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The Graduate Union Annual Report

THE MELBOURNE GRADUATE Vol. 71 No. 1

April, 2018

Annual Report 2017 The Graduate Union of The University of Melbourne Inc.

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 1


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away. — Maya Angelou

Annual Report of The Graduate Union of The University of Melbourne Incorporated Editorial: The Publications Team Printed by: City Copy The Melbourne Graduate April 2018 — Volume 71, Number 1 Periodical Publication of The Graduate Union Print Post Approved PP337834/00022 Incorporated Association Registration Number A0023234B Page 2 | Volume 71, Number 1


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Contents The President’s Message

4

The Chair of Council’s Message

5

The CEO/Head of College’s Message

6

2017 Council Member Attendance

8

2017 – 2018 Council Members

9

Governance and Nominations

10

Subcommittee Governance Standards Rules and Regulations Composition of Council

Graduate Union Council Election

14

Personal statements from Candidates Rules and Regulations

Membership and Marketing

17

45

The In-House International Collegium Graduate House Student Group

Year at a glance

48

Fundraising and Benefactions Working Party

50

Subcommittee Advancement Governance and Engagement Network Major Funds secured and major Projects 'ready-to-go' Awards Donor Thank You Day The Diamond Jubilee 'Roaring 20s' Fundraising Gala

Thank You for your Support

Meeting Services Celebrations at Graduate House Organisation Logos Visiting Dignitaries Christmas In July GU Collegiate Culinary Section and the bar 2017 Monthly Luncheons 2017 College tables 2017 Women's Forums Investment for your Future Other GU Collegiate events

Membership in 2017

Resident Membership

58

Donors and Bequest in 2017 Some High Contributors Helen R Freeman Scholarships

Buildings and Facilities

63

Meet The Graduate Union Team

70

Finance and Audit

72

Financial Report for the year ended 31 December 2017 Independent Auditor’s Report

75 90

38

New members Honorary Life membership Awards Inaugural Patrons of The Graduate Union Australia Day 2017 Honour Award recipients Valete

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

The President’s Message Our planning application for the redevelopment of the terraces is progressing well and 2017 saw the launch of our Diamond Jubilee Capital Fundraising campaign to build this northern wing. We are grateful to all segments of our membership for your generous donations, as well as your continued spreading around the world of the message that this is an important and much-needed redevelopment. Following on from the Association’s conferring of honorary memberships, I have felt privileged to receive visiting delegations from ambassadorial representatives of a number of countries whose citizens have been, are or might be residents at Graduate House or Members of our Association.

It is with pleasure that I present to you my third annual message as President of this unique and multifaceted Association. In 2017 we have continued our progress against the key priorities of our 2016–2018 Strategic Plan, and with the comprehensiveness and robustness of our business planning. Our goal is to become a household and global name as an innovative and influential membership. Though we have a way to go with visibility and reach, I am confident that we are making headway and I thank our Members — here, far and wide — for their contributions. Another key goal is to provide a world-class residential college experience for our graduate students, academics and researchers. From 2016 to 2017 we saw a near 25% increase in the number of postgraduate enrolled students in this Carlton precinct. The thirteen Barry Street apartments, acquired late in 2016, have seen high occupancy rates, as have all the Leicester Street rooms. These results and our analyses of a continuing, strong and increasing market demand, validate our strategy both to acquire property off-site and to redevelop the three wings of Graduate House.

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I extend congratulations and farewell to Elizabeth Alexander AM who ended her term as the 21st Chancellor of The University of Melbourne in 2016, and welcome Mr Allan Myers AC QC as the 22nd Chancellor, who commenced in 2017. Mr Myers gave an inspiring speech at our August Donor Thank You Lunch and I have had the pleasure of speaking with him further about how our Union and House can assist with the strategic objective of The University of Melbourne to support the lived experience of graduates while in Melbourne. The support our Association enjoys, includes, of course, the ongoing engagement and involvement of our Members, many of whom I have had the honour of meeting over the last year. We have also the dedication of your hardworking Council and subcommittee members who give us world-class governance. I thank also our executive and staff for yet another successful, productive and vibrant year.

Dr Ken V Loughnan AO President of The Graduate Union


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Chairperson of Council’s Message 2022 will mark sixty years since the first terrace house was opened as a college to seven postgraduates, the first being Brian Alec Parker from London. Brian graduated in 1964 from The University of Melbourne, one of only 18 that year, as a Master of Arts. With the support of our Members, our Association and residential college have come a long way since these origins in 1911 and 1957, respectively.

At the first meeting of a provisional committee on 4th May, 1911, our founders constituted three subcommittees. One was to form a Graduates Association, now known as The Graduate Union. A second was to initiate a Graduates Day at The University of Melbourne and a third was to form a self-governing College of Graduates. Forty-six years later and inspired by London House, which had been established under a charitable trust as a residential centre for international graduates undertaking post graduate work in London, the Graduates Association purchased Gladstone Terrace, a row of seven houses. 2017 marked our Diamond Jubilee being sixty years since the realisation of the vision of a residential college for graduates. Today as members of The Graduate Union we are also members of a graduate college that is inclusive, self-governing and democratic. Our Diamond Jubilee Capital campaign was established to raise funds to build modern facilities so that we may meet the needs of the next generation of graduates.

It has been an honour to serve as Chairperson of your Council over the last four years as we build on this strong legacy. I feel proud to have had the opportunity to serve during this important time of growth in membership, strengthening of strategic focus, expansion of our buildings and facilities, providing a sound financial position and building a culture of philanthropy. 2017 has seen progress on our three year Strategic Plan together with our G-House and G-Union ten-year master plans. We continue to build our vision of a graduate college with more accommodation, additional sites and improved facilities for the growing number of graduates. We strive to build the intellectual capital of our college to meet the needs of graduates throughout their study, research, career, family, volunteer and retirement stages of life. I thank our President Dr Ken Loughnan AO and fellow Council Members for their dedication and commitment to the good stewardship of our Association. I also thank our CEO/Head of College, Dr Kerry Bennett and her team for their hard work and commitment during the year. I look forward to continuing my contribution to Council and thank Members for their engagement, constructive suggestions, volunteering and pro bono support.

Mr Rhys Watson Chairperson of Council

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Ceo/Head of College’s Message The Graduate Union of The University of Melbourne Incorporated (Association) is a charity with principal purpose to advance education for the benefit of the community. It achieves this purpose by encouraging and assisting postgraduate studies and research, particularly through the provision of residential accommodation, and the fostering and maintenance of academic, educational and cultural relations between graduates. The Association’s mission is to bring together graduates from graduation and through postgraduate study, careers and retirement — in active international membership networks, residential colleges and meeting places for the socially responsible advancement and application of education. The values of the Association are collegiality, universal friendship, lifelong learning, social conscious and responsibility, intellectual challenge and contribution and intercultural and interdisciplinary experiences. The ownership of the Association is relatively unique worldwide, particularly when compared to other university residential colleges owned by universities or religious bodies. Autonomous from all universities — though with an enduring legacy and strong relationship with The University of Melbourne — and with a constitution providing for a non-political and non-sectarian culture, the Association is owned and run by its Members who are graduates of all universities, disciplines, ethnicities and life stages. The principle activities of the Association are the provision of: (a) college accommodation to postgraduate students, and visiting academics, researchers and those undertaking other university business; (b) meeting and function services for the education, not-for-profit, government and professional development sectors; and (c) services to bring together the membership for social good.

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The Association’s market is broad, diverse and global because its activities are across the lifespan for learning and social good at any stage in any place after first graduation. The predominant market segments to which services are provided are: (a) postgraduate students enrolled at The University of Melbourne and RMIT University who reside in college; (b) college alumni around the world; (c) career-aged graduates who attend meetings and professional development sessions at Graduate House; and (d) graduates who engage in GU Collegiate functions, receive and contribute to the Association’s publications, and give guidance, volunteer time, donations and bequests. The external landscape in which the Association operates is competitive and drives identification and building of the Association’s unique value propositions and its sustained and sound market positions. The Association adds value through the provision of collegial, graduate-focused, safe, economic and conveniently located accommodation with catering, room service, Wi-Fi and a friendly, welcoming and diverse community. With approximately 110,000 students enrolled at The University of Melbourne and RMIT University — 35% of these being postgraduate (n=38K) — demand exceeds supply of student accommodation and this imbalance will continue even with the anticipated addition of up to 5,000 new student rooms in new developments in the Parkville precinct over the next three years. The Association’s response to the demand has been to continue to provide a good collegial experience and to market accommodation options between semesters (e.g., for summer and winter schools). For 2017, this has again resulted in high occupancy rates — 92%. Additionally, thirteen apartments in an existing building in Barry Street have been acquired


The Graduate Union Annual Report

and refurbished, other off-site acquisitions are being evaluated through feasibility and financial modelling, and significant staged redevelopments on-site are being planned. Value is added also through the provision of opportunities to meet and learn from others, and for professional, social and personal development. The demand from not-for-profit, university, government and professional bodies for meeting and function services in this precinct continues also to be higher than supply, particularly for what this Association provides — a ‘Ritz’ experience for a charity price so that these groups can get on with the job of contributing to society through education, training and social good. The higher student numbers results in a greater need by university groups to meet for the planning and evaluation of research, teaching, expansion, advancement and development. With increasing emphasis also on compulsory and continuous professional development for those in careers, as well as on training, transition, re-entry, executive and governance programs, this imbalance between demand and supply is forecasted to continue, notwithstanding other developments in the precinct. The Association’s response to the demand has been to continue provision of economic, conveniently located, hygienic services with familiar, friendly staff, flexible catering and audio-visual facilities. Marketing has been focused on repeat business and on recruiting delegates also to membership, and for convenors of small-tomedium-sized events. Hours of operation have been increased with many more weekend and evening events, and a process of reiterative quality control and analysis of feedback has been continued. The redevelopment plans also include more meeting and function spaces, including a fixed-seat theatrette, editing suite, music rooms and subdividable flexible configuration spaces.

GU Collegiate programs in 2017 included the traditional Monthly Lunches, again with an excellent series of speakers and wonderful catering, as well as College Tables, the annual General Meeting Dinner, the Chairperson’s Cocktail function and the annual Christmas Party. Additionally, the Resident Members, through the Graduate House Student Group, organised cultural dinners, weekend excursions, film nights and many other social activities. JobFocus sessions were also introduced to guide early career graduates through the complex world of securing employment in a very competitive job market. The focus in 2018 will be to realise the capital required for the terrace redevelopment through the Diamond Jubilee Capital Fundraising Campaign, and to commence the detailed design and construction phase. The Association's third strategic plan (2019– 2021) will be developed with emphasis on through-life delivery of education and support services, and continued expansion of graduate accommodation options and services. The crowdfunding site — Fund Life Long Learning — will be launched together with a supporting information campaign to encourage the uploading of ‘people’, ‘program’ or ‘places’ funding-request ventures. I thank my hard-working and dedicated Graduate House colleagues, our President, Council and all members of its subcommittees and our wonderful Members for a productive and progressive 2017. Together we are an Association that is vibrant, influential, innovative, intelligent, everresponsive to graduate needs and contributing to important education, research and global good societal developments.

Dr Kerry M B Bennett CEO and Head of College

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

2017 Council Member Attendance Your Council works hard to sustain and grow our Association. Many of your Council Members, including the President, attend Graduate House for weekly meetings, contributing much more than indicated in the schedule of governance meetings from the 1st January to 31st December, 2017 shown in the table below. Subcommittee members who are not on Council and thus not included in the table below are acknowledged in the last paragraph of each subcommittee report. Gratitude is extended also to The University of Melbourne Vice-Chancellor’s representatives on Council, Jo Ligouris and Sarah Banks, for their service to governance and our Association.

Council

M&M

B&F

G&N

Total

%

P

A

P

A

P

A

P

A

Watson, R A

17

82

5

5

4

4

4

3

4

2

Asthana, M from June

7

86

3

2

2

2

2

2

Cobbin, P E to May

6

83

2

1

2

2

Cowie, D G M

13

85

5

5

Davis OAM, R K

13 100

5

5

Green, J M to May

6

100

2

2

Kelleher, M R

13

92

5

5

Mirabelli, V J

13

77

5

5

Pagone, G from June

7

71

3

2

Ryall, K F

13

77

5

3

Santalucia, L

13 100

5

5

Fitzgerald, F M to September

9

56

4

3

Luo, N from December

1

100

1

1

Nguyen, V

9

67

5

3

Southwick, P

11

64

5

3

Elected

4 4 4

4

3

4 3

4

4

4

2

4

4

2

2

4

3

2

1

3 4

4

2

1

F&A P

A

2

2

4

3

2

2

2

2

4

4

4

4

4

3

Appointed

M&M B&F G&N F&A P A

3

4

1

3

2

Membership and Marketing subcommittee Buildings and Facilities subcommittee Governance and Nominations subcommittee Finance and Audit subcommittee Possible number of meetings that could be attended Actual number attended from 1st January, 2016 to 31st December, 2016 Chairperson of Council or subcommittee for the whole of 2017

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

Council Members 2017 – 2018

Dr Ken V Loughnan AO

Cr Rhys Watson

Cr Paul Southwick

Cr Keith Ryall

Cr Mary R Kelleher

President

Chairperson of Council

Vice-Chairperson of Council Appointed to Council to Sept 2018

Chairperson of Membership and Marketing subcommittee

Chairperson of Buildings and Facilities subcommittee

Cr David Cowie

Cr Kingsley Davis OAM

Chairperson of Finance and Audit subcommittee

Chairperson of Governance and Nominations subcommittee

Cr Vincent Mirabelli

Cr Leo Santalucia

Cr Molina Asthana

Cr The Hon Tony Pagone

Vice-Chancellor Representatives from The University of Melbourne

Cr Faith Fitzgerald

Cr Viv Nguyen

Cr Nan (Damon) Luo

Appointed to Council to Sept 2017

Appointed to Council to Jun 2018

Appointed to Council to Dec 2018

Cr Jo Ligouris

Cr Sarah Banks

to Dec 2017

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

Governance and Nominations Governance and Nominations Subcommittee As set out in regulation 31.2, the roles and responsibilities of the Governance and Nominations subcommittee are to: (a)

establish excellence in governance practice;

(b) formulate and review policies and practices relating to the effectiveness of Council and of Council subcommittees, and Council succession planning; (c)

oversee Council’s compliance with its governance obligations established by external regulatory authorities;

(d) determine, review and recommend improvements to governance policies; (e)

review and recommend changes to the structure and functioning of Council and of Council subcommittees for effective governance;

(f)

facilitate the understanding by Council Members of their governance role and responsibilities;

(g)

safeguard the process for annual updating of the strategic plan;

(h) research and recommend improvements to the proceedings of Council in relation to meetings, resolutions of Council Members, Council Members’ interests, minutes and registers; (i)

ensure periodic reviews of the terms of reference for each subcommittee;

(j)

ensure periodic reviews of the performance of each subcommittee;

(k)

ensure Council Members are provided with information about professional development opportunities;

(l)

monitor compliance with PART 2 of the Regulations;

(m) establish and operate a procedure for identifying and securing suitable future candidates for election, co-option or appointment to Council; and (n) monitor the mitigation and management of risk which applies to governance and nominations, including the adequacy of internal systems of risk identification and risk treatment.

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Governance Standards Council and Council Members are required to adhere to the governance standards prescribed under the Associations Incorporation Reform Act 2012 (Vic) and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 (Cth). The Governance and Nominations subcommittee monitors and makes policies to ensure adherence to these standards as provided in PART 2 of the Regulations under the headings of: (a)

purposes and not-for-profit nature of the Association;

(b) accountability to Members; (c)

compliance with Australian laws;

(d) suitability of Officers; (e)

duties of Officers; and

(f)

governance values, ethics and behaviours of the Association.

Rules and Regulations Members will recall that resolutions to amend the Rules of the Association were passed at the 2016 annual General Meeting (AGM). One amendment was to rule 38.1 Use of Technology to provide for Council to determine whether or not technology would be made available to Members for remote participation at General Meetings subject to assessments of affordability, reliability and capacity to allow for simultaneous communication. The other amendments were to provide for postal voting on Special Resolutions at General Meetings. Following from these 2016 amendments, in 2017 the Governance and Nominations subcommittee has continued its review of the Rules of the Association, the results of which are contained in five motions to be proposed as Special Resolutions at the 2018 AGM. One proposed amendment is to rule 4.2(c) to ensure consistency with sections 47(2) and 48(3) of the Associations Incorporation Reform Act 2012 (Vic) (the Act) to provide that only where the Rules of the Association do


The Graduate Union Annual Report

not make provision for a matter specified in Schedule 1 to the Act (or otherwise prescribed) that the model rules, to the extent they make provision for that matter, are taken to be included in the Rules of the Association. Amendments are proposed to improve further the provisions for postal voting at General Meetings. One of these amendments is to relocate provisions in rule 43 to rule 36.2(c) to clarify the additional documents and information that may be sent to Members in advance of General Meetings when Special Resolutions are proposed. Another proposed amendment is to clarify that postal voting may only occur for a General Meeting, in addition to voting in person or remote voting through the use of technology if permitted. Additionally, amendments to rule 44.2 are proposed to provide for the Chairperson of a General Meeting to respond to a demand for a poll at a General Meeting on an issue that requires determination as a Special Resolution by deferring the poll to a subsequent General Meeting to enable all Members to have the opportunity to consider and vote on the issue. Amendments to rules for the terms of the Chairperson and the Vice-Chairperson of Council (rules 52.2 and 52.3) are also proposed. These are to indicate the term in these positions refers to the period from the first Council meeting following the AGM until the subsequent AGM rather than to a specified number of days, and does not include the period from appointment to fill a casual vacancy to the next AGM. Similarly, the proposed amendment to rule 54.1 is to clarify that the term in these positions refers to the period from the declaration at the AGM following their election until the AGM three years thereafter. A review of the Association’s Regulations has been conducted in parallel. One purpose of

this review has been to ensure the making of amendments consequential upon the resolutions passed to amend the Rules in 2016. A similar review will continue in 2018 should the resolutions for rule changes outlined above be passed at the AGM. A second key change to the Regulations has resulted from Council’s decision to reconstitute the Fundraising and Benefactions working party as a subcommittee of Council. As set out in the report from this new subcommittee in this Melbourne Graduate, the Fundraising and Benefactions working party was established in 2013 by the then Chairperson of Council, Mr David Sparks, with governance oversight by the Membership and Marketing subcommittee. The reconstitution as a subcommittee follows the rapid expansion of this working party’s charter and portfolio of activities, the complex legislative and compliance requirements for charities and fundraising and the increasing robustness of the discipline of ‘advancement’. Regulation 30 thus now includes provisions for the composition, roles and responsibilities and delegations for this new subcommittee of Council. A third change to the Regulations has been to increase the number of representatives who are not Council Members on each subcommittee. This follows Council acknowledgement of the importance to the continued growth and vibrancy of the Association of listening to all sectors of the membership, of engaging them in consultation and decision-making, and in fostering a sense of ownership and succession planning. Regulation 16.4 thus now provides that, with the exception of the Remuneration subcommittee, each subcommittee may have a maximum of five non-resident and four Resident Members who are not Council Members.

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

Composition of Council The Rules provide for the election of not more than nine Council Members, each with terms of (usually) three years. Cr Molina Asthana, The Hon Justice Cr Gaetano (Tony) Pagone and Cr Rhys Watson were elected in 2017 and their profiles are shown in the 2016 April edition of The Melbourne Graduate. The Association is most grateful for the service on Council by Dr Phillip Cobbin and Mr John Green who concluded terms at the May 2017 AGM.

Dr Phillip Cobbin Dr Cobbin was coopted to Council in 2010, elected in 2011 and re‑elected in 2014. In these seven years, he was Vice-Chairperson of Council, Chairperson (and longstanding member) of the Finance and Audit subcommittee and a member of the Governance and Nominations, the Buildings and Facilities and the Remuneration subcommittees. Dr Cobbin has thus been instrumental in seeing this Association through a period of significant change, including that to its constitution, governance, organisational structure and internal controls. The Association is fortunate to have the continuing service of Dr Cobbin as a member of both the Finance and Audit and the Governance and Nominations subcommittees.

Mr John Green Mr John Green was elected to Council in 2015 and became a member of the Finance and Audit, and Governance and Nominations subcommittees. As Vice-Chairperson of the Governance and Nominations subcommittee he worked tirelessly on the review of the Rules that led to the amendments adopted by Members at the 2016 AGM, as well as on the consequential amendments to the Regulations and the continuing review of the Rules that has informed the motions on notice for Special Resolution at the coming 2018 AGM. The Association is grateful for the continuing service of Mr Green on the Governance and Nominations subcommittee.

Ms Jo Ligouris Jo Ligouris has been one of the two nominees of the Vice-Chancellor of The University of Melbourne on Council since November, 2012. In addition to this governance role with the Association during the last five years, Ms Ligouris has also been Executive Manager of the Faculty of Arts at The University of Melbourne, and since 2014 the Executive Director of this Faculty. Notwithstanding this large portfolio, with major roles and responsibilities and a significant budget, Ms Ligouris has given very generously of her time to Council and to the Buildings and Facilities subcommittee. Ms Ligouris retired from Council in December, 2017 and we thank her for all that she has done to strengthen the Association’s longstanding relationship with The University of Melbourne.

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

Mrs Faith Fitzgerald The Rules also provide for not more than three appointments to Council (rule 49.1(d)). Through this process, Council appointed Mrs Faith Fitzgerald to Council for a one-year term commencing December 2015 and a second one-year term until December 2017. During this time Mrs Fitzgerald served on the Governance and Nominations, and the Membership and Marketing subcommittees, bringing important education, government, strategy, public policy and business perspectives to the Association’s governance approach. Mrs Fitzgerald continues in her role as Secretary to the John Cain Foundation, and the Association thus continues to receive her support through the convening of the monthly lunches for this not-for-profit ‘think tank for social democracy’ at Graduate House. In addition to the reappointments of Cr Nguyen and Cr Southwick to Council for second year terms in June and September, respectively, Council appointed Cr Damon Luo to Council and to the Fundraising and Benefactions subcommittee in December, 2017

Cr Damon Luo Cr Luo Holds a Bachelor of Arts (Hon; Jurisprudence) degree from Oxford University and a Master of Science (Finance) degree from Peking University, China. He is Associate Director of Mergers and Acquisitions, Capital Management with Goldman Sachs (Asia) LLC and was Associate Director of the Luo and Edwards Foundation. While undertaking his doctoral studies in law at The University of Melbourne with the support of the prestigious Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship, Cr Luo is residing at Graduate House.

In conclusion, I thank the 2017 Governance and Nominations subcommittee members — Mr John Green (Co-Vice-Chairperson), Cr Leo Santalucia (Co-Vice-Chairperson from June), Mr Ben Green (Co-Vice-Chairperson to May), Cr Molina Asthana (from June), Dr Phillip Cobbin, Mrs Faith Fitzgerald, Dr Brendan Grabau, Cr Vincent Mirabelli, The Hon Justice Cr Gaetano (Tony) Pagone (from June), Cr Paul Southwick (from June) and Cr Rhys Watson — as well as the secretariat and administration staff at Graduate House.

Cr Kingsley Davis OAM Chairperson of the Governance and Nominations subcommittee

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

Graduate Union Council Election On Thursday, 15th March, 2018 at 4:00 pm, I had received five valid nominations for the above elections which accord with Clauses 39 and 40 in PART 4 Nomination and Election to Council of the Regulations. One nomination has since been withdrawn. The Notice of Election calling for nominations indicated that there were three vacancies to be filled. A poll will therefore be held, with voting closing at 4:00 pm on Friday, 25th May, 2018. A voting paper, a small envelope marked ‘Voting Paper’ and an outer reply paid return addressed envelope, in which the small envelope containing the voting paper is to be placed, are all enclosed with this Melbourne Graduate and May Newsletter to all Members. If you have not received them, please contact The Graduate Union office immediately. Should you have any privacy concerns, you may, having completed the declaration on the envelope addressed to the Returning Officer, enclose that envelope within a larger plain envelope and address it in the manner identical to that shown on the envelope addressed to the Returning Officer, before posting or delivering to the Returning Officer, as directed on the voting paper.

Candidates are listed here, and on the voting paper, in the order in which names were determined by lot in the presence of witnesses:

Kelleher, Mary

Cowie, David

Cutts, Deborah

Davis, Kingsley

The personal statements which follow are in ballot paper order and have been standardised only by listing the surname first, followed by given names (where a candidate is commonly known by a name other than their given name this will be shown in brackets after the given name), the listing of degrees and diplomas and the inclusion of the names of the proposer and seconder of the candidate. A complete listing of Council membership during 2016–2017 and additional information supplied by candidates is available under the About Us tab on The Graduate Union website: www.graduatehouse.com.au. An asterisk* indicates a retiring Council Member seeking re-election. The three members elected in this poll will have terms expiring in May 2021.

Mr Ronald G Ritchie Returning Officer

The Rules of the Association set out purposes as a charity and outline the rights and responsibilities of Members and office holders.

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The Regulations are established by Council to provide further guidance for the governance and management of the Association.


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Personal Statements from Candidates *KELLEHER, Mary, BMus(Melb), DipEd(Melb), BEd(LaTrobe), GradDip(Curriculum Studies)(Melb) Proposer — Rhys Watson Seconder — Deborah Cutts I was elected to Council in 2015, followed by Chair of the Building and Facilities Committee in 2016, and then membership of the Remuneration Committee. Being on Council has been a rewarding three years for me, especially the Building and Facilities Committee, with planning for the new building extension, the new Reception area and sound proofing the front of the building, in preparation for work on the underground rail loop, to name just a few issues. In 2016 and 2017, I thoroughly enjoyed my involvement at Graduate House as a support mentor to the United Board visiting scholars from China, India and the Philippines, during their two month placements at Melbourne University and residency at Graduate House. I am currently Vice President of the Australian Asian Association of Victoria, and former Manager in International Education in the Department of Education. The above experiences lead me to seek re-election to Council.

*COWIE, David, BComm(Melb), MBA(OpenUni) Proposer — Rhys Watson Seconder — Leo Santalucia After four years as a Council member, the achievement I am most proud of is helping improve the financial health of the Graduate Union by reducing interest costs and increasing surpluses; while investing in improved facilities. I am currently Chair of the Finance and Audit Committee, and members of both the Building and Facilities and Remuneration Committees. I lived in a residential college while at the University of Melbourne in the 1980s. There I gained an understanding of the importance of providing a friendly, collegial environment to support students’ academic achievement and personal growth. I worked in financial and commercial roles for more than 30 years for multinational companies in Australia, Hong Kong, Singapore and the United Kingdom. I am currently Chief Financial Officer of The Lost Dogs Home, which helps me contribute as a councillor by giving me exposure to many of the not-for-profit sector issues facing the association.

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

CUTTS, Deborah, BSc(Pharmacology)(Monash) Proposer — David Bottomley Seconder — Mary Kelleher Following my degree and a career in the pharmaceutical industry, I have worked in the not-for-profit sector in advancement. I am Senior Manager, Fundraising and Philanthropy at the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital and on the Board of the Old Melbournians Football Club. I have been Head of Fundraising at The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, General Manager of Development and Community Relations at Alzheimer’s Australia Vic, Group Corporate Affairs Manager at Epworth HealthCare, Corporate and Philanthropic Manager of the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia, and the Mother’s Day Appeal Director at the Royal Women’s Hospital. I am on the Fundraising and Benefactions Committee and seek to bring my significant experience and expertise to Council, particularly for the capital fundraising campaign. My career path has been based on relationship development and management of key stakeholders; members, patients, bequestors, major donors, philanthropic trustees, Government, corporate partners and boards.

*DAVIS, Kingsley, OAM, LLB(Melb) Proposer — Rhys Watson Seconder — Gaetano (Tony) Pagone Barrister-at-Law. Council Member since September, 2011. Vice‑Chair of Council 2015–2017. Chair of Membership and Marketing Committee 2013–2015. Chair of Governance and Nominations Committee since 2015. Member of Remuneration Committee 2013– 2014, 2015–2017. Graduate Union member for 51 years. As Chair of the Governance and Nominations Committee I have introduced extensive amendments to the Association rules and the regulations have been entirely revised. We have developed new rules for Council elections and new regulations for the conduct of meetings and operation of committees. We have established postal voting to make sure that all members can vote. My vision is to maintain exemplary corporate governance; encourage philanthropy to provide the proposed new building, world-class facilities and an exceptional meeting place for graduates; and build our membership to ensure that we remain an outstanding postgraduate college. I seek your support in achieving these goals for the future of the college.

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

Membership and Marketing Membership and Marketing subcommittee As set out in regulation 32.2, the roles and responsibilities of the Membership and Marketing subcommittee are to:

(h) review membership applications in accordance with the Association’s membership policy; and

(a)

(i)

oversee the recruitment, and growth and maintenance of the Association’s membership, and the development and promotion of new or improved programs or services;

(b) advise Council on the development of new or improved services or programs that strengthen the Association’s offerings to Resident Members, non-resident Members and the general public; (c)

advise Council on marketing and communications strategies to increase Member numbers and Member participation;

monitor Member satisfaction with the Association’s services and facilities;

(f)

oversee the management of and make recommendations for significant awards to, and recognitions of, Members and staff;

(g)

review and recommend to Council any revision to policies for the conduct of Members;

1500

Membership As at 31st December, 2017, The Graduate Union had 2,467 Members as compared to 2,368 by the end of 2016. The increase is attributed to more people joining as daily members. Numbers in other membership divisions are otherwise similar to or lower than those in 2016.

(d) review the fees, charges and conditions for membership and recommend any changes for adoption by Council; (e)

monitor the mitigation and management of risk which applies to membership and marketing, including the adequacy of internal systems of risk identification and risk treatment.

Sadly, some of our Life Members who contributed for decades to our Association have passed away in 2017. We will honour their legacies and thank them for their legacies of service and contribution, and their generous bequests. They are deeply missed. Reflecting the trend for shorter terms of residency, particularly by postgraduate students enrolled in coursework degrees (e.g., professional doctorates, and masters degrees or diplomas by coursework), the number of Resident Members in 2017 (533), though 64 less than that in 2016, remained high.

by end of 2016 1185

1161

by end of 2017

1000 597 500

259

533

485 291

255 36

33

0

Life

Regular

Resident

Organisation

Daily

Comparison of the number of Members in each division of membership by the close of years 2016 and 2017.

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 17


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Reflecting both new Resident and Daily Members, across all twelve months, 2017 demonstrated 18 to 66 new Members per month as compared to 21 to 54 per month in 2016. The occupancy average of 91.63% (excluding Barry Street accommodation because these apartments were being refurbished earlier in the year and not released for bookings) was lower than that in 2016 (94.80%) due to a lower occupancy in January of 2017.

With increasing numbers of in-career aged delegates attending for professional development courses and to participate in other education and social enterprise activities, the number of Daily Members, 485 showed an increase of 194, from 2016. The number of Members in other divisions has remained relatively stable, with a slight decrease in Regular (non-resident, including Associate) and Organisation Member numbers. Not shown in these graphs are the number of college alumni (GUCA) whose records are being gradually entered onto our database, both as they leave residency and through our continued scouring of the Association's publications since 1962 when the residential college opened its doors.

The second bar graph below shows the total number of new Members per membership division. Whilst this demonstrates a continued and increasing interest in the Association, the Membership and Marketing subcommittee has identified the need to continue resourcing and adopting new approaches to recruit and retain new Members, as well as to deliver suitable service offerings.

A total of 457 new Members were admitted in 2017 (408 in 2016). The first chart below shows the numbers who joined each month.

66

by end of 2016 by end of 2017

70 60

50

50 37

40 30

42

37

32

1185 28

54

47 37

39 32

29

20

45

41

42

36

29

27

30

26

21

18

20 10 0

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

The number of new Members admitted each month of 2016 and 2017. 250 200

by end of 2016 by end of 2017

1161 195

1161 208

1161 194 1161 153

150 100 1161 47

1161 48

50 1161 3 0

1161 10

1161 3

Life

Regular

Resident

1161 4

Organisation

The number of new Members admitted per division in 2016 and 2017.

Page 18 | Volume 71, Number 1

Daily


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Underpinning these approaches and new service offerings has been analyses of the Association’s current and potential ‘market’. The framework for this research has been developed with the generous assistance of Mr Roma Hippolite, Managing Director of The Research Broker. Mr Hippolite gave a presentation entitled ‘Do we need Market Research? [and if so] Why?’ in which he stressed the importance of ensuring that the issue under investigation through market research was of paramount and central importance to the Association, that the answers were not already available within existing databases, experiences and reports and that the outcome from market research would give directions and feasible strategies for change. Two key market research topics have been considered. One is the clarity and appropriateness of the Association’s messaging and branding for engendering and sustaining membership and inspiring contribution to this graduate collegium. The second is the recruitment and retention of in-career graduates to membership. Quite obviously, recruitment today ensures a continued future of being owned and governed by members who care about through-life graduate issues. The primary objective of the market research was identified as being to determine segment specific strategies that will increase membership. Though there is the common ground of having graduated from a university — the membership unifying feature — there is a range of segments based predominantly on life stage and the ‘product’ or ‘service’ being sought and used (e.g., college accommodation, a meeting/function venue, networking and socialising). The needs of each segment and how the Association’s current messages and branding are received and responded to are being identified continuously by the Association, particularly with regards to earliercareer graduates (those studying and those working, seeking employment or in career gaps/transitions). With this understanding of the drivers, needs, gaps and opportunities for each segment, we have been progressing ‘gain and retain’ strategies and progressively and responsively changing the messaging and branding of the Association, particularly through our social media and mobile platforms.

Using guidelines developed by Ms Belinda Moore of Strategic Management Solutions, analyses of our membership process have also been undertaken to determine how the Association generates, captures and classifies new member leads, how relationships are built with non-members to engender their conversion to membership, how new members are integrated and engaged and how existing members feel better off as members, rather than as non‑members. The Association also explored the undertaking of a membership drive. This required detailed financial modelling of marketing campaigns using radio, television, social media, letterbox drops, professional journals, telephone and newspapers. It also involved comparative and feasibility studies to ascertain how marketing through existing channels for membership recruitment could be strengthened, as well as the readiness of the Association to deploy human resources to this endeavour given other in-parallel service expansions (particularly in advancement, accommodation and meeting/ function services) and to deliver on the membership drive campaign messages. In 2018, the intention is to undertake market research in a staged and targeted manner, to design the service and product offerings, as well as the branding and messaging, accordingly, and to commence a staged membership drive predominantly through social media and mobile platforms. We are grateful for the assistance of all Members in bringing new members to our wonderful Association. In conclusion, I thank the 2017 Membership and Marketing subcommittee members — Ms Rosie Maddick (Co-Vice-Chairperson), Cr Paul Southwick (Co-Vice-Chairperson from June), Cr Molina Asthana, Cr Sarah Banks, Cr Kingsley Davis, Cr Mary Kelleher, Cr Rhys Watson and Ms Jingyao Yu, as well as the great membership services and hospitality teams at Graduate House.

Cr Keith Ryall Chairperson of the Membership and Marketing subcommittee

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 19


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Communications In 2017 the number of new visitors to the Association's website was near 70,000 and the total number of visits was near 120,000, more than twice the numbers for 2016.

Communication with the membership has remained targeted, relevant and responsive to the preferences of the different membership segments, and with the goal of engendering engagement and participation through a variety of channels.

Though these visitors were from all over the world, the majority were from Australia, North America, South-East Asia (particularly India and Pakistan), China, Japan, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.

The Association's traditional publications have continued in hard copy and digital formats with the monthly newsletter containing regular features such as the reviews of GU Collegiate presentations, innovation and university-sector news, and stories from and about Members, as well as feature and interest stories.

Engagement with the Association's social media platforms has also increased considerably, particularly on YouTube where the number of monthly views was consistently greater than 8,000 every month, increasing by 18% over 2017. Similar increases were noted across other sites, particularly with LinkedIn, with over 12,000 connections.

Due to printing and distribution costs, the Melbourne Graduate is now published twice a year, with the April edition for annual reporting purposes and the December edition focused on Member 'graduate pathway' stories.

Information booklets and in-house displays continue to be subjected to regular quality improvement updates, the series for 2018 including a new design and branding that will be introduced progressively across all material.

Communication through the website, email, social media and mobile platforms is enabling greater reach and visibility, as well as a continuing engagement tool for those who move out of college to live elsewhere. The Association monitors and reports on the various visitor and user metrics to inform the design and directions for using these messaging and member interaction forums.

Reciprocal Associations

Was the moon landing faked?

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2018

University Club of Toronto The University Club of Toronto has the finest examples of classical architecture in Canada. The club houses an impressive collection of Group of Seven art which has admirers at the National Gallery of Canada and Art Gallery of Ontario and is well worth the visit for the art... Read full article -->

Members travelling interstate and overseas can take advantage of reciprocal arrangements negotiated with other and colleges. Members should obtain a letter of introduction from Graduate House and make individual arrangements with associations before travelling. See below for current details of our reciprocal and other arrangements:

The Association of College and University Clubs (ACUC) Graduate House is a member of the Association of Graduates of all Universities across the world and University Clubs (ACUC). While the ACUC is based in the USA with wide ranging reciprocity throughout North America, reciprocal rights in Hong Kong, The Netherlands and Sweden are also available. More extensive information can be obtained from the ACUC website: www.acuclubs.org

2017 CALENDAR IN EVERY BELIEF THERE IS A LIE

ACUC is the leader in providing reciprocity, education and information exchange for university based associations throughout the world. It is a non-profit organisation of campus-based associations located throughout North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Established in 1978, the Association creates global awareness of the services provided by Association of Graduates & University Clubs & in their role as campus hosts. As hospitality providers, Association of Graduates & University clubs promote collegiality, social interaction and enhanced communication among members of academic and professional communities. Nearly 100 clubs worldwide participate in the Association’s program, facilitating academic interaction by opening their doors to association members visiting from other campuses. ACUC promotes excellence in association management through educational programs, newsletters and networking opportunities.

http://192.168.1.201:33333/Preview/home-cc-2014.3/reciprocal-associations.html

The Graduate Union Newsletter

1

RECIPROCAL ASSOCIATIONS by country in alphabetical order

16/03/2015

Meeting & Function Services

Resident Member Handbook

The Melbourne Graduate The Graduate Union of The University of Melbourne Inc.

2018

2018

The Graduate House is the gathering place of The Graduate Union

The Graduate House is a Residential College of The Graduate Union

April 2017

1

your business can make all the difference.

www.graduatehouse.com.au | ABN 55610 664 963 | Incorporated Association Registration No. A0023234B | 1

Page 20 | Volume 71, Number 1

what is the dia mon d ju b il ee ca m pa ig n ?

wh y sh ou l d you d onat e ?

In 1957 we bought the Gladstone Terraces and in 1962 we opened Graduate House with seven Resident Members.

>38,000 postgraduates are enrolled at The University of Melbourne and at RMIT University, a 25% increase since 2016.

60 years on, during our Diamond Jubilee year, over 700 Resident Members stay annually at our postgraduate college.

Graduate House is the only postgraduateonly residential college in Victoria and is experienced in meeting the unique needs of postgraduates.

Our Diamond Jubilee Campaign is to raise funds for a redevelopment behind the Gladstone terraces which will include: 136 new residential rooms. A café, gym, Resident kitchen and lounge. A theatrette and music rooms. New meeting and function spaces.

With long waiting lists and limited capacity, we are simply unable to meet this ever-increasing demand.

It is imperative that we increase the number of residential rooms in the safe, convenient and supportive environment of a greatly expanded Graduate House.

you r l o g o c ou l d be h e re .

DIAMOND JUBILEE CAMPAIGN

how your business can help

1


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Meeting Services 2017 has been another wonderfully busy and successful year at Graduate House with special events, conferences, workshops, planning days and graduations. There was a total of 1,025 bookings from small to large meetings and private functions. A total of 238 convenors booked with us and their events were attended by 22,798 delegates. These figures do not include GU Collegiate events, governance meetings and individuals/groups frequenting the dining room and café bar at Graduate House.

The 8th Annual Australian Accounting Hall of Fame Presentation Dinner and Awards night.

The organisations range from alumni groups, schools, research units and faculties from various universities, to groups from the charitable and not-for-profit sectors and government departments at state and federal levels. We are grateful to the many organisations that use our facility regularly. The year commenced with a January booking by The University of Melbourne Services Business Intelligence and Reporting unit which held a farewell cocktail party for Dr Karen Murphy with 120 attendees. This unit supports the aspirations of the University's students, staff and researchers and provides infrastructure, finance and employee, academic and research support, amongst other important services across the University and to the broader community. March saw the hosting of an International Women's Day Dinner by Members Lesley Bawden and Margaret Sawyer who kindly also sponsored the attendance of two Resident Members. Professor Leigh Ackland, Director of the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Deakin University spoke on the topic of 'Communicating science in a post-truth world' to a very interested audience of forty.

The John Cain Foundation held lunch presentations on the third Wednesday of each month.

The Melba Group met monthly in the Johnston Library bringing together leaders from all generations.

Another big event that week was Social Education Victoria's conference on the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE). This was with 130 attendees and all rooms were utilised to enable in-parallel sessions with speakers and workshops on different topics. Another notable event was the 8th Annual Australian Accounting Hall of Fame presentation dinner and awards night with 100 attendees. Mr John Bishop AO,

Department of Infrastructure Engineering staff with guest visitor Dr Yaakov Anker of Samaria and Jordan Rift Research and Development Centre, Ariel University, seated centre.

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 21


The Graduate Union Annual Report Mr Peter Brownell, Mr George Foster and Mr Warren McGregor were recognised for their outstanding contributions in the field of accounting through their induction into the Australian Accounting Hall of Fame.

Australian Teachers of Media (ATOM) held a full day event with exhibition booths.

The Florence May McCredie Symposium, Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) dinner was also held in March. This was organised by Member David McCredie who named the biennial Lectureship, which commenced in 1991, after his baby sister, who died of intussusception in the 1920s. The prominent international speakers funded under Lectureship have contributed markedly to nephrology and allied disciplines. The Melbourne School of Engineering was again a regular convenor in 2017, holding major staff celebration functions in April and August. The school held a lunch for the Kernot Fellowship Bequest Society, named after the Founding Professor of Engineering. Professor Iven Mareels and engineering students presented and exhibited at the lunch.

The Carlton Rotary BBQ held in November 2017.

The Calabrese Cultural Association dinner included dance in celebration of the southern Italian heritage.

Friends of Graduate House showed their support for 'Orange the World' International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and the 16 Days of Activism against Gender Violence.

Page 22 | Volume 71, Number 1

May saw the Catholic Education Commission of Victoria (CECV) hold a two-day forum with over fifty delegates. The forum was on the legislative requirements for work experience and structured workplace learning in secondary schools, and included a CECV: Auspiced Training Industry Partnership (ATIP) Dinner. The popular John Cain Foundation monthly luncheons continued in 2017 on the third Wednesday of each month with a regular audience of sixty. High calibre speakers, included Victorian Government Ministers Martin Foley and Richard Wynne, presented on matters of national and state importance, including city design, education, energy, housing and the future of work. The Annual John Cain Lecture was also at Graduate House by The Hon Marcia Neave AO, distinguished judge and legal academic. The Foundation's 2018 priorities for these 'think tank' forums are sustainable cities, vocational education, affordable housing and leadership. The Rotary Carlton Club continued to hold its weekly Tuesday lunches at Graduate House, again with an excellent series of speakers and topics. Many other Rotary functions and events were also held throughout the year. On the 1st May, Rotary District 9800 held its Annual Foundation Grant seminar with 90


The Graduate Union Annual Report attendees to begin planning projects for the new Rotary year. This seminar focussed on Foundation Grants at District and Global levels, as well as on the formation and operation of Vocational Training Teams (VTT). Local Rotary Club projects which were identified for matching funding in 2017 from the District, included the establishment of a community vegetable garden and the provision of fruit once a week at a local school. In June, the Order of Saint John of Jerusalem convened the Knights of St John Investiture Celebration Luncheon with nearly 100 guests who enjoyed a sumptuous feast with Master of Ceremonies, Chevalier Alex Anderson JP KGSJ. Another major function was the Australian Teachers of Media (ATOM) in August with 115 attendees. ATOM is an independent, non-profit, professional association promoting the study of media. It has a membership of teachers and lecturers at all levels of education, as well as media-industry personnel, media and education organisations and members of the general public interested in screen literacy and the media. The Australian Italian Lawyers Association (AILA), a not for profit association launched in 1990 to strengthen ties between Australia and Italy, held a number of events at Graduate House in 2017. These included a dinner function in August with 70 attendees with guest speaker The Hon Justice Grant Riethmuller on the topic 'Trust busting: how far can we go?' The 14th of October saw the official launch of the Calabrese Cultural Association with over 100 in attendance. Guests including Professors Joseph Lo Bianco AM and Robert Pascoe enjoyed traditional southern Italian music and dancers performing the Tarantella, as well as Draga's (becoming world famous) apple donuts. The Friends of Baillieu Library held their annual dinner in November. The Friends actively contribute to the development and accessibility of the Library’s Special Collections through the purchase of notable works and the funding of conservation and digitisation projects. The Association is proud to be involved again in their special annual events. A number of groups and organisations enjoyed the Christmas themed festive meals

prepared by our talented Culinary team in the latter months of 2017. These included Probus Carlton Club, Rotary Carlton Club, the Melbourne School of Philosophy, the Royal Australian Chemical Institute (RACI) and the Australian Media Agency (AMA). Many intimate graduation celebrations — usually after the large award ceremonies elsewhere — are held at Graduate House with families and friends proudly acknowledging the achievements of their loved ones. In 2017 the Association was also pleased to be the venue for the Western Clinical School 2017 Graduation in December with 130 attendees. The Chemical Engineering 2017 final year organised a two-course dinner with 88 attendees. At an earlier stage of the education pathway we again also enjoyed the exuberance and excitement of the Carlton Gardens Primary School Year 6 Graduation in December, with 90 attendees. Organisations affiliated with, and units within, The University of Melbourne that booked with the Association in 2017 included the Advancement Office, University Services, Infrastructure Engineering, UoM Commercial, Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network (AURIN), Network of Schools and the Centre for Health Policy.

Visiting Dignitaries His Excellency Dr Obaid Al Ketbi On 27th February, we were honoured to host His Excellency Dr Obaid Al Ketbi, Ambassador of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to Australia. HE Dr Alketbi and his entourage were welcomed by the President of The Graduate Union, Dr Ken V Loughnan AO, the Chairperson of Council, Mr Rhys Watson and the CEO/Head of College, Dr Kerry Bennett. After a tour of Graduate House, the officials shared morning tea in the Johnston Library over discussions about the importance of collegial residencies and programs for international students. These topics were of great interest to the internationally-educated and executiveexperienced Ambassador, as he holds multiple degrees (BSc, MSc [Engr], BBA, MBA [Bus Mgt], MSc [Nat Res Mgt]) including a PhD in International Business. The topic of his PhD

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 23


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Professor Stephen Dinham OAM, Emeritus Professor in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education, The University of Melbourne; as well as the Association's support mentors, Cr Kelleher and Dr Max Stephens, and Cr Asthana.

His Excellency Dr Obaid Al Ketbi, left, with Mr Rhys Watson (centre) and Dr Ken V Loughnan AO.

was 'The International Transfer and Anchorage of Foreign Technology in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) — Case Study of the Private Sector'. We are grateful to the Ambassador for his gift to the Association of his doctoral thesis which is now available to view in the Johnston Library. His Excellency's visit was important in fostering a continuing strong academic relationship between our two countries and we look forward to welcoming UAE citizens to our great city of Melbourne and our 'education state' of Victoria to undertake postgraduate studies.

From left: Dr Cascon, Professor Steinemann, Dr Balor, Cr Asthana, Professor Dinham OAM, Cr Kelleher, Dr Bennett and Dr Stephens.

Dr Balor and Dr Cascon are from the University of St. La Salle and Xavier University — Ateneo de Cagayan — the Philippines, respectively. The Fellows were two of twenty academics undertaking the global twelve-month United Board Fellows Program where the aim is to develop dynamic leaders who will advance whole person education within their home institutions.

Delegates from Gangsu Agricultural University, China

Delegates from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) Embassy to Australia in the Johnston Library.

United Board Fellows

On the 13th of November, the Association hosted delegates from Gangsu Agricultural University, China, led by Mr Feng Xizhong, the University Director who gave an informative presentation about this central northern university. The delegation was welcomed by Cr Kelleher and, in Mandarin, by Life Member

We were honoured to welcome visiting United Board Fellows, Dr Annabelle Balor and Dr Hercules Cascon to Graduate House for a two month residency. In October, the Association welcomed the Fellows at a morning tea, involving also their academic mentors, Professor Anne Steinemann, Professor of Civil Engineering and Chair of Sustainable Cities, The University of Melbourne and Adjunct Professor of Science and Engineering, James Cook University; and

Page 24 | Volume 71, Number 1

Delegates from Gangsu Agricultural University (GAU)


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Dr Max Stephens, who has taught extensively in China. This was followed by a presentation about The Graduate Union by CEO/Head of College, Dr Kerry Bennett assisted and ably translated by Resident Members Ms Juanjuan Wu, Ms Angela Xu and Mr Elvis Lu.

Head of Department and Director of The Melbourne Engineering Research Institute; geographer, Professor Lesley Head; Professor Jeff Borland, Truby Williams Professor of Economics at The University of Melbourne; and law expert, Mr Matthew Albert.

Christmas In July

The table (on the next page) shows attendance rates according to membership division throughout the year for some of these events. This table does not list the regular self-organising groups: Bridge Night (1x per week, 20–40 people), Italian Conversation Dinner 1x per fortnight; 8–12 people) and the Women’s Forum (1x month; 6–10 people). Similarly, it does not list the Resident Member events which now include research talks, welcome tables, JobFocus, English Conversation Corner, cultural dinners, special occasions and excursions.

The Christmas In July promotion attracted many patrons over four Wednesday luncheons. Members and guests enjoyed the themed menu of seafood platter along with turkey, the trimmings and traditional Christmas puddings and other desserts. We hope to continue this popular month of luncheons in 2018 so for those who are not able to wait until December, drop by on Wednesdays in July 2018.

In 2017, there were approximately 135 GU Collegiate functions. For the 24 events (shown in the table) on the next page, the total attendance number was 1,540 for the year inclusive of 235 Life Subscriber Members, 356 Regular and Associate Members, 227 Resident Members and 444 non-members. The average attendance per event was 64 (range 8–260). Life Member Darren Room (second from right), seen with friends, is a regular at Christmas in July lunches.

GU Collegiate GU Collegiate events have been convened since 1911 to foster intellectual stimulation for a diverse (multi-age, multi-cultural, multidiscipline) audience. Our 2017 events adhered to this tradition. The Monthly Luncheons commenced in February, with speakers throughout the year including Life Member Keith Whitford, marketing specialist Professor John Roberts, Founder and CEO of the Care for Africa Foundation Ms Diana Butler OAM, engineer David Beauchamp, author Mrs Val Oldfield OAM, Professor Anne Steinemann and more. See the following pages for further details. Introduced in 2014, The College Tables also continued throughout 2017. The sessions were well attended, and provoked stimulating discussion from a wide range of facilitators including Professor Thas A Nirmalathas,

Culinary team Exclusive of the catering provided for academic and professional development meeting services and GU Collegiate outlined in the previous sections (for ~25,000 delegates). The total number of meals prepared in 2017 increased significantly in 2018 to over 85,000 — more than 300 each day. The catering for Resident Members of seven breakfasts and five meals each week accounts for up to approximately 90% of these meals. The remainder are for an increasing number of graduates who come in for group lunches, dinners and after work functions, as well as the Association's regular clientele of non‑resident Members, non-members and Loyalty Card holders. The Association is very grateful for the professional services provided by our dedicated and talented culinary team, who prepare a wide variety of delicious fare for every occasion.

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 25


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Life/ Regular Honorary and Resident non Life Associate Members Members Members Members

GU Collegiate Events and Participation

Total

Number of 2017 events tabled

24

245

376

227

434

1,540

February Monthly Luncheon

February

7

17

2

6

32

March

12

15

2

10

39

3

15

115

6

139

9

28

3

17

57

March Monthly Luncheon Summer BBQ/Residents and Members April Monthly Luncheon

April

Estimated numbers of 260 vaccinated on the day — managed by Vaccin8@Work

Influenza Vaccination Day

260

10

15

11

36

Oaktree Lunch

17

3

15

35

College Table

6

4

10

Annual General Meeting Dinner

20

24

6

9

59

14

21

11

46

8

2

10

5

18

1

8

32

College Table

2

6

2

10

Donor Thank You and Open Day

32

10

2

42

86

Investment For Your Future

1

10

2

13

Roaring 20s Fundraising Gala

10

32

49

130

221

6

16

8

30

1

9

5

15

8

14

1

11

34

College Table

6

5

0

4

15

Investment For Your Future

2

3

5

10

May Monthly Luncheon

June Monthly Luncheon

May

June

Investment For Your Future August Monthly Luncheon

September Monthly Luncheon

August

September

College Table October Monthly Luncheon

October

November Monthly Luncheon

November

24

20

4

16

64

Chairperson’s Cocktail Party

December

49

44

15

83

191

24

23

22

29

98

Members’ Christmas Party Page 26 | Volume 71, Number 1


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Investment for your Future Seminar Series

Italian Conversation Dinners

Scott Fisher is a Senior relationship Manager with Lanyon Partners Private Wealth. He holds a Postgraduate Diploma in Financial Planning, and is a Certified Financial Planner and a member of the Financial Planning Association. He also holds a Bachelor of Biological Science from La Trobe University.

The Italian Conversation Dinners are held on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month.

Scott joined Lanyon Partners in 2006. He is past Chairperson and now member of Lanyon Partners Investment Committee which oversees the construction of model portfolios and is involved with the research and valuation of direct shares. We are grateful to Scott for his many years of managing and growing the William Berry and Barbara Funder Post-Graduate College Trust. With experience in superannuation, SelfManaged Super Funds (SMSFs), Centrelink, tax structures, insurance, direct shares and managed investments, Scott’s breadth of advice is extensive. In 2017 Scott convened the interactive small group 'Investing for your Future' Seminars. The initial seminar on the 29th June, focussed on tax planning, end of financial year strategies and ownership of assets, Centrelink asset test changes and strategies, superannuation changes and risk versus reward when it comes to investment strategies. The second (31st August) and third (26th October) sessions were on the Australian Stock Market, Australian Banks, Liar Loans, the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC), investing in aged care, estate planning, alternatives to term deposits and investment in property and shares. The Graduate Union is grateful to Scott for his generosity of time and expertise in providing our Members with this pro bono financial advice.

Led and facilitated by Member Francesca Folk-Scolaro, participants dine while learning conversational Italian. Francesca is also dedicated to the preservation of the history of the suburb of Brunswick. She is the driving force behind the creation of a Brunswick Museum. She is editor of the Brunswick Historical Society’s magazine, Fusion, as well as a range of local Brunswick histories. This passion also makes for a great topic of conversation in Italian!

Bridge Nights This popular game has been enjoyed every Wednesday evening at Graduate House since the early 2000s. A regular group of 20 to 40 Bridge players of all skill levels participate in this classic game of bidding, strategy and memory between two teams of two. Skill levels ranged from novice to those with great wiliness and experience. The Association is very grateful for the longstanding coordination and organisation of Bridge Nights by Member, Graham Skewes.

JobFocus JobFocus involves intensive and interactive small group evening sessions with early-career Members and the CEO/Head of College. Participants explore the challenges in preparing resumes, applying for jobs and participating in group and one-on-one interviews. Held every two to three weeks, the JobFocus group also discusses different strategies for dealing with rejection and for maintaining a positive mindset in a highly competitive job market.

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 27


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Oaktree's 'Live Below the Line' $2 lunch on 12th April raised over $1,100.

The Easter Egg Hunt on 13th April was a day of fun and joy, particularly for those who found the eggs.

Our Donor Thank You Day Brunch gave us the opportunity to acknowledge our generous supporters.

About 260 received their flu shot on Vaccination Day, with Channel 7 and Channel 9 crews covering the story.

The last GU Collegiate event for 2017, the Members' Christmas Party was enjoyed by all who attended.

An information session by St. John Ambulance Australia on the use of our new defibrillator.

Celebrations at Graduate House Graduate House is a popular venue for Member celebrations. Many birthdays, anniversaries, farewells, reunions, memorials and get-togethers were held here throughout 2017. Nelson and Basma, Head Chefs

Page 28 | Volume 71, Number 1

With the photographs on these pages we share some of these memorable occasions.


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Anne and James Mulholland celebrated sixty years of marriage surrounded by family and close friends.

A reunion of the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music alumni, including Cr Kelleher (far left), in January.

Organised by Member David Eyres, the 1953 Faculty of Architecture alumni held their reunion in April.

Mr Roy Hardcastle AO celebrated his 90th Birthday with Rotary Carlton Club in April.

The 481 Boys, studentship holders at the 481 St Kilda Road hostel (1955-1958), held their reunion in June.

Mr Mac Nicoll (centre) at his 80th birthday celebration in the dining room with family and close friends.

Rotarian Tim Kent's 90th birthday celebration.

Thirteen graduates from Form 5A, 1947 and 1948 Melbourne Grammar School in November.

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 29


The Graduate Union Annual Report

2017 Monthly Luncheons We are honoured to continue the 1912 initiated tradition of 'lectures by distinguished visitors and others' in our Monthly Luncheons and apologise for no longer charging 9d!

1st February

Reverend Keith Whitford From Hell to High Water Keith was born in Griffith, NSW, the seventh child in a family of twelve. The family fell into abject poverty with the children often having to fend for themselves in an abandoned old house in the small wheat town of Barellan. In this moving presentation, Keith explained what starvation feels like, how he sourced food and clothes from 'Bunnings' (the local tip) and the very real experience of society's rejection. A hymn book and the gift of a pair of shoes were key acts of kindness from strangers that helped Keith turn his life around through education.

1st March

Professor John Roberts Marketers Nudge! Should we let them? Professor Roberts, an expert in branding and marketing strategy. He gave an entertaining presentation to explain marketing, its amorality, how changes in our society may alter the effectiveness of marketing and where our concerns for the future (indeed now) may need to lie. Acknowledging that marketers have "never had a particularly good rap", he defended his profession as having an incredibly important social function to the extent that it understands what people value, and how the resources of the community can be harnessed to give people what they want.

5th April

Ms Diana Butler OAM From Tasmania to Tanzania Diana is the Founder and CEO of the Care for Africa Foundation, a humanitarian aid group providing support to poor communities in Tanzania. While working as an Emergency Nurse in Launceston, a chance conversation with a colleague about extreme poverty in Africa, inspired her journey. Water is one of the ways that her organisation makes a difference. "It is the most confronting thing to see people that have not got access to safe and clean water. I remain incredibly perplexed, here in Australia when I turn the tap on and have a drink of water," she said.

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3rd May

Professor Prakash J. Singh Management and Marketing Dr Singh, Head of the Department of Management and Marketing at The University of Melbourne, outlined the evolution of the doctoral research (PhD) model in Australia to current day practice. Rather than creating a single voluminous tome, the thesis is now published as essays and journal manuscripts. Once completed in three years, a typical PhD program is now over four to six years and requiring coursework, a number of supervisors and collaboration. This new model underpins the gaining of academic appointments in the United States, and increasingly, globally.

7th June

Mr David Beauchamp The 19th Century Notables of Leicester Street Though an engineer by trade, David took us on a historic journey through Leicester Street and its former residents: the engineer, Alexander Kennedy Smith, the inventor, Louis Philip Brennan, the academic, William Kernot, the industrialist, Mephan Ferguson, and the soprano, Amy Castles. The audience was enthralled to learn of the origins of Melbourne's first gasworks, the introduction of the electric light, the manufacturing of Melbourne's water-supplying riveted wrought iron pipes and the 'small and sweet' voice in the Vienna Hofopera.

3rd August

Mr Tony Pooley The Shame of the Risk Profession Tony consults on corporate and safety risk management for large corporations, such as BHP Billiton and ExxonMobil. He explained that the few Australian top 100 companies that undertake quantified material risk assessments across their enterprises, usually use a likelihood/ consequence risk matrix which is known to have several shortcomings. His view is that risk events from all corners of a business or corporation should be aggregated and identified according to performance targets for the whole organisation and with the use of a single, consolidated quantitative approach.

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2017 Monthly Luncheons (continued) 6th September

Professor Stefan Arndt Can trees ‘learn’ to be more stress tolerant? Melbourne has moved from an average mean annual temperature of 14.6° pre-1950s to >16.6°, as well as a lower number of trees and more concrete (and thus heat). Stefan spoke to the question of the vulnerability of different tree species to this and future climate changes. From his work with native and imported species from different climates, he and his team have found some adaptive abilities but within certain temperature and water availability ranges, with older more established trees being less vulnerable due to established root systems and trunk water stores. This advantage remains only should they not be chopped down.

4th October

Mrs Val Oldfield OAM No Beating about the Bush City folk were treated to a brief version of the terrific tales provided in Val's 2012 book, No Beating About the Bush. As a young city-born-andbred woman, Val was catapulted into another world when she began married life on Mungerannie Station in Birdsville, South Australia, 45 miles from the nearest town. Her tales are of the numerous and distinctly outback experiences with a collection of unique Australian characters, such as the famously named Tom Kruse, the outback mailman. “Every fortnight, if we were lucky, we got mail!”

1st November

Professor Anne Steinemann Hidden hazards in everyday products A Professor of Civil Engineering and Chair of Sustainable Cities at The University of Melbourne, Anne spoke to the hidden hazards in everyday products and indoor environments. Providing alarming evidence to suggest that 70% to 90% of human disease is attributed to environmental exposures, Professor Steinemann pointed to sources that are close to us, yet largely unregulated and unmonitored. Referencing a study of 866 household products with 1,937 claims of being green, that found less than 1% could be substantiated, she advised “The solutions are relatively simple. If you can’t eat it or drink it, don’t clean with it."

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2017 College Tables We thank our College Table guests for their generosity of time and expertise, and for enabling robust and challenging discussions around the table over lunch with our very intelligent Members.

19th May

Professor Ampalavanapillai (Thas) Nirmalathas Professor of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at The University of Melbourne Professor Nirmalathas is the Director of the Melbourne Networked Society Institute. He co-founded the Melbourne Accelerator Programs (MAP) to support entrepreneurial activities of the University community through business acceleration models.

18th August

Professor Lesley Head Cultural Research for Climate Change Response — How to make it useful? Professor Lesley Head is a geographer whose research examines humanenvironment relations, both conceptual and material. In recent years, she has worked mostly in cultural geography, with projects on backyard gardens, wheat and invasive plants.

15th September

Professor Jeff Borland Truby Williams Professor of Economics at The University of Melbourne Professor Jeff Borland's main interests are analysis of the operation of labour markets in Australia, program and policy evaluation and design, Australian economic history and sports economics.

20th October

Mr Matthew Albert Commercial, Industrial and Public Law Matthew Albert advises and acts in commercial disputes including contract, consumer, building and construction law. His public law matters include judicial and merit reviews, and acting as counsel assisting the Coroner.

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2017 Women's Forum The Women's Forum began in 1995, with the idea by Patricia Boaden and her friend, Shirley Horne to provide a structured environment where women could express their views on mutually predetermined topics without fear of being interrupted or judged. As one of the founding members of the Forum, Patricia was one of its keenest participants until her death in July, 2010. The Graduate Union is pleased to see a continuing succession and a Women's Forum that remains popular today for women of all ages and disciplines.

From left: Francesca Folk-Scolaro, Jo Elvins, Eva Nagy, Anne Mulholland, Elizabeth Sevior and Margaret Mayers.

The Forum is held in the MV Anderson Room, a comfortable lounge room-like environment, commencing officially at 10:30 AM though many arrive early to enjoy a morning tea beforehand at the café bar. There are a few simple rules, and depending on the numbers present, each person has five

15th February The Significance of Why The probing question we ask ourselves and others daily, 'Why?', is rooted in ancient Greek culture that focused on 'Why?' and applied it to abstract concepts such as 'the good life'. The most significant thing about 'Why?' is to find out. If the ancient Greek philosopher had not explored the concept of 'Why?' many following generations may not have advanced.

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to ten minutes to express her views, without interruption. No questions or comments. are permitted while someone is speaking and no discussion can take place until each attendee has had her say. When each person who chooses to contribute has spoken, there is an open discussion. This discussion is usually lively and continued with conversation over lunch in the dining room for those who are able to stay on after the Forum concludes. No minutes are taken and there is no obligation to speak or to attend each month. The Forum is a great exercise in attentive and disciplined listening, as well as an amazing way to learn about the many and varied ways in which different topics are perceived and understood. The last thirty minutes give rise to two or three more topics for future Forums. Through a consensus-building process, agreement is reached on the discussion topics for the next Forum. The topics range from current affairs to contemporary societal issues and tend to be cross-disciplinary. The Forums commence in February and end in December. There is usually no fixed topic in December, the ladies gathering together for the last occasion for the year to share laughter and jokes. The Forum is open to all women who enjoy the mental stimulation of exposure to a variety of viewpoints and the confidence that comes with participation where no view is right or wrong.

15th March How to help the needy without attracting the greedy Research and decide which charity is the most effective in the use of donations. If a charitable organisation has an administrative support base (check how much donation goes to that), we need to check the percentage before giving. To quote Jesus Christ: "The poor are always with us.”


The Graduate Union Annual Report

19th April Rules for a contented life

The need and purpose of public housing

Health is the greatest gift, and contentment is the greatest wealth. Aim to leave the cup half full, not half empty. Focus on the positivity of one's life. Live working towards goals that are aligned with our needs, values and identity (self-concordant goals). When pursuing selfconcordant goals, our sense of satisfaction (happiness) increases.

Public housing supply in Australia is not keeping up with demand. There is a need for new housing stock as a result of population growth and trends in household formation. The waiting lists for public housing are high and increasing, and the housing affordability problem has contributed to sustained high levels of homelessness in Australia.

17th May Does beauty really lie in the eyes of the beholder?

20th September Lending money to Relatives

Beauty can be enjoyed in many ways. Is beauty a generated concept? Do we need beauty to uplift us? Beauty is in our bodies and its ability to repair. An 80-year-old person can have a beautiful brain and spirit. Some things are beautiful to everyone, e.g., nature and parks, etc. Let's just leave beauty to individual decision.

21st June The role of parents

16th August

Generosity towards family and friends who are in financial trouble is an admirable act that encourages the culture of cordiality and support. However, problems may arise if those family and friends forget their commitment to pay back. While some are good at keeping to their commitment, others may be negligent and erratic.

18th October Asylum seekers: how can we help them?

The real role of parents is to realise and accept that children are NOT our possessions. We have a 'loan' of them from birth to mid-to-late teens. During this time the role of parents is to teach children to be decent, compassionate, law-abiding adults, both by our own example and by using the things happening in society around them as discussion starters.

Friends Of Refugees (FOR) was formed to pass on the goodwill of donors to desperate people needing help. The organisation stores donated goods in various private garages and runs support programs out of private residences and three community organisations. It should not just be the Government's responsibility alone.

19th July The significance of discipline

15th November Social connections in the contemporary world

The word 'discipline' suggests the relevant word, 'disciple'. Parents should be role models for their children and act such that their children adhere to them as disciples and keenly follow their example in life. Some adults also need discipline - aggressive driving or other anti-social behaviour that can cause harm in public areas and society are examples.

Should there be demands on the technological abilities of those aged 50 to 60 plus? None of us have grown up with these devices! How do people get on with new technology if they did not grow up with it — or worse, have not learnt how to use all the possibilities that are offered? One survival hint for the over-60s — keep your own paper track.

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Organisation Logos The logos for organisations and groups that used our facilities in 2017 shown on these two pages illustrate our commitment to assisting other not-for-profits with charters also for the advancement of education for community benefit. Survey results in previous years, our repeat clientele and the feedback that we have been receiving and reporting in every monthly newsletter, give a clear indication that

our success is due to our welcoming and high quality service, the flexible configurations for room layouts to suit individual needs, our range of appetising catering options and our positive and timely response to feedback. From all of us at Graduate House, we thank you for your patronage in 2017 and look forward to serving you again in 2018.

Asialink Business

Association of French Teachers in Victoria (AFTV)

Association of German Teachers of Victoria Inc (AGTV)

Australia Professional Thermography Association (AUSPTA)

Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE)

Australian and New Zealand Academy of Orofacial Pain (ANZAOP)

Australian Asian Association (AAA)

Australian Association of Social Workers (AASW)

Australian Centre for Heart Health (ACHH)

Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation (ACHPER)

Australian Food Hygiene Services (AFHS)

Australian Italian Lawyers Association (AILA)

Australian School of Applied Management (ASAM)

Australian Society of Music Education (ASME)

Australian Teachers of Media (ATOM)

Career Education Association of Victoria (CEAV)

Carlton Connect Initiative

Catholic Education Melbourne

Centre for Eye Research Australia

Cooperative Research Centre for Spatial Information (CRCSI)

David Morris Consulting

Dental Health Services Victoria (DHSV)

Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) Victoria

Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria (GTAV)

Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET)

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International Coach Federation (ICF)

International Institute Management Development Alumni (IMD)

International Student Advisers’ Network of Australia (ISANA)

iStruct Consulting Engineers

John Cain Foundation

Melbourne College of Contemporary Psychotherapy (MCCP)

Modern Greek Teachers' Association of Victoria (MGTAV)

Modern Language Teachers' Association of Victoria (MLTAV)

Mosaic Lab

Order of Saint John

Organisation Development Australia (ODA)

Parentshop

Peer Support Australia

Phoenix Australia

Probus Carlton

Pulse Credit Union

Rhodes Scholars’ Association Victoria

Rotary Carlton

Rushall Consulting Group

School Library Association of Victoria

Social Education Victoria (SEV)

Social Work Department Writing Group

Supply Chain Logistics Association Australia (SCLAA)

Swinburne University of Technology

Turkish Teachers Association of Victoria (TTAV)

Uniseed Management Pty Ltd

University of NSW Australia (Canberra)

Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA)

Victorian Health Psychology College

Vision International

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Membership in 2017 New Members We extend a warm welcome to the new Members of our Association.

Honorary Life Members

Mr Paul Barnett

His Excellency Most Reverend Archbishop Issam Darwish AM

Mr Michael Biviano

Ms Heather Kudeviita

Ms Angela Castro

Mr Allan Myers AC QC

Dr Wai Wai Cheng

Life Members

Mr Peter Cockrum

Ms Lucinda Cree Mr Callum McNair

Ms Diana Butler OAM

Ms Sara Costa Ms Deborah Cutts Mr Andrew Davenport

Organisation Members

Mr John Dorrian

Defence, Science and Technology Group

Dr Evan Dwyer

ICON CO Melbourne

Professor David Forrest

School of Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, Swinburne University of Technology

Professor Kay Gibbons Mr Kusal Goonewardena

Rotary Club of Carlton Inc.

Associate Professor David Hillis

Associate Members

Mr John Kurek

Ms Margaret Lilly Mr Stan Polan

Dr Brett Light Dr Barbara Maddern-Wellington AM Dr Sarah Mahoney

Non-resident Student Graduate Members

Miss Ivon Marin Florez

Mr Jeremy Feiglin

Dr Jean Mulder

Ms Jody Heald AM

Mr Lyndsay Neilson

Ms Sarah Le Page

Mr Barry Novy

Ms Alix Lwanga

Ms Renee Otmar

Mr Rob Soros Mr Christopher Thamm Ms Mengwei Zhang

Members

Mr Gary McMullen

Mr Daniel Ruhoff Mr Jonathan Rush AM Mr Aaron Savic Mr Matthew Schofield Ms Bronwyn Stephens

His Excellency Saeed Matar Sultan Alsiri Alqemzi

Mr Anthony Suen

Mr Robert Arnold

Ms Merle Thornton

Ms Jillian Banfield

Dr Deborah Towns

Dr Edgar Banks

Mr Kenneth Whitters

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Resident Members Mr Oluseyi Aberafa

Dr Victoria Daskalova

Mrs Aila Hannele Kantola

Miss Sharon Abraham

Ms Beatriz de Carvalho Rama Rosa

Dr Jun Kashihara

Dr Ahmed Ahmed

Dr Tymon de Haas

Miss Merium Hussein Kazmi

Mr Sufian Alimdanat

Dr Hamsalakshi Dhayalan

Mr Haris Khan

Miss Aya Habeeb Taher Al-Jasim

Miss Sara Diaz

Mr Eng Hoe Kher

Dr Hafssa Al-Khalil

Mr German Diaz

Ms Wendy Kirarock

Miss Fatima Al-Khateeb

Mr Christopher DSouza

Mrs Klara Kirsch

Miss Lobna Alukaidey

Mr Samuel Edwards

Miss Nardia-Rose Klem

Dr Veronica Andreo

Mr Benjamin Elbers

Professor Joerg Knieling

Dr Hira Anwaar

Miss Myriam Ellison

Mr Yuichi Kobayashi

Miss Jessica Aow

Miss Shihui (Helen) Fang

Miss Parisa Koutsifeli

Mr Robert Arnold

Miss Syed Mahpara Farrukh

Dr Aimee Lahaussois

Ms Mahroo Arshad

Miss Daisy Feller

Mr Antoine Landry

Mr Peter Attema

Ms Elizabeth Forbes

Ms Dani Larkin

Mr Pablo Avenali

Miss Mailie Gall

Mrs Pauline Lawrence

Dr Anna-Maria Babey

Miss Deotima Gangopadhyay

Dr Peter Leck

Mr Aakash Babu

Miss Maria Gavilan Morales

Mr Youngkwang (Nolan) Lee

Professor Zhonglin Bai

Miss Cassandra Gheorghe

Miss Bhoomi Lengde

Ms Olivia Ball

Mrs Marina Gheorghe

Ms Sylvia Lens

Mr James Ballantyne Leslie

Ms Georgia Gillam

Miss Ying Li

Mr Manjot Bansal

Dr Ana Gnjec

Miss Heyu Li

Dr Rosanne Barnes

Miss Ester Gonzalez Martinez

Mrs Li Li

Mr Gregory Burgess

Mr Aashray Gupta

Mr Jun Hua (Bowen) Lim

Professor Jane Buxton

Ms Taiane Lins

Mr Michael Campbell

Mr Mohammad Syafiq Habsirun

Dr Hercules Cascon

Mr Yuuki Hata

Mr Zhixue (Joshua) Liu

Mr Hugh Caterson

Mr Christian Haynl

Mr Weian Liu

Ms Candice Chang

Mr Stefan Heijmans

Mr Yung-Hsiang Lu

Dr Annabelle Chavez-Balor

Mr Lawrence Hsu

Dr Shuai Ma

Mr Shih-Jung Chen

Miss Molly Hunt

Mr Scott Mackay

Miss Xiaojun (Anna) Chen

Ms Jenina Ibanez

Miss Nurual Dayana Mahizir

Miss Ka Ling Cheung

Mrs Swati Jhaveri

Ms Phoebe Mak

Ms Nichole Cobham

Miss Saroj Kamble

Miss Attiya Malik

Dr Ricardo Crespo

Mr Shashank Kanade

Miss Nuria Mallorqui Bague

Ms Aimee Dai

Dr Tetsufumi Kanazawa

Ms Heather Manning

Professor Hans-Dieter Daniel

Ms Miho Kaneko

Ms Julia Marks

Mr Kuoyue Liu

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Miss Mehak Masood

Mr Joe Ravetz

Mr Rhys Thomas

Ms Sophie Metsers

Mr Joshua Rhee

Mrs Bhawna Tikka

Mr Eric Metsers

Mr Carlos Rodriguez

Mr Jasper Toboville

Mrs Sanjana Mhambrey

Ms Nicola Rossdale

Mr Kelvin Tsui

Mr Yuki Miyazaki

Mr Fabio Ruffato

Mrs Swetha Uppala

Dr Erik Mooi

Dr Madgalena Rumantir

Mr Daisuke Uritani

Dr Irma Mooi-Reci

Ms Rebecca Rutherford

Miss Lara Van De Lande

Mr Christopher Morash

Miss Mengyao Sang

Mr Arnav Varma

Dr Moataz Mostafa Shafik

Miss Nancy Santiappillai

Mr Ruben Vera

Dr Carlos Murguia

Professor Yuriko Sato

Dr Geng Wang

Professor Kai Nagel

Ms Isabel Schlangen

Mr Ben Watts

Dr Pooja Nagrath

Dr Darren Ee-Jin Seah

Mr Simon Wells

Ms Aparna Nair

Mr Salik Shafique

Mr Junyan Wenren

Miss Thuy Thi Nguyen

Miss Sumbal Shahid

Mr Peter Wiseman

Miss Philippa Nicolson

Mr Michael Shaw

Dr Sammi Wong

Ms Cecilia Nutter

Ms Prajna Shettigar

Dr Jessica Wong

Dr Fernando Ochoa

Miss Xinyi Shi

Miss Xiwen (Samantha) Wong

Mr Nicholas Ong

Mr Prasan Krishna Shrestha

Ms Juanjuan Wu

Dr Frank Ostermann

Mr Kris Shu

Ms Manni Wu

Mr Atta Oveisi

Mrs Carolina Silva

Ms Yueqi Wu

Mr Claudio Pacciarelli

Ms Filipa Ferrerira Soares

Miss Liqing Xu

Ms Sanuli Paralkar

Mr Prakarn Sombunying

Miss Daniela Yaneva

Mrs Nicola Passmore

Mrs Dharma Sree

Dr Ka Ho Raymond Yip

Professor David Patrick

Mr Edmond Stewart

Mr Hang Yu

Ms Jade Patterson

Mr Devon Stone

Mr Zifan Zeng

Mr Jim Peereboom

Mr Timm Strecker

Mr Bocheng Zhang

Ms Cecelia Juan Perez

Ms Nishat Sultana

Ms Wen Zhang

Dr Claudio Persello

Mr Eurwin Suryana

Miss Miao Zhang

Mr Youwen Qin

Dr Naoki Suzuki

Dr Omar Zuaiter

Dr Viji Rajendran

Ms Aswan Tai

Miss Clara Zwettler

Mrs Vidhyasakthi Ramakrishnan

Ms Yiting Tan

Ms Bhavatharani Ramakrishnan

Ms Sherilyn Tan

Mr Vishal Ratanpaul

Miss Jacinthe Tay

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Honorary Life Membership Awards At the 105th annual General Meeting on the 25th May, 2017, Honorary Life membership awards were presented to Ms Heather Kudeviita and announced for the Chancellor of The University of Melbourne, Mr Allan Myers AC QC. Ms Heather Kudeviita has had a longstanding and contributing involvement with The Graduate Union for several decades. Along with her close friend, the late Miss Barbara Funder, Heather was one of the two Trustees of (the now named) William Berry and Barbara Funder Postgraduate College Trust which has donated grants totalling $115,500 for upkeep of the terraces. Heather convenes a regular French-speaking lunch, attends the majority of the Association's GU Collegiate functions and is a strong supporter of both Graduate House and our Union — the membership. Mr Allan Myers AC QC is the 22nd Chancellor of The University of Melbourne, appointed on the 1st January, 2017. A graduate of The University of Melbourne and of Oxford University, Mr Myers has been a Member of our Association for several decades. There is a long list of accolades for this generous contributor to our society. Not the least of these is his appointment as Companion of the Order of Australia for eminent service to the community through philanthropic leadership in support of major visual arts, higher education, medical research and not-for-profit organisations, to the law, and to professional learning programs.

Inaugural Patrons of The Graduate Union At the Chairperson's Cocktail Party on the 1st December, 2017, Honorary Life Members Mr Neil Taylor and Ms Heather Kudeviita were announced as the Inaugural Patrons of the Association. Patron sashes were thence bestowed at the Members' Christmas Party on the 15th December.

President Dr Ken V Loughnan AO with Ms Heather Kudeviita (left) and with Mr Neil Taylor (right).

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Congratulations to our Members who received Australia Day 2017 Honours Professor Ian Harley Bailey AM SC

Mr Neville Maxwell Heffernan OAM

Awarded Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for significant service to the law, particularly in the area of dispute resolution in the construction industry, and education.

Awarded Medal (OAM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for service to education, and to the community.

His Grace the Most Reverend Archbishop Issam John Darwish AM

Awarded Medal (OAM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for service to the Indigenous community of North Queensland.

Awarded Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for significant service to the Melkite Greek Catholic Church in Australia, to the promotion of inter-faith relations, and to the community.

Dr Albert Edward Foreman OAM Awarded Medal (OAM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for service to medicine, particularly in rural and remote areas.

The Honourable Justice Stephen John Gageler AC Awarded Companion (AC) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for eminent service to the law and to the judiciary through contributions in the areas of constitutional, public, international, common and criminal law, to legal reform, education and academic discourse, and to professional organisations.

His Honour the Honourable John Laurence Hardy AO Awarded Officer (AO) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for distinguished service to the people of the Northern Territory. His honour is a patron and supporter of a range of aviation, health, emergency service and charitable organisations.

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Ms Sandra Ann Kelly OAM

Dr John Michael Quinn AM Awarded Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for significant service to medicine in the fields of general and vascular surgery, and to professional organisations.

Squadron Leader Alan William Robertson OAM CSM RFD (Retd) Awarded Medal (OAM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for service to veterans, and the community.

Dr Michael James Spence AC Awarded Companion (AC) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for eminent service to leadership of the tertiary education sector. Dr Spence's work has lead to the advancement of equitable access to educational opportunities, to developing strategic programs focused on multidisciplinary research, and to the Anglican Church of Australia.

Her Excellency Professor the Honourable Catherine Ann Warner AM AC Awarded Companion (AC) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for eminent service to the people of Tasmania through leading contributions to the legal community, particularly to law reform, to higher education as an academic, researcher and publisher, and as a supporter of the arts, and environmental and social justice initiatives.


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Valete Our condolences are extended to families and friends. The year of becoming a Member is indicated. Dr Barry Ian Aldrich, 1951

Dr Frank Curnow Jones, 1957

Dr Leonard Richard Allen, 1955

Miss Betty Joan Cathles Keay, 1982

Mr Stanton Charles Archer, 1953

Mr Thomas Frank Lee, 1961

Mr Yuzo Baba, 2015

His Hon Francis Bannatyne Lewis, 1975

Dr Edgar Roger Banks, 2017

Mr Allan David Main, 2009

Mr Laurence Mackinley Bell, 1982

Mrs Suzette Rowena Main, 1962

Professor David Biles OAM, 1964

Mr Bernard Gabriel O'Connell, 1955

Miss Gweneth Mabel Bowles, 1975

Mr Peter Terence Osborne, 1954

Dr Derek David Braham, 1962

Professor Peter Angas Parsons, 1979

Dr Alexandra Esther Cameron OBE, 1971

Miss Kathleen Margaret Peace Rankin, 1971

Mr Paul Clement Carlin, 2005

Mr Robert Lawrence Simpson, 1963

Mrs Joan Heywood Chambers, 1953

Dr Brian Robin Stewardson, 1960

Dr James Joseph Cross, 1966

Mrs Kitty Louise Syer, 1951

Mrs Dorothy Maud Delarue, 1954

Mrs Sidney Irene Thomas, 1971

Mr Eric Ford, 2009

Mr Lindsay David Thomson, 1966

Mr Victor Thomas Gillatt, 1969

Mrs Nancye Jean Trigellis-Smith, 1951

Miss Beryl Ida Green, 1962

Mrs Margaret Van Rompaey, 1972

Mrs Janet Robin Guthrie, 1963

Mrs Kitty Van Wees-Miller, 1998

Mr Barry John Henderson, 1956

Dr Geoffrey Norman Vaughan AO, 1963

Mr John Keith Henderson, 1965

Mr John Emerson Warren, 1965

Dr Edgar Roger Banks, 2017 We mourn the loss of Dr (Edgar) Roger Banks, a noted electrical engineer who had a distinguished career with Telecom and was a mentor to many of our Members and Graduate House residents.

Dr (Edgar) Roger Banks (1930 – 2018)

Dr Banks attended Camberwell South Primary School, Brighton Grammar and The University of Melbourne, graduating with a Bachelor of Electrical Engineering (H1) in 1953. His distinguished career with Telecom included roles as Head of Marketing and Director of Corporate Strategy, as well as Chairman of G.A.S.1 which had been commissioned by the International Telecommunications Union to develop manuals for countries to develop national automatic telephone networks. Retiring in 1988, Roger lived a full life including strong leadership of The Melbourne University Engineering Foundation. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by The University of Melbourne in 2012. As a mentor, he brought colleagues and students to Graduate House to support their career development and to foster financial support for The University. For the full tribute, go to: https://www.graduatehouse.com.au/joinus/who-are-our-members/vale/#roger-banks

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Dr Geoffrey Norman Vaughan AO, 1963 Our condolences are extended to the family and friends of Dr Geoffrey Vaughan, AO, a noted scientist in the field of chemistry and a talented sportsman who played rugby union for Australia with the Wallabies. Geoffrey graduated with a Master of Science, majoring in Chemistry, from Sydney University in 1956; and gained his PhD in Chemistry from The University of Melbourne in 1961. Beginning as a Lecturer in Pharmaceutical Chemistry at The Victorian College of Pharmacy of Monash University, he progressed over the next 26 years to Senior Lecturer, then Dean of Chemistry, and to Dean and Director of the College.

Dr Geoffrey Vaughan AO (1933 – 2018)

Dr Vaughan was appointed as an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2006 for service to scientific research and development, particularly through contributions to the development of government policy initiatives, to the growth of innovative technology-based Australian companies, and to education as a mentor and supporter of young scientists. For the full tribute, go to: https://www.graduatehouse.com.au/joinus/who-are-our-members/vale/#geoffrey-vaughan

Miss Betty Joan Cathles Keay, 1982 We are deeply saddened by the death of Honorary Life Member Miss Betty Keay, a high-achieving woman with a zest for life who was an inspiration to young and old. Miss Keay attended Moreland Central School and University High School and then worked at Commonwealth Aeronautic Laboratories at Fishermans Bend for four years carrying out mathematical computations for the testing and modification of aeroplane wings carried out in a high-speed wind tunnel.

Miss Betty Keay (1928 – 2018)

After completing a Diploma of Education (and later a Bachelor of Education) from The University of Melbourne, Betty taught mathematics at Strathmore High School, University High School, Coburg High School and Melbourne College of Textiles in Pascoe Vale (TAFE), now part of RMIT. She continued teaching until 1988 to enter a very active retirement of regular international and intrepid travel, genealogy, volunteering at the Public Records Office, organisation of the weekly Bridge Group at Graduate House and attendance at the majority of the GU Collegiate functions. In 2014, Betty was awarded Honorary Life Membership. For the full tribute, go to: https://www.graduatehouse.com.au/joinus/who-are-our-members/vale/#betty-keay

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Resident membership Graduate House Student Group Formed in 2014 to thence become constituted and affiliated with the Graduate Student Association (GSA) of The University of Melbourne, the Graduate House Student Group (GHSG) is responsible for social and networking activities such as cultural dinners, welcome tables, movie and music nights, sports, environmental initiatives, as well as day trips, group outings and fundraising events. We thank the contributors to GHSG activities in 2017, including Sufian Alimdanat, Kimberley Auyong, Prakhar Bhargava, Nouman Daud Sharif, Avi Ghandhi, Melissa Kennedy, Haris Khan, Rhea Kunwar, Priyanka Rajani, Amer Shanbour, Parisa Shiran, Riyan Stephan, Rhea Kunwar, Juanjuan Wu, Chen Xin and Hui Ping Yaw.

Vaccination Day

In 2017 the many GHSG activities included the Oaktree $2 Lunch, trips to an AFL game and down the coast, a White Night Party, the HeForShe Give a Flower Get a Smile fundraiser and a GH Mixer night of music under the beautiful Graduate House courtyard lights.

2017 GHSG committee members (from left) Prakhar Bhargava, Kimberley Auyong, Avi Ghandhi, Haris Khan, Melissa Kennedy, Rhea Kunwar, Nouman Daud Sharif and Riyan Stephan.

Melbourne's all night party,White Night

At the game.

Ms Sashenka Worsman, CEO of Oaktree

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

The In-House International Collegium Graduate House is one of the most international residential colleges worldwide. Every year, hundreds of postgraduates from around Australia and the globe choose to stay in our great college, creating a truly multicultural, multidisciplinary and multi-life-stage environment. This map shows the number of Resident Members from each country in 2017. These numbers are exclusive of visitors booked in by our organisation members, such as visiting academics and researchers and others here on university-related collaborations. For the new and lone postgraduate student or visiting academic, this means instant immersion into a welcoming and diverse ‘united nations’. Once they leave residence, they are also integrated and active in an increasingly influential, world-caring network.

Cassandra: This is a great experience to be here because we get to meet so many different cultures and talk with so many different people on different subjects. Every night you just eat with somebody else. Marina: Very quickly, I felt reassured because the Graduate House is a safe, convenient, cosy and very supportive place to be. And everybody is very helpful, and we felt quite at home really quickly.

Cassandra and Marina Gheorghe Graduate House opened my eyes by giving me new experiences, new knowledge and opportunities to meet new people. If I described Graduate House in five words I would say, ‘love’, ‘friendship’, ‘food’, ‘knowledge’ and ‘giving back’

Ayako Honzawa I think that where Graduate House really helps the world, or changes the world, is by allowing students to achieve their best while they’re spending time at universities around Melbourne, such as Melbourne University. Graduate House is only going to grow in size as the Australian education sector grows. It’s really a natural development.

Callum Henry McNair

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

Year at a Glance

Graduate House welcomes 2017

Monthly Luncheon with Reverend Keith Whitford

JAN

FEB

Oaktree Day — 'Live below the Line' Lunch

Investment for your future with Scott Fisher AGM Dinner

Monthly Luncheon with David Beauchamp

MAY

JUN Monthly Luncheon with Val Oldfield OAM

Monthly Luncheon with Dr Stefan Arndt

Diamond Jubilee Fundraising Gala

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SEPT

College Table with Mr Matthew Albert

OCT


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Welcome Summer/ Autumn BBQ

Mrs Diana Butlet OAM GU Influenza and Vaccination Day

Monthly Luncheon with Professor John Roberts

MAR

APR HeForShe Day

Christmas in July Luncheons

JUL

Donor Thank You Day

AUG Members' Christmas Party

Monthly Luncheon with Professor Anne Steinemann

NOV

Chairperson's Cocktail Party

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

Fundraising and Benefactions Working Party Fundraising and Benefactions Working Party Subcommittee The Fundraising and Benefactions working party was established in 2013 as a mechanism for the Association to strengthen a systematic and strategic approach to its advancement activities. This working party has met at least four times each year since then and has overseen many new and successful initiatives, including the now-regular Annual Appeal, the establishment of the Graduate House (bequest) Society, the annual Thank You to Donors event, the development of a range of advancementrelated processes and policies, the planning for and launch of the Diamond Jubilee Redevelopment Campaign, the development of a soon-to-be-launched crowdfunding site, an advancement-specific database, and increased resourcing for fundraising and benefaction activities. Recognising the significantly expanded governance charter of this group, Council resolved in late November 2017 to reconstitute the working party as a subcommittee of Council. As set out in regulation 30.2, the roles and responsibilities of this new Fundraising and Benefactions subcommittee are to: (a)

monitor and review policies and practices that relate to advancement activities (donations, fundraising, benefactions, sponsorship, endowments and trust fund management);

(b) provide advice to Council on an appropriate gift acceptance and review framework that aligns with the Association's objectives; (c)

oversee the reporting to Council and donors on the overall management and administration of philanthropic income;

(d) oversee the management and review of the investment performance of the Association’s philanthropic funds;

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(e)

onitor the meeting of endowed trust m fund obligations and expendable gift expectations for compliance with the expressed wishes of donors;

(f)

oversee the Association’s stewardship of donors including, where necessary, responding to individual donors;

(g)

ensure the proper administration and performance of trusts and other funds involving fiduciary obligations, including the proper content and form of the Association's instruments recording trust obligations and related administrative arrangements; and

(h) monitor the mitigation and management of risk which applies to advancement activities, including the adequacy of internal systems of risk identification and risk treatment.

Advancement Governance and Engagement of Networks The roles and responsibilities provided in the Regulations of the Association also reflect the key result areas (KRAs) of the ‘Benefaction’ priority in the 2016–2018 Strategic Plan. The first KRA — Council is driving advancement and the engagement of influential networks with the Association — has been progressed through development and adherence to the Association’s Major Donor Strategy. To ensure appropriate governance for advancement, a range of structures was explored in depth over 2017, including during a session at the 21st October, 2017 Strategic Planning Day. A presentation in this session by Ms Deborah Cutts, Senior Manager of Fundraising and Philanthropy at the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, entitled ‘Successful Governance in a Major Fundraising Campaign’, highlighted to Council the importance of agreed and well-defined governance structures and processes, and of board engagement, advancement training and commitment to influencing their networks.


The Graduate Union Annual Report Dr Ross Coller — previously Director of Divisional Advancement at The University of Melbourne and now Director of Advancement at Victoria University — gave his insights about the highly successful Believe Campaign which raised $500M two years ahead of schedule. From this, Council gained very practical suggestions towards defining the roles for individual Council members in advocating, introducing new prospective donors, speaking to the transformational impact of education and philanthropic investment, and playing a lead role in thanking major donors. It was following this session that Council determined to form the working party as a subcommittee. Council has recognised that ‘advancement’ is an ever-changing field of endeavour, requiring systems, policies and processes, and a continuous professional development approach for its effective practice. 2017 has thus seen increased focus on its review of position papers on the approaches used in Australia and in other countries to strengthen a culture of philanthropy at all levels and to inform the development of policies that relate to advancement, including those for reviewing, accepting and acknowledging donations, for recognising major donors (e.g., through naming of scholarships or spaces) and for the management of endowments. Each Council Member has also been tapping into their networks, and advocating for support of the Association, particularly for the Diamond Jubilee Redevelopment Campaign. This network-influencing role has been supported by the design of tailored material for each Council Member so that they receive individual wording suited to them and their networks. Working with Mr Scott Fisher of Lanyon Partners, who provides investment management services for the William Berry and Barbara Funder Postgraduate College Trust (now under the trusteeship of the Association), Council determined to consolidate a proportion of its donation and bequest pool into a new endowment managed investment fund and to adopt a strategy towards both a stable income stream and a steady growth in the capital value of this endowment fund. This approach is in accordance with the Endowment Management policy for sound investment of the donation pool both to fund regular programs (e.g., the Graduate House Research Scholarship and

Bursaries) from investment earnings, and to grow this pool for in-perpetuity funding programs, as well as for new major initiatives (e.g., the redevelopment behind the terraces). With the aim of developing and running an effective advancement system, financial and human resources have been increased to provide for a full-time Advancement Officer position and a part-time Crowd Funding Officer. Additionally, there are now allocations of dedicated advancement-focused hours from other staff to provide for database development, content writing, graphics and membership relations. Advancement is now ‘ring-fenced’ for budgeting and strategic purposes to foster costing and planning for human resources, communications, campaigns and appeals, printing, posting, hosting of events, marketing, media, etc.

Major Funds Secured and Major Projects ‘ready-to-go’ Significant progress on the second KRA of the ‘Benefaction’ strategic priority that ‘Major funds have been secured from bequests, donations and other endowment sources’ and on the third KRA that ‘G-House and G-Union major projects are ‘ready-to-go’ has been made through the consolidation of the different channels for giving and the development of well-defined funding targets.

Graduate House Society

After establishment of the Graduate House Society in 2016, we have been grateful to those who have named us in their will. There have been several informal and formal bequest pledges made to the Association, signifying the strong affiliation between the Union and our Members. By way of an example of one formal pledge by a Member who wishes to remain anonymous, we have been grateful for the opportunity to contribute to the design of an endowment for a scholarship to be granted

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The Graduate Union Annual Report in perpetuity to an Australian female doctoral research candidate who spends a period of her doctorate residing at Graduate House. This means that we will be better placed to meet the exact wishes of this generous donor in the future, and thus to honour her legacy appropriately. The generous bequest from the late Miss Barbara Funder has been used to fund a number of buildings and facilities projects. One is the establishment of the Barbara Funder Lounge at the old reception at 222 Leicester Street. This has involved the repair and polish of the beautiful floor boards found under the carpet, the installation of new curtains and some of Miss Funder’s furniture — including her trusty typewriter — and plastering and painting. Another part of her bequest has been used to top up the funds received from the 2017 Annual Appeal (see below). The remainder of this bequest (over half) has been added to the endowment fund for capital growth and future use on the buildings and facilities. T H E G R A D U AT E U N I O N o f

AnnualT hAppeal e University of Melbourne Inc.

DiamonD Jubilee C A P I TA L F U N D R A I S I N G

Now a regular feature of the Association’s calendar, the 2017 Annual Appeal was very successful, raising funds for new carpets, chairs, tables and couches for the ground floor of the central wing. The carpet was laid in February of 2018 in the Phillip Law Members' Lounge, the Dining Room, the Stillwell and Ian Potter meeting rooms, reception, the Johnston Library and the MV Anderson Room. As a result, these spaces have been revitalised, feel contemporary and have a warm and welcoming atmosphere. The focus of the 2018 Annual Appeal will be on increasing the pool of funds to continue sending two Resident Members to the National Student Leadership Forum in Canberra each year, a valuable and life-changing experience

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to cultivate leadership skills and to meet some of the country’s most influential leaders. The Association has been the proud sponsor of two Resident Members each year since 2014 and hopes to continue this important tradition of supporting life-long learning.

The Diamond Jubilee Capital Fundraising Campaign In 2017, we undertook a soft launch of the Diamond Jubilee Campaign at the Donor Thank You Brunch on the 20th August. This event was followed by a more formal launch at the successful 'Roaring 20s' Fundraising Gala held at the RACV Club. 2017 is sixty years since we purchased Gladstone Terrace which, after refurbishment, was opened as a residential college in 1962. Through this Diamond Jubilee Campaign we aim to raise significant funds for the proposed redevelopment of the terrace wing from 222 to 234 Leicester Street. This will result in 136 new residential rooms, a ground floor café, a gym, a resident kitchen and lounge, a theatrette and music rooms, and new meeting and function spaces. For more information about the redevelopment please refer to the Buildings and Facilities subcommittee report. Much work has gone into the development of Diamond Jubilee Campaign material, which we hope our Members and other graduates will use in spreading the word across the world to garner major support through their business and personal networks. This material includes a range of videos, brochures, newsletter stories, an on-line social media campaign and tailored printed material (e.g., for use by Council Members or Life Members). It outlines the benefits of a college-like accommodation for postgraduate students and the desperate need for more rooms. It includes explanations, for example, that more than 38,000 postgraduate (not undergraduate) students were enrolled at The University of Melbourne and at RMIT University in 2017, a 25% increase on the previous year. As Members well know, Graduate House is the only postgraduate-focused residential college in Victoria and is specifically adapted to the needs of postgraduates. With long waiting lists


The Graduate Union Annual Report and limited capacity, we are simply unable to meet this ever-growing demand in our current form. It is thus imperative that we increase the number of residential rooms in the safe convenient and supportive environment of a greatly expanded Graduate House. The assistance provided by Members in explaining and disseminating this message will be crucial to the success of the Diamond Jubilee Campaign. Additionally, our advancement team have been discerning and applying for suitable philanthropic grants, and working with a number of potential major donors who share our passion for the support of graduate education and research.

Crowdfunding Several years of research and development have gone into the soon-to-be released crowdfunding site called Fund Life Long Learning. With the goal of becoming as wellknown and frequently accessed as such sites as GoFundMe or Indiegogo, Fund Life Long Learning hosts crowdfunding ventures to facilitate 'People, Programs and Places' in the areas of Education and Research, Professional Development and Sustainable Development in line with the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations and ventures for Lifelong Learning and Philanthropic Pursuits. The site is being populated with ventures before its intended release in 2018. In the category of ‘People’, these ventures include funding requests by our Resident Members towards their education and living costs, as well as for the ongoing Graduate House support programs (scholarships, bursaries, awards, etc.). Over time, it is envisaged that anyone from anywhere in the world will post ventures in support of their education, research, career development and societal contributions. In the category of ‘Programs’ the ventures posted will be towards projects involving a number of people — for example, to create and fund the expenses of a volunteer team to work on a development project (e.g., to provide prosthetics to children injured by land mines; to remove plastic from our oceans). Fund Life Long Learning will

further the Association’s goal to capitalise on the collective intelligence of our membership, as well as of other graduates, who are from all disciplines, life stages and ethnicities. The third ‘Place’ category of ventures will enable funding for the buildings and facilities that enable education, research, professional development, teamwork, etc. For example, the Association will be posting various small and large Graduate House projects, including that for the major redevelopment of the terraces. Posts under this category are also envisaged to come from all over the world to support infrastructure projects. In supporting the SDGs, the site and ventures can link to goal 17 'Partnerships for the Goals' to further the Sustainable Development Agenda. Once the site is live, Fund Life Long Learning can be listed on the SDGs Forum to gain further exposure and potential global support. Individual ventures can also be linked to goals on their forum in accordance with their requirements, to advance the 2030 agenda as well as to maintain accountability towards the objectives.

Awards

MV Anderson Award The MV Anderson Award recognises the achievements of graduates who have developed skills and insights from their field of study for the benefit of the wider community. The award is donated by the family of Magnus Victor Anderson, who was a significant contributor and founding Member of The Graduate Union. In 2017, this award was received by Ms Zizhao (Imogen) She and Mr Shubham Rawal.

Ms Zizhao (Imogen) She

Imogen has been an avid participant in the collegiate experience, through supporting our JobFocus group and appearing in one of our Diamond Jubilee

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 53


The Graduate Union Annual Report Campaign mini-films, eloquently assisting the promotion of Graduate House.

Graduate House Research Scholarship

Imogen completed a Master of Management (Accounting) at The University of Melbourne in 2017, having previously attained a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from University College London.

The 2017 Graduate House Research Scholarship was awarded to Ms Milena Nadgorny who is undertaking her PhD on 3D printing of functional materials at The University of Melbourne.

The second M V Anderson Award in 2017 was presented to Mr Shubham Rawal, who, at the time of the award, was undertaking a Master of Engineering degree at The University of Melbourne. Shubham Mr Shubham Rawal. additionally holds a Bachelor of Technology (2014) from Indraprastha University in India. Shubham has contributed greatly to the collegiate experience by providing information technology advice to us, through his support of our cultural dinners and by appearing in our first mini-film for our Diamond Jubilee Redevelopment Campaign.

Acknowledgment Awards At the 2017 annual General Meeting, a Research Acknowledgment Award was given to Mr Shuntaro Iizuka (PhD Candidate, Faculty of Arts, The University of Melbourne) and a Coursework Acknowledgment Award was given to Ms Ying Barnett. At the 2017 Chairperson's Cocktail Party, Resident Members gratefully acknowledged for continuing to advance the in-house college experience included Mr Mohamed Muzaffar Ahmed, Ms Afra Aldhaheri, Mr Avinash Gandhi, Ms Melissa Kennedy, Mr Haris Khan,Mr Kuoyue (Elvis) Liu, Ms Parisa Shiran, Professor Anne Steinemann, Dr Ximena TolosaAlvarez, Ms Ligia Veliz, Ms Hongjian (Stella) Wang and Ms Juanjuan Wu.

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The funds from the $3,000 scholarship Ms Milena Nadgorny. were used for Milena's travel expenses to access research facilities at The University of Washington in the United States and for the purchase of 3D-printing equipment and consumables. The objective of Milena's PhD research is to synthesise the process and produce functional objects. Her interest lies in producing objects that perform chemical, catalytic or physical functions (unlike the commercially available benign plastics) in the field of soft robots and green chemistry. Future work will be in collaboration with The University of Washington with the hope of developing the new generation of 3D printable materials for tissue engineering and to fabricate some materials with enhanced mechanical performances. “I would like to thank you very much for the scholarship which is a very valuable resource for me to travel to Seattle to proceed with my collaborative research,” Milena said.

The Rhys Watson Medal 2017 saw establishment of The Rhys Watson Medal, generously initiated by the Chairperson of Council. Cr Watson engaged noted sculptor, Michael Meszaros OAM to create a medal for

Ms Parisa Shiran.


The Graduate Union Annual Report the recipient, as well as generously donating a $1,000 cash prize. The Medal was awarded to Resident Member, Ms Parisa Shiran, literature PhD candidate in the Faculty of Arts, The University of Melbourne.

Graduate House Bursaries Bursaries provide financial assistance for coursework studies. The 2017 recipients were Mr Sebastian Teo (Master of Architecture, RMIT), Mr Muhammad Sufiyan (Master of Engineering (Electrical), The University of Melbourne), Ms Melissa Kennedy (Master of Law, The University of Melbourne) and Mr Jim Peereboom (Doctor of Medicine, The University of Melbourne).

Mr Muhammad Sufiyan, Mr Sebastian Teo, Dr Ken V Loughnan AO and Mr Jim Peereboom.

National Student Leadership Forum Mr Nouman Daud and Ms Priyanka Rajani were nominated by Graduate House to attend the 2017 National Student Leadership Forum on faith and values. Priyanka, a Master of Business Administration student at Melbourne Business School, stated of the experience, "It is one thing to know a country is diverse and see people from various backgrounds walk out on the streets, but it is quite another to bring them together in a safe space and to share their honest truths with people whom they have never met." After listening to an honest and personal speech from the Prime Minister of Australia on his faith and personal values Priyanka found that the experience to highlight the importance of conversation and listening to others as a way of changing the world.

Nouman, a Master of Civil Engineering student at The University of Melbourne, noted how inspiring and enlightening he found the event. Nouman has expressed his gratitude to The Graduate Union and Dr Kerry Bennett for their sponsorship to attend the event, stating, "I feel absolutely blessed and grateful to have the opportunity to experience something I never expected and would have not been able to experience in any other environment. I now have a strong urge to do better for others and spread friendship."

Donor Thank You Day

Ms Priyanka Rajani.

Mr Nouman Daud Sharif.

On the 20th of August 2017, The Graduate Union hosted a ‘Donor Thank You Day’ to acknowledge the philanthropic contribution of funds, buildings, bequests and time from our dynamic and generous membership. The annual August Thank You Brunch was an invitation-only event to demonstrate the Association’s gratitude to our donors. The brunch included welcome drinks and a variety of breakfast platters. The quiz based on the rich and exciting history of Graduate House, in celebration of our 60th anniversary, proved to be a great success, particularly for Table 1! A highlight of the day was the speeches. Reflecting on his own personal experience of coming from the west of Victoria and residing in Newman College as a young man, Mr Allan Myers AC QC highlighted the importance of having residential colleges such as Graduate House.

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The Graduate Union Annual Report Two Resident Members also addressed the audience. Ms Ligia Veliz who is studying a Master of Energy Systems degree at The University of Melbourne spoke about how her initial worries when moving from Guetemala to Australia were appeased upon arriving at Graduate House, not only finding a home away from home, but also a new family! Resident Member, Mr Nouman Daud Sharif spoke of how coming to Melbourne has been the best experience of his life so far. He attributed this partially to his experience at Graduate House, a progressive and compelling environment allowing for cultural exchange with graduates from all over the world. Guests then heard from Mr Neil Taylor, past Chairperson of Council and a current Patron of The Graduate Union. Mr Taylor has generously donated $25,000 to the Diamond Jubilee Redevelopment Campaign and encouraged

Donor Thank You Day.

others to donate similar amounts, emphasising the importance of expansion, as it would allow for a greatly increased number of students to be catered for and the cementing of Graduate House as a vital part of the university experience. Finally, Cr Vincent Mirabelli spoke at the podium to urge Members to support the Diamond Jubilee Campaign by coming along to the Diamond Jubilee Fundraising Gala.

The Diamond Jubilee ‘Roaring 20s’ Fundraising Gala On the 2nd of September 2017, our inaugural Fundraising Gala was held on the 17th floor of the RACV Club. The Gala marked the official launch of the Diamond Jubilee Campaign,

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Graduate Union’s initiative to raise funds for the redevelopment of Graduate House. Guests were entertained by ‘Select’, Australia’s premier showband, Channel 7's Mr John Deeks as Master of Ceremonies, who welcomed guests and hosted the silent auction, and piano accordionist John Kalkbrenner. Guests participated in our silent auction and tore up the dance floor The Gala raised funds that have been put to our Diamond Jubilee Campaign, through the very successful silent raffle and the live auction, which boasted donated items such as an original Charles Billich painting, a Zanchi Imports Italian Food Hamper, Simone Perele vouchers, and a golf pass at Heritage Golf and Country Club, amongst others.

Past Chair of Council and current Patron of The Graduate Union, Mr Neil Taylor

Charles Billich's painting, Graduate Diamond Jubilee 2017 pictured on page 57 right, represents a time fusion of our terraces, purchased 60 years ago, with the ultra-modern eleven-storey development of quality post-graduate accommodation, the Cr Vincent Mirabelli focus of Diamond Jubilee Campaign. The painting cleverly melds a bygone era of horses and carts, classic cars with '60' on one number plate and the hustle and bustle of modern life with students in graduation gowns and caps. The success of the Gala could not have been achieved without the tireless work of Cr Vincent Mirabelli, who organised the venue, entertainment, guest numbers and auction items.


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Painting of Graduate House by artist Charles Billich

The Diamond Jubilee 'Roaring 20s' Fundraising Gala was held on the 17th floor of The RACV Club, Melbourne.

In conclusion, I extend my gratitude to the members of the working party, who are now the subcommittee for 2017: Deborah Cutts, Nanette Gibson, Elfrida and Zoltan Kiss, Muan Lim, Fausto Marasco, Vincent Mirabelli and Wal Reid. In particular, I thank Elfrida and Zoltan Kiss, who are retiring from this subcommittee, for their years of dedicated service and contributions since the initiation of this working party in 2013.

2018 sees two new members joining our subcommittee — Shelley Jones and Damon Luo (who has also joined our Council). We very much look forward to working with you both and to another productive year of continued strengthening of our culture of philanthropy.

We are very grateful and wish to thank the following companies and individuals, who generously donated items to the live and silent auctions and to prizes at our 2017 Diamond Jubilee Fundraising Gala:

Flight Centre, Preston

Aromababy Natural Skincare

Kincrome

Artico & Anche Moderno

Heritage Golf and Country Club

Azzaro Fashion House

Marina Mirage Shopping Centre

BE Travel Services

Nespresso Australia and Oceania

Mr Charles Billich

Ristorante Fellini, Marina Mirage

Lady Josie Blyton

Sheraton Grange Mirage

Caine Real Estate

Simone Perele, Hawthorn

Carlton Football Club

Cr Paul Southwick

Confucius Institute, The University of Melbourne

The Balanced Approach

Couture Hair and Beaute, Marina Mirage Don Logozzo

Cr Rhys Watson Chairperson of the Fundraising and Benefactions subcommittee

Franc Salon Ms Gwendolynne Gage Harvey Norman, Preston

Time Out Federation Square Zanchi Imports

Il Pom Italian

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

Thank You For Your Support Donations and Bequests in 2017 In 2017, donations and bequests were received from the following generous supporters:

Mr Mohamed Ahmed Dr Kingsley Allen Miss Joan Ansell Dr Peter Ashton Mr Leonard Bailey Mr Paul Barnett Ms Lesley Bawden Dr Tom Beer Mr Alan Bell Dr Kerry Bennett Ms Marja Berclouw Mr David Berry Dr Kaspars Bitans Lady Josie Blyton Mr Michael Bolam Mr David Bottomley Miss Gweneth Bowles Mr John Brearley Mr Douglas Brooke Mr Clive Brookes Dr Kester Brown Mr Ronald Burgoine Miss Heather Campbell Ms Elizabeth Carvosso Mrs Andrea and Dr Allan Casey Ms Catherine Cervasio Mrs Diana Cherry Mr John Cicero Mr John Cleeland Miss Wendy Cobcroft Mr Ewan Colson Mr Stuart Colvin

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Mrs Aileen Corbern Dr Ricardo Crespo Dr James Cross Mr Glen Currie Mr Kingsley Davis OAM Dr Arthur Day Professor David de Kretser AC Mr Tony De Luca Mr Michael De Zilwa Mrs Margaret Dean Mr John Deeks Mr Mark Dennison Mr Edward Dickinson Mr Lindsay Doig Ms Marie Dowling Dr Hayden Downing Dr Graeme Duke Ms Jo Elvins Mr Kurt Eppinger Associate Professor Joseph Epstein Dr Ken Fargher Ms Francesca Folk-Scolaro Ms Helen Freeman Dr Czesia Geddes Mr George Goode Ms Elsie Graham Ms Natalie Gray Mr John Green Ms Olive Hamilton Mr Peter Hannon

Dr Richard Harcourt Associate Professor John Harcourt OAM Mrs June and Mr Roy Hardcastle AO Ms Pauline Henthorn Dr Marian Hill Professor Brian Howe Mrs Christine Iseli Mr Reginald Jackson Ms Mary R Kelleher Ms Helen Keneley Dr Josephine Kenrick Mr John Landy AC CVOÂ MBE Mr Kenneth Lee Dr Sharon Lierse Dr Leonard Lloyd Dr Ken V Loughnan AO Mr Martin Mahood Mr Richard Manuell Mrs Connie and Mr George Markou Mr Douglas Marshall Dr Lynette Martin Mrs Mary Maslen Mrs Margaret Mayers Dr Peter McCann Ms Fiona McConnell Mrs Desma McDonald Mr Callum McNair Mr Joseph Mel Mr Edward Miller


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Mr Anthony Mirabelli Mr Vincent Mirabelli Mrs Anne and Mr James Mulholland Mr Edward Muntz Mr Sankar Nadeson Professor Kai Nagel Mr Roy Nichols His Hon Justice Tony Pagone Mrs Louise Parsons Mr Fred Pascale Mrs Patsy Patten Ms Hope Peel Dr Patricia Phair Mr Vito Pititto Miss Judith Price Mr Ian Proctor Dr Joanna Pyper Mr Milo Racinac Miss Kathleen Rankin Mr Ratna Ratnakumar Mr Wal Reid His Hon Peter Rendit Mrs Louisa Richards Mr Ronald Ritchie Dr David Robson Mr James Rowan Mr Leonard Santalucia Mrs Wendy Seng Hpa Mrs Elizabeth Sevior Dr Elizabeth Shaw Mr Paul Sheahan AM

Ms Parisa Shiran Mr Peter Sholl Ms Caroline Silk Mr John Skuja Brigadier Bob Slater AM Professor Richard Southby Mr Paul Southwick Mrs Prue and Mr David Sparks Dr Max Stephens Mr Timothy Stephens Mr Kevin Stevenson AM Professor John Stillwell Mr Eric Stokes Mr Stephen Stuart Mr Alex Subostch Dr Rodney Taft Ms Naomi Tanner Dr Bernadette Taylor Mr Neil Taylor Mr Ian Tyler Miss Barbara Tynan Ms Rosemary Tzovlas Dr Geoffrey Vaughan AO Mr Rhys Watson Mr Brian Webb Miss Joy Wellings Dr David Westmore Dr Heather Wheat Ms Susan Wilson Mr Mark Worsnop Ms Sharon Wu Mr Cesare Zanchi

Thank you to those who gave to the Donations Box and who nominated to remain anonymous.

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

Some High Contributors

Mr Neil Taylor

Miss Kathleen Rankin

Cr Leo Santalucia

Cr Rhys Watson

MGS Architects

Mrs Anne and Mr James Mulholland

Cr Vincent Mirabelli

Mr John Deeks

The Hon Justice Tony Pagone

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

Mr Edward Dickinson

Ms Marie Dowling

Mr Roy Hardcastle AO

Mr John Landy AC CVO MBE

Brigadier Bob (Robert) Slater AM

Mr David and Mrs Prue Sparks

Australian Bedding Company

Mr Paul Barnett

Mr Kevin Stevenson AM

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

Helen R Freeman Scholarships Since 2013, Life Member, Ms Helen Freeman has supported two female students undertaking their Master’s degree in Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science) or in Biomedical Sciences (Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences) at The University of Melbourne, through named Scholarships.

Scholarship recipients, awarded based on academic excellence, receive $20,000 over the duration of a two-year course, enabling them to remain focused and committed to their studies, and providing them with a muchneeded and relieving level of financial security. We salute Ms Helen Freeman’s generosity in supporting high-achieving female postgraduate students to achieve their educational and professional goals.

Recipients of the Helen R Freeman Scholarships 2013 – 2014

2016 – 2017

2017 – 2018

Jinghan Hope Xia Olga Shulyarenko Georgia Tsambos

Elena Savva

Erin Crellin

Master of Science Master of Science Master of Science (Mathematics and (Mathematics and (Mathematics and Statistics), now Statistics), now a Statistics), now a a Mathematics Data Scientist at PhD student at Teacher at Yarra Incitec Pivot The University of Valley Grammar. Melbourne.

Master of Biomedical Science, current scholarship recipient, soon to commence work at a genomics laboratory.

Master of Biomedical Science, current scholarship recipient.

Alexandra Simpson

Linda Eitelberg

Mai Tran Master of Science (Biomedical and Health Sciences), now a PhD student at Tufts University, Boston, USA.

2014 – 2015

Laura Finlayson-Short

2015 – 2016

Dana Piovesan

Master of Master of Master of Science Biomedical Biomedical (Mathematics and Science, now a Science, now Statistics), current PhD student at a Research scholarship The University of Associate at Arcus recipient. Melbourne. Biosciences in San Francisco, USA.

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Master of Data Science, current scholarship recipient


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Buildings and Facilities Building and Facilities Subcommittee

(h) review the optimal use of buildings and facilities and recommend to Council any changes thought desirable or necessary.

As set out in regulation 28.2 the roles and responsibilities of the Buildings and Facilities subcommittee are to:

Occupancy

(a)

monitor and review policies and practices relating to the development and management of the Association’s buildings and facilities;

(b) when requested by Council, oversee the development of a master plan (physical infrastructure) for any expansion of the Association’s buildings and facilities; (c)

oversee the development of approved projects for upgrading specific buildings, parts of buildings or facilities;

(d)

review the fees, charges and conditions for the use of college residential rooms and facilities and recommend any changes for adoption by Council;

(e)

monitor the implementation of approved capital expenditure;

(f)

monitor and ensure timely maintenance of all buildings and facilities;

(g)

monitor the mitigation and management of risk which applies to the buildings and facilities, including the adequacy of internal systems of risk identification and risk treatment; and

For the Graduate House facility on Leicester Street (with three wings and 114 rooms), the average occupancy in 2017 was 91.6% as compared to 94.8% in 2016. The thirteen apartments on the seventh floor of 50 Barry Street were acquired late in 2016 and significant refurbishment was undertaken in the first quarter of 2017. Following release to the market in late March, the average occupancy for the months until the end of the year was 82% and bookings ahead suggest that this percentage will be higher for 2018. The bar graph shows the overall occupancy for 2017 each month (that is, inclusive of occupancy in the Barry Street apartments).

G-House Master Plan During 2017, the Association continued to develop a three-staged G-House Master Plan. These stages envisage; Stage 1 redevelopment behind Gladstone Terrace, the northernmost wing; a Stage 2 redevelopment of the Stella Langford Wing, the southernmost wing; and a Stage 3 redevelopment of the central wing, a more challenging endeavour because this wing was built over the University car park entrance.

100%

75%

2016 2017

50%

25%

0%

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Year End

Occupancy chart for 2017.

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 63


The Graduate Union Annual Report The main principles in this Master Plan continue to be: (a)

engagement with Grattan Street and activation of the ground floor interface;

(b) activation of the rear laneway; (c)

allowance for potential future expansion;

(d) creation of open buildings which engage with University Square and the park; and (e)

retention and celebration of the heritage facades.

Late in 2016, the Association submitted a planning application to Melbourne City Council for the first stage of this Master Plan. Within the 40m height limit applicable to these sites, this Stage 1 redevelopment proposed eleven storeys above ground and five basement levels in a redevelopment behind Gladstone Terrace from 222 to 234 Leicester Street. The renovated terraces and new building included a café to Grattan Street, a number of spaces to complement and extend existing Member facilities, executive and administrative offices, state of the art meeting rooms, 136 ensuite apartments, shared resident facilities, such as a large lounge and kitchen area, and a roof terrace. In response to feedback from heritage and urban design departments within Melbourne City Council, in April of 2017 façade studies were undertaken to address scale and composition, the introduction of a vertical ‘break’ and more evident horizontal separation of the tower to the existing terraces. Acknowledging that this redevelopment would be ‘first cab off the rank’ in the block bounded by Grattan, Leicester, Pelham and Bouverie Streets, massing studies were undertaken to examine the proposed scale with regard to future development. These illustrated that the building’s scale would be relatively exaggerated in the short term. A photographic study demonstrated also the diverse nature of the built environment in and around the University of Melbourne and Biomedical precinct with a broad, though relatively cohesive general colour palette. Based on these studies, the redevelopment was re-designed. In terms of the internal layout, this re-design was minor, remaining true to the

Page 64 | Volume 71, Number 1

Association’s purposes of providing a mature collegiate living environment for the best and brightest from around the world, and spaces for intercultural, interdisciplinary and inter-lifestage experiences. The major re-design was to the building’s exterior, particularly to the rooftop by adding photovoltaic solar panels, and to the façade by adding technology that will clean the air. This has been informed by the potential to introduce the most efficient and effective innovative technologies that incorporate ongoing environmental benefits; and reflects the Association’s ongoing role in supporting innovation, and its relationship with the research and development sector through a global network of universities. The latest concept brief was thus for a ‘case study’ building that is 'creating energy and cleaning air', that has a façade that appears to be dynamic and ever-changing with an abstracted imagery emblematic of Graduate House, and that is low maintenance and enduring, incorporating new technologies and adapting to privacy constraints and solar impacts. The newly proposed façade for the redevelopment has various ‘skins’ or layers. The outermost will have five shades of ceramic sunshade ‘pipes’ and ceramic panels that will have a nontoxic, photocatalytic coating which in the presence of ultraviolet light produces a nanoscale reaction to give antibacterial, selfcleaning and anti-pollution benefits. This will reduce the amount of fine air particles and volatile organic compounds, contributing to a cleaner environment. The ceramic structures will be supported by metal outriggers (in colours that match the ceramics) fixed to the structural precast wall. This outrig system will also support a galvanised service access platform to enable façade maintenance and window cleaning. The innermost ‘skin’ will be a curtain wall, double glazed throughout with four bluespectrum tints of opaque glazed spandrel inlays. The recessed Level 2 façade will have clear double-glazed windows allowing for a view of native bushes in the planter boxes, as well as of University Square.


The Graduate Union Annual Report As outlined in the Fundraising and Benefactions subcommittee report we have also recommenced the Diamond Jubilee Campaign and encourage all Members to spread the message amongst their local, national and global networks.

Parkville Station As outlined in last year’s report, the Melbourne Metro Rail Project involves the construction of two nine kilometre long underground rail tunnels from South Kensington station through Melbourne’s central business district (CBD) to South Yarra.

Proposed redevelopment behind the terraces with 11 storeys above and five basement levels.

In 2017 we also undertook detailed financial modelling for this proposed redevelopment. In the first instance this was to determine whether or not the building would generate sufficient surpluses once built and fully operational. Variables manipulated with this analysis included occupancy rates (accommodation rooms), meeting and functions bookings, café sales, borrowing amounts and interest rates, staff numbers and salaries, etc. Business interruption analysis was also undertaken to look, for example, at the feasibility of hiring other venues during the construction period. From these analyses we have been able to determine confidently the maximum amount of borrowings that the Association could take on to fund this redevelopment without risk to its longer-term financial viability, as well as the minimum target for the Diamond Jubilee Campaign. Early in 2018 we resubmitted the revised planning application to Melbourne City Council. We look forward to obtaining the permit to develop the detailed design and construction plan and thence to building this much needed new facility.

Following a call for station name suggestions to all Victorians that resulted in more than 50,000 responses, the five new underground stations have been named North Melbourne, Parkville, State Library, Town Hall and Anzac to enable easy identification by passengers as to where they are on the rail network. The Parkville Station is to be located beneath Grattan Street from under Royal Parade eastwards to the midway point along the northern edge of University Square, west of Leicester Street. The two tunnels are to be more than twenty metres underground, passing alongside our northernmost terrace (234 Leicester Street). During 2017, early works were undertaken along both Leicester and Grattan Streets, primarily to relocate utility lines — gas, water, electricity, telephone and sewerage — and to remove or to protect trees, to begin to close off

Graduate House

Map of Parkville Station

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 65


The Graduate Union Annual Report Grattan Street (now closed between Leicester Street and Royal Parade), and to prepare work sites in Barry Street and on the north-west corner of University Square. The Association has been meeting regularly with representatives from Melbourne Metro Rail Authority (MMRA) and the company contracted to undertake these early works, to ensure that Resident Members and those visiting Graduate House are kept well informed in advance. Monitoring equipment is being installed to measure noise, vibration, structural shifts, air quality, etc. and that mitigation/ management measures are put in place accordingly (e.g., soundproof mats in front of the terrace windows; soundproofing of the windows along Leicester Street). The Association has been meeting also with Cross Yarra Partnership, the main contractor engaged in July 2017 to build the stations and tunnels from 2018 to 2026. The Parkville station will be built using a cut and cover construction technique whereby a large rectangular hole will be excavated (open cut) and then covered by an ‘acoustic shed’ to minimise noise, light and dust impacts during the ensuing 24/7 construction work underground. Following the building of the station, tunnel boring machines will be used to construct the tunnels.

Reimagining University Square We have reported previously the plans by Melbourne City Council (MCC) to ‘reimagine’ University Square that is to the west of Graduate House and bounded by Leicester, Grattan, Barry and Pelham Streets. This development will increase the greenery and vibrancy of this well-used graduate precinct park, and convert Leicester Street into an elegant, tree-lined park lane. The master plan for this initiative was developed in consultation with the community over several years and though some works have necessarily been put on hold to enable early works and construction of the Parkville Station, particularly on the north and western sections of University Square, progress is being made on other sections of the Square. The roundabout at the corner of Pelham Street and Leicester Street has been removed, and

Page 66 | Volume 71, Number 1

activities to construct a new park entrance with native tree raised garden beds and to relocate the temperance fountain have commenced. A portion of the southern half of Leicester Street (just west of Melbourne Business School) is being demolished and a five-metre wide north-bound traffic lane with a dedicated bicycle path and new lighting and trees is being constructed. These Pelham and Leicester Street stages of works are anticipated for completion in 2018.

Major Projects, Repairs and Maintenance Level 7 Barry Street apartments Following purchase of 13 apartments on the seventh floor of 50 Barry Street late in 2016, a major refurbishment was undertaken in the first quarter of 2017 to bring these apartments up to the Association’s college accommodation standards. This work has included the replacement of ceilings and walls, repairs to the plumbing in the kitchenettes and the ensuites, replacement of damaged furniture (beds, desks, chairs) and equipment (jugs, microwaves, stoves, etc.), electrical rewiring, insulation and repainting. By April, all rooms were available for bookings and are proving to be an attractive accommodation alternative for those who want to participate in collegial activities at the Leicester Street campus, including the meals, movie nights, cultural dinners, etc., and live just down the road.

Barbara Funder Lounge With installation of the new reception desk in the foyer of 220 Leicester Street late in 2016, the old reception desk at 220 Leicester Street was fully closed and works were commenced in 2017 to create the Barbara Funder Lounge in the old reception foyer. This has involved the removal of the old carpet and polishing of the beautiful timber floorboards that were found underneath. Miss Funder’s lounge chair furniture has been reupholstered and preparations have been made to install new curtains and to paint and redecorate this area. Personal and professional


The Graduate Union Annual Report a modern canopy that extends out to the Leicester Street footpath, thus providing shelter, as well as an enhanced street aspect with a more conspicuous, attractive and identifiable entrance. An elegant glass encased ‘airlock’ security entrance with two sets of automatic sliding doors enables easy entry to the facility, particularly for those with walking aids and other mobility devices. A bench seat found in the upstairs terrace corridor has been reupholstered and placed in this air-lock, providing an ideal seat to await taxis in a sheltered climate controlled environment.

Miss Barbara Funder

items will be displayed in this area, including Miss Funder’s typewriter and photographs from her period working with the Association from 1962 to 1985 with William (Bill) Berry.

Front entrance at 220 The new front entrance at 220 Leicester Street was constructed in February and March of 2017 and has made a tremendous difference for all who enter Graduate House at 220 Leicester Street. It comprises

Upon entry, the new reception desk is immediately apparent, providing all with an immediate sense of orientation and welcome.

Window soundproofing The soundproofing of windows in the terrace wing has been an ongoing project funded at first in 2014 by donations from the nownamed William Berry and Barbara Funder Postgraduate College Trust Fund for old terrace windows in need of replacement and to counter increasing traffic noise and dust on Grattan Street. This project was made a higher priority and expedited in response to the noisy and dusty early works along Leicester Street in 2017 and in preparation for the construction of the new Parkville station for several years to come. Now, all but two of the terrace wing windows on Leicester Street have either been fully sealed and reconditioned or had a secondary inner frame installed. Additionally, the steel-framed windows of the ground floor meeting spaces were installed with Magnetite inner secondary windows and frames early in 2018. Subject to sufficient funds, it is hoped to achieve also soundproofing of all other windows along Leicester Street in the central wing (upper levels) and the southern Stella Langford Wing (ground and upper levels).

Wi-Fi Network Automatic Wi-Fi access is an inherent requirement of the residential, meeting services and membership experience. The new front entrance.

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 67


The Graduate Union Annual Report Reliability, ease of connection to the system and upload/download capacity are key factors to any Wi-Fi network, and it was becoming clear that the Wi-Fi network installed in 2009 was increasingly unable to meet these requirements. The use of the internet by the Residents is both personal and study related, with meeting/ function service delegates varying this usage from simple cloud stored files to complex digital displays or video conferencing. Resident Members were requesting that the Wi‑Fi connection was included in their weekly rates and market comparisons showed that other student accommodation providers offered this as a standard inclusion. In 2017, the Association thus upgraded its Wi‑Fi network to the latest technology. This involved the replacement of existing Wi-Fi hubs with more technologically advanced hubs, and the addition of eleven more hubs to improve coverage, as well as a change in the company that manages the accessibility, stability and reliability of the network. Additionally, changes were made to the administration and payment options to enable the Association to take over all operations and connections, while continuing to pay the existing or another carrier for the internet connection.

Carpets The 2017 Annual Appeal was focused on the re-carpeting of the ground floor of the central wing, as well as on refurbishment of the furniture for Members. Following this successful appeal and with the use of funds also from Miss Funder’s generous bequest, the carpets of the main dining room, the Phillip Law Members’ Lounge, the Ian Potter and Stillwell meeting rooms and the entrance foyer at 220 Leicester Street were replaced early in 2018. We thank all who contributed so generously to this Annual Appeal. 100% of these donations were put to the funding of this recarpeting project and the result is a much improved amenity and a more vibrant design in these well-used areas of Graduate House.

Page 68 | Volume 71, Number 1

New carpet at Graduate House

Central wing lift The central wing lift was installed when this building was constructed in 2005. During 2016 and 2017 there was a marked increase in the frequency of faults and call outs attributed to the door mechanisms on the ground floor. With the lift being over 12 years old, spare parts for many of the mechanisms operating the doors and floor levels were difficult to locate and it was becoming increasingly difficult to maintain the lift. As the only lift in this wing, this lift is used constantly to go to and from the ground floor to the three floors of accommodation above by Residents, as well as by staff who provide housekeeping and building services. Following research of a number of options in 2017, the mechanisms and machinery for the lift doors at all four levels of the central wing were updated early in 2018. Additionally, new lift control electronics were installed. The Association is particularly grateful to the Residents and staff who battled three flights of stairs for two weeks in January while these upgrades were being undertaken.

Card access system Research has been ongoing for some years on the appropriate technology to install to enable card (as opposed to key) access to all internal and external doors.


The Graduate Union Annual Report With improvements in this technology, as well as greater competition, current systems have greater functionality and are less costly. Given also the expanding population in this precinct and predictions for even higher numbers with the construction of the Parkville Station, the Association determined that security of Graduate House is of high priority, particularly for Residents, and made the decision to progress this project. Late in 2017, electrical wiring was installed throughout the entire Leicester Street facility in preparation for the installation of electronic door locks and other mechanisms in the doors to all residential rooms (n=114) and corridors, in the entrance doors to the facility and for access to the lifts. During the first half of 2018, the electronic door locks will be installed in stages. This new system will not only enable easier access for residents, it will also allow for remote recoding of the cards as Residents enter and depart residency, and rapid deactivation of lost cards to prevent unauthorised access.

Other projects 2017 has been a very busy year of planning and preparing for other major projects to be completed in 2018.

One such project involves the replacement of ageing equipment in the kitchen, particularly the much-used dishwasher, a main oven and some of the refrigeration and freezer units. Another is to continue the replacement of the plumbing and hot water units in the central wing. The apartments in the southernmost (Stella Langford Wing) will be repainted and the terrace wing rooms that have boarded up fireplaces will be refurbished. Finally, reverse cycle air conditioners are intended to be installed in the Barry Street apartments. In conclusion, I thank the members of the Buildings and Facilities subcommittee for 2017 — Mr Robert Heaton (Co-Vice-Chairperson), Cr Jo Ligouris (Co-Vice-Chairperson), Mr David Sparks (Immediate-Past-Chairperson), Cr David Cowie, Cr Vincent Mirabelli, Cr Rhys Watson, and the Resident Member representatives who joined the subcommittee from June, Mr Nouman Daud Sharif, Mr Avi Gandhi and Ms Ligia Veliz. I extend gratitude to the hardworking management group, the accommodation officers and the building services team, particularly to the Operations Manager, Mr Daniel Clark.

Cr Mary R Kelleher Chairperson of the Buildings and Facilities subcommittee

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 69


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Meet The Graduate Union Team In the Office

CEO/Head of College Dr Kerry Bennett

Operations Manager Daniel Clark

Executive Assistant to CEO/Head of College Mary Ellen Hill

Accommodation and Front Desk

Accommodation Officer Sujata Manandhar Gauli

Accommodation Officer Puay Boon (Pei)Â Ng

Advancement and Fundraising

Business Development Analyst Jaimy Skaria-Jose

Analyst Programmer Natasha Thomas

Advancement Officer Georgia Bourke Zoe Tapp

GU Collegiate/ Membership

Membership Relations Officer Priya Rajoo

Page 70 | Volume 71, Number 1

Editorial Coordinator Shirley Ho

Crowdfunding Officer Rebecca Abraham

Accommodation Officer Zaneta Subrata

Finance and Human Resources

Finance Systems Officer Punam Kunwar

Publications

Content Writer/ Social Media Ken Chau Angela Perez

Graphic Designer Eliah Castiello Michael Chau


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Hospitality Hospitality Manager Rosie Ellul

Functions and Guest Services Manager Bill Mihelakis

Guest Services Staff Connor Hadley

Guest Services Staff Amity Stafford

Guest Services Staff Sushmita Manandhar

Functions and Guest Services Manager Marwa Tantawy

Guest Services Staff Damien Nguyen

Guest Services Staff Olivia Pititto

Guest Services Staff Alan Maradika

The Culinary Team

Co-Head Chef Nelson Hu

Co-Head Chef Basma Tantawy

Chef

Chef

Chef

Jessie Tai

Keith Turner

Meng-Chin (Rick) Fang

Kitchen Services Staff Draga Jeftic

Kitchen Services Staff Bishan Gauli

Kitchen Services Staff Nabin Gautam

Housekeeping Head Housekeeper Anne Ladkins

Housekeeping Staff Stana Stojanovic

Housekeeping Staff Jacquelin McGregor

Housekeeping Staff Sarojini Sahal

Housekeeping Staff Sabina Maharjan Singh

Building Services

Building Services Officer Manuel Labaki

Building Services Officer Jaison McGregor

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 71


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Finance and Audit Finance and Audit subcommittee

Policy and Internal Financial Controls

As set out in regulation 29.2, the roles and responsibilities of the Finance and Audit subcommittee are to:

Policies developed and reviewed through the Finance and Audit committee and adopted by Council in 2017 included those on Capital Expenditure and Investment.

(a)

monitor and review policies and practices relating to the sourcing, management, control and auditing of the Association’s finances, and the management of financial risk;

(b) monitor the continuing longer term financial viability of the Association; (c)

advise Council on the protection of the Association’s charitable status;

(d) monitor the management of funds of the Association’s trusts; (e)

monitor the Association’s monthly financial reports, identifying any significant variations from budget and in collaboration with relevant subcommittees direct appropriate corrective action;

(f)

monitor the mitigation and management of risk which applies to finance and audit, including the adequacy of internal systems of risk identification and risk treatment;

(g)

establish, review and recommend to Council any changes necessary to the corporate risk framework of the Association;

(h) review the draft annual budget and recommend the budget to Council for approval; (i)

advise Council on any matter relating to present or future debt;

(j)

ensure statutory accounts comply with relevant reporting standards;

(k)

liaise with the external auditor throughout the period of the audit and facilitate finalisation of the Audit Report; and

(l)

review the annual external auditor’s report and ensure that management responds in a timely way to recommendations made therein.

Page 72 | Volume 71, Number 1

2017 saw the continuation of the assessment of Risks in the framework setup in 2014. Risks continued to be identified and rated (for likelihood of occurrence and impact should the risk occur) under a number of risk categories. In 2016, the oversight of each risk category was assigned to one of the five subcommittees of Council according to the roles and responsibilities provided in the Regulations of the Association for each committee. Hence for the Finance and Audit committee, oversight is now of the risk categories entitled Market Factors to Income and Expense Exposure. For each of these categories a number of key risks have been defined, a commentary has been made to outline why it is considered a risk (e.g., business interruption related to installation of the new Parkville underground station, higher employment and catering costs), and measures to monitor, prevent, mitigate and manage the risk have been outlined.

Financing The five year loan facility, begun in 2016, with the National Australia Bank continues with the facility including both interest-only fixed and variable (floating) components allowing for an overall loan interest cost of $250,431 for the facility. In November 2016 the purchase of the thirteen apartments on the seventh floor at 50 Barry Street was financed under a new loan facility with the Bank of Australia. This facility is also split between two fixed terms (to 2019 and 2020) and a variable component with set interest and principal deduction payments.


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Auditor At the annual General Meeting held on the 25th May, 2017, Mr Sam Claringbold of JTP Assurance was re-appointed as the auditor for the independent audit of the year ending 31st December, 2017.

Financial Performance For the year ending 31 December 2017, The Graduate Union achieved a surplus of $425,441. Operating revenue in 2017 of $3.552 million (M) was $181,821 higher ($3.37M in 2016), with the dominant sources of income being Accommodation and Catering, increasing by 5.4% and 3.6% respectively. Total operating expenses of $3.580M were higher ($3.407M), with the increases in interest, expenses and bank fees, Utilities, Rates and Government Taxes and Repairs and Maintenance being offset by slightly lower Professional fees, Communications expenses and Legal Fees. Cash flow from Operating and Investing Activities in 2017 was positive at $286,958 compared to that in 2016 which was negative at $2,622,931 (due to 2016 expenditure on development and renovations and the purchase of the Barry Street apartments).

Catering $1,349,533 38%

Cash and cash equivalents increased to $431,555 from $177,132. The Association’s total Property, Plant and Equipment were valued at $30.487M in 2017, an increase in value of $408,471 compared to 2016 ($30.079M).

Operating Income A breakdown of operating income is shown in the pie chart below. Revenue from donations and bequests of $297,401 (compared to $51,715 in 2016) is not illustrated. I thank the members of the subcommittee for 2017 — Leo Santalucia (Co-Vice Chairperson), Viv Nguyen (Co-Vice Chairperson), Peter Clark (until May), Phillip Cobbin, John Green, Gaetano (Tony) Pagone (from June) and Keith Ryall, as well as our accountant, Kay Gulenc, our auditor, Sam Claringbold, and the management and operations team.

Cr David Cowie Chairperson of the Finance and Audit Committee

Subscriptions $116,641 3.3% Property Rental and Other Income $63,830 1.8%

Accommodation $2,018,020 56.8%

Interest Received $3,915 0.1%

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 73


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Diamond Jubilee Campaign In 2017 we launched our Diamond Jubilee Redevelopment Campaign. Across our ‘Union’ and in our ‘House’ we aim to acknowledge the privilege of education by fostering a collegium of graduates which works together, wisely and carefully across cultures, disciplines and life stages for the good of society. Our vision for the future is that postgraduate students may successfully focus on their degrees, without the encumbrance of unnecessary worries about where basic needs such as adequate food and accommodation will come from. We see the great potential in the city of Melbourne as a premium destination for aspiring postgraduate students from around the world. We also see our great potential to build on the unique role we already play in Melbourne’s tertiary education landscape to be integral to making this a reality.

Page 74 | Volume 71, Number 1

Graduate House, as the only dedicated postgraduate residential college in Victoria (and one of only a handful around the world), is uniquely placed to fill this gap in provision left between the public and private sectors. For 60 years we have been fulfilling this specialised, yet necessary role, providing specifically for graduate students’ social, academic and financial needs.


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. Incorporated Association Registration Number (IARN): A0023234B Australian Business Number (ABN): 55 610 664 963

Financial Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 75


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. ABN: 55 610 664 963

IARN: A0023234B

for the year ended 31 December 2017

FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2017

CONTENTS Page Council Members’ Report

3

Statement of Comprehensive Income

4

Statement of Financial Position

5

Statement of Changes in Equity

6

Statement of Cash Flows

7

Notes to the Financial Statements

8

Statement by Council Members

15

Independent Audit Report

16

Page 76 | Volume 71, Number 1


The Graduate Union Annual Report

3

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 77


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. ABN: 55 610 664 963

IARN: A0023234B

Statement of Comprehensive Income for the year ended 31 December 2017 Note Revenue Donations Employment expenses Catering expenses Interest and bank fees Repairs and maintenance Depreciation (including buildings) Communications expenses Utilities expenses Rates and government taxes Professional fees Insurance expenses Scholarship Legal expenses

2(a) 2(b)

2017 $

2016 $

3,551,940 297,401 (1,710,709) (560,224) (367,849) (332,942) (172,897) (118,046) (114,833) (98,585) (58,521) (28,839) (10,365) (6,258)

3,370,119 51,714 (1,649,817) (569,234) (286,066) (293,839) (147,296) (157,894) (77,411) (73,643) (93,291) (29,552) (9,643) (20,181)

Surplus / (deficit) for the year

269,273

13,966

Other comprehensive income Gain / (loss) on revaluation of buildings

156,168

118,511

Total other comprehensive income

156,168

118,511

Total comprehensive income for the year

425,441

132,477

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements The accompanying notes form4part of these financial statements Page 78 | Volume 71, Number 1 4


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. ABN: 55 610 664 963

IARN: A0023234B

Statement of Financial Position as at 31 December 2017 Note

2017 $

2016 $

ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents

5

431,555

177,132

Trade and other receivables

6

34,522

153,597

Inventories

7

51,648

36,410

86,653

102,307

604,378

469,446

30,212,554

29,960,251

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS

30,212,554

29,960,251

TOTAL ASSETS

30,816,932

30,429,697

Prepayments TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS NON-CURRENT ASSETS Property, plant and equipment

8

LIABILITIES CURRENT LIABILITIES Trade and other payables

9

475,376

470,476

Provisions

10

217,946

218,152

Borrowings

11

138,045

138,045

831,367

826,673

8,420,678

8,453,213

TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

8,420,678

8,453,213

TOTAL LIABILITIES

9,252,045

9,279,886

21,564,887

21,149,811

19,701,960

19,258,756

1,862,927

1,891,055

21,564,887

21,149,811

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Borrowings

11

NET ASSETS EQUITY Reserves Retained earnings TOTAL EQUITY

The notes form formpart partofofthese thesefinancial financialstatements statements The accompanying accompanying notes 5

5

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 79


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. ABN: 55 610 664 963

IARN: A0023234B

Statement of Changes in Equity for the year ended 31 December 2017

2017

Retained Earnings

$

$

Revaluation Building Residents’ Reserve and Fund Capital Reserve Balance at 1 January 2017

Total Reserves

Reserves

$

General Reserve

Total Equity $

Stillwell Collection

1,891,055

18,538,942

638,032

40,312

30,970

(28,128)

0

286,341

530

10,530

0

297,401

269,273

Transfers to / (from) reserves

0

156,168

0

(10,365)

0

0

145,803

145,803

Balance at 31 December 2017

1,862,927

18,695,110

924,373

30,477

41,500

Surplus / (Deficit) from ordinary activities and donations

2016

Retained Earnings

10,500 19,701,960 21,564,887

Total Reserves

Reserves $

$

Revaluation Building Residents’ Reserve Reserve Fund Balance at 1 January 2016

10,500 19,258,756 21,149,811

$

General Reserve

Total Equity $

Stillwell Collection

1,928,803

18,420,431

642,199

36,586

0

(37,748)

0

6,973

13,771

30,970

0

51,714

13,966

Transfers to / (from) reserves

0

118,511

(11,140)

(10,045)

0

0

97,326

97,326

Balance at 31 December 2016

1,891,055

18,538,942

638,032

40,312

30,970

Surplus / (Deficit) from ordinary activities and donations

a

10,500 19,109,716 21,038,519

10,500 19,258,756 21,149,811

The Capital Fund was established in 2017 for the redevelopment of 222 to 234 Leicester Street, and was added to the Building Reserve which was renamed the Building and Capital Reserve.

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements 6 of these financial statements The accompanying notes form part

Page 80 | Volume 71, Number 1

6


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. ABN: 55 610 664 963

IARN: A0023234B

Statement of Cash Flows for the year ended 31 December 2017 Note

2017 $

2016 $

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Receipts from accommodation and catering

3,368,605

3,237,731

Receipts from subscriptions

116,641

103,322

Donations and other income

312,868

53,933

(340,719)

(261,994)

(3,101,505)

(3,020,997)

355,890

111,995

Property rentals

48,364

34,006

Interest received

3,915

3,779

(107,037)

(377,556)

(14,174)

(2,308,653)

(68,932)

(2,648,424)

(157,535)

(231,000)

125,000

2,646,258

Net cash used in financing activities

(32,535)

2,415,258

Net increase / (decrease) in cash held

254,423

(121,171)

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of financial year

177,132

298,303

431,555

177,132

Interest Paid Payments to suppliers and employees Net cash provided by operating activities

14

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Funds expended on development and renovations Funds expended on asset purchases Net cash used in investing activities

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES Repayments Funds drawn down

Cash and cash equivalents at end of financial year

5

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements 77

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 81


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. ABN: 55 610 664 963

IARN: A0023234B

Notes to the Financial Statements for the year ended 31 December 2017 The Financial Statements cover The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. as an individual entity incorporated in Victoria under the Associations Incorporation Reform Act 2012 (Vic). 1

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (a)

Basis of Preparation The Financial Statements are general purpose financial statements that have been prepared in accordance with the Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements, the Associations Incorporation Reform Act 2012 (Vic) and the requirements of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 (ACNC Act). Australian Accounting Standards set out accounting policies that the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) has concluded would result in a financial report containing relevant and reliable information about transactions, events and conditions. Material accounting policies adopted in the preparation of this financial report are presented below and have been consistently applied unless otherwise stated. The Financial Statements have been prepared on an accruals basis and are based on historical costs, modified, where applicable, by the measurement at fair value of selected non-current assets, financial assets and financial liabilities.

(b)

Income Tax Tax effect accounting has not been applied as the Association is exempt from Income Tax under Section 50-B of the Income Tax Assessment Act, 1997 (Cth). The Association has also been endorsed as a tax concession charity for Goods and Services Tax (GST) and Fringe Benefits Tax by the Australian Taxation Office.

(c)

Property, Plant and Equipment Each class of property, plant and equipment is carried at cost or fair values as indicated, minus, where applicable, any accumulated depreciation and impairment losses. Freehold Land and Buildings Freehold land and buildings are shown at their fair value (being the amount for which an asset could be exchanged between knowledgeable, willing parties in an arm’s length transaction) based on periodic valuations by external independent valuers. Capital Improvements Capital improvements are measured at cost. Increase and decreases in the carrying amount upon revaluation of land are offset to the revaluation reserve in equity. Increase and decreases in the carrying amount upon revaluation of buildings are offset to the Statement of Comprehensive Income. Asset Revaluations An independent valuation of the buildings is carried out every three to four years. In the interim years the Council Members review the carrying amount of the buildings as at balance date. Plant and Equipment Plant and equipment are measured on the cost basis, less depreciation and impairment losses. The carrying amount of plant and equipment is reviewed annually to ensure that it is not in excess of the recoverable amount from these assets.

Page 82 | Volume 71, Number 1

88


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. ABN: 55 610 664 963

IARN: A0023234B

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) for the year ended 31 December 2017 Depreciation The depreciable amount of all fixed assets (excluding Heritage Buildings - refer to Note 8) is depreciated on a straight line basis over the asset’s useful life commencing from the time the asset is held ready for use. The depreciation rates used range from 2.5% to 37.5% based on the type of asset. (d)

Inventories Inventories which consist of beverages, food products and merchandise are measured at the lower of cost and net realisable value.

(e)

Employee Benefits Provision is made for the Association's liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees to the end of the reporting period.

(f)

Revenue and Other Income Revenue from accommodation is recognised upon the delivery of services to residents. Revenue from catering is accounted for on an accruals basis. Interest revenue is recognised on a proportional basis taking into account the interest rates applicable to the financial assets. All revenue is stated net of the amount of GST.

(g)

Goods and Services Tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST, except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Tax Office. In these circumstances the GST is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of an item of the expense. Receivables and payables in the Statement of Financial Position are shown inclusive of GST. Cash flows are presented in the Statement of Cash Flows on a gross basis, except for the GST component of investing and financing activities, which are disclosed as operating cash flows.

(h)

Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, deposits held at call with banks, other short-term highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less, and bank overdrafts.

(i)

Impairment of Assets At the end of each reporting period, the Association reviews the carrying values of its tangible assets to determine whether there is any indication that those assets have been impaired. If such an indication exists, the recoverable amount of the asset, being the higher of the asset's fair value less costs to sell and value in use, is compared to the asset's carrying value. Any excess of the asset's carrying value over its recoverable amount is expensed to the Statement of Comprehensive Income. Where it is not possible to estimate the recoverable amount of an individual asset, the Association estimates the recoverable amount of the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs.

(j)

Provisions Provisions are recognised when the Association has a legal or constructive obligation, as a result of past events, for which it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will result and that outflow can be reliably measured.

(k)

Comparative Figures When required by Accounting Standards, comparative figures have been adjusted to conform to changes in presentation for the current financial year.

9 9

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 83


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. ABN: 55 610 664 963

IARN: A0023234B

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) for the year ended 31 December 2017 2017 $

2

4

5

6

$

Revenue and Other Income Revenue from Continuing Operations 2(a) Revenue - Accommodation - Catering - Subscriptions - Interest received - Property rentals - Other income

2,018,020 1,349,533 116,641 3,915 48,364 15,467

1,914,491 1,302,257 103,322 3,779 34,006 12,264

Total Revenue

3,551,940

3,370,119

240,218 57,183

40,318 11,396

297,401

51,714

2(b) Donations - Donations - Building - Donations - Other

3

2016

Key Management Personnel Compensation The totals of remuneration paid to key management personnel of the Association during the year are as follows: - Short-term employee benefits 282,805 277,481

Auditor’s Remuneration Remuneration of the auditor of the Association for: - Auditing or reviewing the Financial Statements - Other services

Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand Cash at bank Cash Management Accounts (Donations & bequests)

Trade and Other Receivables CURRENT Accounts receivable Land transfer duty refund – 701-713, 50 Barry Street, Carlton

Page 84 | Volume 71, Number 1

10 10

282,805

277,481

11,000 0

11,000 0

11,000

11,000

1,500 78,940 351,115

1,500 81,131 94,501

431,555

177,132

34,522 0

34,742 118,855

34,522

153,597


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. ABN: 55 610 664 963

IARN: A0023234B

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) for the year ended 31 December 2017

2017 $

7

2016 $

Inventories CURRENT Beverages, food products and merchandise - at cost

8

51,648

36,410

51,648

36,410

21,300,000

21,300,000

300,400

300,400

21,600,400

21,600,400

1,306,030

1,306,030

1,306,030

1,306,030

Buildings at independent valuation as at 30 October 2015

4,543,970

4,543,970

Buildings - at cost

1,890,709

1,878,587

6,434,679

6,422,557

(274,679)

(118,511)

6,160,000

6,304,046

274,679

118,511

6,434,679

6,422,557

389,627

377,556

389,627

377,556

Plant and equipment - at cost

1,030,392

785,553

Accumulated depreciation

(548,574)

(531,845)

481,818

253,708

30,212,554

29,960,251

Property, Plant and Equipment Freehold land at independent valuation as at 30 October 2015 Freehold land - at cost

Heritage building at independent valuation as at 30 October 2015

Accumulated depreciation

Council Members’ revaluation as at 31 December 2017

Capital improvements - at cost

Total Property, Plant and Equipment

11 11

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 85


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. ABN: 55 610 664 963

IARN: A0023234B

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) for the year ended 31 December 2017

Movement in carrying amounts Movement in the carrying amounts for each class of property, plant and equipment between the beginning and the end of the financial year. Capital Plant and Buildings Improvement Equipment

Land $

Balance at 1 January 2016

$

$

$

Total $

21,300,000

5,850,000

0

218,838

27,368,838

300,400

1,878,587

377,556

63,655

2,620,198

Transfer to Property Account

0

0

0

0

0

Depreciation expense

0

(118,511)

0

(28,785)

(147,296)

Revaluation increment / (decrement)

0

118,511

0

0

118,511

21,600,400

7,728,587

377,556

253,708

29,960,251

Additions

0

12,122

107,293

149,617

269,032

Transfer to Plant & Equipment Account

0

0

(95,222)

95,222

0

Depreciation expense

0

(156,168)

0

(16,729)

(172,897)

Revaluation increment / (decrement)

0

156,168

0

0

156,168

21,600,400

7,740,709

389,627

481,818

30,212,554

Additions

Balance at 31 December 2016

Carrying amount at 31 December 2017

The freehold land is as per independent valuation by WBP Property Group as at 30 October 2015. The carrying amount of buildings was revalued by the Council Members. Based on maintenance carried out and capital improvements, the value of the buildings was restated to the independent valuation by WBP Property Group as at 30 October 2015. The Council Members have reviewed the carrying amount of the buildings as at balance date and based on improvements and maintenance carried out the Council Members have determined that the carrying amount of the Leicester Street buildings is as per the 2015 independent valuation and that the carrying amount of Level 7 Barry Street is as per the purchase price. Based on this, a revaluation increase of $156,168 was recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income for the year ended 31 December 2017. 2017

2016

99,407 52,885 (6,247) 329,331

84,321 63,333 321 322,501

475,376

470,476

$

9

Trade and Other Payables CURRENT Unsecured liabilities Trade payables Accruals Net GST payable / (receivable) Prepaid accommodation and bonds

Page 86 | Volume 71, Number 1

1212

$


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. ABN: 55 610 664 963

IARN: A0023234B

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) for the year ended 31 December 2017 2017

2016

217,946

218,152

217,946

218,152

138,045

138,045

138,045

138,045

- NAB Bank Bill Facility

6,500,000

6,485,000

- Bank Australia Facility

1,920,678

1,968,213

8,420,678

8,453,213

$

10

11

Provisions CURRENT Employee benefits

$

Borrowings CURRENT - Bank Australia Facility NON CURRENT

NAB Bank Bill Facility The facility has a limit of $7.3 million and is split between interest only fixed components and a variable component. The split as at 31 December 2017 is as follows: $2.5 million fixed interest to 28 February 2020 $1.5 million fixed interest to 30 April 2019 $1.0 million fixed interest to 28 February 2020 $2.3 million variable interest The facility is secured over freehold land, buildings and improvements at 216-220 and 222-228 Leicester Street, Carlton. Bank Australia Facility The loan is for $2,058,723 and is split between interest only fixed components and a variable component principal and interest. The loan is a 30 year facility. The split as at 31 December 2017 is as follows: $0.4587 million variable principal repayment and variable. $0.5325 million fixed interest and principal repayment to 28 November 2019 $1.0675 million fixed interest and principal repayment to 28 November 2021 The facility is secured over freehold land, buildings and improvements at Level 7, 50 Barry Street Carlton and 234 Leicester Street, Carlton.

12

Contingent Liabilities At 31 December 2017 the Association had no contingent liabilities. (2016: None)

13 13

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 87


The Graduate Union Annual Report

The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. ABN: 55 610 664 963

IARN: A0023234B

Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) for the year ended 31 December 2017 13

Capital Commitments At 31 December 2017 the Association had outstanding capital commitments of $232,986 for the recarpeting of the central wing ground floor, the sound proofing of windows along Leicester Street, repairs to the central wing lift and the installation of the electronic card entry system. (2016: $128,369 for new reception and front entrance at 220 Leicester Street, Carlton.)

2017

2016

Surplus / (deficit) for the year

425,441

132,477

Depreciation

172,897

147,296

(156,168)

(118,511)

(52,279)

(37,785)

636

(35,094)

(34,431)

(18,234)

(206)

41,846

355,890

111,995

$

14

$

Cash Flow Information Reconciliation of Cash Flow from Operations with Surplus / (Deficit)

Revaluation Income from investing activities Changes in assets and liabilities - decrease / (increase) in trade, other receivables and inventories - increase / (decrease) in trade payables, accruals and reserves - increase / (decrease) in employee benefits Net cash provided by operating activities

15

Events After the Balance Sheet Date There have been no matters or circumstances which have arisen since the end of the financial year which may significantly affect the operations of the Association, the results of those operations or the state of affairs of the Association in subsequent years.

16

Trusts The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Incorporated is a trustee of the following trust: The William Berry and Barbara Funder Postgraduate College Trust Fund.

Page 88 | Volume 71, Number 1

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The Graduate Union Annual Report

15

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 89


The Graduate Union Annual Report

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT TO THE MEMBERS OF THE GRADUATE UNION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE INC. ABN 55 610 664 963 Report on the Audit of the Financial Report Opinion We have audited the financial report of The Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne Inc. (the Association), which comprises the statement of financial position as at 31 December 2017, the statement of comprehensive income statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, notes comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, and the certification by members of the Council on the annual statements giving a true and fair view of the financial position and performance of the Association. In our opinion, the accompanying financial report gives a true and fair view of, the financial position of the Association as at 31 December 2017 and of its financial performance for the year then ended in accordance with the accounting policies described in Note 1 to the financial statements and the requirements of the Associations Incorporation Reform Act 2012 (Vic) and division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012. Basis for Opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report section of our report. We are independent of the Association in accordance with the ethical requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110: Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) that are relevant to our audit of the financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. Emphasis of Matter – Basis of Accounting We draw attention to Note 1 to the financial report, which describes the basis of accounting. The financial report has been prepared to assist the Association to meet the requirements of Associations Incorporation Reform Act 2012 (Vic) and division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012. As a result, the financial report may not be suitable for another purpose. Our opinion is not modified in respect of this matter. Responsibilities of the Council for the Financial Report The Council is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the financial report in accordance with the financial reporting requirements of the Associations Incorporation Reform Act 2012 (Vic) and division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and for such internal control as the Council determines is necessary to enable the preparation and fair presentation of a financial report that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial report, the Council is responsible for assessing the Association’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters relating to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the Council either intends to liquidate the Association or to cease operations, or has no realistic alternative but to do so.

ABN: 13 488 640 554. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation

Page 90 | Volume 71, Number 1


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of this financial report. As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards, we exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. Further information about our responsibilities can be found at http://www.auasb.gov.au/Home.aspx We communicate with the Council regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that we identify during our audit.

Signed at Melbourne this 29th day of March 2018

ABN: 13 488 640 554. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation

Volume 71, Number 1 | Page 91


The Graduate Union Annual Report

Australian Business Number: 55610664963 Incorporated Association Registration Number: A0023234B 220 Leicester Street, Carlton, VIC 3053, Australia Telephone: +61 (0)3 9347 3428 Facsimile: +61 (0)3 9347 9981 www.graduatehouse.com.au admingh@graduatehouse.com.au

Page 92 | Volume 71, Number 1

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