Lake Viking News_December 2018

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VVA Board of Directors Call to Order Phil Stockard, Lot 1180, called the meeting to order at 6:30 p.m. in the lower level of the clubhouse. Members in attendance were Troy Lesan, Lot 576, Mike Booth, Lot 1259, Susan Zalenski, Lot 364, Mike Krehbiel. Lot 559, Flint Hibler, Lot 183, and James Funk, Lot 2904. Shad Mort led the Pledge of Allegiance. Troy Lesan led in prayer. Approval of Minutes Troy Lesan moved to approve the minutes of the Nov. 11, 2018, board meeting. Flint Hibler seconded; motion passed. Committee Reports Handbook Committee: No report. Finance Committee: Troy Lesan reported the Finance Committee had two meetings this week. The Committee worked on the 2019 Budget and Capital Expenditures. There are a couple of new features in the budget for next year. On the expense side we have added a line item for the Deferred Maint./Capital Projects Assessment. We have budgeted $50,000 for this item and at the end of the year these funds will be added to our cash reserves. We also added a line item for Clubhouse Renovation Expense to offset the income account. The Committee discussed the monthly reconciliation that was approved several months ago. We have some issues with the timely preparedness of the accounting firm performing these reconciliations. We are in discussions with them to resolve these issues. The Committee is also working on moving some money around to get better interest rates. Strategic Planning Committee: Susan Zalenski reported the clubhouse renovation has begun. The cabinets and carpet are out and the new flooring will be installed Dec. 17. The new cabinets should be here in a couple of weeks. This committee is also working on developing a long range strategic plan for our lake. The committee asked the board for time at the annual meeting in March to inform the members and request their input on this plan. Susan also talked a little about the secure page on our website. It is still a work in progress, but would like to see such items as the monthly agenda, minutes, financials and rule changes posted on this site. She would like to see this get started in January, if possible. Susan gave a short update on the Nominating Committee. They are still looking for people to run for the board in March. There are two seats opening up and one candidate so far to run. Activities Committee: Flint Hibler reported on behalf of the Activities Committee. The committee is working on plans for next year’s events and will have that to present to the board hopefully in January. Building Committee: There have been five permits submitted recently and two houses are on hold, waiting for septic permit and plans. Fire Department: Tony Gronniger talked about their latest meeting. The storm sirens were tested over the weekend and the north siren did not seem to work. They held their first video training session. Campground: James Funk reported the Campground Committee looked at the campground review and will make their recommendations to the board at a later date. Lake Committee: At last month’s meeting there was concern about the Marina advertising only 25’ boats, but they assured us they are aware of the 24’ length limit at Lake Viking. Cemetery: No Report. Infraction Committee: No Report. Dredge Committee: No Report. Lake Manager Report (Shad Mort) 1. Dredge: We will be pulling the dredge out next week and take it to the maintenance area. The pump has to be pulled and taken to Kansas City for any necessary repairs. The Pilot / Pirate cove is complete. The danger buoys have been removed from the area the dredge was working on toward the south end. Shad stated that the water depth ranges from 4’- 6’ in this area now. 2. The Special Road District and PWSD #3 contracts have been executed for 2019. The only change was the salt price to the Road District went up slightly. 3. Shad explained the process for snow removal and treatment application. For a normal snowfall, all roads are cleared, but the hills and curves are all that is treated with salt mix. If we were to have a bad ice storm then more salt mix would be used. 4. 4th of July: Shad has already had inquiries about when our 4th of July Celebration will be. The board decided it would be held on July 6, 2019. Financials: Troy Lesan moved to approve the financial statements. James Funk seconded; motion passed. Guest Time: No guest time.

Next VVA Board Meeting:

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December 9, 2018 Board Action 1. 2019 Budget The Finance Committee presented the board with a 2019 Proposed Budget and Capital Expenditures list for their review. Mike Krehbiel moved to accept the 2019 Proposed Budget to be presented to the membership at the Annual Meeting. There were questions pertaining to employee insurance and comparison of 2018 and 2019 Capital Expenditures. In 2018 there was deck railing budgeted and it has not been completed, so Susan Zalenski asked if it would be put on the 2019 list of expenditures. The board did decide to include it on the 2019 list. After discussion, and the change to the Capital Expenditures, Troy Lesan seconded the motion; motion passed. Phil Stockard let the board and members present know there will be another Town Hall meeting in February, like last year. 2. Recommendations/Proposals for 2019 Annual Meeting Agenda By-Law Changes: Standing Committees – Removal and dissolution. (These changes are administrative in nature and neither the Association nor its members will incur any cost.) Motion: The Cemetery Committee shall be removed as a standing committee. The responsibility of coordination for cemetery plot sales and maintenance will be conducted within the Association Office with oversight by the Board of Directors. Phil Stockard made the motion, Susan Zalenski seconded; motion passed Motion: The Nominating Committee shall be removed as a standing committee. The Board of Directors will designate a Special Nominating Committee as need arises. Phil Stockard made the motion, Susan Zalenski seconded; motion passed. Motion: The Board of Directors proposes the movement and renaming of the current Dredge Committee to Dredge & Erosion Committee, from Sub-Committee to Standing Committee status and further expanding the committee’s responsibilities. This committee shall serve as a research, monitor, and advisory committee to the Board of Directors regarding lake dredge operations, soil erosion and bank stabilization issues. The committee shall consist of no less than three members or more than five members to include the Lake Manager, an ex-officio non-voting member. Phil Stockard made the motion, Flint Hibler seconded; motion passed. Motion: The Board of Directors proposes the movement of the Activities Committee from the status of Special Committee to Standing Committee. The Activities Committee shall consist of no less than three active members in good standing and shall work to promote fellowship and positive interaction among Association members. The committee may seek out or develop social opportunities in which members in good standing and their families can take part as well as identifying worthy projects and focus fund-raising events that enhance the community and membership. Phil Stockard made the motion, Mike Krehbiel seconded; motion passed ARTICLE XIV – ENFORCEMENT – Section 4. Infraction – Paragraph 2 (Pg 16 2018 Handbook) (Current) The actions taken by the Infraction Committee may, by notice given to the Board of Directors within thirty (30 d) days of the date final action is taken by the Infraction Committee, be appealed to the Board of Directors, and such appeal will be heard de novo by the Board at its regular meetings. Parties cited with violations may be represented by Counsel. (Proposed Addition in Italic) The actions taken by the Infraction Committee may, by notice given to the Board of Directors within thirty (30 d) days of the date final action is taken by the Infraction Committee, be appealed to the Board of Directors, and such appeal will be heard de novo by the board at its regular meetings. Parties cited with violations may be represented by Counsel. A guest or non-member appealing an Infraction Committee decision to the Board of Directors must appear with the member property owner with whom they were a guest. Phil Stockard made the motion, James Funk seconded; motion passed. 3. Amphitheatre Mark Leggett approached the Board in October about the proceeds from last year’s 50th Anniversary and presented a plan for an amphitheatre to be built behind the clubhouse. The board needed time to think about the project and get more input from members so a decision was not made at that time. Mark was of the thought that presenting the plans for building the amphitheatre,

6:30 p.m. January 13, 2018

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Lower level of the clubhouse

All Members in Good Standing are Welcome & Encouraged to Attend.


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Welcome New Members! November 2018

Lot MH-73 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Daniel & Rebecca Mills Lot 37. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew & Dena Boswell Lot S-105 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ronnie Heinse Jr & Carrie Heinse


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VVA Board Minutes

(continued from page 1)

with the proceeds, was a unanimous decision of the committee. The Board previously discussed putting it on the agenda for the Annual Meeting and let the members decide if this is where the money should be spent. Troy Lesan commented that the idea of an amphitheatre had been brought up at the 2009 Annual Meeting. Two members in the audience, who were on the 50th Committee, and one board member did not agree that it was a unanimous vote by the committee to use the proceeds to build an amphitheatre. The Board took no action on this issue, but Mr. Leggett is welcome to put his proposal for the amphitheatre on the agenda for the Annual Meeting in March and present it to our members. Mr. Leggett must notify the office by Feb. 1 if he would like to be on the agenda. Discussion: Mike Booth reported the Smoke Detector Program has been extended through July 2019. So far, Lake Viking Fire Department has installed 30 smoke detectors for members and they have 55 left. Mike is going to have a table set up at the Annual Meeting for Community Preparedness.

Animal Rules & Regulations Allowing dogs to roam/animal bite: Dogs are not allowed off the member’s property and shall be contained by a fenced enclosure or controlled by a leash. Guests’ dogs are included. Any animal whether leashed or unleashed that attacks or bites a person, and after review of the circumstances, is deemed to be a vicious animal and must be removed from the lake. The owner of the animal is subject to a minimum $500.00 infraction ticket.

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Business Future: No report at this time. Adjourn: Troy Lesan moved to adjourn into Executive Session at 7:50 p.m. Flint Hibler seconded; motion passed. Attendance: Tony Gronniger, lot 2281; Sherry Krehbiel, lot 559; Joe & Nancy Serrone, lot 582; Kenny Southwick, lot 381; Resa & Doug Wiltse, lot 494; Kim Spidle, lot 341; Len Zalenski, lot 364; Bo & Kitty Steed, lot 444; Marvin McNabb, lot 28; Shad Mort, Lake Manager; Sally Zerbe, lot 2528/Office. Let the record show that these Minutes are a record of the business transacted at this meeting and a sampling of the discussions. Comments and discussions are not reflected in whole or as actual quotations in the minutes, nor do they reflect all comments by members. Respectfully Submitted, Mike Booth - Secretary Board of Directors, Viking Valley Association

Cemetery Decorum

Flower bouquets are permitted any time of the year. For the spring and summer seasons beginning March 1st and extending to December 1st of each year, no wreaths or sprays, or other decorative materials shall be used on any lot, except such decorative materials as can be contained in vases mounted to the marker base. Exceptions will be made for a period of one week following an interment service, Easter Sunday, Mother's Day, Father's Day, Independence Day, Memorial Day and Veterans Day. Wreaths, flowers, and other materials left on graves, which have withered or become unsightly, will be removed by the cemetery without notice. Wreaths and other decorative materials must be removed from shipping boxes and containers before placing said materials on any grave.

ATTENTION CAMPERS Just a reminder, camp spaces are NOT transferrable with the sale of your lot or camper. The campground agreement that each of you have signed states: Section Eight: Privilege Not Assignable Licensee’s privileges under this Agreement shall not be assignable by Licensee in whole or in part.


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NASA exhibit at library set to open on Jan. 8

The Daviess County Library has been selected as one of 12 libraries nationwide to host a traveling exhibit entitled, “EXPLORATION: SPACE” as the new year opens. The exhibit is scheduled to arrive right after Christmas with opening day planned for Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019. The library is working on special programming for classroom visits, home school opportunities, and meeting presentations featuring NASA subject matter experts, movies, crafts and more. The local library has benefited greatly from the NASA@my libraray program during the past two years. This in itself is significant in that there are only 75 NASA@mylibrary participants overall. Watch this newspaper for more information on special programming and activities during the exhibit’s 12-week stay. This exhibit is sponsored by Daviess County Library in conjunction with NASA@MYLIBRARY initiative and the American Library Association. In addition to the excitement of EXPLORATION: SPACE, the library will continue its regular winter adult programming, beginning Jan. 2 through March 15, 2019. The theme emphasizes literacy with January designated for “Physical & Health” literacy. Presenters will address mental and physical health and new website links will be constructed to encourage you to pursue a healthy path from the beginning of the new year. During February Tax Literacy will be emphasized. Assistance with taxes for seniors will be offered in the library computer lab on Wednesday mornings, beginning on Jan. 23 and continuing through tax day. Finally, two weeks during March will be devoted to Computer Literacy. Classes will be offered in the lab using a new online teaching program coming to the library in the new year. Regular reading “punch-cards” will be in effect with each completed card acting as one entry into a drawing for one of

three Casey’s gas cards. This year the library is offering additional opportunities to patrons who step outside their box and read books from specific award winner lists. Not to leave the children out, the library is offering a special reading opportunity for independent readers interested in voting for the Mark Twain and Truman Awards. Any child reading at least six books from either list may vote for their choice. This program begins with Christmas break, Friday, Dec. 21, and goes through February, with voting no later than March 1. Ask a librarian for the

Gallatin firefighters move to the new fire station

On Nov. 24, 2018, volunteers of the Gallatin Fire Protection District made their final response from the fire station located on Water Street, which has housed fire trucks and served the community for nearly three decades. Firefighters made the monumental trip with all fire apparatus displaying emergency lights to the new station located at 207 S. Market Street in Gallatin. Calls have been shared between both facilities for some time now. Although work in the new facility will continue, the Gallatin Fire Protection District is proud to announce that response operations have fully moved into the new station. Pictured left to right are, kneeling, M. Sidebottom, J. Fry, B. Lee; standing, S. Wood, R. Lee, D. Wilson, J. Hogan, J. Smith, S. Wilson, Captain D. Wilson, Captain K. McBroom, T. Carder, Captain G. Lollar, K. Sterneker, G. Hamilton, Assistant Chief E. Kloepping, Chief D. Hamilton. Several fire district personnel are not pictured.

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book list and start reading while you wait for Santa. Last, but certainly not least, the library will not assess fines for returned overdue materials during the 12 Days of Christmas. All books, audio books, magazines and movies returned between Dec. 25 and Jan. 7 will have all fines forgiven. What the library really wants for Christmas is all materials back in the house. For more information on library events, visit the library in Gallatin or its branch facility in Jamesport or call 660-663-3222.

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Lake Viking Quilters embrace Christmas spirit year round By Troy Lesan With the Christmas season upon us, we are reminded of the joy of giving. There is also an invisible hand that tugs at our sleeve and a still small voice that whispers in our ear telling us that giving is a good thing all year round. Not just with material things but with actions and gestures ... and the Lake Viking Quilters do just that. They’re always giving away quilts, no matter the season, but over the years, their capacity for giving donations has been fueled by people making contributions to them. The Lake Viking Quilters have been around a long time, and I’m not sure anyone remembers exactly when they started. Many of the early members have passed on while numerous others have moved away. Currently the longest serving quilter is Joyce Becerra and she estimates that the group started around 1995. Originally the group consisted of 10-12 ladies who gathered together to help each other make quilts for their personal use. Then the operation got bigger when donated materials started coming in and the quilts were in turn donated to worthwhile causes. I started writing about the quilters over ten years ago and by that time the Lake Viking Quilters had become so prolific that as many as 150 to 200 of their quilts a year were being donated to concerns all over Missouri and the Midwest. The beauty of it all is that these quilts are created from assorted remnants of fabric, which would have otherwise been discarded, and made into gifts that are cherished by the recipients. Just a few days ago Joyce Becerra took a carload of quilts to the Gallatin school. Recently the school had started an “adopt a family” program which included 24 families. Wouldn’t you know it, the number of quilts Joyce had crammed into her car just happened to be 24! Personnel at the school were grateful for the donation. Earlier in the year, the Quilters donated 51 quilts to the Lighthouse Daycare which is currently located at the Gallatin Christian Church. Lighthouse will, in turn distribute these quilts. It’s definitely all about giving and it is for that reason that Joyce Becerra wants to give out a big thank you to the many people who have donated fabric and other materials to the Lake Viking quilters over the years. Too many to mention, but some of the names that stand out are Margaret Messinger who for years has given material, all of which was already cut and some even sewn. Likewise, Karen Reed of the Seventh-day Church has given so much material and backing. Vickie Archer has given huge amounts of beautiful material, while Arlis Sloebener has given bags and bags of batting and material. Jamesport has contributed as well with Shelley of Wild Child Creations giving a bunch of batting material and entire rolls of scrap material. When we’re talking about the hundreds of quilts a year being turned out, the number grows to thousands when considering the years involved. The amount of fabric and batting required to keep this virtual assembly line going equals a Mount Everest size pile of material. I know because a lot of this stuff goes through our basement. Over the years our vacuum cleaner has picked enough lint, threads, and tiny scrap pieces of fabric to fill a jumbo sized dumpster. Participation among quilters has had its ups and downs. Many sessions consist of two quilters while others are much larger. Current quilters meeting with the Lake Viking Group are Marge Hennen, Debbie Engel, Nadja McCubbin, Barbara Duncan, Jeannie Horst, Shirley Leakey, and Joyce Becerra. New members to this group are always eagerly welcomed. Call Shirley at 660- 663-3744 or Joyce at 663-3474 for more info. Recently the Lake Viking Quilters can boast that their product has taken on an international flavor. Shirley has given a quilt to friends in Holland and to another friend’s sister who is a missionary in Brazil ... which proves that their tradition of giving has gone a long ways.

This stack of quilts is part of a recent donation from the Lake Viking Quilters to the Gallatin R-5 School District for their “Adopt a Family” program.

About your Trash Service ... Just a reminder to all members with dwellings or commercial buildings, you must pay for trash service to the trash removal company providing the service. Full time residents will pay for 12 months of trash service and weekend or part-time residents will pay for 6 months of trash service (April 1 thru September 30.) If you need the phone number for our trash service, please contact the association office, Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. for more information @ 660-663-2131. Anyone setting trash out prior to pickup day must have trash in a container with a closeable / sealable lid. (This was adopted, by motion, at the Board of Directors meeting on August 10, 2008.)

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NOTICE Runway for Aircraft Only Now that spring is here, not only is there an increase in boat traffic, but also more aircraft using the LV airport. While we do not have a great deal of air traffic, remember that our runway is for aircraft use only. For your protection, and that of others, please keep all vehicles and pedestrians clear of the airport runway at all times.

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CALL TO ORDER Kyle Parkhurst, President (2020), called the meeting to order at 4 p.m. Members in attendance were Troy Lesan (2021), Jeffrey Speaker (2019), and Randy Tague (2021). Arlo Aschbrenner (2020) and Diane Hulett, clerk, were unable to attend. Also in attendance was Roger Barker, water superintendent. APPROVAL OF MINUTES Troy Lesan moved to approve the minutes of the Oct. 16, 2018, Board of Directors Meeting. Jeffrey Speaker seconded. All members were in favor; motion carried. PUBLIC COMMENT There were no visitors in attendance for public comment. OLD BUSINESS Revisions to the Rules and Regulations for the district were submitted. Troy Lesan moved to approve and Randy Tague seconded. All members voted in favor; motion carried. NEW BUSINESS Financial Report: The financial reports and bills were reviewed and discussed. Jeffrey Speaker moved to approve the October financial reports as submitted and approve the bills. Troy Lesan seconded. All members voted to approve; motion carried. The bid for audit services was submitted. A motion was made by Randy Tague and seconded by Troy Lesan to accept the bid from Karlin & Long, LLC for the 2018 audit. All members were in favor; motion carried. Preliminary budget figures for 2019 were submitted for review. DISCUSSION Superintendent Report: Roger Barker reported that the tower work is complete and all radio read antennas have been installed. He also provided information on upcoming board training to be held at Cameron, MO. Executive Session: A motion was made and seconded at 5:30 p.m. for the board to enter executive session to discuss personnel. Roll Call: Kyle Parkhurst - yes; Troy Lesan - yes; Jeffrey Speaker - yes; Randy Tague - yes. The board returned to regular session at 5:40 p.m. Kyle Parkhurst announced the next meeting would be Dec. 18, 2018, at 6 p.m. with the location to be determined at a later date. The meeting was adjourned at 5:45 p.m. Respectfully Submitted, Jeffrey Speaker

December 12, 2018 CALL TO ORDER Kyle Parkhurst, President (2020), called the meeting to order at 1:25 p.m. Members in attendance were Troy Lesan (2021), Jeffrey Speaker (2019), and Arlo Aschbrenner (2020). Randy Tague (2021) was unable to attend. Also in attendance were Roger Barker, water superintendent, Gary King, operator, and Diane Hulett, clerk. APPROVAL OF MINUTES The November minutes were amended to reflect the change of date and time for the December meeting from Dec. 18, 2018, at 6 p.m. to Dec. 12, 2018, at 12 p.m. at the water plant. Arlo Aschbrenner moved to approve the minutes of the Nov. 20, 2018, Board of Directors Meeting as amended. Troy Lesan seconded. All members were in favor; motion carried. PUBLIC COMMENT There were no visitors in attendance for public comment. OLD BUSINESS The final 2019 budget figures were reviewed with one line item being changed. Jeffrey Speaker moved to approve the 2019 budget and Arlo Aschbrenner seconded. All voted to approve; motion carried. NEW BUSINESS Financial Report: The financial reports and bills were reviewed and discussed. Troy Lesan moved to approve the November financial reports as submitted and approve the bills. Jeffrey Speaker seconded. All members voted to approve; motion carried. DISCUSSION It was noted that the district’s water loss had decreased significantly since installation of the radio read meters. Troy Lesan pointed out that the water loss percentage for the last three months had been 5.11%, 2.19%, and 3.45% which is a notable decrease from 22.39% a year ago. Executive Session: A motion was made by Arlo Aschbrenner and seconded by Troy Lesan at 1:55 p.m. for the board to enter executive session to discuss personnel. Roll Call: Kyle Parkhurst - yes; Troy Lesan - yes; Jeffrey Speaker yes; Arlo Aschbrenner - yes. The board returned to regular session at 2:15 p.m. Kyle Parkhurst announced the next meeting would be Jan. 15, 2019, at 4 p.m. at the water plant. The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. Respectfully Submitted, Jeffrey Speaker


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Around the Lake

Frankie Valens appears at Lake Viking Church By Troy Lesan In regard to the music personality that appeared at Lake Viking Church on Dec. 9, allow me to shed some clarification. No, it was not Ritchie Valens. Unfortunately, Ritchie Valens passed away over 50 years ago in the famous airplane crash that killed the Big Bopper and Buddy Holly. Nor was it Frankie Valli. No disrespect to the Lake Viking Church but Frankie Valli is HUGE. An appearance for a packed house at Madison Square Garden? Maybe (although Frankie is 84 now). A Frankie Valli appearance at Lake Viking Church? I don’t think so. No, the music personality who appeared at Lake Viking Church was Frankie Valens. Still confused? Don’t feel bad. If you run a google search on Frankie Valens, the first two names that pop up on the computer screen are (you guessed it) Ritchie Valens and Frankie Valli. So let’s get this straight for once and for all. It’s FRANKIE VALENS!!! Frankie Valens was a professional musician who shared the stage with many famous names in the 1960s and ‘70s. He played in nightclubs and played in Vegas for a while and at various times appeared onstage as an opening act for Crystal Gale, The Byrds, The Platters, and The Boxtops. Once, after his group opened a show for the Byrds (eventual members of the R&R Hall of Fame), a lady from the audience later told him that she was disappointed with the Byrds and felt that his group’s performance was the highlight of the show. Frankie even made an onstage appearance once with Ronald Reagan. Frankie was well-known for his popular renditions of famous ‘60s songs. He could sing the doo-wop songs with the best of ‘em. In his first audition to be a lead singer, he totally nailed his version of Unchained Melody, was hired on the spot, and never looked back. Frankie did a great version of This Magic Moment and his version of The Lion Sleeps Tonight was so good that a media reporter asked him how he got the inspiration to write such a song. Frankie had to tell the guy “I didn’t write that song.” Eventually, Frankie Valens walked away from his musical career and, along with his wife Phyllis, took up a different calling. They began singing gospel songs and giving their testimony about accepting Jesus into their lives. They made several gospel albums and CDs, one of which was called Just Give Me Jesus. Finally, in 2012, Frankie was offered a new gig - would you believe? – as pastor as the First Christian Church at Syracuse, KS. Now, when considering this turnabout, be advised that Frankie’s father, Bernie Piper, was actually the pastor of this same church 40 years ago. Frankie (who changed his last name from Piper to the stage-name Valens) tried to follow dad’s footsteps. “I went to bible-college for two semesters and that’s all I could take,” he once admitted. So he embarked on the musical career, grew long hair, and went on tour. Along the way, in his life journey that went full cycle, he had a brief career as an accountant and the ministry with his wife. He has also authored several books. So, fast forward to a chilly night in December at Lake Viking Church. Pastor Nelson had even arranged for a team of parking attendants in reflective vests to work the parking lot to accommodate all the cars. He’d put on these Sunday night music venues before; he knew that they drew big crowds. He

was right. It was a full house at Lake Viking Church. Ironically, there was one lady in the audience who thought she was coming to see Franki Valli, but her disappointment must have been short-lived. After the show, she ended up buying several Frankie ValensS CDs on sale in the church lobby. So, it was all good. For Frankie Valens, the evening was particularly rewarding. His wife was a big part of the show. She played the piano, sang, and narrated, and she explained that a few months ago Frankie had almost “not made it” as a result of serious heart problems. As a matter of fact, they had cancelled everything on their November calendar. The Dec. 9 appearance at Lake Viking was their first show for a while. It felt so good to be back onstage, being with people, giving testimony, singing a little doo-wop and, most importantly – especially after his close call – a heartfelt rendition of Just Give Me Jesus.

Frankie Valens and wife Phyllis perform at Lake Viking Church

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Poacher ordered to watch “Bambi” once a month during his year in jail A Greene County man’s court sentencings in December in Barton and Lawrence Counties are the most recent events in what is one of Missouri’s largest conservation cases involving the illegal taking of deer. On Dec. 13, David Berry Jr. of Brookline, received a 120-day sentence in Barton County Circuit Court for a felony firearms probation violation. On Dec. 6, he received a one-year jail sentence in Lawrence County Associate Court after pleading guilty to taking wildlife illegally on Oct. 11. The 120-day sentence Berry Jr. received in Barton County Circuit Court will be served in addition to the one-year sentence he received in Lawrence County. These convictions were made with information obtained from Operation Game Thief, a hotline sponsored by the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) and the Conservation Federation of Missouri. Berry Jr.’s convictions are the tip of a long list of illegal fish and game activity by him and other members of his family. In addition, Berry Jr. was ordered to repeatedly watch the movie “Bambi” as he serves a year in jail. He was ordered by Lawrence County Judge Robert George to view the Walt Disney classic at least once each month while serving his sentence. “It is unknown how many deer the main group of suspects has taken illegally over the past several years,” Lawrence County Conservation Agent Andy Barnes said. “It would be safe to say that several hundred deer were taken illegally.” Lawrence County Prosecuting Attorney Don Trotter agreed. “Conservation investigators estimated that the group was responsible for killing hundreds of deer over a three-year period,” he said. “The deer were trophy bucks taken illegally, mostly at night, for their heads, leaving the bodies of the deer to waste.” What Barnes and Trotter were referring to were facts uncovered by several years of investigative work. On July 11, 2016, approximately 100 state, federal and Canadian wildlife officers simultaneously interviewed multiple suspects and other persons of interest in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, and Canada. Information gained from these and earlier interviews tied 14 Missouri residents to over 230 charges that occurred in 11 Missouri counties. Three suspects were tied to additional wildlife violations in Kansas, Nebraska and Canada. Two suspects were tied to Federal Lacey Act Wildlife violations that occurred in Kansas, Nebraska, and Canada. As part of this effort, MDC agents concluded an 8½ month investigation by serving arrest warrants on David Berry, Jr., David Berry, Sr., currently residing in Springfield, and Kyle Berry, Everton, on Aug. 31, 2016. Other individuals in Missouri also received summonses to appear in court on charges stemming from this investigation. Charges were filed in Lawrence, Linn, Shannon, Dade, Greene,

Putnam, Harrison, DeKalb, Barton, Vernon and Benton Counties. Most of the Missouri violations were related to the illegal taking of deer. Most of the deer were trophy-class animals. In many instances, only the heads and antlers were removed. More than 300 charges were filed on this group in state, federal and international jurisdictions. Prior to the July, 2016 interviews, David Berry, Sr. and Eric Berry, 20, Everton, were convicted of taking gamefish by hand in Dade County. During the 2017 firearms deer season, while awaiting his court appearance for violations from the 2016 investigation, Eric Berry and an accomplice were caught spotlighting in Lawrence County. To date, this group of poachers has paid $151,000 in bonds and $51,000 in fines and court costs and collectively served 33 days in jail. David Berry Sr. and David Berry Jr. had hunting, fishing and trapping privileges revoked for life by the Missouri Conservation Commission. Eric Berry and Kyle Berry had hunting and fishing privileges revoked for 18 years and 8 years respectively. Jerimiah Cline, Republic, who took wildlife illegally and assisted the Berrys, had hunting privileges revoked for five years. Information received this fall through Operation Game Thief led to the arrests of David Berry Sr. and David Berry Jr. for violating terms of their probation. David Berry Sr. has posted bond and is awaiting a probation revocation. People observing wildlife violations can report them through the Operation Game Thief Hotline, 1-800-392-1111 or call the local conservation agent.

REMINDERS!! 6 Exceed Maximum

Posted Speed Limit: The maximum speed limit for the operation of any vehicle or conveyance upon the roads, ways, streets, and thoroughfares of the subdivision shall be thirty (30) miles per hour except in those areas where additionally restricted speed limits may be posted, whether temporary or permanent.

6

Improper Parking: The parking of motor vehicles on the traveled portion of any street, road, or way within the subdivision is prohibited except for an emergency which does not allow immediate removal.

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LAKE VIKING NEWS

Published monthly by the Gallatin Publishing Company, 609B S. Main, Gallatin MO 64640 All rights reserved. For Advertising information, call 660-663-2154 or FAX 660-663-2498

Opinions expressed in letters to the editor and submitted columns published in the Lake Viking News do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the publishers. Letters are welcome from any association member; letters are subject to editor ’s discretion.


JANUARY 2018

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Highway Patrol addresses cold weather water safety Lieutenant Colonel Eric T. Olson, acting superintendent of the Missouri State Highway Patrol, encourages extra caution around Missouri’s many lakes and rivers during the colder months of the year. Whether you are repairing your dock in the off season or a committed fisherman, it’s important to respect the risks of being near water in the colder months and plan accordingly. The following information could save your life: Water Safety Cold water shock occurs when the body is suddenly immersed in cold water. Once the trunk of the body goes under, the blood vessels will constrict to conserve core body heat. This response, in turn, can cause a sudden increase in heart rate and blood pressure—in some cases resulting in cardiac arrest. Cold water shock also can cause involuntary gasping reflex. When the body hits the water, cold water shock can cause the overboard boater to gasp for air, but inhale water which causes the boater to drown. Most boaters wear more clothing this time of year, so the proper wearing of life jackets and using caution to avoid falling overboard is even more important. Hypothermia is also a concern. The body loses heat 25 times faster in water than in the air. Lifejacket use becomes even more important in cold water because hypothermia can quickly rob the body of the ability to perform the most basic tasks and drowning is always a concern. If you wind up taking an unexpected plunge into cold water, it is vital to get out of the water and into dry clothes as soon as possible. If dry clothes are not an option, leave the wet ones on. Even wet clothes will offer some insulation and trap body heat. A warm drink can be given to someone suffering from hypothermia as long as they are conscious. Caffeine and alcohol should be avoided. Drinks with sugars for quick energy are preferable. Hypothermia can be deadly even if you are wearing a PFD, so it is important to never go boating alone in the winter. If no one knows you are in trouble, no one can help. Dock Safety Ice and heavy snow combinations have caused major damage to boat docks in the past. The extra weight of snow and ice can cause such structures to collapse. The Missouri State Highway Patrol would like to caution dock owners about attempting to remove snow and ice from their docks during inclement weather. It is very easy to end up in the water accidentally. Due to the extreme cold water, hypothermia can set in quickly and render a person helpless in the water. If dock owners insist on being on docks during icy conditions, life jackets should always be worn. Use the buddy system to make sure that someone is there to assist you if you end up in the water. Remember that damaged electric wires around docks should be treated as if they are live. Any boats operating in areas of where major dock damage has occurred are encouraged to operate at no wake idle speed, to prevent further damage to docks already under the added stress off heavy snow and ice. Ice Safety Youngsters are easily attracted to ice covered private ponds for skating and playing. The only “safe” ice is the ice at a skating rink. Ice forming on lakes, rivers, and ponds place a person at much greater risk due to natural variables. It’s impossible to judge the strength of ice by its appearance or daily tem-

perature. Missouri’s temperatures are fluctuating this time of year, so the construction of ice is unpredictable. Stay alert! Many ice victims start out as would-be rescuers. To prevent this from happening, do not go onto the ice to rescue another person or retrieve a pet. To aid someone who has fallen through the ice, the first step should be calling for emergency services. A local fire department should have the quickest response time, the proper equipment, and have trained to handle ice emergencies. Rather than going onto the ice to attempt rescuing someone, you should extend a ladder, pole, or rope to a victim along with something that will float. If you find yourself in the position of needing to be rescued from an icecovered waterway, there are techniques that should be followed for self-rescue. Try not to panic. Face the direction you came from and spread your arms out on the unbroken ice. Kick your feet and try to pull yourself onto the ice. Once out of the water, do not attempt to stand. Lying on the ice keeps your weight distributed. Roll away from the hole then crawl across the ice back to solid land. Adults should never mix alcohol and winter activities around our waterways. Alcohol impairs your judgment and speeds up the development of hypothermia. Follow the Missouri State Highway Patrol on Twitter @MSHPTrooperGHQ

Do Business With Your Neighbor At The Lake! ŸIndependent Financial

Advice ŸNO Captive Production Requirements ŸInvestments ŸRetirement Plans ŸEmployer Sponsored Benefits

Greg DeCamp 816.841.0234 greg@decampfinancial.com www.decampfinancial.com Frazier DeCamp Financial Services is an independent firm. Registered Representatives offer Securities through Summit Brokerage Services, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC. Investment Adviser Representatives offer advisory services through Summit Financial Group, Inc., a registered investment adviser.

Meals on Wheels Daviess County

sponsored by the Active Aging Resource Center (Daviess County Senior Center) asks you to

Light a Candle this Holiday Season.

Your tax-deductible donation helps provide Meals on Wheels to at-risk older adults in Daviess County.

Please complete this simple form and make a difference in the lives of our Daviess County older adults. Donation Amount $__________ In Memory of ________________________________________ or In Honor of ___________________________________________________________

□ I would like a tax receipt letter. Your Name _____________________________________ Address___________________________________________________________

The Daviess County Senior Center is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization that provides home delivered meals to those that are home bound and unable to secure a well balanced meal.

Light A Candle this Holiday Season

Active Aging Resource Center (Daviess County Senior Center) Contact: Deanna Lewis, 109 S Main St., P O Box 272 Gallatin, MO. 64640 • 660-663-2828 Giving is better than receiving and it puts a smile on your heart. Thank you for your gift.


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JANUARY 2018

Lake Viking News 208 E. Putnam, King City, MO 64463

(660) 535-4337

Garages Shops Storage Garage, shops, and storage buildings available in wood frame and all steel structures

Gallatin Publishing Company -- Ph: 660.663.2154

www.LakeVikingMo.com : lets try to crop these and change the 911 Addresses headers to Garages and and Shops Lot and Storage Numbers to be displayed Doug Waugh

a) All King Citydwelling Lumberowners (houses, mobile homes and dwellings of a similar construc208 E. Putnam tion) will have their lot number prominentKing City, MO 64463 ly 660-535-4337 displayed so that it is clearly visible from theCurrent roadway. Notes: July 2016: Four New Pix b) Lettering and numbering needs to3716, located h/customers/king city lumber/ be0174, at least 3 inches high and sign colors 3808, 4466 need to be contrasting colors so the sign is easily read. c) Owners having multiple adjoining lots may include on the sign at the principle residence. d) Lots with structures (shelters, sheds, boat or swimming docks, decks, etc.) will have their lot number(s) prominently displayed so that it is clearly visible from the water (on lake front lots) and from the road way. e) As of August 1, 2014, all docks must have their lot numbers displayed on the lower right side of the dock, facing the water. All lake front dwellings will have lot numbers clearly visible from the water. This rule is in place for your safety in case of an emergency! Safety, Fire Department, First Responders and Ambulance personnel need to be able to see your address and lot numbers to respond!!


Lake Viking News

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1/4 mile west of Jamesport 31301 State Hwy. 6 Jamesport MO 64648 660-684-6650 Monday-Saturday 9AM-5PM

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JANUARY 2018 Lake Viking News • December 2018 • Page 11

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Gallatin Publishing Company -- Ph: 660.663.2154

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Gallatin Publishing Company -- Ph: 660.663.2154

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Building custom homes since 1947 Attention Dock Owners!! Boat dock wiring must be protected by a ground fault interrupter (GFI). If your dock wiring is not GFI protected an electric accident can occur. You can purchase a GFI electrical tester at any hardware store to see if you are already protected or contact a qualified electrician to install a GFI to protect your dock.

Rules

for Committees and Their Members The Board of Directors may appoint Special Committees as they feel necessary. All members must be active members current in dues, assessments and other fees. The board of directors will appoint the following standing committees: finance, building, cemetery, infraction, lake, nominating, handbook, strategic, and campground. ~ All committees shall have a minimum of three active members and include at least one board member. ~ No committee or subcommittee may be formed without board approval. ~ All recommendations from committees shall be presented to the board prior to any actions taken by said committees. ~ No action may be taken by any committee member that has not been approved by the chairperson, board contact and the board. ~ New committee members shall be presented to the board for approval.

Gallatin third grader #1 in Missouri in National Conservation Poster Contest Dawson King, a third grader at Gallatin R-5 and son of Gary and Shelly King of Lake Viking, was selected as a state winner in the National Conservation Poster Contest, which is sponsored by the Missouri Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts. His poster was the winner in the class for second and third graders, with awards presented at Tan-Tar-A Resort at Lake of the Ozarks on Nov. 27. Dawson’s poster will now advance to the national competition sponsored by the National Association of Conservation Districts (NACD). National winners will be announced at the 2019 NACD Annual Meeting in San Antonio, TX, in February. The top three posters in each category of the national contest will receive monetary prizes. The annual National Conservation Poster Contest provides kindergarten through 12th grade students with an opportunity to share their thoughts about

soil, water and related issues. It also highlights the educational efforts of the local soil and water conservation districts. This year’s theme was “Watersheds: Our Water, Our Home.” Twenty-one counties in Missouri participated in this year’s event. Dawson’s poster and posters in four other classes were selected as state winners because they best convey the idea of the theme, Our Water, Our Home. Lake

Property

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— Online and in Print — Put your “For Sale By Owner” where more Lake Viking properties are presented to potential buyers. No charge, no word limit! Messages approved by the lake office before displaying online or in the Lake Viking News. Only one message per property. It’s easy! Submit your free listing today by clicking “Maps, Real Estate” on:

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Lake Viking News

Journey ...

13

to Land of Fire and Ice

Dan and Kim Ackhart and Jeannie and Harlan Horst in front of Skogafoss Waterfall in Iceland.

By Troy Lesan “Do not try to spell or pronounce the names there,” Harlan Horst warns. Good advice, but otherwise Iceland is a beautiful place. Harlan should know. He, along with his wife Jeannie and their Lake Viking neighbors Dan and Kim Ackhart, travelled to the Land of Fire and Ice and spent five days there. The scenery of Iceland was spectacular. The large island nation situated close to the Arctic is actually considered as part of Europe, and with a population of 358,000, it is definitely the most sparsely populated nation of Europe. Iceland features a high degree of geological activity which means volcanoes and geysers, while 10,000 waterfalls and 269 glaciers are also showcased in the scenic landscape. The nation’s population enjoys the advantage of electrical power being produced from geothermal sources. That heat, by the way, is appreciated. The Horsts and Ackharts were there in September but the climate was already cold and windy. The travelers were able to view the Northern lights and drink pristine and pure tap water. Iceland is considered to be among the “greenest” and most environmentally friendly places on the planet. And, oh, about those unpronounceable names. Sure there are places like Vik and Hof, but then how about the Reynisddrangar basalt stacks, the Brioamerkurjokull glacier, or better yet – take a deep breath – Eyjafjallajokul, which happens to be a very active volcano. Maybe those long names are the responsibility of the early Norse explorers who first settled the country in the eighth century. Yep, blame it on the Vikings; they have broad shoulders. As far as our recent travelers from Lake Viking, the Horsts and the Ackharts were impressed with what they saw. As Harlan’s photos confirm, the scenery is breathtaking. Harlan states that the landscapes were “magical” with the “different terrain around every turn” ranging from rugged coastlines to spectacular waterfalls and pastoral farms with sheep, horses and dairy cattle in the pastures. The photos that accompany this article are a small sample of the beauty to be found in the Land of Fire and Ice.

It helps if travelers to Iceland enjoy waterfalls. There are 10,000 of them there.

Plenty of glaciers and icebergs as well.

Early Icelandic settlers lived in manmade caves. There are 200 of them left on 90 farms.

Basalt stacks at Reynisddrager are 217 feet tall.


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Gardens at Hedrick Medical: Becoming a destination In late May of 2018, the Hedrick Medical Center Foundation officially opened The Gardens at Hedrick Medical Center. Use of the area grew with each passing week. “Now that people can actually see it, they’re figuring out how they can use it,” said Lindy Chapman, Hedrick Medical Center Foundation Development Officer. “Whether it’s personally for walking, hosting a meeting in the pavilion, or visiting someone in the hospital, we’re seeing The Gardens being used in a variety of ways.” The Gardens is home to various themed areas and structures for patients, visitors, community members, and employees to utilize and enjoy. Some of those areas include the Rain Garden, which features a wooden overlook, surrounded by plants that thrive in a wet environment, and the Outdoor Therapy Garden, which includes five circles that provide staging areas for trees and therapy equipment to expand the services for hospital patients. The Gazebo serves as the focal point at the end of the Main Lawn area and is surrounded by the Fragrance and Winter Gardens. Other areas include the Main Patio and Pavilion, the Blue Garden, the Miniatures & Topiary Garden, the Learning Garden, the Legacy Garden, the Water Garden and Fountains, the Prairie, Savanah, and Orchard, the Meadow Stone Wall, and various benches for resting. “We’re a rural community that values the outdoors, but that is no different from people anywhere who like to get out and just experience a breath of fresh air, or need time away from the intensity to reflect, rejuvenate, and refuel. This gives them a space to do that,” said Betty Preston Steele, HMC Foundation Board President. “This is one of the best things you can do to help healing from the emotional, whole-person perspective. We’re able to address the emotional needs of our patients and give them a perspective of wellness that they might not have had.” Fund-raising efforts are continuing for the $1.39 million Gardens project. The Hedrick Medical Center Foundation is requesting assistance from individuals, businesses, organizations, and foundations who could benefit from 50 percent tax credits from the Missouri Development Finance Board (MDFB). These tax credits were issued in support of The Gardens at Hedrick Medical Center project – and are only available for purchase through the end of 2018. “These tax credits are an important part of the

funding for our project, and we are hopeful to have them all sold,” according to Lindy Chapman, Foundation Development Officer of the HMC Foundation. “These can provide a tremendous tax advantage for those who pay taxes in our state. Some of the tax credits have been sold already, but we have some remaining and are spreading the word statewide about their availability.” The MDFB tax credits are a 50% match in tax credits toward Missouri Tax liabilities. These credits can be sold or transferred and are able to be used over a three-year period by an individual or a business. Stock gifts also qualify for tax credits. Sponsorship opportunities throughout The Gardens are also available and will be for years to come – engraved steel tiles start at $100 and are a perfect way to honor or remember a friend or family member. Garden and tree sponsorships are also available. “These naming and sponsorship efforts will be an on-going way to remember someone close to you,” states Chapman. Preston Steele explains that The Gardens at HMC is a 3-acre area on the grounds of the hospital. “This is a community space – available for any and all to use. It is becoming a destination for

Gallatin License office closes its doors The Gallatin License Office, which was opened back in March by Access II Independent Living Center, closed its doors on Dec. 1, 2018. The Access II Board of Directors voted unanimously on Nov. 27 to close the license office doors because of the financial strain it was putting on Access II programs and services for the disabled. The Gallatin License Office has not generated enough revenue to sustain itself, or come close to sustaining itself, and it was continuing to lose thousands of dollars each month. From opening day, efforts were made to help keep the license office afloat, including not charging the license office space rental, electricity, water, or supply costs. Despite eliminating those factors from the budget the Gallatin License Office did not make enough revenue to cover the salary of one staff person, and the cost of the required security system and required separate internet and phone system. The Gallatin License Office is currently running a deficit of $28,820.19; the final bills will add to this deficit. “It has been our pleasure to serve the community in this fashion over the last eight months,” said Jessica Adkins, Access II Marketing and Director. “We are sad that we are no longer able to provide this service, but we must be financially responsible and protect the programs and services designed to increase the independence of people with disabilities in our community.” It was agreed by the board of directors that Access II cannot in good faith continue to prop up the failing license office at the expense of cutting back primary Access II programs and services for

the community. The Gallatin License Office generated $379,061.84 for the Department of Revenue in the past eight months, but only $14,923.50 was generated for the license office, which barely covers the initial startup costs of $13,031.18. The return per transaction is just not enough to keep a small office open. This concern has been discussed with local legislators who are working towards a solution. The license office is currently located inside of the Access II Independent Living Center building. Access II Independent Living Center is a not-for profit organization that provides services and programs to people with disabilities, including advocacy, in-home care, durable medical equipment, employment services and much more. Access II re-opened the Gallatin License office as an additional service to the community in an effort to increase convenience and hopefully provide employment to people with disabilities. Unfortunately, because of Department of Revenue restrictions, a very limited number of people with security clearances could have interactions with license office customers, making it virtually impossible for people with disabilities looking for job experience to assist in the office. This did not allow Access II to meet their goal, and after several board discussions it was decided that the Gallatin License Office was not a good fit for Access II as it was not furthering the mission as originally intended. Other businesses or organizations in the county may bid to open the license office in the future.

patients, visitors, community members, and staff. There are spaces for gatherings and meetings, walking paths for exercise, tables and chairs for sharing coffee or a meal, and areas for quiet reflection.” The Gardens is also expected to be a popular tourism destination for those visiting Chillicothe to see the murals and the surrounding northwest area. “There is no other botanical garden like this anywhere near Chillicothe, and we are proud to add this to the list of community amenities,” shares Chapman. “Planned partnerships with businesses, organizations, and individuals to use The Gardens are moving forward with a positive reception.” Chapman encourages anyone with questions concerning the project and/or these tax credits to contact her at linchapman@saintlukeskc.org or 660-214-8107. Hedrick Medical Center is a member of Saint Luke’s Health System, which consists of 16 area hospitals and several specialty and primary care practices, and provides a range of inpatient, outpatient, and home care services. Founded as a faith-based, not-for-profit organization, our mission includes a commitment to the highest levels of excellence in health care and the advancement of medical research and education. The health system is an aligned organization in which the physicians and hospitals assume responsibility for enhancing the physical, mental, and spiritual health of people in the metropolitan Kansas City area and the surrounding region.


Lake Viking News

www.LakeVikingMo.com

Almost everything... you need to know about Lake Viking

Lake Viking 2018 Boards & Committees Activities Committee Mary Hibler (Chairperson), Dustin Hibler, David Hibler, Eric and Jody Odette, Gail Bush, Ramona Miller, Troy Lesan (Board Contact) Board of Directors President, Phil Stockard; 1st Vice President, Mike Krehbiel; 2nd Vice President, Flint Hibler; Secretary, Mike Booth; Asst. Secretary/Sgt. of Arms, James Funk; Treasurer, Troy Lesan; Asst. Treasurer, Susan Zalenski. Viking Valley Association Board of Directors Meetings are held the second Sunday of each month, at 6:30 p.m. in the lower level of the clubhouse. All members in good standing are welcome to attend. Building Committee Chuck Weldon, Jim Miller, Flint Hibler (Board Contact) Building Committee Meetings are held the 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month at the Association office. Building Permits require approval by the Building Committee prior to the start of any construction as stated in the Covenants, Restrictions, By-Laws, Rules and Regulations of Viking Valley Association. Campground Committee Mary Hibler (Chairperson), Marion Crawford, Mike Wolfe, Charles Sudduth, James Funk, Flint Hibler (Board Contact) Cemetery Committee Shad Mort, Mike Booth (Board Contact) Cemetery plots are available; contact the Association office at 660-663-2131 for further information. Communications Susan Zalenski, Dennis Schlaiss Community Strategic Planning Tony Gronniger, Missy Leggett, Shawn Hepinstall, Paula Hepinstall, Dennis Schlaiss, Robert Hayes, Sherry Parkhurst, Carolyn Leeper, Don Leeper, Kenny Southwick, Susan Zalenski (Chair/Board Contact) Employee Board Contact Phil Stockard Finance Committee Mike Kemna (Chairman), Donna Archibald, Shad Mort, Sally Zerbe, Mike Krehbiel, Glenn Miller, Len Zalenski, Phil Stockard, Missy Leggett, Troy Lesan (Board Contact) Handbook Committee Kyle Parkhurst, Donna Archibald, Kim Spidle, Terri Schlaiss, James Funk (Board Contact) Infraction Committee Roger Lankford, Carl Butcher, Bob Clemens, Troy Knight, Gary Covey, Jim Gibbany, James Funk (Board Contact) Infraction Committee meetings are held on the second Saturday of each month, 9 a.m., Lower Level Clubhouse. Lake Committee Troy Lesan, Shirley Leakey, Don Leeper, Carolyn Leeper, Bo Steed, Ramona Miller, Sherry Krehbiel, Mike Krehbiel (Board Contact) Special Road District Mark Leggett, Ron Spidle, Troy Knight Volunteer Fire Department Jeff Johnson, Rusty Hendricks, Gary King, Tony Gronniger, Dennis Schlaiss, Riley Blades, Luke Threlkeld, Len Zalenski, Mike Booth (Board Contact) Fire Department Meetings are held the second Saturday of every month, 9 a.m. at the firehouse in the association main parking lot. If you have the interest and the time to serve your community, be sure to attend the next meeting.

Public Water Supply Dist. #3 Kyle W. Parkhurst, President, term expires 4/2020 - Sub-District #3; Troy Lesan, Vice President, term expires 4/2018 - Sub-District #2; Jeffrey Speaker, secretary, term expires 4/2019 - Sub-District #4; Gary Teegarden, term expires 4/2018 - Sub-District #1; Arlo Aschbrenner, term expires 4/2020 - Sub-District #5; Roger Barker, Superintendent; Gary King, Water Operator; Diane Hulett, Clerk. Board meetings are held on the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the PWSD No. 3 office. Office Hours: 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday thru Friday. All payments for metered water bills are to be made payable to Public Water Supply District No. 3 of Daviess County, Missouri. You may abbreviate as PWSD #3. If you have any questions, contact the PWSD No. 3 office, 116 Waterworks Dr., Gallatin, Mo. 64640 (located at the water plant). Phone 660-663-2771. For the convenience of customers of Public Water Supply District No. 3, a drop box is available at the front door of the office located at the water plant for the payment of water bills.

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JANUARY 2018

Gallatin Publishing Company -- Ph: 660.663.2154

Viking Viking Valley Valley Association Association

Office Office Address: Address: 144 E. Main, 144 E. Main, Gallatin, Gallatin, MO MO 64640 64640 Office Hours: Office Hours: April April 1 1 -- Labor Labor Day Day Monday-Friday: Monday-Friday: 88 a.m.-4 a.m.-4 p.m. p.m. Saturday: Saturday: 88 a.m.-12 a.m.-12 p.m. p.m. Day Day after after Labor Labor Day Day -- March March 31 31 Monday-Friday: 8 a.m.-4 Monday-Friday: 8 a.m.-4 p.m. p.m. For the convenience of Association members, a drop box is available in the front door of the association office for the payment of association bills.

Property Owners

You are responsible for your guests and their actions. It is your responsibility to educate them on the rules and regulations of Lake Viking. Lake Viking is private property, but all lots are owned by some other individual. Please do not drive or ride ATV vehicles or bicycles on neighboring lots, or walk across lots to fish or use others’ property without first getting the property owner’s permission.

Fishery Guidelines

Bass: Release all bass 12” to 19”. Fishermen can keep one bass per day of 19” or longer. Crappie: Keep all crappie caught, within the state limit, which is 30 per day. Walleye: Fisherman can keep Walleye at least 21” in length, release all catches under 21”.

Mowing Regulations

You are required to have your lot mowed by May 1st, June 1st and September 1st of each year. If you do not keep your lot mowed, or hire a contract mower, the Association will mow it, and bill you $70.00 for each mowing.

The Association does not want to be in the mowing business.

Please self-mow your lot or hire a contract mower to do it for you. All contract mowers are required to submit a customer list to the Association office. If you are not on their initial list, you may be accidentally billed by the Association, so please contact your mower early. The below listed mowers have registered with the Association office and can usually be reached in the evening. There may be other mowers who advertise in the Lake Viking News.

Contract Mowers Can Save You Money

Jason Burns......................................... 660-605-2151 Mike Cline............................................. 816-465-0092 Eric Critten.......................................... 660-663-9122 Randy Gatton....................................... 660-663-9348 Mark Hoig................. 816-716-1896 or 660-663-4244 Ron Huston..............660-663-3234 or 816-390-5161 Jeff Johnson........................................ 660-334-0604 Jim Miller..............................................816-520-3280 Gary Salmon........................................660-663-9363

Please Keep Control of Your Dogs

Dogs are not allowed off the member’s property and shall be contained by a fenced enclosure or controlled by a leash. Guests’ dogs are included. Violation of this rule may be subject to an Infraction Ticket issued to the property owner.

Building Permit Notice

Building Permits are required, but not limited to the following projects: fences, storage shed, shelters, decks, boat docks, boat houses, room additions, porches and any alteration of the roof line; and any other construction that requires large earth moving equipment, concrete trucks and other equipment that requires multiple axle trailers. Failure to comply with building regulations could result in a minimum fine of $500 and loss of lake privileges. Any construction not in compliance with these regulations could result in forced relocation of the structure.

REMEMBER

SPEED LIMIT ON LAKE VIKING ROADS IS 30 mph

30 MPH

Watch When & Where You Burn!

Anytime you are burning brush, etc., on your lot, make certain you are burning on your lot and not someone else’s property. Unattended burning is prohibited and burning is not allowed when winds are in excess of 15 mph and shall be subject to an Infraction Ticket and fine.

Member Reminders

• Helmets are required to be worn when operating a motorcycle within the Lake Viking Subdivision. • Goose population control is hard to manage... The first step in this process is DO NOT FEED THE GEESE!

Emergency Phone Numbers * DAVIESS COUNTY EMERGENCY ....................911 Ambulance - Fire - Rescue * Fire - Lake Viking Fire Dept...............................911 To Report Fire Only * Lake Viking Safety Patrol.................660-663-2204 * Sheriff, Daviess Co...........................660-663-2031 or 663-2149 * Highway Patrol (Emergencies) ....1-800-525-5555

***************** Important Phone Numbers * Association Office.............................660-663-2131 * Maintenance Barn.............................660-663-2777 * Public Water Supply District #3 of Daviess County (Water Plant).....660-663-2771 Roger Barker - (Emergency after hours)....660-663-3600

* Lake Viking Marine, Inc., Lot #1000.660-663-3722 * Lake Viking Sales Office, Lot #Z-9...660-663-2134 * Farmers Electric Co-op., Inc. * During business hours............1-800-279-0496 * After Hours...............................1-800-927-5334 * Advanced Disposal Services, Inc.1-800-346-6844 or 1-800-778-7652 * Windstream Telephone Company * Customer Service (Residential).1-800-501-1754 * Repair Service.............................1-800-782-6206


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JANUARY 2018

Lake Viking News

Gallatin Publishing Company -- Ph: 660.663.2154

www.LakeVikingMo.com

Classified Ads For Sale BASE ROCK, BLACK DIRT AND fill dirt. Huston Trucking & Construction, 660-663-3234 or 660-334-0997.

Services KELLY B’S Trees, prompt professional pruning, reasonably priced removals, complicated/ technical removal done regularly. Please call 816632-7077.

SEAMLESS GUTTERING, A-1 Leaf Guard, CHI Overhead Door, LiftMaster-Chamberlain Operator Sales, Installation & Service. Call for free estimate. Serving you since 2006! Miller Construction, Jamesport, MO 660-684-6950.

WINDOWS FOR ANY BUDGET

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USE OF DUMPSTERS

016 er!

The Association provides dumpsters for the Beaches, Campgrounds and some Community Areas, for the purpose of accumulated trash in these areas, not day to day household trash. Please DO NOT dump building materials of ANY kind, such as lumber, sheetrock, shingles, etc. in these dumpsters.

Attention Members

The Viking Valley Fire Department will be meeting the 2nd Saturday of every month @ 9 a.m. at the Fire Station. The Sirens will be tested at this time.

Private Ramp Recommendation

Call or email to order your dock today! You can also find us facebook.com/LVIKINGM88

Ask for Luke Threlkeld 660-663-3722 luke@lakevikingmarine.com

Visit www.lakevikingmarine.com for more pictures and information

The Board of Directors would like to recommend that all private ramps be chained and locked when not in use by property owner.

JUST A REMINDER SPEED CREATING EXCESSIVE WAKE: Trolling speed will be used when approaching within seventy-five (75) feet of boat docks, marina, and coves marked with Association buoys, or other areas marked with permanent or temporary Association buoys.


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JANUARY 2018

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Lake Viking News

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY 660•973•4872 CUSTOM MADE TARPS

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Lake Viking Storage for all your storage needs Units 7'x7' up to 30'x20' Fenced trailer and recreational vehicle storage Open Year-round

Call Larry Tague at 660-663-3722 or 816-868-2835.

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If you want to sell your Car, Van, SUV or Truck Call or Stop By...

Kemper Motors

204 S. Walnut St. • Cameron, MO 816-632-6424 www.kempermotorsinc.com

Mike Steele

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Commercial & Residential 24 Hour Emergency Service New Construction & Remodeling

Keep your Rv and Boats out of the weather!

At Exit 61 on I-35 - Winston, MO

JASON HOLMES 400 N MAIN ST. STE 1 CELL: 660-868-1886 GALLATIN, MO. 64640 jason@midwestfloors.net

Gallatin Lumber Co. Come see us for all your construction needs! 116 South Market, Gallatin, Mo. Phone: 660-663-2522

Roberson Funeral Homes Bethany (660)425-3315 King City (660)535-4321 Eagleville (660)867-3112 Pattonsburg (660)367-2117 Princeton (660)748-3325 Stanberry (660)783-2869 Jamesport (660)684-6999 Lineville, IA. (641)876-5171

or call Toll Free 1-877-425-3315

Visit our website at www.robersonfuneralhome.com

Yetter Pest Control P.O. Box 369, Cameron, MO 64429 Craig Griffin, Owner/Cert. Commercial Applicator

800/530-5944 or 816/632-6766

A Complete Service Company for Your Residential and Commercial Pest Control Needs Specializing in Termite Control

Serving Your Area Since 1972 -Yetter

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660-605-1460

Serving the Gallatin • Lake Viking & Hamilton Areas!

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Technicians: Rob Flinn • Diane Morris

The Way Out

660-367-4407 888-669-5765

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Rob & Tricia Bozarth, Sales #1 Polaris Drive Pattonsburg, MO 64670

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Ready to Retire? Do you have questions about Health Insurance, Medicare Supplements or Life Insurance? Contact me to explore your potential for insurance savings!

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HUTCH’S HEATING AND AIR

163 N 2nd St • Union Star, MO 64494 800-874-3356 • 816-593-2412


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Lake Viking News

Gallatin Publishing Company -- Ph: 660.663.2154

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MDC confirms invasive Emerald Ash Borer in six new Missouri counties Tree-killing pest now found in Caldwell & Harrison Counties Foresters with the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) have confirmed the presence of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) in six new counties across Missouri. New detections have been confirmed in Caldwell, Gasconade, Harrison, Hickory, Webster, and Wright counties. Since EAB was first detected in Missouri in July 2008, the exotic, tree-killing pest has spread to a total of 59 Missouri counties and the City of St. Louis. EAB is a small, metallic green beetle native to Asia that attacks all species of ash trees, including the commonly planted green ash and white ash. At approximately a half-inch long, the green adult beetle feeds on leaves and does very little damage to trees. However, in its larval stage, the insect kills ash trees by feeding on the water- and nutrient-conducting tissues just under the bark. MDC Forest Entomologist Robbie Doerhoff suspects that EAB is present in several other counties besides those on the most recent map of confirmations. “After EAB arrives in a new location, it can take at least five years for the population to build to the point where we can detect it using specialized insect traps,” said Doerhoff. “We really rely on public reports to help us find new EAB locations, particularly in the winter months.” You can help MDC track the spread of this invasive pest by keeping an eye out for bark blonding on ash trees. Bark blonding is caused by woodpeckers removing a tree’s outer bark while searching for insect larvae. On ash trees, this feeding activity reveals a white inner bark that is highly noticeable. “Ash trees with bark blonding may not have EAB, but it is certainly worth reporting these trees for a closer look by MDC foresters,” added Doerhoff. MDC encourages Missourians to report possible EAB infestations in coun-

In winter, watch for bark blonding on ash trees caused by foraging woodpeckers (above). This can be an indication that Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is present. ‘S’-shaped galleries revealed under the confirm the presence of EAB (right). If you find ash trees with bark blonding, MDC encourages you to report the tree’s location using the online form at eab.missouri.edu.

ties where the pest has not yet been confirmed. Reports can be made by using the online form at eab.missouri.edu or by calling MDC’s Forest Pest Hotline at 866-716-9974. You can help slow the spread of EAB and other invasive forest pests by using locally harvested firewood. Buy firewood near where you plan to burn it! MDC works with you and for you to sustain healthy forests, fish, and wildlife.


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Wood ng forward Wood Marshal Marshalll movi moving forward by by T.L. T.L. Huffman Huffman

Wood Wood Marshall, Marshall, the the youth youth pastor pastor at at the First Baptist Church in Gallatin, was the First Baptist Church in Gallatin, was born with a deformed left foot. He has born with afoot deformed lefttofoot. Hefix has had three surgeries try to the problem. of the surgeries had threeNone foot surgeries to try tohelped. fix the One of theNone surgeries, triple fusion in problem. of the asurgeries helped. 2015, might have done more harm than One of the surgeries, a triple fusion in good. 2015, might have done more than It got to the point that justharm taking a good. step caused Wood horrible pain and he hadItto doto something. Early last year ahe got the point that just taking traveled to the Mayo Clinic pain at Rochester, step caused Wood horrible and he MN, after he heard it was ranked one of had to do something. Early last year he the top hospitals nationwide. traveled to the Mayo Clinic Rochester, The doctors at Mayo toldat him they’d neverafter seenhe anything foot. He MN, heard itlike washis ranked one of had no arch, no cartilage, and the bones the top hospitals nationwide. were rubbing — causing the excruciatThe doctors at Mayo told him they’d ing pain when he walked. Wood faced never seen anything like hisuntil foot. the He day three options: 1) do nothing had no arch, noa cartilage, andfoot thewould bones he would take step and his just work; — 2) have a massive fusion of werenot rubbing causing the excruciathis foot, which meant pulling out all the ing pain when he walked. Wood faced bones, scraping them, and putting them three options: 1) do nothing until theget daya back in, or 3) amputate his foot and he would take a step and his foot would prosthesis. guess I felt like an amputation was just“Inot work; 2) have a massive fusion of coming, but I was stillpulling devastated when his foot, which meant out all the I got that news,” Wood says. bones, scraping them, and putting them Through the spring and summer back in,Wood or 3) and amputate hisAshley, foot and get a of 2017 his wife, did their research. They read stories online prosthesis. written by soldiers who’d lost limbs in “I guess I felt like an amputation was

coming, but I was still devastated when I got that news,” Wood says. Through the spring and summer of 2017 Wood and his wife, Ashley, did their research. They read stories online written by soldiers who’d lost limbs in

and not letting my left leg slow me down or or hold hold me me back back anymore.” anymore.” Prior to the surgery, Wood went to the Prior to the surgery, Wood went to the YMCA to work out and build strength YMCA to work out muscles. and buildHe strength in his arm and leg relieved hishis anxiety withleg jokes … I was in arm and muscles. Hethinking relieved about getting a tattoo dotted line his anxiety with jokes — … Iawas thinking that said “Cut here…” and When I buy about getting a tattoo — a dotted line socks I will get twice as many... and At that “Cut here…” and about When matchI buy leastsaid I won’t have to worry socks I will get twice as many... and At ing socks. But he was scared. And about struggling. least I won’t have to worry matchwould be lying if I said I wasn’t ing“Isocks. scared on some days,” he says. “There Butdays he was scared. AndAshley struggling. were I was terrified. was “I would lyingnot if Ian said I wasn’t scared, too. be It was easy road. Sleep didn’t come easily I’d “There wake up scared on some days,” heand says. tired.” were days I was terrified. Ashley was The date of his amputation surgery scared, too. It was not an easy road. at Mayo was set for Jan. 9, 2017. As the Sleep didn’t come easily andfaced I’d wake deadline approached, Wood the up tired.” most difficult time of the whole experience. The date of his amputation surgery “It was like being on a high dive and at Mayo was set for Jan. 9, 2017. As the just standing there,” he says. “I had to deadline faced or the make up approached, my mind: Go Wood back down most time of the experimakedifficult the jump. That waswhole the hardest part. Making that jump.” ence. The surgery took two and and was “It was like being on ahours high dive without complications. He was already just standing there,” he says. “I had to mentally prepared for the moment he make up and my mind: backtodown orhad woke up lookedGo down see he no leg.the Hejump. describes experimake Thatthe washospital the hardest ence Making as “not too He had a normal part. thatbad.” jump.” The surgery took two hours and was without complications. He was already mentally prepared for the moment he woke up and looked down to see he had no leg. He describes the hospital experience as “not too bad.” He had a normal

Ashley and Wood Marshall

amount of pain and the phantom pain combat and everyday people who’d lost was also something he expected. limbs in car wrecks and other accidents. By Jan. 12, he and Ashley were They visited Mayo’s amputation departheaded home. ment. They took a trip to Hanger Clinic: The phantom pain continued for the Prosthetics & Orthotics, located in next week or so. He didn’t sleep well Trenton. and he was going stir crazy from not One particular conversation that being able to move around. There were summer helped him decide. post-surgery appointments back at “I had a guy tell me he wished he Mayo, a fitting for a soft cast, and later had his amputation sooner,” Wood says. for a prosthetic. He had the added stress “That was the opinion of a lot of people of an ongoing fight with his insurance I’d been reading about. It seems that company which was hedging on paying people who kept their mangled limbs Ashley and Wood Marshall his medical bills. only made the pain go on longer.” By mid-February he was seeing his Ashley was great support, but told amount of pain the phantom pain combat andto everyday people who’d lost local doctor andand getting a prosthetic him he had make the decision himself. was also something he expected. limbs in car otherand accidents. at Hangers in Trenton. He took his leg He’d had hiswrecks foot forand 27 years it had home on March He was already given him nothing but problems. departBy Jan. 12, he15. and Ashley were They visited Mayo’s amputation doing well enough and progressing fast “I decided it was time to breakClinic: up headed home. ment. They took a trip to Hanger enough to handle stairs. He was able to with it,” Wood says. “I was moving on The phantom pain continued for the Prosthetics & Orthotics, located in wear his leg around the house for a few

Trenton. One particular conversation that summer helped him decide. “I had a guy tell me he wished he had his amputation sooner,” Wood says. “That was the opinion of a lot of people I’d been reading about. It seems that people who kept their mangled limbs only made the pain go on longer.” Ashley was great support, but told him he had to make the decision himself. He’d had his foot for 27 years and it had given him nothing but problems. “I decided it was time to break up with it,” Wood says. “I was moving on

next week or so. He didn’t sleep well and he was going stir crazy from not being able to move around. There were post-surgery appointments back at Mayo, a fitting for a soft cast, and later for a prosthetic. He had the added stress of an ongoing fight with his insurance company which was hedging on paying his medical bills. By mid-February he was seeing his local doctor and getting a prosthetic at Hangers in Trenton. He took his leg home on March 15. He was already doing well enough and progressing fast enough to handle stairs. He was able to wear his leg around the house for a few

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Getting Getting past past Complex Complex Regional Regional Pain Pain Syndrome Syndrome (CRPS) (CRPS)

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and and now now on on with with life life

hours each day. But But during during April April things things took took a a turn turn for the worse. He was experiencing a for the worse. He was experiencing a lot of pain in his stump. More padding lot pain in More padding wasofadded tohis hisstump. leg. Other things were tried.added He was advised to slow downwere on was to his leg. Other things his therapy. tried. He was advised to slow down on had mixed feelings about doing hisWood therapy. that, but decided it was all about finding Wood had mixedmoving feelingsforward about doing a balance between and that, but decided it was about finding not pushing it. Then theall therapist told him to quitbetween using his leg completely. He a balance moving forward and was not walking on itthe correctly andtold was not pushing it. Then therapist putting too much pressure on his good him leg. to quit using his leg completely. He was“They not walking it correctly and took myon leg away from mewas so I wouldn’ttoo bemuch tempted to wear says. putting pressure onit,” hishe good leg.His doctors and therapists scheduled X-rays and MRIs to try to figure “They took my leg away from me so I out what was going on. He found out he wouldn’t be tempted to to wear wasn’t going to be able useit,” hishe legsays. Hisuntil doctors and again May. Hetherapists felt brokenscheddown and worn out. and MRIs to try to figure uled X-rays “That was the worst moment,” Wood out what was going on. He found out he says. “I was doing really well, and I was wasn’t going to bethis. ableIto usemy hisleg legand suddenly hit with had again until May. He felt broken down and I lost it. It was depressing. I was doing reallyout. good walking and the pain came worn and“That took over. Theworst doctor wouldn’tWood give was the moment,” me my leg back because they didn’t want says. “I was doing really well, and I was me wearing it.” suddenly hit with this. I had mywas leg and The doctors believed Wood Complex Regional Pain Isuffering lost it. Itfrom was depressing. I was doing Syndrome really good(CRPS). walking and the pain came “It was a massive and took over. The doctor wouldn’t give complication,” he says. me my leg back because they want “This pain isdidn’t ranked me wearing it.” highest on the pain charts,Wood even higher The doctors believed was than childbirth. suffering from Complex Regional And Pain there is no cure.” Syndrome (CRPS). CRPS is believed to was a be “It caused bymassive damage to the peripheral complication,” he says. and central “This pain isnervous ranked systems. It involves highest on the pain all the nerves sendcharts, evenfrom higher ing signals the than brainchildbirth. and spinalAnd cord to the is rest the body. there no of cure.” In more than 90% of CRPS is believed to cases, the condition be caused bybydamis triggered a clear age to the peripheral history of trauma or injury. and central nervous “Because of all systems. It involves the problems I’d had all the nerves sendbefore, my nerves ing signals from the were used to being in constant pain and brain and spinal cord were pain to thestill restsending of the body. signals where my foot In more than 90% of was supposed to be. cases, the to condition I now had train my is accept triggered bythere a clear brain and nerves to that was no reason to send pain history of signals trauma or anymore. CRPS isinjury. a very ugly disease, a very bad thing.” “Because of allwas It was a very bad time. The pain the problems had making him incoherent and the I’d pain medicine left him before, “doped my up.”nerves He was unable to rest andwere exhausted. used to being Ashley was scared for his sanity and in constant pain and his life. But then Wood made a decision. sending pain “I decided that were even still if I had to live the where my foot rest of my life in asignals wheelchair, I could still do things,” Wood “I could still wassays. supposed to be. do my ministry. God had not abandoned I now had to train my me. And once I got that right mind set, brain and nerves to accept that there got my eyes focused back on Christ, was nostarted reason to to turn sendaround.” pain signals things June brought dramatic turnanymore. CRPS isanother a very ugly disease, a ing for Wood. Through a combinaverypoint bad thing.” tion of different medications, therapy, It was a very bad time. The pain was natural oils, and prayer, he started making him incoherent and the pain medicine left him “doped up.” He was unable to rest and exhausted. Ashley was scared for his sanity and his life. But then Wood made a decision. “I decided that even if I had to live the rest of my life in a wheelchair, I could still do things,” Wood says. “I could still do my ministry. God had not abandoned me. And once I got that right mind set, got my eyes focused back on Christ, things started to turn around.” June brought another dramatic turning point for Wood. Through a combination of different medications, therapy, natural oils, and prayer, he started

Wood’s new prosthesis

Wood’s new prosthesis

Wood’s new foot

feeling better. He was even wearing his prosthesis some again. The terrible pain was under control on most days. He started going to desensitizing therapy in July. Wood’s new foot In August, he got a new, remade leg. This leg had a new socket and didn’t put feeling better. He was even wearing his as much pressure where the CRPS pain prosthesis some The terrible was. He was ableagain. to walk without thepain was under control on most days. walker. Wood has never right in his He started goingwalked to desensitizing life, so he to retrain his mind and therapy inhas July. body along with his stump and prosthehe got a new, remade leg. sis In onAugust, how to walk properly. He naturally This leg new socket andstep didn’t put wants to had kickahis hip out and with a limp because that feels the normal forpain him. as much pressure where CRPS “I’m was. Helearning was abletotowalk walkagain,” withoutWood the says. walker. His prosthetic leg is called a RenWood never walkedhighest right inactivhis egade T3.has It is the second life, so heT4 has hisand mind and ity level. is to forretrain athletes, maybe one day Wood will one of those. The body along with hisget stump and prostheT3 foot has a spring in the heel to help sis on how to walk properly. He naturally absorb the shock of each step. wants to kickfeet histake hip out and step with “Normal a lot of abuse when a limp because that feels normal forsays him. they strike the ground every time,” Wood. foot to can takeagain,” the abuse a “I’m“This learning walk Wood normal says. foot would take. It’s a really good foot.” His prosthetic leg is called a RenWood credits Jesus first for getting egade T3. It isallthe second highest activhim through that he’s been through, andlevel. Ashley ity T4 second. is for athletes, and maybe don’t think people realize how The hard one“Iday Wood will get one of those. it is on the spouse,” he says. “They’ve T3 foot has a spring in the heel to help got to take care of the person who is absorb the shock of each step.After I had now physically handicapped. take a lot of abuse when the“Normal surgery, feet I had to be woke up every two andevery she had to go theyhours strikefor themeds ground time,” says through that.foot Shecan hastake to take wheelWood. “This the the abuse a chair or the walker out of the car. normal foot would take. It’s a really good “For a while she was taking me three foot.” times a week for therapy. And she has to continue her work the for Christian Wood credits Jesusatfirst getting Lighthouse Carehe’s Center keep him throughDay all that beenand through, up the house. and“The Ashley second. CRPS was hard on her,” Wood “I don’t think realize how hard says. “I know shepeople wondered if I’d ever it is onout theofspouse,” he says. “They’ve come it. Our friends and family andto the church us is so got take care have of thesupported person who much.” now physically handicapped. After I had Along with being youth pastor at the the surgery, I had to be woke up every Gallatin First Baptist Church, Wood is two for medsteaching and sheat had to go at backhours to substitute schools Gallatin and through that.Jamesport. She has to take the wheel“I’m a lot better he says. chair ordoing the walker out of now,” the car. “I’m staying positive. God’s got a plan — “For a while she was taking me three keep moving forward.”

times a week for therapy. And she has to continue her work at the Christian Lighthouse Day Care Center and keep up the house. “The CRPS was hard on her,” Wood says. “I know she wondered if I’d ever come out of it. Our friends and family and the church have supported us so much.” Along with being youth pastor at the Gallatin First Baptist Church, Wood is back to substitute teaching at schools at Gallatin and Jamesport. “I’m doing a lot better now,” he says. “I’m staying positive. God’s got a plan — keep moving forward.”


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