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STATE

M M M M CHAMPS Gallatin Bulldog golfers bring home 3rd straight golf title! by Dennis Cox, Sports Editor

You never know what’s ‘roaming’ around the square!

Mark Pettit was up on the Gallatin square last Friday to show this prize to a friend -- and to anyone else who happened to be there at the right place at the right time. When Mark first saw this Longhorn steer, the animal was five years old and weighed about 1,500 pounds. Mark bought him at the Daviess County Livestock Market about a year ago. “He was black and white, a good looking steer,” says Mark. The steer yielded about 800 pounds of hamburger. The horns measure 4-1/2 feet across from point to point. Now Mark is going to mount this trophy over his fireplace. Mark and his wife, Heidi, live in rural Gallatin. [Staff photo/EW]

The same longhorn, on the hoof

Open house at city’s new water plant tomorrow The public is invited to an open house at the new Gallatin Water Treatment Plant from 2-6 p.m. on Thursday, May 17 at the plant’s location on Rocky Road, just east of Dockery Park. Learn the process that en-

sures the safety and quality of your drinking water as you go through the water treatment laboratory. Find out about the water softening process, the tower, and the lagoon at the bottom of the hill. You will see much of the

ground level pipe-work. Large photos will depict those parts of the plant that, for safety reasons, can’t be seen on the tour. Cups will be given for momentos. USDA Rural Development partnered with the City of Galla-

tin and the Friends of Gallatin to provide funding for the water plant as well as a bucket truck. Their representatives, along with engineers from Snyder & Associates, representatives from Green Hills Regional Planning Commission (GHRPC), and field representatives for Congressman Sam Graves and U. S. Senator Claire McCaskill were at the water plant on May 10 for a presentation of recognition.

Gallatin R-5 varsity golfers conquered the Class 1 field for the third consecutive year on Tuesday, bringing home a third straight Class 1 championship and fourth state trophy in four years. It marked the sixth state golf title for the Bulldogs since 1999. Last season’s championship win was an epic, two-team battle. This year’s Class 1 title came just as hard for the Bulldogs after a solid opening day. “Today (Tuesday) was a grinder for us,” GHS Coach Chad Sullenger told a gathering of approximately 60 supporters who welcomed the team back to town on Tuesday evening. “I’m very proud of these guys for staying focused and taking care of business.” The Bulldogs shot 340 as a team on Monday in very warm, windy conditions that helped the Rivercut Golf Course in Springfield play hard and fast. A 356 total for Tuesday was only fourth best among the top four teams but Gallatin held on to defeat Westran by four strokes and Bloomfield by five strokes Jett Simmons set the pace for all golfers on Monday, carding a one-under par 71 that tied Brice (continued on page 16)

Shown, from left, are Lance Rains, Community Development Coordinator with GHRPC; Stan Wolfe, USDA Area Specialist, St. Joseph; Andy McMinnis and Emily Wycoff, Snyder & Associates; Joe Hegeman, field representative with Congressman Sam Graves office, St. Joseph; Brenna Duffy, field representative with Senator Claire McCaskill’s office out of Kansas City; Mark Morey, Gallatin Public Works Director; Barb Ballew, Gallatin Mayor; Tony Stonecypher, Gallatin City Administrator; Hattie Bailey, Gallatin City Clerk; Dan Lockridge, John Whitfield and Steve Evans, Gallatin Board of Aldermen. [staff photo/TLH]

Gallatin firefighters respond to attic fire At approximately 5 p.m. on May 13, Gallatin Fire Protection District was dispatched to a house fire located at 302 N. Daviess, the Sanders residence. En-

gine 101 Ladder 109, Rescue 107, and Brush 104 responded. Gallatin Firefighters found a two-story wood framed dwelling with smoke coming out of the roof eaves. Everyone had exited the house without injuries. Fire quickly broke through the southwest roof area. Fire crews deployed two hose lines for extinguishment. Two water hydrants were utilized for water supply -- one across the street to the south and another on the north end of the block. Interior attack crews Photo courtesy Chris Coleman worked to extinguish fire in

the attic from the second floor. An elevated water stream was used from the ladder truck to extinguish the remaining attic and roof fire. The fire was under control at approximately 6:44 p.m. Mutual aid was requested from KAW Fire District, Lake Viking Fire, Jameson Fire District, and Pattonsburg Fire District. Gallatin Police 204, Daviess County Ambulance, and Sheriff ’s Deputy 841 also responded. The home suffered heavy fire damage to the attic and roof, and moderate fire and water damage to the rest of the home. Faulty electrical wiring overheating in the attic was the cause.

2018 GHS Valedictorian, Salutatorian Members of the graduating Class of 2018 at Gallatin R-5 High School were led by Valedictorian Hayley Michael (at left), daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Doug Michael, and Salutatorian Maelea Coulson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Stan Coulson. Ceremonies were held on May 11 in the high school gymnasium with former GHS teacher Denise Ray delivering the keynote address for the 59 graduating seniors.

A special 16-page salute to all 100 graduating seniors from Daviess County schools inside in this edition!

Winston R-6 graduation to unfold Sunday, May 20


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OPINION

May 16, 2018

Who’s playing smart? by Freida Marie Crump

The real beef about meatballs Well, okay. Here’s the beef. I realize in this culture of fake news, spontaneous research via the internet, and the zany focus on all things unimportant through social media, nothing should surprise me. But there I sat, waving my coffee cup over my favorite daily newspaper when I happened to notice a special report originating from the New York Times, no less. The story was tagged, “LONDON: Swedish meatballs, the signature national dish, are really Turkish...” I also learned that a country — Sweden, in this case — can operate a national Twitter account. According to the news article, that’s how the Swedes decided to right an eternal wrong, come clean, and admit in a tweet that Swedish meatballs have no meat. Here’s what I learned: Swedish meatballs are actually based on a recipe King Charles XII brought home from Turkey in the early 18th century. And in the world of “get real,” this has actually become a big deal. Turks rejoiced. Playful banter on social media spiked. Some Turks urged the name to be changed to the Turkish name, “kofte.” The Turkish media called the Swedish tweet a “confession”

and suggested that Charles, who reigned from 1697 to 1718 and spent some years in exile in the Ottoman Empire early in the 18th century, took Turkish products back to Sweden — including coffee beans and stuffed cabbage.

O the Editor s S ike

by Darryl Wilkinson

According to the report, the private Turkish news agency Dogan went to the city of Inegol in northwestern Turkey for reaction (by this I learned Inegol is famous for its meatballs). A chef at a local meatball restaurant there kept it simple, merely saying “It is an honor that these tastes have become an example to different cuisines all over the world.” But if this correction on meatballs means so much to the Swedes, what does it mean for Ikea? The Swedish furniture giant has long made Swedish meatballs a staple of its cafeterias

in stores worldwide — 2 million meatballs are consumed there around the globe each day! Even in Turkey, families flock to Ikea on weekends to eat “Swedish” meatballs on the cheap: A portion of eight meatballs with sides of fries and vegetables costs about $1.60. Before digesting all this, let’s be clear: There are distinctions between meatballs. Turkish meatballs are made with a combination of ground beef, ground lamb, onions, eggs, bread crumbs and parsley. The current version of Swedish meatballs may contain pork and is usually served with gravy. The “controversy” actually made me realize how little I know about the little Nordic country called Sweden. I knew where it lies on the globe; I’ve watched movies about WWII Swedish commandos fighting the Nazis. I once liked listening to the music of Abba. And I still like meatballs. But I guess we must scratch the “Swedish” misnomer, in the name of transparent accuracy. Besides, the best meatballs are really just beef meatloaf rolled up into balls with a catsup sauce that my wife, Liz, cooks up and serves. So, forget all the silliness. When you’re eating “American” meatballs, life is good!

State budget now on the books by State Rep. J. Eggleston

This week, the legislature completed the only work we are constitutionally obligated to do. We passed the budget for Missouri’s next fiscal year, which runs from July 2018 to June 2019. This year’s budget divvied up $28.3 billion dollars of taxpayer money to the various departments and programs that our state government funds. About one-third of that is money the legislature can pick and choose where it goes. The other twothirds is obligated spending for specific programs, usually mandated by the federal government. This year, our budget includes a $99 million funding increase for K-12 education, and a $10 million increase for school transportation (busing), bringing the total spent in our schools to over $6 billion a year. This is a 2% increase over the prior year, and

does not count money acquired through local property taxes. Transportation also saw a big funding uptick of 11%, bringing MoDOT’s money to about $2.3 billion for the next fiscal year. This amount is primarily acquired through the fuel tax and license fees, but there is also some from general revenue in there as well. The largest spending item in the budget is the more than $9 billion spent on social services programs, largely Medicaid and welfare. This year’s budget saw targeted increases to help independent living centers and nursing homes care for our elderly population. The last item to mention is a 7% increase for Corrections. Missouri has 21 state prisons, with two of them – Crossroads Corrections Center and Western Missouri Correctional Center – in our region.

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Missouri’s corrections staff are among the lowest paid of state employees, which has led to a shortage of prison personnel. The increase in funding includes a $350/year pay raise for corrections officers on July 1, and another $700/year raise on January 1 next year. Corrections staff who are not officers will not see the July 1 raise, but will get the January 1 raise. These raises should help with recruitment and retention of personnel. With the budget out of the way, the legislature now has one more week of Regular Session to complete work on all of the remaining, unpassed policy bills. Still on the docket to be finished are some tax reform, labor reform, and welfare reform issues. The House and Senate will work late hours to finish as much as possible before session ends on May 18.

5,163 properties for sale today throughout the region

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Greetings from the Poosey. It was just about as tight a game as you’d want to witness. The two teams had been battling it out for almost two hours. The score was tied with almost a minute remaining. Then something mighty remarkable happened. Two players on the blue team joined hands and skipped down the field together. If you’ve not attended a peewee soccer league game then a valuable part of your life is missing. Bad behavior has become the norm in major league sports as hardly game takes place without some sort of unprofessional ugliness. Pitchers toss 90 mph fastballs at the heads of batters crowding the plate then both benches jump onto the field in a slugfest, hockey players are hired because of their ability to duke it out on the ice, the tantrums of professional tennis players have become legendary, dinky little NFL referees are left to break up fights between highlypaid behemoths on the football field, and even the “non-contact sport” of professional basketball often sees bench-clearing melees. It seems that the more an athlete is paid the more right he or she seems to have to stop the game with an outburst. Then there’s soccer for little kids. I’ll admit that what I know about the game of soccer could be easily stuffed under a gnat’s fingernail, but when our neighbor invited Herb and I to witness a Saturday morning game where her two youngest daughters were playing I could hardly resist. I knew that we were in for an unusual contest when I heard the coach giving his final instructions before the game started. Cute as the little gals were, I didn’t see a one of them paying any attention to what the poor guy was saying. Two girls were busy braiding the hair of a little darling while at least a half dozen were busy adjusting their shorts, and nearly all of the team was too busy looking at their parents in the stands to hear what Mr. Coach was telling them. I think that the problem is that the length of an average peewee soccer game is about three times the span of a little girl’s attention. Too much running up and down the field with little or no scoring taking places takes a toll on their ability to focus. The game hadn’t been going for five minutes when I looked down into the opposing team’s goal to see the darling little goalie carefully picking every dandelion in her territory. As the action of the game got closer and closer her coach began shouting to get the young gardener’s attention and soon the cries of her mother could be heard from the stands across the field. Still, the little goalie kept picking flowers, perhaps thinking that the appearance of one’s goal line was of more importance than the final score. Although it’s unusual to see flowers growing in an ice field I couldn’t help but wonder if a few daisies or petunias scattered about the Chicago Blackhawks goal net might take some of the ugly edge off professional hockey. By the time our game was half over the soccer match had turned instead into a sort of Fourth of July Parade. Each time our little Poosey Dragons would run by the home team stands a great majority of them would wave at their admiring parents who were watching the entire contest through the half-inch viewing slot of a cell phone. One little gal waved every time she passed Mom and Dad...for the entire game. Would the Chicago Cubs’ pitching staff be less likely to brush back offending batters if we’d place their mothers right behind home plate and simply ask them to wave at their sons between pitches? After all, who could throw a bean ball with his mother looking on? And, of course, the two little gals running down the field holding hands was hands-down the cutest sight of the day. The soccer ball was being kicked around somewhere out on the field. Parents were shouting. The coach was politely screaming his head off, but the two tiny darlings could have cared less. They were having fun skipping down the field without a worry in their heads. I sat there thinking to myself...the coach is unhappy and the parents were flustered. But the two little players in blue shirts and striped shorts were having the time of their lives. Who was playing it smart? Perhaps it’s too much to ask the Packers and Steelers to skip down the field together holding hands at the final buzzer, but maybe they’re not be paid to be happy. And if this works, we might try it on Congress. You ever ‘round Poosey, stop by. We may not answer the door but you’ll enjoy the trip.

M

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Darryl Wilkinson, Editor & Publisher

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STAFF: Tammy Huffman, reporter; Tisha Perkins, production; Jessica Holcomb and

Elizabeth Wilkinson, bookkeeping/production; Margie Windsor, circulation; Dennis Cox, sportwriter; Pressroom: Ben Gott, Travis Burnett and Neal Hamilton. POLICY: Unless specifically prohibited, digital images submitted for publication, excluding studio photos, will be posted in GPCink online photo galleries and are available for purchase. SUBSCRIPTIONS: In Missouri $36 per year ($33.46+$2.54 tax); out-of-state $45 per year. SINGLE COPY: 75¢ (70¢+5¢ tax). Published Wednesdays. Periodicals Postage Paid at Gallatin, MO 64640 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Gallatin Publishing Company, 609B S. Main, P.O. Box 37, Gallatin, MO 64640 USPS


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Politics and games in defining the age of adulthood A little-covered issue this year to extend the age of persons under juvenile court jurisdiction related to a long history for which I suspect few lawmakers realize. It’s an issue that goes back decades when there was a proposal to establish a uniform legal age for Missouri adulthood. It was a sweeping idea. Under the laws of Missouri and other states, there were different ages for when one can sign a legal contract, register to vote, be charged as an adult for a criminal offense or purchase an alcoholic drink. It became a national debate during the Vietnam War when the question was raised that if a teenager could be drafted or recruited to put his or her life at risk, why couldn’t that soldier vote or purchase a can of beer. In Missouri, one response came from one of the most committed civil libertarians I’ve covered — Sen. A. Clifford Jones, R-St. Louis County. He sponsored a bill that would set the uniform legal definition of being an adult at 18 years of age. His proposal won easy legislative approval, but for one complication — what about booze?

The Senate approved Jones’ uniformlegal-age bill, but the House exempted alcohol, keeping the minimum age at 21. On the last night of that year’s legislative session, Jones accepted defeat and agreed to make the motion for final approval of the House version that exempted alcohol from the adult rights to be extended to those at least 18 years of age. But by Phill when the bill came to the Broo s Senate for the final vote, there was a problem. Jones appeared to have consumed too much alcohol during the late-night session and seemed unable to make what should have been a routine motion to pass the bill in the closing hours. Senate leaders instructed staff to bring cups of coffee to Jones, but he waived them off. Since that bill’s failure, there’s been no subsequent serious legislative effort to establish a uniform legal definition of adulthood. There’s an irony in Jones’ failure. He had a statehouse reputation for being a

heavy drinker whose legislative performances while appearing to be under the influence became classic stories. I’ve since wondered if Jones’ performance that night actually was a deliberate act to send an iconic and pointed message to his colleagues that problems with booze were not limited to young people. That is not as absurd as you might think. Jones often used misdirection to make a point. He was one of the smartest and most unpredictable legislators I’ve covered. He often engaged in outrageous behavior to make a point — including even launching into Greek language during a Senate filibuster. So in hindsight, I’ve wondered if he was just pretending to be too drunk to make a final-passage motion to demonstrate his opposition to the leadership pressure to exempt alcohol from the standard adulthood definition. I confess, I hesitated writing this column.

Capitol Perspectives

Cliffy, as his friends called him, was a mentor for me when I first started covering the statehouse. I learned so much from him about process, politics and policy. But there is something else about Cliffy, who passed years ago, that comforts me in writing his column. He was brutal in demanding honesty and disclosure — including about himself. One of my journalism students discovered that candor from an assignment to interview Cliffy for a profile on the closing days of his last year in Missouri’s legislature. My student was uncomfortable when I advised she had to ask about the decades of truly entertaining stories about his drinking. Cliffy’s answer was illustrative of what made him so special for reporters. “Of course you have to ask that question. I’m not proud of it, but it is part of my legacy,” was how I remember the student telling me of Cliffy’s response to her near apology for asking the question. Editor’ s note: Phill Brooks has been a statehouse reporter since 1970, making him dean of the statehouse press corps. He is the statehouse correspondent for KMOX Radio, director of MDN and an emeritus MU faculty member.

Ordinary officers perform extraordinary service Editor’ s note: National observances are so numerous we frequently choose not to publicize. But the following focus seems particularly appropriate as America observes National Police Week, May 13-19. The circumstances, which unfolded at Clinton in central Missouri, could occur anywhere. The following is provided by office of the United States Attorney for the Western District of Missouri. It is also available online at http://www.justice.gov/wdmo

Officer Gary Michael, Jr., had been on duty at his dream job with the Clinton Police Department for less than a year when he conducted a routine traffic stop. Sergeant Carl Cosper, Jr., traveled a familiar stretch of highway when he responded to a routine domestic violence call. Neither Officer Michael nor Sgt. Cosper returned home to their families after those routine calls; both were killed in the line of duty. Their deaths remind us that, for those sworn to protect and serve, nothing is routine. Every ordinary day could present a matter of life and death. Every ordinary officer makes a hero’s decision, on a daily basis, to do something quite extraordinary – to put their lives on the line for the sake of their community. Officer Michael and Sgt. Cosper are two of the 129 law enforcement officers in the United States to fall in the line of duty in 2017. They made the ultimate sacrifice, and we owe them our undying gratitude. There is no more important duty of government than to protect its citizens from harm. In the cause of public safety, law enforcement officers are our first line of defense. Speaking for myself as well as the Department of Justice, we will continue to “Back the Blue,” as Attorney General Jeff Sessions says, as we are all united in our efforts to reduce crime in America. Aside from national security, my highest priority is to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer. As we reinvigorate our efforts to take guns out of the hands of criminals, curb drug trafficking, and eradicate gangs, we rely on our partners in law enforcement. Collaboration with state and local law enforcement is critical for the Department of Justice. We not only need the support of our law enforcement partners to accomplish this goal, but we need the community’s support as well. Officer Michael and Sergeant

Cosper are two good examples Officer Gary Michael, Jr. of the risks we ask our law enOfficer Gary Michael, Jr., 37, of the Clinton Police Department, was shot and killed durforcement officers to take every ing a traffic stop on Aug. 6, 2017. Officer Michael stopped a vehicle for suspected registraday. We can show our appreciation violation. The driver exited the vehicle and opened fire with a rifle. Despite being mortion for their sacrifice, and the tally wounded, Officer Michael was able to return fire and wounded the subject. The man sacrifices of many other offi- fled the scene in his vehicle, which crashed two blocks away, then he fled on foot but was cers, by supporting their broth- apprehended two days later. Officer Michael was rushed to the hospital, where he later died. ers and sisters in uniform who Officer Michael was a U.S. Army veteran and had served with the Clinton Police Departcontinue that good, essential ment for less than one year. work. Master Sgt. Deputy Sheriff Carl Cosper, Jr. As a small gesture of our naMaster Sergeant Deputy Sheriff Carl Cosper, Jr., 56, of the Barry County Sheriff’s Detion’s appreciation, flags will be partment was killed in a vehicle collision on April 7, 2017. Sergeant Cosper was responding flown at half-staff today in rec- to a domestic violence call in Seligman, Mo. As he traveled south on Missouri 37, approxiognition of National Peace Offi- mately a half-mile south of Washburn, his patrol car struck another vehicle that turned in cers Memorial Day as we honor front of him. Sergeant Cosper was taken to a local hospital where he succumbed to his law enforcement officers killed injuries. Sergeant Cosper began his career in law enforcement in 1994 with the McDonald or disabled in the line of duty. This is part of National Police County Sheriff’s Department. He went on to serve with the Barry County Sheriff’s DepartWeek, an annual tribute to law ment for 10 years. In addition to being a deputy, he was also a firearms instructor, training enforcement service and sacri- agent, and taught classes for people who wanted conceal-carry permits. Deputy Sheriff Edward Culver fice. Each year, tens of thousands Deputy Edward Culver, 60, of the Platte County Sheriff’s Department, was shot and of law enforcement officers killed on June 23, 1917, while breaking up a fight at a saloon in Drydale. The subject was from around the world converge able to disarm another deputy and shot Deputy Culver in the chest. Despite being mortally on Washington, D.C., to partici- wounded, Deputy Culver returned fire and killed the subject. Deputy Culver had served with pate in a number of events to the Platte County Sheriff’s Office for four years. honor those who paid the ultimate sacrifice. Les Kerr, Law Enforcement Coordinator Even as we honor these fallen heroes, we also grieve for the Western District of Missouri, will represent us by the lives of three more law enforcement officers sacriattending this year’s events. ficed since I was sworn in as United States Attorney in National Police Week began last Sunday night with a January. Next year, the name of another Clinton Police candlelight vigil on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Department officer, Christopher Ryan Morton, along with The names of fallen officers, engraved on the walls of the Miller County Deputy Sheriff Casey Lee Shoemate will be National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial, were for- engraved on the memorial wall. We also recently suffered mally dedicated. the loss of FBI Special Agent Melissa S. Morrow, 48, who The names of Officer Michael and Sgt. Cosper – the died from brain cancer as a result of being exposed to two law enforcement officers from the Western District hazardous contaminants when she rushed to help surviof Missouri who were killed in the line of duty in 2017 – vors at the Pentagon during the terrorist attacks on Sept. have been engraved on the National Law Enforcement 11, 2001, and participated in the investigation afterward. Officers Memorial. Additionally, the recently discovered May these public servants, each of whom made the ulname of an officer killed in the line of duty in 1917 has timate sacrifice for the highest good, inspire us to honor been added to the wall. their memory by continuing their legacy of serving.

McCaskill backs effort to suspend import taxes on newsprint U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill is backing a bipartisan push to halt excessive taxes on paper imports that are critical to Missouri’s newspaper and printing industries. The bipartisan legislation, which has been endorsed by printers and publishers representing more than 600,000 American jobs, would suspend the import taxes on uncoated groundwood paper while the Department of Commerce examines the health of — and the

effects on — the printing and publishing industry. “Local news, and newspapers that provide it, are critical pieces of a community and our democracy — they pay attention to what’s going on, hold those in authority accountable, and tell the important stories of folks making a difference in the community,” McCaskill says. “Newspapers Sare already struggling to stay in business with the changing economy — and the last thing they need are

AULT

added costs that were imposed based on what appears to be the request of a single mill owned by a venture-capital firm that’s looking to increase their profits on the backs of newspaper companies across the country.” In late 2017, the Department of Commerce initiated antidumping and countervailing duty investigations into the Canadian uncoated groundwood paper industry on behalf of a single doe mill. ised May 2018 mestic paper This paper is used by news-

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papers and numerous other commercial printers in the U.S., including publications printed at Gallatin Publishing Company. The import taxes are as high as 32% on some products, and that cost is passed on to printers, book publishers, and newspapers that are already under severe economic stress. Nearly all of the U.S. paper in. dustry opposes these import taxes, including the large trade association representing the entire industry, the American Forest

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and Paper Association, because the Department of Commerce’s action threatens to decimate the paper industry’s customers and injure printers and publishers. McCaskill has been a strong advocate on behalf of Missouri businesses and workers. McCaskill recently responded to a letter from a bipartisan group of 16 Missouri State Senators expressing concerns over the Administration’s decision to impose tariffs on manufacturing and agriculture imports.

DAVIESS COUNTY: Let Those You Elect Know What You're Thinking... Commissioner

Commissioner

Commissioner

Wayne Uthe

Randy Sims

(Associate, 1st District)

(Associate, 2nd District)

18141 State Hwy. P, Jamesport, MO 64648 Democrat, Elected 2008 Cell: 660.663.7289 Email: ommi ion a ie ount mo o

24681 U.S. Hwy 69, Altamont, MO 64620 Republican, Elected 2016 Cell: 660.334.0016 Email: ommi ion a ie ount mo o

David Cox

(Presiding)

County Clerk Ronetta Burton

11508 Hwy. 6 Winston, MO 64689 Republican, Elected 2010 Cell 660.605.2056 Email: ommi ion a ie ount mo o

14614 Hwy 13, Pattonsburg, M0 64670 Republican, Appointed 2018 Clerk’s Office: 660.663.2641 Email: ount lerk a ie ount mo o

Other County Officeholders:

Sheriff Ben Becerra, 0. 3.2031 Prosecutor Annie Gibson, 0. 3.412 Assoc. ircuit udge aren Ad ins, 0. 3.2532 ircuit ler Pam Howard, 0. 3.2 32 oroner a id Mc illiams, 0. 3.211 Assessor Betty Harmison, 0. 3.3300 ollector- reasurer, Pam McNeel, 0. 3.2432 ecorder ane Mc insey, 0. 3.3183 Public Administrator ayla Michael, 0. 3.41 0


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May 16, 2018

Food safety workshop in Grundy By Tim Baker, MU Regional Horticulturist Last year, we started a series of workshops to train produce growers about food safety. Growers who sell over $25,000 of produce covered under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) must attend one of these workshops to comply with the law. Covered growers must be trained at one of these workshops by January 2020, so we will offer these workshops periodically until then. FSMA includes rules for produce growers intended to reduce the risk of contamination from E. coli, listeria, salmonella and other disease-causing microbes. The rules set standards related to water quality, use of manure and compost, and worker health and hygiene. The eight-hour workshop covers how to identify risks, best practices to reduce risks, key parts of the FSMA’s produce safety rule, and how to develop a farm food safety plan. Participants will be eligible to receive a Certificate of Course

Attendance from the Association of Food and Drug Officials that verifies they have attended the course, which is a requirement to comply with the FSMA produce safety rule. Certificates are issued to individuals who attend the course and do not stay with the farm or organization if those individuals leave. The Grundy County workshop is scheduled for May 24. If you would like to attend this workshop, please call the Daviess County Extension Center at 660-663-3232, to get your name on the list. There is a $20 registration cost, which includes materials and lunch. Attendance is limited to the first 50 people who register. For a list of additional workshops in Missouri and Kansas, take a look at this web page: http://www.ksre.k-state.edu/ foodsafety/produce. Check out the section titled “FSMA Produce Safety Rule Grower Training.” Growers must attend the entire eight hours to get credit for taking the course.

Get hooked on MDC Free Fishing Days Want some free fun that gets family and friends outside in nature? Get hooked on fishing with the Missouri Department of Conservation’s (MDC) Free Fishing Days June 9 and 10. During Free Fishing Days, anyone may fish in the Show-Me State without having to buy a fishing permit, trout permit, or trout park daily tag. Aside from not needing permits, other fishing regulations remain in effect, such as limits on size and number of fish an angler may keep. Special permits may still be required at some county, city, or private fishing areas. Trespass laws remain in effect on private property. Conservation makes Missouri a great place to fish, and Free Fishing Days encourages people to sample the state’s abundant fishing opportunities. Missouri has more than a million acres of surface water, and most of

it provides great fishing. More than 200 different fish species are found in Missouri, with more than 20 of them being game fish for the state’s more than 1.1 million anglers.

Pattonsburg MultiPurpose Center Menu May 21-25 Monday: spaghetti w/meatballs, lettuce salad, corn, fruit, garlic bread; Tuesday: pork roast, sweet potatoes, peas, fruit, roll, no bake cookie; Wednesday: chef’s salad, strawberries and bananas, bread stick and crackers; Thursday: tator tot casserole, cole slaw, Mandarin oranges, banana cake; Friday: ham, scalloped potatoes, broccoli, pineapple salad, roll.

Jade Wayne and Clint Vanatta.

Jade Wayne receives BTC scholarship Jade Wayne, a 2018 GHS graduate, is a winner of this year’s BTC Bank Area Youth Benefit Corporation scholarship. Each year, BTC Bank awards five $1,000 scholarships to deserving graduates in the Northwest Missouri area. To be eligible for this award,

students must complete a financial literacy course sponsored by BTC Bank. Students must also demonstrate their commitment to using financial practices that will better their lives and their community. Pictured are Jade and Clint Vanatta, BTC Bank Branch Manager.

Missed deer cause of car accident A St. Joseph woman received minor injuries in an accident that happened in Daviess County at about 1 p.m. on April 14. According to the highway patrol, Laura Fountain, 22, was southbound on Route K driving a 1999 Dodge Dakota. About eight miles south of Gilman City, she swerved to miss a deer, traveled off the west side of the roadway, struck a ditch, then overturned through a fence. The vehicle came to rest on its wheels, facing

west off the west side of Route K. Ms. Fountain was taken by private vehicle to Hedrick Medical Center. She was wearing a seat belt. The accident was investigated by Cpl. P.M. Kimball.

Active Aging Resource Center May 18: Blood pressure checks from 11-12; May 22: Birthday celebration for month, OATS bus is available Menus May 21-25 Monday: lasagna, garlic bread, salad, three-bean salad, mixed fruit; Tuesday: ham and beans, cornbread, cole slaw, carrots, fruit crisp; Wednesday: BBQ pork on bun, baked sweet potatoes, cabbage, applesauce; Thursday: chicken livers, mashed potatoes and gravy, green beans, gelatin; Friday: minute steak, corn casserole, spinach, oatmeal muffin, fruit salad.

Pattonsburg Alumni Banquet Saturday, May 26, 2018 Pattonsburg School Gym

The classes of 1968, 1993, and 2018 will be honored. A replica of the old Walbash Depot, donated by Peggy Sperry, will be auctioned at the banquet to help fund the Alumni.

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1983 reunion

Civil War speaker at Cravens meeting

The Class of 1983 will hold a reunion on Saturday, May 26, from 4-8 p.m. at Washington Street Food and Drink, Cameron. The class is invited to “come and enjoy.”

Area students named to honors North Central Missouri College in Trenton has named students with outstanding academic achievements to the Academic Honors Lists for the 2018 spring semester, including the following local students: President’s List — Austin Hunt, Altamont; Harris Cameron, Gallatin; Heather Swymeler, Jamesport; Brooklyn Adams, DeAnna Dinwiddie , Alexis Harris Pattonsburg; Dalton Youtsey, Winston. Dean’s List — Sarah Anderson, Coffey; Cooper Grady, Tatum Griffin Granville, Martha Gunzenhauser, and Saige Holmes, Gallatin; Hailey Burrows and Sarah Fountain, Gilman City; Jennie Bennett, Jamie Kottwitz and Rita Terry, Jamesport; Josie McFee and Austin Rhoades, Winston. Students named to the President’s List have earned at least six credit hours and achieved a perfect 4.0 grade point average (GPA), and students on the Dean’s List have earned at least six credit hours and achieved a grade point average of at least 3.50.

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May 16, 2018

Katy Black earns master’s degree Katy Black of St. Joseph recently completed a Master of Science in Education through the University of Kansas School of Education, Department of Curriculum and Teaching. She worked on her Master’s while teaching sixth grade at Humboldt Elementary School in St. Joseph, and after two years has finished and earned her degree. She graduated from Gallatin High School in 2008 and attended Parkville University for two years. She then transferred to Missouri Western State University where she earned her elementary education teaching degree. She taught 3rd grade at Humboldt Elementary for two years and has taught sixth grade there for the past two years. She will be teaching sixth grade this fall in Smithville.

The public is invited to hear guest speaker John Moloski during the monthly meeting of Surgeon John Cravens Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp 2276 at 7 p.m. on Monday, May 21 at the Friends of Christ Church in Gallatin, 402 N. Main, across the street west from Dungy’s Super Market. Mr. Moloski is a bookseller with Burnt District Press out of Harrisonville. Burnt District features books about state and local history, historical fiction and family histories. Much of the material is not covered in traditional historical textbooks about the Civil War. Burnt district refers to four western Missouri counties, which were first evacuated and then burned during the Civil War. Mr. Moloski will give a power point presentation on Missouri Confederate Troops, primarily discussing the battle of Franklin, TN, which was considered one of the worst disasters of the war for the Confederate States Army. The battle is known as the Gettysburg of the west.

Route O to close May 16-18, local maintenance crews from the Missouri Department of Transportation will close Route O in Daviess County for resurfacing. The road will be closed from approximately 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day, weather permitting. Local traffic only will be permitted on the roadway. During these daily closures, nonlocal traffic will need to use an alternate route.

N atio nal P o lic e Week w as o b s er v ed M ay 1 3 - 1 9 .

Salute to fallen trooper, Sgt. Kimberling The Missouri State Highway Patrol Troop H honored the memory of Sergeant Robert G. Kimberling on May 14 at the Jamesport Masonic Cemetery. Sgt. Kimberling, a Missouri State Highway Patrol trooper based in St. Joseph, was killed on Oct. 6, 1999. He was a 14-year veteran of the patrol. He was shot by a mentally ill man from Wisconsin who drove away from a Faucett, Missouri, gas station without paying for $26 worth of gas. The Wisconsin man then killed himself. Sgt. Kimberling was born and raised in Jamesport and graduated from its high school. According to the highway patrol a total of 31 troopers have died in the line of duty, three by aircraft accident, seven by automobile crash, one by drowning, nine by gunfire, five by being struck by a vehicle, one by vehicle pursuit, four by vehicular

Willow to be paved, chipper purchased, dust an issue

April fire report: vehicle fires & medical assists The Gallatin Fire Protection District has released its fire incident report. April 1 at 2:28 p.m. — Dispatched & cancelled en route to Yale Ave, mutual aid with Hamilton Fire; 2:30 p.m. — Extrication of victim(s) from vehicle on Hwy. 6 west of Hwy. O; 3:11 p.m. — EMS call on Hwy. 6 April 3 at 12:20 p.m. — Power pole fire at 1325 W. Grand April 7 at 6:49 p.m. — Dispatched & cancelled en route to 269th St., mutual aid for Hamilton Fire April 11 at 5:49 p.m. — Tree fire at 809 W. Mill April 13 at 8:06 a.m. — Building Fire on Hwy. UU, mutual aid with Jameson Fire District April 16 at 8:42 p.m. — Controlled burn at Hwy. 13 & 225th April 17 at 4:38 p.m. — Dispatched & cancelled en route to Main & Richardson on a reported vehicle accident April 18 at 12:00 p.m. — Public service at Olive St. & David St.; 10:14 p.m. — Medical Assist on Hwy. V April 21 at 7:11 p.m. — Medical Assist on W. Van Buren; 7:15 p.m. — Medical Assist on W. Ogden; 8:14 p.m. — Dispatched & cancelled en route to Hwy. 6 & Hwy. CC/DD April 26 at 1:27 a.m. — Medical Assist on S. Olive

Gallatin’s Public Works Director Mark Morey announced that Herzog would pave Willow Street Tuesday and Wednesday this week. He told the Board of Aldermen at their meeting held May 14, that the chipper in Kansas was purchased at $1,350. The shipping cost was quoted at $1,100. Discussion was held on possible dust control application on South Prospect due to the increased traffic from the Hwy. 13 Bridge being closed. Dust control will also need to be applied in front of the water plant and the sewer plant. The second grade class at Searcy Elementary toured the new water plant last week, as well as USDA representatives. Street crews have finished setting tubes and filling in the ditch on a section of South Prospect. Change Order No. 8 for the new water plant was reviewed and accepted in the amount of $5,150 for a lime sludge wash down and $1,780 for 16ga stainless steel lockboxes on top of the clear well. Police Chief Mark Richards submitted a report on activity for May 14: 2-Theft, shoplifting; 1-Litter, Pollution, Public Health; 1-Peace Disturbance; 1-Animal Problem; 1-Vandalism; 3-Domestic Disturbance; 1-House Fire; 2-Drug/Narcotic Possession; 2-Juvenile Problem; 2-Traffic Accident with Damage; 1-Traffic Complaint; 1-Theft; 1-Crossing a Funeral Procession; 5-Welfare Check. There are three dogs in the pound. In the past week the Police Department presented a bicycle safety class to the kindergarten class at Gallatin’s Searcy Elementary. The police provided

traffic control at the high school for senior laps and graduation. The department provided approximately 20 gallons of Gatorade for field day and held DARE graduation for the Gallatin sixth grade. The April transaction report was approved. Bills in the amount of $160,139.98 were approved for payment. The board reviewed the April 2018 Financial Review. Ross Construction’s Pay App #15 in the amount of $188,140.81 was approved. Snyder’s invoice 112.0059.1132 in the amount of $19,195.96 was approved. Discussion was held on the People Service O&M Report for April 2018. Board reviewed Eichler’s bookkeeping review for January and February 2018. An ordinance vacating and discontinuing a portion of a public street was approved. The board determined that a part of a platted street in the Gallatin Industrial Park is not of use to the City and it is in the interest of the City to vacate the right-of-way as a public street. Discussion was held on grave marking ordinance examples. Mayor Ballew signed the termination agreement with Superior Cable. Discussion was held on regulations included in a chicken raising ordinance. The board issued a $.25 pay increase to Laurie Roll who is returning as the 2018 Pool Manager. The next council meeting has been moved to May 30 due to the Memorial Day Holiday. Gallatin’s new water plant is complete for all practical purposes.

The public is welcome to tour the new water plant on Thursday, May 17, from 2-6 p.m. During the meeting of the board of aldermen on May 14, Mayor Barb Ballew was authorized to sign the Certificate of Substantial Completion for the new water plant pending Attorney Robert Cowherd’s approval. The above are the unapproved minutes of the regular meeting for the City of Gallatin held on May 14 at city hall. Present: Mayor Barb Ballew, President of Board John Whitfield, Aldermen Steve Evans, Carol Walker, Dan Lockridge, City Administrator Tony Stonecypher, City Clerk Hattie Bailey, Public Works Director Mark Morey, Police Chief Mark Richards, Police Chaplain Austin Bonnett.

assault, and one by weather/ natural disaster. K-9 Reed, a police dog, died in the line of duty, by drowning.

Almond on dean’s Katana Almond, Gallatin, was recently named to the Columbia College dean’s list for the Spring Semester (January-April 2018). To be named to the dean’s list, a student must have completed 12 semester hours in a 16-week period and achieved a minimum GPA of 3.5 on a 4.0-point scale. Katana was an online student.

To Finals Rodeo Nickolas Heldenbrand, an eighth grade student at Chillicothe Middle School, has earned a position on the Missouri provincial National Junior High rodeo team and will be traveling with fellow teammates to Huron, SD, June 24-30 to compete at the 14th annual National Junior High Finals Rodeo (NJHFR) in the ribbon roping and chute dogging competition. Nickolas is the son of Robert and Haleigh Heldenbrand and grandson of Russell and Debbie Heldenbrand of Gallatin.

Ellis on honor roll State Technical College of Missouri would like to congratulate students who achieved the Honor Roll during the 2018 Spring semester, including Colton Ellis of Jamesport.

Warford on dean’s Kelly M. Warford of Pattonsburg has earned a spot on the University of Central Missouri dean’s list. The dean’s list includes the names of students who attained a grade point average of 3.50 to 3.99.

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Manslaughter amended down to assault The following cases session of controlled substance count: A default judgment was were heard by Judge and receiving stolen property. entered for Synchrony Bank Thomas Chapman on Their vehicle was involved in a against Edward Miller. May 9: pursuit which ended after tire James Lewis, road Aaron Thomas Tuck- deflation devices were deployed and bridge supervier plead guilty to an amended by the Cameron Police Departsor, reported that charge of assault third degree, ment and the Highway Patrol. his crew is busy reA misdemeanor, and a sentence Robinson is also facing separate placing culverts on assessment report was ordered. charges in Iowa. Ashwood Avenue, and building Tucker had been scheduled An order of contempt was enconcrete slabs this week. for a jury trial on a charge of tered against Richard W. Welch Assessor Sally Black met with involuntary manslaughter first for non-payment of child support the commission regarding GIS degree, C felony, in connection in the amount of $14,964.11. agreements between the asseswith the death of Michael EstaDissolutions of marriage were sor’s office and other entities. brook at a Jamesport residence granted to Scotty G. Curtis from She also updated the commisin November 2016. Tracy L. Curtis, with her maiden sion other ongoing issues. May — A ereaters Anonymous ee on ly Meeting, a iess Tucker was originally charged name Stretch restored; to Alex ounty Nursing ehab, Gallatin 5 Craig 30pm.Woolridge, landowner in with second degree murder, but L. Groom from Frances A. StagSheridan Township, presented ŸAA pen Meeting, Se enth-day that was reduced to involuntary ner-Groom with her maiden Ad entist hurch, 120 S. lay the commission with a petition St., Gallatin, pm. manslaughter in March 2017. name Medeiros restored; and to close the first half mile of Tucker had knocked Estabrook May to Dee — Flint ercise from Brian lass S. at Flint. a iess 175th ountyStreet, Library,north Gallatin, 2pm. Avof Vista unconscious in an altercation at A quiet title was granted to enue, in Section 17, Range 28W, ŸGame Night - Acti e Aging esource enter, Gallatin, 4pm. the home where they both re- JPMorgan Chase Bank from Township 58N. This is the first sided. Estabrook was later pro- Robert ŸVF Post 21 Rachel 2 Meeting Fire Station in Gallatin, pm. Sweiger, Sweiger reading of the petition, the next nounced dead at Hedrick Medi- May and Evelyn—Hartley. A default May ays Festi al at reading amesportwill be the first week of cal Center. judgment was entered against July 2018.Library, 12pm. May — Bridge lass at the a iess ounty Joseph E. Ginn plead guilty to Rachel and Robert Sweiger, Ronetta Burton, county clerk, two counts of failure to register and a consent judgment was30pm. enŸGallatin -5 Graduation, updated the commission on reas sex offender and was sen- tered against Evelyn Hartley in Ÿ ri- ounty - Graduation, pm. pairs to the emergency lighting tenced to two years in the De- the case. in the courthouse by electriŸ North a iess change -3 Graduation, partment of Corrections on each The following of venue pm. cian, Matt Adkison. Repairs to count, sentences to run concur- May case was filed from Caldwell pm. — Hamilton HS Graduation, an overhead light in the county rently. Two identical counts County: State vs. Jason E. Bentreasurer’s office will be May — Adult hildren of Alcoholic ysfunctional Families - comwere dismissed. Ginn also has nett, Kearney, domestic assault pleted this week. nline, contact 0.334. 334. a conviction in Andrew County. second degree, prior domesThe commissioners continue ŸAA Meetingoffender, at Hamilton Nyia Shynell Robinson plead tic violence C Baptist felony, hurch, pm. to work on updates to the perguilty to D felony receiving sto- May stalking A mis-esource enter, Gallatin 5 —second B NG ,degree, Acti e Aging sonnel policy manual. The issue len property, and a sentence as- demeanor. 10 30am. was tabled until next week. sessment report was ordered. Civil cases filed: The DepartWayne Uthe is continuing to Ÿ ercise lass at a iess ounty Library, Gallatin, 2pm. She was released on a recogni- ment of Revenue has filed cerwork on the sewer odor issue zance bond under the special tificates lien,ri DOR, ŸGallatin of Blood e, 2pmtaxes, in the courthouse, with repairs condition that she sign a waiver against Jordan L. Phelps, GallŸ or in Progress Support Group atongoing. Friends in hrist hurch, of extradition. Nyia was one of atin; Leisa pm. K. Hayes, PattonsGallatin, The commission updated the four people from Kansas City, burg; and Daniel Johnson and contact information for the .gov May — Gallatin -5 School Board Meeting, am KS, who were arrested in Da-THISLindsay Johnson, Gallatin. INCIDENT SUMMARY DOES NOT INCLUDE ACTIVITIES emailROUTINE accountPATROL and added Ronetviess County by the Highway A ssociate D iv ision ( c o ntinu ed o n P ag e 7 ) Patrol on February 4 for posCivil Court — Contract-Ac-

Daviess County

RECORD

May 16, 2018

CALENDAR OF EVENTS May

— Gallatin

May 7

— Braymer

May 7 — 2pm.

ercise

Daviess County Sheriff’s Incident Report

THIS INCIDENT SUMMARY DOES NOT INCLUDE ROUTINE PATROL ACTIVITIES

ŸGame Night - Acti e Aging

arrest. 5-10 -18 4:53 am - Burglar alarm call at residence in Lake Viking. 5:41 am - Property has been searched. No forced entry and nothing out of order. All OK. 6:14 am - Responding to alarm call from gas station in Pattonsburg. Employee set off by accident. All OK. 10:30 am - Funeral escort. 7:26 pm - Report of damage to fences on Highway F east of Jamesport. 5-11-18 9:04 am - Deputy and K-9 Alan out at DDCRJ. 2:03 pm - Assisting Gallatin PD in locating subject who may need medical attention. 9:39 pm - Complaint of possible drunk driver on Highway 190 between Jamesport and Lock Springs. 11:18 pm - Out at residence regarding possible abuse. 5-12-18 3:59 am - Report of possible domestic situation west of Winston. 10:03 am - Out with stranded motorist at the intersection of Highway 6 and K. 11 am - Funeral escort. 5:57 pm - Caller wanting to report that they are receiving threats. 10:02 pm - Deputy and K-9 Alan en route to Crossroads Correctional Center in Cameron reference prisoner disturbance. 10:42 pm - Responding to report of fight at the Winston Speedway. 10:56 pm - One subject from above is being transferred to DDCRJ on 24-hour hold. Sub-

ject was later released with no charges filed. 5-13 -18 8:49 am - Out with stranded motorist on I-35 at the 62mm. 9:17 am - Complaint of aggressive dog in Pattonsburg. 10:02 am - Out with stranded motorist on I-35 at the 68mm. 2:22 pm - Assisting Gallatin PD with domestic disturbance in Gallatin. 16:58 pm - Assisting with traffic control at house fire in Gallatin. 5-14 -18 12:14 am - Checking on abandoned vehicle at Wabash Crossing. 6:17 am - Report of alarm at Pattonsburg gas station. Set off by employee. All OK. 11:17 am - Report of trailer causing damage to property located at Lake Viking. 2:13 pm - Advised of truck off the road and into fence on Highway K, 2 miles north of Highway 6. No one around vehicle. 2:40 pm - Colton Brock, 19, Oregon, was transferred to DDCRJ from Buchanan County on a Daviess County warrant for probation violation on original charges of stealing motor vehicle, felony. Bond is denied. 3:20 pm - Jon Hyatt, 41, Independence, was transferred to DDCRJ from Jackson County on a Daviess County warrant for probation violation on original charges of distribution of a controlled substance, felony. Bond is denied. 7:51 pm - Alarm going off at Home Exchange Bank in Jamesport. Alarm cancelled by alarm company before arrival.

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www.daviesscountysheriff.com 5-8 -18 9:08 am - Report of suspicious vehicle in area north of Winston on Highway KK. 9:38 am - Tyler Parker, 26, Breckenridge, was transferred to DDCRJ from Caldwell County Detention on a Daviess County warrant for probation violations on original charges of felony forgery. Bond is denied. 10:20 am - Out with abandoned vehicle on Nickel Avenue east of Highway DD. 12:45 pm - Report of several cattle out at the intersection of Highways P and K. 3:38 pm - Responding to medical call in Jameson. 4:02 pm - Subject reporting a can of gasoline is missing from property off of Highway KK. 5:54 pm - Complaint of stray pit bull type dog chasing chickens. 8:17 pm - Report of cattle out on Highway 6 and 252nd Street. 5-9 -18 11:44 am - To Pattonsburg School reference complaint. 12:04 pm - Report of suspicious person trying to get into vehicle at business in old Pattonsburg. Suspect left on foot south on Highway 69. 12:14 pm - In Pattonsburg area searching for above . 1:12 pm - Deputy has located subject. He had permission to use the vehicle from the owner. 3:37 pm - Report of dog bite in Jamesport. 4:59 pm - Complaint of possible drunk driver south of Gallatin. 8:32 pm - Suspicous person walking on Highway 190 at Highway B. 8:43 pm - Assisting Gallatin Police Department with possible

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Courthouse News co ta Burton, county clerk, to the account. After lunch the commissioners toured roads, bridges and culverts in Jamesport Township and viewed brush issues in Marion Township. The meeting adjourned at 3:55 p.m. The above information is taken from the minutes of the May 9, 2018, meeting of the Daviess County Commission. All commissioners were present. Bills were approved. Assessor’s Office The retirement reception for Norma Griffin is scheduled from 2-4 p.m. on Friday, May 25 in the lobby of the Daviess County courthouse. In a few weeks the assessor’s office will mail out value change notices for 2018 assessment year. These notices are sent out on parcels that have had an increase in value from the prior tax year due to the following reasons: new construction of a residence, out building, commercial improvement; addition to existing structures such as decks, patios, porches, etc.; corrections made through sale reviews such as bathroom counts, finished basements, etc. If any of these things were added or updated to your improvement from last year, you will more than likely receive a notice. If you receive one and have questions, please call our office. Representatives from the assessor’s office will be in the field reviewing new construction in Jackson and Liberty Townships this week. Recorder’s Office Marriage licenses issued: Devon Ray Ropp, 22, and Lilly M. Kramer, 21, both of Jamesport; Jordan Christopher Eden,

Deaths

A my Marie Mef f ord 19 7 5-20 18 Memorial service for Amy Mefford will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 17, 2018, at the Cameron United Methodist Church. Friends will be received at Poland-Thompson Funeral Home, Cameron, prior to the memorial service and after. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, May 18, 2018, at the funeral home with burial in Evergreen Cemetery, Cameron. Amy Marie Mefford, 43, Cameron, died on May 11, 2018. Amy was born on April 8, 1975, to Dennis and Pat (Linville) Richardson, in Chillicothe. She was a 1993 graduate of Penney High School, Hamilton, and 1997 graduate of Missouri Western State University with a bachelor of education degree. Amy taught seventh grade at Cameron Intermediate School and previously taught at Pattonsburg and Stewartsville. She was a member of Missouri State Teacher’s Association. Amy was preceded in death by her son, Garrett; maternal

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21, and Kamilyn Kay Osmonson, 21, both of Gallatin; James Elvin Rogers, 65, and Kathryn Yvonne Simpson, 62, both of Gallatin. W arranty D eed s Tract in Liberty Township from Laurie and David Roll to Benjamin Martin and Cindy K. Newman as joint tenants with right of survivorship; tract in Jamesport Township from David Cox, trustee of the Martin Living Trust, to Sidney M. Martin and David Cox as tenants in common; Lake Viking lot #502 from Richard and Mary O’Dell to William and Charity Thompson; Lake Viking lot #182 from Robert and Artis Stoebener to Robert and Donna Earley; tract in Liberty Township from Timothy and Brandi Milbourn to Ward and Tanya Allen; tracts in Monroe Township from Charles Potts to Timber Wind Apartments LLC; tracts in Monroe Township from Robert Potts to Timber Wind Apartments LLC; partial lots in Gallatin from Robert and Amy Tull to Donald Wayne Carder; Lake Viking lot #2233 from Larry and Sandra Weigler to Dena McDonell; Lake Viking lot #MH-27 from Weigler-Chance Associates to Bryan Smith; tract in Grand River Township from Jean and Frederick Dustman to Mika Stelzer; tract in Marion Township from Mika and Benjamin Stelzer to Jan Ann Dustman; Unit in West Ridge Condominiums, Union Township, from Kevin Allen and Carol Nelson, and Linda and Greg Houghton, to Sue Hunt and Esther Smith as joint tenants with right of survivorship; partial lots in Gallatin from Robert and Kimberly Cornett to Robert Blake Cornett. Q uit C laim D eed s Partial outlot in Gallatin from Darryl and Elizabeth Wilkinson to Darryl and Elizabeth Wilkinson; partial blocks and lots in Jamesport from Leona and Samuel Woody to Leona and Samuel Woody. Beneficiary Deeds Partial lots in Gallatin from Donald Wayne Carder to Everett Martin Carder; partial outlot in Gallatin from Darryl and Elizabeth Wilkinson to Andrea L. Lockridge, successor trustee of the Darryl Wilkinson Trust Agreement and the Elizabeth Wilkinson Trust Agreement. Trustee’s Deed under Active Trust

grandparents, Archie and Alice Linville; paternal grandmother, Caroline Richardson; grandparents-in-law, Harold and Peggy Mefford; nephew, Darian Mefford; and niece, Taylor Mefford. On Oct. 31, 2000, Amy married Brian Mefford, in Cameron, who survives of the home with twins, Aiden and Maddisson; parents, Dennis and Pat Richardson, Hamilton; brother, Jon Richardson, Kansas City, Missouri. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Amy Mefford Scholarship Fund for future teachers. J oh n S av age 19 4 5-20 17 A graveside memorial service will be held Saturday, May 26, at 2 p.m. at the Savage Cemetery, four miles west of Old Pattonsburg. John was born Aug. 31, 1945, to Eugene and Gertrude Savage and died May 18, 2017. He is survived by wife Sherry, and sons, John, Donnie and Robert. All family and friends are invited.

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Tract in Sheridan Township from Rev. James and Linda Baker as trustees under the Rev. James D. Baker and Linda K. Baker Revocable Living Trust, to CLT Seeds LLC; tract in Jackson Township from Randy and Joyce Eads, trustees of the Revocable Trust Agreement of Randy Eads and Joyce Eads, to Jonas and Florence Hostetler; tract in Jackson Township from James C. Gutshall, trustee of the James C. Gutshall Trust, to Jonas and Florence Hostetler; tract in Monroe Township from Leo Dean Hales, trustee of the Dean Hales Revocable Trust, to Kandi Kae Railsback Revocable Trust. I nd ep end ent P ersonal Rep resentativ e’ s D eed of D istrib ution Tract in Benton Township from Carly Simon, independent personal representative of the Estate of Garry Paul Jackson, to Jessica Rice, Carly Simon, Jennifer Mackey and Lindsey Burnham. Trustee’ s D eed Partial blocks in Gallatin from Tara L. Walker, successor trustee for Sherri Vance, to Adam and Kimberly Ness.

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Ownership change at Taylor Chevrolet Maysville’s longtime Chevrolet dealership recently changed ownership, when it sold to Mike Oyster and his son, Reid Oyster, of Freeman. The business will now be known as Pearl Chevrolet. The Oysters’ family business was in school bus transportation, the Apple Bus Company. The Oysters sold their stake in the bus business in 2016 and started looking for car dealerships that were for sale in rural towns. Their conversations with Mark Taylor, Clark Taylor and Kerri Huffaker culminated with the purchase of the Taylor Chevrolet dealership on May 2. Roger Klein will be general manager, and Brian McDermott will remain as mechanic. The Oysters will be hiring locally for the shop and the sales staff.

Reid Oyster said, “We see this as an opportunity to turn a smalltown dealership into something special, and we’re looking to do the same in other communities. Our goal is to improve and expand the operation here.” The Oysters have joined in the St. Joseph marketing group and will be included in all of the TV commercials that the Chevy dealers in St. Joseph produce. There will be many new and used cars for sale at the dealership soon, and they expect that the business will be heavily internet-sales driven. A grand opening will be held, probably in August, to coincide with the auction the Taylors will have. The Oysters also would like to recognize the Taylor family for 46 years of service to the community.

Public Notices

... Because You Have the Right to Know IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF DAVIESS COUNTY, MISSOURI P RO BA TE D I V I S I O N — E state N o. 18 D V -P R0 0 0 12 I n th e M atter o f th e E st ate o f : H u nter Wh itm o r e, M ino r L ar r y L ivi ck and Ch er yl L ivi ck, P etitio ner s NOTICE UPON ORDER FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION T H E S T A T E O F M I S S O U R I T O : D eidr a Wh itm o r e You are hereby notified that an action has been comm ence d ag ainst yo u in th e P r o b ate D ivi si o n o f th e Cir cu it Co u r t o f D avi ess Co u nty, M isso u r i, th e o b j ect and g ener al natu r e o f w h ich is: th e ap p o intm ent o f G u ar dian and Co nse r va to r f o r M ino r Ch ild. T h e nam es o f all p ar ties to sa id act io n ar e st ated ab o ve in th e ca p tio n h er eo f and th e nam e and addr ess o f th e atto r ney f o r P etitio ner s is: B r ando n F . G r eer , P .O . B o x 4 6 7 , Ch illico th e, M isso u ri6 4 6 0 1 ; 6 6 0 -6 4 6 -4 5 2 2 . T h e Co u r t h as ap p o inted Ju lia R o se lle F illey, A tto r ney, to r ep r ese nt th e M ino r . S aid m atter w ill b e h ear d o n Ju ne 1 2 , 2 0 1 8 , at 1 0 : 0 0 a.m . at th e co u r tr o o m o f th e P r o b ate D ivi si o n at D avi ess Co u nty Co u r th o u se in G allatin, M isso u r i. You are further notified that, unless you file an answer o r o th er p leading o r sh all o th er w ise ap p ear and def end ag ainst th e af o r esa id p etitio n, j u dg m ent b y def au lt w ill b e r ender ed ag ainst yo u . Witness m y h and and th e se al o f th e Cir cu it Co u r t th is 1 8 th day o f A p r il, 2 0 1 8 . / S / Jennif er H o p p enth aler Jenni H o p p enth aler , Cler k, P r o b ate D ivi si o n P u b lica tio n D ates: A p r il 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 ; M ay 2 , 2 0 1 8 ; M ay 9 , 2 0 1 8 ; M ay 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 N O TI C E O F TRUS TE E ’ S S A L E D ef au lt h avi ng b een m ade in th e p aym ent o f th at ce r tain no te se cu r ed b y D eed o f T r u st exe cu ted b y P am ela K Wilso n, dated Ju ne 3 0 , 2 0 0 4 and r eco r ded o n Ju ly 2 , 2004 in Book 210, Page 64, Office of Recorder of Deeds, D avi ess Co u nty, M isso u r i. T h e S u ce so r T r u st ee w ill o n M ay 2 4 , 2 0 1 8 , b etw een th e h o u r s o f 9 : 0 0 o ’ cl o ck A .M . and 5 : 0 0 P .M . m o r e p ar ticu lar ly at 1 : 0 0 P M , at th e D avi ess Co u nty Co u r th o u se , O n T h e S q u ar e, S o u th F r o nt do o r , G allatin, M O 6 4 6 4 0 , se ll at p u b lic ve nu e to th e h ig h est b idder f o r ca sh , th e f o llo w ing r eal est ate: Co m m enci ng at th e N o r th Q u ar ter Co r ner o f S ect io n ( 7 ) , T o w nsh ip F if ty- N ine ( 5 9 ) N o r th , o f R ang e T w entyS eve n ( 2 7 ) West , th ence S o u th 2 1 0 0 f eet to th e P o int o f B eg inning ; th ence S o u th 8 2 0 f eet; th ence N o r th 8 9 deg r ees 3 0 ’ E ast 5 4 0 f eet; th ence N o r th 8 2 0 f eet to th e S o u th R ig h t- o f - Way L ine o f R o u te “ M M ” th ence S o u th 8 9 deg r ees 3 0 ’ West alo ng sa id R ig h t- o f - Way L ine 5 4 0 f eet to th e P o int o f B eg inning . F o r th e p u r p o se o f sa tisf ying sa id indeb tedness and th e co st s o f exe cu ting th is tr u st . S & W F o r ecl o su r e Co r p o r atio n, S u ce so r T r u st ee P u b Co m m ence s M ay 2 , 2 0 1 8 S & K F ile N o .1 5 - 0 2 6 6 0 6 B y: S h ap ir o & K r eism an, L L C w w w .sh ap ir o andkr eism an- m o .co m Purported address: 23365 State Highway MM, Gallatin, MO 64640 Publication Dates: 05/02/18, 05/09/18, 05/16/18, 05/23/18 N O TI C E O F TRUS TE E ’ S S A L E F o r def au lt in th e p aym ent o f deb t se cu r ed b y D eed o f T r u st exe cu ted b y K elly R . B eck and T o nia S . B eck, H u sb and and Wif e, dated A p r il 2 0 , 2 0 0 4 , r eco r ded u nder in Book 208, at Page 58, Office of Recorder of Deeds in D avi ess Co u nty, at G allatin, M isso u r i, th e u nder s ig ned M B & S , L L C, a M isso u r i L im ited L iab ility Co m p any w ill o n M ay 2 9 , 2 0 1 8 , b etw een th e h o u r s o f 9 : 0 0 o ’ cl o ck a.m . and 5 : 0 0 o ’ cl o ck p .m ., at th e S o u th D o o r o f th e D avi ess Co u nty Co u r th o u s e in G allatin, M isso u r i, se ll at p u b lic ve ndu e to th e h ig h est b idder f o r ca sh : A ll o f th e S o u th H alf o f L o t F o u r ( 4 ) and all o f L o t F ive ( 5 ) in B lo ck O ne ( 1 ) o f E lb er t’ s F ir st S u b - D ivi si o n o f M cD o w ell’ s A dditio n to th e City o f G allatin, M isso u ri to sa tisf y sa id deb t and co s le is 2 : 0 0 p .m . a

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF DAVIESS COUNTY, MISSOURI P RO BA TE D I V I S I O N - E state N o. 18 D V -P R0 0 0 0 4 I N T H E M A T T E R O F : Z A CH A R I A H M I CH A E L B R Y A N H A R D I N , D O B : 0 1 / 2 0 / 1 3 , A M ino r . NOTICE UPON ORDER FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION S T A T E O F M I S S O U R I to : JA S O N S M I T H You are notified that an action has been commenced ag ainst yo u in th e Cir cu it Co u r t o f D avi ess Co u nty, M is so u r i, th e o b j ect and g ener al natu r e o f w h ich is a P etitio n f o r th e A p p o intm ent o f G u ar dian and Co nse r va to r o f M ino r Ch ild. T h e nam es o f all th e p ar ties to th is act io n ar e st ated ab o ve , and th e nam e and addr ess o f th e atto r ney f o r P etitio ner is: Ju lia R . F illey, 1 0 8 N o r th M ar ke t S tr eet, G allatin, M isso u ri6 4 6 4 0 . You are further notified that unless you file an answer o r o th er p leading o r sh all o th er w ise ap p ear and def end ag ainst th e af o r em entio ned p etitio n w ith in 4 5 days af ter MAY 2, 2018, the date of first publication of this notice, j u dg m ent b y def au lt w ill b e take n ag ainst yo u . I T I S O R D E R E D th at a co p y h er eo f b e p u b lish ed ac co r ding to law in th e G A L L A T I N N O R T H M I S S O U R I A N a new sp ap er o f g ener al ci r cu latio n p u b lish ed in D avi ess Co u nty, M isso u r i. D ated: A P R I L 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 Cir cu it Cler k B Y : / S / JE N N I F E R H O P P E N T H A L E R D ep u ty Cler k IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF DAVIESS COUNTY, MISSOURI Case No. 17DV-CC00070 D o nald E . O dette A nd Jo dy L . O dette, H u sb and A nd Wif e, P laintif f s, v . L ar r y S ca nlan A nd T h e U nkn o w n H eir s, D evi se es, G r antees, A si g nees, D o nees, A lienees, L eg atees, A dm inist r ato r s, E xe cu to r s, P er so nal R ep r ese ntative s, G u ar dians, Co nse r va to r s, M o r tg ag ees, T r u st ees, A nd L eg al R ep r ese ntative s O f L ar r y S ca nlan, A nd A ll O th er P er so ns, Co r p o r atio ns, O r S u ce so r s Claim ing B y, T h r o u g h O r U nder L ar r y S ca nlan, D ef endants. N O TI C E UP O N O RD E R F O R S E RV I C E BY P UBL I C A TI O N T h e S tate o f M iss o u r i to th e ab o ve - nam ed D ef endants: You are hereby notified that an action has been comm ence d ag ainst yo u in th e Cir cu it Co u r t f o r th e Co u nty o f D avi ess, M isso u r i, th e o b j ect and g ener al natu r e o f w h ich is a P etitio n f o r D ecl ar ato r y Ju dg m ent and to Q u iet T itle, and w h ich af f ect s th e f o llo w ing descr ib ed p r o p er ty: A ll o f L o ts # 1 1 7 1 & 1 1 7 2 o f Valkyr ie Valley S u b - divi si o n, a S u b - divi si o n o f p ar t o f S ect io ns 8 , 9 , 1 6 , 1 7 , 1 8 , 1 9 and 2 0 , in T o w nsh ip 5 9 N o r th , R ang e 2 8 West , D avi ess Co u nty, M isso u r i, to g eth er w ith r ig h ts o f ac ce s, eg r ess and ing r ess o ve r and u p o n all p latted r o ads, st r eets, and w ays o f sa id su b - divi si o n all as sh o w n b y th e r eco r ded p lats th er eo f . S u b j ect , h o w eve r , to th e lim itatio ns, co ve nants, r est r ict io ns, r ese r va tio ns and ease m ents o f r eco r d, if any. T h e nam es o f all p ar ties to sa id act io n ar e st ated ab o ve in th e ca p tio n h er eo f and th e nam e and addr ess o f th e atto r ney f o r th e P laintif f s is D r ew F . D avi s, P .O . B o x 6 1 0 , Cam er o n, M isso u ri 6 4 4 2 9 . You are further notified that, unless you file an answer o r o th er p leading o r sh all o th er w ise ap p ear and def end against the aforesaid Petition within forty-five (45) days after the date of the first publication of this notice (or other date to w h ich th e deadline is ext ended b y th e Co u r t) , j u dg m ent b y def au lt w ill b e r ender ed ag ainst yo u . Witness m y h and and th e se al o f th e Cir cu it Co u r t th is 9 th day o f M ay, 2 0 1 8 . ( S eal) B y: / s/ Cler k o f th e Cir cu it Co u r t Ju dg e/ Cler k/ D ep u ty Cler k o f th e Cir cu it Co u r t Date of first publication: May 16, 2018


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SCHOOL

May 16, 2018

Lightning steals Panther Mojo

Blue Jays rally late to end Pattonsburg baseball season

L ef t to R ig h t: Jac o b Wils o n, A lly Jo h ns o n, K ar ley S alm o n, Z o e B r adf o r d, and E s s ie William s o n.

NHS members volunteer May 14 at autism clinic

The Gallatin National Honor Society sent five members to Olathe, KS, to volunteer at the Kids TLC Autism Clinic on May 14. Students were fortunate enough to participate in all daily routine activities at the school. Activities included playing with the kids at recess, group and individual sessions, lunch, and even partnering on an arts and crafts activity. The day ended with an in-depth question/answer session with staff. NHS members are excited to help purchase items on Kids TLC’s wish list and deliver them next fall.

B ac k R o w : A lly Jo h ns o n, K ar ley S alm o n, Z o e B r adf o r d, E s s ie William s o n, Jac o b Wils o n. F r o nt R o w : A dv is er , K im Jo h ns o n and Jax o n H u m p h r ey.

Students compete in juried art show On May 4, students from Pattonsburg High School competed in the 14th annual Lawson High School Invitational Juried Art Show which is sponsored by the Lawson High School Art Club as a club fundraiser. There were a total of 173 pieces entered from area schools, including Cameron Middle School, Pattonsburg, Richmond High School, Cameron High School, and Lawson High School and Middle School. The show was judged by Lari Bunch. Lari has worked in the visual and performing arts for over 20 years. She has taught

and studied art most of her life and currently does graphic design and owns an apparel business. Mrs. Sherry Siever, art teacher at Pattonsburg, entered 13 pieces of work in the show based on their artistic merit. The following students won medals or ribbons at the show: Draven Mikes, “Lost in space,” 1st place overall; Jillian Plymell, “Cityscape,” 2nd place Middle School; and Grace Warner, “Boom,” and Madison Hulett, “Lost in Color,” honorable mention. These students also had work

Monday night’s fifth inning lightning break did the Pattonsburg Panthers no favor. The Panthers, leading 4-2 when inclement weather moved in from the southwest, gave up three runs when play resumed and saw their season end one game short of the Class 1, District 15 baseball final. Northeast Nodaway made the most of its final at bats. Shortstop Spencer Weir bashed a home run to lead off the bottom of the fifth inning and pitcher Ethan Adwell helped his cause with an RBI-double to tie the game at 4-4. The Panthers, who could muster only one hit and three total base runners in the final three frames, lost the lead in the sixth inning when the Bluer Jays sent nine batters to the plate, scoring three runs on a single, error, three walks and a hit batter. Pattonsburg opened the game with a run when Peyton Jones walked and came home on a twoout single by Logan Pankau. NE Nodaway tied the game in the bottom of the first on a lead-off error and a bloop single to right field that fell between second base, center and right. The Panthers took advantage of some shaky play by the Jays in the third inning. Cameron Jones

led off with a walk. Cole Dilley struck out on a wild pitch but made it safely to first as Jones took second. Pankau drove in Jones on an infield single. Connor Ireland took a pitch in the back to load the bases. Justin Booth singled to score Dilley. Peyton Jones hit into a 4-6-3 double play that scored Pankau to give the Panthers a 4-2 cushion. The Jays tallied a lone run in the fourth inning on a walk and RBI-single from Spencer Gray. The Panthers blasted Grundy County, 17-0, in the district opener last Friday. Peyton Jones tripled, singled twice and scored four runs. Cameron Jones tripled, homered, drove in four runs and scored twice. Dilley singled twice, walked, was hit by a pitch and scored four times. Pankau singled, doubled, homered, drove in four and scored four runs. Booth anchored the lower part of the Panther batting order with two RBI and a run scored. Connor Ireland scored a run. Kaden de Jong singled and drove in three runs. Dylan McCrary scored twice for the Panthers. Pattonsburg finished 14-2 on the season. The only other Panther loss came at the hands of Class 3 Trenton early in the season.

in the show: Matt Henry, Justin Booth, Peyton Jones, Shelby Jones, Angelina Anderson, Brittany Adams, Shelby Snider, Melanie Rogers, and Katie Warford. *****

Memorial Day weekend will bring an increase of motorists on the roadway. Whatever your plans are, remember that Missouri’s roads are for all motorists. Drive courteously. When in doubt, give the other motorist the right-of-way. We want everyone to arrive at his or her destination safely and have a great holiday. A public service announcement from this newspaper and your Missouri State Highway Patrol.

orth Daviess fifth and si th graders are pictured, left to r ig h t, b o tto m r o w , E m ily Wr ig h t, A lex Cr im , T r is tan Cr o w ley, D ylan L inth ic u m , Cam er o n A f f u s o ; m iddle r o w , L u k as Jo h ns o n, Jaiden R ainey, Jes s e S m ith , Jay B ak er , K enneth B r o w ning , O c tav io u s S im s - P ayne, K r is to p h er S tr etc h ; to p r o w , M r s . G r anier , Z ak ier a S im s - P ayne, T ys o n S tev ens , A s h lyn H u g g ins . O nline p h o to s at w w w .N o r th M is s o u r ian.c o m c o u r tes y o f B T C B ank

North Daviess prepares time capsule, to open in 2024-25 Students in Tina Granier’s fifth and sixth grade class at North Daviess R-3 recently finished a month-long time capsule project. The capsules will be opened in their senior year of school. The 2024 and 2025 graduates included letters, diaries, journals, and a platform speech for class president elections in the time capsule. They also predicted what careers they’d have, where they’d be living, and what kind of family life they would be experiencing in the year 2041 — when most would be 35 years old. Through Title One paraprofessional teacher Vera Nelson, the students recorded data of current events, such as gas and milk prices. Mrs. Nelson had the students write a complete summary report in three to five paragraphs, utilizing the introduction, conclusions and general writing process of “Kali,” the eight-chapter journey of the polar bear, provided through the Gallatin North Missourian. Students were encouraged to read daily from the newspapers and collect six articles of interest in their personal time capsule. The time capsule project concluded with a class picture and decorating the outside of their capsules with autographs and drawings. North Daviess Principal Kelly Hightree visited the classroom almost daily to see the progress and encourage the writing that the students were finding fun, but at the same time educational.


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Bulldogs qualify 6 for 6 Class 2 state events Six Gallatin R-5 track and field athletes will head to Jefferson City this weekend for the MSHSAA Class 2 Track and Field Championships after passing qualifying tests at Saturday’s sectional held at Lathrop High

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Jumpin’ Joneses lead Panther efforts Three Pattonsburg Panthers will travel to Jefferson City this weekend to compete in three field events in the Class 1 MSHSAA Track and Field Championships to be held at Jefferson City High School. Brothers Peyton and Cameron Jones each qualified at Saturday’s sectional at Lathrop in the long jump and triple jump events. Brett Curtis also qualified for state for the Panthers in the high jump. Peyton, a senior, finished first at sectional in the triple jump with a jump of 43’3”, just two inches short of last season’s state best. Peyton finished fifth last season in the Class 1 triple jump and was a state qualifier in 2016. Peyton also finished third in the sectional long jump event with a leap of 19’10”. He placed seventh at state in 2017. Cameron, a freshman, took second in the sectional triple jump with a distance of 42’9.25”, and finished fourth in the long jump with a leap of 19’8.5”. Curtis is a two-time Class 1 state qualifier in the

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to this weekend’s state tournament. Baker ran 53.81 to finish just under seconds short of the winning pace by Hamilton’s Derek Dixon. Baker joined Aidan Adkison, Johnny Stout and John Gibson for a third place finish in the 4x800 meter relay. They shattered their previous best time of 9:04.64 by qualifying for state in 8:49.90. Following are times for Gallatin’s state events: Boys 4x800 Relay 11 a.m., Friday Girls 1600m Run 1:20 p.m., Friday Boys 400m Prelim 2:15 p.m., Friday Boys 3200m Run 4 p.m., Friday Boys 1600m Run 12:30 p.m., Saturday Boys 400m Final 1:05 p.m., Saturday

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School. Claire Hemry and Ayden Wayne continued to post personal best times as they both qualified for state in two events. Hemry won the 1600 meter run in 5:33.32, knocking four seconds off her previous best time. She also finished third in the 800 meter run and took another four seconds off her best in that event. Wayne won both the 1600 and 3200 meter races at Saturday’s sectional. His time of 4:53.42 in the 1600 was just over two seconds better than his previous best at district. Wayne won the 3200 meter race in 10:57.88. A fourth place finish in the 400 meter dash sends Noah Baker

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high jump. He finished second at Saturday’s sectional at a height of 6’2”, which was an inch under the Class 1 championship height from a year ago. Curtis also qualified for state in 2017. Following are state times for Panther events: Boys Long Jump - 10 a.m., Friday; Boys High Jump - 1:30 p.m., Friday; Boys Triple Jump - 10 a.m., Saturday.

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F riend s in C h rist Shonna Morrison led the opening, and Peggy Earnst prayed for the congregation. The praise song was “Guardian Angel.” We began a new sermon series “The Grass is Always Greener” by Clay Scroggins of North Point Church in Atlanta, GA. The message was called “The Other Side” and was based on 1 Samuel 9:1 and 1 Samuel 18:6-9. G allatin A ssemb ly of G od The adult Sunday School class study was from II Corinthians 1011. We learned of the Apostle Paul’s warning to the church about false teachers who made themselves appear to be the answer, rather than giving glory to Christ. Clyde Lint led the study and said, “Learn the truth of God’s word so that you will recognize false teachers.” The service began with “This is the Day.” This week’s offering was received as we sang “Marching On.” Tina McFee gave a report of giving to the missionaries. Tim Johnson shared the prayer requests and led in praying. Mothers were recognized with a special word, a prayer, and a gift. Worship time was by Zoe Smith, which included “Old Time Power.” It was announced the New Creation singers will be ministering at 10:45 a.m. on May 20. Pastor Smith gave the message using Proverbs 1:10 and 15 as the text. He spoke of a mother’s value to her family as God designed. A ltamont United Meth od ist

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www.NorthMissourian.com Worship theme was “We are all Members of the Family of God.” Choral call to worship was “Surely, the Presence of the Lord.” Children’s time was “The Love of a Mother to Her Child.” Pastor Marilyn gave a tribute to our three graduating seniors, Blythe Hunter, Corbin Toney and Briar Roll. She gave each one a beautifully wrapped student Bible. Her message was “God’s Nightlight.” A shampoo basket for mothers was passed around and red carnations were given to all ladies. Special music was a tape by Tim Parton “She Danced” and Blythe Hunter presented a solo, “Amazing Grace.” We were happy to have Pastor Marilyn’s daughter, Melanie and family, and the Steth Collins family of Lenexa, KS, as visitors. Decorated cakes and drinks were served following worship time. Prayer continues for Vanda Davis for strength. L ake V iking “Don’t Lose Sight” was Pastor Robert Nelson’s sermon, from II Timothy 1:1-14. The special music “I Can Only Imagine” was by Pastor Nelson. The Ladies Bible Study Group will meet at 11 a.m. on Wednesday. The choir will practice at 6 p.m. Wednesday and the Youth Group will meet at 6:30 p.m. The evening Adult Bible Study Group will meet at 7 p.m. O liv e Bap tist Brother David Leeper’s Sunday

morning message was “Justification by Faith Brings Peace With God” from Romans 5. Staci Gatton’s children’s message was “Show Your Love” from I John 4. The children presented flowers to all the ladies in the congregation in honor of Mother’s Day. We recognized our graduating seniors and presented each one with a Bible. Special music was by Matt Defowe and Tracey Miller. Business meeting was held after morning worship. Sunday afternoon service is at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday evening service will be starting June 6 at 7:30 p.m. Early morning prayer service will be held at 9 a.m. before Sunday school on the first Sunday of each month. Bible school is scheduled for July 12-15. P attonsb urg C h ristian Bro. Terry Oliphant morning message was from John 19:26-29 “Seven Ways to Love Your Mother.” Happy birthday to Jennifer Moore. Prayer requests were for Mary Mott, Trevor Teel, Althea Rhodas, Evelyn Bayne, Jo Hulet, Eugene Stitt, Ronny Cornett, Linda Butler, Debra Applegate, Martin Zimmerman, Susan Holsburg, Sharon Milka, Jerry Steele, Christy Amos, Josie shock, Lisa Wallace, Presley Sherman, Sylas Smith, Dale Stogdill, Rylan Burnet, Barbara Macy, Aspen Clark, John and Janie Beel, and the families of Tracy Baker and Amy Mefford. G allatin United Meth od ist Pastor Mike opened the worship service as Jan Johnson, organist,

played the prelude. He also delivered the children message, “Mothers.” Pastor Mike’s sermon “Ascending to Greatness” was based on Luke 24: 44-53. The Pastor Parish Committee met with and reported on our new pastor who will be coming the first of July, since Pastor Mike is being moved to another Methodist church. Communion was served at the altar. Our graduating seniors, Madison Wood and Megan Cox, were recognized and presented Bibles. May 20 is Pentecost Sunday so be sure and wear red. Board meeting will be after church next Sunday. May 20 is a neighborhood barbecue at the Jamesport parsonage at 5 p.m. Prayers are for Jewell Holt, Ina Wright and Sierra Arndt. F airv iew Fairview opened with prayers for Vanda Davis, Kathy Wilkerson, Morris and Cleta Wright, LaVelle Gerratt, Aspen Clark, Kevin Caldwell, Rayland Adkison, Bill Pettit, Arlene Grimes, Pastor Landry, Joyce Perkins, Clyde Milliken, Jerry Steele, George Taylor and Alyssa Batson. Gospel Concert is May 19 at 6:30 in Kidder Park. Prayer was by Cindy Lang. Worship opened with “Doxology” and “Gloria Patri” and prayer by Raymond Searcy. Hymn “Trust and Obey” was by the congregation. Offertory hymn, “I Need Thee Every Hour,” was by Marilyn Searcy and prayer was by Betty McFee. Scripture was John

4:39-42 and the message was “Why Our Testimony Matters” by Pastor Shadrach Landry. Hymn was “God Be With You” and prayer was by Pastor Landry. All mothers received flowers for Mother’s Day. G allatin F irst C h ristian First Christian Church began the 8:20 a.m. worship service with the praise team leading the congregation in song. We held a child dedication service for six children. Carl Carder led announcements and opening prayer at both services. Pastor Corey Norman preached from Acts 19:1-2, “The Holy Who? Breathe.” FCC recognized all physical and spiritual mothers during both services. Kim Ness led the congregation in song at the 10:50 a.m. service. Prayer concerns this week are for the family of Amy Mefford. G allatin F irst Bap tist Welcome and announcements were presented by Bro. Garrett Trunk, and mothers were recognized. Mike Henderson led prayer time and Rick Willett read scripture. Jeremy and Mandi Ripple provided the special music. Bro. Garrett presented the morning message, and there was no evening service. The JOY Youth will meet on Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. Men’s Bible Study and Women’s Bible Study is on Tuesday evenings at 6:30. Our guest speaker for May 20 during the morning worship service will be IMB Missionary Carolyn Houts, who served on the mission field in Ghana.

Scenes from Gallatin FFA Banquet held May 3, 2018 ( S ee last w eek’ s ed ition f or th e b anq uet story. P ictures w ere unav ailab le f or last w eek’ s issue. )

ayden umps receives reenhand

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S h au nes s y E ato n r ec eiv es h er state proficiency pla ue from olin Beck for ood ervice

essica art receives the B Bank 100 ophomore A cholarship from lint anatta

essica art receives the the Outstanding ophomore Award from olin Beck

arli Beck, Riley Dutro,

Megan o receives the hapter tar armer Award

raydee Rains receives his state proficiency pla ue for iber and Oil rop Production

ayton erry receives the hapter tar in Agribusiness Award

Megan o receives the the ennis and lara roy Memorial cholarship from Dennis roy

lenn mit receives the armers Bank Achievement Award from ody Bird

S h au nes s y E ato n r ec eiv es th e Blue and old Award from olin Beck

Addison Burns receives her state proficiency pla ue for Agriscience Research ystems which was rewarded with first at tate

orestry eam: Addison Burns, Maice Mc eely, essica loria ernande

ayden umps,

Addison Burns receives the Outstanding unior Award and hapter tar in Agriscience

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Our town, our state, our nation, our world needs more Godly mothers (fathers also, but that is another story for another day). Godly mothers don't happen by accident, and they do not raise godly children by accident. I heard about a mother of three very active young boys who was asked by some sensitive soul, “If you had it to do over again, would you still have children?” The young mother responded, “Sure I would ...but not just the same ones.” That can be told as a joke, but I am not telling it as one. It is a serious matter to consider that our children do not turn out the way they do by accident. Godly mothers and godly children do not happen by accident. Planning, preparing, protecting, and persevering are necessities. You may not know who Jochebed is, but you surely have heard of her son, Moses. Exodus Chapter 2 does not name Moses' parents but it tells their story. Exodus 6 and Numbers 26 reveal their names, Aram and Jochebed. The first nine verses of Exodus 2 tell us how Jochebed got to be a godly mother. Verse one declares very simply with no explanation that both were from the tribe of Levi, the priestly tribe; thus, we see that Aram and Jochebed chose godly spouses. Your chances of being a godly mother are very low unless you marry a godly husband. You will not marry a godly husband unless you plan to do so. The Hebrews were slaves in Egypt. To keep them weak, the Egyptian Pharaoh ordered that all Hebrew boy babies be killed. Verse 2 says that Jochebed hid the baby Moses for three months. The point is that Jochebed risked her own life to save the life of her child. It also means that she was willing to subjugate her wishes and desires to the task at hand, protecting and nurturing her child. Hiding an infant who is being hunted by the authorities would be an all-consuming job. Being a godly mother is an all-consuming job. Verse 3 tells us that Jochebed prepared a basket of papyrus so that she could hide her precious baby in the Nile River. Can you imagine the care that went into preparing that basket? Can you imagine how much time was spent selecting the materials? The many coats of water-proofing? The many inspections that basket passed before it was deemed worthy for Jochebed to entrust her child to it? Preparation is necessary in being a Godly mother who raises a Godly child. Your chances of raising a godly child are very low unless you spend a great deal of time selecting and preparing and inspecting those things which you will entrust your child to. As a godly mother, you will need to examine closely the friends, entertainment, school, etc. that you entrust your child to. A godly mother regularly and consistently monitors and regulates her child's cell phone, internet, television, movies, friendships, etc. To do anything less is neglect. That is every bit as important as Jochebed's basket. The Hebrew language in verse 3 is very interesting. The word which we have translated as “papyrus basket” is exactly the same word used in Genesis 6-9 to describe Noah's Ark. These are the only two passages where this word is found. Noah's Ark and Moses' Ark are both pictures of the Lord Jesus Christ. Jochebed hid her child from the world for a while but when it became apparent that she could hide him no longer, she entrusted him to Christ. You have no chance of being a godly mother unless you place your child in the care of Christ. Keep in mind that your child is a free moral agent who will make his own decisions. You place him in the care of Christ and the rest is up to him; you will have done your job.

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Lois Yost paves the way for young women today, honored with Patriot Award from Gallatin DAR

The Gallatin Daughters of the American Revolution presented their Patriot Award to Lois Yost in a ceremony on May 9.

she was awarded the WWII Victory Medal; Asiatic Pacific Campaign; American Campaign; the Phillippine Liberation. “I enjoyed the service,” she said. “I’ve had a lot of benefits from it. I wouldn’t take anything for the experience.”

“We thank Lois for her service to our country and her example to our community,” noted Markay August, Chapter Regent, during the ceremony. “It is with great pleasure that we present our first Patriot Award to a woman, Martha Lois Yost.”

Women graduating from high school today are free to take whatever path they please — go to college, enter the workforce, join the military. Their way was paved more than 70 years ago by women like Gallatin’s Lois Yost. In the 1940s, War War II raged in Europe and the South Pacific and the traditional roles of wife and mother were forever changed as America called its young women to help with the war effort. They helped at home, on the farm and factory, and in uniform. In order to free men to fight, for the first time in America’s history, women drove trucks, became radio and telegraph operators, broke codes, repaired airplanes, and did whatever else was required of them. For Lois, whose memory must go back half a century to recapture that time, it was fun, but also scary, exciting, but also sad. Lois,

now 94, was born in Kansas and when she was four, moved with her family to a farm in Red Cloud, Neb. She graduated and taught school for two years in Nebraska and one year in Iowa. Around this time, her parents bought a farm in Daviess County. Another thing happened about this time — On Dec. 7, 1941, Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. After the horrific surpise military attack, Lois was not necessarily itching to get in the fight, but she was caught up in the wave of impassioned patriotism that swept across the country. “My oldest brother was in the Army. My youngest brother was in the Navy Seabees. My sister worked as a civilian secretary to a major in Washington, D.C. I wanted to do my part, too,” said Lois. “I think people were a lot more patriotic at that time in history.”

The next spring, Lois joined a unit of the Naval Reserve called WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) during WWII. Lois was only 20-years-old at the time. She needed to be 21 to join. So, in order to join, she had to have her parent’s consent, a preacher’s recommendation, and the recommendation of at least three neighbors. She got all that and went to boot camp at Hunter College in the Bronx, New York.

Markay August, right, presented ois Yost with the DAR Patriot Award L o is ’ s o n William ( B ill) attended th e ev ent. “Oh, I was young,” she said. “Everything was new and fun in a way.”

Lois was a gunnery inspector stationed in Pensacola, Fla. How did a 20-year-old girl from Missouri wind up in Florida teaching bomber crews how to shoot machine guns? For Lois it was almost a natural progression. “Being from the midwest, I didn’t have to be told to hold my rifle against my shoulder,” she told the Gallatin DAR at a ceremony to receive their first ever Patriot Award. In fact, she was such a good shot with her pistol that the trainers took bets on her. An article was written about her after her impressive display of marksmanship -- only one of her shots missed the bullseye. Lois said her classroom had room for a screen and a movie projector. The screen depicted each .50 caliber machine gun turret. The training was a mockup of an attack by a Japanese aircraft. “The bomber planes were the same as the Army’s B24, but the Navy called them PB442,” said Lois. “We used the screens to make sure the gunners had the right number of rads when shooting back at the zeroes.” The ‘zeroes’ were the Japanese war planes, Lois explained, and the ‘rads’ refers to the radius. Lois

was teaching these

Lois married Glen Yost after leaving the Navy. They lived on a farm by Pattonsburg and had three children. The were married for 56 years. Glen passed away in 2003. Lois is a member of the United Methodist Church of Gallatin and a life member of the VFW

young men lessons vital and highly valued…how to shoot a machine gun from inside the turret of a bomber…how to recognize enemy aircraft…how not to mistake the enemy for one of their own. In short, how to come out of the fight alive. Did it bother any of the young men to be taught by a woman? Hardly, Lois says. “They liked being taught by pretty young women,” she laughs. “There were six sailors and six WAVES that taught the classes. More often than not, the sailors asked for one of the WAVES to teach them.”

The crews came for training

for six weeks, left to take other classes, then came back for their finals before being shipped overseas to combat. Though Florida was a long way from the battlegrounds, there was no escaping death, tragedy and heartache that came with war. “Crew took off with green pilots,” recalls Lois. “An engine might catch on fire, or they’d do the wrong thing, bank on the wrong side, and crash right there on the field.” Lois remembers one plane that took off and was lost to the Bermuda Triangle. “It disappeared without a sign,” she says. “It was never heard of again. It was a mystery.”

Lois served for 22 months in the Navy Reserves, from 19421944. Among other citations,

L o is Y o s t w ith a p ic tu r e f r o m h er WA VE days . L o is h as a f ew p ic tu r es lef t f r o m h er tim e in th e N av y. S adly, m u c h o f h er b elo ng ing s , inc lu ding her uniform, was lost in a fire in 1

ois and other A wore eans for the first time Despite the women’ s “ r ev o lu tio n” b r o u g h t o n b y WWI I , th ey w er e s till r eq u ir ed to tak e u p a b r o o m and m o p and b u c k et and k eep th eir c las s r o o m s c lean. ois e plained to the DAR members that the training techni ue utili ed m o c k tu r r ets . E ac h tu r r et h ad a tr aining r o o m w ith a m o v ie p r o j ec ted o nto a s c r een dep ic ting attac k s b y th e Jap anes e air c r af t. T h e tr ainer had a pickle switch that synchroni ed with the pro ector and was used to ac c es s ac c u r ac y o f th e g u nner . T h is s ys tem w as th e p r ec u r s o r to modern-day simulators used in all aspects of military trianing CARPET CARPET VINYL VINYL

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Auxiliary. Lois has three children, nine grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild. Lois said she has especially loves two things in life -- flowers and babies--. Her family has given her five generations of babies; and on Mother’s Day her children helped her plant a flower garden. Lois has enjoyed her life as a wife and mother. But when Amercia needed her to switch roles and be something more and different, she answered the call. Would she do it again? “Oh yes,” Lois says. “If I was that young again, I would.”

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Pattonsburg graduates recognized May 6 The Pattonsburg R-2 Class of 2018 graduated on May 6. Top academic honors went to Peyton Jones, valedictorian, and Katherine Warford, salutatorian. The following scholarships and awards were presented during commencement ceremonies: Peyton Jones was V aled ictorian the recipient of the P eyton J ones George Washington Carver Award (top 10 percent of class), DAR Good Citizen Award, MFA Foundation Scholarship, Pattonsburg Lions Club Scholarship and the Kenneth N. and Rosemary B. Williford Foundation Scholarship.

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Bethany farmer to head FSA nationally

Katherine Warford was the recipient of the Dickerson Memorial Scholarship and the PEO Scholarship. Justin Booth and Peyton Jones received post secondary scholarships to Missouri Western State University. They each received the Dean’s Academic ScholarS alutatorian ship for $1,000. K ath erine W arf ord Peyton Jones, Katherine Warford and Jackson Zamora received College Preparatory Certificates. Jackson Zamora received the Boys State Scholarship.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue has announced the appointment of Richard Fordyce of Bethany to serve as Administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA). Mr. Fordyce will lead a network of over 2,100 county and 50 state FSA offices. He currently serves as State Executive Director for FSA in Missouri. The announcement prompted the endorsement of Congressman Sam Graves. He issued the following statement: “Richard is a close, longtime friend, as well as constituent, and I can’t think of anyone more imminently qualified to be FSA Administrator. His time as Missouri Director of Agriculture, State FSA Director for Missouri, and most importantly, as a family farmer, has prepared him well to lead this critical agency. Farmers across the country will greatly benefit from his leadership.”

Daviess Co. PWSD #2 - 2017 Annual Water Quality Report

MO1021080

DAVIESS COUNTY PWSD 2

(Consumer Confidence Report)

Public Water System ID Number: MO1021080

This report is intended to COUNTY provide you with 2 important information about your drinking water and the efforts made to provide drinking water. 2017 Annual Water Quality safe Report DAVIESS PWSD Public Water System ID Number: MO1021080 Attencion! Este informe contiene información muy importante. Tradúscalo o prequntele a alguien que lo entienda 2017 Annual Water Quality Report bien. [Translated: This report contains very important information. Translate or ask someone who understands this (Consumer Confidence Report) very well.] What is the source of my water? This report is intended to provide you with important information about your drinking water and the efforts made to provide safe drinking water. The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, Attencion! Este informeand contiene información muy importante. o prequntele que lo entienda bien. springs, groundwater wells. As Tradúscalo water travels overa alguien the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves [Translated: This report contains very important information. Translate or ask someone who understands this very well.] naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from What is the source of my water? the presence of animals or from human activity. The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and groundwater wells. As water travels Our water thethefollowing source(s): over the surfacecomes of the landfrom or through ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the water presenceisofsupplied animals or from human activity.water system through a Consecutive Connection (CC). To find out more Our drinking from another Our water thesources followingand source(s): about our comes drinkingfrom water additional chemical sampling results, please contact our office at the number Our drinkingbelow. water isSource supplied Water from another water system through a Consecutive Connection (CC). To find out more about our drinking water provided Assessment: sources and additional chemical sampling results, please contact our office at the number provided below.

Buyer Name DAVIESS COUNTY PWSD 2 DAVIESS COUNTY PWSD 2 DAVIESS COUNTY PWSD 2 Source Water Assessment

Seller Name GALLATIN PWS HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2 LIVINGSTON COUNTY PWSD 4 How might I become actively involved?

Source Water Assessment The Department of Natural Resources conducted a source water assessment If you would like to observe the decision-making process that affect drinking to determine the susceptibility of our water source to potential contaminants. quality or if you have any further questions about your drinking water The Department of Natural Resources conducted a sourcewater water assessment to determine the susceptibility of our report, please call us at 660-663-3225 to inquire about scheduled meetings or This process involved the establishment of source water area delineations for water potential contaminants. process involved the establishment of source water area delineations each wellsource or surfacetowater intake and then a contaminantThis inventory was contact persons. performed delineatedwater areas tointake assess potential threats to each for eachwithin wellthose or surface and then a contaminant those delineated areas Doinventory I need towas take performed any specialwithin precautions? source. Assessment maps and summary information sheets are available on Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than to threats to each source. Assessment theassess internet atpotential http://drinkingwater.missouri.edu/swip/swipmaps/pwssid.htm. To maps and summary information sheets are available on the general population. Immunocompromised persons such as persons with the internet To access the maps for your water sysaccess the mapsat forhttp://drinkingwater.missouri.edu/swip/swipmaps/pwssid.htm. your water system you will need the State-assigned cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ identification code, whichthe is printed at the top of this report. Thecation Source code, Water which is printed at the top of this report. The Source Water tem you will need State-assigned identifi transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some Inventory Project maps and information sheets provide a foundation upon and infants can bewhich particularly at risk from infections. These people Inventory maps and information provide a elderly, foundation upon a more comprehensive source which a more Project comprehensive source water protection plansheets can be developed. should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. water protection plan can beindeveloped. Why are there contaminants my water? EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Drinkingare water, including bottled water, mayin reasonably be expected to contain Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Why there contaminants my water? at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). Drinking water, indicate including bottled may be expected to contain at least small amounts of some does not necessarily that water poses awater, health risk. Morereasonably information Abbreviations about contaminants and health effects can be obtained bydoes calling not the necessarily indicateTerms contaminants. Thepotential presence of contaminants that and water poses a health risk. More Population: 2448. This is the equivalent residential population served including non-bill Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection paying customers. 4791). MCLG: Maximum Contaminant Level Goal, or the level of a contaminant in drinking water Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of Contaminants that may bemay presentbe in source waterininclude: Contaminants that present source water include:safety. A. Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from MCL: Maximum Contaminant Level, or the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed A. Microbial such as viruses and bacteria, which come from sewage treatment plants, septic in drinking may water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available sewage treatmentcontaminants, plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and treatment technology. wildlife. systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. SMCL: Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level, or the secondary standards that are B. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturallyguidelines occurring for contaminantsor and may cause cosmetic effectsstormwa(such as B. Inorganic such asindustrial, salts and metals, which non-enforceable can be naturally result from urban occurring or resultcontaminants, from urban stormwater runoff, or domestic or tooth discoloration) or aesthetic effects (such as taste, odor or color) in drinking ter runoff,discharges, industrial, orgas domestic discharges, oilskin and gas production, mining, ornot farming. wastewater oil and production,wastewater mining, or farming. water. EPA recommends these standards but does require water systems to comply C. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from amay varietycome of sources sucha variety AL: Action or the concentration contaminant which,urban when exceeded, triggers C. Pesticides and herbicides, which from ofLevel, sources such asof aagriculture, stormwater as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. runoff, and residential uses. TT: Treatment Technique, or a required process intended to reduce the level of a D. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic contaminant in drinking water. chemicals, whichchemical are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum D. Organic contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of 90th percentile: For lead and Copper testing. 10% of test results are above this level and production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and 90%come are below this level. industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. Range of Results: Shows the lowest and highest levels found during a testing period, if E. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result septic systems. only one sample was taken, then this number equals the Highest Test Result or Highest of oil and gas production and mining activities. Value. or be the result of oil and gas production and mining E. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring RAA: Running Annual Average, or the average of sample analytical results for samples activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the Department of Natural taken during the previous four calendar quarters. LRAA: Locational Running Annual Average, or the locational average of sample Resources prescribes regulations which limit the certain the Department In order to ensure that tap water is amount safe toof drink, of Natural Resources prescribes regulations which analytical results for samples taken during the previous four calendar quarters. contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Department of Health Total Trihalomethanes (chloroform,Department bromodichloromethane, limit the establish amountlimits of for certain contaminants inwhich water by public water systems. of Health regularegulations contaminants in bottled water mustprovided TTHM: dibromochloromethane, and bromoform) as a group. provideestablish the same protection health. tions limits for forpublic contaminants in bottled water whichHAA5: must provide same forandpublic health. Haloacetic Acidsthe (mono-, di- and protection tri-chloracetic acid, mono- and diacid) as a group. Is our our water meeting other rulesrules that govern our Is watersystem system meeting other that govern ourbromoacetic operations? ppb: parts per billion or micrograms per liter. operations? The Missouri Department of Natural Resources regulates ppm: our parts water system andperrequires us to test our water on per million or milligrams liter. The Missouri Department of Natural Resources regulates our water system n/a: not applicable. aandregular basis safety. Our system has assigned theTurbidity identifi cation number MO1021080 for the requires us to testto ourensure water on aits regular basis to ensure its safety. Our been NTU: Nephelometric Unit, used to measure cloudiness in drinking water. testing limits. system has been assigned theour identification number MO1021080 for we the tested nd: purposes of tracking test results. Last year, fornota detectable varietyat of contaminants. The detectable results of purposes of tracking our test results. Last year, we tested for a variety of these testsThe aredetectable on theresults following report.pages Any violations of state requirements or standards will be further contaminants. of thesepages tests areof onthis the following of this report. Any violations state requirements or standards will be further explained later in thisof report. explained later in this report. How might I become actively involved? If you would like to observe the decision-making process that affect drinking water quality or if you have any further questions about your drinking water report, please call us at 660-663-3225 to inquire about scheduled meetings or Thursday, March 22, 2018 contact persons. Do I need to take any special precautions? Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immunocompromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/ CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). Terms and Abbreviations: Population: 2448. This is the equivalent residential population served including non-bill paying customers. MCLG: Maximum Contaminant Level Goal, or the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. MCL: Maximum Contaminant Level, or the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. SMCL: Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level, or the secondary standards that are non-enforceable guidelines for contaminants and may cause cosmetic effects (such as skin or tooth discoloration) or aesthetic effects (such as taste, odor or color) in drinking water. EPA recommends these standards but does not require water systems to comply AL: Action Level, or the concentration of a contaminant which, when exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. TT: Treatment Technique, or a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. 90th percentile: For lead and Copper testing. 10% of test results are above this level and 90% are below this level. Range of Results: Shows the lowest and highest levels found during a testing period, if only one sample was taken, then this number equals the Highest Test Result or Highest Value. RAA: Running Annual Average, or the average of sample analytical results for samples taken during the previous four calendar quarters. LRAA: Locational Running Annual Average, or the locational average of sample analytical results for samples taken during the previous four calendar quarters. TTHM: Total Trihalomethanes (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform) as a group. HAA5: Haloacetic Acids (mono-, di- and tri-chloracetic acid, and mono- and dibromoacetic acid) as a group. ppb: parts per billion or micrograms per liter. ppm: parts per million or milligrams per liter. n/a: not applicable. NTU: Nephelometric Turbidity Unit, used to measure cloudiness in drinking water. nd: not detectable at testing limits. DAVIESS COUNTY PWSD 2 will provide a printed hard copy of the CCR upon request. The CCR will not be mailed, but is available upon request at 502 A South Main St., Gallatin. 660-663-3225. The CCR can also be found on the internet at www.dnr.mo.gov/ccr/MO1021080.pdf.

(Consumer Confidence Report)

The state has reduced monitoring requirements for certain contaminants to less often than once per year because Contaminants Report the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year. Records with a DAVIESS COUNTY PWSD 2 will provide a printed hard copy of the CCR upon request. To request a copy of this report to be mailed, sample year more than year old are considered No data older than 5 years need be inplease call one us at 660-663-3225. The still CCR can also be foundrepresentative. on the internet at www.dnr.mo.gov/ccr/MO1021080.pdf. cluded. If more than one sample is collected during the monitoring period, the Range of Sampled Results will show The state has reduced monitoring requirements for certain contaminants to less often than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants are the lowesttoand highest tested The Highest Test LRAA, or Highest Value must beolder below not expected vary significantly from yearresults. to year. Records with a sample yearResult, more thanHighest one year old are still considered representative. No data than 5the years need be included. If more than one sample is collected during the monitoring period, the Range of Sampled Results will show the lowest and highest tested maximum contaminant level (MCL) or the contaminant has exceeded the level of health based standards and a results. The Highest Test Result, Highest LRAA, or Highest Value must be below the maximum contaminant level (MCL) or the contaminant has exceeded the DAVIESS COUNTY PWSD 2 violation is based issued to theandwater system. level of health standards a violation is issued to the water system. Public Water System ID Number: MO1021080

Regulated Contaminants

2017 Annual Water Quality Report

Range of Sampled Highest (Consumer Confidence Report) Result(s) Unit MCL MCLG Typical Source Sample Point LRAA (low – high) (HAA5) DBPDUAL-01 2017 0 0-0 ppb 60 0 Byproduct of drinking water disinfection (HAA5) DAVIESS DBPDUAL-02 0 - 30.3 ppb request. 60 To request 0 a copy Byproduct drinking disinfection COUNTY PWSD 2017 2 will provide a29 printed hard copy of the CCR upon of this of report to bewater mailed, TTHM DBPDUAL-01 2017 21CCR can also 15 be - 19.8 80www.dnr.mo.gov/ccr/MO1021080.pdf. 0 Byproduct of drinking water disinfection please call us at 660-663-3225. The found on theppb internet at TTHM DBPDUAL-02 2017 59 33.8 - 69.3 ppb 80 0 Byproduct of drinking water disinfection The state has reduced monitoring requirements for certain contaminants to less often than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to Percentile: year. Records with aRange sampleofyear more than one year old are still considered representative. No data older than 5 90th 90% Sampled Sites yearsLead needand be included. If Date more than oneof sample is collected the Range the lowest and highest tested your water utilityduring the monitoring Results period,Unit AL of Sampled Results will showTypical Source Copper Over AL results. The Highest Test Result, Highestlevels LRAA,were or Highest Value must be below less than (low – high)the maximum contaminant level (MCL) or the contaminant has exceeded the level COPPER of health based standards and a violation is0.175 issued to the water 0.0192 system.- 0.242 2013 - 2015 ppm 1.3 0 Corrosion of household plumbing systems Disinfection Byproducts

LEAD

Monitoring Period

2013 - 2015

Contaminants Report

2.56 1.33 - 2.87 ppb 15 0 Corrosion of household plumbing systems Regulated Contaminants Violations and Health Effects Information

of Sampled During the 2017 calendar year, we had Monitoring the below notedHighest violation(s)Range of drinking water regulations. Disinfection Result(s) Unit MCL MCLG Typical Source ComplianceSample Period Point Type Byproducts Period LRAA Analyte (low – high) No Violations Occurred in the Calendar Year of 2017 (HAA5)Lead and DBPDUAL-01 2017 0 0-0 ppb 60 0 Byproduct of drinking water disinfection Special Copper Notice: (HAA5) DBPDUAL-02 2017 0 - 30.3 for pregnant ppbwomen60 0 children. Byproduct drinkingwater waterisdisinfection Special Lead and Copper Notice: If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health29problems, especially and young Lead inofdrinking primarily from TTHM DBPDUAL-01 2017 21 home plumbing. 15 - 19.8 ppb 80 2 is responsible 0 Byproduct of drinking water and components withlead service linescause and DAVIESSproblems, COUNTY PWSD providing high qualitydisinfection drinking water, Ifmaterials present, elevatedassociated levels of serious especially for for pregnant women and young TTHM 2017incan 33.8 -health 69.3 drinking water disinfection but cannot control theDBPDUAL-02 variety of materials used plumbing59components. When your water ppb has been80 sitting for 0severalByproduct hours, youofcan minimize the potential for children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines andyouhome lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, may wish to have your water tested. Information lead in drinking water, testing and steps you canquality take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe 90thon Percentile: Range of methods, Sampled plumbing. COUNTY PWSD 2 is90% responsible for providing high LeadWater andDAVIESS Sites drinking water, but cannot control Drinking Hotline (800-426-4791) orofatyour http://water.epa.gov/drink/info/lead/index.cfm. Date water utility Results Unit AL Typical Source Copper Over AL the variety ofsample materials used in plumbing components. When your wateronline hasatbeen sitting several hours, you You can also find results for all contaminants from than both past and present compliance monitoring the Missouri DNRfor Drinking Water Watch website levels were less (low – high) http://dnr.mo.gov/DWW/indexSearchDNR.jsp. To0.175 find Lead and Copper results foryour your system, type your water name in the box before titled Water System COPPER - 2015 - 0.242 ppmfor 1.3 0 system of household plumbing systems can minimize the2013 potential for lead exposure by 0.0192 flushing tap 30 seconds toCorrosion 2 minutes using water Name LEAD and select Find 2013 Water- Systems at the bottom of the page. The new you the15 water system and number, select andplumbing click the systems Water 2015 2.56 1.33screen - 2.87will showppb 0 nameCorrosion of household for drinking cooking. you concerned about leadChemical in your water, you may wish water tested. System Number.or At the top of the If next page,are under the Help column find, Other Results by Analyte, select and clickto on have it. Scrollyour down alphabetically to Lead and click the Analyte Code (1030). The Lead and Copper locations will be displayed heading Sample Comments. Scroll is to find your location Information onblue lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps youunder canthe take to minimize exposure available from and click the Sample for we thehad results. If yournoted houseviolation(s) was selected by the water and you assisted in taking a Lead and Copper sample from your home During theon2017 calendarNo. year, the below of drinking watersystem regulations. the Safe Drinking Water or atPWSD http://water.epa.gov/drink/info/lead/index.cfm. but cannot find your location in theHotline list, please(800-426-4791) contact DAVIESSAnalyte COUNTY 2 for your results. Compliance Period Type No Violations Occurred the Calendar Year offor 2017 You can also find insample results all contaminants from both past and present compliance monitoring online at

Violations and Health Effects Information Reseller Contaminants

Special Lead and Copper Notice:

Range of the Missouri Drinking Water Watch websiteespecially http://dnr.mo.gov/DWW/indexSearchDNR.jsp. Leadfrom and Highestfor pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking To If present, elevatedDNR levels of lead can cause serious health problems, waterfind is primarily Regulated Collection Water Sampled Sample Unit MCL Typical materials and components associated andwater home plumbing. DAVIESS COUNTY PWSD 2 is responsible for providing high quality drinking Copper results for your system, typelines your system nameResult(s) in the box titled WaterMCLG System Name andSource selectwater, Find Contaminants Datewith service System Result but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your (low water–has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for high) Water Systems at the the page. Thebefore new screen showoryou the water system name and number, select lead exposure by flushing yourbottom tap for 30 of seconds to 2 minutes water will for drinking cooking. about lead in your water, you may BARIUM 5/17/2017 HARRISON COUNTY using 0.173 0.173 ppm If you2are concerned 2 Discharge of drilling wastes; wish to havethe your Water water tested. Information on leadAt inPWSD drinking testing methods, andunder steps you take to minimize fi exposure is available Safe and click System Number. the top of the next page, thecanHelp column nd, Discharge Other Chemical Results 2 water, from from metalthe refineries; Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791) or at http://water.epa.gov/drink/info/lead/index.cfm. Erosion of natural deposits by Analyte, select and click on it. Scroll downpast alphabetically to Lead and online clickatthe blue Analyte Code (1030). The You canCHROMIUM also find sample results for all contaminants from both Drinking from Water Watch 3/10/2017 GALLATIN PWS and present 6.65 compliance 6.65 monitoring ppb 100the Missouri 100 DNR Discharge steel andwebsite pulp http://dnr.mo.gov/DWW/indexSearchDNR.jsp. find Lead andunder Copper results for your system, type your water system Scroll name in to the fi box Water System and Lead and Copper locations will beTodisplayed the heading Sample Comments. ndtitled your location mills Name and select Find Water Systems at the bottom of the page. The new screen will show you the water system name and number, select and click the Water 5/17/2017 HARRISON COUNTY 0.43 selected 0.43 by the ppm deposits; Water additive a click onFLUORIDE the Sample No. for the results. IfHelp your house was water 4system4 andNatural you assisted in taking System Number. At the top of the next page, under the column find, Other Chemical Results by Analyte, select and click on it.which Scrollpromotes down alphabetically PWSD 2 strong teethto Lead and clickCopper the blue Analyte Code (1030). The home Lead and Copper locations willyour be displayed under the heading Sample Comments. Scroll to find your location Lead and sample from your cannot fi0.27 nd location inppm the list,10please DAVIESS COUNTY NITRATE-NITRITE 5/17/2017 HARRISON but COUNTY 0.27 10 contact Runoff from fertilizer use; and click on the Sample No. for the results. If your house was selected by the water system and you assisted in taking a Lead and Copper sample from your home PWSD 2 Leaching from septic tanks, PWSD foryour your results. but cannot2find location in the list, please contact DAVIESS COUNTY PWSD 2 for your results.

Reseller Contaminants

SELENIUM Regulated Contaminants

7/6/2015 Collection Date

LIVINGSTON COUNTY PWSD 4 Water System

16.6 Highest Sample Result

BARIUM

5/17/2017

HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2

0.173

16.6 of Range Sampled Result(s) (low – high) 0.173

50

50

Unit

MCL

MCLG

Typical Source

ppm

2

2

100

50

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits Discharge from steel and pulp mills Natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits Erosion of natural deposits

MCLG

Typical Source Byproduct of drinking water disinfection Byproduct of drinking water disinfection Byproduct of drinking water disinfection Byproduct of drinking water disinfection Byproduct of drinking water disinfection

CHROMIUM

3/10/2017

GALLATIN PWS

6.65

6.65

ppb

100

FLUORIDE

5/17/2017

0.43

0.43

ppm

4

4

NITRATE-NITRITE

5/17/2017

HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2 HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2

10

10

Thursday, March 22, 2018

DAVIESS COUNTY PWSD 2 0.27

0.27

sewage; Erosion of natural deposits Erosion of natural deposits

ppb

ppm

Public Water System ID Number: MO1021080 SELENIUM

7/6/2015

2017 Annual Water Quality Report LIVINGSTON 16.6 16.6 ppb 50 COUNTY PWSD 4 (Consumer

Confidence Report)

Disinfection Byproducts

Monitoring Period

Water System

Highest LRAA

(HAA5)

2017

23

(HAA5)

2017

16

16.4

TTHM

2017

HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2 LIVINGSTON COUNTY PWSD 4 GALLATIN PWS

Range of Sampled Result(s) (low – high) 20.6 - 22.9

13

TTHM

2017

45

TTHM

2017

34

33.6

Thursday, March 22, 2018

HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2 LIVINGSTON COUNTY PWSD 4

Unit

MCL

ppb

60

0

ppb

60

0

13.2

ppb

80

0

31.5 - 45.3

ppb

80

0

ppb

80

0

Reseller Violations and Health Effects Information During the 2017 calendar year, the water system(s) that we purchase water from had the below noted violation(s) of drinking water regulations. Water System Type Category Analyte Compliance Period No Violations Occurred in the Calendar Year of 2017

Optional Monitoring (not required by EPA) Monitoring is not required for optional contaminants. Reseller Secondary Contaminants ALKALINITY, CACO3 STABILITY CALCIUM CHLORIDE HARDNESS, CARBONATE IRON MAGNESIUM MANGANESE NICKEL PH POTASSIUM SODIUM SULFATE TDS ZINC

Optional Contaminants

Collection Date

Water System Name

Highest Sampled Result

Range of Sampled Result(s) (low - high)

Unit

5/17/2017

HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2

376

376

MG/L

3/10/2017 5/17/2017

GALLATIN PWS HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2

137 46.9

137 46.9

MG/L MG/L

3/10/2017

GALLATIN PWS

465

465

MG/L

5/17/2017 3/10/2017 3/10/2017 3/10/2017 5/17/2017 5/17/2017 5/17/2017 5/17/2017 5/17/2017 3/10/2017

HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2 GALLATIN PWS GALLATIN PWS GALLATIN PWS HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2 HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2 HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2 HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2 HARRISON COUNTY PWSD 2 GALLATIN PWS

0.0173 29.9 0.00561 0.00237 8.02 4.07 135 90.9 576 0.00789

0.0173 29.9 0.00561 0.00237 8.02 4.07 135 90.9 576 0.00789

MG/L MG/L MG/L MG/L PH MG/L MG/L MG/L MG/L MG/L

SMCL

250

0.3 0.05 0.1 8.5

250 500 5

This report is being provided to you by: Daviess County Public Water Supply District #2 502 A South Main Street, P.O. Box 284, Gallatin, MO 64640 660-663-3225 Phone; 660-663-2327 Fax


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Agriculture

For Sale

Help Wanted

John Deere 318 Lawnmower/ garden tractor. Newer engine. Runs and operates great. Good paint. $1500. Also, John Deere D130 Riding lawnmower. Reconditioned. Runs and mows great. $800. 660-659-2537

OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE by Central Boiler Inc. FREE HEAT & hot water. Eliminate monthly heating bills. Call 660-707-3866 today. (No Sunday calls, please).

NIGHT SHUTTLE DRIVER: Must have Class A CDL. Works Sunday-Thursday 6pm-3am. Competitive Pay & Full Benefit Package. Graves Foods Chillicothe, MO. Apply within or call 660-247-2135

PAYING $75/ACRE FOR RENTAL PASTURE. Will consider any size and location. Can do any fence repair necessary. 816-787-4006 FREE Red Raspberry plants to give away. 1 1/4 m. east of Sherwood in Jamesport. 660-6846319

Automotive 2001 Pontiac Grand Prix GT 6 cyl. auto, silver in color, leather, very good condition, 176,000 miles. $2,200.00 660-749-5461. FROST AUTOMOTIVE: Auto and truck parts & accessories. See us for all your parts needs. We also make hydraulic hoses. South side Gallatin square. 660-663-2152 1969 Chevy stepside pickup, V8, auto, headers, M50 tires and Eagle Alloy wheels, old show truck customized. $5,500. 660749-5461

Business Opportunities ROOFING CONTRACTORS: Metal Roof Restoration and Flat Roof Products Manufacturer Looking for Qualified Individuals willing to receive training and install roofing systems. 40 Years of Top Quality Products and Developing Successful Business Owners. Investment Required. Training Provided. 816-425-1155

For Rent GALLATIN ESTATES APARTMENTS FOR RENT: 1 or 2 bdrm available. HUD vouchers accepted. Rental assistance available to those who qualify. Equal housing opportunity. Call 660-663-3114. CASE Skid Loader, 85hp, by the day, week or month. Contact Gallatin Truck & Tractor, Inc. 660-6632103 or 2104. STORAGE UNITS: Outside lighting, surveillance cameras, insulated to prevent large temperature variances, different sizes available. Located Hwy. O east of Gallatin. Critten Country Storage, 660-605-3350. NEW 4-Plex in CHILLICOTHE: MAINTENANCE-FREE LIVING - 2 bedroom, 2 bath, large 2 car garage, kitchen appliances furnished. CALL TODAY 660-2477712 KIDDER, MO 2BR duplex, energy efficient, washer, dryer, stove, dishwasher, refrigerator included. Lawn mowed, snow removal. $500 month $500 deposit. No pets. 816575-2211 or 913-558-2819.

For Sale BOATS FOR SALE: New & used boats & pontoons, several to choose from, just watch our website, www.lakevikingmarine.com or call 660-663-3722, Lake Viking Marine.

REACH OVER 17,000 households with your classified message in the Ad Zone ... only $7! (25 words or less). Call Gallatin 660-6632154 or Chillicothe 660-707-1820 to place your ad! Email: ads@gpcink.com. BASE ROCK, BLACK DIRT AND fill dirt. Huston Trucking & Construction, 660-663-3234 or 660334-0997. Cargo trailer, 12’ long, 6’ wide, 5’ tall, all new lights and wiring, tires are in good shape. $1,800 obo. Call 660-973-6757 FAST CASH. Guns, gold and silver wanted. Largest selection of used guns in the area. Cash buyer. Cash on pawn items. R&R Pawn, Cameron. 816.632.1787 Used Tires. Too much tread to throw away. Two sets of R16 and 3 older tires (235/75 R15) for farm use. Take one or all, $10 apiece. Ask for Ben at Gallatin Publishing Co., 660.663.2154 weekdays. Available 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. at Gallatin Publishing Co., 609B S. Main, Gallatin.

Looking for someone to help with yard work in Jamesport. 1 1/4 miles east of Sherwood. 660684-6319 Flexible part time positions available in Chillicothe & Brookfield for commercial and industrial janitorial services. Reliable transportation preferred. Call 660-973-6023 for more info.

TRAGER LIMESTONE ll S e r hed e t ne and e r k a lable

Gallatin Quarry 660-663-3101 Nettleton Quarry 660-644-5821 Office 660-646-5831 Crestview Home seeking RN full-time day shift and night shift. LPN full-time day and night shift. CMT’s evening shift. CNA’s night shift. Dietary cook and aids. Housekeeping FT. Please stop by 1313 S. 25th St., Bethany or submit application online www.visitcrestview.com. 660-425-3128.

Services

2005 5th Wheel Camper. Cedar Creek Silverback by Forest River. Fiberglass exterior. Rubber Roof good shape. 1 year old tires. Very good condition. 816-294-9528 Core gas-less trimmer/weed eater w/ battery, charger and nylon spool, works great, 3 yrs. old.; John Deere X300 tractor w/ 42” mower deck and rear wheel chains. Works great 5 years old. Serviced annually by Glenn Fry. Both as a set for $800. Call Gavin 660-973-8498

YOUR DIRT IS our bread and butter. Carpet and upholstery cleaning. David Baldwin, 816-632-2627 or toll-free 1-888-854-2949.

THE HAMILTON BANK checking/ savings accounts, loans, IRA’s and C.O.D.’s. Visit www.hamiltonbank.net or call 816-583-2143. New branch at Lathrop, MO. Member FDIC & Equal Housing Member.

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North Missourian

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CLASSIFIED DISPLAY ADS - (boxed ads) $5 per column inch CARD OF THANKS - $5; MEMORIAMS - $7.50, $12.50, or regular display rate if lengthy OBITUARIES - $15 for extra information; $40 for unedited; regular display rate if lengthy.

Services

Wanted

JULIA R. FILLEY, Attorney at Law. General Practice, Criminal Defense, Family Law, & Probate. Free Initial Consultation. West side of Gallatin Square. 660-663-2044

SILVER & GOLD COINS, dental gold, gold mountings, sterling silver, old watches & diamonds. Highest cash price paid. Junior Sandy 816-390-2027.

SEAMLESS GUTTERING, A-1 Leaf Guard, CHI Overhead Door, LiftMaster-Chamberlain Operator Sales, Installation & Service. Call for free estimate. Serving you since 2006! Miller Construction, Jamesport, MO 660-684-6950.

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FOR YOUR ASPHALT & SEALING NEEDS CALL: Griffin Asphalt and Construction LLC, S out of Trenton Mo. Larry 660-359-1182 or Brad 660-654-1746. 46 years of experience!! STUMP GRINDING. 660-749-5713 or 816-804-7948. Custom Bobcat work by Joe Buckner. Call for pricing 660-734-2826 Stowell’s Handyman Services, Todd Stowell (417) 298-1718, Electrical and Plumbing service calls, Small Remodel work Beery’s Custom Farm Service. Disking, cultivating, and more. Call Josh at 660-973-6547

Garage Sales ADVENTIST CHURCH THRIFT Shop, 1207 S. Clay, Gallatin, Mo. Open: Every Wednesday from 8am-4pm. Open during the noon hour. Free clothing at 1206 S. Willow entrance. Open 8am-3pm every Wednesday. 660-663-2478

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BIG GARAGE SALE - Friday and Saturday 8-5 p.m. Kitchen, tools, golf clubs, 65 rod and reels, 67 rods, and lots of other fishing items. 2011 Mariner Rd., Trenton.

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Farm ground wanted. Competitive rates. Aaron Landes 660-358-2682

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Wanted Wanting to buy standing timber: Cottonwood, maple, oak, walnut. Call 660-646-5082 after 6:00 p.m.

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HE WHO HAS a thing to sell and goes and whispers in a well, is not so apt to get the dollars as he who climbs a tree and hollers. Call The AdZone, at 660-707-1820 or 660663-2154.

Help Wanted HELP WANTED: Cook, Chillicothe Head Start, 29 hours/week. Visit www.greenhillsheadstart.org for job description and application, or call 660-359-2214. E.O.I. HELP WANTED: Kitchen Assistant, Chillicothe Head Start, 29 hours/week. Visit www.greenhillsheadstart.org for job description and application, or call 660-3592214. E.O.I.

HELP WANTED: Daviess/Grundy Head Start Home Visitor. Visit www.greenhillsheadstart.org for job description and application, or call 660-359-2214. E.O.I. DAILY ROUTE DRIVER Graves Menu Maker Foods. Must have Class A or B CDL & able to lift 80lbs. COMPETITIVE PAY, HOME EVENINGS, PAID VACATION & HOLIDAYS! Apply within or call 660-247-2135

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Winston FFA excels at recent convention

Addison Burns blossoms at plant competition, on to national level Addison Burns, a junior in the Gallatin FFA Chapter, received first place in state during the Agriscience Fair at the University of Missouri-Columbia on May 8. She will now compete at the national level during the National FFA Convention held Oct. 24-27 at Indianapolis, IN. Addison competed in the area of Plant Systems, Division V. In order to participate, Addison had to conduct a scientific research project pertaining to the agriculture and food science industries and present her findings to a panel of judges through a research paper, log book, dis-

play board and interview. Addison’s project involves studying the effects of synthetic auxins on chrysanthemum cuttings. The National Agriscience Fair recognizes student researchers studying the application of agricultural scientific principles and emerging technologies in agricultural enterprises. Addison is the daughter of Brantly and Tara Burns. Her paternal grandparents are Vicki Burns and the late Ronnie Burns of Gallatin and maternal grandparents are Kenneth and Sharon Lockridge of Jamesport.

C ora S tou t rece ive s new

sch olarship

Co r a S to u t is th e r ec ip ient o f th e D av ies s Co u nty F ine A r ts and L ib r ar y S c ienc e S c h o lar s h ip . Co r a p lans to attend N o r th w es t M is s o u r i S tate U niv er s ity and m aj o r in I nter ac tiv e D ig ital- M edia Vis u al I m ag ing . S h e is th e dau g h ter o f D w ayne and L is a S to u t o f G allatin. his is the first year for this county-wide scholarship, which is given b y th e f am ily o f Jan Jo h ns o n, th e 2 0 1 6 D av ies s Co u nty L ib r ar y B o ar d o f T r u s tees , and F r iends o f th e L ib r ar y, in g r atitu de o f Jan’ s 3 6 year s o f s er v ic e as dir ec to r o f th e D av ies s Co u nty L ib r ar y, and in r em em b r anc e o f p as t lib r ar ians w h o nu r tu r ed th e ap p r ec iatio n o f lib r ar ies , r eading , and fine arts hown above are Daren Adkins, ora, and an ohnson

The Winston FFA Chapter had several students excel in events at the 90th Missouri FFA State Convention in Columbia held April 19 and 20. The Entomology team that advanced from districts placed 27th with team member Connor Christensen placing 25th overall individually. The Entomology team consisted of Connor Christensen, Shelby Mason, Holly Caldwell, and Thomas Kile. The Winston Quartet consisting of Shelby Mason, Thomas Kile, Reagan Harrison, and Hannah Hullinger performed “Dr. Rockenstein” on the convention stage during the 2nd general session. Jacob Hullinger was recognized for his state Grain Production-Placement Proficiency Award for his Supervised Agricultural Experience program working J acob Hullinger for Smithfield. Students attended workshops and the career show when not competing, performing, or vol-

Wins to n R - 6 p ar tic ip ants at S tate F F A Co nv entio n.

Wins to n R - 6 F F A q u ar tet unteering with Courtesy Corp., and took a tour of Helmi’s Gar-

Winston FFA recognized for achievements The 2018 Winston FFA Banquet Awards were held recently with the following students recognized for their accomplishments: Area 2 Association Degree: Jacob Hullinger, Steven Muessig, Drew Neth; Creed Speaking Award: Reagan Harrison; MO Cattlemen’s Fall Speaking: Shelby Mason; State Talent Participants: Shelby Mason, Thomas Kile, Reagan Harrison, Hannah Hullinger; Career Development Events: Dairy Foods: Reagan Harrison, Hannah Hullinger, Tyler Muessig, Drew Neth; Entomology: Connor Christensen, Shelby Mason, Tyler Turner; Holly Caldwell, Thomas Kile (Team advanced to State); Food Science & Technology: Drew Neth, Jacob Hullinger, Steven Muessig, Tyler Turner. Completed Record Books — Placement: Connor Christensen-Gold rating; Secretary’s Book: Shelby Mason-Bronze rating; Treasurer’s Book: Reagan Harrison-Bronze rating; Reporter’s Scrapbook: Holly Caldwell-Bronze rating.

H o no r ar y Ch ap ter D eg r ees w er e p r es ented to H eath er and Ju nio r H u lling er and M is s B r ett Wilm es

Chapter Leadership: Tyler Muessig, Kyler Trimble, Tyler Turner, Jacob Hullinger; Chapter Scholarship: Reagan Harrison, Thomas Kile, Connor Christensen, Steven Muessig; Proficiency Awards: Jacob Hullinger Grain Production (1st place at Area); Steven Muessig Agricultural Sales; Drew Neth Home and/ or Community Development (2nd place at Area); Connor Christensen,Beef Production; Shelby Mason, Food Service; Holly Caldwell Vegetable Production. Additional award winners are pictured below. The 2018-2019 Winston FFA Chapter Officers are President Shelby Mason; Vice-President Holly Caldwell; Secretary S tar Ch ap ter Hannah Hullinger; Treasurer F ar m er : H o lly Caldw ell Reagan Harrison.

T h e B T C B ank S c h o lar s h ip w as p r es ented to H o lly Caldw ell b y Cindy Cr o ne.

G r eenh and F F A D eg r ees w er e p r es ented to L o g in G o ll, R eag an H ar r is o n, H annah H u lling er , T yler M u es s ig .

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O u ts tanding D E K A L B A g A c c o m p lis h m ent: Ju nio r : S h elb y M as o n D r ew N eth

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T anner Jo hnson nam ed F reshm an of the Y ear

S tar G r eenh and: H annah H u lling er

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Ch ap ter F F A D eg r ee: H o lly Caldw ell, G u nnar G o ll, T h o m as K ile, K yler T r im b le, S am U th e.

T anner Jo h ns o n p lac ed s ec o nd o n S atu r day at th e I o w a A th letic Co nf er enc e o u tdo o r tr ac k m eet w ith a p er s o nal b es t p o le v au lt o f 1 4 ’ 1 ¾ ” . Jo h ns o n w as als o nam ed “ F r es h m an o f th e Y ear ” f o r th e Centr al ollege (Pella, a ) men s track and field team entral s men captured th is year ’ s c o nf er enc e c h am p io ns h ip title. T anner is th e s o n o f M ik e and Co llena Jo h ns o n and a 2 0 1 7 g r adu ate o f G allatin H ig h S c h o o l.

den’s of Columbia along with the Union Star FFA Chapter.

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Gallatin ca ptured a third straig ht MS H S A A C lass 1 Golf C ham pionship on T uesday and sixt h ove rall state g olf title for the B ulldog s since 1 9 9 9 . W ith their trophy are sophom ore H aden B radford, senior C olin B eck, senior Gab e C ole, senior L og an B urns, senior Je tt S im m ons and C oach C had S ulleng er.

3rd STRAIGHT CLASS 1A

STATE CHAMPIONSHIP!

( co ntinued from

pag e 1 )

Garnett’s GHS best one-day total at state in 2002. Simmons’s 81 on Tuesday gave him a one-shot Gold Medal victory over Miller’s Presten Richardson. Four other golfers in the Class 1 field finished within three strokes of the winning pace. “Jett is a special player that obviously doesn’t come around very often,” his coach said. “He has a unique ability to go about his

business and not let things get to him,” he added. “He’s everything you want in a golfer.” Simmons’s first place finish gave the Bulldog senior an unprecedented four state medals, including fourth place medals in 2016 and 2017 and a fifth place medal in 2015. Gallatin’s success in the Class 1 tournament was a team effort that culminated in a third straight state championship. Gabe Cole shot 177 to finish in the top 30. Logan Burns

totaled 181 for 36th place among 88 competitors. Haden Bradford shot 188 and Colin Beck totaled 190 for two days. “We had five kids that could go down there and shoot under 100 both days,” Coach Sullenger remarked. “No one else had that!” Sullenger also thanked the community for following the team to Springfield. “We had well over 30 people down there,” he said. “That was the most, by far, of any school.”

Gallatin’s 1st Gold Medalist...

Jett Simmons won the Class 1 Gold Medal and is the first individual state g olf c ham pion in GH S history.

“ W e had well ove r 3 0 people down there. T hat was the m ost, b y far, of any sch ool! ” —

GH S B ulldog C oach C had S ulleng er

[ photos co urtesy B rad S im m ons]

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