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AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

TABLE OF CONTENTS MESSAGE FROM BOARD CHAIR & SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS .................................................................2 RESPONSIBILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY STATEMENT .........................................................................................3 COMMUNICATING THE PLAN .....................................................................................................................................3 WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION............................................................................................................................... 3 OUR VISION ..................................................................................................................................................................4 OUR MISSION ............................................................................................................................................................... 4 SUPPORTING OUR STUDENTS FROM EARLY LEARNING TO GRADUATION SO EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS. ..................................................................................................................................................................5 CLASS SIZE REPORTING 2015-2016 SCHOOL YEAR .............................................................................................. 6 OUR HIGHLIGHTS AND CELEBRATIONS ..................................................................................................................7 COMBINED 2016 ACCOUNTABILITY PILLAR OVERALL SUMMARY ......................................................................8 COMBINED 2016 FIRST NATIONS, MÉTIS AND INUIT ACCOUNTABILITY PILLAR OVERALL SUMMARY ..........9 OUTCOME ONE: ALBERTA’S STUDENTS ARE SUCCESSFUL ............................................................................. 10 OUTCOME TWO: THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP BETWEEN FIRST NATIONS, MÉTIS, AND INUIT STUDENTS AND ALL OTHER STUDENTS IS ELIMINATED ............................................................................................................... 133 OUTCOME THREE: ALBERTA’S EDUCATION SYSTEM IS INCLUSIVE ................................................................. 15 OUTCOME FOUR: ALBERTA HAS EXCELLENT TEACHERS, SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL AUTHORITY LEADERS ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 16 OUTCOME FIVE: THE EDUCATION SYSTEM IS WELL GOVERNED AND MANAGED ......................................... 17 2015-2016 SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL RESULTS..................................................................................................... 18 2016-2017 BUDGET .................................................................................................................................................... 21 EDUCATION FACILITIES PLAN AND HIGHLIGHTS OF EDUCATION FACILITIES ................................................ 23 2017-2020 3 YEAR CAPITAL PLAN ........................................................................................................................... 25

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AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

MESSAGE FROM BOARD CHAIR & SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS The schools and staff of the Grande Prairie Public School District (GPPSD) are continuing our journey to ensure that we are “a learning community where every student succeeds.� As part of this we have placed everything we do within a framework of expected practices that lead us on a path of continuous improvement. In this way, we continue to work towards better addressing the learning needs of our students and our staff. Our strategic framework consists of the following:

QUALITY INSTRUCTION We believe that the quality of instruction that GPPSD students receive is the most important factor that influences student achievement. As evidence of this focus, we are proud to provide the results contained in this report. While not perfect, our results reflect an organizational commitment to improvement in all measures. We are especially proud of our increase in Provincial Achievement results, especially in grade 9, and improvements in many Diploma examination courses.

EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP We believe that system and school improvement is not possible without effective school leadership. As a result, we remain committed to developing instructional leadership and building our shared vision in order to support student achievement. We are thankful that these improvements are occurring within the realm of a community of safe and caring schools where we all treat one another with dignity and respect. As you read the summary of our results and our plans, we want you to undertake this journey with us. We are working hard to address the areas we feel we need to focus on to help our learners succeed while we are also addressing unprecedented growth in the District. We are proud that over 75% of our funding last year went directly to address the learning needs of our students and only 3.2% was spent on central office/system and Board expenditures. We also believe that the renewed focus on using evidence that we gather to support our learners will result in improvements over the next three years.

COLLABORATIVE PRACTICES We believe that providing the staff the opportunity to collaborate for the purpose of increasing student achievement, both individually and collectively, is an important factor in supporting our students from early learning through graduation so that every student succeeds. Our Professional Learning Community focus provides schools and school staff the opportunity to work towards the same improvements the District is experiencing. This is accomplished through a close analysis of our evidence and then adjusting our plans to address the identified learning needs.

PURPOSEFUL ENGAGEMENT We believe that the extent to which students are meaningfully engaged in their learning can be considered to have a direct connection to high school completion and graduation rates. Our goal is to have all students succeed as engaged learners. Our high school completion rates and dropout rates continue to improve. As a District we are committed to analyzing the measures on the government surveys to address areas students identify as providing challenges. The conversations that result from these surveys and identifying challenges will act as opportunities for us, as a District, to work directly with our student body. We believe in accountability to the community we serve. We provide this report as part of that commitment to serving you.

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AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

OUR VISION Students will experience enriched, Engaged, personalized, inclusive learning opportunities and will transition as motivated, communicative, Entrepreneurial, academically successful, empathetic, digitally literate, global individuals ready to contribute to community and work as productive, healthy, Ethical citizens.

OUR MISSION The Grande Prairie Public School District (GPPSD) is a learning community in which every student succeeds.

ALBERTA LEARNING MISSION Alberta Learning’s leadership and work with partners to build a globally recognized lifelong learning community that enables Albertans to be responsible, caring, self-reliant and contributing members of a knowledge-based and prosperous society.

UNIVERSAL GUIDING PRINCIPLES For everything we decide and do, we will hold ourselves accountable and we will ask:  Is it good for students?  Will it build trust and good relationships?  Will it help us improve?  Is it a responsible thing to do?  Are we being open, honest and ethical?

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AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

SUPPORTING OUR STUDENTS FROM EARLY LEARNING TO GRADUATION SO EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS. ENSURING “EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS” IN GPPSD GPPSD ensures that students succeed by asking four essential questions:  What do we expect our students to learn? (Goals/Outcomes)  How will we know they are learning? (Assessment)  How will we respond when they don’t learn? (What intervention(s) will we utilize to ensure that they learn the outcome?)  How will we respond if they already know it? (How do we enhance or enrich the learning for these students?) It is essential that we remember that the number one variable for student achievement is the teacher in the classroom. The majority of student learning needs are addressed through quality instructional practices. We believe that this is further aided through other supports aimed at addressing more specific learning needs. GPPSD wants to ensure that “every student succeeds” so we must work to meet the needs of every child who enters our schools.

THESE ARE SOME OF THE OTHER WAYS WE SUPPORT OUR LEARNERS:  

  

  

Reading Recovery – Intervention for the bottom 20% performing grade one students. District Instructional Coaches – support all teachers with best practices and provision/training in Tier one (teaching interventions teachers can use at the classroom level to address learning needs) strategies that address identified learning needs of students within the classroom setting. The Inclusive Education Support Team (IEST) is a Grande Prairie Public School District team that consists of an educational psychologist with a teaching background and two teachers who offer services as educational facilitators. A key objective of the IEST is to develop capacity in Learning Support Teachers, ISC teachers, classroom teachers and school based administrators. Family Outreach- Family Outreach Workers are responsible for developing a proactive approach to connect families, school and community groups in order to facilitate support and services to students. Learning Support Teachers (LST) – support students and teachers at the tier one level with academic learning, inclusive supports and strategies for success. First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) Coordinator – coordinates and supports support workers working with FNMI students and families. The District also employs 4 Outreach Support workers who are responsible for directly supporting FNMI students, their families and the schools in order to maximize opportunities for success in the GPPSD learning environment. Gifted Program Coordinator – supports teachers and gifted students in addressing their specific needs through either in-class or pull-out programming. The coordinator also supports teachers in ensuring enrichment activities are available for identified students. French Coordinator – supports teachers with French teaching, resources and best practices in instruction and assessment in second language learning and French immersion teaching practices. Math Coordinator – supports teachers in best practices in numeracy and with resources to ensure students are having their needs addressed through development of their problem solving and critical thinking skills. Peace Collaborative Services (PCS) is our primary partner agency providing us access to a regional team of specialists which includes speech-language pathologists, psychologists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, consultants for the deaf and the hard of hearing and consultants for the blind and the visually impaired. Additional Community Partner supports are provided through Alberta Health Services, Community Mental Health and Addictions, Disability Services, Children and Family Services (CFS) among others. Having these relationships allows us to offer a broad range of services to our students (both in school and outside of school). PAGE 5 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

Off Campus Coordinators provide further supports for students seeking work experience, job shadowing and apprenticeship opportunities at the high school level. At the high school level, there are two additional supports provided to ensure that students are successful in high school completion, these are: o Personalization of learning and engagement of students through High School Redesign resulted in changes in timetable structures and program offerings. One example of this is the growth of the Off Campus program. o Focus on graduation plans for all students supported by school counsellors and advisors. The Directors of K-6, 7-12 and Inclusive Supports coordinate targeted PD to support our learning.

GPPSD understands that each student needs varied levels and degrees of support to ensure they are successful in their schooling. As a result, supports are available for all grade levels and all students can access these supports.

CLASS SIZE REPORTING 2015-2016 SCHOOL YEAR GPPSD continues to compare quite well to the province with regards to the average pupil teacher ratio for the 20152016 school year. 2015-2016 Class Size Ratio:

Number of Students

25 23.9

24

23.1

23.4

22.6

23

22.9

23

22 21

GPPSD Provincial Averages

20.3 20.3

20 19 18 Grades K-3

Grades 4-6

Grades 7-9

Grades 10-12

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AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

OUR HIGHLIGHTS AND CELEBRATIONS ACCOUNTABILITY PILLAR CELEBRATIONS: THIS IS WHAT OUR PUBLIC IS TELLING US….     

Safe and Caring Measure is at its second highest in 7 years Drop Out Rate is at second lowest level in 7 years Highest result in Program of Studies measures in past 7 years Parental involvement is at highest level in 7 years Our diploma examination results continue to improve o Acceptable standard increased 7.3% overall in five years o Standard of Excellence increased 3.1% in five years

DIPLOMA EXAMINATION CELEBRATIONS       

English Language Arts 30-2: Highest acceptable standard in 6 years. Mathematics 30-2: Highest acceptable standard since this exam began/+32.0% increase in acceptable standard in past 3 years. 1: Data Highlights and Celebrations Social Studies 30-1: Highest acceptable standard in 6 years. Social Studies 30-2: Highest acceptable standard in 6 years. Biology 30: Highest acceptable standard in 6 years; second highest standard of excellence in 6 years; highest exam average in 6 years. Chemistry 30: Highest acceptable standard in 6 years (+25.7% in that time). Physics 30: Highest exam average in 6 years.

GPPSD IMPROVED OR MAINTAINED RESULTS IN 86.9% OF MEASURED AREAS In 15 areas measured by the province of Alberta on the Accountability Pillar report (APORI), GPPSD improved significantly or improved in 6 areas; maintained in 7 areas; and, declined in 2. These 2 have been targeted for improvement over the next year while we also strive to build upon the successes we are celebrating here. GPPSD also focused on our First Nations, Metis and Inuit students and showed improvement in 4 of 8 measures and maintained in 1.

TARGETED APPROACH LEADS TO AREAS OF GROWTH Over the past four years, GPPSD has focused on areas including literacy, supports for all learners and diploma examination results (the chart on the right shows a continued pattern of increases in diploma examination overall results over the past five years). These are all areas where we are seeing great success. We know that where we have targeted, we are seeing growth. We will continue to focus to enhance student success. Notes: 1. 2.

3.

Results have been adjusted to reflect the change from previous data source systems to Provincial Approach to Student Information (PASI). Participation in Diploma Examinations was impacted by the flooding in June 2013 and by the fires in May to June 2016. Caution should be used when interpreting trends over time for the province and those school authorities affected by these events. Data values have been suppressed where the number of respondents/students is fewer than 6. Suppression is marked with an asterisk (*).

2: Graph of Diploma Examination Results – Overall (optional)

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AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

COMBINED 2016 ACCOUNTABILITY PILLAR OVERALL SUMMARY Grande Prairie School District Measure Category

Safe and Caring Schools

Student Learning Opportunities

Student Learning Achievement (Grades K-9)

Student Learning Achievement (Grades 10-12)

Preparation for Lifelong Learning, World of Work, Citizenship Parental Involvement Continuous Improvement

Measure Category Evaluation

Alberta

Measure Evaluation

Current Result

Prev Year Result

Prev 3 Year Average

Safe and Caring

85.4

86.8

85.2

89.5

89.2

89.1

High

Maintained

Good

Program of Studies

82.4

80.4

79.9

81.9

81.3

81.4

Very High

Improved Significantly

Excellent

Education Quality

88.2

88.5

87.8

90.1

89.5

89.5

High

Maintained

Good

Drop Out Rate

4.0

3.7

3.9

3.2

3.5

3.5

High

Maintained

Good

High School Completion Rate (3 yr)

64.6

63.7

63.8

76.5

76.5

75.5

Intermediate

Maintained

Acceptable

PAT: Acceptable

68.8

57.7

65.2

73.6

72.9

73.4

Low

Improved

Acceptable

PAT: Excellence

11.0

8.8

11.4

19.4

18.8

18.6

Low

Maintained

Issue

Diploma: Acceptable

80.0

77.2

76.0

85.0

85.2

85.1

Low

Improved

Acceptable

Diploma: Excellence

11.3

11.1

9.7

21.0

21.0

20.5

Low

Maintained

Issue

Diploma Exam Participation Rate (4+ Exams)

34.9

41.5

39.7

54.6

54.4

53.5

Low

Declined

Issue

Rutherford Scholarship Eligibility Rate

47.8

n/a

n/a

60.8

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Transition Rate (6 yr)

49.2

43.1

45.1

59.4

59.7

59.3

Intermediate

Improved

Good

Work Preparation

73.9

80.1

77.1

82.6

82.0

81.1

Intermediate

Declined

Issue

Citizenship

77.5

78.0

77.0

83.9

83.5

83.4

High

Maintained

Good

Good

Parental Involvement

78.2

77.6

75.4

80.9

80.7

80.5

Intermediate

Improved

Good

Excellent

School Improvement

81.9

76.9

75.6

81.2

79.6

80.0

Very High

Improved Significantly

Excellent

Good

Good

Issue

n/a

Acceptable

Measure

Current Result

Prev Year Result

Prev 3 Year Average

Achievement

Improvement

Overall

Notes: 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Results have been adjusted to reflect the change from previous data source systems to Provincial Approach to Student Information (PASI). Due to the change from previous data source systems to Provincial Approach to Student Information (PASI), historical Rutherford Scholarship Eligibility Rate results are not available. Aggregated PAT results are based upon a weighted average of percent meeting standards (Acceptable, Excellence). The weights are the number of students enrolled in each course. Courses included: English Language Arts (Grades 6, 9, 9 KAE), Franรงais (Grades 6, 9), French Language Arts (Grades 6, 9), Mathematics (6, 9, 9 KAE), Science (Grades 6, 9, 9 KAE), Social Studies (Grades 6, 9, 9 KAE). Aggregated Diploma results are a weighted average of percent meeting standards (Acceptable, Excellence) on Diploma Examinations. The weights are the number of students writing the Diploma Examination for each course. Courses included: English Language Arts 30-1, English Language Arts 30-2, French Language Arts 30-1, Franรงais 30-1, Chemistry 30, Physics 30, Biology 30, Science 30, Social Studies 30-1, Social Studies 30-2. Overall evaluations can only be calculated if both improvement and achievement evaluations are available. Results for the ACOL measures are available in the detailed report: see "ACOL Measures" in the Table of Contents. Participation in Provincial Achievement Tests was impacted by the flooding in June 2013 (Grade 9 only) and by the fires in May to June 2016. Caution should be used when interpreting trends over time for the province and those school authorities affected by these events. Participation in Diploma Examinations was impacted by the flooding in June 2013 and by the fires in May to June 2016. Caution should be used when interpreting trends over time for the province and those school authorities affected by these events. Survey results for the province and school authorities were impacted by the changes in the number of students responding to the survey through the introduction of the OurSCHOOL/TTFM (Tell Them From Me) survey in 2014. Data values have been suppressed where the number of respondents/students is fewer than 6. Suppression is marked with an asterisk (*).

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AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

COMBINED 2016 ACCOUNTABILITY PILLAR OVERALL SUMMARY Measure Category

Measure Category Evaluation

Student Learning Opportunities

n/a

Student Learning Achievement (Grades K-9)

Concern

Student Learning Achievement (Grades 10-12)

Preparation for Lifelong Learning, World of Work, Citizenship

n/a

n/a

Grande Prairie School District (FNMI) Measure Current Result

Prev Year Result

Prev 3 Year Average

Alberta (FNMI) Current Result

Prev Year Result

Measure Evaluation Prev 3 Year Average

Achievement

Improvement

Overall

Drop Out Rate

6.8

6.0

5.7

6.1

7.0

7.2

Intermediate

Maintained

Acceptable

High School Completion Rate (3 yr)

42.1

45.6

46.6

50.2

47.7

46.4

Very Low

Maintained

Concern

PAT: Acceptable

54.8

44.1

49.2

52.4

52.1

52.8

Very Low

Improved

Issue

PAT: Excellence

6.8

4.3

5.8

6.3

6.5

6.2

Very Low

Maintained

Concern

Diploma: Acceptable

77.4

69.5

69.9

78.2

78.3

77.3

Low

Maintained

Issue

Diploma: Excellence

10.1

6.1

6.3

10.0

9.5

9.4

Low

Maintained

Issue

Diploma Exam Participation Rate (4+ Exams)

12.6

17.1

18.7

20.7

21.0

20.4

Very Low

Declined

Concern

Rutherford Scholarship Eligibility Rate

24.3

n/a

n/a

31.9

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Transition Rate (6 yr)

42.7

30.2

34.0

33.5

33.0

33.3

Low

Maintained

Issue

Notes: 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7. 8.

Results have been adjusted to reflect the change from previous data source systems to Provincial Approach to Student Information (PASI). Due to the change from previous data source systems to Provincial Approach to Student Information (PASI), historical Rutherford Scholarship Eligibility Rate results are not available. Aggregated PAT results are based upon a weighted average of percent meeting standards (Acceptable, Excellence). The weights are the number of students enrolled in each course. Courses included: English Language Arts (Grades 6, 9, 9 KAE), Franรงais (Grades 6, 9), French Language Arts (Grades 6, 9), Mathematics (6, 9, 9 KAE), Science (Grades 6, 9, 9 KAE), Social Studies (Grades 6, 9, 9 KAE). Aggregated Diploma results are a weighted average of percent meeting standards (Acceptable, Excellence) on Diploma Examinations. The weights are the number of students writing the Diploma Examination for each course. Courses included: English Language Arts 30-1, English Language Arts 30-2, French Language Arts 30-1, Franรงais 30-1, Chemistry 30, Physics 30, Biology 30, Science 30, Social Studies 30-1, Social Studies 30-2. Overall evaluations can only be calculated if both improvement and achievement evaluations are available. Participation in Provincial Achievement Tests was impacted by the flooding in June 2013 (Grade 9 only) and by the fires in May to June 2016. Caution should be used when interpreting trends over time for the province and those school authorities affected by these events. Participation in Diploma Examinations was impacted by the flooding in June 2013 and by the fires in May to June 2016. Caution should be used when interpreting trends over time for the province and those school authorities affected by these events. Data values have been suppressed where the number of respondents/students is fewer than 6. Suppression is marked with an asterisk (*).

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AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

OUTCOME ONE: ALBERTA’S STUDENTS ARE SUCCESSFUL Performance Measure

Results (in percentages)

Target

Evaluation

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2016 Achievement Improvement

Overall percentage of students in Grades 6 and 9 who achieved the acceptable standard on Provincial Achievement Tests (overall cohort results).

70.0 69.7 68.1 57.7 68.8

74.0

Low

Improved

Overall percentage of students in Grades 6 and 9 who achieved the standard of excellence on Provincial Achievement Tests (overall cohort results).

14.8 12.6 12.8

17.0

Low

Maintained

8.8

11.0

Targets Overall

2017 2018 2019

Acceptable 74.0 75.0 77.0

Issue

14.0 15.0 16.0

COMMENT ON RESULTS After a year that showed a decline in our results (some due to changes in grade configuration and resultant expectations of students) we increased the results by 11.1%. Expectations put into place and professional learning community supports for grade 6 and 9 teachers should assist us in continued success in this area. This included planning and execution of a more effective transition from grade 8 to grade 9 as detailed in last year’s strategies section.

OUR STRATEGIES 

   

Data Day on School Improvement Planning Friday afternoons to analyze results was held in early October at all sites; this analysis specifically looked at areas where our students failed to meet specific outcomes. The analysis was done by large groups of teachers so the entire school knew where the students achieved. The Professional Learning Community process provides guidance for the staff as they work in collaborative teams to address identified needs for the students. Data from multiple sources continues to be utilized to provide guidance for staff decision making and action planning over the course of the year. The high school teams have identified that further work is needed to concentrate on assessment practices meant to focus on feedback and clarifying assessment practices. Increased focus on student program planning and communication between the junior high schools and the HS should also assist in addressing student programming for success. Consistent staffing with Instructional Coaches to build teacher capacity to address student learning needs and Learning Support Teachers to work with students who need the assistance. This support includes our ongoing commitment to our FNMI learners.

District professional development is focused on effective practices with direct correlation to identified needs in the district. Data analysis reveals areas where explicit work is needed to address these areas, these include:  Explicit work around reading within the content area (mathematics, science, social and English).  Work on gathering information/detail from non-text sources including political cartoons (social studies); graphs, charts and tables (social, science and mathematics).  Explicit work around expository writing approaches.  Explicit work with our grade 6 and grade 9 teacher cohorts. Notes: 1. 2.

3. 4.

Results have been adjusted to reflect the change from previous data source systems to Provincial Approach to Student Information (PASI). Aggregated PAT results are based upon a weighted average of percent meeting standards (Acceptable, Excellence). The weights are the number of students enrolled in each course. Courses included: English Language Arts (Grades 6, 9, 9 KAE), Français (Grades 6, 9), French Language Arts (Grades 6, 9), Mathematics (6, 9, 9 KAE), Science (Grades 6, 9, 9 KAE), Social Studies (Grades 6, 9, 9 KAE). Participation in Provincial Achievement Tests was impacted by the flooding in June 2013 (Grade 9 only) and by the fires in May to June 2016. Caution should be used when interpreting trends over time for the province and those school authorities affected by these events. Data values have been suppressed where the number of respondents/students is fewer than 6. Suppression is marked with an asterisk (*).

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AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

OUTCOME ONE: ALBERTA’S STUDENTS ARE SUCCESSFUL (CONTINUED) Performance Measure

Results (in percentages)

Overall percentage of students who achieved the acceptable standard on diploma examinations (overall results).

70.2 74.9 75.8 77.2 80.0

Overall percentage of students who achieved the standard of excellence on diploma examinations (overall results).

6.0

Performance Measure

Target

Evaluation

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2016 Achievement Improvement

8.2

9.8

11.1 11.3

Results (in percentages)

83.0

14.0

Low

Improved

Acceptable

Low

Maintained

Issue

Target

Drop Out Rate - annual dropout 4.4 rate of students aged 14 to 18

4.6

3.6

3.7

4.0

High school to post-secondary transition rate of students within six years of entering Grade 10.

40.3 44.7 47.4 43.1 49.2

Percentage of Grade 12 students eligible for a Rutherford Scholarship.

n/a

Percentage of students writing four or more diploma exams within three years of entering Grade 10.

35.2 40.3 37.3 41.5 34.9

n/a

n/a

n/a

47.8

47.5

55.0

48.0

83.0 85.0 86.0

14.0 15.0 16.0

Targets Overall

68.0

3.0

2017 2018 2019

Evaluation

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Achievement Improvement

High School Completion Rate Percentage of students who 59.3 64.9 62.8 63.7 64.6 completed high school within three years of entering Grade 10.

Targets Overall

2017 2018 2019 68.0 71.0 73.0

Intermediate

Maintained

Acceptable

High

Maintained

Good

Intermediate

Improved

Good

n/a

n/a

n/a

Low

Declined

Issue

3.0

2.9

2.8

50.0 52.5 55.0

55.0 56.0 57.5

45.0 47.0 50.0

COMMENT ON RESULTS The high school redesign project has been focused on ensuring students are more actively engaged in their learning plan. The off campus supports continue to bear success as increased numbers of students can explore careers while in high school.

OUR STRATEGIES 

The high schools are continuing their involvement in the high school redesign project with focus on enhancing student learning opportunities in order to increase high school completion rate. A focus on personalization of learning at both high schools aims to address student learning needs from day one of high school in all aspects of the high school experience. Explicit work focused on ensuring students participate more actively in choosing diploma examination courses should result in higher percentages of students taking 4 or more diploma examinations. This will serve to increase their opportunities in the post-secondary world and the world of work.

Notes: 1. 2. 3.

Results have been adjusted to reflect the change from previous data source systems to Provincial Approach to Student Information (PASI). Due to the change from previous data source systems to Provincial Approach to Student Information (PASI), historical Rutherford Scholarship Eligibility Rate results are not available. Aggregated Diploma results are a weighted average of percent meeting standards (Acceptable, Excellence) on Diploma Examinations. The weights are the number of students writing the Diploma Examination for each course. Courses included: English Language Arts 30-1, English

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AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

4. 5. 6.

Language Arts 30-2, French Language Arts 30-1, Français 30-1, Chemistry 30, Physics 30, Biology 30, Science 30, Social Studies 30-1, Social Studies 30-2. Diploma Examination Participation, High School Completion and High school to Post-secondary Transition rates are based upon a cohort of grade 10 students who are tracked over time. Participation in Diploma Examinations was impacted by the flooding in June 2013 and by the fires in May to June 2016. Caution should be used when interpreting trends over time for the province and those school authorities affected by these events. Data values have been suppressed where the number of respondents/students is fewer than 6. Suppression is marked with an asterisk (*).

OUTCOME ONE: ALBERTA’S STUDENTS ARE SUCCESSFUL (CONTINUED) Performance Measure

Results (in percentages)

Target

Percentage of teachers, parents and students who are satisfied that 79.00 74.9 76.8 76.3 78.0 77.5 students model the characteristics of active citizenship. Percentage of teachers and parents who agree that students are taught attitudes and behaviours that will make them successful at work when they finish school.

Evaluation

Targets

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2016 Achievement Improvement Overall 2017 2018 2019

72.9 74.5 76.7 80.1 73.9

82.0

High

Maintained

Good

Intermediate

Declined

Issue

81.0 83.0 87.0

84.0 86.0 88.0

COMMENT ON RESULTS GPPSD has been working over the past few years to enhance programming and services provided to our students so that they are more engaged in their learning. As well, we continue to expand the services available to students through our Off-Campus Coordinators and Dual Credit programming in partnership with post-secondary institutions across the province.

OUR STRATEGIES  

Continue the leadership work at the high school level. Continue to work at addressing communication amongst our stakeholders, ensuring that student work in these areas is noted and mentioned to parents through multiple means of communication. The addition of a second Off-Campus coordinator and the incorporation of three part time positions into a single Student Success Coordinator position should assist students in achieving in these areas. Multi-pronged approach to support Work Experience, Registered Apprenticeship Programming, Green Certificate programming, internships and other career focused supports for students should also assist in this area.

Notes: 1. 2.

Survey results for the province and some school authorities were impacted by changes in the number of students responding to the survey through the introduction of the Tell THEM From ME survey tool in 2014. Data values have been suppressed where the number of respondents/students is fewer than 6. Suppression is marked with an asterisk (*)

PAGE 12 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

OUTCOME TWO: THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP BETWEEN FIRST NATIONS, MÉTIS, AND INUIT STUDENTS AND ALL OTHER STUDENTS IS ELIMINATED Performance Measure

Results (in percentages)

Target

Evaluation

Targets

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2016 Achievement Improvement Overall 2017 2018 2019

Overall percentage of selfidentified FNMI students in Grades 6 and 9 who achieved the 54.3 52.4 51.1 44.1 54.8 acceptable standard on Provincial Achievement Tests (overall cohort results).

53.5

Very Low

Improved

Overall percentage of selfidentified FNMI students in Grades 6 and 9 who achieved the standard of excellence on Provincial Achievement Tests (overall cohort results).

6.8

6.5

Very Low

Maintained

Overall percentage of selfidentified FNMI students who achieved the acceptable standard 64.1 71.3 69.0 69.5 77.4 on diploma examinations (overall results).

75.0

Low

Maintained

Issue

77.0 80.0 82.0

Overall percentage of selfidentified FNMI students who achieved the standard of excellence on diploma examinations (overall results).

12.5

Low

Maintained

Issue

14.0 16.0 17.0

6.7

5.3

6.5

2.3

6.5

10.3

4.3

6.1

10.1

Issue

55.0 60.0 62.0

Concern 7.5

8.0

9.0

COMMENT ON RESULTS We continue to be committed to bridging the gap between our FNMI and non-FNMI learners through a focus between the curriculum and student services departments on explicitly addressing the learning of all students. We are pleased with the improvement noted on student success on the Provincial Achievement Tests.

STRATEGIES 

    

District/school data days focused on analyzing a wide range of data will provide sites more useful and usable information meant to address student learning for all, including a specific focus on the needs of FNMI learners. Grande Prairie Public’s Strategic Plan is focused on closing the gap between the District and the Province. The Student Services Assistant Superintendent is engaged in enhancing the services we provide all learners including the specific needs of FNMI learners. The coordinator of FNMI learning will be tracking the success of all identified students through an individual plan. We continue to provide early learning support through the Friendship Centre Head Start Program. We continue to provide Reading Recovery and focused learning supports to our highest of needs students.

Notes: 3. 4.

5.

6.

Results have been adjusted to reflect the change from previous data source systems to Provincial Approach to Student Information (PASI). Aggregated PAT results are based upon a weighted average of percent meeting standards (Acceptable, Excellence). The weights are the number of students enrolled in each course. Courses included: English Language Arts (Grades 6, 9, 9 KAE), Français (Grades 6, 9), French Language Arts (Grades 6, 9), Mathematics (6, 9, 9 KAE), Science (Grades 6, 9, 9 KAE), Social Studies (Grades 6, 9, 9 KAE). Aggregated Diploma results are a weighted average of percent meeting standards (Acceptable, Excellence) on Diploma Examinations. The weights are the number of students writing the Diploma Examination for each course. Courses included: English Language Arts 30-1, English Language Arts 30-2, French Language Arts 30-1, Français 30-1, Chemistry 30, Physics 30, Biology 30, Science 30, Social Studies 30-1, Social Studies 30-2. Diploma Examination Participation, High School Completion and High school to Post-secondary Transition rates are based upon a cohort of grade 10 students who are tracked over time.

PAGE 13 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

7. 8. 9.

Participation in Provincial Achievement Tests was impacted by the flooding in June 2013 (Grade 9 only) and by the fires in May to June 2016. Caution should be used when interpreting trends over time for the province and those school authorities affected by these events. Participation in Diploma Examinations was impacted by the flooding in June 2013 and by the fires in May to June 2016. Caution should be used when interpreting trends over time for the province and those school authorities affected by these events. Data values have been suppressed where the number of respondents/students is fewer than 6. Suppression is marked with an asterisk (*).

OUTCOME TWO: THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP BETWEEN FIRST NATIONS, MÉTIS, AND INUIT STUDENTS AND ALL OTHER STUDENTS IS ELIMINATED (CONTINUED) Performance Measure

Results (in percentages)

Target

Evaluation

Targets

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Achievement Improvement

Overall

2017 2018 2019

Concern

45.0 47.5 50.0

High School Completion Rate Percentage of self-identified FNMI students who completed 35.6 50.9 43.3 45.6 42.1 high school within three years of entering Grade 10.

42.0

Very Low

Maintained

Drop Out Rate - annual dropout rate of self-identified FNMI 8.2 students aged 14 to 18

6.0

Intermediate

Maintained

Low

Maintained

Issue

n/a

n/a

n/a

Very Low

Declined

Concern

6.1

4.8

6.0

6.8

High school to post-secondary transition rate of self-identified FNMI students within six years of entering Grade 10.

32.8 31.0 40.7 30.2 42.7

Percentage of Grade 12 selfidentified FNMI students eligible for a Rutherford Scholarship.

n/a

Percentage of self-identified FNMI students writing four or more diploma exams within three years of entering Grade 10.

20.0 23.7 15.3 17.1 12.6

n/a

n/a

n/a

24.3

44.0

36.0

16.0

Acceptable 5.0

4.0

3.5

48.0 52.0 54.0

37.0 40.0 42.0

19.0 22.0 24.0

COMMENT ON RESULTS We are pleased to see gains, especially in the annual dropout rate and Rutherford eligibility.

STRATEGIES  

FNMI Support team has been redesigned to reflect need for outreach support. This support is to ensure our students attend school. High School counsellors focused on ensuring all students develop a plan beginning in grade 9 to address their needs in high school. These initial planning meetings are followed up with progress updates into grade 12 to ensure students are on track and successful.

Notes: 10. 11. 12. 13.

Results have been adjusted to reflect the change from previous data source systems to Provincial Approach to Student Information (PASI). Due to the change from previous data source systems to Provincial Approach to Student Information (PASI), historical Rutherford Scholarship Eligibility Rate results are not available. Diploma Examination Participation, High School Completion and High school to Post-secondary Transition rates are based upon a cohort of grade 10 students who are tracked over time. Data values have been suppressed where the number of respondents/students is fewer than 6. Suppression is marked with an asterisk (*).

PAGE 14 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

OUTCOME THREE: ALBERTA’S EDUCATION SYSTEM IS INCLUSIVE Performance Measure

Results (in percentages)

Target

Evaluation

Targets

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2016 Achievement Improvement Overall 2017 2018 2019

Percentage of teacher, parent and student agreement that: students are safe at school, are learning the 84.7 83.7 84.9 86.8 85.4 importance of caring for others, are learning respect for others and are treated fairly in school.

87.0

High

Maintained

Good

87.0 88.5 90.0

COMMENT ON RESULTS GPPSD is proud to note that our results connected to Safe and Caring school environments is at its second highest level in 7 years. A deliberate and explicit approach to ensuring our schools meet the identified needs of students is part of the reason for these results. Other reasons are the cooperation between the school staff, students and community in building positive learning communities.

STRATEGIES GPPSD will continue to work with our external partners to provide increased opportunities for success in this area. Notes: 14. 15.

Survey results for the province and some school authorities were impacted by changes in the number of students responding to the survey through the introduction of the Tell THEM From ME survey tool in 2014. Data values have been suppressed where the number of respondents/students is fewer than 6. Suppression is marked with an asterisk (*).

PAGE 15 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

OUTCOME FOUR: ALBERTA HAS EXCELLENT TEACHERS, SCHOOL AND SCHOOL AUTHORITY LEADERS Performance Measure

Results (in percentages)

Target

Evaluation

Targets

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2016 Achievement Improvement Overall 2017 2018 2019

Percentage of teachers, parents and students satisfied with the opportunity for students to receive a broad program of 79.6 79.4 80.0 80.4 82.4 studies including fine arts, career, technology, and health and physical education.

82.0

Very High

Improved Significantly

Excellent 84.0 86.0 88.0

COMMENT ON RESULTS Focusing on the learning needs of students through the District Professional Learning Communities model provides a collaborative platform through which a variety of data can be analyzed with the eye to collaborative approaches to addressing areas of concern. Structures throughout the district focusing on collaboration through principal meetings, administrator meetings and school visits by the senior executive team also provide other ways to collaboratively approach problem solving. Ultimately the goal is that we provide a variety of learner pathways in order to ensure that “every student succeeds” in Grande Prairie Public School District.

STRATEGIES GPPSD provides programs of choice to offer students enhanced opportunities to address their specific learning foci. These include:       

District Music Gifted Programming at all sites International Baccalaureate programming at the Grande Prairie Composite High School French Immersion programming at École Montrose and Charles Spencer High School Sports and Arts programming at Alexander Forbes The Academy Christian infused programming at the Grande Prairie Christian School Montessori programming at Parkside Montessori

Notes: 16. 17.

Survey results for the province and some school authorities were impacted by changes in the number of students responding to the survey through the introduction of the Tell THEM From ME survey tool in 2014. Data values have been suppressed where the number of respondents/students is fewer than 6. Suppression is marked with an asterisk (*).

PAGE 16 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

OUTCOME FIVE: THE EDUCATION SYSTEM IS WELL GOVERNED AND MANAGED Performance Measure

Results (in percentages)

Percentage of teachers, parents and students indicating that their school and schools in their 78.5 75.9 74.1 76.9 81.9 jurisdiction have improved or stayed the same the last three years. Percentage of teachers and parents satisfied with parental involvement in decisions about their child's education.

Target

Evaluation

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2016 Achievement Improvement

74.7 73.3 75.1 77.6 78.2

Percentage of teachers, parents and students satisfied with the 86.1 87.2 87.7 88.5 88.2 overall quality of basic education.

80.0

80.0

90.0

Targets Overall 2017 2018 2019

Very High

Improved Significantly

Intermediate

Improved

Good

High

Maintained

Good

Excellent 82.5 84.0 86.0

81.0 83.0 85.0

91.0 93.0 94.5

COMMENT ON RESULTS We believe that through the clearly defined strategic plan and support from the Board, we are performing as a continuously improving school district.

STRATEGIES Grande Prairie Public School District has a Professional Learning Community model that provides a framework for addressing the needs of the teachers and students in our schools. This framework provides support for consistent examination of data to ensure practice is leading to a cycle of continuous improvement in GPPSD.   

Continued support of a broad range of programming through the acquisition of locally developed courses and implementation of Career and Technology Foundation (CTF) courses. A robust Mentorship program for our beginning teachers and teachers new to the district provides support using a collaborative learning model. Leadership for Tomorrow program for aspiring school leaders provides learning opportunities for those interested in leadership (of schools and of classrooms).

Notes: 18. 19.

Survey results for the province and some school authorities were impacted by changes in the number of students responding to the survey through the introduction of the Tell THEM From ME survey tool in 2014. Data values have been suppressed where the number of respondents/students is fewer than 6. Suppression is marked with an asterisk (*).

PAGE 17 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

2015-2016 SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL RESULTS ACCUMULATED SURPLUS AND RESERVES There are three main areas for reserves controlled by the Board of Education: unrestricted reserves ($233,568), internally-restricted operating reserves ($4,893,772), and capital reserves ($222,963). Accumulated Surplus Total accumulated surplus represents the full equity position of the school district, after netting all net financial assets and non-financial assets. For the year ending August 31, 2016, the District recorded a decrease of $241,658 in accumulated surplus, primarily in the area of operating reserves. Most other reserves remained unchanged from the previous year. Unrestricted Surplus Unrestricted surplus helps the Board of Trustees operate the organization in several ways: first, to manage cash flow (due to timing of Government funding and expenditures), second, to manage external risk to the organization from enrolments, funding and other factors, and third to manage internal risk on unanticipated costs without impacting inyear commitments to the budget. For an organization our size, an unrestricted surplus should be about $1,000,000, if not higher. For the year ending August 31, 2016, our unrestricted reserves are $233,568 representing 0.24% of our District budget, or approximately 2 days of operation. Restricted Operating Reserves Restricted operating reserves are funds established for a purpose and represent future commitments. All funds are established by the Board and range from school reserves to specific-purpose reserves. For the year ending 2015-2016, the basic breakdown of restricted operating reserves is as follows: Breakdown of Restricted Operating Reserves New School Implementation

$3,000,000

School and Education Reserves

$1,094,000

School Generated Funds Reserves TOTAL

$799,772 $4,893,772

CAPITAL RESERVES Capital reserves of $222,963 are held for the purposes of future capital needs, and are typically funded through amortization of assets not supported by the Government (evergreening) or unspent administration expenses. The areas of planning are $222,963 for equipment and vehicle planning.

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES Actual revenues to the prior year increased $432,126 or 0.4%. For the 2016 – 2017 budget there are no significant variances to budgeted revenues that are not part of the normal fluctuations that can be expected to occur or from accounting inclusions of amounts that are budget-neutral (increase in revenues is matched with a corresponding increase in expenditures). For the 2015-2016 budget, significant variances to budgeted revenues include increases in Infrastructure Maintenance Renewal (IMR) supports ($1,285,000), early childhood learning supports ($360,000) and Alberta Teacher Retirement Fund supports ($1,163,000). Other revenue variances are part of the normal fluctuations that can be expected to occur or from accounting inclusions of amounts that are budget-neutral (increase in revenues is matched with a corresponding increase in expenditures).

PAGE 18 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

2015 – 2016 FINANCIAL RESULTS Summary of Allocation by Program: $3,066,602 $2,289,121 d

$6,493,395

e

a) ECS Instruction - 7%

a

$15,641,969

c

b) Grades 1 to 12 Instruction - 74% c) Operations & Maintenance of Facilities - 14%

b

d) Transportation - 2% e) Board & System Administration - 3% $68,657,090

ECS Instruction

$6,493,395

Grade 1-12 Instruction

$68,657,090

Operations & Maintenance of Facilities

$15,641,969

Transportation

$2,289,121

Board & System Administration

$3,066,602

TOTAL

$96,148,177

Summary of Revenues by Funding Source $1,187,182

$4,397,438

$591,346

b c d a) Alberta Education - 93%

b) Other Government Of Alberta - 1%

a

c) Fees, Services, Rentals, Other - 5%

d) Fundraising And Donations - 1% $89,730,553

Alberta Education

$89,730,553

Other Government Of Alberta

$1,187,182

Fees, Services, Rentals, Other

$4,397,438

Fundraising And Donations TOTAL

$591,346 $95,906,519

PAGE 19 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

Summary of Expenditures by Object: $84,665

e

$4,861,097

a) Teacher Salaries & Benefits - 58%

d

$16,112,602

b) Support Staff Salaries & Benefits - 20%

c c) Services, Contracts and Supplies - 17%

a b

$56,288,714

d) Amortization of Capital Assets - 5%

$18,801,099 e) Interest on Capital Debt and Other Interest - 0%

Teacher Salaries & Benefits

$56,288,714

Support Staff Salaries & Benefits

$18,801,099

Services, Contracts and Supplies

$16,112,602

Amortization of Capital Assets Interest on Capital Debt and Other Interest TOTAL

$4,861,097 $84,665 $96,148,177

Generally budget variances for expenditures were a product of differences in enrolment projections, where schools often budget enrolments conservatively, or increases in spending consistent with increases in revenues. In almost all cases schools have a positive reserve position, allowing schools to adjust to changing and unexpected needs or future planning. This will be watched this year as we decreased funding to our schools.

SCHOOL GENERATED FUNDS Schools received and fundraised for school generated funds during the year. A total of $995,262 (net of direct costs) was generated from these activities which were used for extra-curricular activities, field trips, and other student activities, with actual expenditures incurred of $986,723. The balance of restricted operating reserves for school generated funds that remained at year end for school uses is $799,772. This amount allows schools to work on school projects relating to student activities from year to year. Information on specific sources and uses of school generated funds can be obtained in the notes of the audited financial statements.

FURTHER INFORMATION The Grande Prairie Public School District’s Audited Financial Statement and the Unaudited Schedules can be viewed in their entirety at: www.gppsd.ab.ca. The web link to all school jurisdiction financial reports, which provides comparative data, is located at: www.education.alberta.ca/admin/funding/audited.aspx.

PAGE 20 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

2016-2017 BUDGET CHANGES FOR 2016-2017 The School District is fully dependent on the support of the Alberta Government to provide education services. Typically, and this year is no different, costs are mainly due to salary decisions, and the government revenue offsets that cost. For this year, the provincial government is collectively bargaining with the Alberta Teacher Association (ATA) for a province wide negotiated teacher salary settlement. As this is provincially bargained, any increase would be expected to be funded. School Year (from September 30) Total Student Numbers 9,000 8,000 7,000

7,631

7211

6,775

7,957

8,282

8170

8088

2014

2015

2016

6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 2010

2011

2012

Year

2013

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Grande Prairie Public School District Total

6,775

7,211

7,631

7,957

8,282

8170

8088

Student Percentage Increase (Decrease)

4.7%

6.4%

5.8%

4.7%

4.5%

-1.4%

-1.1%

2016-2017 Budget Summary of Revenues by Funding Source $654,533

d

$2,221,850 c $1,614,699 b

$75,000

e

f

$1,500,000

g

$699,792

a) Alberta Education & Government of Alberta b) Sales, Services & Expense Recoveries c) Fees

a

d) Fundraising & Donations e) Investment Income

$88,356,191

f) Gains on Disposal of Capital Assets g) School Operating Contingency Reserve

Alberta Education & Government of Alberta

$88,356,191

Sales, Services & Expense Recoveries

$1,614,699

Fees

$2,221,850

Fundraising & Donations Investment Income Gains on Disposal of Capital Assets School Operating Contingency Reserve TOTAL BUDGET REVENUES

$654,533 $75,000 $1,500,000 $699,792 $95,122,065

PAGE 21 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

2016-2017 Budget Summary of Allocation by Program $2,686,903 $2,441,804 c $14,200,349

d a) ECS - Grade 12 Instruction

b

b) Operations and Maintenance of Facilities

a

c) Transportation

$75,793,009 d) Board and System Administration

ECS - Grade 12 Instruction

$75,793,009

Operations and Maintenance of Facilities

$14,200,349

Transportation

$2,441,804

Board and System Administration

$2,686,903

TOTAL BUDGET ALLOCATION

$95,122,065

2016-2017 Budget Summary of Expenditures by Object $3,960,245

d

$60,000

e

a) Teacher Salaries & Benefits

$16,676,085

b) Support Staff Salaries & Benefits

c a

$18,888,682

b

c) Services, Contracts and Supplies d) Amortization of Capital Assets

$55,537,053 e) Interest on Capital Debt

Teacher Salaries & Benefits

$55,537,053

Support Staff Salaries & Benefits

$18,888,682

Services, Contracts and Supplies

$16,676,085

Amortization of Capital Assets

$3,960,245

Interest on Capital Debt TOTAL BUDGET ALLOCATION

$60,000 $95,122,065

Further Information The Grande Prairie Public School District’s budget reports and summaries can be viewed in their entirety at: https://www.gppsd.ab.ca/District/Pages/Budget.aspx. The web link to all school jurisdiction financial reports, which provides comparative data, is located at: www.education.alberta.ca/admin/funding/audited.aspx. For further information, please contact Mr. Jeff Olson, Secretary-Treasurer/ Associate Superintendent of Business Services at the Grande Prairie Public School District: (780) 532-4491 Ext. 1002

PAGE 22 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

EDUCATION FACILITIES PLAN AND HIGHLIGHTS OF EDUCATION FACILITIES BACKGROUND The Board appreciates the Government’s response to date in addressing our facility needs for students from Kindergarten to Grade 8. With the inclusion of Roy Bickell School in the Royal Oaks area in September 2017, three new schools for K-8 students have been added to our District. This has allowed the District to remove over 40 leased modulars for significant cost savings, but most importantly, this has also allowed us to right size our schools and move 1,200 students from modulars into core classrooms. However, from a high school perspective, we are in an immediate need to replace our aging Composite High School with a facility that will accommodate 1,600 students with the capability to expand to 2,000. On April 14, 2016, the Alberta Government announced their Capital Plan which recognized the Grande Prairie Public School District’s request for a Composite High School replacement. This need meets the priority criteria and fits within the three pillars of the Alberta Government’s Capital Plan. The District respectfully and fervently requests formal approval for the replacement of the Composite High School, and that this project moves forward with design and construction funding commitment from the Alberta Government.

DISCUSSION Enrolment Perspective A growing community with a large portion of the population in the child bearing years creates ongoing enrolment pressures for a school jurisdiction. The City of Grande Prairie has this demographic and based on the city census of 2015, we are now the 5th largest city in Alberta. Our city has grown rapidly by 24% in 4 years to over 68,000 residents. The average age is under 30 and skewed towards child bearing years. This is recognized and reflected in our enrolment today. Based on the Forecast Model provided by Alberta Education (which is aligned to the Alberta Treasury Board and Finance second quarter 2016 population projections) an enrolment increase to 9,845 students is forecasted for Grande Prairie School District by 2021-2022. This equals an increase of 1,848 students in 6 years, or about 19% growth, for an average increase of 3% per year. (See table below.)

It is in high school spaces where our enrolment needs are acutely felt. As of October 4, 2016, the District’s enrolment in grades 9 to 12 was 2175 students. With a current combined high school capacity of 2806, we have already reached a 78% capacity at the high school level. It is expected that within 5-6 years our high schools will be at about 100% capacity based on an average 3% enrolment increase.

PAGE 23 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

A high school replacement of 1,600 student spaces with the ability for expansion up to 2,000 must be announced immediately to address the enrolment pressures expected in that time. High School Projections with growth (Using 2016-2017 Enrolments)

20172018

20182019

20192020

20202021

20212022

20222023

20232024

20242025

20252026

Charles Spencer HS Capacity

1212.0

1212.0

1212.0

1212.0

1212.0

1212.0

1212.0

1212.0

1212.0

Composite Capacity

1594.0

1594.0

1594.0

1594.0

1594.0

1594.0

1594.0

1594.0

1594.0

TOTAL CAPACITY

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0 2806.0

Total Capacity

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0

2806.0

Enrolment Growth of 3%

2240.3

2245.9

2364.7

2446.9

2622.3

2782.1

2966.5

3125.1

3211.0

UTILIZATION CAPACITY PERCENTAGE

79.84%

80.04%

84.27%

87.20%

93.45%

99.15%

105.72%

111.37%

114.44%

The table above illustrates a sensitivity analysis using different enrolment growth projections. It indicates in all cases we will be over capacity in a very short time. Facility Perspective Over the last number of years the Board has advocated for the modernization or replacement of the 1960’s era Grande Prairie Composite High School through our annual Capital Plans. This request was supported with a recommendation from a joint report struck by Alberta Education and Infrastructure in 2010. As early as 2008, a report titled, “Composite High School – Facility Review Report of Findings”, with department representatives and outside consultants, recommended that the Composite High School should be modernized or replaced by 2017. The Board has recognized this as a top priority, and the government has acknowledged it for almost 10 years; therefore, we believe positive action is now required. Cost Focusing on the aging Composite High School, the 2008 study reports the replacement costs calculated by engineer experts at $73 million to replace the facility. To do this today would require about $80 million to replace using the Statistics Canada inflation increase from 2008 to 2015. Note that the cost is an estimate and that a scoping exercise done in the designing phase would finalize this cost because of requirements such as Career and Technology Studies (CTS) and possible partnership investments. GPPSD New Building and Modernization Update The Grande Prairie Public School District continues with its current building projects thanks to continued support from Alberta Education.  

New Construction Opening for the 2017-18 School Year Roy Bickell Public School K-8 (Capacity 600 students) The Roy Bickell Public School will serve the needs of students in the Royal Oaks area and surrounding neighbourhoods in the northwest quadrant of the city.

PAGE 24 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

2017-2020 3 YEAR CAPITAL PLAN NEW REPLACEMENT – COMPOSITE HIGH SCHOOL 9–12 (No. 1 Priority)

 

Planning Period: 2016 – 2017 school year Opening Date: September 2019

Accommodate Increasing Enrolment  Opening Capacity: 1,600 students expandable to 2,000  Total Budget $80,000,000

PERMANENT ADDITION – CHARLES SPENCER HIGH SCHOOL GRADES 9 – 12 (No. 2 Priority)

Two story addition  Planning Period: 2016 – 2017  Opening Date: September 2017

Accommodate Increasing Enrolment  Capacity: 200  Total Budget: $8,000,000

PAGE 25 OF 26


AUTHORITY: 3240 GRANDE PRAIRIE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2357

GYM AND OR PARTIAL MODERNIZATION – ASPEN GROVE SCHOOL GRADES K–8 (No. 3 Priority)

English K - 8 Redeployment  Planning Period: 2016–2017 school year  Opening Date: September 2018  Total Budget: $ 8,000,000 - $10,000,000

Further Information The Grande Prairie Public School District’s Capital Plan and Education Facility Report can be viewed in its entirety at: https://www.gppsd.ab.ca/District/School%20and%20Facilities%20Planning%20Documents/2017%20%202020%20Educational%20Facilities%20Plan%20November%2024,%202016%20w%20Append.pdf.

PAGE 26 OF 26

2016 GPPSD Combined Three Year Education Plan and AERR  

We are proud to share the Three Year Education Plan 2016-2019 and Annual Education Results Report 2015-2016.

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