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Welcome

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The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, located in Rapid City, South Dakota, is well-known in academic and industry circles for the high-quality engineering and science education we provide. Practical learning experiences are the cornerstones of a School of Mines education. They bring to life classroom theory by providing true-to-life science and engineering challenges. In fact, 75 percent of our graduates gain the skills employers are looking for by participating in co-ops and internships. These experiences help enlighten the available possibilities so that when you graduate, you are ready to step right into the career you’ve spent so much time and effort preparing for. At the School of Mines, you will receive an education from one of the great engineering and science universities in the world at a fraction of what it would cost at any of the other premier institutions. We offer such an excellent value that we’ve been named one of America’s 100 Best College Buys for 12 consecutive years. In addition, the PayScale 2009 Education and Salary Report ranks the School of Mines as one of the top engineering colleges by salary potential. Our reputation continues to grow and rests on the excellence of our faculty and students, our intimate size, strong sense of community, affordability, and treasured links with the people, history, economy, and natural beauty of the Black Hills of South Dakota. Twenty minutes from Mount Rushmore, Rapid City and the Black Hills offer numerous opportunities for summer and winter outdoor activities to balance academic studies. At the School of Mines, you will invent tomorrow, starting today. We invite you to join us on this adventure.

Placement and Outcomes Career Planning Placement Summary 2 Investment Payoff Salary Potential 41 Undecided? 42 Student Services Scholarships and Financial Assistance Academic Support Services Academic Advising Mentoring Peer Advising Supplemental Instruction Tablet PC Program 43 Student Activities and Organizations 44 Center of Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) Students Emerging as Professionls (STEPS) Inside Back Cover Fast Facts

Degree Programs 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19

Chemical Engineering Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Engineering Geological Engineering Geology -Applied Geology -Earth System Science -Paleontology

21 Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management Interdisciplinary Sciences 25 -Pre-Professional Health Sciences 23 -Atmospheric Sciences 27 -Science, Technology, and Society 29 Mathematics (applied and computational) 31 Mechanical Engineering 33 Metallurgical Engineering 35 Military Science 37 Mining Engineering 39 Physics

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Placement and Outcomes Career Planning School of Mines students who graduated during the 2007-08 school year averaged starting salary offers of approximately $56,000. This figure helps illustrate that employers are looking for students with the kinds of skills our graduates have. The School of Mines’ 16 undergraduate degrees in engineering and science emphasize advanced science and math, and all combine classroom instruction with hands-on laboratory work. In addition, 75 percent of graduates have relevant work experience through co-ops and internships, which increases their marketability to employers.

The School of Mines has been named one of America’s 100 Best College Buys for 12 consecutive years.

Degree Abbreviations CHE CHEM CE

Career Center

CENG

The Career Center helps you plan your future. Talented staff will help you find internships and co-ops while you are a student and job opportunities when you are ready to graduate. Staff will help you prepare letters and résumés and will take part in mock interviews so you are ready to impress potential employers.

CSC EE

Chemical Engineering Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering

ENVE

Environmental Engineering

GEOE

Geological Engineering

GEOL

Geology

IE

Industrial Engineering

Internships and Co-ops

and Engineering Management

When you begin your career pursuit, interviewers are bound to say, “Tell me about your experience.” Internships offer the real-world experience you need for beginning a successful career. The School of Mines knows the value of internships, and the Career Center exists to help you develop your skills and experiences. The Career Center staff will help you find opportunities, post your résumé online, schedule on-campus interviews, participate in job fairs, and coach you for interviews. You will ensure your future success by gaining valuable experience through internships and coops. Last year, 75 percent of our graduates had meaningful work experience through engineering and science positions. This past summer, our students worked for more than 100 employers in 29 states, Europe, and Africa, and earned an average of more than $16 an hour. You can, too. Our students have • Tested prototypes of advanced GPS units. • Helped design and test satellite communications equipment. • Designed road projects for the South Dakota Department of Transportation. • Worked for Bobcat, Rockwell Collins, John Deere, Cargill, Caterpillar, U.S. Forest Service, Archer Daniels Midland, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and many others. This experience makes graduates highly sought after by employers, and it shows in our 98 percent placement rate and average starting salaries for graduates of approximately $56,000.

IS MATH ME MET

Interdisciplinary Sciences Mathematics Mechanical Engineering Metallurgical Engineering

MINE

Mining Engineering

PHYS

Physics

Placement Summary 2007-08 Major

Percent Placed Overall 07-08

CHE CHEM CE CENG CSC EE ENVE GEOE GEOL IE IS MATH ME MET MINE PHYS All Engineering All Science TOTAL

100 92 100 100 100 100 100 100 67 92 100 100 100 100 100 100 99 96 98

Avg. Offer 07-08 $64,860 $50,214** $50,178 $53,264 $56,423 $56,984 * $57,643 * $53,449 $37,167** $51,300 $56,993 $54,825** $65,000** * $56,287 $47,586 $55,759

Percent Placed: # students working + graduate school + military/other * No salary reports or attending graduate school ** Average based on less than five salary reports

Visit <http://careers.sdsmt.edu> to learn about career planning services.

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Investment Pays Off for School of Mines Graduates

Mines 11th among Midwestern universities and 15th among engineering colleges by salary potential. According to the report, the mid-career median salary for School of Mines graduates is $92,300 (average of 15.5 years experience). The School of Mines has also been named one of America's 100 Best College Buys for the 12th consecutive year. This year's America's 100 Best College Buys is the 14th list published by Institutional Research & Evaluation, Inc., a research and consulting organization that specializes in the recruiting and retention of students for universities. Each year, the organization identifies the 100 colleges and universities in the United States that provide students the highest quality education at the lowest cost. "The School of Mines remains the least expensive yet academically demanding college or university in the United States. Our annual national college survey of 1,451 accredited, residential institutions shows this to be a fact," Lewis Lindsay, Jr., president of Institutional Research & Evaluation, Inc., said. "The School of Mines provides an exceptional opportunity to students from across the United States. High quality and low cost will continue to draw the best and brightest students from far and near." While these numbers are outstanding, salaries and placement are not the only measure of return on investment. School of Mines students graduate with only $15,810 in student loan debt, significantly less than the national average of nearly $20,000. School of Mines students receive average financial aid awards of $7,700 and nearly 75 percent receive aid, making an already affordable education even more so. Students also help to finance their education by participating in co-ops and internships. More than 75 percent of School of Mines graduates increase their marketability to employers by working in meaningful engineering and science positions. This past summer, students worked for more than 100 employers in 29 states, Europe, and Africa. They earned on average of $16.48 an hour. In a time of economic uncertainty, with costs rising, high unemployment and a tough investment market, students are looking to find a solid return on one of the most important investments of their lives. At the School of Mines, they will find it.

The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology may be the best college investment in the nation based on the comparison of total costs and average starting salaries of graduates. More importantly, based on data analysis, it appears that the School of Mines may well be the only university in the nation where starting salaries for graduates average the total cost of a four-year degree. Even in uncertain economic times, the School of Mines offers graduates starting salaries that average approximately $56,000, and 98 percent of graduates find work or are enrolled in a graduate program less than one year after graduation. "We've always known that the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology offers a top-notch education at a tremendous value," South Dakota Governor Mike Rounds said. "To be the only college in the country to literally pay for itself the first year after graduation is truly impressive." At the School of Mines, the college price tag doesn't deter would-be engineers and scientists. This is because the School of Mines, with total in-state costs at approximately $13,860 and out-of-state at $15,240, offers students a return on their investment that can't be beat. "We are extremely proud of the quality, costeffective education provided at the School of Mines," School of Mines President Robert A. Wharton, Ph.D., said. "In today's economy, it is even more important for significant investments like a college education to provide an incredibly worthwhile return. Of all the investments one can make, a college education has traditionally been one of the best. And if you examine total costs compared to average starting salaries, the School of Mines is the best college investment in the nation." School of Mines graduates have some of the highest starting salaries in the Midwest and are among the bestpaid in the nation, according to a recent report by PayScale Inc., a Seattle-based research firm. The PayScale 2009 Education and Salary Report ranks the School of

Top Midwestern Colleges by Salary Potential

Starting Median Salary Mid-Career Median Salary

University of Notre Dame University of Chicago Carleton College University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (RHIT) Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Case Western Reserve University Miami University Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T) Kettering University

South Dakota School of Mines and Technology University of Michigan Northwestern University Purdue University Milwaukee School of Engineering Washington University In St. Louis Kenyon College Michigan Technological University Drake University Lawrence Technological University

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Chemical Engineering

(ChE) control laboratory; a biochemical engineering laboratory to study the production of fuels, chemicals, foods, and pharmaceuticals; a computer laboratory; state-of-the-art process simulators; and several research laboratories. The School of Mines is home to the Center for Bioprocessing Research and Development (CBRD), a facility dedicated to biomass and alternative fuel research, and a new National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center, the Center for Bioenergy Research and Development (CBERD).

Faculty

Construction is underway on the Chemical and Biological Engineering/Chemistry Building (CBE/C), a project that will enhance the educational experience for School of Mines students. The new facility will be linked to the existing Chemistry Building, adjacent to the central campus plaza. The project is scheduled to be completed in Fall 2010.

Career Profile Chemical engineers apply chemistry, biology, and engineering principles to the solution of a wide variety of globally important problems. From producing pharmaceuticals for human needs to recycling plastic, chemical engineers work to find creative solutions to some of the most pressing problems of our times. Chemical engineers design and optimize processes for clean energy, for new materials for electronic applications, and for providing basic chemicals at a reasonable cost in the safest manner. A chemical engineering degree prepares students to pursue graduate study in medicine, materials science, patent or environmental law, or even business administration, in addition to classical chemical engineering.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states. The chemical engineering curriculum is also accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Labs and Facilities The chemical engineering program has laboratory facilities that enhance the concepts learned in the classroom. These facilities include the main laboratory that houses miniplant equipment such as a distillation column, evaporators, heat exchangers, a gas absorber, and others that mimic what is found in industry. Other laboratories include a process

Head: Dr. Robb Winter, professor Professors: Dr. Sookie Bang, Dr. David Dixon, and Dr. Jan Puszynski Associate Professor: Dr. Patrick Gilcrease Assistant Professors: Dr. Kenneth Benjamin, Dr. Jason Hower, Dr. Todd Menkhaus, Dr. Rajesh Sani, and Dr. Rajesh Shende Instructor: Ms. Lori Coble

Features and Strengths The chemical and biological engineering department continues to develop a unique biochemical engineering emphasis. Biochemical engineers apply chemical engineering principles to biological processes used in the agricultural, pharmaceutical, environmental, and specialty chemicals industries. Students who choose biochemical engineering as an option gain intensive hands-on experience with fermentation systems.

Program Overview Critical analysis of chemical processes, both as an entire process and individual components, is the core of the program. The courses in the curriculum were chosen to develop a well-rounded education, beginning with the foundations of mathematics, physics, biology and chemistry, and culminating with a capstone process design course at the senior level. Along the way, students develop competencies in fluid dynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, computer solutions to complex engineering problems, process control, kinetics, and reactor design. Students can obtain a special emphasis in emerging areas such as biochemical engineering, environmental engineering, or advanced materials.

Outcomes • School of Mines chemical engineering graduates received salary offers that average nearly $65,000. • 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines chemical engineering graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within three months of graduation. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. • Companies hiring chemical engineering graduates include 3M, Cargill, Dow Chemical, Dow Corning, Poet, Dakota Gasification, Coca-Cola, Ecolab, Lyondell-Basell, FMC, Halliburton, Hutchinson Tech., Lafarge, Michelin, SD DENR, Tate & Lyle, ADM, USAF, US Navy, ICM, KL Energy Corp, and many others.

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For More Information contact: Dr. Robb Winter Head, Chemical and Biological Engineering (605) 394-2421 Robb.Winter@sdsmt.edu <http://cbe.sdsmt.edu>

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramural sports, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. Students in chemical engineering are encouraged to join the student chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects, including the ChemE-Car Team.

MATH 225 Calculus III ENGL 279 Technical Communications I CHEM 326 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 220L Exp. Organic Chem. IA PHYS 213 University Physics II TOTAL

4 3 3 1 3 17

Second Semester CBE 218 Chemical Engineering II 3 CBE 222 Chem. Engr. Thermo. I 3 CBE 250 Comp. App. in Chem. Engr. 2 CHEM 328 Organic Chemistry II 3 MATH 321 Differential Equations 4 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 TOTAL 18

Research Students have the opportunity to be involved in cuttingedge research with professors conducting work on projects such as development of ultra-lightweight space structures, separation of proteins and chemicals using novel membranes, development of an extended wavelength pulsed laser system, bioremediation of drinking water and ground water systems, formation and processing of nanopowders for energetic and structural applications, bio-enhanced coal-bed methane production, and development of processes using renewable feedstocks for production of bio-ethanol and other bio-refinery products. Funding for these projects comes from sources such as the National Science Foundation, the United States Department of Defense, the United States Department of Energy, the State of South Dakota, local and regional industries, and others.

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester MATH 123 Calculus I 4 CHEM 112 General Chemistry I 3 CHEM 112L General Chemistry I Lab 1 GE 130 Introduction to Engr. 2 ENGL 101 Composition I 3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 5 TOTAL 18 Second Semester MATH 125 Calculus II 4 CHEM 114 General Chemistry II 3 CHEM 114L General Chemistry II Lab 1 PHYS 211 University Physics I 3 CBE 111 Intro. Engr. Modeling 1 CBE 117 Prof. Pract. in Chem. Engr. 2 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 4 TOTAL 18 SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester CBE 217 Chemical Engineering I 3

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JUNIOR YEAR First Semester CBE 317 Chemical Engr. III 3 CBE 321 Chemical Engr. Thermo. II 3 CBE 333 Process Measure and Control 1 CBE 361 Chemical Engr. Lab II 2 CHEM 230 Analytical Chem. for Engr. 2 CHEM 332L Analytical Chem. Lab 1 CHEM 341 Physical Chem. for Engr. I 2 ENGL 289 Technical Communications II 3 TOTAL 17 Second Semester CBE 318 Chemical Engineering IV 3 CBE 362 Chemical Engr. Lab III 1 CBE 343 Chem Kinetics/Reactor Des 3 CHEM 343 Physical Chem. for Engr. II 2 CHEM 345L Physical Chem. I and II Lab 1 Engineering Elective 3 Department Approved Elective 3 TOTAL 16 SENIOR YEAR First Semester CBE 417 Chemical Engineering V 2 CBE 461 Chemical Engineering Lab IV 1 CBE 464 Chemical Engr. Design I 4 Chemical Engineering Elective 3 Biology Elective 3 Hum/SS 300 Level or Higher Elective(s) 3 TOTAL 16 Second Semester CBE 433 Process Control CBE 465 Chemical Engr. Design II CBE 487 Global and Contemporary Issues in Chemical Engr. Chemical Engineering Elective Chemical Engineering Lab Elective Department Approved Elective PE Physical Education/MUEN TOTAL 136 credits required for graduation

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Chemistry

(Chem)

professional schools as chosen by the student, with opportunities available for motivated students including undergraduate research experiences and post-graduation employment. Many undergraduates are eligible to present the results of their research at regional and national conferences. Being an ACS-approved chemistry department provides a number of benefits. The ACS promotes excellence in chemistry education for undergraduate students through approval of institutions nationwide. ACS approved programs demonstrate significant commitment by the department and university to meet rigorous academic criteria as required by ACS. These programs provide a broad-based and rigorous chemistry education which equips graduates with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in chemistry and related fields.

Program Overview An undergraduate education in chemistry provides students the knowledge of chemical and physical phenomena at the molecular level. Students gain the skills of critical thinking and chemical problem-solving in all five major sub-disciplines of chemistry: analytical, inorganic, organic, biochemistry, and physical chemistry.

Career Profile An undergraduate degree in chemistry opens an unparalleled number of doors for graduates. In addition to many job opportunities directly after graduation, many graduates in chemistry pursue graduate degrees to further their knowledge and skills in chemistry. Graduates in chemistry are also highly prized by dentistry, veterinary sciences, chiropractic, law, and medical programs, attesting to the centrality of chemistry and the critical role it plays in society.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states. The chemistry curriculum is also accredited by the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Faculty Chair: Dr. Dan Heglund, associate professor Professor: Dr. David Boyles Associate Professor: Dr. Hao Fong Assistant Professors: Dr. Justin Meyer and Dr. Zhengtao Zhu Instructor: Ms. Cabot-Ann Christofferson

Labs and Facilities The department prides itself in having modern instrumentation available not only for research but as an integral part of undergraduate education. The instrumentation within the department currently includes FT-IR spectrometers, a 300 MHz superconducting heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, a spectrofluorometer, diode-array spectrophotometer, gas chromotograph-mass spectrometer, and other instruments.

Features and Strengths The department provides a high-quality and competitive education and an atmosphere conducive to student achievement and individuation. Advisors work closely with students to ensure students complete degree requirements, including prerequisites for medical and subsequent

The chemistry curriculum offers a great deal of flexibility in terms of free elective courses to supplement chemical knowledge with a breadth of other courses, including the humanities, social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics, engineering, and others. This allows a student to develop a customizable program that will result in a wellrounded graduate who is able to face and meet the challenges in his or her chosen career.

Outcomes • •

• • •

School of Mines chemistry graduates received salary offers that average more than $50,000. 92 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines chemistry graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within a year of graduation. 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. Companies hiring chemistry graduates include 3M, Dow Chemical, Celanese, and Cargill. Many graduates find chemistry a great preparation for medical, dental, and veterinary schools.

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. Students in chemistry are encouraged to join the Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society (SA-ACS). Upon graduation, SA-ACS members may join as a full member of the ACS. The ACS is the single largest scientific professional organization in the world. The SA-ACS provides a great way for chemistry students to interact with other chemistry students and the chemistry faculty through numerous activities they host each year. Some students attend national and regional ACS meetings. These meetings provide a great opportunity to share research and interact with both industrial and academic members of the global scientific community.

Research Many students take advantage of research opportunities with professors conducting investigations in areas including synthetic organic chemistry, polymer chemistry, computational

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chemistry, nanochemistry, and spectroscopy. Undergraduate research may culminate in research reports, presentations, and publications by the student. The department faculty conducts high-caliber research that has been funded by a variety of federal sponsoring agencies including the National Science Foundation, the Army Research Office, the United States Department of Agriculture, and additional state and federal agencies.

For More Information contact: Dr. Dan Heglund Chair, Chemistry (605) 394-1241 Dan.Heglund@sdsmt.edu

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY, ACS CERTIFIED The ACS-certified curriculum provides an excellent foundation in science and mathematics for professional preparation in chemistry and meets the nationallyrecognized high standards established by the American Chemical Society. This curriculum opens the way for a variety of careers in research and development in private industry or government, and gives the student an excellent foundation for graduate study in chemistry. Students desiring to meet the minimum requirements for certification by the American Chemical Society should follow the curriculum outlined below.

CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester CHEM 112 General Chemistry I CHEM 112L General Chemistry I Lab ENGL 101 Composition I MATH 123 Calculus I Gen. Ed. Goal 3 or 4 Elective IS 110 Explorations CHEM 290 Seminar TOTAL

3 1 3 4 3 2 0.5 16.5

Second Semester CHEM 114 General Chemistry II CHEM 114L General Chemistry II Lab MATH 125 Calculus II PHYS 211 University Physics I Gen. Ed. Goal 3 Elective Gen. Ed. Goal 4 Elective CHEM 290 Seminar TOTAL

3 1 4 3 3 3 0.5 17.5

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester CHEM 332 Analytical Chemistry 3 CHEM 332L Analytical Chemistry Lab 1 CHEM 326 Organic Chemistry I 3 CHEM 326L Organic Chem. I Lab 2 MATH 321 Differential Equations 4 CHEM 252 Systematic Inorganic Chem. 3 PE Physical Education 1 CHEM 290 Seminar 0.5 TOTAL 17.5 Second Semester PHYS 213 University Physics II 3 PHYS 213L University Physics II Lab 1 CHEM 328 Organic Chemistry II 3 CHEM 328L Organic Chem. II Lab 2 ENGL 279 Technical Communications I 3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s)1 5 CHEM 290 Seminar 0.5 TOTAL 17.5

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Construction is underway on the Chemical and Biological Engineering/Chemistry Building (CBE/C), a project that will enhance the educational experience for School of Mines students. The new facility will be linked to the existing Chemistry Building, adjacent to the central campus plaza. The project is scheduled to be completed in Fall 2010.

JUNIOR YEAR First Semester ENGL 289 Technical Communications II 3 CHEM 342 Physical Chemistry I 3 CHEM 342L Physical Chem. I Lab 1 Elective(s) 9 PE Physical Education 1 CHEM 490 Seminar 0.5 TOTAL 17.5 Second Semester CHEM 344L Physical Chem. II Lab CHEM 344 Physical Chemistry II CHEM 370 Chemical Literature Advanced Chemistry Requirement2 CHEM 490 Seminar Advanced Chemistry Elective3 TOTAL

1 3 1 6 0.5 3 15.5

SENIOR YEAR First Semester Elective(s) 8 CHEM 490 Seminar 0.5 3 Advanced Chemistry Requirement2 Advanced Chemistry Elective3 3 TOTAL 14.5 Second Semester Electives Advanced Chemistry Requirement2 CHEM 490 Seminar TOTAL

6 6 0.5 12.5

128 credits required for graduation Curriculum Notes 1 A minimum of 16 credit hours of university-approved humanities and social sciences are required, with a minimum of 6 hours in humanities and 6 hours in social sciences. 2 Fifteen credits of advanced chemistry courses are required: Chem. 434, 434L 452, 452L, 460 and 482. 3 Three credits of advanced chemistry electives are required. Take any one of the following courses: 420, 421, 426.

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Civil Engineering

(CE)

Features and Strengths Engineering design applications are integrated throughout the curriculum culminating in a senior design project sponsored by industry, private or government agencies. International senior design opportunities exist and have included projects in Mongolia, Rwanda, Mozamique, and Guatemala.

Program Overview An undergraduate education in civil engineering is founded on a broad knowledge of engineering sciences and selected courses in mathematics, physical sciences, social sciences, technical communication, and computer methods. Required civil engineering courses address the emphasis areas of environmental, geotechnical, structural, and water resource engineering. Each student is asked to choose one or more of these areas as an emphasis, or they may take one course in each of the areas for a broad-based civil engineering emphasis.

Career Profile Civil engineering is about community service, development, and improvement. It involves the conception, planning, design, construction, and operation of facilities essential to modern life, ranging from transit systems to offshore structures to space satellites. Civil engineers are problem solvers, meeting the challenges of pollution, traffic congestion, drinking water and energy needs, urban redevelopment, and community planning. Our future as a nation will be closely tied to space, energy, the environment, and our ability to interact with and compete in the global economy.

Outcomes • School of Mines civil engineering graduates received salary offers that average more than $50,000. • 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines civil engineering graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within a year of graduation. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. • Companies hiring civil engineering graduates include Kiewit Western, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, and several state departments of transportation.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states. The civil engineering program is also accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Labs and Facilities The civil engineering department has laboratories equipped for materials testing, fluid flow and hydraulic systems, geotechnical engineering, environmental engineering, structural engineering design, and computer-aided instruction.

Faculty Chair: Dr. Henry Mott, professor Professors: Dr. Sangchul Bang, Dr. Thomas Fontaine, Dr. M.R. Hansen, and Dr. Scott Kenner Associate Professors: Dr. Joseph Fazio, Dr. James Stone, and Dr. Andrea Surovek Assistant Professors: Lois Arneson-Meyer, Dr. Damon Fick, Dr. Lance Roberts, and Dr. Marc Robinson Professor Emeritus: Dr. Venkataswamy Ramakrishnan Associate Professor Emeritus: Dr. Melvin Klasi and Dr. Terje Preber

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. Students in civil engineering are encouraged to participate in the student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). The ASCE Student Chapter participates in many activities and competes regionally and nationally. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects.

Research Students have the opportunity to be involved in research with professors conducting work on projects such as surface and ground water assessment, funded by the United States Department of Agriculture-Forest Service; use of antimicrobials from CAFOs, funded by the National Science Foundation; sediment transport relevant to endangered species habitat restoration, funded by United States Army Corps of Engineers; reclamation of asphalt pavement, funded by the United States Department of Transportation; and more.

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For More Information contact: Dr. Henry Mott Chair, Civil and Environmental Engineering (605) 394-5170 Henry.Mott@sdsmt.edu <http://cee.sdsmt.edu>

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu CIVIL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester ENGL 101 Composition I CHEM 112 General Chemistry I MATH 123 Calculus I GE 130 Introduction to Engineering PE Physical Education Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL Second Semester CHEM 112L General Chem. I Lab CHEM 114 General Chem. II PHYS 211 University Physics I MATH 125 Calculus II CEE 117 Computer Aided Design and Interpretation in CEE PE Physical Education Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL

3 3 4 2 1 3 16

1 3 3 4 2 1 3 17

SENIOR YEAR First Semester IENG 301 Basic Engineering Econ. CEE 474 Engr. Project Management CEE Track Elective2 CEE Approved Elective3 EM 215 Dynamics OR ME 221 Dynamics of Mechanisms CEE 464 CE Capstone Design I TOTAL

3 1 18

Second Semester CEE 463 CEE Profession ME 211 Intro. to Thermodynamics CEE 465 CE Capstone Design II CEE Track Elective2 CEE Approved Elective3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL

1 3 2 3 3 3 15

2 3 3 3

136 credits required for graduation SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester MATH 321 Differential Equations EM 2141 Statics CEE 284 Digital Computation in CEE CEE 206 CEE Pract and Eng Surveys I Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL

4 3 4 4 3 18

Second Semester ENGL 279 Technical Communications I 3 MATH 225 Calculus III 4 Fluid Mechanics 3 EM 3311 EM 3211 Mechanics of Materials 3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 TOTAL 16 JUNIOR YEAR1 First Semester ENGL 289 Technical Communications II Engr. and Construct Materials CEE 3161 CEE 3261 Intro. Env. Engr. Design Hydraulic Systems Design CEE 3361 Geotechnical Engineering I CEE 3461 CEE 3531 Structural Theory TOTAL

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

Second Semester PHYS 213 University Physics II Science Elective3 CEE 368 Intro. to Transportation Engr. Three of the following four courses: CEE 327 Env. Engr. Proc. Analysis CEE 337 Engineering Hydrology CEE 347 Geotechnical Engr. II CEE 358 Applied Struct. Design TOTAL

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Curriculum Notes 1 In order to enroll in the CEE junior courses, the student must earn at least a C in EM 214, EM 321, and EM 331. 2 Students have the option of emphasizing in one area selected from among the environmental, geotechnical, structural, or water resources engineering offerings where two or more approved courses can be selected. The student can also chose a general engineering option thus selecting a mix of approved elective courses. Track electives for the four focus areas are environmental CEE 426 and CEE 427, geotechnical - CEE 447 and CEE 448, structural - CEE 456 and CEE 457, and water resources - CEE 433 and CEE 437, respectively. 3 See your advisor for a listing of CE approved elective courses. Only one approved elective can be completed at the graduate level.

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Computer Engineering

(CEng) Faculty Chair: Dr. Michael Batchelder, professor Professors: Dr. Edward Corwin, Dr. Toni Logar, Dr. Manuel Penaloza, and Dr. John Weiss Associate Professors: Dr. Jeffrey McGough and Dr. Charles Tolle Assistant Professors: Dr. Randy Hoover and Dr. Ziliang Zong Professor Emeritus: Dr. Roger Opp Instructor: Ms. Elaine Linde

Features and Strengths Career Profile Computer engineering is a rapidly growing profession. Computer engineers use knowledge of digital hardware and software to produce instruments, devices, and systems from home computers to supercomputers for the benefit of mankind. Digital systems and computers have developed with remarkable speed during the past 30 years and permeate every aspect of human activity from education in elementary schools to research at the frontiers of engineering and science. There is an unprecedented demand for engineers with a high level of skills in both hardware and software. Computer engineers are educated to satisfy this demand. A computer engineer entering the profession today has a wide variety of job opportunities in the fields of digital systems, software engineering, design automation, and others.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states. The computer engineering program is also accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Labs and Facilities The electrical and computer engineering department houses well-equipped laboratories to provide easy access to experimental support for theoretical studies in computer engineering. Upper-level lab projects are conducted on an open laboratory basis that allows students to schedule experimental work at their own convenience and as needed to satisfactorily complete the work. General-purpose laboratories are fully equipped to provide hands-on experiential learning under the direct supervision of electrical and computer engineering faculty in the areas of circuit analysis, electronics, digital logic, control systems, applied electromagnetics, electromechanics, and energy conversion. In addition, there are special-purpose laboratories serving the fields of directwrite circuit fabrication, antenna design and fabrication, microwave engineering, communication systems, mechatronics and real-time embedded systems, robotics, digital signal processing, biomedical instrumentation, reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) logic, and computer architecture. Unix-based workstation laboratories are available, and students have access to parallel processor machines and to various other computers.

The School of Mines program is offered jointly by the electrical and computer engineering department (ECE) and the mathematics and computer science department. The combined talents of the faculty in these departments provide computer engineering students with a high-quality education. It is an excellent atmosphere in which to learn, emphasizing a handson laboratory approach to learning and design.

Program Overview The computer engineering curriculum is designed to provide the fundamental engineering and scientific principles as well as the general education essential for the professional growth of students. Students who graduate from the program must be well-rounded individuals both professionally and socially. They must have a good command of the fundamental concepts of mathematics and other basic sciences, basic engineering principles, and knowledge in specialty areas of computer engineering. The basic curriculum includes required course work in mathematics, basic sciences, humanities, social sciences, and fundamental engineering topics in circuit analysis, electronics, electrical systems, digital systems, assembly language, data structures, operating systems, and software engineering.

Outcomes • •

• •

School of Mines computer engineering graduates received salary offers that average more than $59,000. 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines computer engineering graduates were working in their field or enrolled in a graduate program within a year of graduation. 75 percent of 2007-08 graduates gained real-life experience through internships and co-ops. Companies hiring computer engineering graduates include ATK, EchoStar Technologies, Innovative Systems, Lockheed Martin, Rockwell Collins, and Western Digital.

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects.

Research Research in the computer engineering department is funded by agencies such as the Army Research Laboratory, Armament Research Development and Engineering Center, and NASA. Projects include Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) development, computationally intelligent systems, through-the-wall radar signal processing, pattern recognition with artificial neural networks, autonomous robotic navigation using fuzzy logic controllers, and more.

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For More Information contact: Dr. Michael Batchelder Program Coordinator, Computer Engineering (605) 394-1219 Michael.Batchelder@sdsmt.edu <http://ece.sdsmt.edu>

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu COMPUTER ENGINEERING CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester MATH 123 Calculus I 4 CHEM 112 General Chemistry I 3 CHEM 112L General Chemistry I Lab 1 CENG 244 Intro to Digital Systems 4 1 PE Physical Education1 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 TOTAL 16 Second Semester ENGL 101 Composition I 3 MATH 125 Calculus II 4 PHYS 211 University Physics I 3 PE Physical Education 1 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 CSC 150 Computer Science I 3 TOTAL 17 SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester EE 220 Circuits I 4 MATH 321 Differential Equations 4 PHYS 213 University Physics II 3 PHYS 213L University Physics II Lab 1 Free Elective 2 CSC 250 Computer Science II 4 TOTAL 18 Second Semester CSC 251 Finite Structures 4 ENGL 279 Technical Communications I 3 EE 221 Circuits II 4 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 EE 351 Mechatronics and Measurement Systems 4 TOTAL 18 JUNIOR YEAR First Semester CENG 314 Assembly Language 3 ENGL 289 Technical Communications II 3 EE 320 Electronics I 4 CSC 300 Data Structures 4 MATH 225 Calculus III 4 TOTAL 18 Second Semester EE 312 Signals CSC 470 Software Engineering CENG 342 Digital Systems Approved Math Elective2 EM 216 Statics and Dynamics TOTAL SENIOR YEAR First Semester EE 311 Systems CENG 464 Senior Design I CENG Elective(s)3 IENG 301 Basic Engr. Economics

10

3.5 3 4 3 4 17.5

Free Elective 1 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 TOTAL 15.5 Second Semester CENG 465 Senior Design II 2 CSC 456 Operating Systems 4 CENG Elective(s)3 3 4 CENG Elective(s)3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 TOTAL 16 136 credits required for graduation Curriculum Notes 1 Music ensemble courses, (MUEN 101, 121 or 122) may be substituted for physical education courses for qualified students. Any other substitution must be approved in advance by the physical education department chair. 2 MATH 381 and 441 are approved electives 3 Eleven CENG elective credits are required. CENG Electives EE 322 Electronics II 4 EE 421 Communications Systems 4 EE 451 Control Systems 4 EE 452 Robotic Control System 3 CENG 420 Design of Digital Signal Processing Systems 4 CENG 440 VLSI Design 4 CENG 442 Microprocessor Design 4 CENG 444 Computer Networks 4 (credit for only one of CENG 444 or CSC 463 may be used) CENG 446 Advanced Computer Architectures 4 (credit for only one of CENG 446 or CSC 440 may be used) CENG 447 Embedded and Real-Time Computer Systems 4 CSC 410 Parallel Computing 3 CSC 415 Robotics 3 CSC 416 Introduction to Autonomous Systems 3 CSC 433 Computer Graphics 3 CSC 440 Adv Digital Systems 4 CSC 447 Artificial Intelligence 3 CSC 464 Intro to Digital Image Processing and Computer Vision 3 CSC 476 Theory of Compilers 3 A maximum of 4 co-op credits may be used toward the CENG electives requirement if a written request presented by the student is approved by the ECE faculty. The student request must justify that the CENG design requirement is met. Computer engineering students are required to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam prior to graduation.

3.5 2 4 2

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Computer Science

(Csc)

The computer science program is also accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Labs and Facilities Computer science is a rapidly changing field, and the department makes certain that our equipment and curriculum keep pace with changing technology. Resources include an extensive PC network, a Linux lab, a Tablet PC lab, and Robotics Lab. The Linux lab is fully equipped with quad-core desktops. Other computing resources may be accessed via the Internet. The institution encourages its students to use the computer facilities in the creative and efficient solution of scientific and engineering problems.

Faculty

Career Profile Computer science applies the power of the computer to solve some of the most perplexing problems of science, engineering, and business. The program at the School of Mines focuses on the scientific and engineering aspects of the field and trains students to develop highly complex programs from initial concept to final product. Computer scientists work in all types of industries and organizations: aeronautical sciences, biomedical research, business, astronomy, geology, and others. Computer scientists created a flight simulator for the space shuttle that helps train astronauts. They create programs that simulate the aerodynamic properties of new types of aircraft and racing vehicles. Industrial robots that perform jobs too dangerous for humans are guided by computer programs. Computer scientists develop programs that help us to better predict the weather and to predict earthquakes.

Chair: Dr. Kyle Riley, associate professor Professors: Dr. Edward Corwin, Dr. Toni Logar, Dr. Manuel Penaloza, and Dr. John Weiss Associate Professor: Dr. Jeffrey McGough Assistant Professors: Dr. Randy Hoover and Dr. Ziliang Zong Emeritus Professors: Mr. Harold Carda, Mr. Roger Opp, and Dr. Ronald Weger Instructor: Mr. Roger Schrader

Features and Strengths The computer science major features a well-developed curriculum that emphasizes both the software and the hardware aspects of the discipline. The faculty in the department consider teaching undergraduates to be their most important activity, and they pride themselves on the personal contact they have with their students.

Program Overview The primary goal of the program is to prepare graduates to enter a dynamic and rapidly changing field as competent computer scientists. Graduates will be capable in all phases of software development including design, development, and testing, and they will have a firm understanding of hardware technologies.

Outcomes

In the world of business, computer scientists create programs that allow financial analysts to model the economy and predict future trends.

• School of Mines computer science graduates received salary offers that average more than $56,000. • 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines computer science graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within a year of graduation. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. • Companies hiring computer science graduates include Microsoft, Rockwell Collins, Northrop Gruman, IBM, L3 Communications, and HewlettPackard.

Accreditation

Student Organizations

Computer scientists in the biomedical field create programs that analyze and test new drugs and chemical compounds, programs that help researchers in the area of genetic manipulation, programs that help physicians diagnose and treat medical problems, and programs that help nurses monitor patients and dispense medications.

The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states.

Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are

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encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Computer science majors have been very active with the Robotics team and the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle competition. Many CAMP projects have the opportunity to utilize the skills of a software engineer.

Research Students have the opportunity to be involved in research with professors conducting work on projects in friction stir-welding, satellite image processing, ground penetrating radar, and software for various CAMP projects.

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu COMPUTER SCIENCE CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester ENGL 101 Composition I Science Elective1 Science Elective Lab1 MATH 123 Calculus I CSC 150 Computer Science I Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s)1 TOTAL

3 3 1 4 3 3 17

For More Information contact: Dr. Kyle Riley Chair, Mathematics and Computer Science (605) 394-2471 Kyle.Riley@sdsmt.edu <www.mcs.sdsmt.edu>

Second Semester CSC 317 Computer Organization and Architecture MATH 315 Linear Algebra CSC 461 Programming Languages CSC 470 Software Engineering CSC Electives1 TOTAL SENIOR YEAR First Semester CSC 465 Senior Design I CSC 484 Database Mgmt. Systems CSC 421 Graphical User Interfaces Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s)1 Free Elective TOTAL Second Semester CSC 456 Operating Systems CSC 467 Senior Design II HUM 375 Computers in Society1 CSC Electives1 MATH 381 Intro. to Probability and Statistics TOTAL

4 3 4 3 3 17

2 3 3 4 3 15

4 2 3 3 3 15

128 credits required for graduation Second Semester MATH 125 Calculus II Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s)1 CSC 250 Computer Science II CSC 251 Finite Structures PE Physical Education TOTAL

4 3 4 4 1 16

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester CSC 300 Data Structures MATH 225 Calculus III CENG 244 Intro. to Digital Systems PE Physical Education Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s)1 TOTAL

4 4 4 1 3 16

Second Semester ENGL 279 Technical Communications I CSC 314 Assembly Language Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s)1 Science Elective1 Science Elective Lab1 Free Elective TOTAL

3 4 3 3 1 2 16

JUNIOR YEAR First Semester ENGL 289 Technical Communications II 3 MATH 321 Differential Equations 4 PHYS 211 University Physics I 3 CSC 372 Analysis of Algorithms 3 3 Elective or CSC Elective1 TOTAL 16

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Curriculum Notes • CSC 465/467 is a two-course sequence in senior design. It is expected that the course sequence will be taken in successive semesters. • An exit exam, such as the Major Field Achievement Test in Computer Science, will be given as part of CSC 467. The overall results of this exam will be used to assess the computer science program. • CSC 105 may not be counted toward any mathematics, computer science, or engineering degree. Other majors should consult their departments on policy regarding this course. • MUEN 101, 121, 122 can be used to substitute for one or two of the required two physical education credits. 1Elective courses must be chosen to satisfy the following requirements.

• Sixteen semester hours in humanities or social science. At least 6 hours must be in humanities and at least 6 hours must be in social sciences. • Six credit hours of humanities and 6 credit hours of social science must be completed within the first 64 hours. It is important to refer to the general education requirements under bachelor of science graduation requirements for further information. • Thirty total hours in humanities, social science, or other nontechnical disciplines that serve to broaden the background of the student. This may include all English classes, 2 credits of physical education, and those courses used to meet requirement (1) above. • A minimum of three computer science elective courses numbered 400 or above must be taken. A 3-credit Co-op may be substituted for one computer science elective. Special topics and independent study courses may not be used to satisfy the computer science elective requirement. • Eleven credits of science. Students must take three science courses that count toward the major in that discipline, with two accompanying labs. These courses must be selected from at least two different disciplines, and one science course must be PHYS 211.

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Electrical Engineering

(EE)

Career Profile Electrical engineering is a dynamic profession that allows electrical engineers to use knowledge of the properties of electrical energy to do useful work for mankind. Electrical engineers design and develop circuitry that makes possible the operation of every type of electrical and electronic product. The products created by electrical engineers are everywhere: radios, televisions, cell phones, computers, video games, electrical lights, and many more.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states. The electrical engineering program is also accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Features and Strengths A two-semester capstone design experience requires electrical engineering students to conduct their own design project in a simulated industrial environment. This foundation provides students with a broad base of understanding that allows them to apply their knowledge of scientific and engineering principles to the practical and innovative solutions of existing and future problems. Students are required to develop a high level of written and oral communication skills and to work well as a member of a team. They must develop a social and ethical awareness so they understand their responsibility to protect occupational and public health and safety and to implement these factors in their professional activities.

Program Overview The electrical engineering curriculum is principally oriented toward preparing students for careers by providing them with the engineering and technical education appropriate to meet modern technological challenges. The basic curriculum includes required course work in mathematics, basic sciences, humanities, social sciences, and fundamental engineering topics such as circuit analysis, electronics, electrical systems, electromagnetics, energy systems, and properties of materials. Electrical engineering students are required to select three senior elective courses from communication systems, power systems, power electronics, control systems, microwave engineering, antennas for wireless communications, digital systems, digital signal processing, VLSI design, microprocessor system design, computer networks, computer architecture, and embedded real-time systems.

Outcomes

Faculty Chair: Dr. Michael Batchelder, professor Professor: Steven P. Miller Endowed Chair Dr. Keith Whites Associate Professor: Dr. Charles Tolle Assistant Professors: Dr. Dimitrios Anagnostou, Dr. Wael Fathelbab, and Dr. Thomas Montoya Instructor: Ms. Elaine Linde and Mr. Scott Rausch

Labs and Facilities The electrical and computer engineering department houses well-equipped laboratories designed to give students easy access to experimental support for their studies. General-purpose laboratories are fully equipped to provide hands-on experiential learning under the direct supervision of electrical and computer engineering faculty in the areas of circuit analysis, electronics, digital logic, control systems, applied electromagnetics, electromechanics, and energy conversion. In addition, there are special-purpose laboratories serving the fields of direct-write circuit fabrication, antenna design and fabrication, microwave engineering, communication systems, mechatronics and real-time embedded systems, robotics, digital signal processing, biomedical instrumentation, reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) logic, and computer architecture.

• School of Mines electrical engineering graduates received salary offers that average nearly $57,000. • 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines electrical engineering graduates were working in their field or enrolled in a graduate program within a year of graduation. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. • Companies hiring electrical engineering graduates include IBM, Intel, HP, Motorola, Boeing, Caterpillar, Raytheon, and Rockwell.

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. In particular, electrical engineering majors are encouraged to participate in IEEE, the professional society for electrical engineers. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects.

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For More Information contact: Dr. Michael Batchelder Chair, Electrical and Computer Engineering (605) 394-2451 Michael.Batchelder@sdsmt.edu <http://ece.sdsmt.edu>

Research Research in the electrical engineering department includes advanced materials and processes for future combat systems, funded by the Army Research Laboratory; maskless mesoscale material deposition and laser write technologies; and more.

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester MATH 123 Calculus I CHEM 112 General Chemistry I CHEM 112L General Chemistry I Lab CENG 244 Intro to Digital Systems Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) PE Physical Education1 TOTAL

4 3 1 4 3 1 16

Second Semester ENGL 101 Composition I MATH 125 Calculus II PHYS 211 University Physics I PE Physical Education1 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) Free Elective4 TOTAL

3 4 3 1 3 2 16

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester EE 220 Circuits I MATH 321 Differential Equations CSC 150 Computer Science I PHYS 213 University Physics II PHYS 213L University Physics II Lab Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL

4 4 3 3 1 3 18

Second Semester ENGL 279 Technical Communications I EE 221 Circuits MATH 225 Calculus III EE 351 Mechatronics and Measurement Systems Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL

3 4 4 4 3 18

JUNIOR YEAR First Semester ENGL 289 Technical Communications II 3 EE 311 Systems 3.5 EE 320 Electronics I 4 EE 381 Electric and Magnetic Fields 3 EM 216 Statics and Dynamics 4 TOTAL 17.5 Second Semester EE 312 Signals EE 322 Electronics II EE 330 Energy Systems EE 382 Applied Electromagnetics Approved Math Elective2 TOTAL

14

3.5 4 4 3 3 17.5

SENIOR YEAR First Semester EE 362 Electric and Magnetic Properties of Materials IENG 301 Basic Engr. Economics ME 211 Thermodynamics EE 464 Senior Design I EE Electrical Engr. Elective3 Free Elective4 TOTAL

3 2 3 2 4 3 17

Second Semester EE 465 Electrical Engr. Design II EE Electrical Engr. Elective3 EE Electrical Engr. Elective3 Technical Elective5 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) Free Elective4 TOTAL

2 4 3 3 3 1 16

136 credits required for graduation Curriculum Notes 1 Music ensemble courses, (MUEN 101, 121 or 122) may be substituted for physical education courses. Any other substitutions must be approved in advance by the physical education department chair. 2 MATH 381 and 441 are approved electives. 3 Eleven electrical engineering elective credits required. EE Electives EE 421 Communications Systems 4 EE 431 Power Systems 4 EE 432 Power Electronics 4 EE 451 Control Systems 4 EE 481 Microwave Engineering 4 EE 483 Antennas for Wireless Communications 4 EE 552 Robotic Control Systems 3 CENG 342 Digital Systems 4 CENG 420 Design of Digital Signal Processing Systems 4 CENG 440 VLSI Design 4 CENG 442 Microprocessor Design 4 CENG 444 Computer Networks 4 (credit for only one of CENG 444 or CSC 463 may be used) CENG 446 Advanced Computer Architectures 4 (credit for only one of CENG 446 or CSC 440 may be used) CENG 447 Embedded and Real-Time Computer Systems 4 4 A free elective is any college level course 100 level or above that is acceptable toward an engineering or science degree. Military science courses, 100 level and above, apply as free electives only; substitution for departmental, technical, humanities, or social science electives is not permitted. 5 A technical elective is any science or engineering course 200 level or above that does not duplicate the content of any other course required for graduation. Co-op credits may be used for technical elective credit. A maximum of 6 co-op credits may be used for the EE degree. Electrical engineering students are required to take the Fundamentals of Engineering exam prior to graduation.

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Environmental Engineering

(EnvE) between students and professors and allows for a great deal of personal attention. The environmental engineering program melds strengths and expertise from faculty with a broad range of backgrounds and experience relative to environmental engineering. It is one of but a few truly interdisciplinary baccalaureate environmental engineering programs in the nation.

Program Overview

Career Profile Environmental engineers serve our society at the most fundamental level in caring for the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the soil in which we grow our food. Environmental engineers solve existing and prevent future environmental problems. Environmental engineering is “the profession that cares for our planet through development of engineered solutions to existing and potential environmental problems.”

Students in the environmental engineering program will be educated in liberal arts, higher mathematics, basic sciences, engineering sciences, and engineering design. The experience will be augmented by laboratory courses at the freshman through senior levels. Fundamental environmental engineering course work will involve heat and mass transfer, both classical and chemical thermodynamics, ground-water and surface-water hydrology, and environmental systems analysis. Each student will opt for an emphasis consisting of five to six required and elective courses. Emphasis areas include chemical engineering, civil engineering, geological engineering, materials and metallurgical engineering, and mining engineering. Each student will participate in a two-semester capstone design experience that will involve work with a multidisciplinary team to solve a significant environmental problem.

Outcomes Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states. The environmental engineering program is also accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Labs and Facilities Laboratories maintained by the chemical engineering, civil and environmental engineering, geological engineering, metallurgical engineering, and mining engineering programs are equipped with up-to-date analytical instrumentation. These laboratories are used in graduate and undergraduate research and in association with undergraduate courses to enhance student understanding of critical phenomena. Computational laboratories maintained by all five programs are equipped with up-to-date personal and workstation computing equipment.

Faculty Chair: Dr. Henry Mott, professor Professor: Dr. Arden Davis Associate Professors: Dr. Todd Menkhaus and Dr. James Stone Assistant Professor: Dr. William Cross

Features and Strengths The small faculty-to-student ratio throughout the programs at the School of Mines fosters relationships

• School of Mines environmental engineering graduates received salary offers of more than $45,000. • 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines environmental engineering graduates were placed in their field or have entered a graduate program within a year of graduation. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. • Environmental engineering graduates have found professional placement with government (SD Dept of Environment & Natural Resources and U.S. Forest Service, Indian Health Service, and Bureau of Reclamation), consulting engineering firms, and the mining industry (Granite Construction, Cleveland Cliffs Mining).

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. Students in environmental engineering are encouraged to join the student chapter of the Water Environment Federation and to also consider joining the student chapter supporting their chosen emphasis area: the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Association of Ground Water Scientists and Engineers, or the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration.

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The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects.

Research Students have the opportunity to be involved in research with professors conducting work on projects such as ground water quality assessment, funded by the United States Department of Agriculture-Forest Service; degradation of antimicrobial agents, funded by the National Science Foundation; and more.

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester ENGL 101 Composition I CHEM 112 General Chemistry I CHEM 112L General Chemistry I Lab MATH 123 Calculus I GE 130/130L Intro. to Engineering General Education goal 3 or 4 elective7 PE Physical Education6 TOTAL Second Semester CBE 111 Intro. Engr. Modeling CHEM 114 General Chemistry II CHEM 114L General Chemistry II Lab CBE 117 Prof. Pract. in ChE5 MATH 125 Calculus II PHYS 211 University Physics I General Education goal 3 or 4 elective7 PE Physical Education6 TOTAL

3 3 1 4 2 3 1 17

1 3 1 2 4 3 3 1 18

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester ENVE 217 Chem. Engr. I MATH 225 Calculus III CHEM 230 Anal. Chem. for Engr. ENGL 279 Technical Communications I BIOL 341 Microbial Processes in Engr. and Nat. Science General Education goal 3 or 4 elective7 TOTAL

3 3 18

Second Semester PHYS 213 University Physics II GEOE 221 Geology for Engineers EM 216 Statics and Dynamics1 MATH 321 Differential Equations General Education goal 3 or 4 elective7 ENVE 390 Seminar TOTAL

3 3 4 4 3 0 17

3 4 2 3

For More Information contact: Dr. Henry Mott Chair, Civil and Environmental Engineering (605) 394-5170 Henry.Mott@sdsmt.edu <http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/sdsmt/environmental>

ENVE 307 Environmental Geostatistics 2 ENVE 315 Fund. of Heat Transfer 2 ENVE 320 Thermodynamics2 4 ENVE 326 Introd. Env. Engr. Design 3 CHEM 332L Anal. Chemistry Lab 1 TOTAL 17 Second Semester CBE 250 Computer Apps in ChE5 CHEM 316 Fund. of Org. Chem. ENVE 318 Chemical Engr. IV ENVE 327 Env. Engr. Proc Analysis EM 328 Applied Fluid Mechanics3 ENVE 390 Seminar Emphasis elective(s)4 TOTAL

SENIOR YEAR First Semester ENVE 421 Environ. Systems Analysis 3 ENVE 464 Environ. Engr. Design I 2 ENVE 475 Ground Water 3 8 Emphasis elective(s)4 TOTAL 16 Second Semester ENVE 337 Engineering Hydrology ENVE 390 Seminar ATM 405 Air Quality ENVE 465 Envr. Engr. Design II Emphasis elective(s)4 Humanities or Social Sciences Electives TOTAL

3 1 3 2 3 4 16

136 credits are required for graduation Curriculum Notes 1 A combination of EM 214/321, EM 214/215, or EM 214/ME 221 may replace EM 216. 2 CBE 222 and CBE 321 will satisfy the thermodynamics requirement. 3 CBE 218, EM 331, or ME 331 will also satisfy fluid mechanics requirements. 4 Each student must select a set of emphasis area course work totaling 14 credits. 5 CEE 284, 4 credits meets the combined requirement for CBE 117-CBE 250, 4 credits total. Math 373, 3 credits, may be substituted for CBE 250, 2 credits. 6 Music Ensemble courses may be substituted for physical education courses for qualified students. Any other substitutions must be approved in advance by the physical education department chair. 7 Consult the section of the catalog addressing graduation requirements for a description of the combinations of lower level (1xx/2xx) social sciences and humanities courses meeting the SDBOR General Education goals #3 and #4.

JUNIOR YEAR First Semester ENGL 289 Technical Communications II 3 IENG 301 Basic Engr. Economics 2

16

2 3 3 3 3 0 3 17

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Geological Engineering

(GeolE) Programs are available for digital modeling of ground-water flow and contaminant migration, petroleum engineering, slope stability, geophysical applications, geochemical modeling, and spreadsheet applications.

Features and Strengths The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is located on the edge of the beautiful Black Hills, where magnificent exposures of rock and structures are one of the major assets of the geological engineering curriculum. The Badlands and the Black Hills are natural laboratories for hands-on studies of geologic processes and are used extensively for field trips. The demand for geological engineers is great and is predicted to remain strong as our nation’s ground-water usage and energy consumption continue to grow.

Program Overview The undergraduate education in geological engineering is based on the fundamentals of engineering and geological science and provides training and practice in the areas of ground water, environmental work, geomechanics, and exploration for and development of fuels and minerals. In the senior year, students select from two of four areas in which to specialize: ground water, environmental site planning, geomechanics and engineering geology, or energy and mineral resources.

Career Profile Geological engineering is the development and conservation of natural resources in ways that are useful to mankind. It encompasses diverse fields such as groundwater resources, subsurface contamination, slope stability, environmental site investigations, petroleum exploration and production, and minerals. The instruction in geological engineering provides training at both the undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral levels. A geological engineering degree prepares students to pursue graduate study in materials science, patent or environmental law, or even business administration, in addition to classical geological engineering.

Accreditation

An appreciation and understanding of earth processes and landscapes is helpful to a geological engineer. Knowledge of computers also is helpful, especially for predicting how much water or oil can be pumped from the ground or for predicting what will happen to pollutants under the land surface in ground water. Mathematics, chemistry, physics, and English are also important to geological engineers.

Outcomes • •

The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states. The geological engineering program is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Faculty Chair: Dr. Maribeth Price, associate professor Professors: Dr. Arden Davis and Dr. William Roggenthen Associate Professor: Dr. Larry Stetler Assistant Professors: Dr. Kurt Katzenstein and Dr. John Sawyer Professor Emeritus: Dr. Perry Rahn

Labs and Facilities The geological engineering facilities include a digital and analytical modeling laboratory, a geographic information systems (GIS) laboratory, a ground-water laboratory, a wind engineering laboratory, a geotechnics laboratory, a drilling fluids laboratory, and an operational well field with data loggers and transducers. Instrumentation includes ground-probing radar, a hydrologic analysis system, a portable wind tunnel, a mobile drilling rig, and petroleum engineering equipment. The computer laboratory is continually updated and contains high-speed computers with GIS and other analytical capabilities.

School of Mines geological engineering graduates received salary offers that average more than $57,000. 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines geological engineering graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within a year of graduation. 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. Companies hiring geological engineering graduates include Pathfinder Energy Services, U.S. Geological Survey, Barr Engineering Company, and Phelps Dodge.

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. Students in geological engineering are encouraged to become student members of The National Ground Water Association, the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration, the Society of Petroleum Engineers, and the Association of Engineering Geologists. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects.

Research Students have the opportunity to be involved in research with professors conducting work on ground water, environmental management, geomechanics, energy resources, and minerals. The Deep Underground Science and Engineering Lab (DUSEL) at the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota provides additional research opportunities.

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For More Information contact: Dr. Maribeth Price Chair, Geology and Geological Engineering (605) 394-2461 Maribeth.Price@sdsmt.edu <http://geology.sdsmt.edu>

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester CHEM 112 General Chemistry I MATH 123 Calculus I ENGL 101 Composition I GE 130 Intro. to Engineering Gen. Ed. Goal 3 and Goal 4 Electives TOTAL

3 4 3 2 6 18

Second Semester CHEM 112L General Chem. I Lab 1 CHEM 114 General Chemistry II 3 MATH 125 Calculus II 4 PHYS 211 University Physics I 3 GEOE 221 Geology for Engineers 3 CEE 117 Computer Aided Design and Interpretation in Civil Engr. 2 TOTAL 16 SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester EM 214 Statics MATH 225 Calculus III MEM 201L Surveying for Mineral Engineers PE Physical Education PHYS 213 University Physics II Gen. Ed. Goal 3 Electives TOTAL

3 4 2 1 3 3 16

Second Semester ENGL 279 Technical Communications I 3 EM 321 Mechanics of Materials 3 GEOL 212 Mineralogy/Crystallography 3 MATH 321 Differential Equations 4 PE Physical Education 1 Gen. Ed. Goal 4 Electives 3 TOTAL 17 JUNIOR YEAR First Semester ENGL 289 Technical Communications II GEOL 331 Stratigraphy & Sedimentation GEOL 341 Elementary Petrology CEE 346 Geotechnical Engineering MET 320 Met Thermodynamics TOTAL

3 3 3 3 4 16

Second Semester GEOE 322 Structural Geology GEOE 324 Engineering Geophysics I EM 328 Applied Fluid Mechanics Approved Elective1 MEM 302 Mineral Econ. and Finance Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL

3 3 3 3 3 1 16

18

Summer GEOE 410 TOTAL

Engineering Field Geology

6 6

SENIOR YEAR First Semester GEOE 466 Engr. and Envr. Geology 3 GEOE 475 Ground Water 3 GEOE 461 Petroleum Production2 3 GEOE 464 Geol. Engr. Design Project I 3 GEOL 316 Intro. to GIS 3 TOTAL 15 Second Semester MEM 304 Rock Mechanics I 4 6 Professional Electives3 GEOE 465 Geol. Engr. Design Project II 3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 TOTAL 16 136 credits required for graduation Curriculum Notes 1 Approved Elective. Must be a course approved by the Department of Geology and Geological Engineering. 2 Students interested in mineral exploration may substitute GEOE 451 for GEOE 461. 3 Professional Electives. Students may choose two of the following courses: GEOE 451 Economic Geology GEOE 425 Engineering Geophysics II GEOE 462 Drilling Engineering GEOE 482 Applied Geomorphology ENVE 327 Environmental Engineering Process Analysis ENVE 421 Environmental Systems Analysis CEE 337 Engineering Hydrology CEE 347 Geotechnical Engineering II CEE 437 Watershed and Floodplain Modeling CEE 447 Foundation Engineering CEE 474 Engineering Project Management ME 351 Mechatronics and Measurement Systems (cross-listed with EE 351) MEM 305 Introduction to Explosives Engineering MEM 405 Mine Permitting and Reclamation MEM 433 Computer Applications in Geoscience Modeling MEM 450 Rock Slope Engineering Additional course work in mathematics and statistics is encouraged. MATH 381 and MATH 382 are recommended statistics courses; MATH 432 is recommended for students interested in numerical modeling of partial differential equations.

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Geology

(Geol) students interested in paleontology an opportunity to learn the techniques of collection, preparation, interpretation, and display of fossil material.

Features and Strengths The School of Mines is located on the edge of the beautiful Black Hills, where magnificent exposures of rock and structures are one of the major assets of the geology curriculum. The Badlands and the Black Hills are natural laboratories for hands-on studies of geologic processes and are used extensively for field trips.

Program Overview

Career Profile Geology literally means “the study of the Earth.” The geologist, a combination of detective and scientist, works outdoors as well as in the laboratory studying the formation of the Earth and its myriad of geological structures. Geologists use fossils to interpret the past; learn how wind, water, volcanoes, earthquakes, and glaciers continue to change the Earth; and locate natural resources. The School of Mines program develops geologists for careers in geology including environmental applications, mineral and petroleum exploration, governmental agencies, museums, academic fields, and entrepreneurship. The basic undergraduate program also prepares individuals for graduate study in geology or related areas, either at the School of Mines or other world-class graduate schools.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states.

The geology program provides a strong background in basic sciences and allows considerable variation in course choices depending on individual interests. The geology curriculum includes three areas of specialization: applied geology, paleontology, and earth systems science. Program faculty members are experienced in a full range of geologic investigations and teach classes in topics such as sedimentary geology, structural geology, geophysics, economic geology, mineralogy, paleontology, biostratigraphy, GIS, remote sensing, ground water, environmental geology, and engineering geology.

Outcomes • School of Mines geology graduates received salary offers that average more than $47,000. • 100 percent of 2006-07 School of Mines geology graduates have found work in their field or entered a graduate program within a year of graduation. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. • Companies hiring geology graduates include Wyoming State Engineers Office, AMWest Petroleum, Chicago Field Museum, Geo Tek Inc., SD Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources, and Wyoming State Engineers Office-Water Resources.

Student Organizations

Faculty Chair: Dr. Maribeth Price, associate professor Professors: Dr. Edward Duke, Dr. James Martin, and Dr. Colin Paterson Associate Professor: Mickelson Professor Dr. Nuri Uzunlar Assistant Professor: Dr. Michael Terry Emeritus Professors: Dr. James Fox, Dr. Alvis Lisenbee, and Dr. Jack Redden Haslem Post-doctoral Fellow: Dr. Darrin Pagnac

Labs and Facilities Analytical and computational facilities in the department and related departments include the electron microprobe, heating-cooling fluid inclusion stage, AA, ICP-MS, FTIR, Raman microscope, XRD, SEM, TEM, microcomputers, additional computers, and a modern geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing lab. The Museum of Geology provides

Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. Geology students participate in the Tech Geological Association, the Society for Economic Geologists, the Paleontology Club, and go on regional and international field trips to places such as Hawaii, New Zealand, and Spain. Summer field camps are offered in the Black Hills as well as at the Taskesti field station in Turkey. An environmental geology field camp is also held at the Andaman Islands and the port city of Chennai in India.

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For More Information contact:

Research

Dr. Maribeth Price Chair, Geology and Geological Engineering (605) 394-2461 Maribeth.Price@sdsmt.edu <http://geology.sdsmt.edu>

Research in the geology department includes the paleontology of mammals and dinosaurs, paleoecology, remote sensing of ore deposits, water quality protection, uranium mining hazards, and the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Lab (DUSEL) at the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota. All seniors conduct an independent research project.

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu GEOLOGY CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST

Applied Geology Specialization FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester MATH 123 Calculus I CHEM 112 General Chemistry I CHEM 112L General Chemistry I Lab ENGL 101 Composition I GEOL 201 Physical Geology GEOL 201L Physical Geology Lab IS 110 Explorations TOTAL

4 3 1 3 3 1 2 17

Second Semester CHEM 114 General Chemistry II CHEM 114L General Chemistry II Lab MATH 125 Calculus II PHYS 211 University Physics I Gen. Ed. Goal 3 and Goal 4 Electives1 TOTAL

3 1 4 3 6 17

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester GEOL 331 Stratig. and Sedimentation MATH 225 Calculus III PHYS 213 University Physics II MEM 201 Surveying for Mineral Engineers GEOL 321 Search For Our Past TOTAL

3 4 3 2 3 15

Second Semester ENGL 279 Technical Communications I 3 GEOL 212 Mineralogy and Crystallography 3 GEOE 211 Earth Systems Engr. Analysis 2 PE Physical Education 1 6 Gen. Ed. Goal 3 and Goal 4 Electives1 TOTAL 15 JUNIOR YEAR First Semester ENGL 289 Technical Communications II1 3 GEOL 341 Elementary Petrology 3 GEOL 316 Intro. to GIS 3 3 GEOL 461 Invertebrate Paleo2 Humanities/Social Science Elective 1 PE Physical Education 1 TOTAL 14

20

Second Semester GEOE 322 Structural Geology GEOL 403 Regional Field Geology GEOE 324 Engr. Geophysics I GEOL 442 Optical Petrology2 Geology Elective3 TOTAL Summer GEOL 410

Field Geology

3 1 3 3 3 13

6

SENIOR YEAR First Semester 1 GEOL 464 Senior Research I4 GEOE 475 Ground Water 3 GEOE 461 Petroleum Production 3 Free Elective(s) 4 Humanities/Social Science elective(s) 3 TOTAL 14 Second Semester GEOL 465 Senior Research II4 GEOE 482 Applied Geomorphology2 GEOE 451 Economic Geology Geology Elective3 Free Electives TOTAL

3 3 3 3 3 15

128 credits required for graduation Specializations in Paleontology and Earth Systems Science are also available. See current catalog for course details at <http://catalog.sdsmt.edu/> Curriculum Notes 1 Students must complete 27 credits of the general education core in their first 64 credit hours, including 6 credits of science, 3 credits math, 6 credits English/technical communication, 6 credits humanities, and 6 credits social science. ENGL 289 yields an addition 3 general education credits, for a total of 30. 2 Courses offered alternate years. 3 A geology elective is any course with a GEOL or GEOE prefix. 4 Under exceptional circumstances, a student may petition the department head to substitute geology electives for senior research.

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Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IE) date industrial software are used for many of the courses.

Features and Strengths The program provides the student with high-quality facilities and faculty from which to learn. The low faculty-to-student ratio reinforces the learning environment between the student and the professor. There are many laboratory classes that provide students with experience in work measurement, human factors and ergonomics, facilities design, computer application, and production control.

Program Overview

Career Profile Industrial engineering and engineering management is concerned with the design, improvement, installation, and management of integrated systems of people, material, and equipment. Graduates of the program employ a set of skills that includes mathematical modeling, probability and statistics, computer science, human factors, interpersonal skills, project management, and an ability to manage and administer large technical engineering and research projects. Thus, industrial engineering and engineering management may be thought of as applied problem solving, from inception to implementation and management.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states. The industrial engineering program is also accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), and the combined industrial engineering and engineering management program will seek its first general review in 2010.

Faculty Head: Ervin Pietz Professor Dr. Stuart Kellogg Professor: Dr. Carter Kerk Associate Professors: Dr. Frank Matejcik and Dr. Jennifer Karlin Assistant Professor: Dr. Dean Jensen Instructor: Ms. Kelly Combs

The curriculum is designed to give students a thorough knowledge in the fundamental principles within the four primary stems of industrial engineering: operations research and optimization, manufacturing, statistical processes, and human engineering. In addition, through a variety of course work and experiential learning activities, students develop an understanding of the engineering relationships with the management tasks of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling as well as the integrative nature of management systems. Throughout the program of studies, special emphasis is placed upon application of systems principles in engineering design to assure proper integration of the individual (or individuals), procedures, materials, and equipment. Servicelearning components, laboratories, case work, simulations, and the capstone design sequence reinforce the managerial aspects of systems integration, systems design, and the global, societal, and business context for product and process improvement.

Outcomes • •

• •

School of Mines industrial engineering graduates received salary offers that average more than $53,000. 92 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines industrial engineering graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within a year of graduation. 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. Companies hiring industrial engineering graduates include UPS, Raytheon, Boeing, Caterpillar, and IBM.

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. In particular, industrial engineering majors are encouraged to participate in the student chapter of the Institute of Industrial Engineers. Other opportunities that are available include the Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP), Engineers without Borders, Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU), undergraduate research projects, co-ops and internships, and Student Innovators for Free Enterprise (SIFE).

Research

Labs and Facilities Laboratories are available for courses in work methods and measurements, human factors, and ergonomics. To respond to changing industrial requirements, a modern computerintegrated manufacturing laboratory has been established. The major amount of laboratory activity, however, is involved in the senior design courses. As often as possible, these design projects utilize the facilities of local industries, service organizations, governmental agencies, and other types of business. In addition, modern computing facilities and up-to-

Research in the industrial engineering department includes studies of colleges of engineering as learning organizations, funded by the National Science Foundation; aging equipment facilities design for the United States Air Force; statistical process control; computer aided manufacturing; operations; human engineering; and engineering education.

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For More Information contact: Dr. Stuart Kellogg Head, Industrial Engineering (605) 394-1271 stuart.kellogg@sdsmt.edu <http://ie.sdsmt.edu>

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester MATH 123 Calculus I 4 CHEM 112 General Chemistry I 3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 1 PE Physical Education1 ENGL 101 Composition I 3 CHEM 112L General Chemistry I Lab 1 ME 110 Intro. to Mechanical Engr. OR CEE 117 Computer Aided Design 2 TOTAL 17 Second Semester MATH 125 Calculus II PHYS 211 University Physics I PE Physical Education1 PSYC 101 General Psychology Engineering Fundamentals Elective Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL

4 3 1 3 3 3 17

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester Engineering Fundamentals Elective ENGL 279 Technical Communications I MATH 225 Calculus III IENG 381 Intro. to Probability and Stats. PHYS 213 University Physics II PHYS 213L University Physics II Lab TOTAL

3 3 4 3 3 1 17

Second Semester IENG 382 Probability Theory and Stats II 3 MATH 321 Differential Equations 4 IENG 215/216/217 Cost Estimating for Engineers 3 IENG 241 Production Tools for Quality Improvement 2 IENG 302 Engineering Economics 3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 TOTAL 18 JUNIOR YEAR First Semester ENGL 289 Technical Communications II 3 IENG 311 Work Methods and Measurement 3 IENG 486 Statistical Quality and Process Control 3 IENG 352 Creativity and Innovation 1 IENG 354 Marketing Technology Innovations 1 IENG 362 Stochastic Models 3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 1 Professional Breadth Elective 3 TOTAL 18

22

Second Semester IENG 355 Financing Technology Innovations IENG 441 Simulation MATH 353 Linear Optimization IENG 321 Ergonomics/Human Factors Engineering Engineering Fundamentals Elective Professional Breadth Elective TOTAL SENIOR YEAR First Semester IENG 425 Production and Operation IENG 331 Safety Engineering2 IENG 471 Facilities Planning IENG 464 Senior Design Project I IENG 462 Industrial and Engineering Management Profession Professional Breadth Elective TOTAL

1 3 3 3 3 3 16

3 3 3 2 1 6 18

Second Semester IENG 366 Engineering Management 3 IENG 465 Senior Design Project II 3 IENG 475 Computer Controlled Manuf. 3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 Department Elective 3 TOTAL 15 136 credits required for graduation Curriculum Notes 1 Music ensemble courses may be substituted for physical education courses for qualified students. Any other substitutions must be approved in advance by the physical education department chair. 2 IENG 341 (Industrial Hygiene) may be substituted during a second semester. Elective courses must be chosen to satisfy all of the following requirements: 1. Sixteen semester hours in humanities or social science. At least 6 hours must be in humanities and at least 6 hours must be in social sciences. This may include PSYC 101, which is required. 2. Six hours of humanities or social science must be included in the list of approved cultural diversity courses. 3. At least 3 hours of humanities or social science must be at the 300 or 400 level.

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Interdisciplinary Sciences

(IS)

Atmospheric Sciences

modern scientific immersive and tracked visualization facility, and the Biogeochemistry Core Facility, a laboratory that analyzes key constituents of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

Faculty Faculty members from many departments across campus teach courses in the interdisciplinary sciences degree track, giving students a wide perspective in many areas of study.

Features and Strengths The interdisciplinary sciences program provides students with the high-quality science education the School of Mines is known for, but with the added benefit of flexibility in a wide range of study. Individual degree design and the opportunity to study natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and liberal arts from a broad perspective result in a well-rounded education. Working with faculty members from the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, students can take course work to satisfy federal guidelines (e.g., for National Weather Service, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and U.S. Geological Survey) for the title of meteorologist.

Career Profile The atmospheric sciences (ATM) specialization is designed to provide a well-rounded background in meteorology and atmospheric sciences. By working with knowledgeable School of Mines faculty, students are able to pursue careers in the National Weather Service, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Geological Survey, and private industry, as well as prepare for continued education at the master’s and doctoral levels.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states.

Labs and Facilities The School of Mines is home to the Institute of Atmospheric Sciences (IAS), whose mission is to study the physical, chemical, and biological processes that affect the Earth’s atmosphere. The IAS has modern laboratory facilities that analyze and measure atmospheric components that have the potential to affect the balance of the earth system. It is also home to the Black Hills Advanced Visualization Laboratory, a

Program Overview Students take a broad range of courses in the natural and physical sciences including physics, chemistry, math and computer science, and, of course, meteorology and related earth sciences. The atmospheric sciences specialization allows students to prepare for careers in earth sciences, meteorology, computational studies, and scientific visualization of the earth system. Atmospheric Science students also participate in research and weather-related activities such as forecasting competitions and summer internships.

Outcomes • 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines interdisciplinary sciences graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within a year of graduation. • School of Mines interdisciplinary science graduates received salary offers that average more than $37,000. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops.

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that

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range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects.

Research A senior capstone experience allows students to study with researchers from the South Dakota School of Minesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; renowned Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and the National Weather Service. Research in the atmospheric sciences department includes 3-D modeling studies of lightning-produced nitric oxide, funded by NASA; surface conditions of lake-effect systems, funded by the National Science Foundation; a carbon sequestration partnership, funded by the United States Department of Energy; and more.

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu SPECIALIZATION IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester CHEM 112 General Chemistry I 3 CHEM 112L General Chemistry I Lab 1 ENGL 101 Composition I 3 IS 110 Explorations 2 MATH 1232 Calculus I 4 Gen. Ed. Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 TOTAL 16

For More Information contact: Dr. Sue Shirley Head, Interdisciplinary Sciences (605) 394-2481 Sue.Shirley@sdsmt.edu <http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/is>

Second Semester ENGL 289 Technical Communications II 3 IS 201 Introduction to Science, Technology, and Society 3 PHYS 213 University Physics II 3 PHYS 213L University Physics II Lab 1 ATM/SCI/MATH/ENG Elective 3 Gen. Ed. Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 TOTAL 16 JUNIOR YEAR First Semester ATM 404 Atmos. Thermodynamics 3 ATM 450/L Synoptic Meteorology I/Lab 3 BIOL 311 Principles of Ecology 3 ATM/SCI/MATH/ENG Elective 3 Upper Division HU/SS Elective 3 TOTAL 15 Second Semester ATM 406 Global Environ. Change ATM/SCI/MATH/ENG Electives Upper Division HU/SS Elective TOTAL

SENIOR YEAR First Semester 11 ATM/SCI/MATH/ENG Electives1 IS 401 Writing and Research in the Interdisciplinary Sciences 3 Upper Division HU/SS Elective 3 TOTAL 17 Second Semester ATM/SCI/MATH/ENG Electives IS 498 Undergrad. Res./Scholarship Upper Division HU/SS Elective TOTAL

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester ATM 301 Intro. to Atmospheric Science 3 ENGL 279 Technical Communications I 3 4 MATH 2252 Calculus III PE Physical Education 1 PHYS 211 University Physics I 3 Gen. Ed. Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 TOTAL 17

24

10 3 3 16

128 credits required for graduation 1

Second Semester CHEM 114 General Chemistry II 3 CHEM 114L General Chemistry II Lab 1 3 CSC 150/L2 Computer Science I/Lab 4 MATH 1252 Calculus II PE Physical Education 1 Gen. Ed.. Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 TOTAL 15

3 10 3 16

All IS specializations require a minimum of 30 semester hours of natural sciences, including a minimum of 3 semester hours in chemistry, 3 semester hours in biology, 6 semester hours in a science sequence, and 12 semester hours at the upper division. The atmospheric sciences/meteorology specialization requires one year of general chemistry with labs, one year of university physics with lab, and one semester of BIOL 311: Principles of Ecology. Students should consult with their advisors to determine additional science courses appropriate for their career paths. 2 All IS specializations require Math 123 or a math course requiring Math 123 as its prerequisite. Atmospheric sciences/meteorology requires CSC 150/150L and additional math course work beyond Math 123. Math 102 and Math 120 may be used toward graduation requirements. Students should consult with their atmospheric sciences/interdisciplinary sciences advisors on the most appropriate ATM/science/math/engineering electives for their career paths.

(877) 877-6044


Interdisciplinary Sciences

(IS)

Pre-Professional Health Sciences

Features and Strengths Internships in the local medical community and complementary course work in the humanities and social sciences are included to help students meet the admissions requirements of professional schools. Faculty members, by staying knowledgeable about requirements for admission, will help students select the courses that the professional and graduate schools require and recommend.

Program Overview The interdisciplinary sciences (IS) program provides students with the high-quality science education the School of Mines is known for, but with the added benefit of flexibility in a wide range of study. Individual degree design and the opportunity to study natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and liberal arts from a broad perspective result in a well-rounded education.

Career Profile A strong background in science prepares students in the pre-professional health sciences specialization for entry into a variety of graduate and professional programs, including chiropractic, optometry, dentistry, medicine, occupational therapy, physician assistant, physical therapy, medical technology, and medical radiography. Working closely with their advisors, they will select the courses needed to fulfill the graduation requirements for the interdisciplinary sciences degree and to meet the entrance requirements for the professional schools in health science.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states.

All IS students are required to take a 60-credit core of math, computer science, and natural sciences. These are complemented with program specialized courses and a senior capstone project that reflect each student’s professional goals and integrate the course work leading to the attainment of the IS degree. For students interested in Medical Technology (MT) or Radiologic Technology (RT), the School of Mines has an articulation agreement with Rapid City Regional Hospital, which has fully certified MT and RT programs. Students take prerequisite course work at the School of Mines before applying to either program.

Outcomes • 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines interdisciplinary sciences graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within a year of graduation. • School of Mines interdisciplinary science graduates received salary offers that average more than $37,000. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops.

Student Organizations

Faculty Faculty members from many departments across campus teach courses in the interdisciplinary sciences degree program, giving students a wide perspective in many areas of study.

Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding clubs, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and

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they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects.

Research A senior capstone experience allows students to explore a health science topic and then conduct a research project that reflects their professional goals and integrates the course work leading to an interdisciplinary sciences degree.

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu SPECIALIZATION IN PRE-PROFESSIONAL HEALTH SCIENCES CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST Course sequence may vary by student entry year, math/science placements, and career objectives. Students should consult with their advisors for a more personalized course of study based on career plans. FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester BIOL 121/121L Human Anatomy and Lab 4 ENGL 101 Composition I 3 IS 110 Explorations 2 3 Math/CSC Elective1 Gen. Ed. Humanities/Social Science Elective3 TOTAL 15 Second Semester BIOL 123/123L Basic Physiology and Lab 4 CHEM 112/112L Gen. Chemistry I and Lab 4 Math/CSC Elective 3 PE Physical Education 1 Gen. Ed. Humanities/Social Science Elective3 TOTAL 15

26

Math/CSC Elective 3 Gen. Ed. Humanities/Social Science Elective3 Electives2 4 TOTAL 17 JUNIOR YEAR First Semester Math/CSC Elective 3 Upper Division Science Elective 3 Upper Division HU/SS Elective 3 Electives 7 TOTAL 16 Second Semester Science Electives Upper Division HU/SS elective Upper Division Science Elective Electives TOTAL

4 3 3 7 17

SENIOR YEAR First Semester IS 401 Writing and Research in the Interdisciplinary Sciences Science Elective Upper Division HU/SS Elective Upper Division Science Elective PE Physical Education Electives TOTAL

3 4 3 3 1 1 15

Second Semester IS 498 Undergrad Res./Scholarship Science Electives Upper Division HU/SS Elective Upper Division Science Elective Electives TOTAL

3 4 3 3 3 16

128 credits required for graduation Curriculum Notes: 1 All IS specializations require Math 123 or a math course requiring Math 123 as its prerequisite. Math 102 and Math 120 may be used towards graduation requirements. Students should consult with their advisors on the most appropriate math/computer science courses for their career paths. 2 Elective credits may include additional course work at the 100 level or above in math, computer science, natural and physical sciences, humanities, social sciences, business, military science, or engineering as needed to meet the required minimums or to meet admissions requirements for professional programs in health science. Students should consult with their advisors on the most appropriate courses for their career goals.

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester BIOL 151/151L Gen. Biology I and Lab 4 CHEM 114/114L Gen. Chemistry II and Lab4 ENGL 279 Technical Communications I3 IS 201 Introduction to Science, Technology, and Society 3 Gen. Ed. Humanities/Social Science Elective3 TOTAL 17 Second Semester BIOL 153/153L Gen. Biology II and Lab 4 ENGL 289 Technical Communications II

For More Information contact: Dr. Sue Shirley Head, Interdisciplinary Sciences (605) 394-2481 Sue.Shirley@sdsmt.edu <http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/is>

3

(877) 877-6044


Interdisciplinary Sciences

(IS)

Science, Technology, and Society

Features and Strengths The interdisciplinary sciences (IS) program provides students with the world-class science education the School of Mines is known for, but with the added benefit of flexibility in a wide range of study. Individual degree design and the opportunity to study natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and liberal arts from a broad perspective result in a well-rounded education.

Program Overview All IS students take a 60-credit core of math, computer science, and natural science courses. These are complemented with program specialized courses. Students in the science, technology, and society specialization pursue a science concentration, such as environmental sciences, or a minor in a science field, which is complemented by studies in areas such as political science, history, humanities, English, or philosophy.

Outcomes Career Profile The science, technology, and society specialization combines a strong science background with a firm grounding in environmental, social, and science policy issues. This track will build the foundation for additional study in law school or graduate programs in science policy or public policy. Possible careers include positions as attorneys, in community and government agencies, in science and technology companies, in the military, or as science lobbyists.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states.

Faculty Faculty members from many departments across campus teach courses in the interdisciplinary sciences degree track, giving students a wide perspective in many areas of study.

• 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines interdisciplinary sciences graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within a year of graduation. • School of Mines interdisciplinary sciences graduates received salary offers that average more than $37,000. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops.

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-ofclassroom events. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects.

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For More Information contact: Dr. Sue Shirley Head, Interdisciplinary Sciences (605) 394-2481 Sue.Shirley@sdsmt.edu <http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/is>

Research A senior capstone experience allows students to conduct a research project that reflects their professional goals and integrates the course work leading to an interdisciplinary sciences degree.

Second Semester Science Electives Upper Division HU/SS elective Elective3 TOTAL

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY CURRICULUM/COURSE CHECKLIST Course sequence may vary by student entry year, math/science placements, and career objectives. Students should consult with their advisors for a more personalized course of study based on career plans.

7 3 6 16

SENIOR YEAR First Semester IS 401 Writing and Research in the Interdisciplinary Sciences 3 Science Electives 8 Upper Division HU/SS Elective 3 1 Elective3 TOTAL 15

FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester ENGL 101 Composition I 3 IS 110 Explorations 2 3 Math/CSC Elective1 Science Elective2 4 Gen. Ed. Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 TOTAL 15

Second Semester IS 498 Undergrad Res./Scholarship 3 Science Electives 7 Upper Division HU/SS Elective 3 3 Elective3 TOTAL 16

Second Semester Math/CSC Elective 3 PE Physical Education 1 Science Electives 7 Gen. Ed. Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 3 Elective3 TOTAL 17

Curriculum Notes 1 All IS specializations require Math 123 or a math course requiring Math 123 as its prerequisite. Math 102 and Math 120 may be used towards graduation requirements. Students should consult with their advisors on the most appropriate math/computer science courses for their career paths. 2 All IS specializations require a minimum of 30 semester hours of natural sciences including a minimum of 3 semester hours in chemistry, 3 semester hours in biology, 6 semester hours of a science sequence, and 12 semester hours at the upper division level. Students pursuing the science, technology, and society specialization are expected to choose a science concentration. A minor in a science field (e.g., atmospheric science, computer science, geology, mathematics, physics, occupational safety) is highly encouraged. Students should consult with their advisors to determine the most appropriate science courses and sequence for their career paths. 3 Elective credits may include additional college course work at the 100 level or above in math, computer science, sciences, humanities, interdisciplinary sciences , social sciences, business, military science, or engineering as needed to meet the required minimums or to qualify for a science minor. Students should consult with their advisors to determine the most appropriate elective courses for their career goals.

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester ENGL 279 Technical Communications I 3 IS 201 Introduction to Science, Technology, and Society 3 PE Physical Education 1 Science Elective 4 Gen. Ed. Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 3 Elective3 TOTAL 17 Second Semester ENGL 289 Technical Communications II 3 Math/CSC Elective 3 Science Elective 4 Gen. Ed. Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 3 Elective3 TOTAL 16 JUNIOR YEAR First Semester Math/CSC Elective Science Electives Upper Division HU/SS Elective Elective TOTAL

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128 credits required for graduation

3 7 3 3 16

(877) 877-6044


Applied and Computational Mathematics

(Math)

Features and Strengths Faculty members consider teaching to be their most important activity and pride themselves on personal contact with students. The department is big enough to offer high-quality programs, yet small enough that students have individual contact with faculty. The department regularly participates in the Putnam Exam and in the Mathematical Contest in Modeling.

Program Overview The School of Mines mathematics program gives students a strong foundation in core mathematics and experience in application areas such as statistics, numerical analysis, and computer science. The curriculum is designed to enhance the best of what modern mathematics has to offer. Students take the introductory computer science courses and then augment this background with class work involving numerical methods and scientific computing. The goal is to produce graduates with the technical skills and the theoretical knowledge in high demand in today’s job market.

Career Profile Applied mathematics refers to a wide variety of mathematical and computational fields and their application to practical problems. Advances in technology and the increasing complexity of society have created a need for mathematicians who can apply their expertise to a diverse array of situations. The degree program in applied and computational mathematics has a curriculum designed for the needs of industry and academia. Applied mathematicians solve problems that arise from scientific and engineering applications, use statistics to evaluate risks for insurance companies, work in industry to ensure quality control, interpret numerical data, and simulate physical problems with mathematical modeling. Graduates of a computational and applied mathematics program have demonstrated the ability to deal with abstract and complex material. A degree in mathematics can also serve as a stepping stone to a career in business, law, library science, and other professions.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states.

Faculty Chair: Dr. Kyle Riley, associate professor Professors: Dr. Edward Corwin, Dr. Roger Johnson, Dr. Toni Logar, and Dr. Donald Teets Associate Professors: Dr. Karen Braman, Dr. Janet Burgoyne, Dr. Jeffrey McGough, and Dr. Travis Kowalski Assistant Professors: Ms. Julie Dahl, Dr. Patrick Flemming, and Ms. Laura Geary Instructors: Mr. Jon Lofberg and Ms. Jill Trimble Emeritus Professors: Mr. Harold Carda, Mr. Carl Grimm, and Mr. Roger Opp

Graduates develop a strong foundation of knowledge and skill in the core areas of analysis, differential equations, and algebra. They also attain a basic understanding of statistics, computer science, and numerical analysis. Since applied mathematicians are problem solvers, students must develop the ability to formulate and solve problems arising from scientific and engineering applications. The importance of applying mathematics in other fields is underscored with the use of an emphasis area as part of the degree program. This feature offers courses that can be useful to a career in industry or provide a strong foundation for the pursuit of a graduate degree.

Outcomes • School of Mines mathematics graduates received salary offers that average more than $51,000. • 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within three months of graduation. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. • Companies hiring mathematics graduates include Assurant, EROS Data Center, Microsoft, Raytheon, Rockwell Collins, IBM, and HP.

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students how to apply their engineering, science knowledge, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP

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For More Information contact:

projects.

Dr. Kyle Riley Chair, Mathematics and Computer Science (605) 394-2471 Kyle.Riley@sdsmt.edu <www.mcs.sdsmt.edu>

Research All math majors have the opportunity to be involved in research with professors conducting work on projects in genetic algorithms, image processing, math modeling, optimal gambling strategies, orbital mechanics, and many other areas.

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu APPLIED AND COMPUTATIONAL MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester ENGL 101 Composition I IS 110 Explorations MATH 123 Calculus I CSC 150 Computer Science I Elective2 PE4 Physical Education TOTAL

3 2 4 3 3 1 16

Second Semester MATH 125 Calculus II Science Elective/Science Lab1 CSC 250 Computer Science II Elective2 PE4 Physical Education TOTAL

4 4 4 3 1 16

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester ENGL 279 Technical Communications I MATH 225 Calculus III MATH 321 Differential Equations PHYS 211 University Physics I Elective2 TOTAL

3 4 4 3 3 17

SENIOR YEAR First Semester MATH 423 Advanced Calculus I 4 MATH 432 Partial Differential Equations 3 MATH 498 Undergraduate Research I 1 8 Elective/Emphasis3 TOTAL 16 Second Semester MATH 424 Advanced Calculus II 4 MATH 451 Math Modeling 3 MATH 402 Communicating Mathematics 1 7 Elective/Emphasis3 TOTAL 16 128 credits required for graduation Curriculum Notes 1 The science requirement for this major consists of PHYS 211, PHYS 213, one course from among BIOL 151, CHEM 112, GEOL 201, plus a lab associated with one of the science courses taken – either BIOL 151L, CHEM 112L, GEOL 201L, or PHYS 213L. 2 Students should consult the “General Education Requirements” section of this catalog for a complete listing of all general education requirements. It is important to note that all general education requirements must be completed within the first 64 credits taken. Math majors are additionally required to take a total of at least 16 semester hours of electives in humanities and social sciences. 3 Math majors must complete three courses in a science or engineering emphasis area. Any double major automatically satisfies this emphasis area requirement with their other major. Further information about possible emphasis areas is available from the department. 4 MUEN 101, 121, 122 can be used to substitute for one or two of the required two physical education credits.

Second Semester MATH 315 Linear Algebra 3 CSC 251 Finite Structures 4 ENGL 289 Technical Communications II 3 PHYS 213 University Physics II 3 3 Elective2 TOTAL 16 JUNIOR YEAR First Semester MATH 413 Abstract Algebra 3 MATH 381 Probability and Statistics 3 MATH 431 Dynamical Systems 3 MATH 373 Intro. to Numerical Analysis 3 3 Elective/Emphasis3 TOTAL 15 Second Semester MATH 382 Probability and Statistics II MATH 463 Scientific Computing MATH 421 Complex Analysis Elective/Emphasis3 TOTAL

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3 3 3 7 16

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Mechanical Engineering

(ME) Labs and Facilities Department laboratories include equipment for materials testing, mechanical systems and instrumentation, thermal and fluid systems, integrated manufacturing/controls and robotic systems, and vibrations. Laboratories are updated with personal computers, peripherals, and data acquisition equipment.

Features and Strengths The mission of the Mechanical Engineering program is to prepare our graduates for leadership roles in the mechanical engineering profession by: • offering a quality education fostering a distinctive curriculum accentuating design and project-based learning, • committing to individual development while emphasizing the values of teamwork in a culturally diverse, multidisciplinary environment, • encouraging undergraduate and graduate research utilizing state-of-the-art facilities in nurturing creative solutions to complex engineering problems.

Program Overview

Career Profile Mechanical engineering is one of the broadest fields of engineering, including areas such as automated manufacturing, efficient use of energy, and the design of mechanical systems. Mechanical engineers have many interests, ranging from small machines to nuclear power plants, heating and air conditioning to robotics, and automobiles to spacecraft. Every manufactured product has been made possible due to the knowledge and resourcefulness of a mechanical engineer. Mechanical engineers are involved in the design, development, and manufacture of such diverse types of equipment as the Space Shuttle, racecars, or air conditioning systems.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states. The mechanical engineering curriculum is also accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

The curriculum in mechanical engineering is designed to give students a thorough knowledge of the basic principles in major areas of mechanical engineering: control systems, mechanical systems, and thermal-fluid systems. The curriculum also develops various aspects of problemsolving skills including defining the problem, working toward a solution, and arriving at an adequate answer; communication and effective presentation skills; an appreciation of the constraints that exist in industry with emphasis on the time and cost factors of engineering; and understanding of engineering theory by hands-on laboratory experience. Students select from course electives that best reflect their interests and career objectives. General areas include manufacturing, thermal science/energy, and mechanical systems/design.

Outcomes • School of Mines mechanical engineering graduates received salary offers that average nearly $57,000. • 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines mechanical engineering graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within a year of graduation. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. • Companies hiring mechanical engineering graduates include Boeing, Caterpillar, Honda, and Raytheon.

Student Organizations

Faculty Head: Dr. Michael Langerman, professor Professors: Dr. Gregory Buck, Dr. Daniel Dolan, Dr. Vojislav Kalanovic, Dr. Lidvin Kjerengtroen, Dr. Umesh Korde, Dr. Wayne Krause, Dr. Karim Muci, and Dr. Mano Thubrikar Assistant Professor: Dr. Myung-Keun Yoon Emeritus Professors: Dr. Paul Gnirk and Dr. Richard Pendleton Instructor: Mr. Jason Ash

Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. Mechanical engineering students are encouraged to participate in the student chapter of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science,

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and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects.

For More Information contact: Dr. Michael Langerman Head, Mechanical Engineering (605) 394-2408 Michael.Langerman@sdsmt.edu <http://mech.sdsmt.edu>

Research Students have the opportunity to be involved in research with professors conducting work on projects such as fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites, funded by the United States Department of Energy; lightweight space structures, funded by the United States Department of Defense; and more.

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST 1

FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester MATH 123 Calculus I CHEM 112 General Chemistry I CHEM 112L General Chemistry I Lab ME 110 Intro. to Mechanical Engr. ENGL 101 Composition I PE Physical Education2 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL

4 3 1 2 3 1 3 17

Second Semester MATH 125 Calculus II 4 PHYS 211 University Physics I 3 CSC 150 Computer Science I 3 1 PE Physical Education2 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 6 TOTAL 17 SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester EM 214 Statics 3 ENGL 279 Technical Communications I 3 ME 262 Product Development 2 ME 264/264L Sophomore Design 2 MATH 321 Differential Equations 4 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 TOTAL 17 Second Semester ME 221* Dynamics of Mechanisms ME 211* Intro. to Thermodynamics PHYS 213 University Physics II PHYS 213L University Physics II Lab MET 231 Properties of Materials Lab MET 232 Properties of Materials ME 216* Intro. to Solid Mechanics TOTAL

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3 3 3 1 1 3 3 17

JUNIOR YEAR First Semester MATH 225 Calculus III 4 ENGL 289 Technical Communications II 3 ME 316* Solid Mechanics 3 EE 301 Introductory Circuits, Machines, and Systems 4 ME 331* Thermo Fluid Dynamics 3 TOTAL 17 Second Semester ME 313* Heat Transfer ME 352* Intro. to Dynamic Systems MATH 373 Intro. to Numerical Methods ME 322* Machine Design I ME 351* Mechatronics and Meas. Syst. ME 312* Thermodynamics II TOTAL

3 3 3 3 4 3 19

SENIOR YEAR First Semester ME 477 Mechanical Engr. Design I 2 IENG 302 Engineering Economics 3 MATH 381 Probability/Statistics 3 ME 4XX Mechanical Engr. Elective #1 4 ME 481 Advanced Prod. Dev. Lab I 1 ME 4XX Mechanical Engr. Elective #2 3 TOTAL 16 Second Semester ME 479 Mechanical Syst. Design II 2 ME 482 Advanced Prod. Dev. Lab II 2 ME 4XX Mechanical Engr. Elective #3 3 ME 4XX Mechanical Engr. Elective #4 3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 4 Free Elective 2 TOTAL 16 136 credits required for graduation * A grade of C or better required for graduation Curriculum Notes 1 Many courses are prerequisites for other courses, and their sequencing is important. A faculty advisor should be consulted for any deviation from the above schedule. 2 Music ensemble courses may be substituted for physical education courses for qualified students. Any other substitutions must be approved in advance by the physical education department chair.

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Metallurgical Engineering

(MET) the physical and mechanical properties of materials also are available.

Faculty Head: Douglas W. Fuerstenau Professor Dr. Jon Kellar Professor: Dr. Stan Howard Associate Professors: Dr. William Cross and Nucor Professor Dr. Dana Medlin Assistant Professor: Dr. Michael West Research Scientist: Dr. Haiping Hong Adjunct Professors: Mr. Bill Arbegast, Dr. Nam Soo Kim, and Dr. James Sears Emeritus Professor: Dr. Glen Stone Distinguished Emeritus Professor: Dr. Kenneth Han

Features and Strengths The School of Mines has a long tradition and heritage in metallurgical engineering. The metallurgical engineering program provides the student with a high-quality education and knowledgable faculty from which to learn. The small faculty-to-student ratio reinforces the learning environment between the student and professor.

Program Overview Today’s materials are exotic and so are the methods of producing them. Metallurgy is based upon the principles of chemistry, physics, and mathematics. These sciences provide an understanding of the methods of metal production processes and the behavior of materials. Students learn the science and technology involved in metal production processes and the properties of these and other materials.

Career Profile Metallurgical engineering is the branch of engineering that develops and supplies the materials for virtually every other engineering field. Three-fourths of all elements are metals, so metals play a vital role in nearly every aspect of modern life. Metallurgical engineers transform the Earth’s mineral resources into finished products by extracting metals from ores, producing ceramics from metal compounds, and fabricating high-performance composite structures.

In courses such as mineral processing, metallurgical thermodynamics, kinetics, and metallurgical design, students learn how materials are produced. Laboratory exercises range from concentrating and refining materials to analyzing the microstructure of materials. Environmental concerns including resource conservation, recycling, and pollution control are major elements of the course of study. Students are often part of design teams that include students from other departments. These teams build human-powered vehicles, Mini Indy race cars, unmanned aerial vehicles, and compete against teams from other universities.

Materials and metallurgical engineers are employed throughout the nation and the world.

Outcomes

Accreditation

The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states.

The metallurgical engineering curriculum is also accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Labs and Facilities Laboratory facilities in metallurgical engineering are equipped with modern instrumentation for instruction in mineral and materials processing, chemical metallurgy, physical metallurgy, and mechanical metallurgy. Sample preparation facilities, gravitational and magnetic separators, froth flotation equipment, and others are available for mineral and materials processing. Induction melting and vacuum furnaces, corrosion potentiostat, are available for chemical metallurgy. X-ray diffraction units, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, Raman Spectrometer, Langmuir-Blodgett trough, metallographs, atomic force microscope, and equipment for measuring

School of Mines metallurgical engineering graduates received salary offers that average nearly $55,000. 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines metallurgical engineering graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within a year of graduation. 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. Companies hiring metallurgical engineering graduates include Nucor Steel, Caterpillar, Micron Technology, Harley-Davidson, and John Deere.

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects.

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For More Information contact: Dr. Jon J. Kellar Head, Materials and Metallurgical Engineering (605) 394-2343 Jon.Kellar@sdsmt.edu <www.sdsmt.edu/mse/met>

Research Students have the opportunity to be involved in research with professors conducting work on projects such as friction stir processing, funded by the National Science Foundation; "Back to the Future" Research Experiences for Undergraduates Site; lightweight space structures, funded by the United States Department of Defense; and more. Nucor recently made a donation of $1 million to fund the Nucor Endowed Professorship for Metallurgical and Steelmaking Technologies, and named Dr. Dana Medlin as the endowed professor. The new professorship will provide critical support for steelmaking research and ensure the continuation of higher education in the field. Funds will also be used to support graduate and undergraduate students working with the named faculty, support travel, dues, professional enrichment, and other necessary research and teaching expenditures.

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester MATH 123 Calculus I5 CHEM 112 General Chemistry I6 ENGL 101 Composition I1 GE 130 Intro. to Engineering PE Physical Education Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s)3, 4 TOTAL Second Semester MATH 125 Calculus II CHEM 114 General Chemistry II6 OR BIOL 151 General Biology I6 OR BIOL 153 General Biology II6 PHYS 211 University Physics I CHEM 112L General Chem. Lab PE Physical Education Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s)3, 4 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s)3, 4 TOTAL

4 3 3 2 1 3 16

4

3 3 1 1 3 3 18

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester MET 232 Properties of Materials 3 MET 231 Structures and Properties of Materials Lab 1 MATH 321 Differential Equations 4 PHYS 213 University Physics II 3 CHEM 114L General Chem. II Lab OR BIOL 151L General Biology I Lab OR BIOL 153L General Biology II Lab 1 ENGL 279 Technical Communications I1 3 EM 214 Statics 3 TOTAL 18 Second Semester MATH 225 Calculus III 4 EM 321 Mechanics of Materials OR ME 216 Intro. to Solid Mechanics 3 PHYS 213L University Physics II Lab 1 MET 220 Min. Proc. and Res. Recov. 3 MET 220L Min. Proc. and Res. Recov. Lab1 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s)3, 4 3 TOTAL 16

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JUNIOR YEAR First Semester ENGL 289 Technical Communications II2 3 MET 320 Metallurg. Thermodynamics 4 MET 351 Engineering Design I 2 Set A or C 7 TOTAL 16 Second Semester MET 352 Engineering Design II 1 MATH 373 Intro. to Numerical Analysis 3 Free Elective 2 Set B or D 11 TOTAL 17 SENIOR YEAR First Semester MET 464 Engineering Design III IENG 301 Basic Engineering Econ. Science Elective7 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) Set A or C TOTAL

2 2 3 3 7 17

Second Semester MET 433 Process Control MET 465 Engineering Design IV Science Elective7 Set B or D TOTAL

3 1 3 11 18

136 credits required for graduation Curriculum Notes 1 Satisfies General Education Goal #1 2 Satisfies General Education Goal #2 3 Satisfies General Education Goal #3 4 Satisfies General Education Goal #4 5 Satisfies General Education Goal #5 6 Satisfies General Education Goal #6 7 See Advisor for approved Science Electives Set A-Fall Even Years MET 422 Transport Phenomena Free Elective Set B-Spring Odd Years MET 321 High Temp. Extract/Conc/Rec Directed Met Elective EE 301 Intro. Circuits, Machines, Syst. Set C-Fall Odd Years MET 330 Physics of Metals MET 330L Physics of Metals Lab MET 332 Thermomechanical Treatment Set D-Spring Even Years MET 440 Mechanical Metallurgy MET 440L Mechanical Metallurgy Lab Directed Met Elective MET 310 Aqueous Extract/Conc./Rec. MET 310L Aq Extract/Conc./Rec. Lab

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4 3 4 3 4 3 1 3 3 1 3 3 1


Military Science

Faculty Chair: LTC Jon Hansen, professor Assistant Professors: Jeremy Bryan, C.P. Van Delist, and Logan Veath

Tuition, Credit, and Equipment Military science and leadership courses are tuition free. Books and equipment are provided by the department. Associated fees assessed for all courses do apply. MSL credit may be applied as free electives toward graduation. MSL 101L or MSL 102L may be used to meet PE requirements. Tuition is charged for courses when used to meet PE requirements.

Features and Strengths

Program Overview The military science curriculum provides an understanding of the concepts and fundamentals of military art and science to develop leadership and managerial potential; a strong sense of personal integrity, honor, and individual responsibility; and an appreciation of the requirements for national security. These objectives prepare students for commissioning and establish a sound basis for future professional development and effective performance in the Army or any chosen career field. Courses are designed to be exciting, educational, and flexible, while helping to accomplish your academic and personal goals. The program stresses techniques of organization, motivation, and leadership. It includes recognizing, comparing, and evaluating courses of action while developing an ability to communicate effectively â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the qualities basic to success in any career. Students are also given the opportunity to participate, on a voluntary basis, in ROTC Adventure Training. No matter what career you choose, ROTC management principles and leadership techniques will help prepare you for success.

Army ROTC is your chance to develop skills for success such as confidence, self-esteem, motivation, and the ability to lead others and make decisions. If you want to build toward a solid, well-rounded future, Army ROTC can be one of the best courses you take. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an elective course that requires a small amount of time (as little as five hours a week) without interfering with your required college curriculum or social life. Army ROTC is a challenging combination of academics and important hands-on training that can put you on course to a more productive and rewarding future.

Extracurricular Activities Military-related extracurricular activities and organizations available to the ROTC student include the Pershing Rifles, Ranger Challenge, and Color Guard. Students also may take part in voluntary hands-on training such as self-defense, survival, weapons, orienteering, rappelling, mountaineering, and first aid.

The School of Mines maintains a unit of the senior division of the Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) known as the Mount Rushmore Battalion.

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Financial Benefits Whether you're a college-bound high school student or already attending the School of Mines, Army ROTC has scholarships available. Two-, three- and four-year scholarships are awarded based on a student's merit and grades, not financial need. These scholarships include full tuition, fees, $1,200 annual book allowance, and a monthly cash stipend of $300-$500. For more information, visit <http://rotc.sdsmt.edu/incentives.html> or call (605) 394-2769.

Curriculum http://catalog.sdsmt.edu ROTC provides leadership training and experience demanded by both corporate America and the U.S. Army. ROTC consists of basic and advanced courses of instructions. The basic course consists of the first four semesters of MSL. It is designed to provide all college students leadership and management skills that complement any course of study. There is no obligation or commitment to continue in ROTC or serve in the Armed Forces. The Advanced Course consists of the last four semesters of the ROTC program. The Advanced Course is offered to students possessing the potential to become Army officers and who desire to serve as commissioned officers in the Active Army, U.S. Army Reserve, or the Army National Guard. The objective of the Advanced Course is to select, train, and prepare students for military service. The ROTC program is designed to provide an understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles of military art and science; to develop leadership and managerial potential and a basic understanding of associated professional knowledge; to develop a strong sense of personal integrity, honor, and individual responsibility; and to develop an appreciation of the requirements for national security. Attainment of these objectives will prepare students for commissioning and will establish a sound basis for future professional development and effective performance in the Army or any chosen career field.

For More Information contact: LTC Jon Hansen Chair, Military Science (605) 394-2769 Jon.Hansen@sdsmt.edu <http://armyrotc.com/edu/sdschoolminestech>

experience. A two-year program is available for any student having four academic semesters remaining or enrollment into a School of Mines masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree program after attending a summer ROTC Leadership Training Course at Ft. Knox, Kentucky. Participation in the basic course does not carry any commitment to participate in ROTC but it does satisfy the prerequisites necessary to enter the final four semesters of ROTC. Students must additionally complete a course in the following areas to satisfy commissioning requirements: 1) American Military History, 2) Communications, and 3) Computer Literacy.

COURSES MSL 101 MSL 101L MSL 102 MSL 102L MSL 120/120L MSL 201 MSL 201L MSL 202 MSL 202L MSL 290 MSL 291 MSL 294 MSL 301 MSL 301L MSL 302 MSL 302L MSL 394 MSL 401 MSL 401L MSL 402 MSL 402L MSL 403 MSL 404 MSL 411 MSL 412 MSL 480 MSL 491 MSL 494

In the traditional four-year program, the student enrolls in eight consecutive semesters of MSL courses, 2 credit hours each semester the first two years, and 4 credit hours each semester the last two years. Leadership laboratories are offered concurrently with each of the classroom courses. Non-traditional two-year programs include eligible veterans with prior military service, current members of the U.S. Army Reserve or Army National Guard, and students who have had high school Junior ROTC or Civilian Air Patrol

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Leadership and Personal Development Leadership and Personal Development Lab Intro. to Tactical Leadership Intro. to Tactical Leadership Lab Orienteering Innovative Team Leadership Innovative Team Leadership Lab Foundations of Tactical Leadership Foundations of Tactical Leadership Basic Small Unit Leadership Internship in Leadership I ROTC Summer Leadership Internship Adaptive Team Leadership Adaptive Team Leadership Lab Leadership in Changing Environments Leadership in Changing Environments Lab Advanced Military Science Internship Developing Adaptive Leaders Developing Adaptive Leaders Lab Leadership in a Complex World Leadership in a Complex World Lab Third Year Advanced Military Science Third Year Advanced Military Science Developing Subordinate Leaders I Developing Subordinate Leaders II Advanced Small Unit Leadership Advanced Internship in Leadership Leadership Development and Assess Course

1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3


Mining Engineering

(MINE) Faculty Head: Mr. Shashi Kanth, instructor Professors: Dr. Zbigniew Hladysz and Dr. Charles Kliche

Features and Strengths The United States grows increasingly more dependent on mineral reserves for energy and other needs. A vibrant system of mining education is fundamental to the health of the industry. The School of Mines program helps prepares for jobs in South Dakota and across the nation. A small faculty-to-student ratio guarantees personal attention for students,something not available at many larger universities.

Program Overview

Career Profile Mining engineers apply engineering and scientific principles to discover, appraise, and extract minerals from the earth and sea. Mining engineers may work in underground mines or in surface mines overseeing the recovery of mineral resources. A mining engineering graduate generally starts out in engineering, but progresses quickly into supervision and then into management. The School of Mines’ mining engineering program prepares graduates for that progression. For graduates of the program, there are more jobs available to graduates than there are graduates to fill them. Currently, there are fewer than 15 universities offering degrees in mining engineering in the United States. In 2003, there were only about 110 mining engineering graduates nationwide.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states. The mining engineering program is scheduled for accreditation review in Fall 2009.

Labs and Facilities Mining engineering laboratory and research facilities exist for the study of mine surveying, rock mechanics, mine ventilation, mine health and safety, and for mine planning and design. Laboratory equipment available for student use includes equipment for rock specimen preparation, rock strength testing machines, triaxial apparati, direct shear machines, computerized data acquisition systems, ventilation network models, surveying equipment, and computerized mine modeling and design equipment. Modern geoscience modeling and mine planning software is used by students for surface and underground mine design.

The program’s course work includes mining engineering principles, management, financial analysis, human resources, and contract negotiations. The program has been designed to satisfy accreditation requirements for both mining engineering and engineering management disciplines. By establishing the program in this way, School of Mines graduates from this program possess an uncommon management emphasis along with a mining engineering education that will set them apart from their peers. The broader educational program will enable the graduates to better serve the needs of the mining industry of today and the future.

Outcomes • School of Mines mining engineering graduates received salary offers that average $65,000. • 100 percent of 2008-09 School of Mines mining engineering graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within one month of graduation. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops. • Companies hiring mining engineering graduates include Newmont Inc., Barrick Goldstrike, Peabody Energy, Kiewit Mining, Foundation Coal, Freeport McMoran, MAPTEK, Rio Tinto Energy, LaFarge, and more.

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. Mining engineering students are encouraged to participate in the student chapters of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration (SME) and the International Society of Explosive Engineers (ISEE). The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects.

Research Students have the opportunity to be involved in research with professors conducting work on projects

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For More Information contact:

such as equipment simulation, slope stabilization, rock blasting excavation, and precision blast timing. The mining engineering and management faculty are actively engaged in the ongoing research with the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL).

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu MINING ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester CHEM 112 General Chemistry I CHEM 112L General Chemistry I Lab MATH 123 Calculus I Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) GE 130 Intro. to Engineering ENGL 101 Composition I PE Physical Education TOTAL Second Semester CHEM 114 General Chemistry II MATH 125 Calculus II PHYS 211 University Physics I MEM 120 Introduction to Mining and Sustainable Development PE Physical Education Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL

3 1 4 3 2 3 1 17

3 4 3 2 1 3 16

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester MATH 205 Mining and Management Math I (Calc III) PHYS 213 University Physics II EM 216 Engineering Mechanics (Statics and Dynamics) MEM 201 Surveying for Mineral Engineers MEM 203 Introduction to Mine Health and Safety ENGL 279 Technical Communications I ECON 201 Microeconomics TOTAL Second Semester MATH 211 Mining and Management Math II (Diff. Eq.) GEOE 221/221L Geology for Engineers ENGL 289 Technical Communications II Humanities/Social Science Elective(s) MEM 202 Materials Handling and Transportation MEM 204 Surface Mining Methods and Unit Operations TOTAL

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2 3 4 2 1 3 3 18

3 3 3 3

Mr. Shashi Kanth Head, Mining Engineering and Management (605) 394-1973; Cell (605) 430-8339 Shashi.Kanth@sdsmt.edu <http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/sdsmt/mine

JUNIOR YEAR First Semester MEM 301 Computer Applications in Mining MEM 303 Underground Mining Methods and Equipment MEM 305 Introduction to Explosives Engineering EE 303 Circuits (for Mining) IENG 366 Engineering Management MEM 307 Mineral Exploration and Geostatistics ATM 404 Atmospheric Thermo. (for Mining) TOTAL Second Semester GEOL 214L Mineralogy for Mining Engineers MEM 302 Mineral Economics and Finance MEM 304 Theoretical and Applied Rock Mechanics EM 328 Applied Fluid Mechanics MEM 4XX Mining Technical Elective1 MET 220 Mineral Processing and Resource Recovery TOTAL

2 2 3 3 3 3 2 17

1 3 4 3 1 3 15

SENIOR YEAR First Semester GEOL 341/341L Elementary Petrology BADM 407 International Business MEM 401 Theoretical and Applied Ventilation Engineering MEM 466 Mine Management Free Elective Humanities/Social Sciences (Language) TOTAL

4 2 2 4 18

Second Semester MEM 464 Mine Design and Feasibility Study ECON 304 Managerial Economics GEOE 322/322L Structural Geology MEM 405 Mine Permitting and Reclamation HRM 417 Human Resource Management TOTAL

4 3 3 3 3 16

3 3

136 credits required for graduation Curriculum Notes 1 Elective chosen from a list of approved mining or business courses.

2 2 16

(877) 877-6044


Physics

(Phys)

Professors: Dr. Michael Foygel and Dr. Vladimir Sobolov Associate Professor: Dr. Robert Corey Assistant Professor: Dr. Xinhua Bai

Features and Strengths The recent down-select by the National Science Foundation of the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Lab (DUSEL) at Homestake as the future home of the world’s deepest underground laboratory opens new avenues for physics majors. Located in Lead, South Dakota, a short distance from the School of Mines, the laboratory will provide research and employment opportunities for School of Mines students like nowhere else in the world.

Program Overview The goal of the program of study in physics is to provide students with an understanding of the basic laws of physics and to help students develop skills that will enable them to further explore physical phenomena and to solve related problems. Students will be expected to develop a high level of mathematical skills and become proficient in oral and written communications. Laboratory skills are also emphasized.

Outcomes

Career Profile Physics examines the behavior and composition of matter and its interactions at the most fundamental level. It is concerned with the nature of physical reality—things that can be measured with instruments. Sub-fields within physics include solidstate or condensed matter physics, nuclear physics, high energy and particle (HEP) physics, biophysics, and astrophysics/cosmology. The curriculum provides a background in applications of physics for students seeking employment in industry and also provides a solid foundation for graduate study in physics or in other fields such as geophysics, meteorgeology, metallurgy, computer science, mathematics, materials science, and many branches of engineering.

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states.

Student Organizations Students at the School of Mines also have a variety of opportunities for extra-curricular activities that range from music, intramurals, and drama to ski and snowboarding, and more than 75 other clubs and professional student organizations. These are important activities for students and they are encouraged to take full advantage of out-of-classroom events. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is designed to teach students engineering, science, and design skills, as well as the ability to work in teams. Team members design, build, market, and raise the money for their projects. All students are welcome to work on CAMP projects.

Research

Labs and Facilities The facilities in the Electrical Engineering-Physics building are equipped for all aspects of the department’s experimental work from the introductory laboratories through graduate research. They enable students to observe physical phenomena, demonstrate physical principles, and learn techniques for making quantitative measurements in the fields of mechanics, heat, optics, electricity and magnetism, atomic physics, and solid state physics.

Faculty

• School of Mines graduates received salary offers that average approximately $56,000. • 100 percent of 2007-08 School of Mines physics graduates were placed in their field or entered a graduate program within three months of graduation. • 75 percent of graduates gain real-life experience through internships and co-ops.

Students have the opportunity to be involved in research with professors conducting work on projects such as solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, properties of ferroelectric and magnetically ordered materials, electronic properties of nanoscale materials and devices, semiconductor spintronics, and more. It is anticipated that students will have unique and exciting opportunities for research and employment thanks to the National Science Foundation’s selection of the nearby Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) at Homestake Mine in Lead, South Dakota.

Head: Dr. Andre Petukhov, professor

www.GoToMines.com

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For More Information contact: Dr. Andre Petukhov Head, Department of Physics (605) 394-2364 Andre.Petukhov@sdsmt.edu

Curriculum Listing http://catalog.sdsmt.edu PHYSICS CURRICULUM/CHECKLIST FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester MATH 123 Calculus I CHEM 112 General Chemistry I CHEM 112L General Chemistry I Lab ENGL 101 Composition I PE Physical Education IS 110 Explorations Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL

4 3 1 3 1 2 3 17

Second Semester MATH 125 Calculus II PHYS 211 University Physics I PE Physical Education CHEM 114 General Chemistry II CHEM 114L General Chemistry II Lab CSC 150 Computer Science I TOTAL

4 3 1 3 1 3 15

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester MATH 225 Calculus III 4 PHYS 213 University Physics II 3 PHYS 213L University Physics II Lab 1 PHYS 275 Relativity 3 ENGL 279 Technical Communications I 3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 TOTAL 17 Second Semester MATH 321 Differential Equations EE 220 Circuits I ENGL 289 Technical Communications II Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL

SENIOR YEAR First Semester PHYS 421 Electromagnetism PHYS 361 Optics1 PHYS 412 Advanced Design Projects I PHYS 481 Mathematical Physics1 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) TOTAL

Second Semester PHYS 433 Nuclear and Particle Physics1 3 PHYS 439 Solid State Physics1 4 PHYS 414 Advanced Design Projects II 2 Math/Physics Electives 3 Humanities or Social Sciences Elective(s) 3 TOTAL 15 128 credits required for graduation Curriculum Notes At the end of the sophomore year, 12 hours of electives must include 6 hours in humanities (in two disciplines or in a sequence of foreign language courses) and 6 hours in social sciences (in two disciplines). The electives must contain a minimum of 16 hours in social sciences and humanities and 3 hours of mathematics or computer science at the 200 level or above. 10 credit hours of military science may also be used as electives. 1

4 4 3 6 17

4 3 2 4 2 15

Courses offered alternate years.

JUNIOR YEAR First Semester MATH 432 Partial Differential Equations 3 PHYS 341 Thermodynamics 2 PHYS 343 Statistical Physics 2 PHYS 312 Exper. Physics Design I 2 CENG 244 Intro. to Digital Systems 4 PHYS 451 Classical Mechanics 4 TOTAL 17 Second Semester MATH 315 Linear Algebra PHYS 471 Quantum Mechanics PHYS 314 Exper. Physics Design II Math/Computer Science Electives Humanities or Social Sciences Electives TOTAL

3 4 2 3 3 15 Deep Underground Science and Engineering Lab (DUSEL)

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(877) 877-6044


?

Undecided

Majors and Programs www.GoToMines.com/programs Students can choose from five science degree programs in: • Chemistry • Geology -Applied Geology -Earth System Science -Paleontology

• Mathematics (applied and computational) • Physics • Interdisciplinary sciences • Atmospheric science • Pre-professional health sciences • Science, technology, and society

School of Mines students have access to cutting edge technology and facilities such as the Bio-Medical Engineering Laboratory.

Choosing a college major and a career field This is one of the most important decisions you will face in your life. If you are not sure about the career path you want to pursue, you are not alone. Although some students know their career choice when they enter college, many others are uncertain about their career objective and what major to select. For students who know their general field of interest but have not yet determined a specific major, students may choose “undeclared engineering or science” their first year of study. This route provides students with opportunities to explore a range of interests before entering a specific degree program. During their freshman year, undecided students are encouraged to schedule courses that fulfill general graduation requirements. Courses may be selected from a wide range of disciplines. Academic mentors/advisors will help students select and schedule appropriate courses.

If you enter the School of Mines as an undecided student, you can: • have an opportunity to adjust to rigorous academic demands (and college itself) while easing into departmental requirements. • strengthen your academic proficiencies as you prepare for a particular major. • take time to learn about various academic disciplines to see which ones best suit your individual interests and goals as they evolve. • get to know faculty from various departments — take time to talk with them as you explore your career options. • learn about majors that relate to various career fields and seek the advice of experts in the university’s Career Center. • progress academically by completing prerequisite courses necessary for admission to certain major programs.

Science graduates from the School of Mines are wellprepared technically to enter the workforce or graduate or professional schools. What distinguishes the education you will get here is the quality of the faculty and the attention to student-oriented learning. Experiential learning is a priority here and undergraduate students have opportunities to participate in research and scholarship using modern equipment and facilities. There is a growing awareness that science transcends national and cultural boundaries. To prepare our students to be successful in this environment, the college is actively embracing study-abroad programs.

There are 11 undergraduate engineering degree programs in: • • • • • • • •

Chemical engineering Civil engineering Computer engineering Computer science Electrical engineering Environmental engineering Geological engineering Industrial engineering and engineering management • Mechanical engineering • Metallurgical engineering • Mining engineering Engineers are in high demand — there is no question about that. Each year, thousands of university students graduate into the ranks of the profession of engineering. Industries, companies, and government pursue these graduates by actively recruiting them and offering them excellent salaries and benefits. If you enjoy a challenge and reward, the School of Mines is for you. We have a highly respected international reputation known for exceptionally highquality graduates.

www.GoToMines.com

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Scholarships and Financial Assistance While a School of Mines education is cited as one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best values, we still offer merit- and needbased financial assistance to our students. In fact, more than 80 percent of students receive a portion of the more than $11 million in financial aid available each year. We understand that you are interested in exploring the availability of scholarships or need-based sources of financial assistance to further reduce your costs. We offer scholarships of varying amounts and sponsor grants, loans, and college work-study funds that, together, can be a helpful financial package. For more information on financial aid and scholarships, visit <http://www.GoToMines.com/costs>.

access points, and technical support. Because this represents a required fee, it may increase your eligibility for financial aid. Through this initiative, students at the School of Mines remain at the forefront of their peers by learning in an environment that encourages students to work collaboratively while providing access to engineering and scientific software at any time and anywhere on campus. For more information and FAQs, visit <www.GoToMines.com/technology>.

Academic Support Services The Office of Academic and Enrollment Services (AES) provides academic support services to School of Mines students through academic orientation, academic advising, peer advising, student assessment (including placement, proficiency testing, and survey administration), student success publications, and tutoring to assist students and increase the percentage who graduate from School of Mines.

Academic Advising AES is responsible for assigning advisors to students to help them have a successful academic career at the School of Mines. AES also publishes an advisor handbook and conducts regular training to update advisors on current academic requirements and course offerings, and Board of Regents and university policies and procedures.

Peer Advising Peer advisors are upper-class students selected to assist other students with advising and registration activities, including planning class schedules, interpreting university procedures and policies, and making referrals to other university services. Peer advisors do not take the place of faculty academic advisors/mentors but they do assist them in fulfilling their roles as academic advisors/mentors. Peer advisors assist the advisors with the fall and spring registration and their college freshman orientation course.

Supplemental Instruction Supplemental Instruction (SI) is a peer facilitated academic support program that targets historically difficult courses so as to improve student performance and retention by offering regularly scheduled, out-of-class review sessions. The School of Mines provides SI for MATH 123 (Calculus I) and CHEM 112. Small groups meet twice weekly.

Tablet PC Program In fall 2006, the School of Mines implemented a Tablet PC Program on campus, which puts a Tablet PC in the hands of all incoming freshmen. Students will be assessed a program fee each semester to cover the cost of the Tablet PC, access to the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s network, site-licensed software, three battery stations, maintenance of wireless

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Student Activities and Organizations Students tell us that the relationships they make at the School of Mines are as important as the world-class education they receive. The School of Mines campus is home to an endless range of diverse interests that bring students together and create lifelong friendships. You can get involved in our more than 75 student-run clubs and organizations as your time and interests allow.

Academic Organizations American Chemical Society American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Mechanical Engineers Association for Computing Machinery/Linux User Group Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Institute of Industrial Engineers Materials Advantage Math Association of America Paleontology Club Society of Automotive Engineers International Society of Economic Geologists Society of Explosive Engineers

Athletic Organizations Cycling Club Hardrocker Climbing Club Hot Rockers Dance Team Ski and Snowboard Club Tech Soccer Club

Interfraternity Council Theta Tau Triangle

Honor Societies Alpha Pi Mu Eta Kappa Nu Order of Omega Phi Eta Sigma Tau Beta Pi

Military Science Pershing Rifles Ranger Challenge Veteranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club

Multicultural Organizations American Indian Science and Engineering Society Association of Norwegian Students Abroad Chinese Student and Scholar Association Cultural Expo Committee India Club Mongolian Student Association

Religious Organizations

CAMP Center of Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing and Production Aero Design Team Amateur Radio Club American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) ChemE Car Team Alternative Fuel Vehicle Baja SAE Concrete Canoe Formula SAE Human Powered Vehicle Robotics Team Steel Bridge Supermileage SAE Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

International Student Fellowship InterVarsity Christian Fellowship Latter-day Saint Student Association Lutheran Campus Ministry Muslim Student Association Newman Club United Campus Ministry

Student Interest Organizations

Community Service Organizations

Ambassadors for Life American Welding Society College Republicans Dirt Biking Club Drama Club Drill and Crucible Club Leadership Development Team M-Week Non-Trad Student Forum Scabbard and Blade Student-Alumni Connection Paintball Club Tech Association of Gamers

Circle K Engineers and Scientists Abroad

Student Government Organizations

Greek Organizations Alpha Chi Sigma Alpha Delta Pi Alpha Omega Epsilon Delta Sigma Phi

Residence Hall Association Student Association

Student Media Raver

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Center of Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing and Production Our exceptional Center of Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) is a competitive, nationally-recognized program that brings together students, faculty, and industry leaders to partner on realworld projects.

CAMP teams include: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Aero Design Alternative Fuel Vehicle Chemical Engineering Car Concrete Canoe Ham Club Human Powered Vehicle Robotics Mini Baja SAE Formula SAE Steel Bridge Supermileage SAE Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

In 2009, the School of Mines Aero Design team took trophies for best design presentation, second place for report, and fourth place overall. In 2005 and 2006, the team took first place in the Aero West international competition.

For more information, visit <http://camp.sdsmt.edu>.

In 2009, the School of Mines’ underclass Baja SAE team finished in fourth place and the senior team vehicle finished in 11th place during the Baja SAE Oregon competition.

The School of Mines chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers took first place at the 2009 regional competition, with the Concrete Canoe capturing first place in finished product and fourth overall and the Steel Bridge taking first place in construction speed and economy and second place overall, earning the bridge team a trip to the national competition. .

In 2009, the ChemE Car finished in third place at the regional competition held in Ft. Collins, Colorado, qualifying the team for the national competition in November 2009.

The School of Mines Unmanned Aerial Vehicle team took home four awards and more than $18,000 in prizes in 2008 at the International Aerial Robotics Competition. The team captured first place in the 2006 and 2007 competitions.

The newest CAMP team, Supermileage SAE, placed third in design report and third in overall design at their first competition, held in June 2009.

Students Emerging as Professionals STEPS: Students Emerging as Professionals, a new student organization, will teach you skills for lifelong learning, leadership and communication, and technical understanding, and give you the opportunity for a global perspective.

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(877) 877-6044


Intercollegiate Athletics: The School of Mines plays in the challenging Dakota Athletic Conference of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). Men: Basketball Cross Country Football Golf Track and Field Women: Basketball Cross Country Golf Track and Field Volleyball

Scholarships and Financial Assistance: While a School of Mines education is cited as one of the nation’s best values, we still offer merit- and need-based financial assistance to our students.

Tuition and Fees Annual Costs (Fall 2009) First-time freshman and transfer students Tuition and Fees* Room and Board** Books and Supplies*** Total

SD Resident $6,830 $5,080 $1,950 $13,860

Non-Resident† $8,210 $5,080 $1,950 $15,240

† includes international students *15 credits per semester **based on average room and board costs ***includes Tablet PC program fees

Results: • Placement rate of 98 percent • Average starting salaries of approximately $56,000

Enrollment: • Approximately 2,100 students • 40 states and 29 countries represented in the student body • The School of Mines has the highest academic profile in the state of South Dakota based on ACT composite scores

Research: Each year, student and faculty research leads to scientific and technological advances in a wide range of fields. In 2008-09, nearly $21 million of funded projects came from agencies such as: • NASA • National Science Foundation • Army Research Laboratory • Air Force Research Laboratory • State of South Dakota • Department of Energy • And many more

Accreditation The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states, through the Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) process. In addition, the curriculum in chemistry is approved by the American Chemical Society. All engineering programs with the exception of mining engineering are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., a specialized accreditation body recognized by the Council on Post-Secondary Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education. The computer science program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc. For more information call (800) 621-7440 or visit: <www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org>.

Visit Us The only way you’ll know if the School of Mines is the right choice for you is to visit. Tour campus, talk to students, meet a faculty member or two in your fields of interest, and experience the campus and the city. In addition to special visit events, you can schedule a visit weekday mornings, or afternoons, or by special appointment. Call us at (877) 877-6044, or visit <www.GoToMines.com/visit>.

7,000 copies of this publication were printed by SDSM&T at a cost of $0.87 each.


South Dakota School of Mines and Technology Office of Admissions 501 East Saint Joseph Street Rapid City, SD 57701

APPLY TODAY! Students will find there are many advantages to applying early. To apply for admission, scholarship, and need based financial aid:  Complete the School of Mines Application found at <www.GoToMines.com/apply>. â&#x20AC;˘ If you apply using the South Dakota Public Higher Education Undergraduate Application for Admission, you must also complete the Supplemental Application for Admission and Scholarships found at <www.GoToMines.com/supplemental> to be considered for admission and freshman scholarships. â&#x20AC;˘ Complete all admission application requirements as soon as possible and no later than February 1 to be eligible for freshman scholarships.

 Submit official high school transcripts  Submit official college transcripts (if attended)  Send report of official ACT or SAT Scores  Pay the $20 application fee  Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 15 to meet the financial aid priority deadline.

For more information (877) 877-6044 (605) 394-2414 admissions@sdsmt.edu www.GoToMines.com

Bachelor of Science Degrees Chemical Engineering Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Engineering Geological Engineering Geology -Applied Geology -Earth System Science -Paleontology

Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management Interdisciplinary Sciences -Atmospheric Sciences -Pre-Professional Health Sciences -Science, Technology, and Society Mathematics (applied and computational)

Mechanical Engineering Metallurgical Engineering Mining Engineering Physics

Master of Science Degrees Atmospheric Sciences Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Construction Management Electrical Engineering Geology and Geological Engineering Materials Engineering and Science Mechanical Engineering Paleontology Physics Robotics and Intelligent Autonomous Systems Technology Management

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences Biomedical Engineering Chemical and Biological Engineering Geology and Geological Engineering Materials Engineering and Science Mechanical Engineering (pending) Nanoscience and Nanoengineering Physics (pending)

Visit Us In addition to special visit events, you can schedule a visit weekday mornings, afternoons, or by special appointment. Call us at (877) 877-6044, or visit <www.GoToMines.com/visit>

Academic Guide 2009-10  

Academic Guide for the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in Rapid City, South Dakota

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