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In 2007, the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced the selection of the Sanford Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at Homestake as the development site for the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL).


Welcome Dear Friends:

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES 1. 2. 3. 4.

I am pleased to provide this brief report on the many significant accomplishments made by the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology faculty and staff this past year. As outlined in the following pages, achievements were recognized across all elements of the institution. As previously announced, our goal is to be recognized by our many stakeholders as a premier technological university; one known for outstanding individuals and success in all facets of the teaching, research, and service enterprise. We recognize this goal is, in reality, a journey. As documented below, we are on our way, guided by our Strategic Agenda and its four Strategic Initiatives.

Reshape the Learning and Teaching Experience Promote the Acquisition, Discovery, and Application of Knowledge Engage and Serve the Broader Community Prepare for Our Future as a National Player in Science and Engineering Education and Research

Our efforts to Reshape the Learning and Teaching Experience were influenced by the most academically prepared freshman class, the result of our new admission policies implemented several years ago. Further challenging these outstanding students was the introduction of our Tablet PC program for all freshmen. The success of our CAMP teams illuminates the success of those “soft” skills interwoven throughout our curriculum; communication, teaming, leadership, and diversity (both domestic and international). At the graduate level, a new doctoral program in Chemical and Biological Engineering was approved for initiation this fall.

MISSION, VISION, AND GOAL The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology serves the people of South Dakota as their technological university. Its mission is to provide a well-rounded education that prepares students for leadership roles in engineering and science; to advance the state of knowledge and application of this knowledge through research and scholarship; and to benefit the state regions and nation through collaborative efforts in education and economic development. The School of Mines is dedicated to being a leader in 21st century education that reflects a belief in the role of engineers and scientists as crucial to the advancement of society. Our vision is to be recognized as a premiere technological university of choice in the United States. Most importantly, our goal is to be recognized as the university of choice for engineering and science within South Dakota and among our peer group of specialized engineering and science universities.

The Promotion of the Acquisition, Discovery and Application of Knowledge, our second strategic initiative, dominated our accomplishments this past year. A reported $17.1 M in sponsored grants and contracts, receipt of a second South Dakota 2010 Center, CBRD (Center for Biochemical Processing Research and Development), as well as several successful technology transfer projects are documented in the following pages. Our third strategic initiative, Engage and Serve the Broader Community, affords us an opportunity to engage in science literacy activities for both young children and adults. Our efforts to support economic development link us with the area economy. As a “good neighbor” we are involved with several community activities and frequently welcome community groups to use campus resources. Finally, our fourth strategic initiative guides our efforts to build a modern, sustainable campus; a suite of human and physical resources designed to support our growth programs of teaching, research, and service. Several of these efforts and accomplishments are highlighted in this report. The School of Mines is a dynamic, evolving institution committed to bringing the best of science and engineering to our citizens, the state, and nation. I hope you share in our pride of accomplishments and vision for the future. As always, I value your thoughts and comments. I can be reached at charles.ruch@sdsmt.edu. Very truly yours,

Charles Ruch President


Welcome Degrees Offered Associate of Arts Degree General Studies Bachelor of Science Degrees Chemical Engineering Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Engineering Geological Engineering Geology -Applied Geology -Earth System Science -Paleontology

Industrial Engineering Interdisciplinary Sciences -Atmospheric Sciences -Business Applications in Science and Technology -Pre-Professional Health Sciences -Science, Technology, and Society

Mathematics (Applied and Computational) Mechanical Engineering Metallurgical Engineering Mining Engineering and Management Physics Master of Science Degrees Atmospheric Sciences Biomedical Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Geology and Geological Engineering Materials Engineering and Science Mechanical Engineering Paleontology Technology Management Doctor of Philosophy Degrees Atmospheric and Environmental Studies Biomedical Engineering Chemical and Biological Engineering Geology and Geological Engineering Materials Engineering and Science Nanoscience and Nanoengineering

DUSEL Announcement Opens New Avenues The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is delighted to share in the excitement of the recent National Science Foundation (NSF) announcement of the selection of the Sanford Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at Homestake as the development site for the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). The project provides for unlimited research potential in a wide array of fields, from physics to geology to biology. Dr. Bill Roggenthen, professor of geological engineering, serves as co-principle investigator for the project and also as the School of Mines liaison with the broader scientific community. Roggenthen will play a central role in the next step of the project — the NSF’s $15 million, three-year grant to develop a specific technical design for the laboratory. He has already received tangible results of his involvement with the Homestake project, as noted by the National Science Foundation’s recent selection of Roggenthen and faculty from University of California-Berkeley to conduct a cooperative project on seismic research at the Homestake Mine. The three-year, $450,000 project is the first of its kind in the world. The project will test how much a 3D array of seismometers will improve sensitivity. Roggenthen hopes to advance seismology and understanding of the deep interior of the Earth. Other School of Mines researchers are also doing studies at Homestake. Dr. Sookie Bang, professor, chemical and biological engineering, and Dr. Rajesh Sani, assistant professor, chemical and biological engineering, are researching thermophiles — microorganisms that live underground at high temperatures. And Homestake, because of its depth, is the best place to study them. Thanks to the efforts of our congressional delegation, Governor Rounds, South Dakota Science Technology Authority, T. Denny Sanford, Co-Principal Investigator Dr. Kevin Lesko, and Barrick Gold Corporation, as well as those individuals on campus, in community organizations, and our other elected officials that worked to make this happen, the School of Mines looks forward to the beginning of what looks to be a long and beneficial partnership with the DUSEL project.

President’s Report 2007

1


Improving the Curriculum for Faculty and Students With a unique, cutting-edge program of study, the School of Mines can become the first choice for the best and brightest students from across the nation and around the world. Building upon our history of excellence, we can — and will — consistently attract those who wish to pursue a high-quality education in engineering and science and leave with marketable skills.

Chemical and Biological Engineering Ph.D. Following a successful pilot program, the School of Mines implemented a Tablet PC program on campus during the 2006-2007 academic year. A tablet PC was chosen because of the unique nature of the School of Mines. Engineering and science disciplines use mathematical symbols and diagrams extensively, posing a problem for a traditional laptop. Through this initiative, students at the School of Mines remain at the forefront of their peers by participating in an environment that encourages students to work collaboratively with access to engineering and scientific software at any time and anywhere on campus.

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President’s Report 2007

The new Chemical and Biological Engineering Ph.D. program will give graduates an educational experience resulting in training in transport phenomena, chemical kinetics, biochemical engineering, chemical thermodynamics, and biotechnology. This core knowledge base will provide graduate students the training to participate in biochemical and petrochemical processing, bio-based energy technologies, including biomass and biofuels; bio-based and bio-compatible materials; bioremediation; emerging energy technologies; and polymer and composite materials and processing.


Reshaping the Learning and Teaching Experience New Admissions Standards Result Graduate Education in Well-Prepared Class Restructured For the second year following the implementation of new admissions standards, the School of Mines welcomed a well-prepared, academically strong, and diverse group of incoming freshmen to campus for the 2007-08 academic year. The Fall 2007 freshman class: • Their credentials reflect increases in both ACT Composite and Math scores. • The grade point averages for incoming students and their rank in high school graduating class have increased. • The 2007 freshman class has a greater percentage of geographic diversity. • The 2007 freshman average course load as measured by credit hours has increased. • The 2007 freshman class was 23.9% larger than the 2006 freshman class. In addtion, the retention rate of the 2006 class is 76.3 percent, a significant increase over previous years. The new admission standards — implemented in fall 2005 for the fall 2006 class — align admission requirements with the expectations students will encounter when they enter degree programs. With these changes in admission, the School of Mines can better serve the students admitted and increase competitiveness with peer institutions.

A Council on Graduate Education has been established at the School of Mines, replacing the previous Graduate Education Council. The restructuring serves two purposes: it ensures that matters of graduate education remain the province of the faculty, and it reduces unnecessary faculty workload. The council is the main forum for the discussion of matters of interest regarding graduate education and associated policies. The council reviews proposals for new graduate programs, evaluates major revisions in graduate curricula, coordinates periodic program reviews, and considers such other matters affecting graduate education as are brought to the council by an administrative officer of the university, a faculty member, or a graduate student.

Graduate Education Welcomes New Dean Dr. John Helsdon, dean of graduate education, has been associated with the School of Mines for more than 28 years, serving as a faculty member, research scientist, and director of the Institute of Atmospheric Sciences. Dr. Helsdon has taught graduate courses in the atmospheric sciences for more than 26 years. His research has focused on the numerical modeling of thunderstorm electrification and lightning. He has mentored numerous graduate students during his tenure at the School of Mines and has a deep understanding in the area of graduate education. As dean, Dr. Helsdon will focus on increasing the national and international recognition of the university's 17 graduate programs in science and engineering. In cooperation with faculty in these programs, he will work to significantly increase the enrollment of and support for graduate students at the university.

President’s Report 2007

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Opportunity Scholarships The South Dakota Legislature created the South Dakota Opportunity Scholarship to reward our state’s best and brightest high school students. Students who take the Regents Scholar Curriculum in high school, maintain good grades, and achieve an ACT score of at least a 24 may qualify for the scholarship, worth up to $5,000 over four years of college study at any public or private South Dakota university. One in every two incoming, first-time School of Mines freshmen in the 2007 class have been designated as Opportunity Scholars.

Total Freshman South Dakota Opportunity Scholars Majoring in Engineering and Science Awarded 2007

All Other South Dakota Regental Institutions 42.2%

SDSM&T 57.8%

Our goal is to be the university of choice for engineering and science in South Dakota. One indicator is the percentage of South Dakota Opportunities Scholars we attract. Currently, 10.6 percent of freshman Opportunity Scholars attending one of the six regental institutions are enrolled at the School of Mines. Of those majoring in engineering and science, 57.8 percent are enrolled at the School of Mines.

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President’s Report 2007

Placement Summary 2006-07 Graduates (BS Degrees) Major

% Working Avg. # Grads % Placed Working Grads in Offer SDSM&T Overall in SD SD

CHE 17 CHEM 6 CEE 33 CENG 6 CSC 17 EE 28 ENVE 1 GEOL 8 GEOE 7 IE 12 IS 19 MATH 3 ME 58 METE 17 MEM 1 PHYS 3 All Engineering 197 All Science 39 TOTAL 236

100% 83% 81% 83% 80% 89% 0% 50% 86% 92% 93% 100% 89% 82% 100% 100% 87% 81% 86%

1 1 9 1 4 5 0 1 0 3 2 0 8 1 0 0 32 4 36

7% 100% 50% 20% 50% 28% 0% 33% 0% 33% 100% 0% 19% 9% 0% 0% 24% 57% 26%

$59,206 $42,000** $51,098 $54,688 $55,881 $52,687 * $47,220** $57,300 $50,208 * * $54,778 $56,962 * * $54,515 $45,132 $54,205

Avg. Offer National

$59,361 $41,506 $48,509 $56,201 $53,396 $55,292 $47,421 $40,786 $54,381 $55,067 N/A $46,594 $54,128 $56,767 $54,381 $44,308

Placed: total working + graduate school + military/other % Placed: # students working + graduate school + military/other * No salary reports or attending graduate school ** Average based on less than 5 salary reports

Construction Management M.S. Program In today's competitive global economy, there is an increasing need for construction managers who have the ability to respond to the changing technical, organizational, and managerial environments within the engineering and construction industry. The School of Mines’ proposed M.S. in construction management will prepare technically qualified students for responsible roles in all phases of the construction industry. The construction industry in general represented by construction companies, industry, developers, and government agencies all require engineers with construction management knowledge and skills. The construction management program will reflect a collaborative effort between the construction industry and the university to provide an effective and vigorous workforce development for the continued growth of the South Dakota region.


Reshaping the Learning and Teaching Experience Fall 2007 Undergraduate Student Profile 80

Ethnicity

Gender

Enrollment

70

%

% 60

40

50 40

ACT MATH

ACT COMPOSITE 50

37%

40

40

32%

15%

20

<20

5%

10 20-22

23-27

0

28-36

<20

9%

20-22

23-27

537 (29.3%)

Male students

Female students

Black/Non-Hispanic 0.7% Asian/Pacific 0.9%

American Indian 2.6% Non-US Citizen 2.0%

30 20 10

Hispanic 1.4%

0

Fr

Soph

Jr

Sr

Spec Grad

28-36

HIGH SCHOOL GPA 70

American Indian Initiatives 30%

20 9%

10

4%

0

<2.5

2.5-2.9

3.0-3.49

3.5-4.0

Faculty and Staff

Serving under-represented populations, including American Indians, is an integral part of the School of Mines vision. To move this vision to reality, the School of Mines has expanded our initiatives and collaborations with K-12 schools and tribal colleges. Recently instituted scholarships for American Indian students have significantly increased available resources.

200

0

Faculty

Total Staff (157)

Total Faculty (116)

Faculty and Staff*

In addition, summer 2007 saw the return of the South Dakota Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (SD GEAR UP) Honors Program, serving to maintain a 15year tradition of summer programs for American Indian youth. This year the program attracted more than 170 students in grades 9-12 and several college students. Nearly two-thirds of the students are female, and approximately 85 percent of the students are American Indians, with many of the students as potential firstgeneration college students. Of those students who have graduated from the program in the past, virtually 100 percent also graduate from high school, 85 percent go on to attend college, and 7 percent enter the military.

56 49 42 35 28 21 14 7 0

18 (1.0%)

20

Research/Admin. (32)

40

Temp/Part Time Faculty (15)

60

Professor (52)

120

Assistant Professor (29)

140

Instructor (7)

160

80

% 70 63

180

100

Age Groups

<17 18-23 24-29 30-39 40-49

13 (0.7%)

30

34 (1.9%)

40

96 (5.2%)

57%

279 (15.2%)

50

1,394 (76.0%)

60

Associate Professor (28)

0

20

4%

10

1,297 (70.7%)

0

30

30

10

20

49%

49%

50

Other 5.2%

30

256 (14%)

50

308 (16.8%)

White/Caucasian 87.2%

70

432 (23.6%)

60

80

351 (19%)

The Fall 2007 freshman class was one of our strongest academic and most ethnically and geographically diverse classes. Freshmen are from 40 South Dakota counties, 23 states, and five countries. The classâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s average ACT composite was 25.7 and the average ACT Math score was 26.4. The average high school grade point average was 3.50.

487 (26.6%)

Freshman Class Profile

50+

*Temporary enployees included

Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report 2007

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Making Research a Key to the Education of Students A dynamic research program attracts the attention of funding agencies and would-be students. Each group complements the other, with research providing the knowledge with which we train our students — and our best students contributing to this research and furthering our mutual success.

In 2007, the School of Mines implemented new master’s and Ph.D. programs in Biomedical Engineering in conjunction with the University of South Dakota. These programs focus on the emerging field in the delivery of health care by applying engineering and science methods to the analysis of biological and physiological problems.

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President’s Report 2007


Promoting the Acquisition, Discovery, and Application of Knowledge Specialized Research Labs and Resources

FY 07 Research

The School of Mines embraces research to solve problems of industry, the military, and government agencies, and to generate economic development in Rapid City, the Black Hills, and the state of South Dakota.

The Center for Bioprocessing Research and Development (CBRD) focuses on research that leads to new technologies for processing plantderived materials into biomaterials such as ethanol and key building block chemicals.

• Additive Manufacturing Laboratory • Advanced Materials Processing (AMP) and Joining Laboratory • Black Hills Natural Sciences Field Station • The Center for Accelerated Applications at the Nanoscale (CAAN) • Center for Bioprocessing Research and Design (CBRD) • Center of Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) • Composite and Polymer Engineering Laboratory (CAPE) • Computational Mechanics Laboratory (CML) • Direct Write Laboratory • Engineering and Mining Experiment Station • Institute of Atmospheric Sciences (IAS) • Museum of Geology • South Dakota Space Grant Consortium • Supersonic Wind Tunnel • Tech Ventures

School of Mines faculty members and researchers received 72 awards totaling more than $17.1 million during the 2007 fiscal year. The funding came from many different agencies, including the National Science Foundation, the State of South Dakota, NASA, the Department of Transportation, Air Force Research Laboratory, Army Research Laboratory, and many more.

DOD 58.8%

Other 1% USDA 1.8% Private/Industry 2.3% EPA 2.5%

NSF 11%

NASA 3.6% Other Federal 4.6% DOT 6.2%

State 8.2%

School of Mines students have access to cutting-edge technology and facilities such as the Supersonic Wind Tunnel.

President’s Report 2007

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Award Information

Research Award Highlights 2007 Army Research Laboratory: ......................................$3,196,000 Advanced materials and processes for future combat systems

Air Force Research Laboratory: ................................$1,920,000

Total Awards Received for FYs 2000 and 2007

$ 20 M 2007

Lightweight and novel structures for space

United States Department of Transportation: ......$1,017,000 Quality base material produced using full-depth reclamation on existing asphalt pavement structure

$17,148,735

$ 15 M

National Science Foundation: ........................................$531,739 Colleges of engineering as learning organizations: implications for student intellectual development

South Dakota Board of Regents: ..................................$500,000 Center for Bioprocessing Research and Development

$ 10 M

United States Environmental Protection Agency:....$303,780

2000

South Dakota uranium mining impacts evaluation

Western Research Alliance Foundation: ....................$275,000 Great Plains Center for Atmosphere and Human Health

$5M

$6,045,524

National Science Foundation: ........................................$224,095 Science-based leadership for South Dakota

NASA: ..................................................................................$100,000 3-D modeling studies of lightning-produced nitric oxide

Lockheed Martin Corporation: ........................................$65,000

$0M

Awards have increased 184%

Investigation of friction stir welding and friction stir spot welding as a mechanical fastener replacement technology for multiple rocket launch structures and components

External Source of FY 07 Project Funding U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) ..................................$10,091,012 National Science Foundation (NSF) ....................................................$1,892,125 U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) ......................................$1,065,505 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) ................$619,000 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ......................................$429,544 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) ..............................................$303,780 U.S. Department of Commerce ..............................................................$275,000 U.S. Housing and Urban Development (HUD) ....................................$168,300 U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) ..................................................$105,746 U.S. Department of Education (DOED)....................................................$82,500 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) ......................$75,000 U.S. Department of Labor ..........................................................................$57,275 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ............................................................$28,796 Federal Total ........................................................................................$15,193,583 South Dakota Agencies ........................................................................$1,404,703 Private (includes Industry) ......................................................................$395,715 Other............................................................................................................$154,734 Grand Total ..........................................................................................$17,148,735

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Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report 2007


Promoting the Acquisition, Discovery, and Application of Knowledge Center for Bioprocessing Research and Development (CBRD) The Center for Bioprocessing Research and Development (CBRD) has been created on the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology campus, in conjunction with South Dakota State University. The center, supported with $500,000 in first-year funding from the state, joins four other highly-specialized research centers already in operation, one of which, the Center for Accelerated Applications at the Nanoscale, is also located at the School of Mines. The center focuses on research that leads to new technologies for processing plant-derived materials into biomaterials such as ethanol and key building block chemicals. It is anticipated that these efforts will to reduce the nation’s dependence on petroleum and lower the production of greenhouse gases.

Fall 2007 Graduate Student Profile Gender (M.S.)

Ethnicity (M.S.)

% 80

White/Caucasian 61.1%

70 60 50 40

Male students

Female students

131 (70.8%)

54 (29.2%)

Non-U.S. Citizen 31.9%

30 20 10 0

Hispanic 0.5% American Indian 1.1%

Gender (Ph.D.)

Other 3.8% Asian/Pacific 1.6%

Ethnicity (Ph.D.)

%

100

80

60

Male students

Female students

40

8 20

0

38 (82.6%)

(17.4%)

White/ Caucasian 54.3% Non-U.S. Citizen 41.3% Hispanic 2.2%

Other 2.2%

Faculty/Staff Recognitions • Dr. Daniel Dolan, professor, mechanical engineering, and co-director, Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) was awarded the Carroll Smith Mentors Cup Award, the highest honor that can be bestowed on any Formula SAE Advisor. • Ms. Sandra Fischer, director of business services at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, was named president of the National Association of Educational Procurement for the Minnesota/Dakota regions. • Dr. M. R. Hansen, professor, civil engineering, was named a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers. • Dr. Jennifer Karlin, assistant professor, industrial engineering, was the recipient of a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). • Dr. Michael Langerman, chair and professor, mechanical engineering, was named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. • Dr. James Martin, professor, geological and geological engineering, paleontology program coordinator, and curator of vertebrate paleontology, was awarded the Department of Defense Antarctica Service Medal. • Dr. Dana Medlin, associate professor, materials and metallurgical engineering at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, was prominently featured in the article, "Metallurgical Musings: Thoughts on Materials Science" in Orthopedics This Week. • Darrell Sawyer, director, Career Center, was elected president of the South Dakota Career Planning and Placement Association (SDCPPA). Sawyer will serve a two-year term from 2007-09. • Dr. Larry Simonson, Hoffert professor, electrical and computer engineering, was named president of Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honor society. • Dr. Paul L. Smith, professor emeritus, atmospheric sciences, received the American Meteorological Society’s (AMS) Remote Sensing Lecturer Award in 2006 for his work in advancing the quantitative use of radar in cloud and precipitation physics. • Dr. P.V. Sundareshwar, assistant professor, atmospheric sciences, detailed a plan for an environmental monitoring network for India in a Policy Forum article published in Science magazine. • Ms. Maureen Wilson, director of Residence Life and Surbeck Center/ Student Conduct administrator, was named president of the South Dakota College Personnel Association (SDCPA) for 2007-08 at the SDCPA Winter Conference. • Two patents were issued to School of Mines researchers in FY 07. There were also four United States and one international patent filings.

President’s Report 2007

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Broadening Our Public Support In our history of more than a century of community involvement, it has been important to involve others in our educational efforts. By doing this, we become more effective in the pursuit of our mission. These efforts at collaboration include the American Indian community and other universities, as well as business, industry, and government agencies.

High school students have the opportunity to learn about engineering and engineering careers during Youth Engineering Adventure (YEA) programs. Held in conjunction with South Dakota State University, YEA is intended for high school students, freshman to seniors, interested in math and science. Nearly 200 students have participated in YEA during the program's first six years. The program encourages students to have fun while learning about technology and engineering.

The School of Mines launched the Office of Educational Programs and Professional Conferences (EPPC) to create educational opportunities for youth and professionals. Since its inception, EPPC has served more than 8,000 participants through more than 225 classes, camps, and conferences. Conference highlights include the Rocky Mountain Unconventional Gas Conference, featuring exploration and production of unconventional fuels, and the Storm-Penetrating Aircraft (SPA) Workshop in which a diverse group of scientists discussed the utility of the Next-Generation SPA to further research in multiple disciplines of atmospheric sciences.

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Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report 2007


Engaging and Serving the Broader Community Office of Technology Transfer Opens

School of Mines Welcomes Sioux Falls Liaison

The School of Mines has established an Office of Technology Transfer (OTT). The OTT, directed by Dale “Butch” Skillman, assistant professor, mechanical engineering, is open for business and its services available will increase over time. Currently, several initiatives are being undertaken to create a sustainable and responsive intellectual property (IP) management function on the campus. The OTT will facilitate greater research interactions with corporate partners and sponsors, with one goal being the licensing of more School of Mines IP to industry as well as developing industrial relationships that will increase industry sponsored research.

The School of Mines welcomes Pete Roberts as the new Sioux Falls Regional Admissions and Community Relations Developer.

Another OTT goal is to coach faculty entrepreneurs who are interested in pursuing commercialization of their ideas. Also, the OTT will work diligently to support our colleges in the creation of tenure and promotion policies that honor patents, entrepreneurship, and the commercialization of our technologies as measures of professional development. The OTT will establish policies, practices, and procedures that are widely understood and disseminated amongst those in our community who create new technologies. The OTT team represents more than 50 years of experience in the technology transfer enterprise.

Roberts, who has nearly 10 years of experience in various aspects of higher education, will be actively involved in all levels of student recruitment and community relations and will serve as a media spokesperson in Sioux Falls. He will also be actively involved with admissions, marketing, continuing education, academic affairs, alumni, and others to develop partnerships and serve the Sioux Falls and surrounding markets.

Emergency Preparedness Plan The School of Mines takes very seriously its responsibility to prepare for any contingency. To that end, the School of Mines created the position of campus environmental health and safety manager, which was filled by Jerilyn Roberts. In 2007, Roberts has worked closely with the South Dakota Board of Regents, Pennington County Emergency Management, the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, and Rapid City Regional Hospital to update and expand the university’s emergency preparedness plan.

Community Outreach We pride ourselves on being contributing members of our Rapid City community. Faculty, staff, and students donate time and money to organizations and charities throughout the Black Hills. We have a responsibility to share our expertise, our resources, and ourselves to make this an even better place to live, and we take that responsibility seriously. We partner with: • Athletics summer camps • Black Hills Vision • Engineering and science outreach to schools and businesses • Engineers Week • Engineering GIRLS (Girls Into Real Learning Succeed) • Hands-On Partnership for Science • Homestake Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory • NASA Honors Program • Rapid City Area Chamber of Commerce • Space Days • The Nature of Things educational newspaper • Western Research Alliance • Higher Education Center – West River • United Way

President’s Report 2007

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We live in a global society, and it is becoming increasing critical that students gain the skills to be part of it. Through study abroad programs, volunteer travels, and research experiences, our faculty, staff, and students are spreading the School of Mines message far and wide. Most importantly, their experiences give them a better understanding of global issues and the increasingly interdependent nature of the world.

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Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report 2007


Engaging and Serving the Broader Community Accreditation

Marketing Initiative

The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology has been accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the recognized accrediting agency for the north central states, since 1925. In 2006, the HLC voted to continue accrediation of the School of Mines.

The School of Mines story is too important to keep to ourselves. To remain competitive and to tell that story to more prospective students and community members, the School of Mines has undertaken an increased marketing effort. Based on the finding of intense research, a new logo was introduced, along with a marketing and recruitment plan to provide direction in order to achieve our enrollment goals. As part of this effort, the School of Mines website, <http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu> has received a new look and structure consistent with other publications. New sites for undergraduate recruitment (<www.GoToMines.com>) and graduate education (<http://graded.sdsmt.edu>) have also been established.

In September 2007, the university switched from a 10-year cycle of accreditation review under the Program to Evaluate and Advance Quality (PEAQ) to the Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) process for institutional accreditation. The Higher Learning Commission is still the accrediting body; however, under the AQIP process reviews are done yearly and continuous improvement initiatives are ongoing. In addition, the curriculum in chemistry is accredited by the American Chemical Society. All engineering programs and the computer science program are accredited ABET, Inc., with the exception of mining engineering and management, a new program which is preparing to request accreditation once it has satisfied the requirement that it have at least one graduate.

The National Research Center for College & University Admissions’ (NRCCUA) recently recognized <www.GoToMines.com> as one of the top in the country. The School of Mines was one of only 140 institutions that received an “A” ranking. The School of Mines website was rated 111 overall out of more than 3,000 institutions, and ranked no. 5 on the list of Top-10 Specialty Institutions.

Recognitions The School of Mines has been named as one of America’s 100 “Best Buys in College Education” for 10 consecutive years.

Media Placement Stories about School of Mines students, faculty, research, and programs appeared in local, regional, national, and international newspapers, websites, and television and radio newscasts, including USA Today, Science, Calgary Sun, Washington Post, Turkish Daily News, Melbourne Herald Sun, CNN International, Boston Herald, Prairie Business, South Dakota Public Radio, and many more.

President’s Report 2007

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Becoming a National Player The School of Mines continues to build on its reputation as a leader in engineering and science education and research. School of Mines professors and researchers are active in pursuing research grants from businesses, federal agencies, and foundations to create new knowledge and bring high-tech benefits to the state and nation. School of Mines faculty and staff are also sought for their expertise, and make regular appearances in local, regional, and national media. These strong foundations form the basis of an exciting future for the School of Mines.

Students Emerging as Professionals STEPS: Students Emerging as Professionals, a new student organization, teaches skills for lifelong learning, leadership and communication, and technical understanding, and gives students the opportunity for a global perspective.

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Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report 2007


Preparing for Our Future as a National Player Capital Improvements

Facilities

Building committees are in place for the renovations of the Surbeck Student Center and for the new construction of a Paleontology Center and a Chemical and Biological Engineering and Chemistry/Research Building. These capital improvement goals are paving the way for the School of Mines to be recognized nationally as a premiere science, engineering, and research university.

South Dakota School of Mines and Technology facilities include the Black Hills Business Development Center, the Darold D. King Physical Education Building, the Chemistry/Chemical Engineering Building, the Civil/Mechanical Engineering Building, the Computational Mechanics Laboratory, the Electrical Engineering/Physics Building, the McLaury Building, Devereaux Library, O’Harra Building, Mineral Industries Building, the Tech Development Laboratory, and Surbeck Student Center.

Smithsonian Accepts School of Mines painting into Collection

Facilities and Construction Projects

The Smithsonian’s Museum of the American Indian accepted a painting from the School of Mines into their permanent collections in spring 2007. The painting, by Oglala Lakota artist Don Montileaux, was commissioned by the School of Mines to represent the desire for young American Indians to reach beyond themselves . . . toward the stars and their visions. “Looking Beyond One’s Self” flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavor during the STS-67 NASA mission. For more information about the painting and its history, visit <http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/montileaux>.

Renovation projects: Tech Development Laboratory, ongoing; Surbeck Center, building committee in place; Mining Laboratory, ongoing. Construction projects: Computational Mechanics Addition to the Civil/Mechanical Engineering Building, completed Spring 2006; 40,000-square-foot Business Incubator, opened Spring 2006; Dunham Field at O’Harra Stadium, completed Summer 2007; Chemistry/Chemical Engineering Building, building committee in place; Paleontology Center, building committee in place.

Black Hills Business Development Center Opens The Black Hills Business Development Center, a 40,000-square-foot building located on the south side of campus, is home to several government and private agencies, including the Rapid City Area Economic Development Partnership, West River Business Service Center, Genesis Equity Fun, and more. The rest of the building is open space that can be modified to meet the needs of entepreneurs. The location on campus also provides faculty and students access to the incubator to explore commercial potential for ideas produced during research, and independent entrepreneurs can utilize the university’s technical expertise. The ties between the incubator and campus are already strong — several alumni and faculty members are housed in the incubator doing research and nurturing businesses involved in everything from carbon sequestration to ultra high-resolution laser projectors.

President’s Report 2007

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Operating Budget, FY08 Revenues State Appropriations General Fund ..............................$14,564,768 Tuition and Fee Allocation ................6,134,607 Other Tuition and Fees ......................6,489,138 Auxiliary Sales and Services ..............1,849,500 Federal Grants and Contracts..........12,935,783 State Grants and Contracts ................1,050,000 Private Grants and Contracts ................860,000 General Sales and Services ................1,118,577 Other ......................................................5,127,515 Total Revenues ..............................$50,129,888 Expenditures Instruction ........................................$12,915,362 Research ..............................................14,431,322 Public Service ............................................852,526 Academic Support ................................4,279,471 Student Services....................................3,190,718 Institutional Support ..........................4,541,638 Physical Plant ........................................3,240,367 Scholarships ..........................................2,976,161 Auxiliary ................................................3,702,323 Total Expenditures ........................$50,129,888

SDSM&T Foundation Endowment (as of June 30, 2007) Endowed Scholarships and Fellowships*..........$25,369,357 Total Assets ............................................................$53,098,536 Number of Donors, FY 07 ................................................2,397 Total Donation, FY 07..............................................$6,910,670 *Includes principal and earnings

Tuition and Fees, Fall 2007 Undergraduate Tuition and Fees* Room and Board**† Books and Supplies† Total

SD $5,673 4,600 1,930 $12,203

*(15 credits per semester) **Includes Tablet PC Program † Rates based on approximate average. Costs may vary.

Graduate Tuition and Fees* Room and Board**† Books and Supplies† Total

SD $4,130 4,600 1,200 $9,930

*(9 credits per semester) † Rates based on averages. Costs may vary.

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President’s Report 2007

Non-SD $6,911 4,600 1,930 $13,441

Non-SD $8,520 4,600 1,200 $14,320


Preparing for Our Future as a National Player School of Mines Athletics Receives Recognitions For the third consecutive year, the School of Mines is the recipient of the Dakota Athletic Conference Scholars Award. The award is presented annually to the school with the highest percentage of athletes honored as DAC Scholar Athletes. More than half of all Hardrocker athletes were honored for their academic achievements. In order to be recognized as a DAC Scholar-Athlete, a student athlete must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.25 or better and have earned 12 or more credit hours for a semester in which he or she participates in a conference sponsored sport.

The Center of Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP) CAMP provides School of Mines students the best design and manufacturing education available. CAMP integrates students, faculty, and industry partners into a center whose purpose is to develop a unique approach to manufacturing education that also addresses the explicit needs of industry. Among their projects, CAMP students design, build, and compete with solar cars, concrete canoes, unmanned aerial vehicles, race cars, and other vehicles. CAMP teams compete regionally, nationally, and internationally. In 2007, the School of Mines was host to the 2007 Baja SAE Competition. More than 100 teams traveled to the School of Mines from as close as North Dakota and Iowa and from as far away as South Korea, France, Brazil, Mexico, and Africa. • • • • • • • • • • •

Aero Design: 2nd place in design Alternative Fuel Vehicle: 2nd place American Society of Civil Engineers: 2nd place ChE Car: 4th place Concrete Canoe: 4th place Human Powered Vehicle: 1st place in design Robotics: 4th and 6th place Mini Baja: 7th and 11th place, with a 1st place finish—dynamic events Formula SAE: 6th place Steel Bridge: 2nd place Unmanned Aerial Vehicle: 2nd place, and also received first perfect paper score in the 17-year history of the competition

A Publication of South Dakota School of Mines and Technology 2,000 copies of this publication were printed at a cost of $1.38 each.

Student Acheivements The School of Mines team took the first place award in the National Scholar Award for Workplace Innovation & Design competition for their Universal Box Taping Device. The purpose of the competition is to encourage college students to design creative technological solutions to barriers that prevent people with disabilities from entering or advancing in the workplace. The team members: Nicole Gaffney (IE07), Clark Nelson (IE07), Chris Setera (IE, Miles City, Mont.), and Angela Setera (IE, Miles City, Mont.). Freeman Park (IE, Marion) was awarded a Purple Heart for his service in Iraq. Deborah Carlson (MetE07) was awarded the Outstanding Scholar Award from ASM International, the world’s largest materials information society. ASM International also awarded Cassandra Degen (MetE07) the William Park Woodside Founder’s Scholarship. Two students received awards during the 2007 Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida. Cassandra Degen (MetE07) was the recipient of the Light Materials Division Scholar award. Matthew Lyndoe (MetE07) was the recipient of the Extraction & Processing Division Scholar award. Joshua Valder (Ph.D. AES, Ballston Spa, N.Y.) received first place in the student speaker contest at the South Dakota Association of Environmental Professionals’ annual meeting. A team of students won top honors in the 2007 EntrepreneurshipWeek USA Challenge, which asked students to take a common everyday object and create as much value as possible. More than 200 student submissions from across the country entered the contest that required participants to stretch their entrepreneurial muscle and create a unique, valuable service or product made with Post-it® Notes. The School of Mines students’ winning idea was Carbon Post-it Notes. The team members: Akash Adhikari (MEM, Rapid City), Lance Hildebrandt (IE, Faith) Colin Nelson (CE, Mitchell), Karmen Powell (EE, McIntosh), Caleb Skjervem (CE, Helena, Mont.), and Mark Wager. Angela Setera (IE, Miles City, Mont.) was the recipient of a $5,250 scholarship from the American Society of Safety Engineers. Setera was awarded the David Iden Memorial Safety Scholarship (sponsored by UPS). The UPS Scholarships are ASSE’s most prestigious. Setera was also the recipient of a $500 scholarship from Alpha Pi Mu, the only nationally accepted industrial engineering honor society. Six School of Mines students were named Tau Beta Pi Scholars for the 2007-2008 academic year. Out of the more than 85 chapters in the nation with recipients, only one chapter boasts more scholars. The students: Daniel Deisch (EE, Elbert, Colo.), Brandon Fredrickson (MEM, Fort Collins, Colo), Mark Horton (MetE, Wall), Cory Khoury (EE,, Rapid City), Dyan Lorge (CE, Rapid City), and Melanie Vedvei (IE, Lake Preston). Aaron Hartwell (CE, Rapid City) was awarded a Tau Beta Pi Fellowship for the 2007-2008 academic year. Two School of Mines placed in the top 10 at the North Central Regional of the ACM programming contest. The Red Team of Andrew Kraft (CSc, Rapid City), Chris Rudolph (CSc, Box Elder), and Brandon Skari (CSc/Math07), placed 9th, and the Blue Team of Anthony Amundson (CEng/EE, Hutchinson, Minn.), Jill Anderson (CSc/Math07), and Jacob Oursland (CSc/Math, Rapid City) placed 10th out of 181 teams from South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, western Michigan, western Ontario, and Manitoba.

President’s Report 2007

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SDSMT President's Report 2007