CAPITAL Magazine Summer 2022

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Capital BUILD UP OTTAWA!

WORLD-CLASS HEALTHCARE Ottawa boasts trailblazing advancements, cutting edge treatments, and collaborative research

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THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE OF

Prior to COVID we were firing on all cylinders and setting record airport arrivals and hotel occupancy. Now we have to rebuild that industry.

ON TRACK TO BE THE BEST CAPITAL CITY IN THE WORLD

OTTAWA’S EDGE Canada’s capital is a world-class city for numerous reasons, not least are its quality of life, thriving industry and top talent base.

SUMMER 2022

VISIT OUR WEBSITE! CAPITALMAG.CA


Supporting Downtown Ottawa Businesses The Downtown Ottawa Business Relief Fund was developed to help local businesses directly and negatively impacted by the demonstrations near Parliament Hill in January and February 2022. With applications closing May 15, 2022, and applications still being processed, Invest Ottawa, the Ottawa Coalition of Business Improvement Areas, and the Ottawa Board of Trade are proud to announce the outcomes of the fund so far:

$11,925,501 ALLOCATED TO DATE, WITH MORE TO COME

1,127

1,561

APPLICATIONS APPROVED, WITH MORE TO COME

APPLICATIONS RECEIVED

This project is funded in part by the Government of Canada through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario and by the Government of Ontario.

*As of June 8, 2022


CONTENTS

Capital

SUMMER 2022

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32

40

FEATURES

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32

40

Reimagining Ottawa

Ottawa's Cultural Heft

BY JEFF BUC KSTEIN

BY J E N N I FE R CA M P BE L L

Ottawa Driving World-Class Medical Research And Advancements BY J E FF BUC KST E IN

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CONTENTS

Capital

SUMMER 2022

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6

DEPARTMENTS

IN EVERY ISSUE

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6

18

45

Capital Context

C-Suite View Ottawa's edge

Committee Corner "Progress over perfection"

The Last Word

BY JENNIFE R CA M P BE L L

On the Cover

Capital BUILD UP OTTAWA!

WORLD-CLASS HEALTHCARE Ottawa boasts trailblazing advancements, cutting edge treatments, and collaborative research

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THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE OF PM 4 3136 012

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Prior to COVID we were firing on all cylinders and setting record airport arrivals and hotel occupancy. Now we have to rebuild that industry.

ON TRACK TO BE THE BEST CAPITAL CITY IN THE WORLD

OTTAWA’S EDGE Canada’s capital is a world-class city for numerous reasons, not least are its quality of life, thriving industry and top talent base.

SUMMER 2022

VISIT OUR WEBSITE! CAPITALMAG.CA


THE OBOT PERSPECTIVE

THE LAST TWO years of change and

challenge has revealed many opportunities for growing, learning, and planning for a better future. One that requires a high level of collaboration, innovation, and strategic investments. Now is the time to be bold and create an environment that leverages the ingenuity and success of business to drive community health and prosperity. Ottawa is well positioned to optimize the investment, lifestyle, and workplace trends we are tracking globally. Together, we can build on our strengths, address our challenges and be the thriving world class capital city we have the potential and responsibility to be. The purpose of this edition of CAPITAL is to bring together, the many pieces of the puzzle that are growing our city in the right way – inclusively, sustainably, as a model of leadership for the world. A city that will attract the best of the best and welcome and care for those from every walk of life. Status quo is not option. It’s time to reimagine Ottawa.

Not only in the projects we pursue but perhaps more importantly, in our approach. It is critical we build on the hard-won lessons we have learned: • We are all connected, business drives community, community drives business. • Our economy and our physical and mental health are fully entwined, one does not thrive without the other. • Pursuing progress over perfection and committing to radical collaboration is our competitive edge. In the pages of this edition, you will see the what the national capital region has to offer today, exciting plans for our future and even more exciting opportunities that will be leveraged by the collaborative, determined and passionate business and community leaders of our city. We wish to express appreciation to the members, volunteers, and partners of the board of trade for your ongoing ingenuity, resilience, and willingness to work together. We wish to express appreciation to all local business leaders and residents. We are all stewards of our nation’s capital – Canada in One City. Together we will continue to build on our strong foundation of arts and culture, education and health, tech and tourism, our downtown and our vast natural spaces. For today and for our next generation of Canadians.

The magazine about doing business in Ottawa, created by the Ottawa Board of Trade in partnership with gordongroup. OTTAWA BOARD OF TRADE www.ottawabot.ca President & CEO Sueling Ching PUBLISHER gordongroup 55 Murray Street / Suite 108 Ottawa, Ontario K1N 5M3 Phone: 613-234-8468 info@gordongroup.com Managing Editor Kim Latreille Contributors Jeff Buckstein Jenn Campbell Alyssa Saturley Creative Director Louise Casavant SALES For advertising rates and information, please contact: Director of Advertising Sales Stephan Pigeon Phone: 613-234-8468 / 250 spigeon@gordongroup.com OTTAWA BOARD OF TRADE Director of Organizational Advancement, Ottawa Board of Trade Lynn Ladd Phone: 613-236-3631 / 120 Lynn.Ladd@ottawabot.ca www.capitalmag.ca

ISSN 2371-333X. All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the contents without prior written authorization from the publisher is strictly prohibited. PM 43136012. Capital is published three times a year: winter, spring, and fall.

Sueling Ching, President & CEO Ottawa Board of Trade

Printed in Canada.

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C-SUITE VIEW

OTTAWA’S EDGE Canada’s capital is a world-class city for numerous reasons, not least are its quality of life, thriving industry and top talent base. BY J E N N I FE R CA M P BE L L

W

HEN SONYA SHOREY thinks about what makes a city

world-class, she lists quality of life, thriving industry, a top talent base, good travel infrastructure and diversity and inclusion, to name just a few. And, when she thinks of Ottawa in that context, she thinks the city “punches far above its weight on many fronts.” The vice-president of strategy, marketing and communications at Invest Ottawa notes that this capital has the top concentration of 6

tech talent in North America at 11.6 per cent, more even that Silicon Valley, according to a CBRE’s 2021 report for North America, titled Scoring Tech Talent. “We have what I would call Olympians in terms of deep, deep tech expertise in so many critical sectors and a lot of roots in the ICT sector that have branched off and are now enabling and accelerating growth in a host of other sectors, including some emerging ones such as those supported by Area X.O,” she says of Ottawa’s global

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innovation playground. “You can look at smart mobility, connectivity and autonomy. Those enabling technologies play a role in all kinds of sectors — from aerospace, defence and space through to clean tech, intelligent transportation, life sciences, cybersecurity and smart cities. We have the opportunity to take a leadership role in helping to realize a vision for smart cities in the future.” Ottawa also has strong post-secondary system that supports the country’s most educated workforce (61 per cent of the labour force hold a post-secondary degree) and it’s “very diverse and inclusive,” she says, pointing to the veracity of the slogan “Canada in one City” currently being used in Ottawa Tourism’s recent branding. “That is very true,” Shorey says. “We are a beautiful tapestry of many cultures, languages and opportunities.” Asked about lessons learned from the February convoy protests in Ottawa, Shorey says collaboration is key and points to the speed with which three levels of government brought about the downtown Ottawa business relief program for those whose businesses were negatively affected by the protests. “It’s a many-hands-on-deck, holistic, integrated approach that’s

Sonya Shorey

Kathryn Tremblay

Asked about the convoy, Tremblay says she’s a proponent of democracy so she’s pleased they were allowed to protest, but she doesn’t like that they “trampled on the rights” of business owners and residents and adds that the racism that came with it didn’t fit with her vision of Canada. The view from public health Looking at Ottawa as a world-class city through the health lens, chief public health officer Vera Etches says she was impressed with the way people took collective action to protect each other during the pandemic. “People really adapted how they thought about infection prevention control in workplaces,” Etches says. “It wasn’t just to keep themselves healthy, it was really about everyone in the community. I think care for people really stood out.” That continued when vaccines became available and people flocked to get them, knowing their actions would make a difference. “We did see that not every neighbourhood has the same advantages and Ottawans learned that we can deliberately make

Dr. Vera Etches

required to move forward,” she says. “We are focusing on the solution and the impact and progress that’s being made.” A talent finder’s take Kathryn Tremblay, CEO and co-founder of Altis Recruitment, says Ottawa is a mix between big and small, old and new. The city has lively educational institutions, good health-care infrastructure, multiple sports and cultural events and more than 1,000 parks. “I love the fact that we have so many knowledge workers here who work for the federal government, with all of the breadth that that brings, plus our tech sector is really vibrant,” Tremblay says. “Whatever you want to be, there’s job opportunity here.” She too points to Ottawa’s embrace of newcomers and the diversity and vitality they bring to the city. “I’m also seeing far fewer barriers to entry for newcomers,” she says. “I used to hear complaints that people didn’t have ‘Canadian experience,’ but I don’t often hear that anymore.” She also says the city is the perfect size, and as a result of being a capital, has plenty of cultural amenities, including the National Arts Centre and seven national museums. Asked what Ottawa might be missing, names more direct flights. “For business people, trying to create their future network, having direct access to cities is quite important,” she says. “I’m also seeing more U.S.-based recruitment and my fear is that with work-fromhome model, it could change our entire dynamic. I’m scared about the portability of our skills.” To that end, she says Ottawa has plenty of programs to help settle newcomers, but sees an “opportunity to continue enhancing it.”

things more equitable,” she says. “We’ve learned that we’ll have more effective services and better outcomes when we target our efforts to neighbourhoods where the needs are greater.” Etches says her team at Ottawa Public Health has incredible dedication and a willingness to keep on learning, take feedback and adjust. “The team really wants to do something around overall well-being again, too,” she says. “We also have seen we need to continue to find ways to promote health, especially mental health. We’ve seen and learned that the social connections are really important for health.” Regarding the convoy protests, Etches says she always tries to understand what citizens value. “It’s a values level conflict in terms of people’s understanding of what freedom and choice is,” she says. “We are trying to think about that approach. We do absolutely respect individual autonomy. No one will be forced to get the vaccine, but we want to make sure people are making informed choices.” She says her team has learned it needs to reach people through their peers in language that make sense for people. She said Ottawa’s public health is very connected to its many partners, which she thinks allows it to have greater impact, and she vows to continue to work on having greater impact when it comes to mental health and substance use. She noted that she also knows how employment and health are interlinked and she’s happy people are having conversations about lessons learned and what can be maintained to continue to keep employees and the public healthy. “We have to look after ourselves before we can look after others.”

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CAPITAL/Colonnade BridgePort

REIMAGINING REAL ESTATE

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OLONNADE BRIDGEPORT, ONE of Ottawa’s largest and most respected real estate investment and management companies, is embarking on an exciting new phase of growth. With a committed development pipeline valued at over $1 billion, the company is poised for significant expansion. Colonnade BridgePort recently welcomed Justin George to the newly created role of Senior Vice President and Head of Development, to lead its development team. Justin brings an extensive track record of local and international experience developing complex, large-scale projects. His expertise in environmental, social, and governance (ESG) development practices, as well as his strategic focus on the innovative use of new technology, was a perfect fit for the company and the city it is helping to build. A key focus of Colonnade BridgePort’s development portfolio is on projects located inside the urban boundary that are mixed-use, transit-oriented, and require brownfield environmental clean-up. These projects will strategically enhance mature communities and are designed to bring needed amenities while adding employment and residents to support existing businesses. “It’s a pivotal time for Colonnade BridgePort, and everyone in the company is motivated to expand on its existing legacy by bringing new and inspiring ideas to the marketplace,” says Justin. “We are rolling up our sleeves and we will have a meaningful impact on our great city.”

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Talent Required With an aggressive development plan in place, Colonnade BridgePort is now searching for talent to join its growing team. Given the company’s solid foundation and exciting future, it is actively seeking new talent who are aligned with the company’s values and who want to have a positive impact on the growth of the city. “When I looked at Colonnade BridgePort’s track record, the quality of its people and plans for the future, it was my only choice,” Justin says. “The company has some of the industry’s brightest talent and best located development sites in Ottawa. For people with a passion for city building, there is no better place to build a phenomenal career with a growing and diverse real estate company.” Competition for talent in real estate has always been high and Colonnade BridgePort understands that more than ever, employees are seeking opportunities that go well beyond just a paycheque. In 2016, the company developed an Employee Value Strategy (EVS) to show its commitment to its employees and the employee experience. The strategy highlights the importance of the relationship between an employer and its employees, and ensures employee interests are considered in all decision-making. “Real estate is a people industry, and I’ve always believed that’s what makes it so fulfilling. It’s the people that make it thrive, and now more than ever, our industry needs new people and new ideas,” Justin says. Colonnade BridgePort employees can expect to work with and learn from some of the best in the real estate industry and be provided with opportunities to further enhance communities; to be supported and embraced in the company’s culture of team-oriented high achievers that enjoy being social and having fun together; to be provided with opportunities for career development with a clear individual development plan; and to be recognized and rewarded for performance and contributions. Enriching and Enhancing Communities For Colonnade BridgePort, building the city doesn’t just mean erecting structures, it means enriching and enhancing the community that has already been established.

Senior Vice President and Head of Development Justin George, and Director of Development Stephen Martin stand in front of 100 Argyle Ave where Colonnade BridgePort will break ground on a new development project in 2023. The project will add to the fabric of the community by replacing the existing office building with a residential apartment building, while preserving the current architectural façade.

“When determining which projects we take on, we want to ensure we don’t disrupt the balance that currently exists,” says Justin. “By creating opportunities and spurring investment, we aim to make communities stronger, more vibrant, and sustainable for future generations.” Examples of this commitment to communities are the recently completed Westboro Connection and Hintonburg Connection properties, built in partnership with Fiera Real Estate, one of North America’s leading independent investment management firms. Situated on the corner of Scott Street and McRae Avenue, Westboro Connection combines quality office space, service-oriented retail space, and 277 modern apartments. Hintonburg Connection is a 19-storey apartment building located in a trendy and heritage-rich neighbourhood, designed with the creative professional in mind. In 2023, Colonnade BridgePort will break ground on new residential projects in Centretown, at the Ottawa Train Station, and in the established communities of Carlingwood and Westboro. The Centretown project will add to the fabric of the community by replacing an existing office building with a residential apartment building, while preserving the current architectural façade. “It’s an exciting time for real estate and I feel very fortunate for the opportunities ahead of us as a company and as a city,” says Justin. “I encourage anyone interested in real estate and being a part of Ottawa’s evolution to consider a career with Colonnade BridgePort.” To learn more about Colonnade BridgePort and see employment opportunities, visit www.colonnadebridgeport.ca.

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CAPITAL CONTEXT

O

TTAWA IS BUILT on unceded Algonquin Anishinaabe

territory. The peoples of the Algonquin Anishinaabe Nation have lived on this territory for millennia. Their culture and presence have nurtured and continue to nurture this land. We honour the peoples and land of the Algonquin Anishinaabe Nation. We honour all First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and their valuable past and present contributions to this land. The Ottawa Board of Trade is the voice of business and a key advocate for economic growth in the Nation’s Capital. Our mission is to create a thriving world class business community, one that drives community prosperity and cultivates an inclusive, sustainable city. To that end, we routinely bring together business and community leaders to align our vision, optimize our resources and ensure our collective work moves Ottawa to its full potential as the best capital city in the world. On June 6, 2022, we partnered with the Ottawa Business Journal to present the 2022 City-Building Summit: Reimagine Ottawa. Over 200 leaders gathered at the historic Horticulture Building at Lansdowne Park to engage in a community conversation about how to leverage our many strengths to build forward better. Local, regional and national experts contemplated the various ways that our vibrant city, a thriving cosmopolitan, an international community, has grown and adapted over the past several years. And how it must continue to innovate in the wake of the severe adversity faced over the past two years.

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We are well positioned to do so. Ottawa is more than the capital of Canada, the seat of our federal government and home to 130 foreign embassies – it is Canada in One City. Rich in history, tradition and legacy, Ottawa also features leading edge businesses, including a thriving tourism industry that draws people from across Canada and around the world into our city. We have top rate educational institutions – including the University of Ottawa, Carleton University, Algonquin College, and La Cité. Our health and research facilities are second to none. This issue features the brilliant work and future of The Ottawa Hospital, The Royal, CHEO, and the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. Several high impact projects are on the horizon, including a new addition to the Civic campus of The Ottawa Hospital, ongoing upgrades to Ottawa’s Macdonald-Cartier International Airport, and expansion of the light rail system. More are planned, including enhanced sporting and entertainment facilities in Lansdowne Park and new projects by the National Capital Commission. Ottawa is a thriving global tech hub with decades of disruptive technology innovation, expertise, and capabilities. Anchored by more than 1,750 technology companies that employ more than 74,000 highly skilled people, Canada’s Capital boasts the highest concentration of tech talent per capita in North America. With the most educated workforce in all of Canada, our top tech talent spans many of the entrepreneurs, SMEs, and multinationals from every

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corner of our city. It also includes the next generation of innovators emerging from our post-secondary institutions. These innovators are leading the world in sectors such as software, life sciences, communications technology and 5G, aerospace, defence and security, smart mobility, and smart cities. And they are developing innovative technology solutions and applications for some of our greatest global opportunities and challenges, helping to create a cleaner, more connected and productive and equitable world. The global pandemic has both accelerated existing trends and taught us new lessons about the future of work. The development of leading-edge technologies – some locally – has provided employees with flexible new options of working from home. Employers continue to explore return to office strategies that will support their employees’ well-being as well as build culture, innovation, and productivity. Another key lesson strongly reinforced by the global health crisis was the need to view our local businesses and the community as full partners. Economic progress entails much more than just financial growth. People matter. Their culture and passion are equally important drivers of success. Our community’s economic well-being is intimately tied to the physical and mental health, and public safety of every employee, resident, and visitor. Community and business leaders must continue working together to build a vibrant, sustainable future with long-term

benefits. We are fortunate to live in a city where elected officials, business and community leaders are committed to such a high level of collaboration. Local community and business leaders are skilled at proactively planning rather than merely reacting to events – skills that are required now more than ever to address serious challenges facing our cities across Canada, such as the need for affordable housing. One particular advantage that we enjoy, as a mid-size city, albeit one of Canada’s largest cities, is the potential to be nimbler and more flexible in responding quickly to major new consumer and workplace trends. The Best Ottawa Business Awards, including the 2021 winners featured in this issue, attest to the depth of strong leadership in Ottawa. The brilliant group who make the annual lists of Ottawa’s Forty Under 40 promise that local businesses will remain in capable hands well into the future. Our city has many positives to offer contemporary leaders who are attracted to work-life harmony, including easy access to surrounding natural beauty, as outlined in the infographic on these pages. This adds to the high quality of living and enhances the desire of residents to build and enjoy a prosperous future for themselves and their families. Sueling Ching is the president and chief executive officer of the Ottawa Board of Trade.

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CAPITAL/Sports and Entertainment Group

LANSDOWNE REVITALIZATION CARRIES CITY-WIDE BENEFITS O

TTAWA CITY COUNCIL has voted in favour of continuing

down a path which will ultimately result in a muchneeded replacement of the 55-year-old City-owned sports and entertainment facilities at Lansdowne. The proposal brought forward by the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group (OSEG), who partnered with the City on the revitalization of Lansdowne back in 2010, calls for a new standalone event centre, new north stadium stands and additional retail space configured in a podium that would form the base for new residential units. Under the proposed project, dubbed ’Lansdowne 2.0,’ the cost of the replacement of these City assets would be $330 million. The entire amount would be generated from incremental revenues to the city generated by the sale of air rights and a portion of property taxes associated with the new residential and retail space at Lansdowne, as well as from ticket fees and direct cash amounts paid to the City from the Lansdowne Partnership. The City is also proposing enhancements to the public space and programming they are responsible for at Lansdowne. Next steps for Lansdowne 2.0 will include extensive citywide consultation aimed at getting the general public’s thoughts and suggestions on the proposal, which are expected to result in refinements to the current project scope and proposal. The City has also earmarked funds for consulting work and studies that will be needed to bring a final proposal back to the new City Council in the first half of 2023 for final approval. Lansdowne has been an important local destination throughout its storied 175-year history. Brought back to life in 2014 as a result of the City and OSEG partnership, it has become an important City and region-wide economic contributor. 12

“Lansdowne now generates between $270 and $530 million in economic benefit annually,” says Mark Goudie, president and chief executive officer of OSEG. “This project alone, including the residential component, will generate about $1 billion of economic activity, and result in 2,700 people years worth of jobs, so it is a major development. When finished, Lansdowne will employ another 600 on top of the current 4,000 employees that work here,” he adds. With Lansdowne 2.0, OSEG will be building on the success of its 2014 revitalization. “Before 2014, Lansdowne had become a wasteland of asphalt and old exhibition era buildings and partially-condemned stadium. It was a embarrassing blight in a highly visible part of our community and in a major capital city,” recalls Goudie. Since 2014, Lansdowne has re-emerged as Ottawa’s gathering place and the hub of sports and entertainment in our region, says Goudie, who cites the successful return of CFL football to Ottawa with the Ottawa Redblacks, the long-term financial security provided for the Ottawa 67’s of the Ontario Hockey League, and the introduction of two new professional teams – the Atlético Ottawa soccer team which competes in Canada’s Premier League, and the Ottawa BlackJacks of the Canadian Elite Basketball League. The reopening of the Stadium and Arena at TD Place has also allowed Ottawa to host other key sporting events, including the 2017 Grey Cup game, the NHL’s 100th anniversary outdoor classic between the Ottawa Senators and Montreal Canadiens in 2017, and the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup of soccer. “We’ve also had multiple Canadian and international figure skating and curling championships, and we introduced Ottawa’s first Christmas market to Lansdowne. On top of that, there have been

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over a thousand other events including concerts, comedy shows and other events,” adds Goudie. However, in spite of the successes achieved over the past eight years, further modernization is required. Lansdowne 2.0 provides the city with the opportunity to make two major improvements that, arguably, should have been included as a part of the 2014 project.

In addition to the new sports and entertainment facilities that will continue to allow Lansdowne to retain and attract world-class events and keep residents and tourists entertained for decades to come, additional residential density on site for people will better support 15 minute communities, says Goudie. “Back when the redevelopment of Lansdowne was being planned there was an overly optimistic hope that the facilities would last another couple of decades. However, eight years of experience of what were never terribly well maintained city facilities have led engineers and stadium consultants to conclude that they are at their ’end of life’ and ’functionally obsolete’ and need to be replaced,” he explains.

The Lansdowne 2.0 process began back in 2020 with the City Council asking their staff to work with OSEG to review if the best path forward was “do nothing for now,” or repair or replace the aging facilities. In 2021, City Council determined that a replacement strategy was the most viable and responsible path forward. Major elements in the Lansdowne 2.0 proposal include a new 5,500 seat Event Centre to host the Ottawa 67’s and the Ottawa BlackJacks, along with other world-class arts and entertainment concerts and events, and new North Stadium stands for TD Place to seat 11,200 and hold a total of over 12,000 spectators for Ottawa Redblacks and Atlético Ottawa games. These facilities will also provide greater accessibility for individuals with a disability, and updated sustainability building standards in terms of energy efficiency, among other features. The proposal also includes the addition of 59,000 square feet of mixed-use retail space in a podium contained within the current footprint of the old Civic Centre, which would form the podium base for an additional 1,200 rental and owned residential units, of which 120 units will be affordable housing to be developed with a local social housing partner. Goudie acknowledged that there is a vocal segment of population who, philosophically, doesn’t agree with public-private partnerships and will never support a further evolution of the Lansdowne partnership. However, Goudie and his team look forward to speaking to the broader Ottawa population over the upcoming months. “The city approved $8 million to continue with the studies and consulting work. Next steps will include an extensive public consultation process that will help OSEG and the city refine our proposal and recommendation on what is next for Lansdowne. “This will all come back to the new term of Council around this time next year,” Goudie says. “We’re extremely proud of what we’ve been able to build with our City partner, which has transformed Lansdowne back into ’Ottawa’s Gathering Place,’ he adds. “We look forward to continuing to provide exceptional hospitality and continuing to make memories for our guests and visitors for generations to come.”

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REIMAGINING OTTAWA: EXCITING DOWNTOWN REVITALIZATION WILL GENERATE NEW ENERGY BY J EF F B UCKST EI N

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TTAWA’S DOWNTOWN CORE remains a vital economic

hub in a city that was thriving before the global pandemic, and promises to bounce back in new exciting ways in a world that has been forever changed. “The status quo is not an option. It is time to reimagine Ottawa, not only in the projects that we pursue, but perhaps more importantly in our approach,” said Sueling Ching, president and CEO of the Ottawa Board of Trade (OBOT). “It is critical we build on the hard life lessons we have learned. We are all connected. Business drives community. Community drives business. Our economy and our physical and mental health are completely intertwined,” said Ching. A recent OBOT sponsored event, City Building Summit 2022: Reimagine Ottawa, reinforced that theme. “Downtowns have multiple purposes. There are many more pieces to add to the narrative about what downtowns have become and what they will look like in the future,” said keynote speaker Mary Rowe, president and CEO of the Canadian Urban Institute in Toronto. She noted that “as much as we have technology, and as much as we have the enabling things that will give us more choice, it’s no replacement for the kind of engagement and experience that we are going to have as a collective. That’s why cities happen.” Downtown Ottawa only makes up 0.3 per cent of Ottawa’s census metropolitan land area, but six per cent of the population lives there, and it is home to 24 per cent of jobs, generating 22 per cent of the city’s gross domestic product, said Rowe. She cited a massive drop off in visitor traffic as one of the most significant impacts of the pandemic on downtown Ottawa, with average weekday visitor volume in foot traffic in May 2022 down by 79.4 per cent since March 2020.

“The return to office is the pressing question,” said Rowe. “One of your great assets of being a [government] town is [also] one of your great liabilities in that you have a single industry that was bringing in a couple of hundred thousand workers into the core every day. This holding pattern is a very difficult position to put a municipality in, and Ottawa is bearing the brunt of that more seriously than any other city across the country.”

It is important to bring people back into the downtown core. And so with the Government of Canada leasing more than 40 per cent of Ottawa’s commercial office space, if it does not choose to reinhabit some of its buildings itself, it must be bolder about repurposing them so they get used for something else, she stressed. Addressing cities in general, Rowe said COVID revealed or exacerbated certain vulnerabilities of downtown cores, including a lack of housing affordability and inadequate housing choices; growing mental health and addiction challenges; unsustainable transit funding; shifting consumer patterns away from in-store to purchasing online; inequitable investment in the public realm; and a lack of funding, plus varying responsibilities among the different levels of government. Although downtowns have multiple purposes, there are some common principles associated with downtown recovery, said Rowe. It must be equitable, meaning welcoming and inclusive. It must be vibrant, always active. Livable, with complete communities and housing options available to residents. Flexible, meaning innovative in governance and built form. And resilient by being prepared for future shocks that might occur to disrupt the status quo. Rowe recommended several steps for revitalizing the downtown core, including allowing for new uses and new neighbours and becoming more creative about adapting interior spaces for flexible uses. “Let’s get much more nimble about how we adapt space quickly. That has to be part of the resilience and adaptability of cities,” she said. Rowe said it is important to create partnerships and new coalitions designed to bring cultural events, recreation and other experiences into the downtown core. Reassurance is also vital. “We need to be able to find ways to assure people that they are safe. That there is the capacity for people to get the support they need. This is no easy fix. This is complicated,” she said. That involves reinforcing the sense of community and community safety and mutual responsibility in an inclusive, nonstigmatizing way. There also needs to be a comprehensive, integrated coordinated approach between the various levels of government and business to providing housing and looking after residents’ mental health, including providing a range of interventions where needed to support people, so that they can co-exist in a safe and healthy way, Rowe elaborated. She encouraged cities to imagine more opportunities for alternative property uses, as she did for the federal government in Ottawa, stressing that the downtown core must be for everyone. Whatever constraints there may be – whether it be money-related, zoning, roads, or political will, “we’ve got to figure out how [to] get more land in denser environments to be able to create more housing, and more opportunities for supportive housing for people to be able to live there,” Rowe emphasized.

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Urban Future with a Purpose “As Canadians become more comfortable returning to everyday life, we have begun to reconsider what we want every day life to look like, and which pandemic era of changes we think should remain in place,” said Kevin Radford, the Ottawa based national real estate leader with Deloitte Canada. Deloitte’s presentation at the Summit was themed Urban Future with a Purpose. Foremost among those changes is the remote work environment, as the pandemic has helped to transform thinking around cities, added Radford, who noted that there are both employers and employees who seek value in allowing remote work arrangements to continue, either entirely or as a hybrid workplace. For example, in knowledge-intensive sectors, 70 per cent of workers say they will work from home at least one day a week. In a tight labour market, the decision made by an organization can distinguish it from its competition. It can also have broader ripple effects across the entire downtown and urban network, said Radford. Globally, he noted, there is a multi-centered and human centered 16

approach to city building, where critical goods and services are no more than a 15-minute walk or bike ride away from where residents live. Instead of a single city centre, there are segregated places where people live, work, shop and play. “This approach envisions a decentralized city, where every neighbourhood contains all the basic social functions for living and working,” explained Radford, who said that such a city would also reduce carbon emissions, provide an option to go car-free, and increase quality of life. This will, of course, also have a significant impact on public transportation. “It is possible that due to flexible work arrangements and shifting preferences, the way transportation systems are designed is out of step with the way that people now prefer to live, work and travel. That’s a problem. But it is also an opportunity to rethink not only mobility in Canadian cities, but the cities themselves,” said Radford. This could also enhance the use of a mobility as a service platform to “allow dynamic trip planning and payment across all modes, public or private, on a single platform or application,” he added.

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City Upgrades The Summit audience of business and community leaders was also appraised of future planning near the downtown area. “We’re developing a state of the art trauma centre,” explained Cameron Love, president and CEO of The Ottawa Hospital, who noted that especially in the wake of COVID-19, with a shortage of professionals available, the healthcare profession has become extremely competitive. “We’re very fortunate to have people [from] all across the globe. And as we look forward to the number of people we need to hire to be able to be able to provide high quality health care, this building becomes a magnet. This will position us to create a world class centre that puts us in the same league as places like the Mayo Clinic (in Rochester, Minnesota), Johns Hopkins (in Baltimore), the Cleveland Clinic, and Massachusetts General in Boston,” he explained. In LeBreton Flats, the National Capital Commission (NCC) is bringing back an historic part of the city “that has been untouched for too long,” said Véronique de Passillé, the NCC’s vice-president of corporate, legal and government affairs. The mix of residential housing, including affordable housing, recreation and nature will be “a wonderful example of sustainable and integrated urban planning,” added de Passillé. Mark Goudie, president and CEO of the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group (OSEG), discussed how OSEG partnered with the City of Ottawa to bring historic Lansdowne Park “back to life in 2014.” It has further development plans. The Lansdowne 2.0 proposal, which has been approved by City Council, will add three phases of development over the next approximately seven years, he explained. The first will be to build a new event centre. Phase II will see the demolition of the old Civic Centre as well as the demolition and rebuild of the north side stadium stands and the retail podium. Phase III will add 1,200 new residential units in new buildings, including 120 units for affordable housing.

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OTTAWA’S NEW BRAND: CANADA IN ONE CITY. HE CITY BUILDING Summit also addressed the origins and use of Ottawa’s current branding. Michael Crockatt, president and CEO of Ottawa Tourism, explained that after conducting extensive research, including surveying close to 1,400 citizens, interviewing more than 25 community leaders, analyzing nearly seven million online conversations, and conducting four workshops with more than 100 attendees, among other activities, “we determined Ottawa’s brand essence – the real heart and soul of our brand, to be ‘Canada in One City.’” “It’s a powerful statement, particularly because it’s one that no other city in Canada can make. It beautifully describes not only who we are, but the experiences that we can deliver, and the image that

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we want to project to the rest of the world,” Crockatt explained. Businesses also need to embrace this as part of their own brand, viewing this as a mutual opportunity to build that brand, while the brand can also help to build their business, said Sueling Ching, president and CEO of the Ottawa Board of Trade. “Talent is exceptionally challenging at this time because we’ve got a global mobile talent force and a lot of new conditions with respect to the virtual hybrid world,” said Sonya Shorey, vice-president of strategy, marketing and communications with Invest Ottawa. Follow and share Ottawa’s story with #myottawa and #monottawa. Check out ottawatourism.ca for what’s happening and cometoottawa.ca to be an ambassador.

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COMMITTEE CORNER

“PROGRESS OVER PERFECTION” The Board of Trade calls for strong leadership as the city emerges from the global COVID crisis. BY J E N N I FE R CA M P BE L L

S OTTAWA EMERGES from the global pandemic, the Board of Trade will be collaborating and focusing on a city-wide economic development plan. It will also make a point of outlining its priorities for the provincial and municipal elections this spring and autumn. The Ottawa Board of Trade was formed as a result of several chambers of commerce across the city consolidating in 2018. The collective history of the predessor chambers is 165 years of business advocacy and community building. Still, just two years into its new mandate as one voice, set with an express goal of strengthening business in Ottawa, the organization was challenged by a pandemic that decimated economies worldwide. “In many respects, our advocacy work was accelerated because we were in a real-world situation and we had to build new muscle in terms of agenda-setting and advocacy,” says Sueling Ching, CEO of the Board of Trade. “Even though we’re about to mark 165 years of operating in Ottawa, we’re really operating like a start-up because we’ve made a paradigm shift in our role as an advocate and economic partner. As we contemplate what this next stage, we need to reimagine what Ottawa could be and ensure we leverage the lessons we’ve learned over these last two years — what to focus on and how to get things done.” Ching says that as a community, Ottawa has demonstrated it is highly resilient. “We’ve demonstrated the ability to collaborate at a very deep level and to do things quickly,” Ching says. “We were forced to prioritize progress over perfection.”

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Now, she wants to determine how to move that forward and leverage the opportunities before us, utilizing the business community strengths. The pandemic, she says, forced members of the business community to move from just-in-time to just-incase business planning. And our governments must do the same. For the board, it means focusing on enhancing relationships and developing a community-wide economic agenda that incorporates the agendas of our key stakeholders and prioritizes optimizing the resources of our community. “We need to set ourselves us up for radical collaboration, which is the competitive advantage that we have,” she says. With respect to the provincial and municipal elections, the Board of Trade priority will be in encouraging Ottawans to elect “true leaders.” “We are calling on leaders to work across parties and within the lines of government to tackle the big issues,” she says. “The challenges we’re facing can’t be solved in a four-year cycle. We need to work in a consultative, transparent way that includes evidence-based decision-making. The role of government is to create a competitive business environment in which the private sector will drive growth and community prosperity.” Ching notes that during COVID, the government was continually locking down business and rolling out programs. What may have been necessary for public health also created a confidence issue that needs to be addressed, particularly with the hardest hit sectors. “We need to change the narrative,” she says. “Get back to business, build forward better and set our sights on being the best capital city in the world. TH E BUS I N E S S M AG A Z I N E OF TH E OT TAWA BOA R D OF TR A D E | S UM M E R 2 02 2

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CAPITAL/Algonquin College

LOOKING TO PROVIDE EMPLOYEES WITH NEW TOOLS AND TRAINING? ALGONQUIN COLLEGE CAN HELP LGONQUIN COLLEGE’S MISSION is to transform hopes and dreams into lifelong success. As life resets and businesses fully re-open, Algonquin College stands ready to give learners the skills they need to make their dreams become reality. Algonquin College, an Ontario public sector community college with campuses in Ottawa, Perth, Pembroke and AC Online offers hands-on, digitally connected, experiential learning in more than 185 programs. Its deep relationships with business and institutions provide opportunities to our learners with access to subject matter experts, cutting edge placement and co-op opportunities and contacts able to help those looking to make a change or improve their career.

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AC Online and Corporate Training As an employer, you can enhance the skills of your workforce with Algonquin Colleges AC Online and Corporate Training with our full catalogue of accredited training and development for your employees. “AC Online is a flexible way to enhance or augment skills or knowledge,” says Patrick Devey, Associate Vice-President, Global, Online, and Corporate Learning. “Instead of coming on to campus we bring the campus to you. You control the time and space and have access to 900+ fully online courses. The key is flexibility and access. As an employer, to enhance skills of your workforce, instead of shopping around, we have a full catalogue of accredited training and development for staff.” Training is key to success. “All AC Online programs are aligned with industry needs, and industry representation guides our curriculum to ensure it’s relevant” said Devey. For businesses looking to “upskill” or “retrain” workers, Algonquin College can help with that. “We have some programs offered six or twelve times per year depending on field of study,” said Devey”. 20

“We offer personalization by changing the pace of the program and catering to the individuals as much as we can. We offer the largest selection of online programs across the Ontario college system. Our variety of programming really allow us to be a one-stop show.” AC Online and Algonquin Corporate Training are key resources for businesses looking to provide training and skills for its workforce. “Seventy per cent of what we do is creating tailored solutions for specific business challenges,” said Jerry Van Olst, Manager of Business Development, Algonquin College Corporate Training. This means programs can be individually tailored to specific businesses and industries. “We provide learners with specific examples for their industry and can deliver the program online, on-site, at your business, or at our Corporate Learning centre at 700 Sussex,” added Devey. “We can create a custom training program, so if it’s around retention or coaching or how to be brand ambassadors or improving customer service, we can help,” said Van Olst. “Our training is offered in a variety of ways, leveraging technology - including self-paced programs, e-learning, virtual classes, in-class sessions, coaching, or on-site at your business or at our corporate training facility.”

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To learn more about individualized or personalized options for your business, email training@algonquincollege.com or visit www.algonquincollege.com/corporate. For a listing of courses available through AC Online visit https://www.algonquincollege.com/online/.


ALGONQUIN COLLEGE GRADUATING NURSES FOR HEALTH CARE JOBS IN OTTAWA IND. COMPASSIONATE. CAPABLE. Patient. These are all words used to describe nurses. In the past two years much has been written and spoken about this profession. For nursing students graduating from Algonquin College and entering the workforce, another word can be used to describe these students —resilient. “Our graduates during the time of COVID-19 are very unique,” said Carmen Hust, RN PhD, CPMHN, Chair, Nursing Studies at Algonquin College. “They have lived through and learned through a pandemic and come out with a unique set of additional skills. They are computer savvy, they can pivot on a dime, and they are amazingly creative. They are the most versatile group, having done nothing the traditional way.” Hust adds these graduating students are highly motivated and continued to learn despite many obstacles. “They have had to find their voice early and advocate for themselves. ” The health care industry has seen upheaval in the workforce with many staffing challenges arising from the pandemic. Hust says because of their unique learning experience, they bring a lot to the table. “They are self-directed, very disciplined, have a lot of grace and are very accommodating”. For employers, these are attractive qualities in a sought-after employee. With an ongoing nursing shortage, graduates are in a situation where they have multiple job opportunities and are able to be discerning with selecting their place of employment. “At the end of the day, our students have met the competency levels and done it in a non-traditional way,” said Hust. “Our criteria are accountable to the College of Nurses of Ontario.”

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Algonquin College offers two nursing programs. The two-year Practical Nursing Ontario College Diploma program prepares students for work in the healthcare system, with September and January program start dates and 150 seats in each class. The collaborative four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program helps develop the skills to enter the field of nursing, and runs annually with 160 seats available. In addition, several pathways programs and courses are available to lifelong learners who wish to upgrade skills and credentials. “In today’s environment, nurses can build their careers and go anywhere,” said Hust. To learn more visit https://www.algonquincollege.com/ healthandcommunity/.

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Ottawa Valley: Opportunity, Fu Gatineau Park Camp Fortune 300 Chem. Dunlop, Chelsea, QC

Great Canadian Bungee 1780 Quebec Rte 105, Chelsea, Quebec

Wilderness tours 1260 Grants Settlement Rd, Foresters Falls, ON

Canadian Museum of History 100 Laurier St, Gatineau, Quebec

Canadian War Museum 1 Vimy Pl, Ottawa, ON

Macnamara Nature Trail 284 McNab St, Arnprior, ON

Elk Ranch Carp Road 1271 Old Carp Rd, Kanata, ON

Diefenbunker Museum 3929 Carp Rd, Carp

Almonte Saunders Farm 7893 Bleeks Rd, Munster Hamlet,

Merrickville

Festivals and Events: Ottawa is a city of eclectic festivals and events. Residents and visitors can find a wide range of festivals and events throughout the year to satisfy myriad interests, ranging from music, nature, sports, culture and so much more!

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The 2022 calendar lists 29 events, including the everpopular Ottawa Jazz Festival, RBC Bluesfest, and Chamberfest 2022. Check out the events calendar at Calendar | Ottawa Festivals.


, Fun, Beauty Ottawa Art Gallery 50 Mackenzie King Bridge, Ottawa

Parliament Hill Wellington Street, Ottawa

National Arts Centre 1, Elgin Street, Ottawa

Canada Science and Technology Museum 867 St Laurent Blvd, Ottawa

Omega Park 399 QC-323, Montebello, QC

Canadian Museum of Nature 240 McLeod St, Ottawa

Aviation Museum 11 Aviation Pkwy, Ottawa, ON

Rideau Hall 1 Sussex Drive, Ottawa

Le Cordon Bleu Ottawa 453 Laurier Ave. E, Ottawa

Calypso Theme Waterpark 2015 Calypso St, Limoges, ON

Ottawa Jazz Festival Meech Lake

Golf courses Itching to get out on the links? There are 29 golf courses located inside Ottawa, Gatineau, and the suburban areas, plus another 39 within about a 50 kilometre radius of the city. That's a total of 68 courses within easy reach to perfect that swing and bring down that handicap! This list from GolfLink can help connect you to the course

that's right for you. 68 Golf Courses near Ottawa, ON Reviews & Ratings | GolfLink

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CAPITAL/Hydro Ottawa

LEADING THE WAY TO A SMART ENERGY FUTURE IN 1881, THOMAS Ahearn and Warren Y. Soper built Canada’s first hydro electric generating station at Chaudière Falls on the Ottawa River. That same year, they pioneered the telegraph and telephone devices as part of their communications business. Only four years later, in 1885, Ottawa became the first city ever to light all of its streets with electricity (resulting in the establishment of the Ottawa Electric Light Company, which would ultimately become Hydro Ottawa). And by 1891, Bytown had the first electric heated street cars in the world. It was the start of a technical and electrical revolution that placed Ottawa at the forefront of energy and telecommunications innovation. These trailblazing ideas laid the groundwork to modernizing transportation and linking the city through technology. They transformed the community, improved quality of life and connected residents. Indeed, Ottawa was an early adopter of the smart-city concept. Today, this strong foundation of innovation and entrepreneurship is proving beneficial. From monitoring environmental conditions and consumption habits, to neighbourhood growth and traffic patterns,

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smart-city solutions empower municipalities to improve planning, public safety, sustainability and more – producing invaluable insights grounded in real-time data to help solve challenges. And they’re helping Hydro Ottawa - whose core businesses are electricity distribution, renewable energy generation and energy and utility services - lead the way to a smart energy future. “As the energy needs of our customers and community evolve, we remain committed to building a vibrant and sustainable National Capital Region,“ says Bryce Conrad, President and Chief Executive Officer of Hydro Ottawa. “As our history shows, we are the leading energy authority in Ottawa. Even more so now, by leveraging greater Internet connectivity, real-time data and smart automation, we are uniquely positioned to support the transition to a greener economy and help the community with their goals of achieving a greener lifestyle.” The federal government has committed to making Canada net zero by 2050, but there’s still a lot of action needed at a community level before it can happen.

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According to the Canadian Federation of Municipalities, roughly 50 per cent of all greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Canada come from municipalities. In Ottawa, 90 per cent of community emissions come from the building and transportation sectors, with the remaining 10 per cent from the waste and agriculture sectors. The most significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions will come from retrofitting existing residential and commercial buildings, diverting organic waste from landfills and transitioning to zeroemission commercial fleets and public transportation. However, simple actions and leveraging smart technologies can also allow us to better manage our energy consumption, lower costs and reduce our carbon footprint. Much like how electrical technologies transformed the city 140 years ago, the digital revolution is driving Ottawa’s smart energy future helping the municipality reduce emissions and save operational costs. Here’s how: • The installation of solar panels on eight municipal buildings (with plans for additional installations); • The electrification of the City of Ottawa’s transportation fleet, the installment of electric vehicle charging stations across Ottawa and the installment of charging infrastructure and maintenance for electric buses; • The installation of heat pumps and dual fuel systems at a few recreation centres throughout the city; and

Converting the city’s streetlights with LEDs, which, with its adaptive dimming and asset management control system, has decreased the city’s carbon dioxide emissions by a remarkable 1,200 metric tonnes every year, and translates into a 55 per cent reduction in energy consumption. Policy makers, businesses and residents all play a critical role in transitioning to a greener economy. And now is the time to put strategies and policies in place. As we work together to balance growth with environmental and social responsibility, remember, Ottawa, you too have the power to shape our city’s energy future. •

Hydro Ottawa Holding Inc. (Hydro Ottawa) is a private company 100 per cent owned by the City of Ottawa and whose core businesses are electricity distribution, renewable energy generation, and energy and utility services. As a leading partner in a smart energy future, Hydro Ottawa is committed to sustainability and reducing its impact on the environment in all aspects of its operations. It owns and operates three primary subsidiary companies: Hydro Ottawa Limited – a local distribution company that delivers electricity to more than 353,000 customers in the City of Ottawa and the Village of Casselman; Portage Power – the largest Ontario-based municipally-owned producer of green power with 128 megawatts of installed green generation capacity (enough to power 107,000 homes); and Envari – an energy solutions company offering products and services that help reduce energy consumption and costs for municipalities, industrial and commercial clients, and various local distribution companies.

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CAPITAL/Ottawa Employment Hub

Grow your business using free labour market information (LMI) Access custom data and insights for Ottawa and the Valley

Now more than ever, LMI is vital not only in securing employees but also in planning for future success as technologies and business practices change the landscape of the way we live and work. The LMI Help Desk is a free resource available to businesses and organizations providing custom reports on demand using advanced data sources including Statistics Canada, EMSI Analyst, Vicinity Jobs, Job Hub Tools and others to gather and interpret data in relation to your specific business needs.

Since its launch in 2021, the LMI Help Desk project has completed over 300 requests from businesses, Employment and Community Service Providers, Post Secondary Institutions, Economic Development Officers, Local Government, and Job Seekers and Students. As part of an Eastern Ontario Regional initiative funded by the Ministry of Labour, Training and Skills Development, the project aims to provide access to consolidated data and information that is FREE and up to date. Here are some of the ways in which the LMI Help Desk can help your local business in Ottawa, Renfrew and Lanark.

Competitive Wages and Benefits

Industry standard wages are changing, and staying on top of competitive wages is a key component in attracting and retaining employees. Did you know that Ontario’s new minimum wage is $15 per hour, while the current average Canadian hourly wage is double that? Are you aware that it costs an average of $4,000 to hire a new employee? As the labour shortage continues, ensuring that you remain competitive in wages and benefits will help give you an edge over your competition.

We can tell you the current rate for positions you’re looking to fill.

Trends and Projections

As new laws and practices emerge around data security, environmental regulations, and business culture, we can help you look at your industry and see how these trends and projections could affect you in the coming years. A custom LMI report can give you insights so that you can plan for projected changes now.

Local Talent Pool

As the baby boomer generation ages, the labour pool will continue to shrink as we see retirements and shifts in active workers. Companies can use LMI to look at their current talent and labour pool as part of an effective recruitment strategy. A custom LMI report can break down the number of available workers by age group, graduate program, and region.

Foreign Talent

Canada is making changes to its foreign worker and immigration policies to help bring more skilled workers into the country. Businesses can tap into this global market in their search for skilled workers. We can help by providing insight into the global talent pool and ways in which you can hire foreign workers.

Grant Writing and Business Planning

It’s important to not only forecast your financial goals but also your targeted labour growth, changing customer base, and predicted market changes. Do you want to know how the population and business growth in your area can mean more (or less) business for you? We can provide you with specific numbers and data to help back up your proposals.


GET TO KNOW YOUR LABOUR SUPPLY. THERE WERE OVER 26,500 POST-SECONDARY GRADUATES IN OTTAWA, 2019-2020

TOP EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS IN OTTAWA BY PERCENTAGE OF GRADUATES, 2019-2020

Business, management, marketing and related support services 15%

Health professions and related programs 9%

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Engineering technologies and engineering-related fields 5%

Social sciences 9%

Engineering 8%

Data source: Statistics Canada Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) via EMSI Analyst 2022.

The LMI Help Desk has supported local area businesses like Cada Construction who recently reached out to our Ottawa Employment Hub LMI Help Desk for key information to support their company’s business planning processes. “The construction industry is under incredible pressure right now when it comes to attracting quality skilled tradespeople. As a local area company who prides itself in offering quality products and services and maintaining strong relationships within our community, we needed up to date information on compensation for Carpenters, Project Managers and Coordinators to ensure we were not only offering competitive wages but investing in our teams for the long term.” “The LMI Help Desk responded quickly and provided useful information, saving us time and effort in trying to complete this research in house. For a small, family business, this resource is extremely valuable.” -Vice President, Business & Project Manager Amy Cada of Cada Construction To reach your local LMI Help Desk in the Ottawa area, please contact LMI@ottawaemploymenthub.ca 700 Sussex Dr., 2nd Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 1K4

ottawaemploymenthub.ca @OttEmpHub

@ottawaemploymenthub

To reach your local LMI Help Desk in the Renfrew and Lanark Counties, please contact lmg@algonquincollege.com 141 Lake Street, Pembroke, ON, K8A 5L8

labourmarketgroup.ca

@LMRenfrewLanark @lmrenfrewlanark


CAPITAL/Dragon Boat Festival

Love of its community is central to the organization’s foundation and two festivals. T

THE OTTAWA DRAGON Boat Foundation’s (ODBF)

mission is to help build, strengthen and enhance community life in the National Capital Region by raising, managing and distributing funds to local charitable organizations in support of essential programming. ODBF was the recipient of the Association of Fundraising Professionals’ Ottawa Chapter Outstanding Philanthropic Group in 2018, and to-date, has raised over $5 million for 65 local charities through its annual fundraising campaigns. The ODBF Pledge Challenge is the foundation’s annual summer campaign which is currently raising funds for Cornerstone Housing for Women, Ottawa Anglican Day Programs (including St. Luke’s Table, The Well and Centre 454), and Shelter Movers Ottawa. In 2022 the organization’s annual winter campaign, the ODBF Shiver ’N Giver Fundraising Drive, supported The Snowsuit Fund, Lotus Centre for Special Music Education, Tim Hortons Foundation Camps, and Youth Services Bureau.

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Local charities can apply for funding through the ODBF Community Fund for new or ongoing initiatives (up to $10,000) through ODBF.CA. The organization’s love of its community extends to serving it not only through its foundation but also through its winter and summer festivals with the presentation of sports, music and the arts. What has long been known to be true was highlighted exponentially more by the COVID-19 pandemic. Access to sport, music and the arts all share intrinsic commonalities that are essential to the wellbeing of a community's physical and mental health and an overall higher quality of life. Access to and participation in sport, music and the arts build strong communities which can be rallied around, find support in, and where communities can weather storms together. It is these things that the organization celebrates. The return to in-person festivities of the organization’s winter and summer events, and its merging of these elements into a shared experience is at the heart of a healthy community. The BeaverTails Ottawa Ice Dragon Boat Festival is the first of the organization’s events each year that brings these elements

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together for its community. It is the largest ice dragon boat race in the world and a highlight of Winterlude. The event combines dragon boating with Canadian winter sport culture. February 3 and 4 on the Rideau Canal Skateway at Dow’s Lake, the twelve-person boats get equipped with skate-like blades and competitors propel themselves along the course using spiked ice-picks. Typically 100 teams made up of 1,200 athletes from around the world including England, Ireland, Japan, New Zealand, the United States and more come to Ottawa to compete. Practices occur

throughout the day on Friday in preparation for the races on Saturday. On Friday evening, under the lights, a special race is held for the foundation’s annual winter ODBF Shiver ‘N Giver Fundraising Drive. In an exciting and innovative step, the 2023 festival will host the first IDB1 World Championship on February 11 and 12 at TD Place Arena. IDB1’s are liberally called single-person “dragon boats”, affectionately named after the sport that inspired their development. The winter festival is also excited to be presenting 18 days of free programming from February 3-20 at Ottawa’s iconic live music hall The Rainbow. Early announcements from the all Canadian 2023 lineup include Barry & the Blasters, C5, Craig Cardiff, The Commotions, Emma Lamontange, Faux Confessions, HOROJO, Indigenous Experiences, JW-Jones, Lynne Hanson, Main Street Revival, Moonfruits, The Peptides, Pony Girl, Rory Taillon, Silent Winters, Success Dragon Lion Dance, Taming Sari, Twin Flames and We Were Sharks. The organization’s work in the community culminates each year with its annual summer event the Tim Hortons Ottawa Dragon Boat Festival. It is one of the world's premier regattas and like the winter festival the event presents the sport of dragon boating and combines it with Canadian summer water-sport culture. This year the festival, takes place June 24-26, 2022, offering free admission to concerts, sports demonstrations, artisans and exhibitors, delicious culinary treats, children’s area and non-stop racing! Paddlers from all skill levels compete in a variety of divisions, including the Sue Holloway Cup, Breast Cancer Paddlers Cup, Pride Cup, and the new Paradragons and All Cancer Paddlers Cups. The festival is also showcasing a two-person dragon boat called the DragonFly, which was developed during the pandemic, in a first ever exhibition race. The festival’s popular multi-sport paddling event, Ottawa Wa’a, Hawaiian for outrigger canoe, returns with divisions for OC1, SUP, SurfSki, 1X, C-1, and K-1. Headlining an all Canadian 2022 lineup are The Strumbellas and Serena Ryder with local guests Rebelle, Steve Neville, Stoby, Frown Line and more. Dragon boats and the other watercraft that are featured at the festivals are not just a sport. For Canadians, it links cultures together over continents and through time. It brings people from all walks of life together into one unified team. Transcending borders, languages and a host of other differences becoming globally loved and enjoyed in the same way that music and art transcends, shapes cultures and communities and speaks to the heart of a community.

Former Minister Catherine McKenna

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CAPITAL/NCC

NATIONAL CAPITAL COMMISSION: PROTECTING AND ENHANCING NATURAL AND CULTURAL SPACES S PLANNER AND steward of the National Capital Region, the National Capital Commission’s (NCC) role is to ensure that the Capital remains an enjoyable place to live and visit — for both current and future generations. Part of the NCC’s work involves protecting vital public places that are unique to our nation’s natural and cultural heritage. Here are a few of the projects that the NCC is currently working on.

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Capital Culture Lives Here: Giving new life to heritage sites The NCC is the steward of many heritage sites in the National Capital Region. Some of these require investment and reimagining to give them new life. The Capital Culture Lives Here initiative is part of the NCC’s mandate to create an inspiring Capital Region for all Canadians. In 2021, we launched a pilot project to transform the Rochon Residence in Ottawa into a residence for artists. Our request for expressions of interest (REI) was successful, and we are pleased to have launched a partnership with the SAW Centre Nordic Lab artist-in-residence program this year.

Building on the momentum from the pilot project and the interest it received from various organizations, we are launching an REI for three more sites: the Strutt House (a mid-century icon set among the trees of Gatineau Park), 108 Pine Road (a natureinspired experience in Meech Creek Valley, in Gatineau Park) and the McConnell House (a heritage gem located in a dynamic corridor). Our goal is to seek proposals for these sites that will conserve their heritage value, build awareness of their significance and enhance the Capital experience. Building LeBreton: Progress update coming this summer The creation of a unique destination and dynamic new community in the heart of the Capital is moving forward at LeBreton Flats. The project’s first phase, the Library Parcel, is moving through the design and permit process, while the main library it will be next to is currently under construction. In June, we’ll launch the next development phase to seek proponents to develop a section of the Flats District along Wellington Street, across from the Canadian War Museum. This

The historic Rochon Residence in Ottawa, part of the NCC’s Capital Culture Lives Here initiative 30

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Artistic rendering of the Library Parcel development at LeBreton, which will feature sustainable construction, mobility features, social programming, affordable and accessible housing.

site will become an important gateway to LeBreton Flats from Wellington Street and the parkway. The successful proponent will be responsible for building the local streets and infrastructure. In addition, we are pleased to have received multiple responses to our REI for major attractions at two sites at LeBreton Flats. The evaluation process is well under way, and we are working to advance negotiations with potential proponents. The major attractions

are expected to be a regional and international draw for sports, entertainment, cultural and/or recreational purposes. A progress update will be provided at our next Board of Directors meeting in late June. Westboro Beach area redevelopment project: Revamping the shoreline Westboro Beach is a key hub on the Ottawa River. The NCC’s redevelopment project is currently underway, aiming to create a more vibrant space that will improve the visitor experience and quality of life for residents. This project will see the rehabilitation of the beach-level Strutt Pavilion, a heritage structure designed by well-known Ottawa architect James Strutt, to provide updated modern amenities that are inclusive and accessible. We will also build a new zero-carbon pavilion at the upper level, to serve the public year-round. It is designed to reflect the heritage and natural context of the site, by minimizing the building footprint. The new pavilion will complement existing heritage buildings, while maximizing the views of the river. Improvements to the site will also include a restaurant, community space, children’s play area, picnic and volleyball areas, and riverfront lookouts. Working with the NCC The NCC welcomes the opportunity to work with new suppliers and contractors. If you are interested in offering your services, please visit https://ncc-ccn. gc.ca/business/contracting-with-the-ncc.

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OTTAWA’S CULTURAL HEFT

Ottawa has many attributes, including great outdoor amenities and a small-town feel, but chief among the factors that make it most livable is its cultural heft. BY J ENNI F ER CAMPBELL

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T’S OFTEN SAID that Ottawa — a G7 capital and yet

a city of just 1,000,000 residents — punches above its weight for its size. And when it comes to culture, that punch is more akin to a knockout. After all, the National Capital Region is home to seven national museums, covering everything from fine art, history, war, nature, science and technology, agriculture and aviation. And mustn’t forget the National Arts Centre. Then there’s Bluesfest, one of the country’s largest music festivals, as well as the TD Ottawa Jazz Festival and CityFolk. And being a city that plays host to more than 130 embassies, there are hundreds of cultural festivals and events to take in, too. In short, culture enthusiasts can be busy nearly every day of the year. MUSEUM MADNESS The surplus of national institutions creates a vibrant art scene that trickles down to regional and private galleries as well as regional and municipal museums and they’re all supported and attended by culture enthusiasts in the city and beyond. A study by the Ottawa Museum Network, which is responsible for 11 small museums around the city, found that 70 per cent of Ottawa residents feel culture is important to their mental health. “Social cohesion is a big part of what museums contribute to a community,” says Sara MacKenzie, executive director of the Ottawa Museum Network. “We make Ottawa an interesting, vibrant city.” And as cities emerge from the pandemic, MacKenzie says culture will become ever more important. Within the network is the Diefenbunker, which was the wartime hideaway for prime minister John Diefenbaker. There’s also the Bytown Museum, located on the Rideau Locks, explores the city’s history. The Museo-Park Vanier is Ottawa’s only francophone museum and includes a sugar shack, now being rebuilt after a fire, among its amenities. MacKenzie says museums and beautiful public spaces are an important part of great livable cities. “As small museums, we offer so much,” she says. “There are all kinds of events always happening that contribute to social cohesion and they are places where people can experience life-long learning. I have yet to meet someone who says they don’t like museums. With the cultural venues all over the city, you could do something different every weekend for the whole year. I think that someone moving to Ottawa would be pleasantly surprised with how much there is to do week in and week out.” LIVE MUSIC YEAR-ROUND When Toronto native Erin Benjamin moved to Ottawa in 2003, she was immediately impressed by the diverse range of experiences one can have here.

“Amazing people live in Ottawa and that’s why it’s a cool place to be,” says the president and CEO of Canadian Live Music Association. “Whether you’re running a technology company or the live music association, it’s a really interesting mix. I think folks are really proud to be here.” On the topic of live music, Benjamin is optimistic that the festival community will rebound and even have a bit of a renaissance. After all, the size and quality of festivals measure up to the national

museums and there are several other events — think Canada and Remembrance Day — that happen in Ottawa on a grander scale.

“We’re where the country meets on Remembrance Day,” Benjamin says. “We’re used to gathering in large numbers for all kinds of reasons that other cities don’t have and that certainly instills a sense of pride.” Meanwhile, Benjamin says live music animates the city and contributes greatly to its livability. “It’s one of those things that we get to do,” she says. “You can see everyone from the biggest stars to emerging artists, often in places you can walk to from your home and if not, everything is very accessible.” She points to a great history of campus radio and a solid range of venues, including the Canadian Tire Centre and TD place stadiumsized venues down to smaller venues such as Live on Elgin and Irene’s. “We have a real venue ladder, which we need in order to facilitate the growth of music in our city,” she says. “The festivals feed the venues and venues feed the festivals and promoters like Mark Monahan [Bluesfest] and Cat Coté [Ottawa Festivals] are putting an international stamp on the vibrancy of the city and giving people reasons to be inspired to go out year-round.” Benjamin also lauds the city’s nighttime economy strategy, which she says puts Ottawa ahead of the curve. It’s currently being investigated by city staff and then it will go to council. “The creative cultural industry is at the heart of any successful nighttime economy so we’re going to look at our current assets and what we need to build,” she says. “We’ve got this whole eight to 12 hours that we’re really underutilizing and I’m really excited to explore.” SMALL FESTIVALS; BIG IMPACT As many as half of Ottawa’s festivals are free of charge to attend, says Lee Dunbar, interim executive director of the Ottawa Festival Network. Think of events such as Bank Street’s Fire and Ice Festival or Sparks Street’s many events, including Ribfest, Buskerfest and Poutinefest. “It creates energy in those areas,” Dunbar says. “It brings the locals together, but it also brings other people into the neighbourhoods to get to know them.” The city also has a number of cultural festivals that showcase the city’s diversity. Dunbar remembers one particular visitor who was able to visit one country for lunch and another country for dinner. Another who visited three festivals in one day reported to him that she was “festival hopping.” Dunbar thought to himself, “In what other city could you festival hop?” The cultural festivals range from Greek, Italian and Indian to Indonesian, Asian (through a night market) and South Asia. The other big contribution festivals make to the city is philanthropic. “Some of these festivals raise millions of dollars a year for charities,” he says, naming Tamarack Race Weekend as chief among them, while others, such as the Ottawa Dragon Boat Festival and HOPE Volleyball event have participants raising money through sport. Meanwhile, other festivals are charities unto themselves or have foundations that run alongside them. Ottawa Bluesfest, Writers Festival, Jazz Festival and the Children’s Storytelling Festival all partner with schools.

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CAPITAL/GOHBA

WILL WE HAVE ENOUGH HOMES FOR OTTAWA’S FUTURE?

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N FEBRUARY 2022 Statistics Canada released new

census figures that showed the population of OttawaGatineau grew from 1,371,576 in 2016 to 1,488,307 last year. This 8.5 per cent population growth over the last five years is higher than the national rate of 5.2 per cent, with Ottawa surpassing Calgary as Canada’s fourth largest urban centre. These figures beg the question – are we building enough homes to accommodate our growing population? In 2019, the City of Ottawa forecasted three potential population growth scenarios (“low”, “medium”, “high”) for the city’s Official Plan. The new Official Plan approved last year is built on housing requirement estimates from the “medium” scenario – 400,000 new people and 195,000 new homes over the next 25 years. However, recent growth projections have changed significantly. Last year the Ontario Ministry of Finance published new population projections which forecasted that Ottawa could see 530,000 new residents by 2046 – an additional 130,000 over the medium growth scenario (but close to the City’s “high” growth scenario) that the Official Plan is based on. The increase in population translates into a need for 224,000 new homes by 2046. That’s a deficit of 29,000 homes over the next 25 years compared to the current Official Plan. Broken out by housing type, the results mean that there is a need for 72,200 high-rise apartments (an additional 19,600 more than the Official Plan) and a need for 151,800 low-rise housing units (an additional 9,600 homes than the current Official Plan). Low-rise homes would include 4-storey and shorter apartment buildings, town-, row-, semi- and single-detached homes. In order to have a chance at prosperity over the next 25 years, the City cannot be in a position where its Official Plan is shooting for a housing target that is well below the housing needs of its residents, both current and future. It is also critical that Ottawa provide a range of housing and 34

Rideau Canal Custom Condos: Roca Homes with Hobin Architecture Incorporated Housing Design Awards 2021 Winner for Low-Rise Apartment (Condo or Rental, up to 4 storeys)

101 on the River: Claridge Homes Housing Design Awards 2021 Winner for Custom Urban Home: Multi-unit

lifestyle options for residents to attract and retain talented people, businesses, and economic development opportunities. Our housing affordability is an economic competitive advantage for employers compared to Toronto and Montreal, so we need to protect it. Ottawa residents know that the City is experiencing the impacts of an insufficient housing supply. A 2020 Scotiabank report put the shortage in sharp focus - the number of housing units per 1000 residents in Ottawa-Gatineau decreased from 421 in 2016 to 412 in 2020. In May 2022 CMHC released a report observing that Ottawa's

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population is growing faster than the rate at which new homes are being built. And while we’re doing a good job providing a variety of housing – 40% apartments, 30% “missing middle” housing and 30% singledetached – the totality of new homes is not enough to meet demand. CMHC also notes that despite a 50-year high in new home starts in 2021, housing supply is still the biggest barrier to affordability. That’s why GOHBA and its members push to ensure that there’s enough housing for Ottawa’s current and future residents, and that the housing shortage is recognized as the primary factor for our current housing affordability crisis. Is housing affordability complicated and multi-factored? Of course, it is. On top of supply, inflation, interest rates, supply chain issues, labour force and investors all play a role. There’s no silver bullet that’s going to magically fix things. But increasing housing supply is the intrinsic first step to addressing the housing crisis. Public discussion about the need to increase housing supply has increased over the past year, with calls from all three levels of government for more coordination of efforts to improve housing affordability.

the construction site – live in every neighbourhood there is across the city. Some love living in Westboro, others in old Ottawa East, others still in Barrhaven or even further south. They appreciate the neighbourhood they are in and the lifestyle it provides, and they want their fellow citizens, current and future, to have the opportunity to live there as well. Many of us live in established neighbourhoods that were once brand new. We have that privilege because a home builder had a vision to build a new community where our homes now stand. And those communities thrive because they are constantly evolving. It is also important to not ignore residents’ wants in terms of the type of housing they desire and lifestyle that housing is associated with. Not providing a sufficient supply of all types of housing – including ground-oriented, family-friendly homes – will continue to negatively impact housing affordability Consider the issue from a first-time home buyer’s perspective. Today we have people and families driving further and further away from the City limits in order to fulfill their particular dream of a home of their own. That is real sprawl – people living in satellite communities and driving into Ottawa to work – that puts demand on infrastructure without contributing to the tax base.

The Roosevelt: Rosaline J. Hill Architect Inc. with Haslett Construction Inc. Housing Design Awards 2021 Winner for Custom Urban Home (3,000 sq. ft. or less) - Traditional

The Willow at eQuinelle: eQ Homes with Norma King Design Housing Design Awards 2021 Winner for Production Home: Single Detached - $750,001 - $1,000,000

Over the past few months Ahmed Hussen, Federal Minister for Housing and Diversity and Inclusion, Steve Clark, Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing in Ontario, and Ottawa’s Mayor Jim Watson, along with the Ontario Big City Mayor’s Caucus, have all acknowledged a mismatch between housing supply and demand. As the people on the supply end of the equation, GOHBA members recognize that finding the right home for you is a balance of housing type, location and affordability. You can compromise on the first two, but not the third. The number of homes available is a fundamental consideration in the affordability of homes. Ottawa's population is growing, and everyone has to live somewhere. That's why it's critical for neighbourhoods - both new and existing - to house more people. New(er) neighbourhoods are doing a good job of intensifying by consistently exceeding the City’s density targets. New housing in existing neighbourhoods, while sometimes controversial, is necessary in order for neighbourhoods to change and grow. Otherwise they wither and risk losing their schools, restaurants, and local stores. Home builders – not the companies, but the actual human beings who work in the sales office or are skilled tradespeople on

Everyone’s aspirations for a “home” are unique. Everybody’s dream home, and the lifestyle it provides, is different, and all are equally valid. When buying a home, people are going to continue to do what they have always done - balance their housing needs with their wants, budgets, and the lifestyle associated with different types of homes in different areas of the city. So how are we going to supply enough homes to meet our population growth? By building Up, In and Out: Up – with taller buildings around transit stations and on main streets; In – with denser infill projects in existing neighbourhoods; and, Out – with new communities in the suburbs. We have a responsibility to look at our current housing affordability issues and consider that the decisions we make now will affect affordability and choice for those looking for a home 10 or 20 years from now. So, GOHBA and its members will continue to push for a greater supply of housing and greater affordability so that more people, more citizens of Ottawa, can achieve their dreams of home.

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An Interview with Penny Torontow, President of the Ottawa Real Estate Board BY A LYS S A S ATUR LE Y

PEAKING WITH PENNY Torontow can leave you somewhat breathless. As President of the Ottawa Real Estate Board for 2022, her unwavering commitment to OREB’s members and their clients is clearly her raison d’être. It’s an energy and focus that echoes throughout the entire organization.

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AS: Tell me about OREB’s role in Ottawa’s real estate market. PT: Truthfully, I never tire of this question. Whether buying their first home, selling their treasured property, sourcing a place for business or locating their recreational dream, a professional REALTOR® manages the process. This can be a very emotional experience. Our members help people navigate the most important milestones of their lives. AS: What does OREB represent for REALTORS today? PT: We are a professional association with almost 3,900 registered REALTORS® in our membership. Established over 100 years ago, OREB was one of Canada’s first real estate boards. We’ve built a foundation based on cooperation and upholding the highest ethical standards and practices. AS: What kind of assistance do you offer to your members who are seeking support? PT: As a REALTOR® myself, I can attest to the need for the work we’re doing. A professional REALTOR® stands for three things: Service, Competence and Adherence to a Code of Ethics. We support our REALTORS® by providing leading-edge technology, tools 36

and resources. Our REALTORS® live and work in their communities. Whether it’s the Ottawa Region or the surrounding areas of Renfrew, Rideau St. Laurent and Cornwall, we want to enhance the quality of life for our residents. AS: What makes Ottawa such a great place to live? PT: How much time have you got? From our recent study conducted with Nanos Research, we learned that 78% of respondents feel Ottawa is an ideal place for raising families, and 70% confirmed that our city is a safe place to live. Ottawa is a beautiful location with fantastic amenities, public transit, excellent schools, stunning parklands/green spaces and modern athletic/sports facilities. Gems like the Canal, our rivers, and an urban farm in the city’s centre are what makes us a world class city. The vast majority of respondents said that Ottawa’s job market is good or above average. Employment is highly stable, thanks to the public service and hightech sectors. Ottawa also has a deep cultural heritage, unmatched by many other cities of our size, with galleries, museums and the National Arts Centre. Each year, hundreds of festivals celebrating ethnicity, music, the arts, professional sports teams and our glorious seasons all make Ottawa a city worth celebrating.

Penny Torontow

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AS: As we resume some of those cherished activities, after two years of lockdowns and isolation, can you reflect on how the pandemic has impacted Ottawa’s real estate market? PT: It’s been such an unbelievable time, hasn’t it? As in almost all aspects of life, the pandemic created a


sudden and drastic change for our members and our community. The Ontario Government deemed real estate an essential service after REALTORS®, along with the Ontario Real Estate Association, lobbied to ensure that people were still able to buy and sell properties in our province. This advocacy resulted in our members having some room to continue serving their clients while keeping them healthy and safe. The Great Awakening had many people evaluating their priorities and making significant life changes, including where they wanted to live. This created a high demand for new and different configurations and creative solutions for working from home. In meeting the challenges of this new workforce, REALTORS® got busy and stayed busy. Some clients required more office space, while others made their backyards a staycation destination.

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AS: What was the pre-pandemic status of the Ottawa housing market, at the start of 2020? PT: Yes, context is especially critical in this case. The demands of the pandemic came to a market where supply had long been constrained. We started seeing lower inventory in Ottawa back in 2015. The fact of the matter is that Ottawa had already been undervalued for quite some time. This was a very affordable place to purchase a home in terms of what we had to offer. As our population reached a million people, we were no longer considered a smaller city. With that growth comes even more of the amenities we already talked about. The appeal just grew at an increased rate, creating a perfect storm between high demand and low inventory. AS: How did your members rise to the challenge? PT: I’m so proud to share how our members stepped up, helping people navigate these unique times! They supported clients through highly competitive and sometimes stressful situations on both the buying and selling sides. In 2021 alone, the total number of residential and condo units sold was 20,302 compared to 18,953 in 2020, which represents an increase of 7 percent. Meanwhile, total

sales volume in 2021 was approximately 13.1B compared to $10B in 2020. Essential service, indeed! AS: What trends will impact Ottawa’s residential real estate market over the coming months? PT: I’m a planner, so this question is never far from my thoughts. In the short term we’re facing rising interest rates, limited supply and high demand. This creates a resale market that is in flux. We’ll see prices rise, but their trajectories will level out. Condos will continue to perform well as an affordable housing class. REALTORS® are also helping with more rental properties of late. AS: And in the longer term? PT: Certainly, housing trends will be affected by the Grey Tsunami as the boomer generation ages. Our survey shows that a third of respondents will require a senior-friendly home in the next five years. Ottawans are concerned about affordability and access to housing for seniors. There’s strong, popular support for easing restrictions on building secondary suites or coach houses in order to provide space for a family member to live. AS: What is REALTORS Care®? PT: I’m glad you asked! It’s a guiding principle and brand that unites the great charitable work involving our members and the REALTOR® community. Our foundation raises funds to support Ottawa area shelter-based charities. The idea is to provide a helping hand for those in our community experiencing homelessness. We support more than 20 shelter-based organizations in Ottawa and the surrounding area. Our members already do so much to support the neighbourhoods and communities where they live and work in. Community fundraisers, charity golf tournaments, sports team sponsorships, and other local good causes are just a part of what they do. REALTORS Care® is the natural progression of that kind of positive momentum.

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CAPITAL/TCC

Hybrid work is adapting to how teams work best and creating experiences where individuals and companies thrive. ith our vast experience providing workspaces for the past 30 years, TCC Canada understands that well-designed offices not only improve our user’s quality of life but should also offer a choice of where and how is best for them to work. With regional offices conveniently located around Ottawa, we are seeing that flexible workspace, meeting rooms and coworking spaces are becoming an essential part of the local business community. With amenity spaces and lavish design features, TCC recognizes that office design plays a critical role in encouraging employees to come back to the office. Ideally, workdays are not spent sitting at the same desk. Office design trends are moving in a direction where activity-based work requires a combination of open office spaces with other taskoriented spaces to choose from. TCC specializes in creating hybrid solutions for small, medium and large teams, so many of the problems associated with open plan are eliminated. Confidential calls can be done in a private phone booth, a brainstorming session should take place in a comfortable team space that encourages creative thinking, someone writing a legal document prefers a small quiet space for thinking and concentration.

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TCC offers virtual offices, coworking, meeting, conference and training room facilities and fully serviced dedicated workspaces so you can focus on what’s important - YOUR BUSINESS! Join the TCC Community - we’re more than just a workspace! Learn more about how we can help your business. www.tcccanada.com

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CAPITAL/Performance Plus

COMMITTING TO AN INCLUSIVE FUTURE / BUILDING A COMMUNITY HE SPORTS AND entertainment industries in Ottawa about continuing the inclusive hiring process. “The people we thrive on building a positive fan experience. They reflect identified were first of mind when we began hiring again. We made a their community, and they practice inclusion ensuring commitment to those living with a disability in our community and everyone feels welcome. That positive attitude translates we wanted to continue to offer the job opportunities.” into the work experience. In 2016, Ottawa Sports & Jean-Yves Nicholas is starting his new position with OSEG. When Entertainment Group asked about his job start, (OSEG) began a relationship Jean-Yves was excited. with Performance Plus “They gave me something Rehabilitative Care Inc. to look forward to during (PPRC) and hired job the lockdown. I had a seekers who self-identified job waiting and that was as living with a disability important, it gave me from the PPRC talent hope.” pool. Francis Menard was “We look for positive one of those hires, and he energy and a willingness to continues with OSEG today. learn and the candidates In January 2020, OSEG provided by PPRC are well partnered with PPRC to supported and meet those hold an inclusive hiring criteria,” says Anne Marie opportunity. PPRC Villeneuve, Vice-President identified candidates Guest Experience and from their talent pool and Operations with OSEG. assisted them in preparing Everyone has strengths, for the interviews. Bentley we look for those and find a McKay, HR Generalist with role that allows them to use OSEG, worked with Joel their talents,” states Julia Daze of PPRC to conduct Weagle, Manager Guest one-on-one interviews and Services. establish suitability. “We The partnership between hire for personality and OSEG and PPRC has been train for skills,” offered invaluable in creating job Bentley. “We believe that opportunities in our Ottawa people, whether they work labour market and their here or come for the event, commitment to diversity should all have a positive and inclusion continues to and fun experience. We will flourish. teach you the skills you need Whether you are a Left to Right Back Row: Julia Weagle, Manager Guest Services, Bentley McKay, Human to succeed, however you person who self-identifies Resources Generalist, Anne-Marie Villeneuve, Vice-President Guest Experience and need to come with the passion Operations, OSEG. as living with a disability, or to make it positive.” an employer who is looking to Front Row: Joel Daze, PPRC, Francis Menard and Jean-Yves Nicholas, OSEG Staff. Several PPRC job seekers hire inclusively, let PPRC be from the Ottawa community your trusted partner. Contact were offered opportunities with OSEG to start in the upcoming PPRC at 613-748-3220, or through our website at www.pprc.ca. season. The pandemic intervened and the sports and entertainment industries were put on hold. Fast forward one and half years and in late 2021 as things started to open, Bentley returned to the people who they had identified a year earlier and approached PPRC

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OTTAWA DRIVING WORLD-CLASS MEDICAL RESEARCH AND ADVANCEMENTS BY J EF F B UCKST EI N

Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) In addition to being at the cutting edge of developing new diagnostics and treatments of physical diseases, CHEO, a pediatric hospital and research centre in Ottawa, has sharpened its focus on the prevention and treatment of mental health disorders. Mental health issues have become more acute during the pandemic because of the increased isolation both adults and children are experiencing, says Jason Berman, chief executive officer and scientific director at the CHEO Research Institute and also Vice President of Research at CHEO. Even in children that didn’t already have underlying mental health issues, the pandemic has “had a profound effect on kids, youth and adolescents because they haven’t been able to do the regular things that kids should do, like go to school and participate in intermural sports and have sleepovers and birthday parties and play on soccer teams,” says Dr. Berman. CHEO’s 1Call1One Click.ca program, established in late 2021, is a centralized mental health program that allows individuals to either call, or go online to identify a specific mental health service they need, and to receive service promptly. CHEO’s precision child mental health initiatives are also aimed at eating disorders. A large clinical program, along with a strong collaborative research program involving adolescent medicine physicians, psychiatrists, scientists, radiologists and psychologists work together to examine how, for example, novel brain imaging can help them understand this disease better and perhaps be able to intervene to address the problem earlier. “Right now, the kids that really get the attention are those that are the sickest and require admission to hospital. But there are many kids out there that have milder, earlier forms of eating disorders that 40

if we could understand and tackle these earlier, we could perhaps prevent their progression,” Dr. Berman explains. Dr. Berman says that CHEO is well positioned to lead in research and innovation operating within Ottawa, which also boasts leading technology companies, universities, and other hospitals to serve as partners. The Royal Joanne Bezzubetz, president and CEO of The Royal, says the hospital’s trailblazing brain imaging centre has helped make important advancements in understanding the biology of mental illness and substance use disorders. It allows neuroscientists and clinicians to study brain circuits involved in depression and other mental illness like schizophrenia. Through research studies, neuroscientists and clinicians can measure the impact of specific treatments on the brain. It could also measure the effect of medication on the brain, she elaborates. The Royal’s Prompt Care Clinic provides rapid care to people who come in with a referral from a physician or psychiatrist to receive four sessions of psychotherapy and/or medication. The clinic began as a virtual meeting place during the early stages of the pandemic but will be expanding to also offer a physical location option for patients.

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TTAWA RESIDENTS ARE fortunate to live in a city with many world-class institutions that are advancing medical education and research. Here are some of the current initiatives of four leading local health centres.


quickly, that patient can be moved promptly into a cardiac catheter laboratory, which significantly improves their chances of recovery, Dr. Rayner explains. “Ottawa has been increasing in the rankings when it comes to research and innovation scores, no matter what sort of metric you use. I think some of the driving force is that Ottawa has been quite an innovative city when it comes to technology,” says Dr. Rayner, who notes that when a local tech company has developed a new medical app, tracker or other technology, they often test it with the Heart Institute’s patients. The Ottawa Hospital Cameron Love, president and chief executive officer of The Ottawa Hospital (TOH), says that research in hospitals tends to be divided into three major components - clinical, translational, and bench research, and that all three are key areas of activity for his hospital. TOH’s research is dedicated to finding advanced treatments to manage various diseases including cancer, ALS, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. “A huge portion of what we do is focused around clinical trials and clinical research to come up with new

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The Royal’s Rapid Access Addiction Medicine program enables people to receive immediate addictions services on an outpatient basis. This service has helped reduce opioid and alcohol related emergency department visits, hospitalization and deaths. “Our substance use and concurrent disorders program at the Royal is one of the most advanced programs in the country,” says Bezzubetz. “Like mental illness, addiction does not discriminate. It touches people at all ages, all demographics and all different socio-economic statuses.” Bezzubetz says she is noticing much more collaboration among all the research institutes, academic health sciences centres and large hospitals in the region. “When it comes to mental health, the Royal has a very large footprint. Our vision is to be a hospital without walls. We’ve got tremendous outreach through working with large hospital partners like Queensway-Carleton and CHEO, but also various community hospitals in Hawkesbury, Cornwall, and Kemptville,” she explains. University of Ottawa Heart Institute’s Faculty of Medicine “One of the major ways that cardiovascular research has evolved, and that we at the Heart Institute have contributed significantly, is to the understanding of the underlying patient genetics that contribute to the way an individual develops heart disease, and then might respond to treatment,” says Katey Rayner, a professor and assistant dean of research and special projects at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute’s Faculty of Medicine. Understanding genetics has also provided a completely new level of understanding about how to approach patient care. For example, some people have very high levels of blood cholesterol for which genetic mutations can be identified and appropriate treatments devised for those individuals to manage their cholesterol, says Dr. Rayner. The University of Ottawa Heart Institute’s ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] Program protocols have resulted in faster treatment and saved lives. If somebody is brought into the hospital and suspected of having a heart attack, the type of heart attack that person is having can be diagnosed. For example, if there is a blockage in an artery that needs to be broken up very

treatments and protocols,” Love says. For example, in clinical trials, TOH has made several advancements. “We use viruses in immune cells to fight cancer. We use stem cells to repair damage caused by heart attacks or by septic shock. For programs such as the neurosciences, hematology and cancer, we run very large trials using experimental therapies that are regulated. The outcome of those trials is making a huge difference in terms of what we’re doing for treatment in advancing care,” he explains. Several major research breakthroughs have emerged from TOH, as it has attracted world-class, renowned researchers in many fields from all across the globe in recent years, says Love. “We have a huge opportunity in Ottawa to take this to the next level now with the new Civic Campus we’re building,” says Love. “A big portion of this will revolve around our building a brand new research tower and large clinical research spaces predominantly focused around neurosciences. When we get this built, we’ll have the largest congregation of scientists and clinicians focusing on the brain in Canada. “This is probably the biggest opportunity that I’ve seen in the last 25 years. It will allow us to truly transform and advance health care through new research and innovation,” he adds.

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CAPITAL/ Carol Ring

OTTAWA COMPANIES ADOPT CULTURE FOR SUCCESS N BUSINESS, CONNECTIONS matter. The connection between a company and its suppliers. The connection between a company and its clients. But, says business consultant Carol Ring, the most important of all connections is the one between employer and employee. In fact, says Carol, the CEO and founder of Culture Connection, the strength of that connection – and the positive workplace culture it creates – often separates companies that thrive from those that struggle. “In a company with healthy connections – not only between employer and employee but also among employees – information can be exchanged more quickly, people can understand concepts more easily, and there is generally a greater level of trust,” says Carol. “Research shows that companies with strong, positive workplace cultures routinely outperform those with even just an average workplace culture.” Carol says she’s been fortunate to work with organizations in Canada and the United States. And she’s delighted she’s had the opportunity to play a part in their success. The National Capital Region also boasts a number of accomplished organizations who attribute their results to their culture. The following are just a few examples:

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The Royal It’s simple, says CEO Joanne Bezzubetz. As one of Canada's foremost mental health care and academic health science centres, the Royal is obviously in the people business. It’s critical that they focus on people: clients, families and staff. Also, when considering any decision, to ask what impact that decision will have. In singling out the Royal for its workplace culture, Carol notes that when building their strategic plans, some managers place values and people initiatives at the base – like a foundation – in their presentations. “In reality, like at the Royal, people need to be at the top as the key enabler of everything else that follows. The stronger the focus on people, the stronger the organizational performance outcomes.” Chemical Industry Association of Canada (CIAC) An advocate for Canada’s chemistry and plastics industry, the CIAC was recently certified as a “Great Place to Work®,” a designation 42

CEO Bob Masterson describes as an affirmation that it is doing the right thing when it comes to workplace culture. As a result of being certified, he says, CIAC sees significantly more interest from potential employees and a higher quality of candidates. “Benchmark yourself,” says Bob. “Learn how you’re doing, especially if you’re a new leader.” Carol is in total agreement. “Benchmarking allows you to determine if your values are actually in practice or if they are still in the aspirational phase. Too often, organizations only declare their values – they put up the posters and create the desktop trinkets. But that’s just the FAD part of managing culture – the Fun and Done part. The real work is the constant managing and monitoring of culture enhancing opportunities.” Ross Video In addition to winning the Ottawa Business of the Year and CEO of the Year, Ross Video has recorded a CEO’s dream of 30 consecutive years of growth. CEO David Ross says the company’s code of ethics places great importance on being a great company to work with (and for) and putting customer interests first. Taking the time to write its culture down in a memorable way may well have been the most important thing Ross Video has done in the last 25 years. David believes that the combination of empowering employees to do the right thing with a strong culture that fosters cooperation and innovation is a special kind of magic. “Leaders at companies that fail to live up their potential frequently take an optimistic point of view when it comes to their culture,” says Carol. “As a result, they often fail to recognize the pockets of poor culture in their workplace that are holding them back. “Seeing companies recognize the need for a positive workplace culture – and helping them take the steps to bring that culture to life – is what drives me,” she says. “I do what I do because I know that when employees are happy and engaged, the companies they work for dramatically increase their chances of success.” Carol Ring is the CEO of Culture Connection. Curious how your culture stacks up? Learn more at www.carolring.ca. Contact Carol at 613-716-5115 or carol@carolring.ca

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CAPITAL/Escape Manor

COMING BACK HOME

WHEN THE FOUNDERS of Escape Manor set out

in 2014, they had one goal in mind – to reshape the entertainment landscape in Ottawa. In their minds, there was a gap in their home town. Their humble beginnings took shape in a 2000 square foot office space on Queen Street in downtown Ottawa. It took the city by storm. With a 6-month waitlist, demand quickly outpaced supply and they outgrew their space. Over the next couple of years, they expanded their Ottawa-based operations by adding similar sized venues to their portfolio and forming strategic partnerships with the Diefenbunker museum and Museum of Nature.

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With a solid footing in Ottawa, the company looked to other markets to expand its offerings while simultaneously being courted by interested parties in distant corners of the globe. “If we were to put some pins on a map of where we’d have planned to expand, I don’t think Brisbane, Australia or Regina, Saskatchewan would have been at the top of the list”, says Co-Founder, Chris Bisson, “but, we’re so thankful that we were approached by our eventual partners in those markets”. After expanding to Australia and Saskatchewan, the company took a decidedly more strategic approach to expansion and began opening more locations in Ontario and Saskatchewan. It was around this time that they began to think of themselves as more than simply an escape room company. “We took the view that we were an entertainment and hospitality company and decided it was time to expand on the guest experience”, says Bisson. That guest experience includes axe throwing, immersive theatre, a games lounge, and is complimented with a full bar and kitchen in their large-format Toronto, Hamilton, and Saskatoon locations. The company was enjoying success and well on its way to rapid expansion across Canada when the pandemic struck. Like so many others, Bisson and his team faced an existential crisis. “We knew right away that as a high-touch hospitality business, we would be among the most harshly impacted”, says Bisson. They quickly took stock of the situation and created an online experience to manage some of the loss. “We were surprised at how well it performed and went back to the idea lab and started working on more online experiences”, he says. In total, Escape Manor brought four online experiences to market over the pandemic. As the group learned to keep a pulse during the pandemic, they began to set their sights on a grand recovery and the center stage was going to be their home town – Ottawa. “As we expanded outside of the region and built bigger and better venues, we always felt like Ottawa deserved as good or better. This is our home and where we began”, says Bisson. At the time of this writing, the company has found and is fitting up their new Ottawa location. “We can only tell you that it going to be in a prominent location and will be our best location yet!”, says Bisson. The location is slated to open sometime in September. Not surprisingly, Bisson declined to reveal its location wanting to maintain the mystery. It is Escape Manor afterall.

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CAPITAL/CAPP

CANADA’S OIL AND NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY: ENERGY SECURITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOLUTIONS FOR THE WORLD, ECONOMIC BENEFITS FOR ALL CANADIANS

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and 2019 supply chain revenues of about $14 million in the Ottawa region alone. The burgeoning hydrocarbon cleantech industry is further expanding what it means to work in Canada’s natural gas and oil industry. The world’s energy systems are in transition, but such massive change is not simple. Current energy security and economic impacts we’re seeing around the world demonstrate that Canada is uniquely positioned to find solutions to keeping energy clean, affordable and abundant, and that includes our vibrant oil and natural gas industry that continues to deliver reliable, environmentally and socially responsible energy to the world. Learn more at CAPP.ca.

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PHOTOS SHELL, CE NOVUS

HERE IS AN important opportunity for Canada. Our oil and natural gas industry can help provide global energy security, while finding solutions for a lowcarbon future through innovation and collaboration. Together, Canadian oil and natural gas producers are a solutionoriented partner to the world’s need for affordable, clean, safe and secure energy. As consumers, we need affordable energy for our homes, businesses, and vehicles. In addition, industries like manufacturing and agriculture depend on reliable energy. Skyrocketing price increases in Europe and rolling blackouts in China show us what could happen here if the supply of natural gas and oil doesn’t meet demand. Reducing emissions is vital, and Canada is a world leader in developing the new technologies that are doing just that, and spurring the growth of our cleantech sector. Working with innovators, governments and other industries, Canada’s oil and natural gas producers are ensuring Canada is positioned to help meet global climate commitments as the supplier of choice in a world that demands a lower carbon energy future. Natural gas, oil, and refined products such as gasoline and diesel are Canada’s number one export, bringing $112.6 billion into Canada in 2019. Exports inject money into the economy, essential to generating long-term economic recovery and growth here at home, while delivering energy the world needs and demands. The natural gas and oil industry is one of Canada’s largest employers, supporting more than 500,000 jobs across the country,


THE LAST WORD

Mayor Jim Watson APITAL: What are your fondest reflections of Ottawa during your mayoralty terms in office from 1997 to 2000 and from 2010 to date? My fondest reflection is that we continue to be a very caring city. For example, we helped to facilitate the arrival of over 4,000 Syrian refugees. We are now helping Ukrainians who want to relocate to Ottawa because of war in their country. I’ve seen so many good people get behind good causes when the going got tough. A great example is Joe Thottungal, owner of Thali Restaurant, who prepares meals every day out of his kitchen for people living in shelters. I’ve seen various fundraisers pop up after disasters, such as flooding or the tornado in 2018. People like Dave Smith, founder of the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre, broadcaster Max Keeping, who was involved in many civic causes, and Jean Piggott, a politician and businessperson who was very involved in the community – all of whom are no longer with us, always set the bar very high to remind people that we have an obligation to give back to those who are less fortunate.

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CAPITAL: Is there anything you would have done differently, knowing what you know now? I’ve never been one to look in the rear view mirror. You can’t change the past. I’m satisfied that what I tried to do over the course of my four terms in office was to put forward a realistic platform of attainable commitments, and then live up to those commitments. CAPITAL: How have you seen Ottawa grow and develop since 1997? A lot has happened over the last 25 years. We went through both the best of times and the worst of times when it came to the high tech sector. We lost Nortel and other big companies, but we’ve bounced back in a bigger and better way. We now have the largest tech park in Canada. We’ve seen more investment, including more angel investors. We’ve

invested record amounts of dollars in infrastructure in things like the LRT, bridges, the Ottawa River Action Plan, and various housing initiatives. We’re building what will be the first of its kind - a net-zero carbon gold standard new Central Library, which is a joint effort of the federal and municipal governments. The other thing that’s important, because tourism is our third largest industry, is we’ve invested significant dollars in tourism. Prior to COVID we were firing on all cylinders and setting record airport arrivals and hotel occupancy. Now we have to rebuild that industry. CAPITAL: What do you view as Ottawa’s main attributes as you assess the city’s prospects over the next 25 years? We have a very safe city. We are also a very green city. We have a high quality of life, with a commitment to protecting our environment and our waterways. We are devoted to education, and to having the best quality secondary and post-secondary institutions. Several major projects that we are investing in today will reap benefits in the future, including Phase II and Phase III of the LRT, the new Central Library, and the new Civic Hospital to improve the health care of our citizens. CAPITAL: What are your future plans after retiring as the longest serving Mayor in Ottawa’s history? I haven’t had a lot of time to really think about it. I still have a job until November 15, 2022, so my focus is to wrap up any items that need wrapping up over the course of the next several months. Then maybe I’ll take a little bit of down time and go and see what’s out there. I would certainly like to do more volunteer and charity work. I’ve put that on the backburner for the last number of years, because there’s not a lot of time to do that when you’re Mayor. But I want to be able to give back to the community that’s been so good to me for many years.

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CAPITAL/Merkburn

ESTABLISHED OTTAWA LANDLORD OPENS NEW KANATA CO-WORKING CENTER

S WE EMERGE from the global pandemic, one thing is clear: The future of office work is hybrid. It’s no secret that the recent global pandemic changed the way many businesses think about the workplace. Even before COVID, entrepreneurs and large corporations alike were discovering the undeniable benefits of coworking spaces and shifting their businesses to this type of environment. In keeping with our philosophy of forming lasting relationships, and growing with our tenants, Merkburn Holdings opened the Catalyst Kanata Business Center in April 2021. With a wide variety of coworking options available, businesses can customize to achieve their financial and workplace goals. Looking at our current mix of tenants at Catalyst Kanata it’s clear that business centers and coworking spaces will be a key component of a successful hybrid model for many companies in the years ahead. The right balance will differ for each company, depending on the nature of the business, the needs of your customers, and the expectations of your staff. High quality coworking centers are expected to continue to crop up in suburban areas, in response to workers desire to stay close to home. The benefits of a hybrid model with a coworking component are numerous: • Plug & Play environment = no upfront furniture or I.T. costs • Short term commitment = ability to take more or less space from one month to the next • Professional, quiet space = boosts productivity • Amenities = access to kitchen, lounge, meeting room, on as needed basis • Close to home = greener, more sustainable • Gets you out of the house = combats loneliness, boosts mental health

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Like-minded professionals = opportunity to build connections and friendships • Collaborate in-person = build culture and rapport (no, you can’t do this online) Many people still think coworking centers are noisy, crowded places with foosball tables, and beer taps in the lounge, but not all coworking centers are the same. Catalyst Kanata offers a professional and peaceful environment, more in keeping with a traditional business center, where members can work and collaborate privately with their teams. Feedback from companies using coworking spaces agree it’s a better model based on three key criteria: • Better for staff • Better for the planet • Better for profits Consider the following research when formulating your workplace strategy: • Office for National Statistics indicates 85% of adults currently working from home want a “hybrid” approach to working from home and the office • The Future Of Work: Productive Anywhere | Accenture study indicates 83% of workers think a hybrid model is optimal, and 63% of high growth companies have already enabled “hybrid” workforce models Book your tour of Catalyst Kanata today! Visit our website catalystbusinesscenter.com to discover the many benefits of coworking, and to learn how your organization can adopt this environment as part of your overall workplace strategy. Wishing all Capital Magazine readers a healthy and prosperous 2022! Sincerely, your Merkburn Team •

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CAPITAL/TAAG Corporation

TAAG ACCOUNTING – CONTINUING THE SUCCESSFUL TRADITIONS OF ELITE ACCOUNTING INCE ANDREW ABRAHAM founded Elite Accounting in 2009 in Ottawa, it has provided quality accounting and financial services to clients in the National Capital Region and across Canada. Now, with more than 20 employees, and offices in Ottawa, Montreal and Arnprior, Elite Accounting has rebranded as TAAG Corporation. A new, larger office will soon be opening at 251 Bank Street, to accompany a new satellite office in Arnprior to service an increasing base of rural clients. TAAG’s focus has always been primarily aimed towards small and medium sized enterprises [SME], servicing entrepreneurs with companies at all stages of their life cycle, from start-up to mature company. “To me, SMEs are the backbone of our economy, where a majority of the action happens. The SMEs shape our economy and we like to work with the decision makers and their families,” says Abraham. TAAG also occasionally offers venture capital funding to start-up clients. TAAG Accounting will continue to offer its traditional suite of services, including monthly bookkeeping, payroll, government remittances, financial statements, year-end tax filing, and business advisory services. The firm has also recently expanded its menu to provide clients with virtual controller, and virtual CFO services.

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“Those virtual services allow us to focus on the internal controls of a growing entity. Small businesses that

are in their growth phase require more focus on internal controls, as well as on corporate governance, and that requires more accounting oversight reporting and strategic meetings, which our virtual controller and CFO services provide,” says Abraham. “It allows us to take our a la carte services, as we call them, and bundle them up into more of a strategic service,” he adds. TAAG will also expand to offer a new multi-family office line to provide fullservice wealth advisory assistance to high net worth families, including insurance, tax and financial advice. TAAG will help families define their short, medium and long-term goals and guide their crucial financial decisions. This will include vision planning, to assist families craft a clear view of how to amalgamate wealth, estate and risk management strategies to achieve their goals while protecting their assets. For families with businesses, TAAG will assist with optimizing the most efficient corporate tax structure amidst a complex legal and tax system. The family services line of TAAG will also assist families develop strategies for giving back to society, including efficient charity assistance and, for those families that wish to do so, establishing a new charitable trust. And, of course the services provided will also include professional planning necessary to ensure generational prosperity and succession planning to protect family wealth. “Legacy building is an important factor to us, which is why the family office component will be joining the organization,” Abraham explains.

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CAPITAL/Tourisme Outaouais

Canadian Museum of History Did you know that you can rent a space for your event at Canada’s most visited museum? Picture the scene: Your guests arrive, marvelling at the architectural gem that is the Canadian Museum of History. The sun is shining down on Parliament Hill across the river. From the museum entrance, you head to the Grand Hall, the perfect place to network and enjoy a cocktail. Huge windows. A collection of world-unique totem poles all around you. And here you are in a reception room that can accommodate up to 1,000 people! Bonus: the museum has nine other rooms of different sizes to suit any event. Four Points by Sheraton Hotel & Conference Centre Gatineau–Ottawa Cross the street from the Canadian Museum of History and you’re at the Four Points. Besides being a top-rated downtown Gatineau hotel, it has 10 meeting rooms for small-group events. Within walking distance, your guests will find some of the best restaurants in town, numerous bars, and the Palais des congrès de Gatineau, which connects directly to the hotel.

Four Points by Sheraton & Centre de conférences Gatineau-Ottawa @Myriam Baril-Tessier

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HATEVER THE SIZE of your business event, the choice of location is a key factor! Set your business events up for success with these four downtown Gatineau venues.

PHOTOS MYRIAM BARIL-TES SIER

GREAT LOCATIONS FOR YOUR EVENT IN GATINEAU


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What about Happy Hour? The downtown area has some unique gathering spots! Check out Soif – Bar à vin, a wine bar owned and operated by internationally renowned sommelier Véronique Rivest, where your group will have the opportunity to taste privately imported wines. For beer lovers, Les Brasseurs du Temps microbrewery and pub invites you to taste a wide selection of beers brewed on site and visit the brewing museum. FOR MORE INFORMATION, contact our Business Events Representative Tracy Campbell! TCAMPBELL@TOURISME-OUTAOUAIS.CA

Soif - Bar à vin @Myriam Baril-Tessier

tourismeoutaouais.com/en/business

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PUT YOUR MONEY WHERE YOUR HEART IS.

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Ottawa’s Investment Property Design & Build Experts High quality. Fair price. Always on-budget. Since 1956, OakWood has been providing a specialized Design & Build service to help homeowners and real estate investors generate ongoing lease or rental income from various property strategies in the Ottawa market. Our clients are attracted to the long-term security of owning something tangible that can increase in value over time. We help them leverage their current equity to obtain financing for development projects, find land for future development, and invest in custom-designed investment properties. From modifying existing single-family homes to building a customized multi-floor rental property, our Team of experts will work with you to find a solution that is right for your financial goals and investment level.

Voted Ottawa’s Best Home Renovation & Design Company every year since 2008

OakWood.ca | 613.236.8001 3D Design • Kitchens • Renovations • Custom Homes • Commercial • Investment Properties • Financing


Even after 33 years, there is still more to discover. Getting to know our clients is something we’ve been doing for decades. Together, we can uncover the best solutions to maximize your marketing initiative. Sign up for a complimentary Discovery Session and get an expert analysis and recommended

We’re not just a marketing agency. We’re design in all things…discovering and shaping your true nature.

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