Page 1

spirit

BIG MOVE TO BARC Relocating 65 employees at one time is no easy task, and to do it without interruption of work has proven to be a minor miracle, says Carol Osenga, administrative assistant in University Advancement, who handled the logistical coordination for one of the largest moves in University history.

GONZAGA FACULTY AND STAFF NEWSLETTER

“It couldn’t have happened without great support from Plant Services, ITS, Telecom, Sodexo and our friends at DeVries,” Osenga says. The goal for University Advancement Vice President Joe Poss was to bring his division together in one place, the BARC, and create optimum synergy for Alumni Relations, Development, Donor Relations, Organizational Effectiveness and Marketing & Communications, departments that do so much work together on behalf of the University. “By consolidating our workspace and resources, we are much better able to serve the needs of our University community, as well as our benefactors, alumni and friends,” says Associate Vice President Dori Sonntag, who oversaw development of the space, formerly occupied by GU’s temporary dining hall.

Dori Sonntag, center, took space formerly configured as a dining hall and helped create an area maximizing workspace and resources to help colleagues best serve GU.

work on the new website, due for unveiling later this year. The space also includes Gonzaga’s telefund center, manned nightly by student callers.

Bringing enrichment to women leaders

Staged by Professional Studies, “The programs are designed to reengage alumni, and educate and empower women for professional and personal enrichment, and workplace advancement,” says Sherri Lynch, outreach and recruiting specialist in the School. “And these conferences are not just about women; they’re for men, too. We need their voices to help women’s voices to be heard. “Gonzaga alumni have told us that what they really want is networking opportunities within our alumni base,” Lynch

›› Sodexo chief hands-on, 3 ›› Empowering women, 4 FEB. 2017 | VOL 18 | #5

Being Engaged Citizens, Modeling for our Students

“We worked closely with UA to understand the processes – who was doing what where, and which groups needed to be together,” says Campus Architect Mac McCandless, who coordinated design work with ALSC Architects. “We were able to incorporate natural light The new UA offices include 90 workstations, able coming in on three sides, developed many to accommodate employees who work remotely collaborative areas, and enabled everyone to have their own space.” from the Seattle and Portland areas, as well as student workers and others doing business with For longtime employees, the move proved to be the division, including those helping to finish

Considering the massive worldwide women’s march in January, Gonzaga’s two all-day Women’s Leadership Conferences seem quite timely: March 15 at Hemmingson Center, and May 19 in Seattle.

›› Gonzaga Day Feb. 11, 2

says. Time is set aside in both conferences for just that. The Spokane conference features an interactive presentation by Sara Jordan-Bloch, Stanford University Clayman Institute for Gender Research, on Untying Double-Binds, and a panel discussion with Sr. Madonna Buder, ‘Iron Nun;’ Kay LeClaire, oldest woman to successfully climb the 7 Summits; and Sandra Williams, activist, filmmaker and publisher of the Black Lens. Seattle’s conference features speakers Caroline Simard, senior research director at Clayman; GU Basketball Coach Lisa Fortier; and discussions focusing on emotional intelligence and embodying core leadership values. Learn more: gonzaga.edu/ womeninleadership.

an exercise in downsizing, one veteran staffer explaining he filled four 30-gallon recycle bins. For more recent hires, the move was a cinch, made possible by synchronized organization. In all, 75 computers needed to be transferred and reinstalled, and GU’s new Polycom phone system has employees reaching for their instruction manuals. Modern Languages will consolidate its department in lower level College Hall where part of UA was previously housed. It will include language labs. Campus Security & Public Safety, and Emergency Preparedness & Risk Management will move to the Huetter Mansion, Alumni’s Relation’s former home.

BENEFIT UPDATES Teladoc: Employees covered under GU’s medical plan can now use Teladoc to speak with and get prescriptions from a U.S. board-certified doctor 24 hours a day, with a $25 copay. GU Living: Our new concierge service provides GU employees 24/7 free personalized research and referrals for everyday needs. Livongo: Employees and covered dependents on GU’s medical plan can use our new diabetic management program offering a state-of-the-art meter, coaching, lancets and test strips at no cost. ZAGFit: There are new ways to earn ZAGFit points and new goals added to trackers. To learn more visit http://benefits.gonzaga.edu

Upcoming Financial Seminars - 25 ZAGFit Points Register at www.gonzaga.edu/Training Designing Your Financial Roadmap: March 30, noon-1 p.m., Hemmingson Auditorium Social Security Seminar: April 4, 2:30-4 p.m., Hemmingson Ballroom Within Reach: May 23, noon-1 p.m., Hemmingson Auditorium Transitioning to Retirement: Aug. 10, noon-1 p.m., Hemmingson Auditorium Gaining Insight: Dec. 5, noon-1 p.m., Hemmingson Auditorium

VIEW ONLINE AT: www.gonzaga.edu/spirit

Welcoming back the faculty to campus following the holidays, President Thayne McCulloh remarked how the break came on the heels of a tumultuous fall including the national elections that have been the topic of frequent conversation. One of the issues that has been top of mind for McCulloh are questions surrounding the new administration’s position regarding “undocumented” students and higher education. “We have students who are very concerned about the potential crumbling of the DREAM Act,” says McCulloh. “We are working to understand what their needs are and position the institution’s support for them to optimize the completion of their education at Gonzaga.” What impact will the federal and state policies have, especially on private institutions such as Gonzaga? Funding K-12 education in Washington state has implications for how much money the legislature will be able to provide to public and private universities. McCulloh notes that while private schools have been favored less, there is much activism occurring on behalf of Gonzaga and others, especially considering Washington’s 10 independent universities collectively confer 20 percent of the state’s baccalaureate degrees but use only 6 percent of state dollars. However, he says, “Not everyone is in support of state funding going to private education, much less religious private education.” While in Washington, D.C. for a meeting of independent college leaders, President McCulloh met with our region’s senators and representatives. “Members on both sides of the aisle were stunned by the outcome of the election,” says McCulloh. “Regardless of one’s political affiliations, the phenomena of this moment constitutes an invitation to engage our students across a broad spectrum of topics.” Earlier in the faculty meeting, AVP Patricia Killen had discussed a desire for our students to engage in tough issues fearlessly in a time of uncertainty and volatility. McCulloh remarked, “In this I hear an invitation to all of us to think about and encourage such engagement. How will we share our own reactions to the national political scene? We must acknowledge that

The president encouraged colleagues to engage students in conversation, reminding them that our students pay attention to what we say, what we do and how we do it.

Continuing work toward our goals 1. Entering the second phase of “Gonzaga Will” – our capital campaign 2. Designing and beginning construction on the Center for Integrated Sciences and Engineering 3. Optimizing the University’s administrative structure for the greatest benefit to faculty and to students. 4. Reviewing & implementing clearer compensation systems for both faculty and staff 5. Bolstering our institutional values and a work culture rooted in mission identity 6. Nurturing and developing the UW-GU partnership 7. Engaging faculty in dialogue around the future of higher education 8. Exploring non-tuition sources of revenue 9. Expanding campus engagement around ecological sustainability 10. Addressing issues of racial, ethnic and cultural diversity, equity and inclusion

we’re constantly involved in modeling: Our students pay attention to what we say, but also to what we do, and how we do it.” A steadfast belief in the democratic process depends on engaged citizens, he continued. “We have an opportunity – and responsibility – to engage young people who are consistently barraged with a message that being involved in civic life does not matter, that there are too many issues and participants for any one individual to have significant impact. These are questions that really matter. Will our students choose to become more, or less, engaged in democratic process going forward?” Amid difficult evening news and related conversations on campus, McCulloh reminds us of Ignatius’ instruction to his own community of brothers – that we assume the best intentions in our colleagues as we grapple with difficult decisions. “There is a search for truth at all universities, but the Jesuit institutions bring something in addition: They’re about hope. Gonzaga is very powerfully possessed of hope: a belief in people and that people can make a difference for the future of our world.”

FEB 2017


AROUND CAMPUS GONZAGA DAY FEATURES CAMPAIGN

UPDATE, PUSH FOR ENDOWMENT GIFTS

>>

Gonzaga is seeking faculty, staff and student input on how safe and valued our campus constituents feel here. A Campus Climate survey will be disseminated Feb. 7 by the Campus Climate Committee to gather input about attitudes, experiences and behaviors which affect the personal development of the campus community, addressing inclusion and equity, in particular. For more information, visit gonzaga.edu/ campusclimate. >> American novelist Tim O’Brien, known for his books inspired by his experiences in the Vietnam War, including “The Things They Carried” (1990), and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, will read from his work at 7:30 p.m., Feb. 6 in the Hemmingson Center Ballroom as part of the Visiting Writers Series. >> Mary Fairhurst (’79, J.D. ’83) was elected the 56th chief justice of the Washington Supreme Court on Nov. 3 by a vote of her peers. She succeeds GU law alum Barbara Madsen, one of the longest-serving chief justices in state history.

At least 31 Gonzaga Alumni Chapters in 15 states and three countries will enjoy a Gonzaga men’s basketball game-watch versus Saint Mary’s as part of the fifth annual Gonzaga Day festivities. Faculty and staff are invited to join 100 Spokane fans expected to watch this road game in the auditorium and on other screens throughout Hemmingson. Tipoff Feb. 11 in Moraga is 5:15 p.m. on ESPN.

Wenatchee launches a new alumni chapter on Gonzaga Day, Trustee Kathleen MagnusonSheppard will be in Tokyo to celebrate with alums, and Education Dean Vinny Alfonso will be with Calgary alums to celebrate the school’s 40 years of offering graduate education programs there. Visit gonzagaday.org for more.

Magis embodied in Mission Award recipients

PAGE 2

Shannon Sanders, custodian lead, Plant; Spencer Alexander, lead security officer; Joanne Shiosaki, assistant director, Student Media; Lori Leonard, concierge, Hemmingson; Marlene Cicchetti, concierge, Hemmingson; Rizah Kahrimanovic, custodian, Plant; John Maxwell, assistant professor, Civil Engineering; Maureen Duclos, budget & personnel officer, Business; Michelle Wheatley, assistant VP Mission/ Ministry & director, University Ministry; Cindy Perry, assistant to the VP, Mission; Allysen Hawk, marketing & special event manager, Business; Vivi Windsor, senior event manager, conferences & camps, GUEST; Tere Graham, event manager, GUEST; Julie Schaffer, assistant director, Law in Public Service (CLIPS); Clement Lye, digital content producer, Virtual Campus

Goodbyes

Anabel Madera, admin assistant, Education; Lane Lewis, schedule & events coordinator, Education; Stephanie Ranstrom, program coordinator, Learning Strategies; Richard Nungester, lecturer-IR, Electrical & Comp; Mark Bowman, lecturer-IR, Philosophy; Jill Lynn Nunemaker, lecturer-AT, Foley; Kasey Barghout, alumni event coordinator; Katherine Love, temp assessment evaluator, Business; Amy Edwards, head women’s soccer coach; Catherine Brown, assistant director, Law in Public Service; Donna Byrd, nurse, Health Center; Elizabeth Roewe, associate director, Learning Strategies; Bridget Smith, layout designer, Virtual Campus; Carly Gerard, Elect IT Accessblty Tech; Valerie Shayman, academic adviser, Academic Advising & Assistance; Edgar Anzaldo, assistant women’s soccer coach; Mike Davis, assistant women’s soccer coach

Anniversaries

30 15

Mike Roth, athletic director, Athletics

>> University Ministry’s Greg Onofrio invites you to consider serving as Eucharistic Minister or as a member of a choir for Commencement Mass, May 13, 3:30 p.m. in McCarthey Athletic Center. Previous choir experience is not required, “just a desire to help lead the assembly in prayerful, joyful song.” Contact Onofrio at onofrio@gonzaga.edu.

>> John Caputo, professor of Communication and Leadership Studies, was honored by the National Communication Association, in front of 5,000 scholars, at a recent convention session entitled, “Teachers on Teaching Series: The Pedagogy of Dr. John Caputo.”

New Hires

New Positions/Promotions

>> Gonzaga’s student-athletes set academic records last fall, as 145 of the approximately 320 earned at least a 3.5 GPA. The cumulative departmental-record GPA was 3.38, including a record 17 with perfect 4.0 GPAs,

>> Shakespeare’s Troilus & Cressida, directed by Assistant Professor Kathleen Jeffs, runs Feb. 10, 11, 16 and 17 at 7:30 p.m., and Feb. 11, 12 and 18 at 2 p.m. in Magnuson Theatre. Cost is $10 with a GUID card, $15 for general public. Lighting design by Assistant Professor Courtney Smith, costume design by faculty member Leslie Stamoolis.

Matthew Gerdes, parking enforcement & transportation officer, Security; Nihad Suljic, custodial specialist, Plant; Susan English, associate professor, Integrated Media; Michelle Wissink, Mail Services clerk

10

Debra Louden, assistant director, Student Accounts; Kim Dayot, web application support specialist, CCNSS; Katie Herzog, assistant director of leadership development, Student Development; Jilliene McKinstry, assistant director, Engineering-Transmission & Distribution; Cory Mitchell, groundskeeper irrigational specialist, Plant; Suzanne Ostersmith, assistant professor, Theater & Dance; Shannon Sanders, custodian lead, Plant

5

Tomson Spink, maintenance and grounds manager, Plant; Andrew Brajcich, assistant professor, Accounting; Sarah Kelley, office assistant II, Student Development; Heather Shilley, associate director, Budget & Finance

Smiles are commonplace on Chris Wheatley and MaryAnn Rinderle.

Former CCASL Associate Director Chris Wheatley and AVP Office Coordinator MaryAnn Rinderle were recently honored with the Staff Assembly’s Outstanding Service in Support of Mission Award. Wheatley was cited for his commitment to our students and the University at large, embodying magis by consistently giving more and providing tremendous value to GU. Rinderle has done the work of two people for

FOCUS ON... CLELLAND ON THE RUN

Danielle Bennet, cataloging/database maintenance assistant, Foley; Sarah Yerden, admissions counselor, Virtual Campus; Kathryn Callaghan, admissions counselor, Virtual Campus; Jeremy Armes, layout designer, Virtual Campus; Mike Leach, HVAC technician, Plant; Tonya Stewart, project manager, ITS; Alissa Adams, program assistant II, Disability Access; Matthew Morris, recruiting & research specialist, Career & Professional Development; Judith MacKay, field-based mentor, Education; Stephen Hess, alumni chaplain, Mission; Christopher Watkins, head women’s soccer coach, Athletics; Brent Diebel, lecturerIR, Philosophy; Bruce Beerman, lecturer-IR, Philosophy

A 2 p.m. Zag women’s basketball home game against the Gaels will feature a first-ever combined halftime performance by the GU Dance Team and Bomb Squad. Fans will be given an update on Gonzaga Will: The Campaign for Our Future, as Zags all over the world unite to celebrate all things Gonzaga. The $250 million Campaign is emphasizing the importance to give to GU’s endowment. Already, 32,000 supporters have given to the Campaign. The Gonzaga Day Giving Challenge runs Feb. 9-11, offering alumni, faculty, staff and friends a chance to help make Gonzaga more affordable so future Zags can have the same experience alumni had. Visit gonzaga.edu/zagsgive.

NOTEWORTHY

almost a year due to illness, channeling magis and doing everything necessary to ensure the AVP’s office, and colleagues throughout the University, are successful. “She is the perfect example of what it means to live the mission,” her nominator said. Wheatley has since left GU to work in organizational development at Numerica Credit Union.

Cradle Call

Drew Satter, area coordinator, Housing & Residence Life, and spouse Kimber had twin boys Brady and Bishop; Tim Olsen, assistant professor, Business Management Information Systems, and spouse Rebecca had a baby girl, Eliza; Lazarina Topuzova, associate professor, Organizational Leadership, and spouse Kaushik Dayal had a baby girl, Irena; Brandon Forster, custodian, Plant, and spouse Stephanie had a baby boy, Lucas; Josh Boche, technical coordinator, Integrated Media, and spouse Jessica had a baby girl, Austin; Caris Friberg, talent acquisition specialist, Human Resources, and spouse Darrin has a baby girl, Rowan; Joe Poss, vice president, University Advancement, and spouse Megan had a baby boy, Samuel

Fr. Mike Maher and Pat Clelland mapping out plans for a Knights of Columbus dinner.

Pat Clelland lives on a small farm in Elk with his wife, 11-year-old daughter, cows, chickens, ducks, dogs, cats, parrots and Mr. Peacock. It’s not unusual to see him coming to work, early, in his farm boots, a sport coat and slacks. He drops his briefcase and coat in his makeshift office about the size of an elevator, just off a side door to the Marketplace in Hemmingson. From there Sodexo’s Regional District Manager hits the ground running, engaging with the campus community, keeping up with appointments, and working with his team to foster exceptional experiences Clelland’s values fit the Jesuit mold to perfection. “Food is only part of my job,” Clelland says. “Serving our community and seeking ways to better serve our students, providing educational opportunities, contributing to student and institutional success, building collaborative relationships, diversity, and sustainability … those are very high priorities for me personally.” On Community – “Being part of the Gonzaga Community is an honor … I felt welcomed before I even started.” It’s not uncommon seeing Clelland chatting with students along Main Street or during a meal in the COG. Students are much more attentive to food now than when he started his career with Sodexo 25 years ago. “What has changed most dramatically is demand for variety,” Clelland says. “Students want choice, driven by the propensity of TV food networks, social

media and dietary restrictions. We also have to keep up with technology because it is the communication mechanism today. So now you can go to (gonzaga.edu/zagdining) and get the week’s menu. “When I was in school in the 80s, we never thought about university food service offering all the food brands out there today. I had a meat entree, starch, vegetable and salad bar. Scan the COG today, and the difference is like comparing apples to rocks.” On Sustainability – “I believe in being proactive for our health, our community, our people and our planet. As an institution, we have the opportunity to continuously improve upon this journey of sustainability,” says Clelland, who prides himself on living the path personally and professionally. Top of Mind – “Food insecurity for students concerns me but we are fortunate enough to have a deep culture of collaboration at Gonzaga; I am confident in the progress we will make.” Always Reaching Out to Help – A prospective parent recently toured Hemmingson, and, by chance, ran into Pat, who, unsurprisingly, gave him a tour. So happened the man is VP for a company that manufactures automated hydroponic plant growth systems. “He took me and a colleague on a tour of the high-tech greenhouse on top of the student union. I was very impressed,” the gentleman said. “Gonzaga is the answer to our prayers.” Add Clelland to that list.

Education preparing to launch doctoral program in 2018 A doctor of educational leadership is in the works, scheduled to launch at Gonzaga in July 2018, says Dan Mahoney, program director. The program is designed to provide advanced preparation for educational leaders in United States, Canadian, Indigenous and Catholic pre-K-12

settings. The hybrid program includes both on-campus and online classes, regular contact and coursework with advisers, and field-based internships. “We have designed the program to enable candidates to continue working as they complete their seven-semester doctoral degrees,” Mahoney says.

PAGE 3


AROUND CAMPUS GONZAGA DAY FEATURES CAMPAIGN

UPDATE, PUSH FOR ENDOWMENT GIFTS

>>

Gonzaga is seeking faculty, staff and student input on how safe and valued our campus constituents feel here. A Campus Climate survey will be disseminated Feb. 7 by the Campus Climate Committee to gather input about attitudes, experiences and behaviors which affect the personal development of the campus community, addressing inclusion and equity, in particular. For more information, visit gonzaga.edu/ campusclimate. >> American novelist Tim O’Brien, known for his books inspired by his experiences in the Vietnam War, including “The Things They Carried” (1990), and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, will read from his work at 7:30 p.m., Feb. 6 in the Hemmingson Center Ballroom as part of the Visiting Writers Series. >> Mary Fairhurst (’79, J.D. ’83) was elected the 56th chief justice of the Washington Supreme Court on Nov. 3 by a vote of her peers. She succeeds GU law alum Barbara Madsen, one of the longest-serving chief justices in state history.

At least 31 Gonzaga Alumni Chapters in 15 states and three countries will enjoy a Gonzaga men’s basketball game-watch versus Saint Mary’s as part of the fifth annual Gonzaga Day festivities. Faculty and staff are invited to join 100 Spokane fans expected to watch this road game in the auditorium and on other screens throughout Hemmingson. Tipoff Feb. 11 in Moraga is 5:15 p.m. on ESPN.

Wenatchee launches a new alumni chapter on Gonzaga Day, Trustee Kathleen MagnusonSheppard will be in Tokyo to celebrate with alums, and Education Dean Vinny Alfonso will be with Calgary alums to celebrate the school’s 40 years of offering graduate education programs there. Visit gonzagaday.org for more.

Magis embodied in Mission Award recipients

PAGE 2

Shannon Sanders, custodian lead, Plant; Spencer Alexander, lead security officer; Joanne Shiosaki, assistant director, Student Media; Lori Leonard, concierge, Hemmingson; Marlene Cicchetti, concierge, Hemmingson; Rizah Kahrimanovic, custodian, Plant; John Maxwell, assistant professor, Civil Engineering; Maureen Duclos, budget & personnel officer, Business; Michelle Wheatley, assistant VP Mission/ Ministry & director, University Ministry; Cindy Perry, assistant to the VP, Mission; Allysen Hawk, marketing & special event manager, Business; Vivi Windsor, senior event manager, conferences & camps, GUEST; Tere Graham, event manager, GUEST; Julie Schaffer, assistant director, Law in Public Service (CLIPS); Clement Lye, digital content producer, Virtual Campus

Goodbyes

Anabel Madera, admin assistant, Education; Lane Lewis, schedule & events coordinator, Education; Stephanie Ranstrom, program coordinator, Learning Strategies; Richard Nungester, lecturer-IR, Electrical & Comp; Mark Bowman, lecturer-IR, Philosophy; Jill Lynn Nunemaker, lecturer-AT, Foley; Kasey Barghout, alumni event coordinator; Katherine Love, temp assessment evaluator, Business; Amy Edwards, head women’s soccer coach; Catherine Brown, assistant director, Law in Public Service; Donna Byrd, nurse, Health Center; Elizabeth Roewe, associate director, Learning Strategies; Bridget Smith, layout designer, Virtual Campus; Carly Gerard, Elect IT Accessblty Tech; Valerie Shayman, academic adviser, Academic Advising & Assistance; Edgar Anzaldo, assistant women’s soccer coach; Mike Davis, assistant women’s soccer coach

Anniversaries

30 15

Mike Roth, athletic director, Athletics

>> University Ministry’s Greg Onofrio invites you to consider serving as Eucharistic Minister or as a member of a choir for Commencement Mass, May 13, 3:30 p.m. in McCarthey Athletic Center. Previous choir experience is not required, “just a desire to help lead the assembly in prayerful, joyful song.” Contact Onofrio at onofrio@gonzaga.edu.

>> John Caputo, professor of Communication and Leadership Studies, was honored by the National Communication Association, in front of 5,000 scholars, at a recent convention session entitled, “Teachers on Teaching Series: The Pedagogy of Dr. John Caputo.”

New Hires

New Positions/Promotions

>> Gonzaga’s student-athletes set academic records last fall, as 145 of the approximately 320 earned at least a 3.5 GPA. The cumulative departmental-record GPA was 3.38, including a record 17 with perfect 4.0 GPAs,

>> Shakespeare’s Troilus & Cressida, directed by Assistant Professor Kathleen Jeffs, runs Feb. 10, 11, 16 and 17 at 7:30 p.m., and Feb. 11, 12 and 18 at 2 p.m. in Magnuson Theatre. Cost is $10 with a GUID card, $15 for general public. Lighting design by Assistant Professor Courtney Smith, costume design by faculty member Leslie Stamoolis.

Matthew Gerdes, parking enforcement & transportation officer, Security; Nihad Suljic, custodial specialist, Plant; Susan English, associate professor, Integrated Media; Michelle Wissink, Mail Services clerk

10

Debra Louden, assistant director, Student Accounts; Kim Dayot, web application support specialist, CCNSS; Katie Herzog, assistant director of leadership development, Student Development; Jilliene McKinstry, assistant director, Engineering-Transmission & Distribution; Cory Mitchell, groundskeeper irrigational specialist, Plant; Suzanne Ostersmith, assistant professor, Theater & Dance; Shannon Sanders, custodian lead, Plant

5

Tomson Spink, maintenance and grounds manager, Plant; Andrew Brajcich, assistant professor, Accounting; Sarah Kelley, office assistant II, Student Development; Heather Shilley, associate director, Budget & Finance

Smiles are commonplace on Chris Wheatley and MaryAnn Rinderle.

Former CCASL Associate Director Chris Wheatley and AVP Office Coordinator MaryAnn Rinderle were recently honored with the Staff Assembly’s Outstanding Service in Support of Mission Award. Wheatley was cited for his commitment to our students and the University at large, embodying magis by consistently giving more and providing tremendous value to GU. Rinderle has done the work of two people for

FOCUS ON... CLELLAND ON THE RUN

Danielle Bennet, cataloging/database maintenance assistant, Foley; Sarah Yerden, admissions counselor, Virtual Campus; Kathryn Callaghan, admissions counselor, Virtual Campus; Jeremy Armes, layout designer, Virtual Campus; Mike Leach, HVAC technician, Plant; Tonya Stewart, project manager, ITS; Alissa Adams, program assistant II, Disability Access; Matthew Morris, recruiting & research specialist, Career & Professional Development; Judith MacKay, field-based mentor, Education; Stephen Hess, alumni chaplain, Mission; Christopher Watkins, head women’s soccer coach, Athletics; Brent Diebel, lecturerIR, Philosophy; Bruce Beerman, lecturer-IR, Philosophy

A 2 p.m. Zag women’s basketball home game against the Gaels will feature a first-ever combined halftime performance by the GU Dance Team and Bomb Squad. Fans will be given an update on Gonzaga Will: The Campaign for Our Future, as Zags all over the world unite to celebrate all things Gonzaga. The $250 million Campaign is emphasizing the importance to give to GU’s endowment. Already, 32,000 supporters have given to the Campaign. The Gonzaga Day Giving Challenge runs Feb. 9-11, offering alumni, faculty, staff and friends a chance to help make Gonzaga more affordable so future Zags can have the same experience alumni had. Visit gonzaga.edu/zagsgive.

NOTEWORTHY

almost a year due to illness, channeling magis and doing everything necessary to ensure the AVP’s office, and colleagues throughout the University, are successful. “She is the perfect example of what it means to live the mission,” her nominator said. Wheatley has since left GU to work in organizational development at Numerica Credit Union.

Cradle Call

Drew Satter, area coordinator, Housing & Residence Life, and spouse Kimber had twin boys Brady and Bishop; Tim Olsen, assistant professor, Business Management Information Systems, and spouse Rebecca had a baby girl, Eliza; Lazarina Topuzova, associate professor, Organizational Leadership, and spouse Kaushik Dayal had a baby girl, Irena; Brandon Forster, custodian, Plant, and spouse Stephanie had a baby boy, Lucas; Josh Boche, technical coordinator, Integrated Media, and spouse Jessica had a baby girl, Austin; Caris Friberg, talent acquisition specialist, Human Resources, and spouse Darrin has a baby girl, Rowan; Joe Poss, vice president, University Advancement, and spouse Megan had a baby boy, Samuel

Fr. Mike Maher and Pat Clelland mapping out plans for a Knights of Columbus dinner.

Pat Clelland lives on a small farm in Elk with his wife, 11-year-old daughter, cows, chickens, ducks, dogs, cats, parrots and Mr. Peacock. It’s not unusual to see him coming to work, early, in his farm boots, a sport coat and slacks. He drops his briefcase and coat in his makeshift office about the size of an elevator, just off a side door to the Marketplace in Hemmingson. From there Sodexo’s Regional District Manager hits the ground running, engaging with the campus community, keeping up with appointments, and working with his team to foster exceptional experiences Clelland’s values fit the Jesuit mold to perfection. “Food is only part of my job,” Clelland says. “Serving our community and seeking ways to better serve our students, providing educational opportunities, contributing to student and institutional success, building collaborative relationships, diversity, and sustainability … those are very high priorities for me personally.” On Community – “Being part of the Gonzaga Community is an honor … I felt welcomed before I even started.” It’s not uncommon seeing Clelland chatting with students along Main Street or during a meal in the COG. Students are much more attentive to food now than when he started his career with Sodexo 25 years ago. “What has changed most dramatically is demand for variety,” Clelland says. “Students want choice, driven by the propensity of TV food networks, social

media and dietary restrictions. We also have to keep up with technology because it is the communication mechanism today. So now you can go to (gonzaga.edu/zagdining) and get the week’s menu. “When I was in school in the 80s, we never thought about university food service offering all the food brands out there today. I had a meat entree, starch, vegetable and salad bar. Scan the COG today, and the difference is like comparing apples to rocks.” On Sustainability – “I believe in being proactive for our health, our community, our people and our planet. As an institution, we have the opportunity to continuously improve upon this journey of sustainability,” says Clelland, who prides himself on living the path personally and professionally. Top of Mind – “Food insecurity for students concerns me but we are fortunate enough to have a deep culture of collaboration at Gonzaga; I am confident in the progress we will make.” Always Reaching Out to Help – A prospective parent recently toured Hemmingson, and, by chance, ran into Pat, who, unsurprisingly, gave him a tour. So happened the man is VP for a company that manufactures automated hydroponic plant growth systems. “He took me and a colleague on a tour of the high-tech greenhouse on top of the student union. I was very impressed,” the gentleman said. “Gonzaga is the answer to our prayers.” Add Clelland to that list.

Education preparing to launch doctoral program in 2018 A doctor of educational leadership is in the works, scheduled to launch at Gonzaga in July 2018, says Dan Mahoney, program director. The program is designed to provide advanced preparation for educational leaders in United States, Canadian, Indigenous and Catholic pre-K-12

settings. The hybrid program includes both on-campus and online classes, regular contact and coursework with advisers, and field-based internships. “We have designed the program to enable candidates to continue working as they complete their seven-semester doctoral degrees,” Mahoney says.

PAGE 3


spirit

BIG MOVE TO BARC Relocating 65 employees at one time is no easy task, and to do it without interruption of work has proven to be a minor miracle, says Carol Osenga, administrative assistant in University Advancement, who handled the logistical coordination for one of the largest moves in University history.

GONZAGA FACULTY AND STAFF NEWSLETTER

“It couldn’t have happened without great support from Plant Services, ITS, Telecom, Sodexo and our friends at DeVries,” Osenga says. The goal for University Advancement Vice President Joe Poss was to bring his division together in one place, the BARC, and create optimum synergy for Alumni Relations, Development, Donor Relations, Organizational Effectiveness and Marketing & Communications, departments that do so much work together on behalf of the University. “By consolidating our workspace and resources, we are much better able to serve the needs of our University community, as well as our benefactors, alumni and friends,” says Associate Vice President Dori Sonntag, who oversaw development of the space, formerly occupied by GU’s temporary dining hall.

Dori Sonntag, center, took space formerly configured as a dining hall and helped create an area maximizing workspace and resources to help colleagues best serve GU.

work on the new website, due for unveiling later this year. The space also includes Gonzaga’s telefund center, manned nightly by student callers.

Bringing enrichment to women leaders

Staged by Professional Studies, “The programs are designed to reengage alumni, and educate and empower women for professional and personal enrichment, and workplace advancement,” says Sherri Lynch, outreach and recruiting specialist in the School. “And these conferences are not just about women; they’re for men, too. We need their voices to help women’s voices to be heard. “Gonzaga alumni have told us that what they really want is networking opportunities within our alumni base,” Lynch

›› Sodexo chief hands-on, 3 ›› Empowering women, 4 FEB. 2017 | VOL 18 | #5

Being Engaged Citizens, Modeling for our Students

“We worked closely with UA to understand the processes – who was doing what where, and which groups needed to be together,” says Campus Architect Mac McCandless, who coordinated design work with ALSC Architects. “We were able to incorporate natural light The new UA offices include 90 workstations, able coming in on three sides, developed many to accommodate employees who work remotely collaborative areas, and enabled everyone to have their own space.” from the Seattle and Portland areas, as well as student workers and others doing business with For longtime employees, the move proved to be the division, including those helping to finish

Considering the massive worldwide women’s march in January, Gonzaga’s two all-day Women’s Leadership Conferences seem quite timely: March 15 at Hemmingson Center, and May 19 in Seattle.

›› Gonzaga Day Feb. 11, 2

says. Time is set aside in both conferences for just that. The Spokane conference features an interactive presentation by Sara Jordan-Bloch, Stanford University Clayman Institute for Gender Research, on Untying Double-Binds, and a panel discussion with Sr. Madonna Buder, ‘Iron Nun;’ Kay LeClaire, oldest woman to successfully climb the 7 Summits; and Sandra Williams, activist, filmmaker and publisher of the Black Lens. Seattle’s conference features speakers Caroline Simard, senior research director at Clayman; GU Basketball Coach Lisa Fortier; and discussions focusing on emotional intelligence and embodying core leadership values. Learn more: gonzaga.edu/ womeninleadership.

an exercise in downsizing, one veteran staffer explaining he filled four 30-gallon recycle bins. For more recent hires, the move was a cinch, made possible by synchronized organization. In all, 75 computers needed to be transferred and reinstalled, and GU’s new Polycom phone system has employees reaching for their instruction manuals. Modern Languages will consolidate its department in lower level College Hall where part of UA was previously housed. It will include language labs. Campus Security & Public Safety, and Emergency Preparedness & Risk Management will move to the Huetter Mansion, Alumni’s Relation’s former home.

BENEFIT UPDATES Teladoc: Employees covered under GU’s medical plan can now use Teladoc to speak with and get prescriptions from a U.S. board-certified doctor 24 hours a day, with a $25 copay. GU Living: Our new concierge service provides GU employees 24/7 free personalized research and referrals for everyday needs. Livongo: Employees and covered dependents on GU’s medical plan can use our new diabetic management program offering a state-of-the-art meter, coaching, lancets and test strips at no cost. ZAGFit: There are new ways to earn ZAGFit points and new goals added to trackers. To learn more visit http://benefits.gonzaga.edu

Upcoming Financial Seminars - 25 ZAGFit Points Register at www.gonzaga.edu/Training Designing Your Financial Roadmap: March 30, noon-1 p.m., Hemmingson Auditorium Social Security Seminar: April 4, 2:30-4 p.m., Hemmingson Ballroom Within Reach: May 23, noon-1 p.m., Hemmingson Auditorium Transitioning to Retirement: Aug. 10, noon-1 p.m., Hemmingson Auditorium Gaining Insight: Dec. 5, noon-1 p.m., Hemmingson Auditorium

VIEW ONLINE AT: www.gonzaga.edu/spirit

Welcoming back the faculty to campus following the holidays, President Thayne McCulloh remarked how the break came on the heels of a tumultuous fall including the national elections that have been the topic of frequent conversation. One of the issues that has been top of mind for McCulloh are questions surrounding the new administration’s position regarding “undocumented” students and higher education. “We have students who are very concerned about the potential crumbling of the DREAM Act,” says McCulloh. “We are working to understand what their needs are and position the institution’s support for them to optimize the completion of their education at Gonzaga.” What impact will the federal and state policies have, especially on private institutions such as Gonzaga? Funding K-12 education in Washington state has implications for how much money the legislature will be able to provide to public and private universities. McCulloh notes that while private schools have been favored less, there is much activism occurring on behalf of Gonzaga and others, especially considering Washington’s 10 independent universities collectively confer 20 percent of the state’s baccalaureate degrees but use only 6 percent of state dollars. However, he says, “Not everyone is in support of state funding going to private education, much less religious private education.” While in Washington, D.C. for a meeting of independent college leaders, President McCulloh met with our region’s senators and representatives. “Members on both sides of the aisle were stunned by the outcome of the election,” says McCulloh. “Regardless of one’s political affiliations, the phenomena of this moment constitutes an invitation to engage our students across a broad spectrum of topics.” Earlier in the faculty meeting, AVP Patricia Killen had discussed a desire for our students to engage in tough issues fearlessly in a time of uncertainty and volatility. McCulloh remarked, “In this I hear an invitation to all of us to think about and encourage such engagement. How will we share our own reactions to the national political scene? We must acknowledge that

The president encouraged colleagues to engage students in conversation, reminding them that our students pay attention to what we say, what we do and how we do it.

Continuing work toward our goals 1. Entering the second phase of “Gonzaga Will” – our capital campaign 2. Designing and beginning construction on the Center for Integrated Sciences and Engineering 3. Optimizing the University’s administrative structure for the greatest benefit to faculty and to students. 4. Reviewing & implementing clearer compensation systems for both faculty and staff 5. Bolstering our institutional values and a work culture rooted in mission identity 6. Nurturing and developing the UW-GU partnership 7. Engaging faculty in dialogue around the future of higher education 8. Exploring non-tuition sources of revenue 9. Expanding campus engagement around ecological sustainability 10. Addressing issues of racial, ethnic and cultural diversity, equity and inclusion

we’re constantly involved in modeling: Our students pay attention to what we say, but also to what we do, and how we do it.” A steadfast belief in the democratic process depends on engaged citizens, he continued. “We have an opportunity – and responsibility – to engage young people who are consistently barraged with a message that being involved in civic life does not matter, that there are too many issues and participants for any one individual to have significant impact. These are questions that really matter. Will our students choose to become more, or less, engaged in democratic process going forward?” Amid difficult evening news and related conversations on campus, McCulloh reminds us of Ignatius’ instruction to his own community of brothers – that we assume the best intentions in our colleagues as we grapple with difficult decisions. “There is a search for truth at all universities, but the Jesuit institutions bring something in addition: They’re about hope. Gonzaga is very powerfully possessed of hope: a belief in people and that people can make a difference for the future of our world.”

FEB 2017

Spirit January 2017  
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