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Green Point Christian College Limited A ministry of Green Point Baptist Church ABN 61 003 829 767

Annual Report

2018 “Excellence in Christ Centred Education”


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Table of Contents School Overview Information ………………..………………………………………………………………………….. 3 Contextual Information ..………………………………………………………………………………….…….. 3 Messages from Key School Bodies ……………………………………………..……………………………………… 4 Board Chairman ………………………………………………………………………..……………………………. 4 Acting Principal ………………………………………………………………………………………..…………….. 5 Student Representative Council ……………………………………………………………………..………. 6 Description in Plain Language …………………………………………………………….…………………………….. 7 School Strategies ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8 Priority Areas for Improvement ………………………………………………………………………..……. 8 Actions Undertaken to Promote Respect and Responsibility ……..…………………………… 9 Staff Information ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..……... 10 Summary of Workforce …………………………………………………………………..……………………. 10 Summary of Professional Learning …………………………………………………………………..…… 10 Number of Teachers ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 11 School Policies ………………………………………………………………………………………………….………..……. 12 Student Non-Attendance ………………………………………………………………..……………………. 12 Enrolment Policy and Procedures ……………………………………………………………..………….. 13 Anti-Bullying Policy ……………………………………………………………………………….……………… 17 Behaviour Management Policy and Procedures ………………………………………………..…. 22 Grievances Policy and Procedures ………………………………………………………………………… 46 Student Outcomes and Performance …………….……………………………………………………………….. 55 Outcomes in Standardised National Literacy and Numeracy Testing ……………..…….. 55 HSC and Year 10 Comparisons …………………………………………………………….……………….. 56 Secondary School Outcomes …………………………………………………..….……………………..... 58 Post School Destinations ……………………………………………………………………………………... 59 Student Information …………………………………………………………………………………………..…..………. 61 Characteristics of the Student Body ………………………………………………………………..……. 61 Student Attendance Rates ………………………………………………………………………………..….. 61 Retention Rates ……………………………………………………………………………………………..…….. 61 Financial Information ………………………………………………………………………………………….………….. 62 Statement of Faith …………………………………………………………………………………………….……………. 63


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School Overview Information Contextual Information Green Point Christian College was established in 1982 by Green Point Baptist Church with a vision to offer Christ centred education to the children of Christian families. The vision came from the desire of these parents to have the teaching of the home reflected in, and encouraged through, the teaching at school. Consistency is a firm basis for trust and when the home, Church and school work in partnership, this can be achieved. As a Christian school, our values and beliefs are founded in Jesus Christ and we aim to be obedient to His revealed Word, the Bible. Green Point Christian College is alive and vital; it is a place where the love of God is reflected in all we do and say, as we act as one of the agencies of Christian nurture for our students and their families. God’s Word remains the benchmark against which we critique our lives, where we return our students to the message “that Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today and forever.” The College encourages the fullest possible development of the spiritual, social, intellectual and physical potential of each student. Vision for the College Green Point Christian College has built a strong tradition of providing quality education in a Christian learning environment, aiming to see our young men and women challenged to strive for excellence and Godliness in every sphere of life. Our College’s Vision Statement is Excellence in Christ Centred Education and as such Green Point Christian College is committed to providing quality education at an affordable price. The College Board has developed infrastructure to enable the teaching programs of the College to keep pace with rapid educational change. Our technology resources support excellence in teaching for all students. Our vision of Excellence in Christ Centred Education maintains our focus, not only on teaching from a Christian perspective, but ensuring that our students recognise the importance of serving and service in response to what God has done for us in Christ. God’s Word indicates that there is a plan and a purpose for all people and the unique gifting of each student is treasured by staff as they nurture and develop the talents which lie within each one of them. Our College seeks, through education, to equip young people to make Godly choices at a time in history when secular and material values are challenging the basis of our society. “Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in the heavenly realms with every spiritual blessing in Christ.” Ephesians 1:3 Green Point Christian College is registered and accredited with the NSW Standards Authority (NESA). The College is also a member school of CSA and AIS.


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Messages from Key School Bodies Board Chairman This year has again seen the Board provide governance and policy oversight to the College in fulfilling its mission to provide “Excellence in Christ Centred Education”. Composition of the Board has remained stable with one small adjustment; Pastor Phil Blair stood aside for a brief period, with Rev Bob Hooper fulfilling the role as an alternate Director. The other Directors are: Kay Cooper, Samuel Tsang, Mal Rowson (Deputy Chair) and Kevin Sproats (Chair). Mr Michael Lowbridge, the College Business Manager, continued as Company Secretary. Under Michael’s guidance the Board reviewed and subsequently approved updates to College policies and procedures. The Board draws on the services of CSA and AISNSW, together with other professional training providers, as members continue to fulfil their professional development requirements. At the end of third term, after six years as Principal, the College farewelled Mrs Debra Wells. The Board acknowledged her faithful service and leadership and wishes her well for her future. During the year the Board undertook an extensive recruitment process seeking a new Principal. In July the Board appointed Mr Phillip Nash as the incoming Principal. Due to his commitments in Indonesia, Phillip is not due to take up the position until June 2019. Mrs Jane McLarty, the current Deputy Principal, was appointed by the Board to fulfil the role of Acting Principal pending the new Principal arriving. Substantial new property development commenced during the year. A significant upgrade and number of parking spaces plus improved access in, across and out of the campus will result. The work is expected to be completed by mid-2019. With the leadership team now settled, the Board felt it was an appropriate time to take a deep and considered look at the College, taking in such things as: its purpose, vision, beliefs, linkages to Green Point Baptist Church, governance structures, and constitution. A Taskforce has been assembled to work with the Board drawing representatives from the staff and Church. The Taskforce will commence work in January 2019 aiming to complete their review in the second half of 2019.

Kevin Sproats Chairman


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Acting Principal Green Point Christian College continues to embrace its heritage as a ministry of Green Point Baptist Church. It maintains the journey started 35 years ago by a group of men and women who had a vision and acted on that vision. The small school that started all those years ago is no longer, for it is now a thriving community spreading and sharing the gospel message whilst educating students through Christ centred educational practices. As always and often, it is important to acknowledge the support of Green Point Baptist Church for the sustaining power of the prayers and practical support they offer the College. To the Board of Directors, Mr Kevin Sproats, Mr Mal Rowson, Pastor Phil Blair, Mrs Kay Cooper and Mr Samuel Tsang; thank you for your governance, and for the wisdom and responsibility you demonstrate. With your support the College remains committed to the formation principles of its Statement of Faith and the expression of Excellence in Christ Centred Education. With a Godly and efficient Executive team, we are blessed to be able to guide and nurture staff. At the end of Term 3 2018, the College farewelled its Principal, Mrs Debra Walls. We are thankful for her godly leadership of the College for over six years and for her contribution to Christian education throughout her teaching career. In 2018 our Executive staff included Deputy Principal (Acting Principal Term 4 2018), Mrs Jane McLarty; Head of Secondary, Mr Peter McLellan; Head of Primary (Acting Head of Primary School Terms 1-3 2018), Mrs Jane McLarty ; Head of Professional Learning, Mr Matthew Cohen; and Business Manager, Mr Michael Lowbridge. The Executive is faithfully supported most professionally by Mrs Sue Parkinson, who also acted as Secretary of the College Company. We are blessed by staff who are called to Christian schooling and who commit so fully to the Vision of the College. We are blessed with wonderful students who serve with willing hearts, being authentic about their faith in the ultimate servant leader: Jesus. The College is also a place of activity, learning and laughter. With Swimming Carnivals, Athletics and Cross Country Carnivals K-12, and many sporting opportunities. There are also many co-curricular activities including Choir, Band, Musicals, Student mentoring programs, Student Representative Council, Public Speaking, Chess, Debating, MUNA, Coding classes, Drama Club, Art Club and our Mission and Service programs. Every aspect of life at the College continues to be dedicated to the service of our living God. When an entire staff acknowledges Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour, our purpose is clear, and our task set before us for “we look at the fields which are ripe for harvest” (John 4:35). It is most encouraging to see the servant heart of the College – whether it is in terms of mission or fundraising or caring for others. The College is a hive of activity with Mission and Service opportunities. Students and staff continue to reflect the College’s desire to spread the good news of Jesus Christ. From staff training teachers in Tonga; a team visiting Compassion Centres in Indonesia; and Secondary students teaching Scripture classes at East Gosford Primary School. Our connection with the Gulargambone Indigenous Mission (AIM) continues to gain momentum with two separate teams (one all girls and one all boys) travelling to these remote areas to share God’s Word, build relationships, bless the communities and support the work of the Indigenous Pastors. In 2018, 78 students sat the HSC. The College received three nominations for Encore, the NSW showcase for outstanding Music students. Congratulations to Maegan Cameron, Gemma Gardiman and Samuel Sheehan on your nomination. Amelia Ferry gained a place on the NESA merit list for being an “All Rounder”, achieving a Band 6 in all of her subjects; an outstanding accomplishment. The Creative Arts Faculty excelled again with 7 Band 6’s. Jane McLarty Deputy Principal (Acting Principal)


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Student Representative Council – Junior School The Student Representative Council is an elected body of students that speak for change. It is a wonderful leadership opportunity for class representatives. They learn to run a meeting, keep notes, elect speakers and raise concerns in a mixed age group; democracy in action. Our Year 6 Councillors were amazing. Right from the beginning of the year leadership potential was evident. Carol Soliman was our Chairperson; she was motivated and organised. Her team of Councillors, Alexander Blanch, Poppy Cameron, Lucas Hall, Ava Melenewycz, Matias Trewela and Grace Tweedie represented our school, their families, their class and their teachers with passion and integrity. A job well done to them all. The SRC Councillors ran an Anti-bullying Day (National Day of Action, Friday 16 March 2018), they decorated, made announcements, shared their experiences and packed up after a big day. I was so proud of their willingness to serve and lead a conversation on the importance of students being kind to each other. Their message for students to “tell bullies to stop, walk away, tell an adult and don’t be a bystander” was well received by all students K-6. The SRC introduced: • • • • •

buckets and spades for the Infants sandpit a plan for handball lines to be painted (this was postponed due to classrooms moving) clocks near student play areas tidying our school access to sport equipment during recess and lunch

As always, I was honoured to work with our Year 6 Councillors to make the SRC an active and important avenue for student leadership development. Throughout the year students became more confident to voice their opinions, gathered evidence to support their points and handled responsibility faithfully. I will leave you with the words of our 2018 Chairperson: “The role of the SRC is to improve and innovate within our school. In the year we have spent together we have certainly achieved that.” SRC Chairperson - Carol Soliman

Nicole van Wyk SRC Co-ordinator (Junior School)


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A Description in Plain Language of Parent Teacher and Student Satisfaction The staff of Green Point Christian College apply themselves with diligence and dedication to ensure that the focus of all teaching and learning is based in meeting the Vision and Mission of the College and the external expectation and accountabilities of NESA. The professional responsibilities of all staff are undergirded and supported through personal friendship and also their Christian fellowship at local Churches. There is a low turnover rate of staff at the College, which reflects the long-term commitment of the staff to the ethos and values reflected. Reflections from past and present students likewise support this satisfaction. We have commenced a Past Students’ Association and have welcomed our foundation students back to the College to share their experiences. Specific surveys for students about the processes and procedures continue to reflect a positiveness about what the College offers. Changes have been made where students and parents have raised ideas, and consultation and collaboration has taken place to the satisfaction of all concerned. There is a continuing satisfaction with the relationships that have been developed and continue to be developed at the College by all involved in striving for Excellence in Christ Centred Education. Student numbers at the College reflect a high level of student satisfaction. The College is undertaking a Sentiment Survey in Term 3 2019. Likewise, our parent body continues to remain a high priority, as the College places a special emphasis on the partnership aspect of teaching and learning. The College was formed to support the process of transformative learning and to be an extension of the home. We are also very encouraged by the support of volunteers at the College. The College has a very strong and reliable response and recording ethos which ensures parent and student concerns are considered in a timely manner and are responded to appropriately. Policy documents are evaluated to ensure that communication and referral pathways are established and followed, building a confident foundation which parents and students follow. Processes of review are available to any student or parent who feels that an issue has been inadequately handled. The staff at the College are dynamic and provide diverse opportunities for teaching and learning. There is a positive and hopeful feeling among the students of the College, reflected by their commitment to Vision and Mission, and their involvement in many service programs. The College maintains a strong profile in the community.


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School Strategies Priority Areas for Improvement Progress on Specific Improvement Targets for 2018: 1. Induction and transition of the new leadership positions of Head of Primary and College Principal. This has been a significant transition period with both positions having delayed starting dates in 2019. During this time both positions were filled by existing staff to maintain day-to-day functioning. 2. Introduction of Internal Professional Provider Training. This has been a positive outcome for the College which employs over 80 teaching staff and has allowed for increased mentoring and coaching. The College has extended an invitation to other schools in our network to join us in a variety of professional development activities. 3. Satisfaction survey – parents. With the transition of the above two Executive positions, surveys were not conducted in 2018. The College is planning a Sentiment Survey in Term 3 2019. 4. NAPLAN Data Analysis. NAPLAN Data Analysis continues to drive classroom practice. Staff development continues, particularly in the area of Explicit Direct Instruction, to ensure staff develop and students receive the best practices in education. Specific Improvement Targets for 2019 1. Induction and transition of the new leadership positions of Head of Primary (commenced January 2019) and College Principal (June 2019). As previously mentioned, both of these positions did not commence until 2019. The College will continue the process of transition. 2. Review of Vision and Mission. Under new leadership, the College will review current Vision and Mission, and examine linkage with Green Point Baptist Church. 3. Site Works. The College will undertake significant site works, including a Primary staffroom and offices, carpark upgrade and traffic flow initiatives. 4. Review of Policies and Procedures. The College will commence a cyclical review of all policies and procedures to ensure they reflect current practice. 5. Assessment and Reporting. The Primary School will review differentiated assessment and report format, with a plan to restructure the report format. 6. Feedback. The Secondary School will focus on effective feedback of student work.


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Actions Undertaken to Promote Respect and Responsibility Respect and responsibility are essential components of the procedures, processes and policies of Green Point Christian College. These are reflected within the College community, both intrinsically and extrinsically. All documentation is written to account for the express need to acknowledge and therefore respect our Lord and Saviour, and His revelation to us through the Word of God, our families, our leaders, others and ourselves, and the giftedness that God has given us both individually and corporately. We also foster respect and responsibility for the facilities and environment that have been entrusted into our care through devotions and professional development of staff and students, and learning opportunities for parents; we are encouraged to consider what it means to be respected. Respect is a responsibility; it is in fact not a right. Some of the characteristics of people who are respected include: being consistent, mindful of others, having integrity in all situations, expressing love and compassion and forgiveness. The responsibilities and expectations of each individual within our community have been centred on the desire to have relationships that are pleasing and honouring to God. These responsibilities and expectations are Biblically based to ensure our College community operates, so that all individuals grow in their relationship with God and others in a safe, uplifting environment. The desire to ensure our programs reflect Christian distinctives and that we incorporate Professional Teaching Standards developed by Christian Schools Australia, reflects our commitment and responsibility to ensure we fulfil our Vision of Excellence in Christ Centred Education. The College flies the Australian and College flags and celebrates ANZAC Day. We are also proactive in monitoring students who are engaged in activities outside the College community, ensuring they maintain the respect and dignity becoming of a student at Green Point Christian College. In dealing with the general public, they are made aware of the impact and responsibility of all their actions. We include in our program of study a number of activities that unite us as a community recognising different cultures and citizens. Likewise, the notion of service to promote respect and responsibility has been a significant focus of the College and will continue to be so in the future. God calls us to conform to His ways and bring honour to His name.


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Staff Information Summary of the Workforce Composition including Indigenous TEACHING STAFF Full time Part time TOTAL

NON TEACHING STAFF 60 31 91

Full time Part time TOTAL

23 32 55

Total staff in 2018 = 146

Summary of Professional Learning Undertaken by Teachers Professional Development remains an integral and strategic part of planning for Green Point Christian College in developing and maintaining our Vision of “Excellence in Christ Centred Education.” Our policies and procedures support a holistic approach, which whilst looking at the individual needs of specific teachers also supports the teaching and learning process of the whole community. At the College, Child Protection and National Curriculum continue to be a priority. All staff undertook Work, Health and Safety Training, whilst Higher School Certificate teachers who completed HSC marking engaged in an excellent opportunity to network with staff from other schools and sectors. New Scheme Teachers continue to be guided and supported by the Supervising Teacher responsible for growth and development of these teachers and the compliance needs associated with their continued professional association with NESA. This is a vital part of a school community and maintains the Christian distinctives of this program which is a focus. All Professional Development is designed with a holistic vision of the College at the forefront and is valued for the benefit it gives to the whole College community. We maintain compliance with professional regulatory organisations and look at professional development as an opportunity to deepen and strengthen the commitment we have to maintaining the distinctives of Christian education in our community. As always, Professional Development focused in planning our year with individual, corporate and specific Faculty professional development, which included: Child Protection Mandatory Reporting/Reportable Conduct; WHS Drills/Fire Safety; Asthma and Anaphylaxis Training; Careers Advisors’ and Teachers’ Conference; Learning Difference Convention (Primary School); Writing for NAPLAN; AIS ICT Management and Leadership Conference; AIS School Counsellors Conference; Curriculum Planning and Governance Seminars.


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Number of Teachers in the following categories who are responsible for delivering the curriculum: (i) Have teaching qualifications from a higher education institution within Australia or as recognised within the National Office of Overseas Skills Recognition (AEI-NOOSR) guidelines (ii) Have qualifications as a graduate from a higher education institution within Australia or one recognised within AEI-NOOSR guidelines but lack formal teacher qualifications (iii) Do not have qualifications as described in (i) or (ii) above but have relevant successful teaching experience or appropriate knowledge relevant to the teaching context

91 0 0


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School Policies The following policies are all available on the College website: • • • • • • • • •

Child Well-being and Protection Policy Uniform Policy Anti-Bullying Policy Privacy Policy Behaviour Management Policy and Procedures Enrolment Policy Conditions of Enrolment Code of Conduct – Parent, Guardian, Visitor Grievance Policy and Procedures

Availability of Policies These policies are consistently monitored. Full texts of policy documents are available by contacting the College office. All policies of the College are monitored at regular intervals to see whether or not they continue to meet the emerging needs of the College community. Advice in respect to policy changes is also sought from the Association of Independent Schools (AIS), the network of schools which comprise CSA, and the College’s Legal Advisors.

Description of How Student Non-Attendance is Managed Day 1 – (Explained Absence) - The College accepts verbal messages left on the absentee line, emails to Administration, then documents the absence. Day 1 - (Unexplained Absence – Day of Absence) - Text message is sent to parent advising student is absent from school. Day 10 – If explanation is still not received, a letter outlining date of absence and explanation is sent requesting parent complete and return to school. When received, details of parent letter explaining absence is entered onto the TASS.Web School Management System.


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Enrolment Policy and Procedures 1 The vision of Green Point Christian College (the College) is Excellence in Christ Centred Education. As a ministry of Green Point Baptist Church, the College aims to support Christian parents in the education of their children. However, places are available for children from families that are supportive of the policies of the College but are not practising Christians provided 80% of the students in each year come from practising Christian families. 2 • • •

A practising Christian family is considered to be a family who: recognises and testifies to the Lordship of Jesus Christ; has a commitment to model and teach Biblical principles in the home; is actively involved in the ministries of and regularly attends the services of worship in a local Christian church.

3 The administration of this Enrolment Policy is the responsibility of the Principal of the College. All prospective enrolments are subject to an enrolment interview to ensure that all families with children enrolled in the College are supportive of the ethos and policies of the College.

APPLICATIONS FOR ENROLMENT

4 All enquiries and applications for enrolment are to be directed to the Registrar. At the time of enquiry, a College Prospectus will be sent to each family. To cover processing costs, a nonrefundable Application Fee of $250 for each child must be included with each application for enrolment. • • • • • •

Completed Application for Enrolment form Birth certificate Copies of school reports (if applicable) NAPLAN results (if applicable) Recent photo of the student (can be digital or on paper) Pastor’s reference (where possible) or a personal reference or contact details to enable a reference to be obtained by telephone

5 After an interview has been arranged and completed, an offer for placement may be made then it is necessary for the College to receive written acceptance of the offer and a non-refundable Enrolment Fee of $200 before enrolment can proceed. The Fee Agreement must be signed and returned as this stage.

WAITING LIST

6 Where there are no positions available in a particular grade, the applicant’s name may be added to the waiting list, should parents so desire. The waiting lists are prioritised as follows: • • • • •

Priority 1 Priority 2 Priority 3 Priority 4 Priority 5

Children of families attending Green Point Baptist Church Church Affiliated (practising Christian) Siblings Church Affiliated (practising Christian) Families* Non-Church Affiliated Siblings Non-Church Affiliated Families *Children from other Christian Schools may be given priority A student will only be interviewed if there is a position available.


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INTERVIEW PROCEDURE

The Registrar will arrange an interview for each new applicant and his/her parents (or guardian(s)). That interview, which will usually be conducted by the relevant Head of School but may be conducted by the Principal or Deputy Principal, will normally take ½ hour. Parents must come equipped with any information that may assist in assessment of the application, such as reports, special awards, samples of work, external professional assessments (where appropriate) and any other certificates that the applicant has gained. The purpose of the interview is for the College to get to know the family and its value system as well as give the College an opportunity to understand the particular gifting of the applicant. The interview is not meant to be a threatening procedure but parents should be prepared, in the confidential nature of the interview, to be open and honest and answer a variety of related questions. Both parents and child are requested to attend this interview. Parents should come prepared to ask any questions about the College and its operation or share any concerns they may have. Parents will be informed of the decision in relation to their application as soon as possible after the interview. It should be understood that decisions on enrolment applications are made at the discretion of the Principal.

CONDITIONS OF ENROLMENT

All parents are expected to read the Conditions of Enrolment which includes the Parent/Guardian/Visitor Code of Conduct, available from the College website. By signing the Application for Enrolment parents indicate their acceptance of those Conditions. The College reserves the right to add to and amend the conditions of enrolment from time to time as they see fit. However, any proposed change to the conditions of enrolment will be indicated in The Messenger and/or on the College’s website and an opportunity for comments will be provided before any change is made. Any proposed change to conditions of enrolment will be advised in The Messenger and on the College website and will take affect when that notification is made. Such alterations or amendments will be binding on all families of the College from that date.

FEES

The College recognises the need to try to keep fees as affordable as possible. It is a requirement of the College for all families to complete a Fee Agreement form when they accept the enrolment offer. Fees are billed annually at the beginning of each academic year and may be paid by instalments by entering into a payment plan. It is a requirement of the College for all families to complete a fee payment form at the beginning of each year to advise method of payment. If no payment plan is entered into then fees are to be paid quarterly within 7 days of the commencement of each term. The College realises that some families may experience unexpected short term financial difficulty and will attempt to offer grace and understanding where there is a difficulty in paying fees. Where problems occur parents should contact the Business Manager. Non-payment of fees without explanation will be followed up in the normal course of College management and may incur additional charges. Failure to pay fees may result in termination of enrolment. The College has a percentage sibling discount (family rebate) for the 2nd, 3rd and subsequent children in a family.


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ATTENDANCE

All students are expected to be in attendance each day of the College year. All students are expected to be in attendance at special College functions including sports days. Where a child is absent with parental permission, the College is to be notified by either: • • • •

an email to the College office (office@gpcc.nsw.edu.au) a facsimile (to 4363 1082) a telephone call to the College’s absentee line (4367 9950) a letter sent to the College

If no notification has been made, absences must be followed up with a note on the child’s return. Absent notes must clearly explain the reason for absence and be signed by the parent. If a child is absent and there is no known reason the parents will be sent an SMS by 11.00am to alert them to the absence and request them to notify the College of the reason.

COMMUNICATION PROCEDURE

Parents are requested to respect normal operation of the College and not to make direct contact with teachers at their classroom or at home. Any contact with teachers should be done through the office email where an appointment can be made or a teacher requested to telephone a parent. As the College staff attend devotions each day from 8.15am - 8.30am, parents are requested not to telephone the office before 8.30am. Apart from individual messages, the College will communicate with students and their parents via the weekly newsletter, called The Messenger, and via the College’s website, www.gpcc.nsw.edu.au, SMS notification, or the College’s Facebook page.

EXIT PROCEDURES

Where a student is to be withdrawn from the College, parents must give 10 school weeks’ written notice. Where such notice is not given, the College will charge ten (10) weeks’ notice fee plus GST in lieu of notice. Any student who is withdrawn must complete a Student Exit Checklist and ensure that all equipment and books are returned. Failure to do so will result in additional charges being levied. An Exit Interview may be conducted by the Principal, Deputy Principal or relevant Head of School.

PROCESS FOR STUDENT ENROLMENT ONCE STUDENT IS OFFERED A POSITION

Please note that the enrolment process will require a 48 hour time period to ensure all affected people are contacted, that students are placed in the correct classes that co-ordinators can, if necessary, refer to documents held by the Registrar. Members of the College staff who are involved in new enrolments include the Principal, Deputy Principal, Registrar, relevant Head of School, Curriculum Co-ordinator/Student Advisor, Year Advisors, Faculty Co-ordinators, Class Teachers, ICT staff, Library staff and Office staff.


16 The following table is intended to ensure that new enrolments are handled properly and promptly. Staff member

Action

Step 1

Registrar

(a) Collect relevant information (such as reports and details of any special needs) and pass them on to the Principal, Deputy Principal and relevant Head of School for review (b) Notify Deputy Principal, Head of School, Year Advisor and Faculty Co-ordinators of new enrolment (c) Notify Curriculum Co-ordinator/Student Advisor for application for Board of Studies (BOS) number (d) Notify Library staff to create library borrowing account (e) Notify IT staff to create computer account (f) Notify Support Services where applicable.

Step 2

Principal/Deputy Principal/ Head of School

(a) Views information (b) Passes that information to Year Advisor

Step 3

Year Advisor

(a) Contacts Faculty Co-ordinators to place student in appropriate classes (b) Consults with Curriculum Co-ordinator/Student Advisor to confirm groupings and timetable requirements (c) Notifies the Office staff

Step 4

Office staff

(a) Enter student on class lists (b) Emails Registrar, Curriculum Co-ordinator/Student Advisor, Year Advisor, Faculty Co-ordinator and Class teachers of new student’s classes

Step 5

Year Advisor

(a) Arranges a buddy for the new student (b) Meets the student on the first day with a copy of the student’s timetable

RELATED DOCUMENTS

The following documents are related to this Enrolment Policy: • • • •

Application for Enrolment; Conditions of Enrolment; Fee Agreement; Family Information Form.

Further information about the College may be found in the Prospectus and on the College’s website.


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Anti-Bullying Policy ►

INTRODUCTION

The Anti-Bullying Policy of Green Point Christian College is an essential aspect of student welfare and pastoral care with the College and augments the College’s Behaviour Management and Code of Conduct policies. This policy is intended to provide students, staff and parents with appropriate mechanisms to address the issue of bullying. Green Point Christian College does not tolerate bullying in any form.

RATIONALE

As a Christian school our God given mandate is to create an environment that develops an ethos of care and encouragement and an environment where all students and staff feel safe. One in which their right to be respected and treated as individuals is to be protected. The purpose of this policy is to promote consistency of approach and to create a climate in which all types of bullying are regarded as unacceptable. It is to provide a structure and strategies by which students, who believe they are bullied, are counselled sensitively and effectively. It is also to provide structure and strategies by which students that are identified as bullies are dealt with promptly and the outcomes achieved are in the best interests of the student and the College.

AIMS • • • • •

To promote a secure and happy environment free from threat, harassment and any type of bullying behaviour. To take positive action to prevent bullying from occurring through a clear College policy. To show commitment to overcoming bullying by practising zero tolerance. To inform pupils and parents of the College’s expectation and to foster a productive partnership which helps to maintain a bully free environment. To make staff aware of their role in fostering an environment of care and develop in them an appropriate knowledge and attitudes which will assist to achieve the above aims.

BIBLICAL GUIDELINES

At Green Point Christian College, we follow the guidelines that are laid out to us in the Bible: 1.

Bullying is never acceptable behaviour and will not be tolerated. “Get rid of all bitterness, rage, anger, brawling and slander along with every form of malice. Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other.” Ephesians 4:31

2.

The Bible tells us that each member of Green Point Christian College is made in the image of God and that we are His precious creation, which we need to honour. “Let us make man in our image, in our likeness.” Genesis 1:26 “But you are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging to God.” 1 Peter 2:9

3.

Therefore, all students, parents and teachers have the right to feel and be safe going to and from the College as well as in the playground and classroom.


18 “Live in harmony with one another be sympathetic, love as brothers, be compassionate and humble, do not repay evil for evil or insult with insult, but with blessing because to this you were called so that you would inherit a blessing. (1 Peter 3:8-9) 4.

Each member of the College community has a responsibility of assuring the safety of other members of the community.

SCOPE OF POLICY

The Principal will ensure that the College has appropriate policies, training and procedures in place to regulate a safe and supportive school environment and that these policies and procedures ae regularly monitored.

The College will have, and enforce, responsible use of technology guidelines;

The Principal will provide regular opportunities for all College staff to be trained to recognise and respond effectively to bullying. This training must include the key elements of digital citizenship;

Anti-bullying training and familiarisation with the College’s Policy and Procedures are to be addressed in new staff and student induction processes;

College staff will regularly review their processes for identifying and responding to bullying;

Records of incidents of bullying will be kept systematically by the College and regularly analysed to identify patterns and proactively support student wellbeing;

Students will receive regular explicit instruction on the College’s Policy and Procedures dealing with incidents of bullying;

Students will be educated on the meaning and application of this policy and the College’s procedures at an age appropriate level;

Parents/caregivers will receive regular advice on the existence of the College’s Policy and Procedures for dealing with incidents of bullying, and details on how they can access assistance if they have concerns in relation to bullying;

This Anti-Bullying Policy and Procedures will be placed on the College website.

DEFINITION OF BULLYING

The following definition of bullying reflects the position of the College: Bullying is when someone or a group of people with more power repeatedly and intentionally causes hurt or harm to another person or group of people who feel helpless to respond. Bullying can continue over time, is often hidden from adults and will probably continue if no action is taken. The key features of bullying are that it, causes hurt and distress, is repeated and involves the use of power in an unfair way. Bullying is not: • single episodes of social rejection or dislike; or • single episode acts of nastiness or spite;


19 • random acts of aggression or intimidation; • mutual arguments, disagreements or fights. A helpful resource is “The National Centre Against Bullying” http://www.ncab.org.au/ This policy specifically deals with bullying amongst students, but the College recognises that bullying may occur at all levels and in all relationships.

FORMS OF BULLYING

1

Physical Bullying - Includes hitting, kicking, rude gestures, extortion, pushing and shoving, taking or damaging belongings i.e. any form of physical behaviour that hurts others or their property.

2

Verbal Bullying - Name-calling, insulting, repeated teasing, racist remarks, threatening, sexual harassment and any other form of verbal behaviour designed to hurt another.

3

Social (Covert) Bullying – Includes spreading lies, slander, rumours, playing nasty jokes, mimicking, excluding someone from the group, isolating someone and isolating others by preventing others from befriending them. Damaging a person’s social reputation or social acceptance.

4

Psychological Bullying - Includes threatening, manipulative and stalking behaviours.

5

Cyber Bullying – Cyber bullying is causing hurt via modern technologies such as the Internet and other forms of social media, and through the use of smart phones and other mobile devices. a)

Examples of Cyber Bullying

Sending hateful or threatening comments or pictures via MSN, mobile phone or the Internet and by social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook. Using modern technologies to engage in the social exclusion of someone. Posting rude, explicit or embarrassing messages or pictures about someone on the Net. Stealing someone’s identity in order to harm them in some way. Putting pressure on a person to send revealing or compromising pictures of themselves. Covertly filming, recording or taking a picture of someone and posting the images on the Net to cause hurt. “Outing” and disseminating confidential information about someone. “Flaming” and multi-messaging to clog up a person’s electronic system and to cause them distress. Using aliases and pseudonyms in chat rooms and on social networking sites in order to harass and upset. Engaging in cyber-stalking and the invading of privacy.

b)

Sexting

Another expression of cyber bullying is sexting. Sexting is taking sexually explicit photos and making them available for others to see via a carriage service such as mobile phone or computer. Sending explicit images of anyone, including yourself, is a crime if you are under the age of 18 years. If the person in the picture is under 16 years, it can be a very serious crime resulting in charges of paedophilia.

• • • • • • • •


20 ►

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1

Members of the College community have a right to: • Be safe at Green Point Christian College, free from fear of bullying, harassment and intimidation; • Know that their concerns will be responded to; • Be provided with appropriate support.

2

Members of the College community have a responsibility to: • Refrain from engaging in bullying behaviours; • Report bullying of self and / or others; • Assist in implementing the College’s anti-bullying policy.

3

College’s Responsibilities • Provide access to the Anti-Bullying Policy and Procedures, and College Code of Conduct to all members of the College community via the intranet, website, hard copies (available on request) and summary statement (via newsletter); • Involve staff, parents and external support agencies in developing and revising consistent procedures across the College for responding to and documenting bullying; • Clarify roles of student support staff including Year Advisors, Co-ordinators, Home Teachers, Head of School, College Counsellors; • Program specific activities in classes, across stages and for the whole College community which promote values associated with anti-bullying; • Provide support and guidance to the victims of bullying; • Provide intervention for individuals who bully others.

4

Teacher Responsibilities • Model anti-bullying attitudes and behaviour; • Encourage the teaching of tolerance, respect and valuing of difference and diversity through Key Learning Areas; • Listen to and respond to reports of bullying. Provide support and refer as needed; • Implement the College’s Code of Conduct and Anti-Bullying Policy and Procedures.

5

Parent Responsibilities • Model anti-bullying attitudes and behaviour; • Support the values of tolerance and respect in the home; • Encourage children to exercise these values in all contexts including at school; • Report bullying and encourage their child to do so; • Provide support and encourage their child to seek help; • Work with the school to resolve bullying issues.

6

Student Responsibilities • Model anti-bullying attitudes and behaviour; • Show respect for all members of the College community; • Speak out against bullying and report it when they see it. Report if you are bullied; • Support students who are bullied; • Support the Student Representative Council to assist with anti-bullying suggestions.

NSW POLICE

The Police Local Area Command (LAC) appoints a Schools Liaison Officer to schools. The Liaison Officer can provide advice on a wide range of areas associated with bullying. These could include understanding the best ways to address instances of bullying from the perspective of legal or criminal processes or providing general advice on the burden of proof required for a bullying matter to be


21 progressed through the legal system. Schools have a reciprocal obligation as responsible corporate citizens to provide the Police with any relevant information they have on community members engaged in matters of interest to the Police. Schools should keep in regular contact with their Schools Liaison Officer. Senior Constable Rebecca Armitage – 0437 776 727.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Kids’ Helpline 1800 551 800 www.kidshelp.com.au Cybersafety help www.cybersmart.gov.au/report.aspx Australian Federal Police www.afp.gov.au Reach Out www.reachout.com.au Beyondblue www.beyondblue.org.au Bullying. No way! www.bullyingnoway.com.au The Australian Psychological Society www.psychology.org.au


22

Behaviour Management Policy and Procedures ►

PREAMBLE

In both the Primary and Secondary School sections of the College, the following applies to all staff and volunteers: At Green Point Christian College no form of corporal punishment is used and there are no exceptions to this rule. At Green Point Christian College, in light of God being our Almighty Creator and in response to all He has done for us, we as a school community desire to honour God in our daily lives and relationships. Therefore, we seek to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul, and mind. We also seek to love our neighbour as ourselves (Matthew 22: 37-39). The responsibilities and expectations of each individual within our community have been centred on the desire to have relationships that are pleasing and honouring to God. These responsibilities and expectations are Biblically based to ensure our school community operates so that all individuals grow in their relationships with God and others in a safe, uplifting environment. Parents are an integral part of any discipline within the College because of their Biblical responsibility to raise their children and we seek to encourage their participation and support within this area. In addition, we seek to assist and support parents in the Godly development of their children. Understanding that we all fail and fall short of God’s expectations, the cornerstones of this Behaviour Management Policy will be Love, Grace, Mercy and Justice.

PROCEDURES – PRIMARY SCHOOL ►

AIM

The key aim in Primary School is to assist the students in moving from imposed discipline to managing their own behaviour. Therefore, the structures in place to manage discipline are more than riles and punishments. Through guidance and modelling it is hoped that students are able to make wise choices about how they act, speak and interact with other. In order to build a positive, respectful and honouring learning environment, staff members are asked to consider the following: Teaching and learning environments • Staff are encouraged and supported to consider how their own teaching style can build appropriate relationships with students. • Staff members are encouraged to consider how their classrooms reflect an environment of effective learning, engagement and respect. This involves ensuring that student seating and grouping is intentional and meets the various adjustments needed in for their students. • Staff members utilise quality teaching and learning practices and appropriate differentiation in order to promote student engagement in learning. This includes adjustments made for students with supplementary needs.


23 Class rewards, expectations • Staff members introduce standards for their students in terms of behaviour. These are created in consultation with the students. They are integrated with the class reward system that focuses on effort, kindness, Fruits of the Spirit, and respect for others. Head of School Awards • These awards allow teachers to select students from within their class who have demonstrated excellence in an area of their learning or relationship with others. Students can be recognised for: - Upholding the College core values; - Demonstrating creative and critical thinking skills in their learning; - Examples of excellence in their behaviour and respect of others. These students are recognised at our weekly Chapel Service and they are then invited to a morning tea with the Head of Primary. Reflection Time/ Detention In the Primary School we have a multi-step approach to the correction of behaviour that is contra to our College core values. While teachers deal with minor indiscretions in their own appropriate ways, we have a standard procedure to deal with more significant or repetitive issues. Students who attend a reflection time or detention, have their details entered by their class teacher on TASS.Web and the child’s parents are informed of the misdemeanour and their consequent reflection time/detention.

PRIMARY SCHOOL BEHAVIOUR MONITORING CARDS

When students continue to make poor behaviour choices and are unable to manage negative behaviour, they will be placed on a Behaviour Monitoring Card. This will be done in consultation with the parents and students. Behaviour Monitoring Cards will contain specific goals for the student to achieve and will be monitored each session and break time by teachers. The behaviour cards will be sent home each night for parents to read and sign and presented each day to the Head of Primary. Behaviour Monitoring cards will be reviewed after two weeks. If these behaviours continue, negatively impacting on the student and others, the student will be moved up the discipline levels. Students who are on Behaviour Monitoring Cards may not be permitted to attend excursions, camps or sporting activities within that term as this is an important Risk Management process for all students and staff.


24

Management of Unacceptable Behaviour Level 6 – Principal Possible Actions • Long suspension • Position terminated • Contract with student and parents

Level 5 – Head of Primary/Deputy Principal Possible Actions – Head of Primary School/Deputy Principal records on TASS.Web • Time In – letter sent home • Suspension • Parental/Student meetings (Teacher, Student Well-being Co-ordinator/Head of Primary may be involved) • Daily progress monitoring and parental updates • Counselling required – parent feedback • Mediation meeting

Level 4 – Student Well-being Co-ordinator Possible Actions – Student Well-being Co-ordinator records actions on TASS.Web Parent contacted • Lunch Detention with Student Well-being Co-ordinator – telephone parent • Counsellor, Student Well-being Co-ordinator, student meetings • Reconciliation meetings, restitution for damage • Mediation meetings • Time In • Head of Primary made aware of the issue

Level 3 – Student Well-being Co-ordinator Possible Actions – Student Well-being Co-ordinator records on TASS.Web • Use of behaviour cards/Time In • Discussion of behaviour to determine issues • Behaviour monitoring of student • Restitution • Referred to Counsellors

Level 2 – Student Well-being Co-ordinator Possible Actions – Recorded on TASS.Web • Action plan reportable to Student Well-being Co-ordinator • Time In/Reflection time supervised by Student Well-being Co-ordinator or restitution plan • Parent/Teacher/Student Well-being Coordinator meeting or contact

Level 1 – Classroom Teacher Possible Actions – Classroom Teacher Records on TASS.Web • Seating Plan • Discuss issues and create plan • Short term removal of child from room • Moving child/Time In with class teacher • Reflection time/restitution plans


25

STUDENT CLASSROOM/PLAYGROUND MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES (Examples only, as all cases must be looked at individually and with regard to procedural fairness for all involved) LEVEL OF OFFENCE

INDIVIDUAL INSTANCE OF INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIOUR LEVEL 1

MILDLY UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR CLASS TEACHER

TYPE OF OFFENCE

CONSEQUENCES/ SUPPORT OPTIONS

The following may be an isolated incident • Disruptive behaviour • Poor attitude

• • •

Report made in discipline system to parent Any teacher initiated action appropriate to offence Moved within classroom

• • • •

• •

Short time out/reflection sheet Brought back at lunchtime to discuss behaviour/catch up work

• Repeated disruptive classroom behaviour • Repeated lack of application/incomplete work/homework • Repeated poor attitude to work

• • •

Any teacher initiated action appropriate to offence Individual action plan for student in consultation with Student Well-being Co-ordinator in class seating plan

• • • •

Leaving room without permission Refusal to follow the teacher’s instructions Repeatedly not bringing equipment Inappropriate use of technology or equipment

• • • •

Teacher based detention – lunchtime/Time In Time In with Student Well-being Co-ordinator Daily monitoring Short time out/reflection sheet

• Repeatedly not completing homework • Rudeness to peers/staff • Inappropriate comments or actions to another in class

• •

Personal restitution plan Parent contact by classroom teacher

Not listening to instructions Not bringing equipment to class Inappropriate use of technology or equipment Not completing all work

• Repeated lateness to school or class without reason • Deliberate breaking of classroom rules

MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE Dealt with by the classroom teacher

Dealt with by the classroom teacher with Student Well-being Co-ordinator being informed, action recorded on TASS.Web


26

STUDENT CLASSROOM/PLAYGROUND MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES (Examples only, as all cases must be looked at individually and with regard to procedural fairness for all involved) LEVEL OF OFFENCE

LEVEL 2

MODERATELY UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR OR CONTINUED INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIOUR STUDENT WELL-BEING CO-ORDINATOR

TYPE OF OFFENCE • Student not responding to classroom controls – work /behaviour /attitude /guidelines / continued disobedience/ defiance • Bullying/harassment of any kind ie cyber, psychological, verbal, physical • Fractional truancy • Swearing between peers/aggressive behaviour • Student involved in moderately serious incident that breaks school rules • Refusing to follow teacher’s instructions

• • • • • •

CONSEQUENCES/ SUPPORT OPTIONS

MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE

Lunchtime detention with Student Well-being Coordinator Personal restitution plan Inclusion in well-being focus groups Parents contacted or meeting Time In/Reflection times Confiscation of equipment

Dealt with by Student Well-being Co-ordinator in consultation with the classroom teacher, action recorded on TASS.Web Head of Primary School informed


27

STUDENT CLASSROOM/PLAYGROUND MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES (Examples only, as all cases must be looked at individually and with regard to procedural fairness for all involved) LEVEL OF OFFENCE

LEVEL 3

CONTINUED UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR WITH NO IMPROVEMENT STUDENT WELL-BEING CO-ORDINATOR

TYPE OF OFFENCE • Student not responding to classroom controls – work/ behaviour/ attitude/ guidelines/ continued disobedience/ defiance • Bullying/harassment of any kind ie cyber, psychological, verbal, physical • Fractional truancy • Swearing between peers/aggressive behaviour • Student involved in moderately serious incident that breaks school rules • Refusing to follow teacher’s instructions • Continued repetition of the above behaviours or uniform issues

CONSEQUENCES/ SUPPORT OPTIONS • Parents contacted and meeting or phone conversation to create plans for change • Behaviour monitoring cards • Student Well-being Co-ordinator detentions • Restitution meeting with affected staff • Meeting with Head of Primary/Counsellors • Confiscation of equipment • Time off playground or directed play locations • Student Well-being Co-ordinator to visit student(s) in class when appropriate • Possible in school suspension for part of day

MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE Dealt with by Student Well-being Co-ordinator in consultation with the classroom teacher, action recorded on TASS.Web


28

STUDENT CLASSROOM/PLAYGROUND MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES (Examples only, as all cases must be looked at individually and with regard to procedural fairness for all involved) LEVEL OF OFFENCE

LEVELS 4 AND 5

SERIOUS UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR OR CONTINUAL MISBEHAVIOUR HEAD OF PRIMARY, DEPUTY PRINCIPAL / PRINCIPAL

TYPE OF OFFENCE

CONSEQUENCES/ SUPPORT OPTIONS

• Student not responding to Student Well-being Co-ordinator or Head of Primary/persistent disobedience or defiance

In school suspension

• Teacher directed abuse/aggressiveness/ rudeness • Serious incidents of various natures • Destruction of property within school grounds

Out of school suspension (permission from Principal) Withdrawal from playground, supervised play

Withdrawal of privileges and exclusion from nonclassroom activities including excursions, sports representation etc

• Jeopardising the safety of others • Physical assault eg hitting, kicking, pushing, shoving, punching (below shoulders)

• • • • •

Interview with parents Consultation with Counsellor Welfare focus meeting Possible referral to outside agency support Possible loss of privilege to represent school

Head of Primary to monitor student progress using Behaviour Monitoring card

• Serious physical assault eg hitting, kicking, pushing, shoving, punching (above shoulders); serious misuse of technology • Swearing aggressively, directly at staff • Serious or ongoing bullying/harassment of any kind • Truancy in more than one subject • Vilification of students (Intentionally insulting a person’s identity, beliefs and values, race, gender etc

MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE Dealt with by Head of Primary and Deputy Principal / Principal in consultation with staff involved


29

STUDENT CLASSROOM/PLAYGROUND MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES (Examples only, as all cases must be looked at individually and with regard to procedural fairness for all involved) LEVEL OF OFFENCE

LEVEL 6

EXTREME UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR HEAD OF PRIMARY, DEPUTY PRINCIPAL AND PRINCIPAL

TYPE OF OFFENCE

CONSEQUENCES/ SUPPORT OPTIONS

• Illegal actions ie drugs • Weapons/dangerous implements • Violent behaviour

• • •

Consultation and interview with parents Suspension Inclusion in welfare focus

• Stealing • Serious offensive behaviour

• • •

Referral to Counsellor No inclusion in leadership roles Termination of contract of enrolment

Possible referral to Police or other relevant agencies

• Vilification of staff or students (Intentionally insulting a person’s identity, beliefs and values, race, gender etc) • Serious physical assault

MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE Dealt with by the Head of Primary, Deputy Principal and Principal


PROCEDURES – SECONDARY SCHOOL ►

ASPECTS OF OUR DISCIPLINE PROCESS

1.

Home-School Partnership Partnership between home and school is vital, with open two-way communication between home and school being an important part of this. Further, there is no substitute for consistently applied standards, with all adult members of the school community modelling correct attitudes and behaviour to students.

2.

Teaching Students are taught what God requires of them and about school procedures and expectations.

3.

Planning and Organisation Effective planning and efficient time management of student activities promotes good discipline. Lack of classroom organisation is a major catalyst for misbehaviour.

4.

Encouragement Teachers should seek opportunities to encourage students in good behaviour. At Green Point Christian College, the following methods for encouraging appropriate student behaviour will be employed: Informal i. Non-verbal encouragement methods - eg teacher glance, smile, nod. ii. Verbal encouragement - eg a “Well done”. iii. Granting of an in class privilege - eg Use of particular equipment; opportunity to do additional challenging work. Formal iv. A system of compliments, merit certificates and assemblies recognise and encourage positive behaviour and character traits that we value in our school. (Please see Management of Positive behaviour)

5.

Protection An aspect to be considered at all times is the protection of students from the misbehaviour of others.

6.

Prayer Staff are encouraged to pray for students in all stages of the discipline process.

7.

Sanctions Students must learn that actions have consequences. In order to allow students to connect behaviour with consequences, staff at Green Point Christian College will ensure that there are consequences which suit the offence. Sanctioning actions are not just directed at the student concerned. The actions set a tone and a precedent for all students at the College. Students need to see that justice is carried out and that it is tempered by mercy. The Lord requires of us that we act justly and love mercy. The “Student Classroom Management Procedure” document indicates the sanctions that staff at Green Point Christian College are encouraged to use.

MANAGEMENT OF POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR

An important part of our Behaviour Management Policy is recognising, encouraging and rewarding positive behaviours. If Secondary School students are encouraged to display positive behaviours towards other


31 students, staff, visitors to the College and the school environment, then they are more likely to adopt these behaviours rather than other less positive behaviours. Our formal system for recognising positive behaviour inside and outside the classroom is designed so that all students have the opportunity to participate and be recognised. Staff are encouraged to utilise this system where possible in a fair and consistent manner.

COMPLIMENTS

Compliments are issued to students for particular actions deserving of commendation. They recognise behaviour we want to encourage that go beyond satisfactory expected behaviour of the student. Some examples may include demonstrating: • • •

Excellent assignment work; Consistently demonstrating a strong work ethic in class; Courtesy.

Compliments are entered into TASS.Web on the Pastoral Care module by the teacher. This generates a notification to the Parent Lounge and parents will see it when they log in to their account. Compliments are then tallied, and the following awards are given: 3 Compliments 10 Compliments

• •

Merit Certificate Head of School Award Certificate at either a Commendation Assembly or Year Meeting ($5 canteen voucher)

COMMENDATION ASSEMBLY

Commendation Assemblies are held each term. Parents are invited to share the moment with their child and a light lunch is served by our Hospitality staff and students. The following awards are presented at these assemblies. a. b. c. d.

High Distinction and Distinction awards for academic competitions; Staff nominated awards for leadership, faithful service, improvement, consistency; Head of Secondary School Awards (for acts of outstanding care of others or achievements within the College body); Sporting awards and achievements are recognised through a special Sports Awards Assembly.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

Governing principle: “Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men.” (Colossians 3:23) Students • “Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things” (Colossians 3:2); and “Finally brothers, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable – if anything is excellent or praiseworthy – think about such things.” (Philippians 4:8) • “As God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience.” (Colossians 3:12) • “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.” (Romans 12:17)


32 • • • •

“Forgive as the Lord forgave you.” (Colossians 3:13) “Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, Who is in you, Whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore, honour God with your body.” (1 Corinthians 6:19-20) “Each one should use whatever gift he has received to serve others, faithfully administering God’s grace in its various forms.” (1 Peter 4:10) “I tell you the truth, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me.’” Matthew 25:40)

Teachers • • • •

“Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right.” (Ephesians 6:1) “He who heeds discipline shows the way to life, but whoever ignores correction leads others astray.” (Proverbs 10:17) “No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it.” (Hebrews 12:11) “Obey your leaders and submit to their authority. They keep watch over you as men who must give an account. Obey them so that their work will be a joy, not a burden, for that would be of no advantage to you.” (Hebrews 13:17)

Other students • • • • •

“Brothers, do not slander one another. Anyone who speaks against his brother or judges him speaks against the law and judges it … There is only one Lawgiver and Judge, the one who is able to save and destroy. But you – who are you to judge your neighbour?” (James 4:11-12) “Show proper respect to everyone: Love the brotherhood, fear God, honour the king.” (1 Peter 2:17) “But I tell you: Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be sons of your Father in heaven.” (Matthew 5:44) “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God. Do not cause anyone to stumble, whether Jews, Greeks or the Church of God.” (1 Corinthians 10:31-32) “Bear with each other and forgive whatever grievances you may have against one another. Forgive as the Lord forgave you.” (Colossians 3:13)

Property • •

“The Lord God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it.” (Genesis 2:15) “Whoever can be trusted with very little can also be trusted with much, and whoever is dishonest with very little will also be dishonest with much. So if you have not been trustworthy in handling worldly wealth, who will trust you with true riches? And if you have not been trustworthy with someone else’s property, who will give you property of your own?” (Luke 16:10-12) “You shall not steal …You shall not set your desire on … anything that belongs to your neighbour.” (Deuteronomy 5:19-21)

PRACTICAL OUTWORKING OF CHRISTIAN BELIEFS

Our goal as a College is to be real in our outworking of our belief. We desire a place where Biblical principles are encouraged, developed and fostered to create a learning environment characterised by love, compassion, and justice. We aspire to develop within the students of the College the yearning for the personal application of these principles. The following are a practical guide for students in our College:


33 For Individual Students “Finally brothers, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable – if anything is excellent or praiseworthy – think about such things.” (Philippians 4:8)

Principle The College’s goal is to nurture and educate you in an environment that reflects Jesus’ love, compassion and justice. We desire to guide you in the Godly qualities of love, compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience in a College that is peaceful, safe and God honouring. We want you to be able to grow into the unique, special individual that God has created you to be for His praise.

Student Responsibilities In our College students have responsibilities. Students must respect the Biblical beliefs and values that this College is based upon. Students need to treat other members of the College with respect, politeness, and patience even in stressful situations. Students should try to be positive to others in an attempt to build them up as individuals. Students must attempt to follow the school rules as they are the framework for a safe, exciting Godly College. Students need to be attentive to your learning and aim to achieve your very best in all areas of the school.

College Expectations The beliefs and values of the College are to be respected both inside the classroom and around the school. All students are to attend devotions and assemblies. They must show respect to any speakers or presentation. As a member of the student body and to show respect to the College, full school uniform is to be worn. Threats, bullying, ganging up, fighting, violence, and foul language are not to occur. All members of the College community (staff, parents, students, visitors) are to be approached with courtesy and respect. Movement around the College is not to disrupt other classes or create an unsafe environment. Students will not bring to school cigarettes, matches, illegal drugs, alcohol, lighters, personal medication (other than Ventolin) or weapons of any sort. Students are to attend all compulsory school days unless hampered by illness.


34 Relationship with Staff “Obey your leaders and submit to their authority. They keep watch over you as men who must give an account. Obey them so that their work will be a joy, not a burden, for that would be of no advantage to you.” (Hebrews 13:17) Principle

Student Responsibilities

Within the College, the staff have been given the role to both guide and discipline children. The staff members of the College have a goal that each individual student is nurtured and guided in the way that God directs.

Students have the responsibility to respect and obey the authority of the College staff even in situations where you are stressed and agitated.

The staff seek to respect, care and love each student as the unique individual God has created. The staff strive to have relationships with students that are based on trust, understanding and forgiveness. They seek to create an environment that is safe and dynamic which caters for all the educational needs of the student which include, spiritual, physical, emotional and social aspects of the individual within Biblical principles.

If students are struggling in any area of their school life seeking help through the many avenues within the school is highly encouraged.

College Expectations Students will approach teachers and staff with courtesy and respect in all situations. Students will listen and obey teachers’ instructions in all situations unless they violate the principles of the school. Students are not to threaten teachers in any manner.

The classroom is an area of learning and the teacher is in control of the learning process. Students must use this opportunity and do everything to encourage the learning for themselves and others.

Relationship with other Students “Show proper respect to everyone: Love the brotherhood, fear God, honour the king.” (1 Peter 2:17) Principle

Student Responsibilities

College Expectations

Our College’s goal is to build everyone up in Christian love.

Relationship with fellow students is to be characterised by respect and building each other up.

Threats, bullying, ganging up, violence of any sort, and foul language are not to occur.

We desire our relationships to be positive and real so that all members of the community are affirmed in their uniqueness before God.

Conflict needs to be sorted out with care and forgiveness not sanction or exclusion.

Other students’ property is not to be touched without permission from its owner.

Goals include the betterment of fellow students in all aspects of their school life, full of encouragement for their achievements and efforts.

Any conflict or problem between students must be dealt with in the procedures provided by the College.

Success, effort and determination in all aspects of the school are encouraged and applauded by everyone in the College.

Relationships between students must be appropriate and adhere to Biblical principles.


35 Relationship with Property “Whoever can be trusted with very little can also be trusted with much, and whoever is dishonest with very little will also be dishonest with much. So if you have not been trustworthy in handling worldly wealth, who will trust you with true riches? And if you have not been trustworthy with someone else’s property, who will give you property of your own?” (Luke 16:10-12) Principle The College aims to provide facilities and equipment that is modern and up to date. It aims to provide a modern, clean, dynamic learning environment.

Student Responsibilities The College facilities and equipment are designed to be used by all students. Use them with care and respect in the manner in which they were designed to be used. Students must remember that all facilities and equipment are there for all members of the College.

College Expectations The College is to be kept clean and tidy. Rooms and equipment are to be kept clean, orderly and undamaged. Equipment is not to be used without permission.

If damage is caused take ownership of that damage and seek help to return facilities and equipment to proper condition.

NSW POLICE

The Police Local Area Command (LAC) appoints a Schools Liaison Officer to schools. The Liaison Officer can provide advice on a wide range of areas associated with bullying. These could include understanding the best ways to address instances of bullying from the perspective of legal or criminal processes or providing general advice on the burden of proof required for a bullying matter to be progressed through the legal system. Schools have a reciprocal obligation as responsible corporate citizens to provide the Police with any relevant information they have on community members engaged in matters of interest to the Police. Schools should keep in regular contact with their Schools Liaison Officer. Senior Constable Rebecca Armitage / Senior Constable Peter Hughes – 0437 776 727.


36

Management of Unacceptable Behaviour Level 6 – Principal Possible Actions • Long suspension • Position terminated • Contract with student and parents

Level 5 – Head of Secondary/Deputy Principal Possible Actions – Head of Secondary/Deputy Principal records actions on TASS.Web • Afternoon detention – letter sent home • Suspension • Parental/student meetings (Teacher, Year Advisor may be involved) • Daily progress monitoring and parental updates • Counselling required – weekly feedback • Mediation meeting

Level 4 – Head of Secondary Possible Actions – Head of Secondary records actions on TASS.Web • Parent contacted • Lunch detention with Head of Secondary – letter sent home • Daily Discipline Behaviour Card designed to meet specific behavioural change • Counsellor, Year Advisor, student meetings • Reconciliation meetings, restitution for damage • Mediation meetings

Level 3 – Year Advisor Possible Actions – Year Advisor records actions on TASS.Web • Letter automatically sent home • Lunch Detention/use of behaviour cards • Discussion of behaviour to determine issues • Behaviour monitoring of student • Restitution • Referred to Counsellors

Level 2 – Co-ordinator

Level 1 – Teacher

Possible Actions – Co-ordinator records actions on TASS.Web • Action plan reportable to Co-ordinator • Faculty Detention or restitution plan • Parent/Teacher/Co-ordinator meeting or contact • Temporary isolation of student during lesson • Notify Year Advisor

Possible Actions – Teacher records on TASS.Web • Seating Plan • Discuss issues after lesson and create plan • Short term removal of child from room • Moving child/detention • Reflection sheets/restitution plans • Contact parents


37

Uniform

Deputy Principal/Head of Secondary • •

Friday afternoon detention Parents contacted

Head of Secondary School

• • • •

Three uniform detentions Letter sent home Student interviewed Parent contacted

Uniform Detention • •

Lunch detention Rubbish pick up

Students assigned to lunch duty staff Must be signed on and off detention

• •

Year Advisor

Move to Friday afternoon detention Parents contacted

Four uniform detentions Parents contacted

Student Skips Detention

• •


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STUDENT CLASSROOM/PLAYGROUND MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES (Examples only, as all cases must be looked at individually and with regard to procedural fairness for all involved) LEVEL OF OFFENCE

INDIVIDUAL INSTANCE OF INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIOUR

LEVEL 1

MILDLY UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR TEACHER LEVEL

TYPE OF OFFENCE The following may be an isolated incident • Disruptive behaviour • Poor attitude • Not listening to instructions • Not bringing equipment to class • Inappropriate use of technology or equipment • Late to class on an occasion • Not completing all work • Repeated disruptive classroom behaviour • Repeated lack of application/incomplete work/homework • Repeated poor attitude to work • Leaving room without permission • Refusal to follow the teacher’s instructions • Repeatedly not bringing equipment • Inappropriate use of technology or equipment • Repeatedly not completing homework • Rudeness to peers/staff • Inappropriate comments or actions to another in class • Repeated lateness to school or class without reason • Deliberate breaking of classroom rules

CONSEQUENCES/ SUPPORT OPTIONS • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE

Report made on discipline system/parent Any teacher initiated action appropriate to offence Moved within classroom Short time out/reflection sheet Brought back at lunchtime to discuss behaviour/catch up work

Dealt with by the classroom teacher

Any teacher initiated action appropriate to offence Individual action plan for student in consultation with Co-ordinator Seating plan/in class isolation Teacher based detention – lunchtime Faculty based isolation (with Co-ordinator) Daily monitoring (attendance or behaviour) Short time out/reflection sheet Personal restitution plan Parent contact

Dealt with by the classroom teacher with Faculty Co-ordinator being informed, action recorded on a demerit slip and/or recorded on TASS.Web Discipline system


39

STUDENT CLASSROOM/PLAYGROUND MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES (Examples only, as all cases must be looked at individually and with regard to procedural fairness for all involved) LEVEL OF OFFENCE

LEVEL 2

MODERATELY UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR OR CONTINUED INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIOUR FACULTY CO-ORDINATOR LEVEL

TYPE OF OFFENCE • Student not responding to classroom controls – work/behaviour/attitude/ guidelines/continued disobedience/ defiance • Bullying/harassment of any kind ie cyber, psychological, verbal, physical • Fractional truancy • Swearing between peers/aggressive behaviour • Student involved in moderately serious incident that breaks school rules • Refusing to follow teacher’s instructions

CONSEQUENCES/ SUPPORT OPTIONS

MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE

Lunchtime detention with Faculty Co-ordinator Personal restitution plan Faculty based isolation Inclusion in welfare focus groups Behaviour contracts Parents contacted or meeting Temporary removal from class and supervised by Co-ordinator. • Faculty Detention/Time-out • Confiscation of equipment

Dealt with by Faculty Co-ordinator in consultation with the classroom teacher, action recorded on a demerit sheet and/or recorded on TASS.Web Discipline system.

• • • • • • •

Faculty Co-ordinator/Year Advisor/Head of Secondary informed.


40

STUDENT CLASSROOM/PLAYGROUND MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES (Examples only, as all cases must be looked at individually and with regard to procedural fairness for all involved) LEVEL OF OFFENCE

LEVEL 3

CONTINUED UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR WITH NO IMPROVEMENT YEAR ADVISOR/ HEAD OF SECONDARY LEVEL

TYPE OF OFFENCE

CONSEQUENCES/ SUPPORT OPTIONS

• Student not responding to classroom controls – work/behaviour/attitude/ guidelines/continued disobedience/ defiance • Bullying/harassment of any kind ie cyber, psychological, verbal, physical • Fractional truancy • Swearing between peers/aggressive behaviour • Student involved in moderately serious incident that breaks school rules • Refusing to follow teacher’s instructions • Continued repetition of the above behaviours or uniform issues

• Parents contacted and meeting or phone conversation to create plans for change • Behaviour contracts or cards • Year Advisor/Head of Secondary detention • Restitution meeting with affected staff • Meeting with Head of Secondary/Counsellors • Confiscation of equipment

MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE Dealt with by Year Advisor/Head of Secondary in consultation with the classroom teacher; action recorded on TASS.Web Discipline system


41

STUDENT CLASSROOM/PLAYGROUND MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES (Examples only, as all cases must be looked at individually and with regard to procedural fairness for all involved) LEVEL OF OFFENCE

LEVELS 4 AND 5

SERIOUS UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR OR CONTINUAL MISBEHAVIOUR HEAD OF SECONDARY/ DEPUTY PRINCIPAL LEVEL

TYPE OF OFFENCE • Student not responding to Year Advisor or Head of Secondary - persistent disobedience or defiance • Teacher directed abuse/aggressiveness/ rudeness • Serious incidents of various natures • Destruction of property within school grounds • Jeopardising the safety of others • Physical assault eg hitting, kicking, pushing, shoving, punching (below shoulders) • Serious physical assault eg hitting, kicking, pushing, shoving, punching (above shoulders); serious misuse of technology • Swearing aggressively, directly at staff • Serious or ongoing bullying/ harassment of any kind • Sexual harassment towards peers/ staff • Smoking • Truancy in more than one subject • Vilification of students (intentionally insulting a person’s identity, beliefs and values, race, gender etc)

CONSEQUENCES/ SUPPORT OPTIONS • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

Friday afternoon detention Partial attendance to classes In school suspension Out of school suspension (permission from Principal) Warning of suspension Isolation from playground Withdrawal of privileges and exclusion from non-classroom activities including excursions, sports representation etc Contact and possible interview with parents Consultation with Counsellor Inclusion in welfare focus meeting Referral to outside agency support Head of Secondary to visit student in class at random Level 3 weekly detention/check in with Head of Secondary Exclusion from non-classroom activities Loss of privilege to represent College Head of Secondary to monitor student progress via the use of Red Behaviour Card

MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE Dealt with by the relevant Year Advisor/ Head of Secondary/Deputy Principal/ Principal in consultation with staff involved


42

STUDENT CLASSROOM/PLAYGROUND MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES (Examples only, as all cases must be looked at individually and with regard to procedural fairness for all involved) LEVEL OF OFFENCE

LEVEL 6

EXTREME UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR

HEAD OF SECONDARY, DEPUTY PRINCIPAL PRINCIPAL

TYPE OF OFFENCE • • • • • •

Illegal actions ie drugs Weapons/dangerous implements Violent behaviour Stealing Serious offensive behaviour Vilification of staff (Intentionally insulting a person’s identity, beliefs and values, race, gender etc) • Serious physical assault

CONSEQUENCES/ SUPPORT OPTIONS • • • • • •

Student asked to leave the College No inclusion in leadership roles Possible referral to Police or other relevant agencies Suspension Inclusion in welfare focus Referral to Counsellor

MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE Dealt with by the Head of Secondary, Deputy Principal and Principal


Behaviour Management – Procedural Fairness (Primary and Secondary) The College will ensure that there is a transparent, consistent, unbiased and fair procedure in place for each instance of student behaviour that requires discipline according to the Behaviour Management Policy. This will include providing a fair “hearing” regarding an event, instance or allegation that is made against a student. It will also necessitate ensuring that there is an impartiality in an investigation and decision making and that there an absence of bias by the decision maker. The College will seek to use a range of disciplinary actions to help students change behaviour which is deemed unacceptable. In the case of a disciplinary action being taken by a Head of School, phone contact will be made with all parents concerned to discuss the action to be taken. A written caution will be given to the student and parent, and recorded on the student file and TASS.Web. In instances of unacceptable behaviour that is of an extreme nature or in the case of repeated instances of unacceptable behaviour, the College may follow procedures that lead to suspension or expulsion. Definitions: Investigation is a process that will involve the assessing of information regarding an allegation made against a student. It includes, but is not limited to, the questioning of witnesses, collection of data and interviewing of the student(s) involved. Decision Making is the final process that will demand the Principal to assess the veracity of the findings in the investigation and making a final judgment regarding the outcome and consequences of the allegation made against a student. Suspension is a temporary removal of a student from all of the classes that a student would normally attend at the College for a set period of time. Suspension may be held at the College or at home at the discretion of the Head of School and the Principal. Immediate Suspension is a temporary removal of a student from all of the classes that a student would normally attend at the College effective immediately following a student’s behaviour at LEVEL 6 whilst an investigation is carried out. Expulsion is the permanent removal of a student from the College.

INVESTIGATION AND THE “HEARING” RULE

The investigation of allegations made against students will be conducted by the Head of School but may include input from the appropriate Year Advisor and Co-ordinators. In the instance of long suspension (a maximum of 20 days) or expulsion being considered by the College, particular emphasis will be given to procedural fairness. This includes the offer of having a support person/observer to attend formal interviews. In the instance of an allegation being made against a student at Level 5 or 6, then immediate suspension may be appropriate until a proper investigation can be carried out. In such an instance the well-being of all students at the College must be considered.


44 In the instance of an allegation being made against a student at Level 3 or above, an investigation will take place. The student along with their parent, carer or support person will be called to the Head of School’s office as part of the investigation and the following will be explained to the student: • • •

The details of the allegation related to a specific matter or the allegations relating to continued unacceptable behaviour; The process that the College will follow in investigating the matter; Any other circumstances or information that may be taken into account in considering the matter: o Age of the student; o Specific needs or disabilities of the student; o Safety, care and welfare of other students at the school; The process that the College will follow in considering the matter.

At this point the Head of School will give an opportunity for the student to respond to the allegations. The Head of School will ensure that the student and parent/carer has access to a letter that contains: • • • •

A copy which details the nature of the allegation; The policies and procedures under which disciplinary action is taken; The process for seeking a review of the decision made in response to the allegations; An approximate timeframe for decisions to be made.

Notes regarding the key points of discussion in a formal interview or meeting should be recorded in writing by the Head of School or their appointee, a copy of which should be kept on the student’s record.

DECISION MAKING

The final decision regarding suspension or expulsion will be made by the Principal. The decision will be made after: • assessing the veracity of the findings in the investigation; • ensuring the process of investigation was fair and equitable; • making a final judgment regarding the outcome and consequences required by the school policy regarding the behaviour of the student. In the instance that expulsion is being considered the Principal will: • obtain a report from the College Counsellor regarding the impact of the expulsion on the student; • provide to the parents a copy of material pertinent to the decision; • allow seven days for parents to respond to the material and allegations; • discuss with parents the impact of expulsion on the student; • Outline the process of appeal against the decision to expel. The student may be placed on long suspension at this time. Following the decision, the Principal or the Head of School will ensure that the student and parent or carer is made aware of the decision that has been made and the reasons for the decision. A letter outlining the decision will be sent to parents and kept on the student’s record.


45 â–ş

SUSPENSION RESOLUTION

Before returning to school following a period of suspension, the student will meet with the Head of School in order to design and implement a plan for the successful reintegration into the College community. A formal contract or plan may be agreed upon by each of the parties involved before the student resumes classes.

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APPEALS AND REVIEW

Reviews of decisions and procedural fairness will be undertaken by the Principal in conjunction with the Deputy Principal following the plan as outlined in the College Grievance Policy and Procedures.


Grievance Policy and Procedures ► AIM The aim of this policy is to guide the College’s approach in managing concerns and complaints that arise as grievances. This policy also provides a Biblical process for effective and cordial relationships between staff and parents, as well as a protective environment in which children can develop relationships with one another. As we live in a fallen world, problems can and do arise. As a Christ-centred community we have opportunities to see conflicts worked through where truth and honesty are paramount and there is a desire to see relationships restored and reconciled. We are a community moulding and shaping young people and all relationships are fundamental and foundational and are crucial to our mandate. Indeed, without healthy relationships it will be difficult to see how we could fulfil our mission. Education includes learning to live in community. If we claim to be caring, we will care about resolving conflict for all involved. This should be an environment where there is the culture for growth, forgiveness and love.

► VISION STATEMENT

“Excellence in Christ-Centred Education”

► BIBLICAL CONTEXT This policy is based upon Biblical principles. Some key references include – Matthew 18:15–35; Romans 12:9-21; 1 Corinthians 13:1-8; Ephesians 4:1-4 and 5:21 and Philippians 2:1-5. The policy should also be understood and implemented within the context of the love for one another that should characterize a Christian community (John 13: 34-35). "If your brother sins against you go and show him his fault, just between the two of you. If he listens to you, you have won your brother over. But if he will not listen, take one or two others along, so that every matter may be established by the testimony of two or three witnesses. If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church;” (Matthew 18:15-17 NIV). “Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in love. Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.” (Ephesians 4:2-3 NIV).

► DEFINITIONS Grievance:

The term “grievance” in this Policy is used to encompass the concepts of a complaint and disputes as defined in AS/NZS 10002-2014. These terms are defined in that standard as follows: Complaint - An expression of dissatisfaction made to an organisation, related to its products [or services], or the complaints-handling process itself, where a response or resolution is explicitly or implicitly expected. Disputes - Unresolved complaints escalated internally or externally or both. This definition does not incorporate general negative feedback, which may not require a resolution or formal follow-up. While this type of feedback is valuable, the Policy does not apply to feedback of this nature.


47

Victimisation:

To single out for punishment or unfair treatment; management will take all steps necessary to ensure that staff are not victimised for coming forward with grievances – victimisation will lead to disciplinary action.

Procedural Fairness:

Procedural fairness generally requires: • a hearing appropriate to the circumstances; • lack of bias; • evidence to support a decision; and • inquiry into matters in dispute.

Senior Management:

Principal, Deputy Principal and Business Manager.

► SCOPE OF THIS POLICY If a complaint contains an allegation of abuse or any inappropriate behaviour towards children or a “reportable allegation”, reference must be made to the College’s Child Protection Policy and the allegation dealt with in accordance with that policy. Employee grievances (made by employees in their capacity as an employee) may, depending on their nature, fall within the ambit of the dispute resolution process in an industrial agreement or other contractual arrangement or within a statutory resolution process. In those circumstances the applicable provisions will apply to the exclusion of this policy. Where other processes do not apply, the approach set out in this Policy will apply subject to any modification necessary to meet other statutory obligations. Employees who are also parents may, in their capacity as parents, make a complaint under this Policy.

► PRINCIPLES OF MANAGING GRIEVANCES 1

Grievances should be treated seriously and sensitively, having due regard to procedural fairness. In following the Biblical model and where this is possible for both parties, without causing harm to either party. There should be an attempt to meet “one on one” as outlined in Matthew 18, however this Policy accepts that this is not always possible.

2

If it is not possible for the aggrieved person to follow the “one on one” process, they then approach: If the issue is with: A teacher A Co-ordinator A Head of School The Deputy Principal The Business Manager The Principal

3

Approach: Their Co-ordinator The relevant Head of School The Deputy Principal The Principal and Business Manager The Principal and Deputy Principal The Board Chair

The person(s) subject of the grievance is entitled to know the details of the grievance against them in a timely manner, including the name of the person with the grievance, the specific details of the grievance, and be given the opportunity to respond prior to any action being taken in response to the grievance.


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4

Other than the “one on one” discussion with the person, both the aggrieved person and the person subject of the grievance is advised to have a support person with them. The role of the support person is to provide support and not to act as an advocate.

5

Any person present at a meeting is free to take notes. The person(s) subject to the grievance is not required to sign a record of interview and may present alternate perspectives that were recorded by their support person. It may however, assist in the resolution of grievances if agreement is reached in relation to the matters discussed.

6

The investigative meetings when concluded, will present a written record of the investigation to the Principal. This written record will include conclusions and recommendations and an agreed action plan (including instructions, any strategies to overcome the problem and the period of time in which those strategies are expected to lead to a resolution of the problem).

7

Any investigation must also be conducted in a timely manner, with reporting back to all concerned and recommendations followed through considering the constraints of the process. What constitutes “a timely manner” will vary due to the nature of the grievance.

8

At the conclusion of the investigation, the Principal will assess the validity and integrity of the allegations and the investigation and determine a resolution. Where a warning, censure or reprimand is issued by the Principal, this will be confirmed in writing, and a copy placed in the file of the person(s) subject to the grievance.

9

In relation to staff, if the matter is serious enough for the employer to consider disciplinary action that may result in a demotion, or dismissal, the staff member will be told of the possibility of this course of action and given an opportunity to respond.

10 Where the grievance is found to be vexatious or based on misinformation etc, any records pertaining to the grievance will be kept as follows: Person subject to grievance – all records placed in a sealed envelope in the person’s file to ensure that the reports are not relied on in future; person with grievance – all records relating to the grievance will be kept on file. 11 All endeavours will be made by all parties to keep the issue confidential. This means confidential not only within the school where the matter arose, but the wider Christian community. This is primarily to ensure that the dignity of the staff member, staff at the school, participants in an investigation, and of any person making a grievance or raising a concern, is maintained at all times. 12 At the conclusion of the investigation a determination regarding a resolution plan of action is to be written and given to both parties stating a clear timeline for the agreed plan of action, which will include how and by whom regular support will be given and review undertaken. (For staff see document within the College Policies and Procedures titled Staff Employment Policy). 13 Victimisation of a person for making a grievance or allegation (be they a member of staff, a student, a parent, or a member of the public) is unacceptable. 14 All staff are expected to live in unity and act professionally so there is a safe environment where grievances can be heard sensitively and compassionately. 15 All staff, parents, students will be offered the use of an interpreter if needed.

► ROLE OF THE PRINCIPAL The Principal is expected to fairly represent all the interests of the College community. The Principal is available to take representation from any stakeholder within the community or agencies and/or groups in the wider community. The Principal is not solely an advocate for any particular group or stakeholder.


49

In the case of a formal grievance involving an investigation, the role of the Principal or delegated representative will generally be that of the decision maker rather than the investigator. The Principal will make a determination as to who will investigate and will be informed at the commencement of the investigation. At the conclusion of the investigation, the Principal is to review the preliminary findings and make a final determination. In some other less formal matters, the Principal ‘s role may include: • • •

seeking information from all relevant parties; attempting to instigate productive dialogue; and ruling on the matter which may include written findings.

The written report and all information referring to the investigation is to be kept on file in the office of the Principal’s PA. Where appropriate and with the agreement of the Principal, matters that are usually kept confidential in the College Counsellor’s office will be there.

► ROLE OF THE COLLEGE BOARD As the College Board has delegated the responsibility of the running of the College to the Principal, they only rarely become involved in grievance matters that require their direct intervention or as the result of a review request, see below. If the grievance is raised against the Principal, the Board Chair will firstly consult with the Deputy Principal and Business Manager. Unless, after consultation the Board Chair determined the grievance to be totally without merit or cannot be resolved satisfactorily as a "one on one" meeting with the Principal, the Board Chair will raise the matter at the next appropriate Board meeting. The Board will determine how to address the grievance after seeking any appropriate external advice.

► GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE AS REFLECTED IN FLOWCHARTS The College has developed flowcharts to reflect the process of any grievance raised by a parent or a staff member. The flowcharts give limited guidance and information only and any staff member or parent should read the whole of this document carefully before proceeding.

► DISCIPLINARY ACTION If the person/s investigating the grievance decide that there has been a breach of one of the College policies or procedures, one of the options available is disciplinary action. If it is shown that the person making the grievance has made a vexatious claim, this can also be the subject of disciplinary action. The level of discipline will depend on such things as: • • • • •

The seriousness of the breach; Awareness of intention; Understanding of the nature of a vexatious claim; Extenuating circumstances surrounding the situation; Whether the person has been officially warned or disciplined before about this type of breach.


50

Discipline could involve one or more of the following: • • • • • •

A written apology; Counselling; An official warning; Loss of promotion rights or wage/salary increases for a specified period; Demotion or change to role and/or responsibilities; Dismissal.

A record of the grievance and the resulting disciplinary action will be placed on the personnel file of the person who is disciplined. The grievance investigators will also send all their notes and a copy of the record of the grievance to the Principal. In addition, if they believe the original grievance investigator mishandled the grievance in a way that breaches this grievance procedure, they may recommend disciplinary action against that person. All records, including allegations, investigation reports, interview and file notes will be securely kept by the Principal.

► APPEALS AND POSSIBLE OUTCOMES This Policy recognises that there are times when the requirements of serving the College’s diverse needs as a Christian education community, including legislative and regulatory requirements, and that the complainant may not be satisfied with the outcome. It is nonetheless the aim of this policy that the aggrieved person recognises fairness and equity in the process which has been followed. If a person who raises a grievance is dissatisfied with the College’s response, they have the right to ask for a review of the response by: If the issue was raised with: A teacher A Co-ordinator A Head of School The Deputy Principal The Business Manager The Principal The Board Chair

Approach: Their Co-ordinator The relevant Head of School The Deputy Principal The Principal and Business Manager The Principal and Deputy Principal The Board The Board

Access to any member of the Board including the Chairman, is through the Senior Management team. Such a request should be made in writing and outline the reasons why it is considered the response should be reviewed. The applicable reviewer will generally review the matter in relation to whether this policy has been followed and the principles herein adhered to. The applicable reviewer may however, “rehear” the grievance, where they consider that the response was not capable of being reached in good faith by the initial process. This may involve going through the same steps as the person who handled the original grievance. However, they may decide to interview more witnesses if they think that will support the achievement of a better outcome. They may confirm the original decision or overturn it.


51 ► CONFLICT BETWEEN TWO FAMILIES Where there is conflict between two or more College families, this is not normally a matter for involvement of the College. Normally the Principal will only intervene where the issue directly involves school hours and events (ie it is school related) and which directly impacts the College (eg phone, social media, email). We would prefer to see parents resolve their normal differences as they would in any community situation.

► CONFLICT BETWEEN PARENTS AND TEACHER INVOLVING A STUDENT While a grievance is being addressed, it is important that the College continues to operate as normally as possible. A student cannot refuse to attend a particular teacher’s class or refuse to co-operate with a teacher simply as a result of a grievance being raised against the teacher by the student’s parents. The student must obey all reasonable instructions. Where a student fails to comply with the authority of the College or the individual teacher, they may be withdrawn from either the respective class or all lessons, in consultation with the relevant Head of School and Principal until the matter is resolved (internal suspension). In the case of ongoing problems or more serious matters, the Principal may suspend the student from school. This also applies to situations where a parent or student refuses to comply with normal operational procedures, including issues such as uniform, detentions, attendance etc. A parent does not have the authority to withdraw or refuse to allow a student to attend class/classes without the prior approval of the Principal. If a parent withdraws a student without prior approval from the Principal, the student will not be permitted to attend any classes until the matter is effectively resolved.

► CONFIDENTIALITY AND VICTIMISATION The parties to a grievance are required at all stages of this policy and procedure, to maintain confidentiality in relation to the concern or complaint. The parties must not disclose by any form of communication, either the fact or the substance of the matter to anyone other than an advocate, staff representative, or a qualified counsellor. A person must not victimise or otherwise subject another person to detrimental action as a consequence of that person raising, providing information about, or otherwise being involved in the resolution of a grievance under these procedures. Any breach of either the confidentiality or non-victimisation requirements will be treated seriously by the College and may result in disciplinary action. Any such breach will be referred for investigation and handling in accordance with the relevant misconduct procedure.

► POLICY REVIEW From time to time the College may make changes to this policy to improve the effectiveness of its operation. These changes will be advised to all stakeholders.


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Appendix One: Considerations in responding to Grievances Those to whom a grievance is brought should: •

Listen to the person with the grievance – asking them to clearly explain what the grievance is, if they have sought to solve the grievance, how do they want it resolved?

If the grievance is brought to the attention of a member of staff and is potentially reportable conduct, it needs to be referred to the Principal immediately. The matter can be presented in writing, verbally, anonymously or from a person not associated with the College. The decision of whether a matter meets the reportable conduct threshold is made by the Principal.

Likewise, if it becomes obvious at any stage that the grievance is more significant than the person hearing the grievance expected, it is to be taken to a more appropriate person.

Subject to the situation, ask the person with the grievance to remain where they are while you obtain the other person’s perception of events. Were there any witnesses to the events (record their names, record other relevant information).

Decision time: ➢ Do I need to talk to witnesses? ➢ Is the grievance genuine? ➢ Should it be proceeded with? ➢ Can it be resolved in accordance with the person with grievance’s desires?

Decide how the grievance may best be resolved and discuss the solution with the person with the grievance. This could include joint agreement. Many grievances will be able to be settled by joint agreement between the people involved in the grievance. No records or notes will go on anyone’s personnel file. The person who handled the grievance will write a confidential report which will be stored on file.

The person with grievance may come to a personal crossroad at this point; forcing them to go on or they may wish to withdraw their grievance.

It is essential you point out the possible outcomes.

If you believe the grievance must be resolved, you will continue to resolution. However, if there is not enough proof to work out who is telling the truth, no disciplinary action will be taken. Instead, we may decide to: - Keep a closer watch on the people involved; - Consider wider staff training on the particular policy or standard involved. The person who handled the grievance will write a confidential report. This report will be kept on file. Act on your decision, advise all parties involved as to your intentions and course of action, and most importantly why. Advise them also of any other avenues that may be open to them internal/external. Present your decision regarding the resolution to the appropriate party and the timeframe you expect action to occur. Implement your decision and monitor the outcome. If the situation is not resolved to the satisfaction of the parties concerned, move to the next stage in the process. Document your involvement in the outcome.

• • • • • •


Staff Grievance Procedure Has a concern? Unresolved issue? Grievance? Process A – to be followed for any staff other than those defined within the Definitions Section as Senior Management staff: 1. The staff member with the grievance meets with their direct supervisor to advise of allegation(s); resolution may be possible at this level; if so, no further action required / or 2. A member of the Senior Management Team meets with the staff member and direct supervisor to discuss allegation(s) and proposed way forward and possible investigation; resolution may be possible at this level; if so, no further action required / or 3. The College Investigation Policy and Procedures will then be followed; 4. A Senior Management Team member considers whether it is necessary to advise the Principal.

Process B – to be followed for any staff member regarding a grievance about a Senior Management Team member: 1. The staff member together with their direct supervisor meets with a Senior Management Team member, not subject to the allegation(s); resolution may be possible at this level; if so, no further action required / or 2. That Senior Management Team member meets with staff member and direct supervisor to discuss allegation(s) and proposed way forward and possible investigation; resolution may be possible at this level; if so, no further action required / or 3. The Senior Management Team member will advise the Board Chair of the grievance. 4. The College Investigation Policy and Procedures will then be followed, however if a decision is made that the allegation is deemed to be of significant import, the Board will be become part of the actioning of the investigation.


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Parent Grievance Procedure

Has a concern? Unresolved issue? Grievance?

Check you have all the facts. Person with grievance arranges a meeting with person subject to grievance to discuss the concern/issue/grievance. Aim for resolution. Both parties document the issue. Communicate ongoing progress – if applicable.

Issue resolved satisfactorily and outcome accepted.

Issue unresolved? Person with grievance request meeting with person subject to grievance and Co-ordinator or Year Advisor. Document the issue. Co-ordinator or Year Advisor brief Head of School.

Issue unresolved? Issue resolved satisfactorily.

Issue resolved satisfactorily.

Parent with grievance requests meeting with person subject to grievance and Head of School. Head of School makes a decision and provides a written report to the Principal outlining perceptions, procedures followed to date and actions taken.

Issue unresolved? Parent with grievance requests meeting with person subject to grievance and Principal. The Principal considers final action and reports back to all parties.


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Student Outcomes and Performance Student Outcomes in Standardised National Literacy and Numeracy Testing EXTERNAL TESTING: NAPLAN Online Students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 sat the NAPLAN (National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy) Assessments in May 2018. The tests ran over a two week window and the results present a snap shot of how students are tracking compared to the National Standards. These results are one piece of evidence that can be used to help develop and maintain programs that best meet both group and individual needs. As we have a significant intake into Year 7, NAPLAN results also provide a common gauge that can be used to guide class placement in Mathematics and English.

RESULTS The Commonwealth Government sets minimum standards for Reading, Writing, Grammar and Punctuation, Spelling and Numeracy. The percentages of our students achieving at or above these standards are reported in the table below (2017 results): Year 3 (NMS Band 2) 5 (NMS Band 4) 7 (NMS Band 5) 9 (NMS Band 6)

Reading

Writing

Spelling

Numeracy

98 (100)

Grammar/ Punctuation 98 (100)

100 (100)

100 (100)

100 (100)

100 (96)

100 (99)

100 (99)

100 (99)

96 (100)

93 (100)

96 (100)

99 (99)

99 (100)

100 (99)

92 (97)

95 (98)

97 (98)

100 (100)

100 (100)

The table below indicates the percentage of students achieving the top band or above (+). Year Reading Writing Spelling Grammar/ Numeracy Punctuation 3 (Band 6, 6+) 53% 12% 30% 52% 36% 5 (Band 8, 8+)

32%

4%

20%

40%

28%

7 (Band 9, 9+)

10%

5%

7%

13%

14%

9 (Band10, 10+)

5%

6%

2%

14%

14%

The table below indicates the School Average Band compared to the (State Average Band) Year Reading Writing Spelling Grammar/ Numeracy Punctuation 3 (Band 1- 6+) 6 (5) 5 (4) 5 (4) 5 (5) 5 (4) 5 (Band 3 - 8+)

7 (6)

6 (5)

6 (6)

7 (6)

7 (6)

7 (Band 4- 9+)

7 (7)

6 (6)

7 (7)

7 (7)

7 (7)

9 (Band 5- 10+)

8 (7)

7 (7)

8 (7)

8 (7)

8 (8)


56 The NAPLAN results for 2018 were very positive, with many students demonstrating impressive growth since their last NAPLAN assessments in 2016. Particular highlights included Year 3 Reading, where 53% of students achieved Band 6 (the highest band) and Year 5 Reading, where 32% of students achieved Band 8 (the highest band). It is interesting to note that in 2017, Year 9 students needed to achieve a minimum Band 8 in Reading, Writing and Numeracy in order to be eligible to sit the HSC. This benchmark has since been abolished. In 2018, 100 % of our students achieved above the National Minimum Standard (Band 6 or above) in Reading, 92% in Writing and 100% in Numeracy. 9 (NMS Band 6)

100 (99)

92 (97)

95 (98)

97 (98)

100 (100)

Higher School Certificate and Year 10 Comparisons for 2018 Year 10 The submitted grading results for 2018 Year 10 are shown in the following table:


57 Compared to the State-wide pattern, in 2018 GPCC gained a higher percentage of cumulative Grade A and B results in 26 out of 27 (96%) Stage 5 courses, that is, in all but one course. Notably this high achievement occurs in large cohort courses such as English, Maths, Science, Geography, History and PDHPE (200 hours). The only course in which the cumulative A and B grades were below State average was in the PDHPE (100 hours) course consisting of one student who enrolled in October of 2018 and whose grade was supplied by a different school. By comparison, in 2017 GPCC gained a higher percentage of cumulative Grade A and B results in 16 of the 23 (70%) Stage 5 courses. In 2016, we gained a higher percentage of cumulative Grade A and B results in 15 of the 25 (60%). In 2015 we gained a higher cumulative Grade A and B results in 16 of 24 (67%) courses. In 2014 we gained a higher cumulative Grade A and B results in 16 of 23 (70%) courses.

Higher School Certificate Twelve students (compared to 12 in 2017, 19 in 2016, 18 in 2015, 15 in 2014, 20 in 2013, 18 in 2012, 23 in 2011 and 14 in 2010) gained entry onto the NESA Distinguished Achievers List having gained 20 (compared to 26 in 2017 and 2016, 38 in 2015, 19 in 2014, 25 in both 2013 and 2012, 41 in 2011 and 25 in 2010) occurrences of top band results (band 6 in 2 unit courses or band E4 in Extension courses) across a variety of subjects including Advanced English, Ext 1 English, Music 1, Biology, Senior Science, Spanish (Beginners), History Extension, Ancient History, Software Design and Development, Textiles & Design, and Visual Arts. Four students gained top band results in more than one course. Of particular note was the success of one of our students, Amelia Ferry, who gained an All Rounder result meaning that she gained the top band in ten or more units of courses. Strong results were achieved in Music 1 where all students in the subject gained results in one of the top two bands: 4 students in band 6 and 4 students in band 5. Consistently high results have been gained in terms of the top ATAR results for each cohort over recent years. The top ATAR result in 2018 was 96.65. The top ATAR result in 2017 was 99.4. The top ATAR in 2016 was 96.8, and in 2015 was 99.90 and in 2014 was 92.25 and in 2013 was 96.8. In 2012 the top result was 98.6. The top three ATAR results for 2011 were 99.5, 98.8 and 98.6. The top 2010 ATAR was 98.00. In terms of HSC exam results in 2018, 16 out of 29 (55%) of HSC examinable courses had school means above the State means. In 2017, 13 out of 30 (43%) of HSC examinable courses had exam means above the State exam averages. In 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011 and 2010 over half of the HSC examinable courses delivered by the College had exam averages above that of the State average. For 2016, 2015, 2014 and 2013, these percentages are 55%, 73%, 55%, 57% respectively. In the HSC, Band 5 and 6 results (and E3 and E4 in Extension courses) indicate a high level of achievement in a course.


58 The following table and graph indicate success in terms of Band 5 and 6 HSC results over recent years:

HSC Results - Total of Bands 5 and 6 for 2008 – 2018 Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Number of Students who sat HSC 100 86 81 58 79 71 90 64 70 70 76

Band 6 15 31 22 41 25 25 19 38 26 26 15

Band 5 131 156 171 120 150 94 153 132 147 115 107

% Band 6 of sitting students 15% 36% 27% 71% 32% 35% 21% 59% 37% 37% 20%

% Band 5 of sitting students 131% 181% 211% 207% 190% 132% 170% 206% 210% 164% 141%

HSC Results - Total of Bands 5 and 6 for 2008 – 2018

HSC Band 6 and 5 Results 180

160 140 120 100

Band 6

80

Band 5

60 40 20 0 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

As in 2017, 2016, 2015 and 2014, there were students in the 2018 cohort who presented for the highest Extension courses in English, Mathematics and History.

Secondary School Outcomes The number of students in Year 12 undertaking vocational courses in 2018 was 10 students out of 76 (13%). In 2017 there were 7 students out of 70 (10%). In 2016 there were 16 students of 70 (23%). In 2015, there were 5 students of 64 (8%). In 2014 this was 20 of 90 (22%) students. In 2013 this was 19 of 71 (24%) students (2012 was 15%).


59

In terms of VET (Vocational Education and Training) courses in 2018, there were 8 students in the school Hospitality course. There were 2 studying out-of-school courses (TVET and/or Private Provider courses). Of the 76 students who completed Year 12 last year, the number of students obtaining an HSC in 2018 was 76. The number of GPCC students obtaining a Record of School Achievement (RoSA) was 10. The percentage of students in Year 12 attaining a Year 12 Certificate (HSC) or equivalent VET certificate was 96%. This is because enrolment in Year 12 peaked at 79 but 3 students left during the HSC course.

Post School Destinations Based on tertiary offers extended to our Year 12 students through UAC, 47 of 76 (62%) of the Year 12 candidature who completed the HSC had tertiary degree courses offered to them as a possible postschool destination (previous years were 58% in 2017, 73% in 2016 and 70% in 2015). An additional 4 students were offered a pathway program which may subsequently lead to a University undergraduate course.

2019 University Offers (as per UAC provided data)

University Australian Catholic University Charles Sturt University ICMS Macquarie University University of Newcastle University of Sydney University of Technology UNSW - Sydney Western Sydney University Total Newstep (University of Newcastle) Intensive Program (Macquarie) University Foundation Studies (WSU)

Number of students offered a place 2 1 1 5 29 1 5 2 1

Percentage of cohort offered this University 3% 1% 1% 7% 38% 1% 7% 3% 1%

47

62%

2 1 1

3% 1% 1%


60


61

Student Information Characteristics of the Student Body Green Point Christian College is predominantly an Anglo Saxon demographic mix made up of 545 females and 460 male students. The Primary School comprises 452 students and the Secondary School comprised 553 students. Note: Figures taken from Census dated 3 August 2018.

Student Attendance Rates for Each Year Level In 2018 each student, on average, attended the College as follows (by percentage):

Kinder Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 Year 12

92% 92.5% 92% 92% 92% 91% 91.5% 90% 92.5% 91% 89% 91% 91.5%

In 2018, the student attendance rate for the school as a whole was 91.4%.

Actual Retention Rates Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 Year 12

As at 1 December 2016 104 89 78 70

As at 4 August 2017 107 96 79 71

As at 3 August 2018 101 94 60 76


62

Financial Information Summary

2018 Recurrent Expenditure

Teacher Salary 23.9%

6.2%

Other Staff Salary 49.1%

Staff Related Expenses Superannuation

1.7%

19.1%

Operating Expenses


63

Statement of Faith The Statement of Faith of the Company is as follows: God There is one God and He is sovereign and eternal. He is revealed in the Bible as three equal divine Persons – Father, Son and Holy Spirit. God depends on nothing and no one; everything and everyone depends on Him. God is holy, just, wise, loving and good. God created all things of His own sovereign will, and by His Word they are sustained and controlled. God is the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. He is also Father of all whom He has adopted as His children. Because of God’s faithfulness and His fatherly concern, nothing can separate His children from His love and care. The Lord Jesus Christ is the eternally existing, only begotten Son of the Father. He is the Creator and Sustainer of all things. He was conceived by the Holy Spirit and born of a virgin, truly God and truly man. He lived a sinless life and died in our place. He was buried, rose from the dead in bodily form and ascended to heaven. Jesus is King of the universe and Head of the Church, His people whom He has redeemed. He will return to gather His people to Himself, to judge all people and bring in the consummation of God’s Kingdom. The Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father and the Son. He convicts people of their sin, leads them to repentance, creates faith within them and regenerates them. He is the source of their new sanctified life bringing forth His fruit in the life of believers. He gifts believers according to His sovereign will, enabling them to serve the Lord. The Bible The Bible, which is comprised of the books of the Old and New Testament, is the inspired, inerrant and infallible Word of God, and the only absolute guide for all faith and conduct. It is indispensable and determinative for our knowledge of God, of ourselves and of the rest of creation. God’s World Adam and Eve, the parents of all humankind were created in the image of God to worship their Creator by loving and serving Him, and by exercising dominion under God’s rule by inhabiting, possessing, ruling, caring for and enjoying God’s creation. Consequently, the purpose of human existence is to glorify God and enjoy Him forever. Sin entered the world through Adam’s disobedience, because of which all people are alienated from God and each other and, as a result, they and all creation are under God’s judgement. All people have sinned and, if outside of Christ, are in a fallen, sinful, lost condition, helpless to save themselves, under God’s condemnation and blind to life’s true meaning and purpose. God holds each person responsible and accountable for choices made and actions pursued. Human responsibility and accountability do not limit God’s sovereignty. God’s sovereignty does not diminish human responsibility and accountability. Salvation from the penalty of sin is found only through the substitutionary, atoning death and resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ. As the sinless One, He took upon Himself the just punishment for our sins. Through His death and resurrection, the Lord Jesus has destroyed the power of Satan, who is destined to be confined forever to hell along with all those who reject Jesus as Lord. Out of gratitude for God’s grace and in dependence on the Holy Spirit, God’s people are called to live lives worthy of their calling in love and unity and in obedience to God in all spheres of life. They are responsible to ensure that the gospel is faithfully proclaimed. Christian parents are required to bring their children up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord and to diligently teach them the truth of God’s Word.

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Annual Report 2018 with Policies  

Annual Report 2018 with Policies  

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