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We are all about education! 2015 - 16 Year in Review


The Dean’s Perspective In the United States and around the globe people are starving for leadership. One does not have to look far in our technologically-driven information age to find examples of this craving for guidance whether in war-torn countries, our own political systems, or in our schools. It seems that, in different ways, people are seeking safety from above, empathy from those who lead them, and new ways of doing and being. Perhaps this is why the School of Education (SOE) adopted the following vision statement, the first in its decadeslong history: Shaped by the Jesuit, Catholic, humanistic tradition, the School of Education aspires to prepare transformational leaders who are committed to excellence and serve others in a diverse and global society. As you peruse the pages of this year’ SOE Year in Review (YIR), I believe you will enjoy reading some of our most salient accomplishments and also sneaking a peek at our future initiatives. The work of our faculty, students, and administrators is experienced by preschoolers, school-aged students, adolescents, and adults alike because we believe that through education the path to freedom is not only created but sustained over time. We are committed to serving the underserved through our teaching, advising, research, and celebrations. Once again I invite you to be part of this project, to take a leadership role, and to encourage friends and colleagues to be part of transforming the world in which we live via education because after all is said and done we can proclaim confidently it is all about education. I leave you with a quote from the American author Louis L’Amour from Education of a Wondering Man: “If I were asked what education should give, I would say it should offer breadth of view, ease of understanding, tolerance for others, and a background from which the mind can explore in any direction. Education should provide the tools for a widening and deepening of life, for increased appreciation of all one sees or experiences. It should equip a person to live life well, to understand what is happening about him/her, for to live life well one must live with awareness. Education depends on the quality of the teacher, not the site or beauty of the buildings-nor might I add the winning record of the football team.”

DR. VINCENT C. ALFONSO PROFESSOR AND DEAN, SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

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Table of Contents 4-5

CATHOLIC IDENTITY OF THE UNIVERSITY

6

BUILDING A SOLUTION AT SUNNYSIDE

7

TURNING “WHAT IF?” INTO “WHAT NEXT?”

8

MADISON ROSE

9

MISSION: POSSIBLE

10-11

WHY I TEACH

12

YOUNG CHILD EXPO AND CONFERENCE

13

RESPECTING AND SERVING OUR VETERANS

14

OUTSTANDING PARTNERSHIP WITH HILLYARD

15

RETHINKING NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATION

16-17

NEW FACULTY

18

ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROGRAM

EDITOR: CAROL BRADSHAW | ASSISTANT EDITOR: ANNIE BLAKE-BURKE | PROJECT MANAGER: CARA HOAG | DESIGNER: PAT SKATTUM | PHOTOGRAPHERS: RAJAH BOSE, ERIKA SCHULTZ, ZACK BERLAT (’13), JOSHUA SCHEEL (’15), RYAN SULLIVAN (’16), EDWARD BELL (’17)

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Catholic Identity of the University Conversations at the World Congress Last November, Dean Alfonso was honored to be invited to the World Congress “Educating Today and Tomorrow: A renewing passion,” held in Rome. He and delegates from 10 Jesuit universities in the United States, in collaboration with bishops, delegates from other universities, and religious congregations serving over 250,000 Catholic schools throughout the world, met to examine the fundamental issues of education. The central theme was the future of Catholic schools related to identity, mission, communities and challenges for the future. Dr. Alfonso said, “The days at the conference were exhilarating, exciting and rejuvenating. Listening to dozens of speakers, conversing with colleagues, and spending time with hundreds of people from around the world helped me regain perspective on the importance of Catholic education. Our session with Pope Francis was without a doubt the highlight. I will never forget him running down the center aisle touching the faithful and always stopping to kiss and embrace a child he spotted with eagle eyes. Pope Francis’s presence and his thoughtful, deliberate, and inspiring words were wonderful to hear, and quite an emotional transformation for me.”

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The conversations in Rome paralleled the same conversations that take place at Gonzaga, the School of Education (SOE), and the Catholic Diocese of Spokane. There are approximately 1,861 Catholic colleges and universities worldwide, and approximately 12% of the world’s Catholic colleges are in the United States. The Dean believes that we need to be intentional in supporting our universities’ future teachers and providing a path for them to want to teach in Catholic schools. The World Congress and the planned Center for Catholic Education (CCE) are consonant with the SOE’s and University’s mission of preparing men and women for others. Approximately two years ago, we created a work group to deliberate how we can serve our schools. This group that included Bishop Thomas Daly, leaders from the community of Catholic organizations, the Diocese, Spokane business leaders, SOE and the School of Business Administration (SBA), and a private donor were instrumental in creating a mission statement, vision statement and pillars for the CCE. The SOE, also the CCE, and most recently, the SBA have been providing a variety of services to principals, teachers and students in our Catholic schools for the past three years.


The World Congress was a testament to the responsibility for all of us to understand that the future of Catholic schools lies within ourselves. The work that is going forward at our university is intentional and an affirmation of this responsibility. Dr. Alfonso said. “The mission of the CCE is to renew and strengthen our K-12 Catholic schools so they may flourish through a community that nurtures the heart, mind and soul of our children. This community acts collectively through God’s love and the Church’s teachings.” The vision of the CCE is to be an international leader in transforming lives through faith formation and intellectual inquiry within our Catholic tradition.” When we reach the goal of establishing this Center, we will have accomplished a great feat.

“The differentiating factor must be a transcendent anthropology.” Jorge Humberto Peláez, S.J., rector of the Pontifical University of Javeriana of Colombia. Fr. Peláez called educators to respond positively and not defensively to the challenges encountered in the current social context. There are four great challenges that should be confronted today in Catholic universities: identity, integral education, formation and faith, and peripheries. So, Jorge Humberto Peláez, S.J., rector of the Pontifical University of Javeriana of Colombia, synthesized the hundreds of responses to questions sent to the Congregation for Catholic Education from all over the world.

The School of Education welcomed our new Bishop, Thomas Daly to the annual celebration of Catholic Schools. Gonzaga President Thayne McCulloh expressed his gratitude to Bishop Daly, the principals, teachers, students and clergy for the long-standing partnership with the University and the SOE. Highlights were hearing the personal story of Emmy Farrell, who, as a foster child, was able to attend St. John Vianney; Cataldo Catholic School for leading prayer; and the singing of 1st and 2nd graders from St. John Vianney.

The School of Education hosted the Diocesan Teacher Professional Development Day in January. Separate training sessions supported teachers of Grades Pre K-2 and Grades 3-8. Dean Alfonso presented Developmental Indicators of Learning and Behavior Problems. The training session explored the individual and environmental risk factors for mental health concerns, recognizing the signs, and exploring ways to partner with family and professionals. Dr. Alfonso discussed behavior problems in young children, assessing and the rationale, and special considerations when working with young children living in poverty, and those who are culturally and linguistically diverse. Dr. Adriana Wissel, Assistant Professor in Counselor Education, spent the second half of the day training teachers on functional behavior assessment and behavior intervention plans, in addition to providing specific interventions to address student behaviors. She also shared strategies for creating and cultivating a positive social/emotional classroom environment. 5


Building a Solution at Sunnyside Powerless to Powerful: Leadership for School Change After many years, Drs. Chuck Salina and Suzann Girtz in the School of Education (SOE), along with Joanie Eppinga, published a book that outlines the process of improving the attendance and graduation rates at Sunnyside High School in Washington state. Powerless to Powerful: Leadership for School Change, is a result of the turnaround effort at a high school which had a graduation rate of 64 percent when Salina’s work began in 2010. The initiative was a $6 million Federal School Improvement Grant that focused on research-driven activities to promote student attendance and academic success. One of the conditions of the grant was that Dr. Salina serve as interim principal. The book details the humanistic approach taken to implement programs and systems that cultivated social support and relational trust together. Included is the research and theory behind the approach as well as action steps for leaders, and lessons learned in the process, which serve as useful examples for any school. According to Rick Cole, Superintendent of Sunnyside

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School District at the time, “The results were nothing short of amazing. The culture change at the school was palpable and the change in belief that students and staff had in themselves and each other was incredible.”

By June of 2012, the school reported an attendance rate of 95 percent, with 78 percent of students passing all classes, and a graduation rate of 78.4 (and an extended graduation rate of 79.7 percent). Dr. Salina highlights that “a collaborative culture focused on student learning and higher graduation rates; datadriven support for at-risk students; acceleration and enrichment programs extending beyond the school day; a safe and welcome environment to increase attendance; and enhanced parental and community involvement” were needed to achieve results. “The kinds of demands our K-12 schools are facing require lots of support,” Salina said. “It is a privilege for Gonzaga to be part of building a solution at Sunnyside,” he said. This was a unique partnership between Sunnyside and Gonzaga University’s SOE.


Turning “What If?” into “What Next?” The Power of Risk DEBORAH NIEDING, PH.D. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, TEACHER EDUCATION

Developing the master’s program at Charles Lwanga College of Education in Monze, Zambia, was one of the risky endeavors taken by the School of Education (SOE) in recent years. I was in charge of these student candidates and taking them across the planet, not knowing for certain if this was going to work out. One of the biggest obstacles was not actually in Zambia, but convincing the families of Gonzaga students that the experience would be safe. I talked with the candidates’ parents to assure them, I will watch over your children as if they were my children’ in order to reassure parents, and make the experience possible. Another project with risks was the Saturday Literacy Program. Education candidates volunteer their time on Saturdays to tutor at-risk youth, grades 1-6, from the Spokane community in reading and writing. The program is a risk every single week. It’s not funded externally, so the teacher education program budget pays the two teachers, and the snacks, which are essential because some of the children may not have had a meal the night before. With this population you never know if they have the means to get here either, but we’re committed to it every single Saturday.

We’re continually changing the way that we teach in order to better prepare our candidates, most of the time doing something we haven’t done before. In that way, we are taking risks. The SOE is also doing this through community outreach and always finding a way to connect our work to helping candidates find a way to give back to the community. Whenever there is a need we say, ‘What if?’ I’d love for the teacher education program to have greater global outreach opportunities and take the culturally relevant, responsible teaching beyond the Spokane area. This is definitely a possibility, as our faculty, Drs. Jonas Cox, Jerri Shepard, James Hunter and Heidi Nordstrom, traveled to Zambia this summer where projects are being developed that not only are for education students but also students in different fields of study at the university to make an impact in Zambia. We are exploring again, because there is always a ‘What next?’

Deborah Nieding, Associate Professor in Teacher Education presented on Gonzaga Day 2016 to nearly 100 alumni and friends in Seattle for the first-ever ZagTalk, during which she used two examples of risks taken in the School of Education.

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Madison Rose: Newman Civic Fellow Madison Rose, ’18, a special education major was selected as one of the national recipients of the Campus Compact 2016 Newman Civic Fellow. She was among 218 student leaders from colleges and universities in 36 states, Washington, D.C., and Mexico who were honored. This award pays tribute to the late Frank Newman, a founder and tireless advocate for the civic engagement of higher education, and recognizes students who have taken action in pursuit of long-term social change and who engage and inspire others in their communities. Madison also serves as student coordinator for the Eye to Eye mentoring program, a national initiative that creates awareness about learning differences and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). She and four fellow Gonzaga students, hosted the “Share Your Story� event on campus to share their personal stories of dealing with a learning disability. Madison hopes for this to be an annual event as her legacy at Gonzaga University and to make change in the education field. School of Education Professor, Mark Derby, and Thomas Beck, cofounder of the Winston Center in Spokane for the treatment of ADHD and dyslexia, spoke at the event. 8


Mission: Possible Service to Others and Making a Difference Gonzaga’s Center for Community Action and Service Learning coordinates Mission: Possible – Spring Break projects in various cities where students work with individuals from marginalized populations, including the homeless, incarcerated women with children, Native Americans, refugees from other countries and veterans. Mission: Possible is an immersive experience for students to gain insight into the lives of others who are facing adversity and is an opportunity to grow as an individual. Perhaps more significantly, the experience provides a deeper understanding and respect for the backgrounds of others, which has proven to be essential in the field of education. This year, Kathy Nitta, lecturer in Teacher Education and Dr. Heidi Nordstrom, assistant professor in Sport and Physical Education, served as advisors for two of the programs. The two advisors and their students share their experience.

shouldn’t matter the reason – we should just serve others and help where we can. This is especially true with the veteran population. Some of the men and women were severely injured and not capable of living without assistance, while others suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or were affected by other types of mental illness from the trauma experienced during conflict. We often forget how hard it can be to lose everything, especially for veterans who often return to the United States with little help and resources to transition back into everyday life.

MAKAH TRIBE, NEAH BAY, WA KATHY NITTA, LECTURER IN TEACHER EDUCATION KATHY NITTA ADVISED STUDENTS WORKING IN SCHOOLS ON THE RESERVATION.

ADVISED STUDENTS WORKING WITH GROUPS SEEKING TRANSITIONAL HOUSING ASSISTANCE.

This trip to work among the Makah Tribe was incredibly eye-opening. What I learned as an advisor and a teacher educator is that we talk about drawing on individual cultural community, but the question really becomes, ‘How do we bring it into that context and use the Native American culture to inform the way we educate?’

We shared that we should not assume “why” there are homeless people and just accept the reality they are homeless. We do not know all of their stories and it

I was expecting that I would learn a lot about a culture, but this experience afforded a great opportunity to get an in-depth perspective. I gained a

HOMELESSNESS IN PHOENIX DR. HEIDI NORDSTROM, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN SPORT AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

deeper understanding of the struggles these children face and learned to see the inequities which exist in education for students with varied cultures. Morgan Green, one of Kathy’s secondary education students, shared, “Our time in Neah Bay was a great view into culturally competent teaching, as the school so seamlessly integrated the culture of the outside community into their students’ education.” She was very impressed by a group of students in a shop class at Neah Bay High School who were building canoes and paddles to use on their journeys in the summer. Her experience on the Makah reservation allowed Morgan to gain a better understanding of how each student carries his/her own personal background and narrative into the classroom, and how embracing a student’s culture enables him/ her to thrive. Morgan said, “This cultural immersion experience was invaluable to my development as a future educator and allowed me to see new perspectives, and approaches that will mold my own personal philosophy.”

“We think sometimes that poverty is only being hungry, naked and homeless. The poverty of being unwanted, unloved and uncared for is the greatest poverty. We must start in our own homes to remedy this kind of poverty.” – MOTHER THERESA 9


Teacher of the Year An Alumni Gem Lauren Macey ’12 (B.A. in English) and ’13 (Master of Initial Teacher degree and secondary certification) was named the 2015-16 Teacher of the Year at Syringa Middle School, and for the Caldwell School District in Caldwell, Idaho. She is also a finalist for Idaho Teacher of the Year, to be announced in October.

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Why I Teach:

“Danny humbled me. To be completely honest, I get humbled by my students daily.” – LAUREN MACEY

Danny’s Story I get asked all the time why I teach. I never know how to answer it quite right, so I usually say something sarcastic like, “Because I’m really a huge fan of hearing myself repeat the same thing 16 times in three minutes,” or “Because summers, obviously.” There was a 13-year-old boy in my morning class who I’ll call Danny. At least three times a week, he showed up over an hour late to my class. He was always behind, never quite knew what was going on, and his late work caused extra grading for me. Frankly, he annoyed me. Every time he showed up late, I assumed he didn’t care. He wasn’t responsible. He didn’t respect me. Finally, I asked him. “Danny, why are you always late?” He shrugged. I said nothing, and waited for a response. He sighed, “My mom got this new boyfriend, and whenever she stays the night at his place, no one is home to make sure my little brother gets on the bus. I make sure he’s awake and get him on his bus, but that means I miss my bus and have to walk.” How far is your house from school? “A little over a mile.” Woah! Danny IS responsible. Danny DOES care. Danny DOES value his education. See, whenever Danny was late, he would miss the school’s free breakfast and go hungry until lunch. He’s

frustrated with his mom, behind in his classes and hungry. Now, when Danny shows up late, instead of greeting him with a detention slip and an eye roll, I get to greet him with a genuine smile and a granola bar. Danny humbled me. To be completely honest, I get humbled by my students daily. They make me realize that I can be impatient, judgmental and imperfect. But the thing is, there’s no eleventh commandment that says, “Thou shalt be perfect.” Jesus just showed up, met people exactly where they were and loved them. Then he taught, but only after their immediate needs were met. I teach because I get to ask kids “why” every day. Why are you late? Why aren’t your clothes clean? Why aren’t you doing your work? Why do you want to sleep in my class? Why are you so afraid to take a risk? Why don’t you trust adults? Why are you acting out? Why are you arguing with me? (Sometimes the questions are ridiculous: why are you hiding in my closet? Why did you think it was a good idea to throw your shoe out the window? Why did you just lick your neighbor’s ear?). The “whys” teachers ask aren’t to be punitive and shame kids. Teachers ask kids “why” because we get to treat students like human beings worthy of love and respect. Those “whys” show

kids that we care, that they’re worthy, that they matter, and that they’re safe. We ask why, and then we listen ... really listen to these kids. For eight (sometimes up to 11) hours a day, I have the privilege of treating my students like people – not like test scores, not like a pay check, not like one big group who are all the same. In each class, I have 30 Danny’s. Each kid shows up with individual baggage, and I get one year to try and help them unpack it. When a kid trusts you enough to let you in or to take a risk in your classroom, that is a victory I can’t even begin to put into words. Teaching isn’t about the curriculum, the common core, the SBACs, the pay for performance ladders, or any of that. For me, teaching is about being that one consistent adult in a kid’s life. It’s about that moment when you see a kid grasp a concept they’ve struggled with for days, weeks, or even months. It’s about the look in their eyes when something clicks. It’s about the pride students feel when they turn in a project they were excited about. It’s about a student begging, “Miss, pleaseeee just read one more chapter, the story is so good!” It’s about one of the toughest kids in the school saying your class is their favorite because they know you care.

It’s about the smile that crosses a kids’ face when you hand them back an assignment with an ‘A’ written on the top and they feel successful for the first time in their life. Yes, I get frustrated sometimes, but I don’t get to quit. I try and teach kids like Danny not to give up – to stick it out, face the adversity and rise above it. If we as teachers want to live out the lessons we teach, we can’t focus on all the negative aspects of this job, when there are so many good things! I fail every single day. I handle situations the wrong way, I say the wrong thing, I snap at a kid who didn’t necessarily deserve it. I’m human, I’m flawed and I’m broken. But as a teacher, I have redemption every day. I can lead by example and show kids how to come back from a mistake. Every class is a fresh start and a new opportunity to do a little bit better than I did last time. Every single kid deserves a chance to make it. As teachers, we get to help them realize that education is their way out. Education is the springboard that’ll get them out of the situation they came from. Teaching isn’t about me. It’s bigger than me, and it’ll always be that way. Teaching isn’t just a job. It’s a lifestyle. That’s why I teach. 11


Young Child Expo and Conference In October 2015, the School of Education presented, along with Los Niños, the 1st Young Child Expo and Conference (YCEC) in Spokane, attracting more than 500 early childhood education teachers, scholars, aids and administrators. Dean Alfonso and Dr. Scott Mesh, CEO of Los Niños Services in New York, developed the conference more than 12 years ago. When Dr. Alfonso assumed the position of dean at Gonzaga in 2013, he believed that bringing a YCEC to Spokane would attract a high level of interest. Bringing the event to Spokane is evidence of his dedication to improving Spokane schools, public and private.

“There are limited professional development opportunities for people working with young children in our area. It is our hope to improve and expand upon various aspects of early childhood education.” – DR. VINCENT C. ALFONSO

The YCEC included a summit prior to the conference for community leaders. A keynote speaker led the summit and breakout sessions were held for the 75 guests to discuss early childhood education and creating a shared vision.

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Local speakers at the summit and the conference included Spokane Mayor David A. Condon and Whitworth University President Beck A. Taylor, who inspired the leaders and educators to spark change in education. Attendees were primarily professionals from multiple disciplines (e.g., teachers, special educators, school psychologists, physical and occupational therapists, and speech pathologists). The event attracted people from around the country, but majority were from the Pacific Northwest. This extensive network of key players involved in the YCEC contributed to the enormous success and would never have been achieved if it were not for the community coming together to make a change. Many thanks to the dozens of volunteers who assisted with planning and execution, including graduate students from Gonzaga, Eastern Washington University, Washington State University and Whitworth.

With more than

100

speakers

80

conference sessions

40

exhibitors

there was something for everyone. TOPICS INCLUDED

Early literacy Bullying Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Educational policy Speech language issues Autism essentials Developmental discipline Music and learning


Respecting and Serving our Veterans Compassion and Respect for Oneself MARK YOUNG, PH.D. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, COUNSELOR EDUCATION

In 2012, the Spokane County Veterans Service office reported that nearly 12 percent of the Spokane County population (50,000-60,000) was comprised of veterans. Sadly, after returning from war, many of those who served in the military find themselves in dire circumstances with little support and a lack of government resources. Mark Young, associate professor in Counselor Education, has been working with the veteran population in Spokane for several years, supervising counseling graduate students who have been assigned internships at the Veterans Administration and the Vet Center. Recently, Dr. Young offered his services to work with the Spokane Veterans Forum , a volunteer group of veterans and Gold Star Mothers who offer guidance and provide mentoring to those men and women coming through the Spokane Veterans Court. In monthly presentations, his objective is to focus on relationships. Dr. Young, who specializes in relationships, has presented on the topics of “Caring for Self” and “Responding with Love.” “When I speak to the group, my goal is to offer encouragement through sharing information that can help them find love and support in their relationships. There is amazing research and principles on how to achieve happiness in life and in our relationships – and I try to help them see that they deserve to be loved.”

When asked why working with the veteran population is important to him and his students, Dr. Young explains, “Veterans have given of themselves to care for our country and to care for others and I want them to experience care in return.” He recognizes the importance for veterans to be able to cultivate a strong sense of compassion and respect for oneself. While most of his presentations have focused on the primary support systems of veterans such as their families and friends, Young has also tried to help them see how they can apply the same principles in caring for the self. He says, “My hope is that this will give them options; they can rely on themselves for most of their needs while only relying on others for some of their needs.” Dr. Young values his work because it allows for connection and understanding. “It’s one of my highlights because I get to hear amazing stories and insights while getting to know the veterans in a deeper way.”

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Outstanding Partnership with Hillyard The Ignatian Medal The Jesuit Association of Student Personnel Administrators has awarded Gonzaga University the Ignatian Medal for Outstanding Academic Partnership for its work on the Hillyard Youth Project Collaborative in Northeast Spokane. The initiative is led by Dr. John Traynor, associate professor in the School of Education, and Bailey Wootten, assistant director for youth programs in the Center for Community Action and Service-Learning. The Hillyard Youth Collaborative promotes the success of youth in the northeast neighborhoods while providing Gonzaga students, faculty and staff opportunities to collaborate with local nonproďŹ t organizations and public schools to improve their own growth and development, as well as middle school student achievement. As leaders of the Hillyard Youth Collaborative, Traynor and Wooten develop partnerships with faculty across campus, and partner with school administrators and staff. The Ignatian Medal for outstanding academic partnership award is conferred annually in recognition of a program/initiative that demonstrates collaboration or integration of academic and student affairs in support of student success and student learning.

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Rethinking Native American Education Awareness is Raised The School of Education (SOE) continues to raise awareness of education for Native Americans, this year partnering with the American Indian Studies department to offer a symposium, Rethinking Native American Education: Why Race Matters. The keynote speaker was Ali Michael, Ph.D., from the University of Pennsylvania, director of the K-12 Consulting and Professional Development at the Center for Study of Race and Equity, and author of Raising Race Questions: Whiteness, Inquiry and Education. Dr. Michael’s experience as a teacher, teacher educator, filmmaker and author informed discussion on the issue of race in schools, and how it impacts our education system, leaving non-whites at a disadvantage.

“While the event was certainly emotionally charged,” explained Wendy Thompson, director of Tribal Relations in the Center for American Indian Studies at Gonzaga, she notes that the university is the perfect place to have this conversation. “We are surrounded by eight Native American tribes in the Inland Northwest and Fr. Joseph Cataldo, S.J., our founder, was a proponent for inclusive education.” Thompson and Dean Alfonso share a goal that through continued collaboration with the Spokane Unified School District, the SOE will provide current and future teachers with ways to transform this informed perspective on race into a more inclusive and positive way of teaching within the classroom.

Dr. Michael led a panel of Gonzaga students – three Native Americans and one Caucasian student. The purpose was to inform the Gonzaga community of the struggles Native American students face when entering into the public school system, and to discuss possible solutions to these complex and culturally embedded obstacles.

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New Faculty A Faculty Shift Every 20 to 30 years, one of the most noticeable changes at a university is a generational shift of its faculty. Conversations among us change from discussing our children’s upcoming weddings, grandchildren, and how do I apply for Medicare, to talking about upcoming births, pre-schools and youth sport activities. This year we welcome faculty who are highly qualified, knowledgeable, energetic and bring innovative ideas and strategies to the School of Education. They are also very proud to be a faculty member at Gonzaga University.

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Melanie Person, Ph.D.

Don Jay Garre, DHSc.

Nichole Calkins, Ed.D.

IDA HO S TATE UNIV ERSIT Y

A .T. S TILL UNIV ERSIT Y

SE AT TLE PACIFIC UNIV ERSIT Y

Person is an assistant professor in Counselor Education. She has been a faculty member at Northwest Nazarene University in Nampa, Idaho, for the past four years involved in department and university accreditation, e-learning, IRB and admissions. She is a licensed counselor focusing on personality disorders, severe and persistent mental illness, and addiction issues. Melanie has two small children and loves exploring with her family.

Garrett is an assistant professor in Sport and Physical Education. He has taught anatomy, physiology and clinical nutrition to nursing students; instructed paramedics; and taught a wellness class at Chemeketa Community College in Oregon. Don has also worked as an exercise physiologist and personal trainer, and helped transform a Fitness Assessment Lab into a Human Performance Lab in Portland. He is originally from Fairbanks, AK, and he and his wife, and two children are looking forward to snow and living where there are four real seasons.

Calkins joined Sport and Physical Education as an assistant professor. Her interest is designing curriculum and instruction to support students in achieving optimal health, and using self-regulations strategies to promote positive health behaviors. Nichole is a veteran of the Army Reserves, committed to fitness and to being a great wife and mother.


Jimmy Smith, Ph.D.

UNIV ERSIT Y OF A LBERTA , EDMONTON

Smith is an assistant professor in Sport and Physical Education. Dr. Smith teaches the sport management courses in management principles, organizational behavior, marketing, and research methods. He received his B.S., in Kinesiology (Fitness Management), from the University of Nevada Las Vegas, where he was a student-athlete with the baseball team, and received his master’s degree from Central Michigan University. Jimmy is married and has three children.

Cynthia Caniglia, Ph.D.

Jennifer Hamilton, Ph.D.

WA SHINGTON S TATE UNIV ERSIT Y

FLORIDA S TATE UNIV ERSIT Y

Caniglia joined the Special Education faculty this fall as a lecturer. She has served schools as an education consultant and teacher in early childhood special education, and K-5 special education. Her areas of interest include pre- and in-service teacher preparation, literacy, effective assessment and instruction in multi-tiered systems of support, and working with students who are at-risk. Cyndi enjoys spending time with her husband and three daughters, hiking, skiing, running, reading and taking time for Casey, her English springer spaniel.

Hamilton joined Sport and Physical Education as a lecturer. Her research interests and activities lie in the areas of sport marketing and consumer behavior. Dr. Hamilton’s most recent research examined the impact of sports scandals on team identification and consumer behavior. Outside of teaching and research, she enjoys playing softball, watching football and basketball and traveling.

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English Language Program Joins School of Education We are very pleased to welcome the Master of Arts in Teaching English as a Second Language (MA-TESL) program to the School of Education. The program faculty – Drs. Mary Jeannot, James Hunter and Martha Savage – moved to the Rosauer Center for Education during the summer, and joins the Department of Teacher Education. Dr. Deborah Nieding, department chair, said, “The addition of the program is very exciting, and I value the backgrounds and expertise the MA-TESL faculty will bring to the department.” This group of faculty will broaden the scope for creative collaborations in teacher preparation programs, and open up new opportunities for building a multi-cultural/multi-lingual education program.

WELCOME TO THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Anabel Madera A DMINIS TR ATIV E A S SIS TA NT, DE A N ’ S OFFICE

Meg Martens PROGR A M A S SIS TA NT, GR A DUATE A DMIS SIONS

Mayra Villalobos PROGR A M A S SIS TA NT, FIELD E XPERIENCE

Yu Jen Wang BUDGE T A ND A DMINIS TR ATIV E A S SIS TA NT

Faculty and Staff Volunteered at Over

60

non-university organizations

IN THE GREATER SPOKANE AREA

CONGRATULATIONS Suzann Girtz, Ph.D., Associate Professor in Teacher Education was granted tenure; and Cynthia Johnson, was promoted to Associate Professor, and granted tenure.

2015-16, Scholarship by the Numbers… BOOKS

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School of Education

CONGRATULATIONS TO:

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JOURNALS, CHAPTERS, SECTIONS

87

PRESENTATIONS

61

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS WITH FACULTY

89

STUDENT POSTER PRESENTATIONS WITH FACULTY

46

Suzann Girtz, Ph.D. – received the Gonzaga University Exemplary Faculty Award for Professional Contributions John Traynor, Ph.D., with Bailey Wootton – received the Ignatian Medal for Outstanding Academic Partnership awarded by the Jesuit Association of Student Personnel Administrators School of Education Jeanne Foster Wardian Leadership Award – Kathy Nitta, faculty; Chris Reiber, staff Mark Derby, Ph.D. – was inducted into the Jesuit Honor Society Alpha Sigma Nu


We are all about education!


Looking Ahead to 2016-17

Degree and Certification Programs

SEPTEMBER 2016

B.Ed. in Kinesiology and Physical Education B.Ed. in Special Education B.Ed. in Sport Management

– THE ASSOCIATION OF JESUIT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES (AJCU) CONFERENCE FOR EDUCATION DEANS

OCTOBER 2016 – RETHINKING NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATION: IF ONLY THEY WOULD CHANGE – ADDRESSING THE HIDDEN CONTEXT 3RD IN THE SERIES OF SYMPOSIA FOR CURRENT AND FUTURE EDUCATORS – YOUNG CHILD EXPO AND CONFERENCE (YCEC)

The conference is designed for professionals and parents in order to help all young children learn, grow, and reach their full potential. Attendees include teachers, psychologists, special education teachers, social workers, physical, occupational and speech therapists, pediatricians, nurses, and higher education faculty and students.

MARCH 2017

M.A. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling M.A. in Leadership and Administration (U.S.) M.A. in Marriage and Family Counseling M.A. in School Counseling M.A. in Sport and Athletic Administration M.A. Teaching English as a Second Language Master of Counselling (Canada) M.Ed. (School Administration) (Alberta) M.Ed. in Leadership and Administration (British Columbia) M.Ed. in Special Education M.I.T. (Elementary or Secondary Certification) Elementary and Secondary Certification Principal / Program Administrator Certification School Counseling Professional Certification

– CELEBRATION OF CATHOLIC SCHOOLS LUNCHEON – 3RD ANNUAL ASSESSMENT CONFERENCE

502 E Boone Ave, Spokane, WA 99258-0025


School of Education 2015-2016 Year in Review