatuch Comanches on a Shackelford County reservation. Once again, Texas Rangers recruited Tonkawa warriors after the U.S. 2nd Cavalry’s departure from Texas. As a result, settlers were much more vulnerable to Comanche

NORTH TEXAS TALES BY GAY SCHLITTLER STORMS and Kiowa attacks. Texas Gov. Runnels reappointed ranger frontier battalions and appointed John “Rip” Salmon Ford to try a bold offensive strategy. Instead of waiting for Comanches to enter Texas, Ford was ordered to take his forces into the Indian lands or the Comancheria. What began as a dawn sneak attack, the Battle of Little Robe Creek proved to be an all-day battle that historians say could not have been won without help of Tonkawa warriors. Ford praised the Tonkawas for their help. Complements were a rare thing for the Army and Indian War veteran. When the Tonkawas returned to the reservation, the white settlers didn’t react with gratitude. Settlers in Young and surrounding counties were afraid the Indians would kill them in their sleep, and they blamed Comanche raids on the friendly Indians. Faced with the overwhelming odds, Neighbors under military escort, moved all reservation Indians, including the Tonkawas, to Indian territory in Oklahoma on August 1, 1859. The Tonkawas received no special compensation for their help in winning the Battle of Plum Creek and the Little Robe Creek Battle. All the other friendly Indians hated and plotted revenge against the Tonkawa for aiding the enemy Texans. Their tribe of 300 would face the equivalent of a holocaust in Indian Territory.

Young County adopted an $11.3 million budget last year. I anticipate a larger budget this year because I project greater revenues. However, usually along with greater revenue also come greater expenses. The 2012-13 budget process for Young County has begun. It’s a lengthy and tedious task that requires focus and diligence from your elected officials. As your judge, I have three key objectives in this budget cycle. In last year’s initial budget proposal, I suggested a new approach to accomplish some of the tasks of the commissioners court. The proposed budget was based on the expected revenue, was less than the previous budget and included a slight tax rate decrease. Unfortunately, the proposal was not adopted by the members of the court. This year, I plan to approach it differently. Preserving your right to vote Once again I will request that the commissioners court unify the functions and responsibilities of local elections by re-establishing a county elections department. In 1992, the department was dissolved because of budgetary constraints and the workload absorbed by other offices in county government. Since then, our federal, state See GUEST, Page 5A

Getting legal and almost naked while doing business at the bank I recently opened a new bank account. I’d had the old one for about 40 years … give or take a decade. I knew banking had changed since the old account had been created. I should have known it was outdated when the account number had only three digits and the date at the top of the checks started with 19. The old checks were in the name of the company my late husband started. It started as a computer service. When he ordered 5,000 checks imprinted with the name of the company and bought an embossed checkbook larger than our family photo album, I thought it was a little overkill. I remember he said, “We won’t have to order checks for a long time.” No kidding.

I took over the business when he died, and even though I didn’t program computers, I continued to use the checks for my tax business. After all, we had at least 4,000 left. I changed the name of the company, but just didn’t worry about the name on the account. It started with the same word. Well, the time had come. Last week, I marched (drove) down to the bank and proceeded to do the deed. I figured it would be easy. Wrong. It seems the old account was under my social security number but my husband’s birthday. It didn’t have the proper documentation from the county to show I was “doing business as.” I was working under an assumed name, and my picture

BETH BEGGS didn’t match the one on file. “All I wanted to do was change the name.” I’d been there 20 minutes while the officials took turns viewing the account. They called in the senior vice president, the vice president in charge of homeland safety and the custodian. They said he was on the board of directors, but I suspected they just wanted him to see what a mess that account was. People started to walk by the glassed-in office to get a look. Prob-

ably no one in the break room could believe it. “I guess I could just close that account and start a new one.” As I said it, relief flooded the room. We all agreed. The custodian moved a large shredder nearer the door. The old account had a lot of unnecessary paper. They had no idea how many unused checks I had at home. “We’ll need some identification.” I got out my driver’s license and the IRS form showing my business number. “And we’ll need to weigh you.” What? It’s bad enough to have to disrobe in the hall at the doctor’s office, but I really hated doing it in the lobby of the bank. I guess I had a pained look on my face as I slipped out of my shoes and removed my ear-

rings. “I think you misunderstood. We’ll need to PAY you interest on the other account.” I had to give them my grown daughters’ addresses and phone numbers. They said it was so I could have a beneficiary, but I suspected it had something to do with my disrobing a few minutes before. I didn’t know my daughters’ phone numbers. One of them has a bunch of sixes in it, and the other one starts with a five. They are on my phone. I finally found them. Two hours later, I left the bank. I forgot my keys and had to go back. The vice president who had helped me was sitting with her head on her desk. I guess she doesn’t do too many of these name changes.


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12A • THE GRAHAM LEADER

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2012

www.grahamleader.com

Local Dairy Queen now offers Orange Julius

Richeson Group Dairy Queens began rolling out Orange Julius and Fruit Smoothies into its 53 locations across Texas. Pictured left to right are Pat Dial, president, Doris Richeson, chief executive officer, Dallas Pooser, director of operations at the Kerrville opening with store manager Dana Preece. Graham Dairy Queen hosted an Orange Julius sample day Tuesday. (Photo courtesy of Lisa McCool)

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Graham Dairy Queen stores are among the first in a new wave of installations in the state to install new equipment to produce Orange Julius beverage products at Dairy Queen It includes a product, that for a long time, was available only in a free-standing Orange Julius facility. Re-introduction to the 86-year-old formula product is ongoing throughout area DQs owned by The Richeson Group. Originally, back in 1929, an orange juice stand owned by Julius Freed collaborated with real estate developer Bill Hamlin to develop the frothy, creamy product, and people lined up at the free-standing store demanding, “Give me

an orange, Julius.” From that point on, the new product was ordered as Orange Julius. Orange Julius was named the official drink of the 1946 New York World’s Fair, and in ensuing years became known with the slogan, “A Devilish Good Drink.” In 1987, the Orange Julius chain was bought by International Dairy Queen and in 1999 became part of Berkshire Hathaway, as part of its purchase of International Dairy Queen. The local Orange Julius menu will feature the original premium in its primary flavor, as well as strawberry banana, mango pineapple and tripleberry, which will also be the flavors for the

exciting new smoothies, made with real fruit and yogurt. The Richeson Group is a 53-store organization based in Graham with stores in ten of the state’s 18 designated marketing areas. Annually it provides jobs for some 1,000 people, serves up a million pounds of potatoes, over a half million pounds of American beef and a half million gallons of soft serve dessert mix. “We are proud to bring Orange Julius products into our Dairy Queen operation, and thus include right in the midst of our full menu one of the long-esteemed frothy beverage favorites,” said Doris Richeson, chairman of the board.

Additional recycling containers available for Graham residents The City of Graham, with the encouragement of Keep Graham Beautiful and in cooperation with IESI Disposal Company, is now providing additional recycling collection bins at the Graham Water Department Service

Join us for POWER POINTS OF LIFE This Sunday “Power to Begin Again” 8:45 a.m. & 10:50 a.m. Dr. Richard Reed, Pastor

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Yard at 818 Loving Highway, between Elm and Tennessee streets. The newly situated bins are in addition to existing bins at the IESI yard a few miles north of the city on the Loving Highway. Citizens are encouraged to drop recyclable paper, glass and plastic containers in the bins. Plastic shopping bags are not recyclable with current processes and should not be placed in the bins. Materials placed in the bins do not need to be sorted and can be placed within a paper sack or a large plastic garbage bag. No household garbage or organic matter is to be placed in the recycling containers. The recyclable materials are transferred to McKinney where they are automatically sorted and sold for reuse. At this time, neither the City of Graham nor IESI can realize positive revenue from the recycling bins. However, the two entities are working on options to reduce transfer costs through compaction of recyclables so that recycling in Graham can become a more revenue neutral operation for IESI. The City, IESI and Keep Graham Beautiful are working on ways to place more collection bins around the city to encourage recycling when transportation cost challenges are overcome. “Keep Graham Beautiful applauds IESI and the city for reaching out to those wishing to recycle,” says Roy Robinson, president of Keep Graham Beautiful. “We are hoping for more recycling opportunities in the days to come.”

Graham residents have begun using the recycling bin available at IESI on the Loving Highway. Items to be recycled need not be sorted. The City of Graham and Keep Graham Beautiful are looking to expand recycling options to citizens. (Photo courtesy of Carter Pettit)

Michael T. Hay, M.D.

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LVN Award Malinda Ramsey grins ear-to-ear as she receives an award from Gie Archer, North Central Texas College health and sciences dean, for earning a grade point averages of 3.63. About 20 students graduated from NCTC’s Licensed Vocational Nurse program in August. Graduates were pinned by their instructors. (Courtesy Photo)


cyan magenta yellow black

8B • THE GRAHAM LEADER

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

www.grahamleader.com

Graham, IESI provide additional recycling bins The City of Graham, with the encouragement of Keep Graham Beautiful and in cooperation with IESI Disposal Company, is now providing additional recycling collection bins at the Graham Water Department Service Yard at 818 Loving Highway, between Elm and Tennessee streets. The newly situated bins are in addition to existing bins at the IESI yard a few miles north of the city on the Loving Highway. Citizens are encouraged to drop recyclable paper, glass and plastic containers in the bins. Plastic shopping bags are not recyclable with current processes and should not be placed in the bins. Materials placed in the bins do not need to be sorted and can be placed within a paper sack or a large plastic garbage bag. No household garbage or organic matter is to be placed in the recycling containers.

The recyclable materials are transferred to McKinney where they are automatically sorted and sold for reuse. At this time, neither the City of Graham nor IESI can realize positive revenue from the recycling bins. However, the two entities are working on options to reduce transfer costs through compaction of recyclables so that recycling in Graham can become a more revenue neutral operation for IESI. The City, IESI and Keep Graham Beautiful are working on ways to place more collection bins around the city to encourage recycling when transportation cost challenges are overcome. “Keep Graham Beautiful applauds IESI and the city for reaching out to those wishing to recycle,” says Roy Robinson, president of Keep Graham Beautiful. “We are hoping for more recycling opportunities in the days to come.”

National ‘Recycle Bowl’ open to Texas schools Last year, Texas registered the most schools in the U.S. in the Recycle Bowl program, and the Keep Texas Beautiful organization would like to keep that record. The second annual Recycle Bowl youth recycling competition is sponsored by Keep America Beautiful, a community action and education organization, and Nestle Waters North America. In its inaugural year, more than 1,200 elementary, middle and high schools around the country, representing more than 500,000 students, participated in a fun, interactive way to learn about waste reduction and environmental responsibility through inschool recycling. Registration for this incentive-based recycling competi-

tion is now open to all U.S. schools at the Recycle Bowl website at http://recyclebowl.org. The competition runs from Oct. 15 through Nov. 9, 2012, culminating around America Recycles Day (http:// americarecyclesday.org). Participating schools will track and report how much recyclable material they collect for a chance to win prizes. At the close of the four-week competition, the school in each state that collects the most recyclable material per capita will win $1,000. A national champion will then be chosen from among the statewide winners to receive an additional grand prize valued at $2,500. For more information about Keep America Beautiful and its community improvement programs, visit www.kab.org.

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4A • THE GRAHAM LEADER

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012

THE GRAHAM LEADER Taking a look at housing in Graham USA WEEK’S END www.grahamleader.com USPS 225 240

William Dean Singleton President Robert L. Krecklow Publisher/Vice President

Carla McKeown Associate Managing Editor

EDITORIAL Every little bit makes a difference Too often, it seems as if the actions of one person aren’t worth the effort. Sometimes, we’re tempted to skip voting because “what good is my one vote going to do?” We ignore injustice because “no one will listen to what I have to say.” We even toss the fund-raising request in the trash because “the little I can afford to give won’t help anyone.” All of those excuses are invalidated by the phrase “every little bit helps,” a concept that is especially true when it comes to recycling. More often than not, we toss that soda can in the trash. If we even think about it at all, we think, “One little can won’t hurt the environment.” We never even give our actions a second thought as we stuff another milk jug into the trash can, assuming that our garbage won’t make a difference in the world. But, it does matter. When we add up all of those seemingly insignificant bits of trash, Americans throw away 161 millions tons of stuff each year, according to Keep America Beautiful. On the other hand, in 2009, we recycled 82 million tons of materials. That stuff was then re-used in manufacturing. When we reuse recycled materials, we use less energy and generate fewer harmful emissions. According to KAB, 20 recycled aluminum cans can be made with the energy needed to produce one can using new ore. Put another way, the energy saved by the recycling of just one aluminum can is enough to power your television for three hours. Another recycled can saves enough energy to run your laptop computer for five hours. That glass bottle? The energy it saves could power a lightbulb for eight hours. The six-pack of water bottles? The energy that would be saved by recycling them could run your air conditioner for half an hour. Your actions, even the small ones, make a difference. Local citizens are fortunate that the City of Graham and the IESI Disposal Company, with the encouragement of Keep Graham Beautiful, have teamed up to make recycling easy. Recycling of most of your trash is simple, now. You don’t have to sort it, aside from putting the non-recyclables in your regular trash can and the recyclables in a container to take down to the collection site. You don’t have to separate plastics from paper anymore. You just have to take the recyclable things from your household trash and put them in the recycling bins situated in two area locations: the Graham Water Department Service Yard at 818 Loving Highway between Elm and Tennessee streets or at the IESI yard a few miles north of Graham on the Loving Highway (Highway 16 North). What can you recycle? Just about everything. You can recycle paper (junk mail, office paperwork, school papers, etc.); cardboard (cereal boxes, packing boxes, etc.); newspaper; glass bottles, containers and dishes; cans — aluminum, steel and tin; and plastic containers #1 through #7 (remove and discard the lids). What do you need to put in the regular trash can? Nonrecyclables include plastic bags, plastic and Styrofoam food containers, wax-coated drink containers, plastic and foil food packaging, plastic straws, paper towels and tissues. Leave those things for the garbage truck. Sure, it takes a little bit of extra work to recycle, but it will make a difference. Take advantage of this great opportunity that Graham has to offer and recycle everything you can.

The Federal Reserve has decided to take another swing at the slowed U.S. economy, its third attempt to help since the country fell into a steep recession in late 2007. The officers of the nation’s central bank announced Thursday it will purchase $40 billion in mortgage bonds each month through the rest of the year and hold down interest rates, as well, in an effort to reduce the country’s unemployment rate. Sound confusing? Well, it is for most Americans, who don’t really comprehend how the Federal Reserve System works to control the nation’s money supply and influence such things as the rate of inflation and unemployment. Simplified somewhat, the Fed hopes its initiative will push more investors out of a safer bond market and into potentially higher earning, albeit more risk-filled, investments. This includes stocks, commodities and other capital investments that, in turn, could encourage companies to get back in the game and start hiring back eight million unemployed persons. More paychecks mean more spending and investing, all of which helps the economy recover faster. The announcement is a blessing to potential home and car buyers because interest rates on such purchases will remain low for several months longer. How this comes home to Graham and Young County, Texas, depends on how many people put away their fears of tomorrow and start buying homes and cars and many other more expensive items.

BY ROBB KRECKLOW

In consideration of this development, I thought it would be interesting to look at housing in Graham. Among the providers of housing profiles are the real estate search engine, CLRSearch.com, and Sperling’s Best Places, a data provider on community lifestyles. These snapshots are generally close to target but not always right on the nose. Local Realtors and local bankers are still the best resources for up-to-the-minute information. With that disclaimer, here is some gee whiz information about local housing, as it is viewed from the national stage, including the Federal Reserve Board. The average age of a home in Graham is 47 years and five months, or, about a dozen years older than the average home in the United States. In fact, almost half of Graham’s homes were built before 1950, compared to 30 percent nationwide. Consequently, it costs less to buy a home here. The data says the median price of all homes here is $63,400 compared to $152,300 around the country. When the data looks just at owneroccupied homes, the median price in Graham jumps to $80,469. In Texas, it is $118,954 and in the U.S. $177,046. Simply stated, buyers can get a lot of house for their money in Graham, Texas. There are approximately 2,635 owner-

occupied homes in Graham, a fraction of the 3.9 million in Texas and the 80.1 million in the U.S. About 60.7 percent of all homes here are owned by the people living in them. That is three percentage points higher than the country’s average. The remainder are owned by landlords (28 percent) or are vacant. However, fewer home owners here are still paying off mortgages. About half of the local home owners have no mortgage, while 65 percent in Texas and 71 percent in America owe those monthly payments. As for what it may cost someone to purchase a home in Graham, there’s a house in every price range. A third of one-percent of the homes here would go for more than $1 million, not as high a percentage as the U.S. at large, but available none the less. A full third of the homes here, according to the national data, have values ranging from $80,000 to $150,000. That leaves more than half of the homes in Graham with values of less than $80k. While homes everywhere in the U.S. declined in value the last five years, Graham’s homes fared better than the nation at large – two to four times better off on percentage of decline. No, that’s not good, but does speak obliquely to the quality of life and attractiveness of the community. So, now we wait and see if the Fed’s policy will have a positive impact on Graham and the nation because nothing happens instantly in this economy. But at least the Fed is trying to hold up its end of the deal and not just arguing about it. Posturing never provides a solution. Doing is the only cure.

Thank You Happy returns This time it’s a little girl, Kinsley Amburn, who donated treats, food and cash to the Humane Society for for her sixth birthday. All the animals join me in wishing her many happy returns of the day and saying a big thank you. Judith Witte HSYC

Life and times of Frank Herron: Part II For the second time, the Union Army threatened the life of Frank Herron, who later became a prominent Graham citizen. After recovering from a near mortal wound at a Union field hospital in 1864, Herron had rejoined Company K, the 3rd Tennessee Infantry. However, in August 1865, the teenager was convicted of murder by a Union military tribunal and sentenced to death by hanging. The execution sentence resulted from Herron’s killing a Union civilian in Tennessee in December 1864. However, Herron may have faced execution because the alleged crime occurred in after the Civil War was over. Herron’s imprisonment was not mentioned in The Graham Leader but was recorded by a descendant, who requested more information about him on ancestry.com. To be tried for a murder during that time seems highly unusual, whether or not a soldier was Confederate or Union. In fact, the most famous man executed after the war was CFA Capt. Henry

NORTH TEXAS TALES BY GAY SCHLITTLER STORMS Wirz, who ran the notorious CFA POW camp at Andersonville, Ga. His conviction remains controversial even today. Forty-three percent of all Union deaths occurred at Andersonville. Wirz was also accused of murdering prisoners, but Union officials later found out that the witness had perjured himself. Some Southern historians believe that Wirz was the “scapegoat” in a camp where 3,000 died of starvation and disease. The other only other person executed was Johnny Y. Beal, a Rebel conspirator and spy, who died a slow death from a botched hanging in 1865. It’s true that more soldiers were executed during the War Between the

States than in all other American wars combined. Approximately 500 men, representing both North and South, were shot or hanged during the fouryear conflict, two-thirds of them for desertion. The General Orders of the CFA War Department from 1862 to the end of the war directed that men convicted of desertion were “to be shot to death with musketry, at such time and place as the commanding General may direct.” During the summer of 1862, only 12 percent of convicted deserters were sentenced to die, and 40 percent were pardoned. However, in the final year of the war, it appeared that the South could not win the war if desertions continued. General Robert E. Lee told CFA president Jefferson Davis that if desertions were not stopped, the possibility of winning the war was unlikely. Lee said, “I fear the army cannot be kept together.” He had formerly recomSee HERRON, Page 10A

Getting things together for ‘The Viewing’ During the past few years, I’ve attended several funerals. Funerals have always been a big part of my life. As a teenager and young adult, I “married and buried” a lot of people. That is to say that I sang in the choir that provided music for these services. I guess since I wasn’t out dating or running around with a wild crowd, I was easy to find on short notice. I got to be sort of an expert. But times have changed, and funerals have changed. The most striking difference is the collection of photographs shown during “The Viewing” and sometimes reshown during the actual service. I think it has become part of the package provided along with the fancy cars and little roller

carts to get the “celebrated” in and out of the church. I guess the funeral homes have added video services to the check list. Having recently attended a very nice service for one of my former students, I was pleased to see her sweet smiling face in the selection of pictures. She always had a wideeyed, love-everybody smile, and it was comforting to see her as a baby, a teenager and as a mother, herself. She looked so cute … even in those big square glasses from her fifth grade school picture. I’m pretty sure she didn’t pick out that picture. It got me to thinking about my own service. Oh, I’m not worried about

BETH BEGGS the expense. I’ve told the girls it is OK to go cheap. I just hope they don’t try to show some of those pictures that are in that box in the storage cabinet. I can just see my two daughters whizzing into town to put the house up for sale, clean out the bank account and set up card-tables on the lawn for the garage sale. Right in the middle of it, the funeral home director arrives with questions about what pictures to include in

the slide-show at the “meet and greet” the night before the funeral. They won’t have time to pick out the good ones. My panties show in all my “kid” pictures. My school pictures are closed mouthed and look like my dog has just died. I had a funny tooth and thought I’d hide it. There are some rather adorable pictures of me holding onto the girls during vacations while their father tried to get the camera to do something “special.” The one standing before Lincoln’s statue is great. My husband was lying on the marble floor trying to get Lincoln in the shot. We’d just tramped through Arlington cemetery for three hours, walked the “short”

distance to the Lincoln Memorial, and all I could think about was that Lincoln was the only one getting to sit down. My exhaustion shows. So does the roll under my chin, the wrinkles under my eyes and the fact that my shirt had gotten trapped in my underwear after the last trip to the restroom … but we are smiling. I’ve decided not to leave the slide-show to the girls. Thanks to modern photography, I think I can Photoshop a pretty good set of pictures. No need to bother the children. Those who have known me for a long time will have to promise not to say anything like … “Is that Beth?” or “I didn’t know she was ever skinny.”


cyan magenta yellow black

Newcastle church accomplishes mission

Steers gear up for Breckenridge game

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THE GRAHAM LEADER Oldest business institution in Young County • Established August 16, 1876

VOL. 137, NO. 10 • SINGLE COPY 75¢

MIDWEEK EDITION • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012

www.grahamleader.com

Fugitive arrested near Canada, awaiting extradition BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com A burglary suspect arrested in Graham after a car chase in June was re-arrested near the Canadian border for jumping bail. Kenneth Michael Adams, 64, of St. Catharines, Ontario, was arrested Sept. 8 by Border Patrol. He is being held in Buffalo, N.Y.

Adams took Young County Sheriff’s Deputy Dan Birbeck on a chase the afternoon of June 6 while driving a stolen white 2006 Isuzu box truck. Alert firefighters heard a report of the theft on the scanner and notified the sheriff’s office that the truck was traveling south on Highway 67. Birbeck attempted to make a traffic stop when the truck turned around and a pursuit ensued into Graham.

During the chase, Adams crashed into fencing and damaged property at both Harbison Fischer and Stephens Trucking and totaled the truck. Three guns that were reported to have been in the truck were not located upon Adam’s arrest. A flyer in the truck from a Graham self-storage facility with a handwritten note reading “Unit 84” led law enforcement officers to the guns and other stolen

goods, namely radios and airplane parts stolen from the Olney Airport. Adams was placed under arrest for evading arrest with a vehicle, unauthorized use of vehicle and criminal mischief. “Looks like we only had him for three days. He posted bonds totaling $22,500 for the three charges we processed him on,” said Young County Sheriff’s Capt. B.J. Cook.

Charges of theft of property valued at $20,000 or more but less than $100,000 and theft of firearm were later added by Olney Police Department. Cook said if Adams waives extradition, Young County will have 10 days to collect him from New York and bring him back to Young County Jail. A transporting company will be contracted to do that.

Shutterbugs share skills Graham Photography Club offers lessons, discussion BY JULIANNE MURRAH gninews@grahamleader.com Photographers, both novice and advanced, may now share their skills with one another thanks to the Graham Photography Club. The Graham Photography Club was recently formed by photography enthusiasts as a place where fellow photo artists can meet, learn and discuss new, eye-opening techniques. The club’s photographers include Danny and Cindy Parker, Tommy and Marlene Edwards and Ron Wickson. “We just got together and decided that we needed it,” said Wickson, experienced photographer and club president. “We have had a very good response. We have about 30 members, which is pretty good considering we met only three or four times.” The club meets once a month at 6:30 p.m. at the Old Post Office Museum and Art Center. “The club is dedicated to the enjoyment of sharing images and enjoyment of photography and also sharing and learning more and more about digital techniques and cameras,” Wickson said. “Also of course, there’s the art side of it, compositions and writing — we’re trying to See PHOTOGRAPHY, Page 2

Photography club member Beth Prichard takes a photo of what seems to be a very photogenic giraffe at Fossil Rim Wildlife Center in Glen Rose. Club members have an opportunity to learn new techniques and view photos, such as the one at left of a butterfly resting on a flower in the wilderness of Possum Kingdom. (Photos by Ron Wickson)

Cleanup cruise Bruce Street Jr., vice president of Keep Graham Beautiful, demonstrates one of two “litterbuggies” now patrolling the streets of Graham. Litterbuggy I and Litterbuggy II, right-hand drive former U.S. Postal Service delivery vehicles, were retrofitted and painted in Graham for curb and gutter litter pickup. The two litter patrol vehicles will be frequently at work on the streets of Graham, driven by KGB board members and volunteers. Both buggies will be on display from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, at the Downtown Square kickoff of “Brush Up Graham,” a community-wide fall cleanup campaign. The “litterbuggies” are a gift to Keep Graham Beautiful from the Bertha Foundation of Graham. (Courtesy photo)

Car wreck lands two in hospital BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com A two-vehicle accident Friday afternoon resulted in a child being flown to Cook Children’s Hospital. At approximately 2:30 p.m., a Nissan containing two parents and a child was traveling southbound on Highway 16 near Cliff Drive in Graham. According to Texas Department of Public Safety Trooper Tyler Williamson, there was a distraction in the passenger car, and it crossed over into the other lane with a dually pickup truck pulling See WRECK, Page 2

Your Local Weather Local Forecast Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

9/19

9/20

9/21

9/22

86/61

92/61

90/58

86/56

Abundant sunshine. Highs in the low 90s and lows in the low 60s.

Abundant sunshine. Highs in the low 90s and lows in the upper 50s.

Sunny skies. High 86F. Winds S at 10 to 15 mph.

Mainly sunny. Highs in the mid 80s and lows in the mid 50s.

©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service

Weather High Low Rain Tuesday, 9/11 91 64 0 Wednesday, 9/12 91 68 0 Thursday, 9/13 81 61 0 Friday, 9/14 63 57 0 Saturday, 9/15 68 59 0.01 Sunday, 9/16 72 61 0.08 Monday, 9/17 82 63 0 Rain: Month 3.42• Year 28.83 Lake Graham at capacity: 1,075.00 Current level: 1,071.59 Temperatures and rainfall provided by the National Weather Service.

NEWS BRIEFS Donations accepted for William Proffitt Rick Edwards of KWKQ-KSWA radio, is spearheading a fundraising campaign through Saturday, Sept. 29, on behalf of Will Proffitt, who was diagnosed with stage four colon cancer which has spread into his lymph nodes. He is unable to work due to his condition and is on medical leave with no pay. Funds will help with

medical and travel expenses for chemotherapy treatments five days a week for six weeks in Weatherford. Donors may make donations at The Graham Leader or call Edwards at (940) 549-1330 for more information or if you wish to organize individual fundraising. Proffitt was a disc jockey for 33 years at KWKQ-KSWA radio. He currently is employed in the sporting department at Walmart.

Inside Lifestyles ................................. Page 3 Calendar ................................. Page 6 Obituaries ............................... Page 4 Police Blotter .......................... Page 7 Sports ...................................... Page 8 TV ............................................ Page 9 Entertainment ........................ Page 6 Classified .............................. Page 10

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www.grahamleader.com

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012

‘Brush Up Graham’ to begin Oct. 6

650 FOR SALE - FARM & RANCH

Your Premier West Texas Farm & Ranch Specialist We currently have over 6,000 acres of very high-quality inventory to look through. Ranches range from less than 100 acres to close to 2,000 acres. Take a look at

www.remingtonrealestate.net

or give us a call at 940-521-9039 • 940-362-4590

66516

660 FOR SALE-LOTS & ACREAGE

FOR SALE 3 miles S. Olney on FM 3329

80 +/- Acres $145,000 940-549-8290 680 FOR SALE-COMMERCIAL

760 FOR RENT-COMMERCIAL

— FOR SALE —

25x30 Shop with restrooms for lease. 50x20 Shop for lease, 438 Grove Street. Call 940704-4557.

INVESTMENT PROPERTY Commercial Building Individual Business Spaces Available!

• Great Location • 10,000 SQ. FT. ON 5 LOTS 609-15 SOUTH ST. & CHERRY

40x50 Shop with bathroom & office. $675 monthly, 438 Grove Street. 940-704-4557

800 PUBLIC & LEGAL NOTICES Pursuant to City of Graham Building Code (Section 6-16, d)

940-872-2521

73196

700 FOR RENT-APARTMENTS Apartments for rent, 811 South and 1200 Indiana. Call 940-549-7650

Indiana Crossing Apartments 1100 Indiana 1, 2, 3 BR & Townhouses, from $445 to $565

The Quarters Apartments 1222 Brazos 1 & 2 BR, from $425 to $465 We welcome children. Pets not allowed. Both locations have modern laundries for residents use only. All maintenance requests are handled promptly. Contact Gary Sloan, Resident Manager. Leasing Office at Indiana Crossing Apartments

940-549-1708 25078

710 FOR RENT-MOBILE HOMES 1/1, Travel Trailer, set up for permanent living, all bills & maintenance paid. Deposit required. Laundry on-site. 940-550-8094, 940-549-0784.

720 FOR RENT-HOMES 1302 B Calaveras, $500 month, $350 deposit. 940549-0938. 2-1-1 Very Clean. Brick. Central H/A. 2 Living Areas. Large Fenced Backyard. No Pets. Available 10-1. $725 rent. $725 deposit. 1339 Cherry Street. 940-521-9894. 2/1, 821 Oak. Year lease, References plus Deposit. No Pets! 940-521-9333 3/1, 1352 Hillcrest, $725 monthly, $725 deposit. 817614-5532 914 Kentucky - Two BR, washer/dryer connections, wood floors, fenced yard, car port, storage shed. $675 rent, $675 deposit. Absolutely no indoor pets or smoking. Call 940-549-4683. DGH Home & Property Solutions, LLC. 940-549-0081 For Rent, Townhouse: 2/1, 1409 B Willow Wood. $975 monthly, $975 deposit. Call Bonnie, 940-521-5411

$300/dep. $550/mo. rent $50/mo. for water

ADOPTION-YOUR OPTION NY couple offers your newborn happiness, laughter, financial security, tons of TLC. Expenses paid as permitted. Legal/ confidential. Call Peggy & Sonu 1-888-962-5022

By virtue of an execution issued out of the 90th Judicial District Court, Young County, Texas on a judgment rendered in said such Court in favor of Credigy Receivables, Inc., in Cause No. 29647 in such Court, I did on the 30th day of August, 2012, levy upon the following described tracts of land in Young County, Texas as the property of the defendant, Jeff P. Dyer, to wit:

lawn mower tires — $1 each, ag-related, including front tractor tires — $5 each, 18-wheeler tires — $7 each, tractor back tires — $35 each. Kevin Fullerton of K&K Motor & Salvage of Graham will have a table at the kickoff to sign up residents who want junk vehicles removed from their properties. Owners with titles to junk vehicles will be paid for cars, trucks and other vehicles at the time of pickup. Michael Cowan, Graham site manager for IESI, will provide a trailer for recyclable materials, including plastic, glass bottles, glass containers, dishes, telephone books, magazines, catalogs, newspapers, aluminum, steel, tin containers, boxboard, chipboard, corrugated cardboard and mixed papers. IESI, in cooperation with the city of Graham and Keep Graham Beautiful, has recently expanded recycle drop locations with containers at the city water plant on Loving Highway. Brush Up Graham will continue from Saturday, Oct. 6, through Sunday, Oct. 14. Residents are asked to join community-wide cleanup efforts, with added focus on the

drop their tickets into a pink box displaying the name of the drawing prize. Drawing items include a JVC HD video camera, donated by First State Bank; a Playstation Vita game with Wi-fi, Graham InterBank; Jawbone portable wireless speaker, First National Bank;

shotgun, Graham Savings; iPad 2 with cover, Southern Bleacher Co.; Kindle Fire with cover, Mark Thayer; microderm abrasion, Skin Essentials; $200 cash, Cam Bennett; “You Need A Vacation Cash,” Graham doctors; and a $500 Cabela’s gift card, Monte Montgomery.

Errors & Adjustments

TexSCAN Week of September 23, 2012 ADOPTIONS

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY LOOMIX FEED supplements is seeking dealers. Motivated individuals with cattle knowledge and community ties. Contact Bethany at 1-800-870-0356 or becomeadealer@adm.com to find out if there is a dealership opportunity in your area.

DRIVERS 25 DRIVER TRAINEES needed now at Werner Enterprises! Earn $800 per week, no experience needed, local CDL training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-734-6710

DRIVERS- TEAMS AND SOLOS dedicated MISCELLANEOUS runs, recession proof freight. Class CDL-A and one-year experience. Lease purchase SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00. Make and save money with your own bandmill. program with down payment assistance. Call 1-866-904-9230, DriveForGreatwide.com Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free information/DVD, www.NorwoodDRIVERS- $2000 SIGN-ON. 100% owner Sawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N operator company. Pay increase/ home REAL ESTATE weekly. Regional and dedicated Class CDL-A, 1-year experience in last 3. Call 10.23 ACRES, Duval County. South Texas 1-888-377-7537 or www.driveforwatkins.com brush. Electricity. Deer, hog, turkey. Private EXPERIENCED FLATBED DRIVERS: locked gate entrance. $1816 down, $331/ Regional opportunties now open with plenty month, (9.9%, 20-years) or TX Vet. Toll-free, of freight and great pay. 1-800-277-0212 or 1-866-286-0199. www.westerntexasland.com primeinc.com 72.88 ACRES, Sonora/Del Rio. County road. OWNER OPERATORS Home every other Rugged hunting/recreational property. Whitetail, night. Dedicated to one customer, 100% aoudad, axis, hogs, turkey. $895/acre, owner fuel surcharge, lease purchase program or TX Vet financing. 1-800-876-9720. www. with down payment assistance. Class texasranchland.com CDL-A and 1-year experience. 1-866- $106 MONTH BUYS land for RV, MH 242-4978. DriveForGreatwide.com. Text or cabin. Gated entry, $690 down, Greatwide to 30364 ($6900/10.91%/7yr) 90-days same as cash, PAID CDL TRAINING! No experience Guaranteed financing, 1-936-377-3235 needed. Stevens Transport will sponsor ABSOLUTELY THE BEST VIEW Lake the cost of your CDL training. Earn up to Medina/Bandera, 1/4 acre tract, central W/S/E, $40K first year and $70K third year. Excel- RV, M/H or house OK only $830 down, $235 lent benefits! EOE, 1-800-333-8595, www. month (12.91%/10yr), Guaranteed financing, becomeadriver.com more information call 1-830-460-8354 YOU GOT THE DRIVE, we have the direction. AFFORDABLE RESORT LIVING on Lake OTR drivers, APU Equipped, Pre-Pass, EZ- Fork. RV and manufactured housing OK! Guarpass, passenger policy. Newer equipment. anteed financing with 10% down. Lots starting 100% NO touch. 1-800-528-7825 as low as $6900, Call Josh, 1-903-878-7265

AVERITT IS LOOKING for CDL-A drivers. Weekly hometime and full benefits package. 4-months T/T experience required. Apply now! 1-888-362-8608, Visit AVERITTcareers.com

And on the 2nd day of October, 2012, being the first Tuesday of said month, between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., on said day, at the courthouse door of said county, I will offer for sale and sell at public auction for cash, all the right, title and interest of said defendant in and to said property.

EDUCATION DRIVER - Daily or weekly pay! 1¢ raise per mile after 6 months. Refrigerated & dry van AIRLINE CAREERS begin here. Become freight. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experi- a n a v i a t i o n m a i n t e n a n c e t e c h . FA A ence. 1-800-414-9569; www.driveknight.com approved training. Financial aid if qualiDRIVERS- $2000 SIGN-ON. Great benefits, fied, housing available, job placement paid orientation/training. Miles/weekends assistance. Call Aviation Institute of home. SW regional, top pay. Minimum 6 Maintenance, 1-877-523-4531 months tractor trailer experience. Class ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. CDL-A required. 1-888-518-7084 or www. Medical, Business, Criminal Justice, Hoscypresstruck.com pitality. Job placement assistance. ComDRIVERS- ONLY 6 MONTHS experience puter available. Financial aid if qualified. needed. Pets welcome. $250 orientation SCHEV certified. Call 1-888-205-8920, pay. Up to 38¢ cpm. O/O’s. Lease-purchase www.CenturaOnline.com drivers needed. CDL-A, OTR 48-states. CAN YOU DIG IT? Heavy equipment 1-888-476-1514. school. 3-week training program. BackDRIVERS-OWNER OPERATORS and fleet h o e s , b u l l d o z e r s , e x c a v a t o r s . L o c a l drivers, Texas or Oklahoma CDL. New pay job placement assistance. VA benefits package, sign-on bonus, return to Texas approved. Two national certifications. 1-866-362-6497 every 6-8 days. Call 1-800-765-3952. DRIVERS- STUDENTS 18-days from start HIGH SCHOOL PROFICIENCY Diploma to finish. Earn your CDL-A. No out-of-pocket 4-week program, free brochure and full tuition cost. Step up to a new career with information. Call now! 1-866-562-3650, ext. 55. www.southeasternHS.com FFE. www.driveffe.com, 1-855-356-7122

Place your line ad today and get double exposure! www.grahamleader.com

Proceeds will benefit medical equipment for the hospital. The auxiliary will have its annual chalupa luncheon at noon Thursday, Oct. 12, on the Downtown Square. Holiday gifts will be sold during the luncheon, another fundraiser for medical equipment.

Please check your ad the first day that it runs to see that all of the information is correct. This will ensure that your ad is exactly what you want readers to see. Call us at 940-549-7800 the first day if you find an error. We must limit our financial responsibilities, if any, to the charge for the space and cannot be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication.

- Being all of Lot No. Thirtyone (31), in Block No. Three (3) of the COLLEGE HEIGHTS Addition to the City of Graham, Young County, Texas, more commonly known as 728 Indiana, Graham, TX 76450.

DON’T FORGET! Class Line Ads are ONLINE ONLINE!!

removal of brush, tree limbs and dead trees. Drought conditions last year and earlier this year left a visible toll on trees in the city and across Texas. Homeowners with curbside brush ready for pickup at no cost can call city hall at 5493322 at any time. IESI will set 30-yard disposal containers at five locations: corner of Indiana and Calaveras streets, Third Street at Indiana, across from the swimming pool, Old Jacksboro Road behind the Cross Timers Church, West Street between First and Second streets and Carolina/ Lindy between Allison and Hillcrest. Containers will be available for public use for nine days, and will be rotated as they fill. Keep Graham Beautiful hopes to arrange additional initiatives to encourage residents and property owners to brush up the community’s appearance. Meanwhile, organizations and residents are encouraged to plan preferred clean-up projects during the Brush Up Graham observance. Keep Graham Beautiful reminds residents, “Graham’s Beauty Is Our Duty!”

GRMC Auxiliary drawing to raise funds

STATE OF TEXAS COUNTY OF YOUNG NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL ESTATE

(940) 549-7800 72873

940-549-1963, home or 817-296-3044, cell

scholarship to a Graham High School graduate pursuing studies in music. A large trailer provided by Tony Hawkins of Excel Pump and Supply Co. of Graham will be situated in front of the American Legion Building for easy access. Electronic devices can be left on the trailer at any time between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. Shred-It of Dallas/Fort Worth will have a self-contained truck on the Square for on-site shredding of paper documents at no cost to Graham residents and businesses. “Shred-It’s document destruction service is the best option for organizations that care about protecting their information and reputation,” said sales executive Toni Stone. “People bringing documents for shredding can watch the whole process or leave their papers for shredding by the Shred-It operator.” Scott McClure of McClure Transport Tire Disposal in Clyde will be at the square to accept tires for environmentally safe disposal. Tire disposal costs, payable at drop-off, will be: Passenger tires — $2 each, ATV and

The Graham Regional Medical Center Ladies’ Auxiliary are selling tickets for a variety of prizes at the hospital. Tickets may be purchased from the GRMC Gift Shop or from any auxiliary member. The tickets cost $1 each or six for $5. After a customer purchases tickets, they will

CONDO FOR RENT 1/2 with an open loft, 2 front decks, 1 cp, stainless steel appliances, 5 minutes from Marinas and Restaurants, 13 miles from Graham to the West Side of PK Lake. References required. No inside pets, no exceptions.

Want to get rid of old electronic devices? Shred paper documents? Dispose of wornout tires? Have a junk vehicle hauled away? Need to drop off recyclable materials? All at the same time — at one location? Keep Graham Beautiful will facilitate those services and more from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, on the Downtown Square. The occasion will launch Brush Up Graham, a nine-day fall cleanup campaign during which 30-yard disposal containers will be conveniently placed for public use at five locations in the community. The city of Graham and Keep Graham Beautiful previously arranged the neighborhood disposal containers for the spring Clean Up Graham campaign in April. Computer equipment and other electronic devices can be dropped off without charge at the Brush Up kickoff. The discarded electronic items will be recycled by the Hawkins family of Graham to benefit the Helen Hawkins Scholarship Fund. The fund, honoring the retired longtime organist at the First United Methodist Church of Graham, awards an annual

The last known owner of the structure at 711 Cherry, Mae McFadden, is again notified that the Building Official of the City has determined that the structure is not suitable for human habitation and is unsecured and unsafe. The structure has been appropriately tagged. Be it known that numerous attempts have been made to contact the owner, notices have been published in the local newspaper and a public hearing held on this property in accordance with the applicable code. The city has previously removed a garage at the location that was in imminent danger of collapse and has mowed the lot numerous times to control vermin. The structure will be removed the week of October 8-12, 2012. Should there be any objections to this removal by any person, such objections should be presented to the City Building Official no later than 5 pm on October 5, 2012. The Building Official may be contacted at City Hall, 429 Fourth Street, Graham, Texas or by phone at 940-549-3322.

Dated: August 30th, 2012 Signed: Bryan Walls, Sheriff YOUNG COUNTY, TEXAS

750 FOR RENT-LAKE PROPERTY

THE GRAHAM LEADER • 7B

CDL-A DRIVERS! Texas regional drivers needed. Take home more. Be home more. Dedicated freight and modern equipment. Dallas terminal coming soon. 1-800-392-6109, www.goroehl.com

WEEKEND GETAWAY available on Lake Fork, Lake Livingston or Lake Medina. Rooms fully furnished! Gated community with clubhouse, swimming pool and boat ramps. Call for more information: 1-903-8787265, 1-936-377-3235 or 1-830-460-8354

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OPINIONS

4A • THE GRAHAM LEADER

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012

THE GRAHAM LEADER KGB serves up a beautification smorgasbord WEEK’S END www.grahamleader.com USPS 225 240

William Dean Singleton President Robert L. Krecklow Publisher/Vice President

Carla McKeown Associate Managing Editor

EDITORIAL Vote: It’s your right and your duty As Texans, we encounter many milestones throughout our lives. When we turn 5 years old, we’re old enough to start kindergarten; when we’re 14, we can get a job; when we turn 16, we can get a provisional driver’s license; and, at age 18, we can register to vote, along with the rest of the adult Americans. Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, is fewer than 40 days away, and the last day to register to vote is Oct. 9...yes, that’s next week. Do you need to register to vote? Are you already registered to vote? Are you sure? If you have any questions about registering to vote or about voting, you can find most, if not all, of the answers at the Texas Secretary of State’s special election website, www.votetexas. gov. At that site, you can check to see if you are registered to vote, fill out a form to print and mail to register to vote and find the answers to your election-related questions. Locally, you may contact the Young County Tax Assessor-Collector’s office at (940) 549-1393 for information about registering to vote. According to the website, Texas’ new voter identification requirements have not been approved by the federal government, and voters do not need a photo ID in order to vote. As of The Graham Leader’s press time for this issue of the paper, to cast a ballot in person for the general election during early voting (Oct. 22 - Nov. 2) or on Election Day, voters should present their voter registration card or, in lieu of a voter registration card, at least one of the following: • A driver’s license or personal ID card issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety. You may also bring a similar document issued to you by an agency of another state, even if the license or card has expired; • A form of ID that contains your photograph and establishes your identity; • A birth certificate or other document confirming birth that is admissible in a court of law and establishes the person’s identity; • Your United States citizenship papers; • Your United States passport; • Official mail addressed to you by a governmental entity; or • A copy of your current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document that shows your name and address. Depending on your age, gender, race, financial status or your actual location on Election Day, your right to vote was likely established by any of the several Constitutional amendments, voting acts and court cases pertaining to the issue. Some people in the U.S. are not allowed to vote because they are prisoners, convicted felons or homeless. Laws related to those topics vary from state to state. If you fall into any of those categories or if you question your eligibility to vote for any reason, contact the Young County Tax AssessorCollector’s office or the Texas Secretary of State’s office to verify your status. Despite the occasional claims to the contrary by one political party or the other, voting gives the individual American power. You can argue about the Electoral College procedure; you can discuss whether or not one vote matters; you can even claim that if your neighbor votes for a different candidate than you do, you’ll cancel each other’s votes, so there’s no point in voting at all. If everyone carelessly ignores their right to vote, we’ll no longer have the government “by the people” that President Abraham Lincoln touted almost 150 years ago. Within the next week and a half (before Oct. 9), verify that you’re registered to vote. If you’re not, and you’re eligible to vote, get registered. Then, vote early (from Oct. 22 through Nov. 2) or vote on Election Day. Whenever and however you cast your vote, the important thing is that you exercise your right and your duty to your country and vote.

When most people hear or see the word smorgasbord, they immediately conjure up a large buffet of food. It is the second definition that interests me at week’s end, which refers to a smorgasbord as any venture that exhibits “a wide variety.” That’s exactly what the Keep Graham Beautiful (KGB) committee plans to serve Graham residents on Saturday, Oct. 6, when it kicks off the organization’s fall campaign from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Entitled “Brush Up Graham,” the nineday campaign offers local residents a variety of recycling and clean-up features. However, a few of the menu items only happen next Saturday. You can see the details of that menu on a full-page promotion on Page 5A of today’s paper, or grab last Wednesday’s edition of The Graham Leader for a narrative (Sept. 26, Page 7B). The whole affair follows the KGB’s very successful spring clean-up campaign, which saw several tons of trash removed from Graham’s yards, byways and homes. This fall, the KGB is topping its spring effort by serving several new features. On Oct. 6, local residents will be able to take dead trees, limbs and brush to a brush pile station at Fireman’s Park. The service is “on the KGB,” meaning there will be no charge to residents. Two other first-time services also are on the menu. Residents may recycle

BY ROBB KRECKLOW

old or unused computers, monitors and electronic equipment. And, they can get old financial records shredded, with the remains winding up in a recycling stream for paper. Both activities will take place Saturday on the Downtown Square, and again, it’s on the KGB. There is no charge. Staying in the recycling mode, residents also will have free access to recycling trailers for such things as plastic, glass, telephone books, catalogs, newspapers, magazines, aluminum, steel, cardboard and mixed paper. The only recycling effort that will require a modest fee relates to tires. From lawn mowers to tractors, the fees for recycling tires will range from $1 to $35 – a bargain. Residents who have the title to old, junk cars will get an opportunity to dispose of them and earn a little cash doing so. As with the spring clean-up, the KGB has arranged for 30-yard disposal containers at five locations around the community. (Please, see the map in this

edition for locations.) The containers will be available for all nine days of the campaign. To get you into the spirit of recycling and clean-up, permit me to share some gee-whiz statistics about the activity, courtesy of the folks producing the website www.all-recycling-facts.com. • Recycled paper manufacturers consume 70 percent less energy than mills that produce paper using raw materials. • Plastic bottles now constitute onehalf of all recyclable waste laying in landfills. It takes them seven centuries to decompose. • It only takes American industry 60 days to recycle aluminum cans into new products. • Glass and steel can be 100 percent recycled. No waste is produced. In fact, glass can be recycled over and over, again and again. • Americans produce more trash than anyone else in the world. Researchers estimate that each person in the USA generates 1,609 pounds of trash annually. Just ponder that last fact for a couple minutes, and then start thinking how to take advantage of the KGB’s “Brush Up Graham” campaign, beginning next Saturday. The price is right. The effort is small in most cases. The reward is great for Graham. Please participate.

Thank You Heartfelt thank you The family of Elizabeth Sconce would like to say a heartfelt thank you to so many people involved in supporting our family during the week of Elizabeth’s passing. The food and other items provided for a very large family coming together to celebrate our sweet Elizabeth’s life were deeply appreciated. Most especially we would like to thank our Faith Center and Oasis of Grace friends and family for showing us how See THANK YOU, Page 6A

Chuck wagon cooks reigned supreme The old timey chuck wagon cook operated much differently than today’s chuck wagon cooks. Certainly not in the quality of what they cooked. The frontier menu offered more variation. An ambitious cook added wild game to the menu, like the one mentioned in Frank Dobie’s classic book,“Cowboys.” One chef/hunter served fried wild turkey, antelope steaks and roast calf, all in the same night. The huge difference was the highhanded attitude of Texas frontier cooks. Although trail cooks were technically in a subordinate position, they acted like tyrants if riled. One cook caught his trail boss using his own eating fork to spear stewed dried apples out of the pot. A lecture followed in which the cook said, “I guess you go to town and eat in them fine cafes and talk to society folks about the manners of poor ignorant cowboys.” The riled cook claimed that cowhands in his camp had better manners. Then he picked up and flung the defiled pot of apples as far as he could. The “tetchy” cook was not fired.

NORTH TEXAS TALES BY GAY SCHLITTLER STORMS Traditional cooks’ crankiness was based on duty and a desire to keep the camp in order, Dobie said. But the cook’s circle of power was at least restricted to a designated area around the chuck wagon. Within this domain, no one was supposed to ride close enough or fast enough to scatter dust over pots, pans, food or fire. No one could walk in and take a snack — even a cup of coffee — unless the cook said so. However, the man lived under a brutal schedule with no luxuries and no excuses accepted if the meals weren’t ready. If the cook was cooking for more than 45 cowboys, he went to bed at 10 and got up at three in the morning. The noon meal was the hardest to get ready on time. Cooking for such a crowd

meant that right before breakfast, he went into fast-forward. He dug a trench, filled it with wood and put the meat on as soon as the coals were ready. The cowboys were then served with all the fixings and a calf or a yearling. The cook served less of a spread at supper if he had trouble catching up to the herd. A good cook cut lots of wood and had plenty on hand when crossing a prairie. When there were no trees for miles and miles, he might burn bacon to boil coffee or commandeer fence posts to put on the fire. If there was no water, the men scoured their plates with sand and wiped them with a rag. If there were no rags, the cowboys cleaned them with grass. To top off his daily existence, the cook survived the same natural challenges that trail hands navigated: rivers, dust storms, thunder storms and blizzards. Stampedes were the ultimate challenge. A cook only worried about foods like flour and sugar when crossing a river. He figured bacon and lard would come through a little river water, whether it be the Pecos, Brazos or Red rivers.

Life in Witness Protection has been difficult Have you spent a lot of time worrying about your neighbors? Is that man at the pizza shop really from around here? He doesn’t use jalapenos on any of his pizzas. Is that family down on the corner really related to each other? Some of their kids have red hair. The new preacher seems to have a lot of Yankee ideas. Maybe your suspicions are justified. For years you didn’t hear much about the Federal Witness Protection program, so you weren’t aware of it. But during the past five years or so, it’s been mentioned so much on television that you have to wonder. One loose lip to the FBI, and a whole family is transferred from Chicago to Clairette, Texas, overnight. Somehow, the newly protected learn a trade, find a house and lose

their accents. Their kids learn to dress in jeans, cowboy boots and drive pickups. Mothers learn to make chicken-fried steak. All because Daddy overheard a conversation in Denny’s and ratted out a Mafia boss to the feds. It’s not an easy change. I know … because I, too, have had to make the transition. Forty-five years ago, I was a budding actress and model in New York City. I was making lots of money. My picture was in Vogue a couple of times and on the cover of Sports Illustrated once during duck hunting season. My family was in the restaurant business in one of the Five Boroughs of New York City. I can’t be specific … some distant cousins are still there. I was dating a good-looking young

BETH BEGGS man who did legwork for one of the “families.” Someone shot him, but before he died, he whispered some really important names in my ear. Like any good citizen, I told the FBI. If I had known how that one conversation with Special Agent Maloney would change my life … I might have kept it to myself. I had to change everything. My thick black hair had to be progressively streaked by Secret Service hairdressers over the years until now, it is completely gray. They

insisted I cut it myself … so the haircuts would look cheap. I had to eat … a lot. My size zero body quickly morphed into the Xs. It was difficult, but I did it to protect my family back East. All that food … all those desserts … all those chips and rib-eye steaks. All for dear old Grandma in a nursing home in the South Bronx. Of course, I had to learn to do something new. There were no “runways” in Podunk Junction. There were no five-inch heels. I went from wearing top fashions to Birkenstocks and mumus. I had to. I was gaining weight fast. I couldn’t afford new clothes every day. By the time I graduated with a teaching certificate, Witness Protection was helping less and less.

They gave me only six dresses. By fall of 1970, I had to be ready to support myself. Thank goodness, the food was cheap. Over the years, I’ve learned to speak with a slow drawl, use tanning beds and keep my weight up. My natural inclination is to be skinny and sexy, but I’ve taken on the fat and dowdy persona for a reason. So, don’t feel sorry for me. Just understand that I did it all for Uncle Fredo and Aunt Sophia. I’ve had a good life. Thanks to Witness Protection, I don’t look a thing like my relatives. I guess I could go back now … the bad guys are dead, but no one would recognize me. Besides… they don’t serve chili-cheese-dogs in New York City, and I’ve gotten use to them.


Keep Graham Beautiful’s

Fall Clean-up Campaign S

Nine Days to Make Graham Shine!

Kickoff Event

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9 a.m. to 2 p.m. • Saturday, October 6 on the Downtown Square

St.

LEARNING CENTER

GRAHAM JUNIOR HIGH

Pioneer

Indiana St.

PIONEER ELEMENTARY

First St.

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St laveraas St. alavera Calaveras

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Tanglewood

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$5 $35 $7

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$2 $1Terri Road Star

Passenger Tires ATV & Lawnmower Ag-related – Including Front Tractor Tires Tractor Back Tires 18-Wheeler Tires

.

TIRE DISPOSAL FEES

erry St. Berry

H mpton Ct. Hampton

Recycling containers for plastic, glass, aluminum, steel, tin, boxboard, chipboard, corrugated cardboard and mixed papers can be found at: IESI at 24000 Hwy. 16 N and the City Water Plant at 818 Loving Hwy

Forest

Normand

il Tra Morado St.

Randy Dr.

E STATE HWY

Mimosa Cir.

Los Colinas Rolling Hills

Rodgers Dr. Preston Trail Ct.

Dr.

Roanoake Doral Ct.

Corto St.

Pine Tree Ct.

Northcliff

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Recycling Trailer

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Crescent Dr.

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GRAHAM HIGH SCHOOL

WOODLAND ELEMENTARY

Brazos St.

S SHAWNEE

13 Shawnee e SPRINGSS Shawnee e On-Site Paper Shredding Calaveras as

Find the title to that old clunker and K&K Motors will pay you for it when they come pick it up!

Cliff Drive

Fairview

Texas St.

Carolina St.

Tennessee

PA PARK Brazos Trailer provided by Excel Pump & Supply Co. Brazos

Virginia St.

Kentucky St.

12

pton Hamp H Hampton Rodeo

$

Pearl St.

Morningside

South

South

30-Yard Disposal Container

FM 2179

PIONEER CEMETERY

30-Yard Edgewood Disposal 11 Rolling Hills Dr. Container Rodgers Dr.

Short St.

Downtown Square

Corporate Dr.

Second St.

Texas St.

East St.

Plum St.

Cherry St.

Elm St.

Oak St.

Grove St.

Wes West st SSt.

Pec Pecan St.

5

Southview ew Electronic Devices Drop-Off SHAWNEE AW

akland St. Oakland

Clifff Drive

Candle essttic tiickk Dr .

Cliff Drive

St. enth Sev

CRESTVIEW IEW IE EW ELEMENTARY TA ARY AR

N. Cherry St.

Walker St. Florence St..

Hicks St.

B Bu

Pennsylvania

1

Colorado

Summit

Second econd St.

River Dr.

9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Old Jacksboro Ol sboro R sb Rd.

Colorado

Ohio

7

2

Second nd St.

First Fir

Avenue A

Fo Fourth ourth St St. Third St St.

4

First St.

Ohio St.

Grove St.

Ohio St.

Summit

Gleese

Blewett St. Ble

Th St. Third

3

Ragland

Echo

Virginia St.

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VICTORY PARK

Florea

Avenue B

Johnnie Rem Remington St.

Tennessee St.

Fifth St.

30-Yard Disposal Container

Texas

St. rth No

Supply St.

1

Gleese

Old Jacksboro Rd.

Fifth St.

Fourth St. Fo

Goldenrod Cir.

Monroe St.

Sixth St.

3 2

Ragland

Sage Cir.

OAK GROVE CEMETERY

6

Clove Cir.

Larkspur Cir.

McBrayer

Sixth St. Sixt

380

Sunflower Cir.

Bluebonnet Cir.

10

380

Smith St.

FIREMAN'S PARK

US HWY

Milwood St.

US HWY

Oakland d

Willow St.

Ohio St.

St

US HWY

Walker St.

8

Avenue F

1 - Old Jacksboro Road behind Cross Timbers Church. 17 2 - Avenue ThirdE Street at Indiana, across from the swimming pool. 3 - West Street between 1st and 2nd streets 380 Avenue D 4 - Corner of Indiana and Calaveras. Avenue C 5 - Carolina/Lindy between Allison and Hillcrest

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30-yard dumpsters will be conveniently placed for public use at five locations in the community from PPowellll D Dr.r. Dr Saturday, Oct. 6 through Sunday, Oct. 14. N. Colorado N

Live Oak St..

ap

M

Lincoln St.

For curbside pickFM up61 any time, call City Hall Trail n w at 940-549-3322

30-Yard Disposal Container

16

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at Fireman’s Park

Mesq

STATE HWY

9

St.

BRUSH PILE DROP-OFF

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Electronics Drop-Off • Paper Shredding • Tire Disposal Junk Vehicle Pick-Up • Recycling Trailer

Dr

POINTS OF INTEREST 1. Largest Downtown Square in U.S. 2. City Hall 3. Convention & Visitors Bureau 4. Graham Memorial Auditorium 5. Graham Fire Department 6. Commemorative Air Force Museum 7. City Pool 8. Department of Public Safety 9. Graham Police Department 10. Graham Post Office 11. Graham Senior Citizens Center 12. The Library of Graham 13. Graham Higher Education Center 14. Humane Society of Young County 15. Young County Arena 16. Steer/Lady Blues Baseball Stadiums 17. Young County Jail & Sheriff’s Office

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cyan magenta yellow black

Rain doesn’t dampen fun at Western Heritage Days

See more GHS Homecoming stories, photos inside

Page 3A

Pages 1B and 7A

THE GRAHAM LEADER Oldest business institution in Young County • Established August 16, 1876

VOL. 137, NO. 14 • SINGLE COPY 75¢

MIDWEEK EDITION • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012

Homecoming Queen

‘Brush Up Graham’ kicks off with Saturday cleanup event Editor’s Note: For more details on Brush Up Graham, see the map and information on page 5A of today’s Graham Leader. BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com

Gracie Chavez, escorted by her brother, Rick Munoz, was crowned Homecoming Queen at the Graham High School football game Friday night. She is the daughter of Alicia and Sergio Chavez. See pages 7A and 1B of today’s Graham Leader for more Homecoming coverage. (Photo courtesy of David Flynn)

www.grahamleader.com

Keep Graham Beautiful is kicking off its fall campaign, Brush Up Graham, Saturday. For nine days, Grahamites are encouraged to make their piece of the community sparkle with help from KGB. “It’s a community beautification effort. That’s what KGB is all about,” said Roy Robinson, KGB president. “It’s an opportunity for people to show pride in the city and help clean up.” There will be an easy-access brush drop-off point at Fireman’s Park, across from Fifth Street. The city will take the brush to the convenience station for mulching. Like with the spring clean-up campaign, there will be five 30yard disposal containers located throughout the city for trash and larger items. “We’re asking folks to join us for the full nine days,” Robinson said. “The five locations of 30-yard Dumpsters will be out 24/7 and rotated out with empty Dumpsters as they fill. “During the spring clean up, IESI hauled away 110 tons of eyesores and debris with the Dumpsters.” The opportunities for doing away with your junk abound, starting on the Downtown Square at 9 a.m. During the kickoff event, there will be some opportunities to properly dispose of waste that can’t legally be thrown in a trash bin. There will be a trailer for electronic device drop-off. The Hawkins family will be taking old computers, cell phones and any type of electronics as a fundraiser for the Helen Hawkins music scholarship.

The event also is a chance to dispose of old electronics safely and legally. Jeff Ash, IESI district manager, said the EPA views one computer in a Dumpster as incidental, but disposing of many is illegal due to the heavy metals contained in the equipment. For those businesses that have been stacking up old computer gear, now is a perfect opportunity to free up some storage space. Along with com- At Keep Graham Beautiful’s spring event, Lillian, Jack puters, old files and Mary Lyndell Graham picked up trashbags and can be safely dis- a yard sign in support of the effort. Saturday, Oct. 6, posed of Satur- the organization will kick off its fall campaign with day. Shred-It will Brush Up Graham. (Photo by Cherry Rushin) provide on-site paper shredding at the Square at cash paid upon pick-up of cars with no cost to participants. clear titles. “Anyone can bring documents out The KGB board is made up of Robfor shredding at no cost,” Robinson inson, Bruce Street, vice-president, said. Eva Hoffman, secretary/treasurer, One caveat, documents must be along with directors Derrell Dodson, bagged or boxed. Loose paper can- Dortheia Henderson, Ed Hinson, not be accepted. Carter Pettit, Jerry Schultz and Doug “If people are concerned about Stroud. Several of the KGB memsecurity, they can stay and watch bers will be at the Square Saturday it be shredded, but if they’re in a offering free Cokes, Keep Graham hurry and need to go on, they can Beautiful yard signs, litter bags and drop it and leave,” he said. several items for children. Other items that will be accepted The group is particularly grateful at the Square that can’t be thrown for the help it has received from the in the trash are tires. city of Graham and IESI. McClure Transport Tire Disposal “They are the lead service providwill accept tires for a fee, and K&K ers in this clean up effort,” Robinson Motors also will be on site to regis- said. “We’re the facilitators. They’re ter people for junk car pick-up with the guys doing the heavy lifting.”

Keeping Graham beautiful

GISD adujsts to new menu planning guidelines BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com Beginning with the new school year, lunch rooms across the country have begun implementing the new USDA guidelines known as Michelle Obama’s Healthy and Hunger-Free Kids Act. The new standards require schools to provide more fresh fruits and vegetables of varying categories and whole grains, as well as reducing the amounts of saturated fat, trans fats and sodium, while limiting calories based on two age groups. So, how’s that going for Graham ISD? Jodi Arispe, GISD food service director, said it’s taken some work, but so far, so good. “The new menu planning is not that hard. It’s hard to adjust to something different that you’ve

Your Local Weather Local Forecast Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

10/3

10/4

10/5

10/6

83/62

80/57

84/53

61/46

Mostly sunny skies. High 83F. Winds SSE at 15 to 25 mph.

More sun than clouds. Highs in the low 80s and lows in the upper 50s.

Times of sun and clouds. Highs in the mid 80s and lows in the low 50s.

Partly cloudy. Highs in the low 60s and lows in the mid 40s.

©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service

never done before and no one trains you for it,” Arispe said. “We’re adjusting. It’s offering more fruits and vegetables. It’s going to cost more, so we’re going to absorb that. The new six cents worksheet is difficult, there’s an additional six cents per meal, but they make you fill out a whole lot of forms to make sure you’re meeting the guidelines.” Lunches are divided into five different components — meat/meat alternative, fruits, vegetables, milk and grains. To be considered a reimbursable meal by the USDA lunch program, three of those components must be served and one of the components must be a fruit or vegetable. “It’s just a different way of counting a reimbursable meal. Every child has to have a half a cup of See LUNCH, Page 2A

Weather High Low Rain Tuesday, 9/25 91 72 0 Wednesday, 9/26 91 70 0 Thursday, 9/27 86 66 1.10 Friday, 9/28 73 66 0.44 Saturday, 9/29 68 63 1.62 Sunday, 9/30 77 61 0 Monday, 10/1 79 57 0 Rain: September 7.68 • Year 33.09 Lake Graham at capacity: 1,075.00 Current level: 1,071.44 Temperatures and rainfall provided by the National Weather Service.

Lunch break Graham High School freshmen Jordan Garner, Dalton McAnear and Zeland Culpepper enjoy their lunch break. The boys agree they’re not in favor of the switch to whole grain breads, a change the school district recently made as part of the new USDA school lunch menu guidelines. (Photo by Cherry Rushin)

NEWS BRIEFS Vocal Trash to perform Thursday, Friday

Lions Club to sell mops, brooms Oct. 10

The West Texas band Vocal Trash will perform free to public at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Graham Memorial Auditorium in a concert sponsored by the Graham Concert Association. Graham elementary students will see the show for free on Friday. That concert will be sponsored by the Kaleidoscope Children’s Theater.

The Graham Evening Lions Club will have its annual Broom and Mop Sale from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, on the Downtown Square. The funds raised through the sale go toward the Cliff Walker Graham Evening Lions Club Memorial Scholarship, which the organization awards each year.

Inside Lifestyles .............................. Page 3A Calendar .............................. Page 6A Obituaries ............................ Page 6A Police Blotter ....................... Page 6A Sports ....................................Page 1B TV ..........................................Page 3B Entertainment ......................Page 4B Classified ..............................Page 5B

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Keep Graham Beautiful’s

Fall Clean-up Campaign S

Nine Days to Make Graham Shine!

Kickoff Event

OCTO

M

T

1

7

2

8

14

9

15

21 28

23

29

30

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18 25

S

5

11

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F

4

10

16

22

BE R 2 012 W

3

6

12 19 26

31

13 20 27

9 a.m. to 2 p.m. • Saturday, October 6 on the Downtown Square

St.

LEARNING CENTER

GRAHAM JUNIOR HIGH

Pioneer

Indiana St.

PIONEER ELEMENTARY

First St.

Oak

St laveraas St. alavera Calaveras

t.

t.

Tanglewood

. Caarol ina St

Rd.

r.

aD

ot

ak

Dr.

Arapaho Cir.

R Rodgers Dr.

Cheyenne Trail

wa . Cir

r.

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D 30-Yard Disposalp Loo ee Container rok Che

Apache Cir.

Old Bunger

Thomas Lane

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16

Sherwood Drive

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Green St.

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Fairway Dr.

le D

Melissa Dr.

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St.

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St.

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$5 $35 $7

Mars

St.

$2 $1Terri Road Star

Passenger Tires ATV & Lawnmower Ag-related – Including Front Tractor Tires Tractor Back Tires 18-Wheeler Tires

.

TIRE DISPOSAL FEES

erry St. Berry

H mpton Ct. Hampton

Recycling containers for plastic, glass, aluminum, steel, tin, boxboard, chipboard, corrugated cardboard and mixed papers can be found at: IESI at 24000 Hwy. 16 N and the City Water Plant at 818 Loving Hwy

Forest

Normand

il Tra Morado St.

Randy Dr.

E STATE HWY

Mimosa Cir.

Los Colinas Rolling Hills

Rodgers Dr. Preston Trail Ct.

Dr.

Roanoake Doral Ct.

Corto St.

Pine Tree Ct.

Northcliff

Lane

Cross Oaks

Family

Pine Tree Rd.

ood

Hil

rS

aS

ne

We stw

St.

lin

rs La

Tackett

ro

Love

W

he

e

Royal Lan

Willow Wood Ct.

Ribble Rd. Ribbl Rd

Ca

Montgomer Montgomery

provided by IESI

N

Fis

est

r.

Nor mandy Dr

lcr

er D

Roa Austin Road

Recycling Trailer

Ross Dr.

Quail Run Red Bud Cir.

du ra

Kintn

Register with K&K Motor Company

Crescent Dr.

Hillcrest Dr. H D

wn odla St. a Wo ian Ind

tory

Junk Vechicle Pick-Up Gregory Rd

Vic

wn

St.Mic St.Michael Court C

Roanoake

Woo dla

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rva

by McClure Transport Tire Disposal

Thompson Dr.

esta Court Fiesta

4

Co

Hillcrest Dr.

Texas SSt.

Park

Victory

Pack inng H ouse Rd.

Calaveras as

Tire Disposal

Rolling Hills Dr.

s es pr Cy

by Shred-It of Dallas/Fort Worth

Dr.

Hills

Dr. nic Sce

GRAHAM HIGH SCHOOL

WOODLAND ELEMENTARY

Brazos St.

S SHAWNEE

13 Shawnee e SPRINGSS Shawnee e On-Site Paper Shredding Calaveras as

Find the title to that old clunker and K&K Motors will pay you for it when they come pick it up!

Cliff Drive

Fairview

Texas St.

Carolina St.

Tennessee

PA PARK Brazos Trailer provided by Excel Pump & Supply Co. Brazos

Virginia St.

Kentucky St.

12

pton Hamp H Hampton Rodeo

$

Pearl St.

Morningside

South

South

30-Yard Disposal Container

FM 2179

PIONEER CEMETERY

30-Yard Edgewood Disposal 11 Rolling Hills Dr. Container Rodgers Dr.

Short St.

Downtown Square

Corporate Dr.

Second St.

Texas St.

East St.

Plum St.

Cherry St.

Elm St.

Oak St.

Grove St.

Wes West st SSt.

Pec Pecan St.

5

Southview ew Electronic Devices Drop-Off SHAWNEE AW

akland St. Oakland

Clifff Drive

Candle essttic tiickk Dr .

Cliff Drive

St. enth Sev

CRESTVIEW IEW IE EW ELEMENTARY TA ARY AR

N. Cherry St.

Walker St. Florence St..

Hicks St.

B Bu

Pennsylvania

1

Colorado

Summit

Second econd St.

River Dr.

9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Old Jacksboro Ol sboro R sb Rd.

Colorado

Ohio

7

2

Second nd St.

First Fir

Avenue A

Fo Fourth ourth St St. Third St St.

4

First St.

Ohio St.

Grove St.

Ohio St.

Summit

Gleese

Blewett St. Ble

Th St. Third

3

Ragland

Echo

Virginia St.

h St. mith Smit

VICTORY PARK

Florea

Avenue B

Johnnie Rem Remington St.

Tennessee St.

Fifth St.

30-Yard Disposal Container

Texas

St. rth No

Supply St.

1

Gleese

Old Jacksboro Rd.

Fifth St.

Fourth St. Fo

Goldenrod Cir.

Monroe St.

Sixth St.

3 2

Ragland

Sage Cir.

OAK GROVE CEMETERY

6

Clove Cir.

Larkspur Cir.

McBrayer

Sixth St. Sixt

380

Sunflower Cir.

Bluebonnet Cir.

10

380

Smith St.

FIREMAN'S PARK

US HWY

Milwood St.

US HWY

Oakland d

Willow St.

Ohio St.

St

US HWY

Walker St.

8

Avenue F

1 - Old Jacksboro Road behind Cross Timbers Church. 17 2 - Avenue ThirdE Street at Indiana, across from the swimming pool. 3 - West Street between 1st and 2nd streets 380 Avenue D 4 - Corner of Indiana and Calaveras. Avenue C 5 - Carolina/Lindy between Allison and Hillcrest

.

le

30-yard disposal containers will be placed for public use at five locations in the community from PPowellll D Dr.r. Dr Saturday, Oct. 6 through Sunday, Oct. 14. N. Colorado N

Live Oak St..

ap

M

Lincoln St.

For curbside pickFM up61 any time, call City Hall Trail n w at 940-549-3322

30-Yard Disposal Container

16

uite

at Fireman’s Park

Mesq

STATE HWY

9

St.

BRUSH PILE DROP-OFF

hioo

V

Electronics Drop-Off • Paper Shredding • Tire Disposal Junk Vehicle Pick-Up • Recycling Trailer

Dr

POINTS OF INTEREST 1. Largest Downtown Square in U.S. 2. City Hall 3. Convention & Visitors Bureau 4. Graham Memorial Auditorium 5. Graham Fire Department 6. Commemorative Air Force Museum 7. City Pool 8. Department of Public Safety 9. Graham Police Department 10. Graham Post Office 11. Graham Senior Citizens Center 12. The Library of Graham 13. Graham Higher Education Center 14. Humane Society of Young County 15. Young County Arena 16. Steer/Lady Blues Baseball Stadiums 17. Young County Jail & Sheriff’s Office

73039


cyan magenta yellow black

Hit Men to perform Oct. 16

Young volleyball players gain experience

Page 7A

Page 1B

THE GRAHAM LEADER Oldest business institution in Young County • Established August 16, 1876

VOL. 137, NO. 15 • SINGLE COPY 75¢

WEEKEND EDITION • SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012

www.grahamleader.com

Estes visits with Young County Republicans BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com

Pendergraft sentenced to nine years BY MARK ENGEBRETSON

MediaNews Service In Palo Pinto on Tuesday, a 10-woman, two-man jury sentenced Lisa Lynette Pendergraft, former manager of the Possum Kingdom Lake branch of Graham Savings and Loan, to nine years in the Institutional Division of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice and assessed a fine of $10,000 for theft of $100,000 or more but less than $200,000. The jury had the option for probation but denied that possibility. The sentence came after Pendergraft pleaded guilty to the allegation and witnesses were called by both District Attorney Michael Burns and defense attorney Cora Moore. “It gives me no great pleasure to send you to prison,” 29th District Judge Jerry Ray said after sentencing Pendergraft. “That’s something you brought on yourself. You stole a huge sum of money and paid back not one penny.” Margaritte Cannon, compliance officer at Graham Savings and Loan in Graham, and Danny Buckalew, vice president, each testified that they had gone to the PK branch on Dec. 6 to perform an unannounced audit of teller drawers and the safe box. The two teller boxes in use were found to be in balance, but the vault box was a different story. “She placed the cash box on the

State Sen. Craig Estes encouraged local Republican party members to take up the Romney mantle out of state. The three-time incumbent is up for re-election this year, running against Libertarian candidate Richard Forsythe. Estes visited Graham Tuesday to speak to the Young County Republican Women. He said although the presidential election isn’t over until it’s over, he’s certain Republican candidate Mitt Romney will cinch Texas. “Unless things go haywire, Romeny’s going to win Texas,” Estes said. “Tune in tomorrow and pray for them, and I think a good prayer is ‘Let each man reveal what is in

his heart.’ That’s a good bipartisan prayer.” With that in mind, Estes said his campaign efforts to help his fellow Republican will take him elsewhere. “I’m going to go to Florida Nov. 1 and knock on doors, and I’m going to say, ‘I’m State Senator Estes. I’m from Texas, and I’m here to encourage you to vote for Mitt Romney,’” he said. He encouraged those in attendance to pick up the phone and call voters in swing states, although there are very few true independent voters. “Most lean toward Obama or lean toward Romney. They just really don’t care that much,” Estes said. “They’re busy with their own lives, and we’ve been infected by the poSee SENATOR, Page 11A

Senatorial visit State Sen. Craig Estes visits with Bob and Betty O’Dell before speaking to the Young County Republican Women Tuesday. Estes came to Graham to talk to the club about the upcoming presidential election. (Photo by Cherry Rushin)

Chalupalicious Annual luncheon fundraiser slated for Thursday BY JULIANNE MURRAH gninews@grahamleader.com Folks can get a taste of homemade goodness at the annual Chalupa Luncheon fundraiser Thursday, Oct. 11, on the Downtown Square. The Graham Regional Medical Center Ladies Auxiliary will host the event, a tradition for some of about 50 years. Although the event offers tasty chalupas, it also includes a bake sale, a gift shop sale and drawings for several prizes. The event, which is open to the public, will begin with the bake sale and gift shop sale at 10 a.m., followed by the luncheon from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The women’s auxiliary prepares the homemade delights for the sale. In the past, people have lined up early for baked goods, which include traditional cakes, cinnamon rolls, German chocolate cake, pies and brownies. They also will sell jellies, pickles and relishes and plan to sell out of everything before the luncheon is over.

Gift Shop sale Graham Regional Medical Center Ladies Auxiliary members Sally Fisk, left, and Coleta Bruce, display a few of the holiday items available for purchase during the gift shop sale at 10 a.m. during the Chalupa Luncheon on Thursday, Oct. 11. The fundraiser will offer gifts and a broad selection of Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas decorations for purchase. (Photo by Julianne Murrah) The gift shop sale will be on the northeast corner of the Square. Shoppers can pick up a broad variety of holiday items that were selected by auxiliary members Nann Hale, Nancy Hays and Pat Goodwin. The shop will have Hal-

loween, Thanksgiving and Christmas items. Also available will be tree skirts, ornaments, nativity sets and stockings. For those who can’t make it to the luncheon, the

Annual Sale Graham Evening Lions Club member Larry Choate, left, shows a mop to Corey Gober at the 2011 sale. This year’s sale will be from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, on the Downtown Square. (Photos courtesy of Carolyn Stroud)

Your Local Weather Local Forecast Sat

Sun

Mon

Tue

10/6

10/7

10/8

10/9

74/47 Cloudy early with partial sunshine expected late. High 74F.

50/42

56/45

70/56

Mostly Cloudy. Highs in the low 50s and lows in the low 40s.

Mostly cloudy. Highs in the mid 50s and lows in the mid 40s.

More sun than clouds. Highs in the low 70s and lows in the mid 50s.

©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service

Weather High Low Rain Friday, 9/28 73 66 0.44 Saturday, 9/29 68 63 1.62 Sunday, 9/30 77 61 0 Monday, 10/1 79 57 0 Tuesday, 10/2 75 55 0 Wednesday, 10/3 82 52 0 Thursday, 10/4 79 59 0 Rain: Month 0.00 • Year 33.09 Lake Graham at capacity: 1,075.00 Current level: 1,071.37 Temperatures and rainfall provided by the National Weather Service.

National 4-H Week set for Oct. 7-13 BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com

Sales for the Blind and other companies that employ blind individuals. Products include brooms, mops, lawn rakes, household products, dish and dust cloths, oven mitts, scouring pads, sponges, ironing board covers and washing machine bags. Industrial products also will be available, including commercial dust mops, brooms, mops, business truck washing brushes, window and floor squeegees and more. “The products are pretty good quality,” said Graham Evening Lions President Carolyn Stroud. “They even have little kids’ brooms and mops and whisk brooms. You can hardly find them anywhere.” Larry Choate, broom and mop sale chairman, said that some customers return every year for certain products. “We have these non-abrasive scouring pads,” Choate said. “These are big sellers. We have a See BROOMS, Page 2A

See 4-H, Page 3A

Lions to sell mops, brooms Wednesday Folks will get the chance to purchase brooms, mops and more at the ninth annual Lions Club Broom and Mop Sale from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, on the Downtown Square near the American Legion Building. The event is the primary fundraiser for Graham’s Evening Lions Club. The annual sale started with the Noon Lions Club, but the Evening Lions Club took over the event nine years ago. The sale will feature items made by Caravan

Keep Graham Beautiful’s “Brush Up Graham” cleanup campaign kicks off today with many opportunities for Grahamites to get rid of everything from old computers and sensitive documents to used tires and tree branches. Today’s activities are from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., mostly in the Downtown Square area. The event will include five 30-yard trash bins located around town. Those containers will remain in place throughout the cleanup campaign, which continues until Sunday, Oct. 14. See the map on page 5A of today’s Graham Leader for more details.

The Lonestar 4-H Club is celebrating National 4-H Week Oct. 7-13 and the members have taken on a new service project for veterans. For the Texas One Day 4-H project, clubs around the state are performing various service projects in their communities. The Young County 4-H club has taken on iPads for Soldiers and are raising funds to help purchase iPads for overseas military personnel, as well as veterans who are here at home and have been wounded. Overseas, the iPads will be used for reading and communicating with their families back home. Wounded vets will use them for rehab therapy. “This actually was brought to council by Orth 4-H of Olney, and Carson Fite is the council delgate who proposed the project to the council members,” said Extension Agent Penny Warren. There are five

See CHALUPA, Page 2A

See SENTENCING, Page 3A

BY JULIANNE MURRAH gninews@grahamleader.com

‘Brush Up Graham’ campaign starts today

NEWS BRIEFS GHS Class of 1972 schedules reunion

Proffitt fundraiser assistance needed

The Graham High School Class of 1972 will have its 40 year reunion beginning with a tour of the high school at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20. A party will follow at 7 p.m. at the Alley House, behind 434 Oak St. Cost is $30 per person and reservations are required. Call for information or to RSVP. Kathy May (940) 549-0436.

A fundraiser committee meeting for Will Proffitt will begin at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, at Hudson Chapel, 213 Texas Street. A second fundraiser, “Our Will to Help,” has been scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 27. The fundraiser committee seeks volunteers to help assist during fundraising events.

Inside Lifestyles .............................. Page 7A Calendar .............................. Page 6A Obituaries ............................ Page 8A Police Blotter ........................Page 4B Sports ....................................Page 1B TV ..........................................Page 3B Entertainment ......................Page 4B Classified ..............................Page 6B


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012

THE GRAHAM LEADER • 5A

www.grahamleader.com

Keep Graham Beautiful’s

Fall Clean-up Campaign S

Nine Days to Make Graham Shine!

Kickoff Event

OCTO

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1

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2

8

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9

15

21 28

23

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5

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9 a.m. to 2 p.m. • Saturday, October 6 on the Downtown Square

St.

LEARNING CENTER

GRAHAM JUNIOR HIGH

Pioneer

Indiana St.

PIONEER ELEMENTARY

First St.

Oak

St laveraas St. alavera Calaveras

t.

t.

Tanglewood

. Caarol ina St

Rd.

r.

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ot

ak

Dr.

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che Ci

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Old Bunger

Thomas Lane

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16

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Kio

S

Green St.

r.

Fairway Dr.

le D

Melissa Dr.

y

Corvadura St.

Cir c

Dr.

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lcr es tD r.

dy St .

t.

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How

St.

. Sky St

$5 $35 $7

Mars

St.

$2 $1Terri Road Star

Passenger Tires ATV & Lawnmower Ag-related – Including Front Tractor Tires Tractor Back Tires 18-Wheeler Tires

.

TIRE DISPOSAL FEES

erry St. Berry

H mpton Ct. Hampton

Recycling containers for plastic, glass, aluminum, steel, tin, boxboard, chipboard, corrugated cardboard and mixed papers can be found at: IESI at 24000 Hwy. 16 N and the City Water Plant at 818 Loving Hwy

Forest

Normand

il Tra Morado St.

Randy Dr.

E STATE HWY

Mimosa Cir.

Los Colinas Rolling Hills

Rodgers Dr. Preston Trail Ct.

Dr.

Roanoake Doral Ct.

Corto St.

Pine Tree Ct.

Northcliff

Lane

Cross Oaks

Family

Pine Tree Rd.

ood

Hil

rS

aS

ne

We stw

St.

lin

rs La

Tackett

ro

Love

W

he

e

Royal Lan

Willow Wood Ct.

Ribble Rd. Ribbl Rd

Ca

Montgomer Montgomery

provided by IESI

N

Fis

est

r.

Nor mandy Dr

lcr

er D

Roa Austin Road

Recycling Trailer

Ross Dr.

Quail Run Red Bud Cir.

du ra

Kintn

Register with K&K Motor Company

Crescent Dr.

Hillcrest Dr. H D

wn odla St. a Wo ian Ind

tory

Junk Vechicle Pick-Up Gregory Rd

Vic

wn

St.Mic St.Michael Court C

Roanoake

Woo dla

Privado

rva

by McClure Transport Tire Disposal

Thompson Dr.

esta Court Fiesta

4

Co

Hillcrest Dr.

Texas SSt.

Park

Victory

Pack inng H ouse Rd.

Calaveras as

Tire Disposal

Rolling Hills Dr.

s es pr Cy

by Shred-It of Dallas/Fort Worth

Dr.

Hills

Dr. nic Sce

GRAHAM HIGH SCHOOL

WOODLAND ELEMENTARY

Brazos St.

S SHAWNEE

13 Shawnee e SPRINGSS Shawnee e On-Site Paper Shredding Calaveras as

Find the title to that old clunker and K&K Motors will pay you for it when they come pick it up!

Cliff Drive

Fairview

Texas St.

Carolina St.

Tennessee

PA PARK Brazos Trailer provided by Excel Pump & Supply Co. Brazos

Virginia St.

Kentucky St.

12

pton Hamp H Hampton Rodeo

$

Pearl St.

Morningside

South

South

30-Yard Disposal Container

FM 2179

PIONEER CEMETERY

30-Yard Edgewood Disposal 11 Rolling Hills Dr. Container Rodgers Dr.

Short St.

Downtown Square

Corporate Dr.

Second St.

Texas St.

East St.

Plum St.

Cherry St.

Elm St.

Oak St.

Grove St.

Wes West st SSt.

Pec Pecan St.

5

Southview ew Electronic Devices Drop-Off SHAWNEE AW

akland St. Oakland

Clifff Drive

Candle essttic tiickk Dr .

Cliff Drive

St. enth Sev

CRESTVIEW IEW IE EW ELEMENTARY TA ARY AR

N. Cherry St.

Walker St. Florence St..

Hicks St.

B Bu

Pennsylvania

1

Colorado

Summit

Second econd St.

River Dr.

9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Old Jacksboro Ol sboro R sb Rd.

Colorado

Ohio

7

2

Second nd St.

First Fir

Avenue A

Fo Fourth ourth St St. Third St St.

4

First St.

Ohio St.

Grove St.

Ohio St.

Summit

Gleese

Blewett St. Ble

Th St. Third

3

Ragland

Echo

Virginia St.

h St. mith Smit

VICTORY PARK

Florea

Avenue B

Johnnie Rem Remington St.

Tennessee St.

Fifth St.

30-Yard Disposal Container

Texas

St. rth No

Supply St.

1

Gleese

Old Jacksboro Rd.

Fifth St.

Fourth St. Fo

Goldenrod Cir.

Monroe St.

Sixth St.

3 2

Ragland

Sage Cir.

OAK GROVE CEMETERY

6

Clove Cir.

Larkspur Cir.

McBrayer

Sixth St. Sixt

380

Sunflower Cir.

Bluebonnet Cir.

10

380

Smith St.

FIREMAN'S PARK

US HWY

Milwood St.

US HWY

Oakland d

Willow St.

Ohio St.

St

US HWY

Walker St.

8

Avenue F

1 - Old Jacksboro Road behind Cross Timbers Church. 17 2 - Avenue ThirdE Street at Indiana, across from the swimming pool. 3 - West Street between 1st and 2nd streets 380 Avenue D 4 - Corner of Indiana and Calaveras. Avenue C 5 - Carolina/Lindy between Allison and Hillcrest

.

le

30-yard disposal containers will be placed for public use at five locations in the community from PPowellll D Dr.r. Dr Saturday, Oct. 6 through Sunday, Oct. 14. N. Colorado N

Live Oak St..

ap

M

Lincoln St.

For curbside pickFM up61 any time, call City Hall Trail n w at 940-549-3322

30-Yard Disposal Container

16

uite

at Fireman’s Park

Mesq

STATE HWY

9

St.

BRUSH PILE DROP-OFF

hioo

V

Electronics Drop-Off • Paper Shredding • Tire Disposal Junk Vehicle Pick-Up • Recycling Trailer

Dr

POINTS OF INTEREST 1. Largest Downtown Square in U.S. 2. City Hall 3. Convention & Visitors Bureau 4. Graham Memorial Auditorium 5. Graham Fire Department 6. Commemorative Air Force Museum 7. City Pool 8. Department of Public Safety 9. Graham Police Department 10. Graham Post Office 11. Graham Senior Citizens Center 12. The Library of Graham 13. Graham Higher Education Center 14. Humane Society of Young County 15. Young County Arena 16. Steer/Lady Blues Baseball Stadiums 17. Young County Jail & Sheriff’s Office

73039


www.grahamleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 700 FOR RENT-APARTMENTS

760 FOR RENT-COMMERCIAL

Apartments for rent, 811 South and 1200 Indiana. Call 940-549-7650

For Rent! Commercial Building, 432 Oak. $400 Rent, $400 Deposit. Call 940-5504307

Indiana Crossing Apartments

800 PUBLIC & LEGAL NOTICES

1222 Brazos 1 & 2 BR, from $425 to $465 We welcome children. Pets not allowed. Both locations have modern laundries for residents use only. All maintenance requests are handled promptly. Contact Gary Sloan, Resident Manager. Leasing Office at Indiana Crossing Apartments

• Furniture • Appliance • Computer • Electronics 1311 Hwy. 16 S. Graham, Texas

940-549-7600

47366

940-549-1708 25078

710 FOR RENT-MOBILE HOMES

720 FOR RENT-HOMES 1/1 with storage room and fenced yard, refrigerator & stove. No Pets. 304 2nd Street, $490.00 rent $500.00 deposit. Call 940-232-3051

2/1, new carpet and hardwood floors, new paint. On half acre lot in a quiet neighborhood. C a l l 9 4 0 - 4 5 6 - 6 11 5 f o r inquiries.

A brief statement of the nature of this suit is as follows, to wit: As is more fully shown by Plaintiff’s Petition on file in this suit. APPLICATION TO APPOINT A RECEIVER The officer executing this writ shall promptly serve the same

NEWCASTLE ISD will hold a public meeting at 6:00 pm, Monday, October 22, 2012, in the Newcastle School Community Room, 505 Washington Street, Newcastle, Texas 76372. The purpose of this public meeting is to distribute Newcastle ISD’s financial management performance report that explains the district’s performance and rating under the Texas School FIRST (Financial Integrity Rating System of Texas) program, as well as any descriptive information as required by the commissioner o f t h e Te x a s E d u c a t i o n Agency.

GRAHAM SELF STORAGE: Kristy Lynn - Unit 53 Chris Wilkerson - Unit 65 Kerry Hopkins - Unit 123 James Coleman - Unit 126 Kim Stegar - Unit 137 Vivian Browning - Unit 138 Belinda Ramsey - Unit 149 ADG STORAGE: Shane Steele - Unit 8 Mike Pestrue - Unit 90

Got a News Tip? Call 940-549-7800 when you see news happening.

A Reminder from Keep Graham Beautiful…

Lake House for Sale/Lease Eastside Lake Graham. 3/2, 2 lots-3c-carport. Call 972365-8718 or 940-521-0472. Sale $70K, Lease $1000 per month with 1 month deposit. References required. No pets!

Please check your ad the first day that it runs to see that all of the information is correct. This will ensure that your ad is exactly what you want readers to see. Call us at 940-549-7800 the first day if you find an error. We must limit our financial responsibilities, if any, to the charge for the space and cannot be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication.

VS DAWSON, RUBY DYER, D A W S O N , R AY M O N D , D AW S O N , B E N J A M I N , BROWN, T H, WEST, JACK D, ROBERTSON, ARTHUR ROBERTSON, ROBERT D, ROBERTSON, KENNETH LEE, ROBERTSON, FRANK, R O B E RT S O N , R O B E RT L JR ROBERTSON, RICHARD DANIEL, R O B E RT S O N , R A N D A L CHARLES, CARTER, V L Defendant

Signed by: R Murray, Deputy

(940) 549-7800

DGH Home & Property Solutions, LLC. 940-549-0081

Errors & Adjustments

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING TO DISCUSS NEWCASTLE ISD STATE FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY RATING

JAMYE ROGERS DISTRICT CLERK 516 FOURTH STREET ROOM 201 GRAHAM TX 76450

Place Your Ad Today By Calling

914 Kentucky - Two BR, washer/dryer connections, wood floors, fenced yard, car port, storage shed. $675 rent, $675 deposit. Absolutely no indoor pets or smoking. Call 940-549-4683.

73512

RANGER OPERATING CO Plaintiff

Issued and given under my hand and seal of said Court at office, this the 27th day of September, 2012.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to Chapter 59, Texas Property Code, Graham SelfStorage which is located at 215 North Ohio Street in Graham, Texas 76450 and ADG Climate Controlled Storage located at 1520 Highway 380; Graham, Texas 76450 will hold a public auction of property being sold to satisfy a landlord’s lien. Sale will be at 10:00 A.M. September 29th, Saturday, at 215 North Ohio, Graham, TX 76450. Property will be sold for cash. Deposit for removal and cleanup may be temporarily required. Seller reserves the right to not accept any bid and to withdraw property from sale. Property in each space will be sold by the space. Property being sold includes contents in spaces of tenants’ below:

When you purchase a line ad, you also get online exposure at www.grahamleader.com

3/1-3/4 Bath, 1319 Rolling Hills, new carpet, new appliances. $900 monthly, $400 deposit. 940-549-0938

940-337-3797

according to requirements of law, and the mandates thereof, and make due return as the law directs.

Get double exposure by placing a line ad.

3/1, 1352 Hillcrest, $725 monthly, $725 deposit. 817614-5532

812 Austin St. • Graham, TX

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: “You have been sued. You may employ an attorney. If you or your attorney does not file a written answer with the clerk who issued this citation by 10:00 a.m. on the Monday next following the expiration of forty-two days after the date of issuance of this citation and petition, a default judgment may be taken against you.”

APPLICATION TO APPOINT A RECEIVER Petition at or before 10:00 o’clock, A.M., of the Monday next after the expiration of forty-two days after the date of issuance of this citation, the same being day of, before the Honorable 90th District Court of Young County, Texas at the Court House of said County in Graham, Texas. Said Plaintiff’s Petition was filed in said court on September 27th, 2012 in this case numbered 31897 on the docket of said court, and styled

Classifieds

2 / 1 , 9 0 8 Vi r g i n i a . $ 3 5 0 monthly, $350 deposit. 940549-0938

HOUSE FOR RENT

THE STATE OF TEXAS

Greeting: You are hereby commanded to appear by filing a written answer to the Plaintiff ’s

1302 B Calaveras, $500 month, $350 deposit. 940549-0938.

3 br/1ba, washer/dryer hookup, garage, plus large fenced back yard, $650/month.

ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER MISTY M PRATT 801 CHASE TEXAS TOWER FORT WORTH TX 76102

TO: DAWSON, RUBY DYER, D A W S O N , R AY M O N D , D AW S O N , B E N J A M I N , BROWN, T H, WEST JACK D, ROBERTSON, ARTHUR, ROBERTSON, ROBERT D, ROBERTSON, KENNETH LEE ROBERTSON, FRANK, R O B E RT S O N , R O B E RT L JR, ROBERTSON, RICHARD DANIEL, R O B E RT S O N , R A N D A L CHARLES, CARTER, VL Defendants

1/1, Travel Trailer, set up for permanent living, all bills & maintenance paid. Deposit required. Laundry on-site. 940-550-8094, 940-549-0784.

Nice 2/1, refrigerator, stove, washer/dryer connection, fenced yard, storage, carport 206 Mesquite; $610. (940) 521-7756.

CLERK OF THE COURT JAYME ROGERS 516 FOURTH STREET ROOM 201 GRAHAM TX 76450

790 RENT TO OWN

1100 Indiana 1, 2, 3 BR & Townhouses, from $445 to $565

The Quarters Apartments

THE GRAHAM LEADER • 11B

The Federal Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in the sale, rental, leasing and financing of housing. The law also prohibits discriminatory advertising on the basis of race, sex, color, religion, national origin, mental or physical handicap or marital status. The law covers any potential or actual sale, lease, rental, eviction, price terms, privileges or any service in relation to the sale of or use of housing. The law not only prohibits advertisements which restrict access to housing based on the protected categories, but also prohibits advertisements which indicate a preference for or against a person based on a protected category. In some circumstances, the use of local terminology, symbols or directions to real estate for sale or rent may indicate a discriminatory preference. It is the intent and goal of The Graham Leader for each advertiser who wishes to place an advertisement in The Leader to comply with the Federal Fair Housing Act. Any advertisement which is perceived to contain language contrary to the act will be rejected or changed to remove the offending reference(s). There may be situations where it is not clear whether particular language is objectionable. Such advertisements should be referred to the publisher for consideration and determination. Under certain circumstances, advertisers may claim that because of the nature of the housing being advertised, they are not subject to Fair Housing laws. Such claims are irrelevant for the purpose of considering advertisements for publication in The Graham Leader. Every housing advertisement published in The Graham Leader is subject to all provisions of the Federal Fair Housing Act.

+1Ê"1-  "**",/1 /9

Graham’s Beauty Is Our Duty!


cyan magenta yellow black

Woodworker carves out new hobby

Lady Blues beat Iowa Park

Page 3A

Page 8A

THE GRAHAM LEADER Oldest business institution in Young County • Established August 16, 1876

VOL. 137, NO. 16 • SINGLE COPY 75¢

MIDWEEK EDITION • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

www.grahamleader.com

Back tax payments boost county funds BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com

Keep Graham Beautiful members assist local residents who lined up Saturday morning to drop off documents to be shredded, as well as old tires and electronic equipment. (Photos by Carla McKeown)

Brush Up Graham continues this week BY CARLA MCKEOWN editor@grahamleader.com Saturday morning dawned overcast and chilly, but the dreary weather did not stop the citizens of Graham from turning out to take advantage of Keep Graham Beautiful’s Brush Up Graham cleanup project. At one time Saturday, a line of local residents waiting to drop off their recyclables snaked around the Downtown Square. They came in cars and pickups; they came pulling trailers full of tires and old computers; they came hauling box after box of papers that needed to be shredded. “We filled two large trailers with old computers and electronics, and the Shred-It truck was busy for almost four hours straight,” said Roy Robinson, president See KGB, Page 7A

Young County Commissioners discussed start-up funds for the first quarter of the new fiscal year at Monday’s meeting. County Auditor Cheryl Roberts explained that the bulk of the first couple of months’ money for the four precincts comes out of the general fund. The county doesn’t start collecting most of its revenue until property taxes start rolling in December and January. Roberts said the general fund was looking good for Young County thanks to the receipt of some delinquent taxes. There is about $900,000 in the fund, Roberts said. Usually at this time of the year, that amount is between $300,000 and $500,000. “We’re still paying some September bills, but we’ll probably come out $300,000 better than normal when it’s all said and done, maybe a little better,” she said. With that, the road and bridge start-up money will be $94,250 per

precinct to get crews started and paid until property tax collection gets underway. The commissioners also discussed renewal in NACo, the National Association of Counties. For a $400 membership fee, any resident in the county can receive a prescription drug discount card good at participating pharmacies. According to a CVS Caremark customer service representative, nine out of 10 pharmacies accept the NACo prescription discount card, including Walmart. The amount of the discount depends on the prescription. “If two people use it, it’s worth it,” said Precinct 4 Commissioner Jimmy Wiley. “One prescription can cost $400.” Precinct 3 Commissioner Stacey Rogers said NACo offers more than just a prescription discount. “We’re helping to support this organization and their lobbying efforts,” Rogers said. To get a card, visit the county auditor or treasurer’s office on the second floor of the courthouse.

Robert Garner hands off some electronic equipment to KGB Director Jerry Shultz. Saturday’s cloudy weather did not deter Grahamites from filling up two trailers with old computers and electronics.

Fields of Faith slated for tonight BY JULIANNE MURRAH gninews@grahamleader.com Students all over the nation will celebrate Fields of Faith at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, and those Graham ISD students participating will gather at Newton Field for the local event. The gates will open at 6:45 p.m., and students are asked to be seated by 7 p.m. They will share their Christian faith and fellowship with each other during the sixth annual national Fields of Faith event. This year marks the fourth time the event has taken place in Graham. “My experience is, I think the kids are interested in looking for something to put a little faith into,” said coach Robert Sides, Graham Fields of Faith leadership team member. “They know there’s a need for their lives. They sometimes don’t know what that need is.” Some students, in an effort to find something to focus on during a troubled time in their lives, may find negative things to concentrate

Your Local Weather Local Forecast Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

10/10

10/11

10/12

10/13

84/55

75/63

82/64

Partly cloudy skies. High 84F. Winds S at 10 to 20 mph.

Plenty of sun. Highs in the mid 70s and lows in the low 60s.

Times of sun and clouds. Highs in the low 80s and lows in the mid 60s.

80/65 Mix of sun and clouds. Highs in the low 80s and lows in the mid 60s.

©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service

The Humane Society of Young County reported that two women in this silver Nissan were spotted dumping cats at the shelter after hours. Dumping animals is abandonment and against the law in Texas. (Photo courtesy of Roy Spain)

Animal abandonment becoming more common BY CHERRY RUSHIN newsdesk@grahamleader.com

More than 100 community church leaders greeted those entering Newton Field with cheers and high-fives at Fields of Faith last year. About 2,000 people, primarily teens took part in the event. (Photo by Cherry Rushin) on. Fields of Faith provides an opportunity for students to help one another. “They turn to their friends and their families aren’t always there

for them, so they turn to things that aren’t healthy for a young person,” Sides said. “I think Fields of Faith

Weather

NEWS BRIEFS

High Low Rain Tuesday, 10/2 75 57 0 Wednesday, 10/3 82 52 0 Thursday, 10/4 79 59 0 Friday, 10/5 68 54 0 Saturday, 10/6 54 45 0 Sunday, 10/7 48 37 0 Monday, 10/8 64 32 0 Rain: Month 0.00 • Year 33.09 Lake Graham at capacity: 1,075.00 Current level: 1,071.26 Temperatures and rainfall provided by the National Weather Service.

See FAITH, Page 6A

Chalupa Luncheon set for tomorrow The annual Chalupa Luncheon fundraiser will be Thursday, Oct. 11, on the Downtown Square. The Graham Regional Medical Center Ladies Auxiliary will host the event, which will begin with the bake sale and gift shop sale at 10 a.m., followed by the luncheon from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The cost will be $5. Take-out or-

People have been dumping animals at the Humane Society after hours, and it’s possible they don’t know that’s against the law. Kim Shawver, Graham Police animal control officer, said that under the Texas Penal Code, knowing and intentionally or recklessly abandoning an animal in your care is illegal. “If you feed an animal in Texas, it’s yours,” Shawver said. “There are people that will bring a dog to the shelter and say, ‘Oh it’s not my dog; it was dumped.’ We don’t

ders are available. The final event will be the prize drawing at 1 p.m. Tickets cost $1 each or 6 for $5 and may be purchased from any auxiliary member, at GRMC’s Gift Shop. The tickets also will be on sale during the luncheon. Winners do not have to be present to win. Money raised from the bake sale, gift shop, luncheon and prize drawing will benefit GRMC to purchase medical equipment.

care. If you know the dog’s name, age and breed, more than likely, it’s your dog.” Kim Baxter, executive director of Humane Society of Young County, said she’s seen an increase of animals dumped at the shelter. “We had a donkey put in a stall at the arena and left,” Baxter said. “People are dumping at the gate when we’re not open. “Monday, two women drove up in a car and dumped a cat off, and it ran off. And they were going to dump another one, but a staff member See ANIMALS, Page 6A

Inside Lifestyles .............................. Page 3A Calendar .............................. Page 4A Obituaries ............................ Page 5A Police Blotter ....................... Page 7A Sports ................................... Page 8A TV ......................................... Page 9A Entertainment ..................... Page 6A Classified ........................... Page 10A

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THE GRAHAM LEADER • 7A

www.grahamleader.com

Thursday, Sept. 27 Jail count: 67 3:43 a.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported. 5:29 a.m.—Livestock complaint reported. 8:00 a.m.—Suspect arrested for evading arrest at Indiana and Carolina streets. 10:04 a.m.—Silent 9-1-1 calls reported. 10:18 a.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 300 block of Smith Street, and patient transported by ambulance to GRMC for chest pain. 10:48 a.m.—Silent 9-1-1 calls reported on Flat Top Mountain Road. 11:15 a.m.—Neighbor disturbance reported in the 500 block of Victory Street. 1:37 p.m.—Attempted suicide reported in the 200 block of Ragland Street.

Friday, Sept. 28 Jail count: 69 1:02 a.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1300 block of First Street, and patient transported by ambulance to GRMC for shoulder and hip pain. 1:46 a.m.—Suspect arrested for possession and delivery of drugs at Fireman’s Park. 7:06 a.m.—Gas drive-off reported in the 2800 block of Highway 16 South. 7:47 a.m.—Traffic hazard reported on Fourth Street. 8:37 a.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1200 block of Highway 16 South, and patient transported by ambulance to GRMC. 10:16 a.m.—Suspicious subject reported at Texas and Fourth streets. 10:55 a.m.—Domestic disturbance reported in the 1500 block of Old Jacksboro Highway. 12:02 p.m.—Vehicle hitand-run accident reported at Tennessee Street and Old Jacksboro Highway. 12:03 p.m.—Utility complaint reported in the 1300

of KGB. “About 200 tires were dropped off, and the brush drop-off at Fireman’s Park was busy, too. We are very pleased with the response.” The activities on Saturday kicked off a week-long campaign encouraging Grahamites to brush up their little corner of the community. Brush Up Graham will continue through Sunday, Oct. 14, with the large disposal bins located around town and the brush drop-off area at Fireman’s Park. The drop-off is for brush only; trash, tires, etc. are not allowed. Robinson said the only disappointment about the cleanup efforts over the weekend was that the large trash containers placed in Graham neighborhoods for residential trash were misused by people who dumped construction trash and tires into the containers. “The neighborhood containers were overwhelmed and abused,” Robinson said. “It is very clear that they are not to be used for construction trash and tires. The

Saturday, Sept. 29 Jail count: 81 12:07 a.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1600 block of Hillcrest Drive, and patient transported by ambulance to GRMC. 12:07 a.m.—Subject reported missing in the 1400 block of Scenic Drive. 3:22 a.m.—Disturbance reported in the 600 block of Indiana Street. 5:05 a.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from GRMC to Wichita Falls. 7:27 a.m.—Medical emergency reported on Cliff Drive. 9:00 a.m.—Theft reported

Sunday, Sept. 30 Jail count: 77 12:15 a.m.—Suspicious circumstances reported in the 200 block of Mesquite Street. 1:52 a.m.—Reckless driving reported on FM 209. 7:34 a.m.—Vehicle accident reported with no injuries at Second and Elm streets. 8:27 a.m.—Burglar alarm reported in the 100 block of Carol Street. 9:11 a.m.—Parking complaint reported in the 400 block of Elm Street. 9:22 a.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from GRMC to Wichita Falls. 9:40 a.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported in the 900 block of Carolina Street. 10:23 a.m.—Silent 9-1-1 calls reported in the 500 block of Brazos Street. 11:22 a.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from GRMC to Fort Worth. 12:57 p.m.—Suspicious circumstances reported in the 1500 block of Avenue A. 2:45 p.m.—Information reported in the 800 block of Carolina Street.

abuse is going to spoil it for everyone. We just ask people not to abuse the service.” The KGB and IESI Disposal Company set up the 30-yard trash containers at five locations in Graham for residents to use for disposing of trash and larger items. The large bins are located at the corner of Indiana and Calaveras streets; Third Street at Indiana, across from the swimming pool; Old Jacksboro Road behind Cross Timbers Church; West Street between First and Second streets; and Carolina/ Lindy between Allison and Hillcrest. “The containers are filling up as fast as IESI can empty them,” Robinson said. By Monday afternoon, less than 72 hours after the bins were placed around town, at least 600 cubic yards of trash had been collected. “Keep Graham Beautiful wants to thank the residents of Graham for the overwhelming response to Brush Up Graham,” he said. “We just really appreciate their support for Keep Graham Beautiful’s slogan, ‘Graham’s Beauty is Our Duty.’”

3:02 p.m.—Livestock complaint reported on highways 16 North and 114. 3:27 p.m.—Domestic disturbance reported in the 1300 block of Fourth Street. 3:56 p.m.—Assault reported on Highway 380. 4:00 p.m.—Reckless driving reported on Highway 380. 4:04 p.m.—Burglar alarm reported in the 900 block of Kintner Road. 4:28 p.m.—Domestic disturbance reported in the 400 block of Lower Tonk Road. 5:47 p.m.—Vehicle repossession reported in the 300 block of Gleese Street. 5:57 p.m.—Suspicious subject reported. 6:27 p.m.—Disturbance reported at Grove and Brazos streets. 7:03 p.m.—Disturbance reported in the 1100 block of Blewett Street. 7:09 p.m.—Suspicious subject reported on Elm Street. 7:29 p.m.—Vehicle reported stolen in the 3100 block of Fish Creek. 7:57 p.m.—Suspicious circumstances reported in the 800 block of Tennessee Street. 8:08 p.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1200 bock of Corvadura Street. 8:57 p.m.—Family violence reported in the 1200 block of Fourth Street. 10:31 p.m.—Civil matter reported in the 2000 block of Lindy Street. 10:41 p.m.—Suspect arrested for impersonating a peace officer on Highway 380 East. 11:59 p.m.—Fire reported at Ribble and Old Bunger roads.

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in the 300 block of Shawnee Street. 9:33 a.m.—Hold-up alarm reported in the 1500 block of Fourth Street. 9:51 a.m.—Theft reported in the 700 block of South Street. 11:29 a.m.—Criminal mischief reported in the 600 block of Indiana Street. 11:50 a.m.—Burglar alarm reported in the 200 block of Oak Street. 1:10 p.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported in the 1500 block of Highway 380 Bypass. 1:41 p.m.—Disturbance reported on Plum Street. 2:05 p.m.—Suspect arrested on TDC blue warrant. 2:24 p.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported. 3:05 p.m.—Vehicle repossession reported in the 1200 block of Indian Mound Road. 3:31 p.m.—Information reported in the 1400 block of Scenic Drive. 5:02 p.m.—Suspicious circumstances reported in the 800 block of Carolina Street. 5:46 p.m.—Livestock complaint reported on FM 3329. 5:47 p.m.—Livestock complaint reported on FM 2178. 5:51 p.m.—Fraud reported. 5:55 p.m.—Criminal mischief reported in the 1500 block of Uselton Road. 6:04 p.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 900 block of Eastside Lake Road, an patient transported by ambulance to GRMC. 6:12 p.m.—Livestock complaint reported at Highway 16 North and Cliff Drive. 6:32 p.m.—Traffic hazard reported in the 3900 block of Highway 380 East. 7:06 p.m.—Civil standby reported in the 1200 block of Randy Street. 9:50 p.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported in the 1300 block of Florea Street. 10:14 p.m.—Information reported in the 2100 block of Highway 16 South.

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KGB Continued from Page 1A

block of Corto Street. 12:23 p.m.—Suspicious vehicle reported in the 300 block of Smith Street. 1:48 p.m.—Domestic disturbance reported in the 1500 block of Old Jacksboro Road. 1:56 p.m.—Burglary of habitation reported in the 1100 block of Second Street. 2:01 p.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1100 block of Eastside Lake Road, and patient transported by ambulance to GRMC. 2:46 p.m.—Suspicious circumstances reported at Third and Oak streets. 4:00 p.m.—Information reported in the 2400 block of Highway 114 East. 4:02 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from the 1200 block of Corvadura Street to GRMC. 4:39 p.m.—Livestock complaint reported on Highway 251. 4:42 p.m.—Civil matter reported in the 1000 block of FM 701. 4:46 p.m.—Reckless driving reported in the 2100 block of Highway 16 South. 4:47 p.m.—Disturbance reported in the 3900 block of Highway 380 West. 5:27 p.m.—Livestock complaint reported on Highway 251. 5:45 p.m.—Information reported in the 1500 block of Old Jacksboro Road. 7:13 p.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported. 7:57 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from the 1000 block of Cliff Drive to GRMC. 8:27 p.m.—Suspicious vehicle reported in the 300 block of Shawnee Street. 10:11 p.m.—Suspicious subject reported in the 1500 block of Old Jacksboro Road. 10:19 p.m.—Prowler reported in the 100 block of Calhoun Road. 10:29 p.m.—Disturbance reported in the 1500 block of Green Street. 10:39 p.m.—Suspect arrested for public intoxication in the 1500 block of Green Street. 10:42 p.m.—Suspect arrested for possession of a controlled substance in the 100 block o Calhoun Road. 10:43 p.m.—Vehicle hit-andrun accident reported on Virginia Street. 10:46 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from GRMC to Wichita Falls.

64896

1:37 p.m.—Attempted suicide reported on Gleese Street. 1:39 p.m.—Outside agency assistance requested. 1:57 p.m.—Vehicle accident reported with no injuries on Highway 16 South. 2:01 p.m.—Wallet reported stolen in the 900 block of Grove Street. 3:44 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from the 1300 block of First Street to GRMC for evaluation. 3:45 p.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1900 block of Crawford Street, and patient transported by ambulance to GRMC. 3:55 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from the 1300 block of First Street to GRMC for evaluation. 3:56 p.m.—Vehicle accident reported with no injuries at Cherry and Shawnee streets. 4:00 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from GRMC back to a nursing home. 4:16 p.m.—Domestic disturbance reported in the 300 block of Brazos Street. 4:44 p.m.—Ambulance assistance requested in the 1300 block of First Street. 5:09 p.m.—Information reported in the 2100 block of Highway 16 South. 5:37 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from GRMC to Fort Worth. 6:16 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from GRMC to Fort Worth. 6:23 p.m.—Animal complaint reported in the 200 block of Gleese Street. 6:37 p.m.—Family violence reported in the 200 block of Gleese Street. 6:45 p.m.—Close patrol requested in the 800 block of Plum Street. 7:33 p.m.—Vehicle accident reported with no injuries at Highway 16 South and Dark Canyon Road.

60382

Wednesday, Sept. 26 Jail count: 68 12:06 p.m.—Funeral escort reported. 12:15 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from GRMC to Fort Worth. 1:02 p.m.—Suspicious subjects reported around a residence in the 1300 block of Johnnie Street. 2:16 p.m.—Close patrol requested at the Young County Arena. 3:06 p.m.—Unattended death reported in the 100 block of Gleese Street. 3:38 p.m.—Suspicious circumstances reported on Pine Tree Road. 4:33 p.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported in the 100 block of Summitt Street. 4:42 p.m.—Patient transferred by ambulance from the 1300 block of First Street to GRMC. 4:52 p.m.—Vehicle accident reported with no injuries at Graham Junior High School. 5:04 p.m.—Suspect arrested at Pine and Young streets. 5:19 p.m.—Burglary reported in the 1100 block of Blewett Street. 5:21 p.m.—Suspect arrested on JP-1 warrant in Palo Pinto. 5:48 p.m.—Ambulance assistance requested in the 1900 block of Lindy Street. 6:10 p.m.—Dog reported loose in the 1500 block of Mimosa Circle. 6:25 p.m.—Cow reported loose on FM 1287. 6:35 p.m.—Burglar alarm reported in the 300 block of Cliff Drive. 6:57 p.m.—Children reported driving dirt bikes in the 1500 block of Avenue D. 7:18 p.m.—9-1-1 hang-up reported in the 1400 block of Doral Court. 7:59 p.m.—Close patrol requested in the 900 block of Calaveras Street. 8:19 p.m.—Vehicle accident reported with no injuries in the 1400 block of Avenue D. 9:03 p.m.—Medical emergency reported in the 1000 block of Cliff Drive, and patient transported by ambulance to GRMC. 9:36 p.m.—Suspicious subject reported in the 1100 block of Remington Street.

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Community Service