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Photo: Waleska Sallaberry & Luis Mendez by Kelvin Sánchez, Facebook.com/kelvinsanchezphoto

Fabulous CREATIVE NATURE Fan Fare AGING KIDS Healthy Tailgating Recipes

Gloriously Enriching Our Later Years

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September Central FL Edition | GoNaturalAwakenings.com July 2017 || North Location-Edition | NaturalAwakeningsMag.com natural awakenings

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letterfrompublisher I am pleased to bring you this month’s Yoga issue! Not only is it

contact us Publisher Shannon Knight Co-Owner Dean Schmitt National Editor S. Alison Chabonais Editor Martin Miron Design & Production Stephen Blancett Steven Hagewood Chelsea Rose Martin Friedman Consultant Cathy Culp Distribution Cathy Culp Jules Gollner Vicki Gard Natural Awakenings North Central Florida P.O. Box 831038, Ocala, FL 34472 Phone: 352-629-4000 GoNaturalAwakenings.com GoNaturalAwakenings@gmail.com Follow us on: Facebook.com by searching: Natural Awakenings North Central Florida

©2017 by Natural Awakenings. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reproduced and reprinted, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Natural Awakenings is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. It is available in selected stores, health and education centers, healing centers, public libraries and wherever free publications are generally seen. Please call to find a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business.

loaded with important news and information, but the cover features two members of our Natural Awakenings publishing family, Waleska Sallaberry and Luis Mendez of Natural Awakenings Puerto Rico (photo credit: Kelvin Sánchez, Facebook/Kelvin Sanchez: graphic design & photography). Their story is an inspirational one. Shannon Knight, Celebrating 15 years of publishing the magazine and publisher creating wellness initiatives in their island this year, the couple continues their passion for service and their desire to make a difference in their community and the World. Waleska and Luis have three kids, ages 11 to 21. During the last 16 years they have focused on their personal and spiritual growth process. They are both certified advanced yoga teachers (RYT-500) and make time every year to detox, recharge and reconnect. They both enjoy stand-up paddle boarding, taking care of Mother Earth–and inspiring others to do too–and enjoy spending time outdoors with their kids and friends. They currently live in Rincón, Puerto Rico, a small, laid-back surf town in the west of the island, where they are blessed with a growing eco- and health-conscious community. Their passion and commitment to providing their readers with resources to help them live more balanced lives led them to create in 2004 their first event, Expo Calidad de Vida, which quickly became the most important natural health and wellness expo in Puerto Rico and the Caribbean, attracting more than 6,000 people each year. In 2009, they launched the Natural Awakenings Network, the first holistic discount card through which subscribers have access to an extensive network of products and services focused in promoting total well-being. The program today has more than 250,000 members and a network of 1,000 providers. As Natural Awakenings publishers, Waleska and Luis can live up to their two life mottos: “Life is good!” and “Work hard, Play harder”. Be well in love and peace,

Shannon Knight, publisher

We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. We welcome your ideas, articles and feedback.

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Visit GoNaturalAwakenings.com Natural Awakenings of North Central Florida is a faithful steward of global resources. We are delighted to be a part of an environmentally conscious community and therefore manufacture this magazine utilizing the environmentally-friendly cold-set web printer process which emits virtually immeasurable VOC's into the environment. The product is 100% recycleable.

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contents 6 newsbriefs 7 kudos

8 healthbriefs

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10 globalbriefs

13 ecotip

14 fitbody

19 inspiration

20 healthykids

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2 1 therapyspotlight

22 consciouseating

27 calendar

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29 classifieds 30 resourceguide

advertising & submissions HOW TO ADVERTISE To advertise with Natural Awakenings or request a media kit, please contact us at 352-629-4000 or email GoNaturalAwakenings@gmail.com. Deadline for ads: the 10th of the month. EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS Email articles, news items and ideas to: GoNaturalAwakenings@gmail.com. Deadline for editorial: the 10th of the month. CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS Email Calendar Events to: GoNaturalAwakenings@gmail.com. Deadline for calendar: the 10th of the month. REGIONAL MARKETS Advertise your products or services in multiple markets! Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp. is a growing franchised family of locally owned magazines serving communities since 1994. To place your ad in other markets call 239-449-8309. For franchising opportunities call 239-530-1377 or visit NaturalAwakeningsMag.com.

Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health, nutrition, fitness, personal growth, green living, creative expression and the products and services that support a healthy lifestyle.

14 RODNEY YEE ON YOGA

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AS A WAY OF LIFE Simple Strategies for Staying on Track by Marlaina Donato

16 AGING WITH PASSION AND PURPOSE

Finding Fulfillment, Creativity and Meaning by Deborah Shouse

19 BEING BEAUTY

What Makes Us Glow by Glennon Doyle Melton

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20 NATURE’S CLASSROOM 22 Outdoor Learning Engages the Whole Child

by Meredith Montgomery

21 BIOLOGICAL DENTISTRY Makes a Healthy Difference by Astrid Sand

22 FABULOUS FAN FARE Healthy Tailgating Foods to Cheer For

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by Judith Fertig

25 CANNABINOIDS Are the Most-Studied Therapeutic Compounds on the Planet by Linda Sechrist

GoNaturalAwakenings.com natural awakenings

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newsbriefs Get New Insights Into AttentionDeficit Behaviors

l'J'o promote t/ie �ligion, Science ancf Pfiifosopfiy ofSpiritua{ism

New series of Psychic/Mediumship Classes in The Villages starting in November See Website for details. Check our complete program on the website.

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DHD coach Helen Kornblum, MA, owner of Natural Order Coaching & Organizing, will teach a class, Mind Mapping for Productivity, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., September 13, at the Santa Fe College Northwest Campus. She states, “If making to-do lists doesn’t help you accomplish anything at work or home, it’s time to explore how mind mapping can increase your productivity. This technique helps with Helen Kornblum organization, memory deficits, impulsivity and creativity.” Then, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., September 27, Kornblum will teach Understand Executive Function. “Children and teens with executive function issues don’t necessarily think differently. They struggle with the process of coordinating, prioritizing or managing information needed to perform tasks successfully. I encourage my clients to change their focus from weaknesses to strengths as their key to reaching their goals,” she advises. Students receive an overview of the executive functions, highlighting strategies for parents that want to help their children develop new skills in these areas. Cost is $24. Location: 3000 NW 83rd St., Gainesville. To register, call 352-3955193 or visit sfcollege.edu/cied/communityed and choose Take A Class. For more information, visit CoachOrganizer.com. See ad, page 9.

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Quick Affordable Health Exams in Ocala

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ife Line Screening will conduct testing at Unity of Ocala on September 19. The results are easy to read and understand about risk factors for major diseases and arrive within 21 business days. Carotid artery (plaque) screenings are an ultrasound scan of the carotid arteries that looks for buildup of fatty plaque, a leading cause of strokes. Hearth rhythm screening (atrial fibrillation) is a quick and easy test using EKG electrodes placed on the arms and legs to identify the presence or absence of an irregular heartbeat. Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening is an ultrasound test for an abdominal aneurysm (enlargement) that could lead to a ruptured aorta. Peripheral arterial disease screening evaluates for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the lower extremities, which increases the risk of heart disease. Osteoporosis risk assessment is an ultrasound that screens the heel for bone mass density. Osteoporosis is painless and silent in its early stages. Life Line has partnered with more 100 hospitals across the country and conducted 8 million screenings since 1993. Location: 101 Cedar Rd., Ocala. To preregister (required) for an appointment and receive a $10 discount, call 1-888-653-6450 or visit LifeLineScreening.com/ Community-Partners.

News to share?

Submit information to GoNaturalAwakenings@gmail.com Submittal deadline is the 10th of the month. 6

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newsbriefs Become a Yoga Teacher with Neil Crenshaw

kudos

he Florida Yoga Academy, in McIntosh, is offering an ongoing Yoga Teacher Training program from 1 to 6 p.m. It covers the eight limbs of yoga, including meditation, asana, pranayama, relaxation techniques, philosophy, Yoga Sutras, chants, and anatomy and physiology. After completing 180 hours, graduates receive a certificate to teach yoga and the ability to register with Yoga Alliance at RYT-200. Neil Crenshaw, E-RYT, is a certified meditation teacher, Warriors at Ease yoga and meditation teacher, older adultscertified fitness instructor and certified yoga instructor with Connected Warriors. He has been teaching yoga and meditation for 22 years and written three books on yoga.

Natural Awakenings Publishing Corporation (NAPC) welcomed three new publishers to a recent training session at their headquarters in Naples, Florida. The NAPC staff spent several days with (L-R) Linda Palmer, Leslie Cueva, these entrepreneurs, Zack Propes, Sharon Bruckman, discussing the ins Simone Anewalt and Tracy Patterson. and outs of publishing a new Natural Awakenings edition in southern Idaho by Simone Anewalt; and taking over publication of two existing magazines, by Karen Propes, in Chattanooga, aided by her son, Zack; and by Tracy Patterson, in Phoenix. A new staff member of the Miami magazine, Leslie Cueva, also attended, accompanied by longtime owner Linda Palmer. Founded by Chief Executive Officer Sharon Bruckman with a single edition in Naples in 1994, Natural Awakenings has grown to become one of the largest, free, local, healthy living publications in the world.

Cost is $50 per session. Location: 6369 E. Place, McIntosh. For more information, call 352-591-5739 or visit Florida YogaAcademy.com.

For a list of locations where Natural Awakenings is published or to learn more about franchising opportunities, call 239-5301377 or visit NaturalAwakeningsMag.com. See ad, page 12.

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esearchers from Helsinki, Finland, analyzed data from 2,000 people to find out how sleeping patterns affected their food choices. They discovered individuals that wake up early make healthier food choices throughout the day and are more physically active. “Linking what and when people eat to their biological clock type provides a fresh perspective on why certain people are more likely to make unhealthy food decisions,” explains lead author Mirkka Maukonen, from the National Institute for Health and Welfare, in Helsinki.

The Sun’s Role in Causing Cancer

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EARLY BIRDS EAT BETTER AND EXERCISE MORE

pproximately one out of every three women and one out of every two men will develop cancer in their lifetime. In Florida, skin cancer is more prevalent because we enjoy going to the beach, being in the sunshine and even tanning. There are some genetic components to skin cancers and susceptibility. We have all read that fair-skinned, light-haired people are more prone to the common, non-melanomatous skin cancers, and that is basically true. They also burn much more readily. That is the real key. It is the sunburn, not the sun exposure, which causes these common skin cancers. In fact, sunlight is very important for our health, and several studies have shown that sunlight may actually decrease the chances of certain skin cancers, provided the person does not sunburn. A randomized trial of nicotinamide used to prevent skin cancers published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2015 proved that by taking the nicotinamide twice a day, the overall incidence of skin cancers was reduced by 23 percent in one year. Squamous cell carcinomas of the skin, the deadlier of the two most common skin cancers, was reduced by 30 percent during the same period of time, and basal cell carcinomas were reduced by 20 percent. This demonstrated that a daily supplement could dramatically reduce the skin cancer rate. Avoiding the sun however, does pose its own problems. There have been numerous studies looking at the incidence of cancer and the distance from the equator. It is well known that the farther a person lives from the equator, the less sun exposure they get. Because vitamin D is not manufactured in the body, but can be produced with exposure to the sun, this is the primary source for humans to get their vitamin D. Many studies have linked levels of vitamin D to the incidence of cancer. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-6 found that the average vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. was 41.6 percent. Ethnic groups fared much worse—82.2 percent of African Americans and 69.2 percent of Hispanics were deficient in vitamin D. Clearly, Americans need to increase their levels of vitamin D. Michelle Haessler M.D., a board-certified radiation oncologist with more than 25 years experience treating cancer patients, is located in central Florida. For more information, visit TheOlaKinoCompany.com. See ad, page 29. 8

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healthbriefs

Yoga Lessens Back Pain and Opioid Use

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ith the U.S. opioid epidemic reaching a boiling point, insight into the effectiveness of alternative methods of pain relief has become increasingly relevant. Scientists from the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System have found yoga to be an effective technique to reduce back pain. The researchers divided 150 California veterans with chronic low back pain into two equal groups. One attended two yoga classes per week— comprising postures, movement and breathing techniques—for 12 weeks in addition to their more conventional treatment. The other continued such treatment without yoga. Scientists measured pain levels before and after the core study period and again six months later. After only 12 weeks, those that participated in the yoga practice experienced a 2.05 point reduction in Roland−Morris Disability Questionnaire scores, compared to a 1.29 reduction for those that received only usual care. After six months, this difference increased, with the yoga group’s scores decreasing 3.37 points compared to only an 0.89 reduction in the usual care group. In addition, pain intensity scores were reduced by 0.61 in the yoga group and 0.04 in the group receiving usual care after 12 weeks. Opioid medication use declined among all participants, from 20 percent to 8 percent after six months.


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esearchers from Brown University, in Providence, Rhode Island, have found that regular yoga practice can help reduce anxiety and depression in young women with eating disorders. The scientists followed 20 girls between the ages of 14 and 18 that were enrolled in an outpatient eating disorder clinic that comprised the larger control group. Those selected agreed to participate in a weekly yoga class and complete questionnaires after six and 12 weeks, assessing their anxiety, depression and mood. Of those that started the study, five attended all 12 yoga classes and six completed between seven and 11 classes. Researchers found decreases in anxiety, depression and negative thoughts among those that participated in the yoga classes, with no negative side effects. Another study from the University of Delaware, in Newark, supports these results. Half of the 38 residential eating disorder treatment program participants did one hour of yoga prior to dinner for five days and the other half did not. The yoga group showed significant reductions in pre-meal anxiety compared to the control group.

YOGA INCREASES HEALTHY BRAIN MARKER

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study from Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, in SĂŁo Paulo, Brazil, suggests a link between regular yoga practice and an increase in brain cortical thickness, associated with memory and attention. The researchers used brain imaging scans (CT) to measure the cortical thickness of 42 Brazilian women older than 59. Twenty-one of the subjects had practiced hatha yoga regularly for at least eight years. These women were compared to 21 other women matched for age and education that engaged in other physical activity comparable to hatha yoga. The researchers found that the cortical thickness in the yoga practitioners was significantly greater in the left prefrontal lobe of the brain. This portion of brain gray matter is linked to awareness, attention, executive function and memory, suggesting that hatha yoga practice may be associated with cognitive preservation. The scientists added, “The present results parallel those previously reported in which younger yoga and meditation practitioners had greater gray matter volumes than non-practitioners in the following brain regions: larger gray matter volume in the right anterior insula and right inferior temporal gyrus.â€?

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Elena Ray/Shutterstock.com

fizkes/Shutterstock.com

Yoga Eases Eating Disorders


News and resources to inspire concerned citizens to work together in building a healthier, stronger society that benefits all.

for all Health Challenges

* Classical Homeopathy * Heavy Metal Detox * Nutrition * Preventive Health Care * Allergies

Experiential Ed

* Chronic Fatigue * Environmental Toxicity * Stress Management * Biosyntonie * Holistic Pediatrics

Gestalt-Based Curricula Emerging Finland, internationally renowned for innovative educational practices, is poised to become the first country to eliminate school subjects. Officials are making changes to be implemented by 2020 that will revolutionize how the school system works by allowing pupils to absorb a body of knowledge about language, economics and communication skills. “We need something to fit for the 21st century,” says Department of Education head Marjo Kyllonen. The system will be introduced for seniors beginning at age 16. They will choose which topic or phenomenon they want to study, bearing in mind their ambitions and capabilities. “Instead of staying passively in their benches listening to the teachers, students will now often work in smaller groups collaborating on projects, rather than just assigned classwork and homework.” Another new model of learning sparked by XQ: The Super School Project (xqsuperschool.org) is underway at New Harmony High School, housed on a floating barge at the mouth of the Mississippi River southeast of New Orleans. They’ve received a $10 million grant to work on environmental issues when it opens in 2018. “High schools today are not preparing students for the demands of today’s world,” says XQ Senior School Strategist Monica Martinez; she notes that about a third of college students must take remedial courses and are not prepared to thrive as employees.

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Lasers Stamp Prices on European Produce

Complementary and alternative treatment for advanced cancer

Food retailers are aiming to cut plastic and cardboard packaging by ditching stickers on fruits and vegetables, instead using high-tech laser “natural branding” and creating huge savings in materials, energy and CO2 emissions. Pilot projects are underway in Europe with organic avocados, sweet potatoes and coconuts. The technique uses a strong light to remove pigment from the skin of produce. The mark is invisible once the skin is removed and doesn’t affect shelf life or produce quality. The laser technology also creates less than 1 percent of the carbon emissions needed to produce a similar-sized sticker. Source: The Guardian

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352-729-0923

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I don’t go by the rule book...

I lead from the heart, not the head. ~Princess Diana

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olistic Medicine


Milkweed Mittens Leene/Shutterstock.com

J.D.S./Shutterstock.com

Common Weed Is Lightweight Insulator The Canadian Coast Guard is testing milkweed pods as a source of potential environmentally friendly insulation in partnership with Encore3, a manufacturing company in Québec, Canada, in prototype parkas, gloves and mittens. The plant is roughly five times lighter than synthetic insulation and hypoallergenic. The Farm Between, in Cambridge, Vermont, harvests the plants and sends the material to Encore3. Co-owner John Hayden says, “Milkweed is grown as an intercrop between the rows in our apple orchard to increase biodiversity and provide a host plant for monarch caterpillars. Monarch populations are in serious decline, and the two things we can do to help on the land we steward are to not use pesticides and provide milkweed habitat.”

Plutonium Problem Glass or Cement May Encase Nuclear Waste

Congress might consider authorizing the U.S. Department of Energy to encase much of the nuclear waste at the Washington state Hanford Nuclear Reservation, the nation’s largest waste repository, in a cement-like mixture, according to a new report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office. It states that when burying the waste, cement would be less expensive and faster than vitrification, an alternative process currently used to turn the waste into glass logs. A $17 billion vitrification plant, one of the federal government’s most expensive construction projects, is intended to separate much of the waste into high- and low-level radioactive material, but construction has stalled over design and safety concerns. After the highly radioactive waste is immobilized in the glass logs, it would theoretically be shipped to an as-yet-nonexistent national repository proposed for Yucca Mountain, in Nevada. The 56 million gallons of waste in question is left over from plutonium production for nuclear weapons since World War II, and the site itself has a history of leaks. The Department of Energy likes the cement burial, but state officials believe the best way to safely deal with the waste and protect the environment is by turning it into glass. Source: enews.earthlink.net

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Publish One of the Nation’s Leading Healthy Living Magazines Natural Awakenings Magazine

is ranked 5th Nationally in Cision’s® 2016 Top 10 Health & Fitness Magazines list 1. 2. 3. 4.

Spry Living – 8,907,303 Shape – 2,521,203 Men’s Health – 1,852,715 Prevention – 1,539,872

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6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Women’s Health – 1,511,791 Weight Watchers Magazine – 1,126,168 Dr. Oz The Good Life – 870,524 Vim & Vigor – 789,000 Experience Life – 700,000

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Own a Natural Awakenings Magazine Turn Your Passion Into A Business

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ecotip Retired Volunteers Keep National Parks Humming Retirees are volunteering at hundreds of nationally protected lands. They staff visitor centers, do maintenance, clean up debris and remind visitors to keep food items secure from wildlife. Last year, volunteers outnumbered National Park Service staff about 20 to one, expanding the financially strapped agency’s ability to serve hundreds of millions of visitors. Nearly a third of them are 54 and up, contributing to the 7.9 million service hours worked in 2015 by all 400,000 volunteers. Volunteer opportunities also exist at National Wildlife Refuge sites, fish hatcheries and endangered species field offices of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Sallie Gentry, volunteer coordinator for the Southeast Region, based in Atlanta, notes that Georgia’s Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge has a dozen designated spots for motor homes in its Volunteer Village. She says most volunteers are local retired residents whose working hours vary while RV volunteers commit to 20 hours a week for at least three months. In return, they get free hookups for electricity, sewage, propane and water. “They have skills they want to contribute, but are also looking for a social outlet,” notes Gentry. Cookouts and potlucks are common. She also cites the Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge, an important migratory stop especially for songbirds, as a place with great appeal. “We supply uniforms, training, tools and orientations,” says Gentry. “It’s a mutually beneficial investment.” She suggests that individuals apply for specific sites at least a year in advance. Megan Wandag, volunteer coordinator for the USFWS Midwest Region, based in Minneapolis, cites the popular Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge, in Bloomington, and the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge, near Des Moines, as “oases near urban areas.” USFWS Southwest Region volunteer coordinator Juli Niemann highlights the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, in central New Mexico, that has 18 recreation vehicle spots and an average occupancy duration of five months. “It’s a prime wintering place for sandhill cranes.”

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Rodney Yee on Yoga as a Way of Life Simple Strategies for Staying on Track by Marlaina Donato

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enowned yogi and international teacher Rodney Yee, of New York City, has maintained an inspired yoga practice for 37 years while juggling career obligations, fame and family life. While the benefits of yoga are increasingly well known—from stress reduction and pain management to a more limber body and inner peace—Lee is also aware of the challenges to maintaining a consistent practice. Here he shares insights on the pitfalls encountered by both beginning and advanced students.   “My advice is to first get rid of self-berating behavior, including judgmental inner dialogue. In many aspects of life, we are constantly measuring ourselves against a standard, which is a waste of time and energy,” says Yee. With a professional background in classical dance and gymnastics, Yee decided to give yoga a try at a nearby studio when he craved more physical flexibility. “As many people do, I came to yoga for a reason. I was a dancer with tight joints. After the first class, I couldn’t believe how I felt. It was not at all like an athletic high; I had a sense of well-being and knew what it means to feel peaceful and clear.” For people with jam-packed lives, finding time for exercise can be daunting. Yee suggests a relaxed approach to scheduling yoga into a busy day. “As the rishis [Hindu sages] say, we shouldn’t ‘try’ to meditate, not try to force a natural state. To say, ‘I have to do yoga,’ just puts another thing on our to-do list. Sometimes discipline is needed, but another part of discipline is not about force.”


You can blink and half your life is gone. You can’t always be busy, busy, busy; you have to decide how to fill your life.

Different approaches to yoga abound, and part of staying motivated may include exploration of a variety of traditions as individual needs change due to lifestyle, health, interests or simple curiosity. Yee reminds us to go with the flow and follow how we feel in the moment. “Different schools of yoga exist because each offers something different. There is a form for all of our moods and a practice for how you feel at any given time.” Reflecting on how his own practice has evolved through the years, Yee recollects, “In my 20s and 30s, my yoga practice was arduous, including three to four hours of strong, physical work and a half hour of pranayama [breath work]. Then for 20

years, it involved a lot of teaching. Over the past 17 years, my practice has become more subtle, with a focus on sequencing and meditation; it’s about how to do this all day long in the context of my body and my life; about being both centered and in the world. In some way, we’re always doing yoga, as we already take 20,000 breaths a day. From a philosophical and ethical point of view, yogis have no choice but to practice.” Because many American women have found their way to a yogic path, men often assume it’s primarily a women’s niche. But yoga has been a male practice for nearly 2,500 years in other countries. Yee encourages men to not feel intimidated. “Why not try something that can help you improve your business, family life and even your golf game?” he queries. While Yee believes in a no-pressure approach, he also suggests inviting ways to foster consistency. “If you are just beginning, set aside a half-hour before going to bed or get up a half-hour earlier. Also note that pain is less to be avoided than learned from.” Wisdom can come from dedication to a yoga practice. Yee’s philosophy is, “You can blink and half your life is gone. You can’t always be busy, busy, busy; you have to decide how to fill your life. As spiritual teacher Ram Dass counsels, ‘Be here now.’ Train yourself to bring body, mind and heart together and fully drink from that.” Learn more at YeeYoga.com. Marlaina Donato is a freelance writer, author and multimedia artist. Connect at MarlainaDonato.com.

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Aging with Passion and Purpose Finding Fulfillment, Creativity and Meaning by Deborah Shouse

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ant to age well? The answer isn’t in your 401k. Self-acceptance, a positive attitude, creative expression, purposeful living and spiritual connections all anchor successful and meaningful aging. In fact, these kinds of preparations are just as important as saving money for retirement, according to Ron Pevny, director of the Center for Conscious Eldering, in Durango, Colorado, and author of Conscious Living, Conscious Aging.

Savor Self-Acceptance

While most people believe adulthood is the final stage of life, Dr. Bill Thomas is among the creative aging experts that identify another life chapter: elderhood. “Elders possess novel ways of approaching time, money, faith and relationships,” says Thomas, an Ithaca, New York geriatrician and fierce advocate for the value of aging. “The best chapters may be near the end of the book,” Thomas continues. “Once you appreciate yourself and your years, you can relinquish outdated expectations and seek to discover your true self. Then the world can open up to you,” says Thomas. “Living a rewarding life means we are willing to say, ‘These chapters now are the most interesting.’” During this time, rather than feeling consumed by what we have to do, we can focus on what we want to do. 16

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Fill the Funnel of Friends

For older people, relationships offer foundational connections; but as we age, friends may drift away, relocate or die. “Successful aging requires refilling our funnel of friends,” says Thomas, who considers socially engaged elders with friends wealthier than a socially isolated millionaire. “Notice opportunities for interacting and connecting,” advises Shae Hadden, co-founder of The Eldering Institute in Vancouver, Canada. Talk with the checkout person at the grocery store or smile at a stranger walking her dog.

Cultivate a Positive Attitude

Our beliefs about aging shape our experiences. A Yale University study found that older individuals with more positive self-perceptions of aging lived 7.5 years longer than those less so inclined. Connecting with positive role models helps us release limiting beliefs and embrace an attitude of gratitude instead. Other life lessons can be gleaned from observing how negativity affects people physically, emotionally, and socially. Holding onto regrets traps us in the past zapping energy and self-worth; it also keeps the best in us from shining out says Pevny. He suggests a simple letting-go ceremony, with friends as witnesses. If possible, hold it in a natural outdoor setting.


Understand Our Life Stories

Creating our own life review helps us acknowledge and understand our most significant experiences and reminds us of all we’re bringing to our elder journey. Pevny offers these approaches: n Develop a timeline, dividing life into seven-year sections. For each, write about the strongest memories and most influential people. n Consider what matters most, from people and values to challenges and dreams. n Write to children and grandchildren, sharing tales of our life’s most significant events and lessons. n Record key stories on audio or video.

Explore the Arts

The changes that aging brings can mire elders in depression and isolation. “Older people need to be brave and resilient,” says Susan Perlstein, of Brooklyn, New York, founder emeritus of the National Center for Creative Aging, in Washington, D.C., and founder of Elders Share the Arts, in New York City. “To age creatively, we need a flow of varied experiences, exploring new activities or reframing longtime interests from a fresh perspective.” Expressive arts can engage people’s minds, bodies and spirits. A George Washington University study shows that people engaged in the arts are happier and healthier. Perlstein understands this firsthand, having begun taking guitar lessons in her 70s. Motivated to play simple songs for her new granddaughter, she subsequently learned to play jazz and blues tunes and joined a band. “I’m doing something I love,” says Perlstein. “I’m meeting diverse people, learning new things and enjoying a rich life.”

The answers can lead to fresh settings, including local community centers and places of worship. Many universities have extension classes for lifelong learners. State arts councils support programs, and museums and libraries host helpful activities. Shepherd Centers encourage community learning and Road Scholar caters to elders that prefer to travel and study.

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At one of his conscious aging retreats, Pevny created a fire circle. Mike, 70, had been a dedicated long-distance runner for most of his life. Now plagued with mobility issues, Mike decided to let go of regrets. He brought a pair of running shorts into the circle and talked about what the sport had meant to him—its joys, challenges and camaraderie. Then he tossed the shorts into the fire, telling his friends, “I am letting go so I can find a new purpose and passion.”

Discover a Purpose Older people are our Upon retirement some people feel greatest resource. We need purposeless and lost. They yearn for to nurture them and give something that offers up excitement, energy and joy. Hadden invites people them a chance to share to be curious and explore options. “We’re designing our future around what they know. ~Susan Perlstein, founder, National Center for Creative Aging and Elders Share the Arts Musician John Blegen, of Kansas City, Missouri, was 73 when he realized his lifelong secret desire to tap dance. When Blegen met the then 87-year-old Billie Mahoney, Kansas City’s “Queen of Tap,” he blurted out his wish and fear of being “too old.” She just laughed and urged him to sign up for her adult beginner class. He asked for tap shoes for Christmas and happily shuffle-stepped his way through three class sessions. “Tap class inspired me, encouraged me and gave me hope,” he says. “Now I can shim sham and soft shoe. It’s a dream come true.” To unearth the inner artist, ask: n Which senses do I most like to engage? n Do I enjoy looking at art or listening to music? Do I like sharing feelings and experiences? If so, a thrill may come from writing stories or plays, acting or storytelling. n As a child, what did I yearn to do; maybe play the piano, paint or engineer a train set? Now is the time to turn those dreams into reality. n How can I reframe my life in a positive way when I can no longer do activities I love? If dancing was my focus before, how do I rechannel that energy and passion? If puttering in the garden is too strenuous, what other outdoor interests can I pursue?

who we are and what we care about now,” she says. Try keeping a journal for several weeks. Jot down issues and ideas that intrigue, aggravate and haunt. After several weeks, reflect on the links between concerns that compel and those that irritate. Perhaps we’re intrigued by a certain group of people or a compelling issue. “A concern points to problems and people you want to help,” Hadden observes. This can range from lending a hand to struggling family members, maintaining our own health, volunteering for a literacy project or working to reduce world hunger. “Choose what inspires you to get out of bed each day, eager to move into action.”

Develop Inner Frontiers

People in their elder years may still be measured by midlife standards, which include physical power, productivity and achievement. “They come up short in the eyes of younger people,” dharma practitioner Kathleen Dowling Singh remarks. “But those standards do not define a human life.” Rather, aging allows us to disengage from the pressures of appearances and accomplishments. As we release judgments and unwanted habits, we can increase our feelings of spirituality and peace. “When doors in the outer world seem to be closing, it’s time to cultivate inner resources that offer us joy and meaning. We have the beautiful privilege of slowing down and hearing what our heart is saying,” says Singh, of Sarasota, Florida.

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Meditation is one way to deepen spiritually as we age. “Sit in solitude, gather your scattered thoughts and set an intention,” Singh suggests. “A daily practice shows what peace, silence and contentment feel like. As you become more comfortable, add time until you’re sitting for 20 to 40 minutes.”

Acknowledge Our Shelf Life

“We cannot speak about aging and awakening without speaking about death and dying,” Singh believes. “We need to confront our mortality.” Meditating on the coming transition opens us up to the blessings of life. We can ask ourselves deep questions such as, “What am I doing? What do I want? What does this all mean? What is spirit?” Singh believes such searching questions are vital. None of us knows how much Earth time we have to awaken to a deeper, fuller experience of the sacred.

Help the World In today’s world of chaos and crisis, the wisdom of elders is more important than ever. “Older people need to be engaged, using their insights to help the Earth, community and world,” Pevny says. Creative aging is about improving the future for subsequent generations. In 2008, longtime educator Nora Ellen Richard, 70, of Overland Park, Kansas, wanted to be of greater service. She

respect, appreciation and celebration, and says, “As I’ve grown older, I’ve learned how vital it is to nurture the world I am in.” Deborah Shouse is a writer, speaker, editor and dementia advocate. Her newest book is Connecting in the Land of Dementia: Creative Activities to Explore Together. Connect at DementiaJourney.org.

Nearly three-quarters of America’s adults believe they are lifelong learners. It helps them make new friends and community connections and prompts volunteerism.

Creative Aging Resources

~Pew Research Center

The Eldering Institute Eldering.org

asked herself, “What if I housed a foreign student?” and found the International Student Homestay Program. She embarked upon an exploration of cultures from around the world without leaving home. Today, Richard has hosted more than a dozen female students and each relationship has expanded and enriched her life. “We talk about politics, food, religion and cultures; we even pray together,” Richard says. She points to memorable moments of bonding and

Elders Share the Arts Estanyc.org

Center for Conscious Eldering CenterForConsciousEldering.com Changing Aging ChangingAging.org Dr. Bill Thomas DrBillThomas.org

From Aging to Sageing Sage-ing.org Kathleen Dowling Singh KathleenDowlingSingh.com National Center for Creative Aging CreativeAging.org Shepherd’s Centers of America ShepherdCenters.org

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by Glennon Doyle Melton

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lenty of people are pretty, but haven’t yet learned how to be beautiful. They have the right look for the times, but they don’t glow. Beautiful women glow. That’s because beautiful is not about how we look on the outside; it is about what we’re made of and being “full of beauty” on the inside. Beautiful people spend time discovering what their idea of beauty is on this Earth. They know themselves well enough to know what they love, and they love themselves enough to fill up with a little of their particular kind of beauty each day. When we are with a beautiful woman, we might not notice her hair, skin, body or clothes, because we’ll be distracted by the way she makes us feel. She is so full of beauty that some of it overflows onto us. We feel warm and safe and curious around her. Her eyes typically twinkle a little and she’ll look at us closely—because a beautiful, wise woman knows that the quickest way to fill up with beauty is to soak in another’s beauty. The most beautiful women take their time with other people; they are filling up. Women concerned with being pretty think about what they look like, but women concerned with being beautiful think about what they are looking at, taking in the loveliness around them. They are absorbing the whole beautiful world and making all that beauty theirs to give to others. Source: Adapted excerpt from Love Warrior by Glennon Doyle Melton (Flatiron Books). She’s the founder and president of the nonprofit Together Rising. Read more at Momastery.com/blog.

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Public School Programs

NATURE’S CLASSROOM Outdoor Learning Engages the Whole Child by Meredith Montgomery

Nature-based schools provide a child-centered, guided discovery approach to early learning that appeals to kids, parents and teachers and offers far-ranging benefits.

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or youngsters at Tiny Trees Preschool, in Seattle, nature is their classroom— rain or shine; tuition even includes a rain suit and insulated rubber boots. At Schlitz Audubon Nature Preschool, in Milwaukee, children use downed wood to build forts and fires. Students of Vermont’s Educating Children Outdoors (ECO) program use spray bottles of colored water to spell words in the snow.

Forest Schools Based on the publicly funded forest kindergarten model used by Scandinavian countries since 1995, Tiny Trees encompasses seven urban park locations throughout the city, ranging from 15 to 160 acres. With no buildings, playgrounds or commercially produced furniture and 30 percent less overhead, “We can make exceptional education affordable,” remarks CEO Andrew Jay. “Most of the day is spent exploring the forest. If children see salmon in the 20

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stream, we observe them from a bridge, and then search out the headwaters to see where they’re coming from,” explains Jay.

Nature Preschools The launch of Earth Day in 1970 and America’s nature center movement in the 1960s yielded another immersive nature-based model that includes indoor learning. The preschool at the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Designcertified Schlitz Audubon Nature Center includes three nature-focused indoor classrooms and three outdoor areas— two with manmade structures like a slide and picnic tables, and one left completely natural. Founding Director Patti Bailie says the children spend most of their day outside and teachers can take them beyond the play areas to explore 185 acres of prairie, forest, wetlands and lakefront beach habitats.

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ECO currently collaborates with seven Vermont public schools from preschool to high school, offering year-long programs for students in inquiry-based outdoor learning for up to four hours a week. “We immerse ourselves in nature with a 10-minute hike into the forest,” says program coordinator Melissa Purdy. Students first learn safety protocols and how to set up camp. Introducing skill-appropriate tools, preschoolers whittle sticks, third-graders build teepees and lean-tos, and high school students build bridges across streams.

Building Resiliency Sharing space with insects and plants requires special safety protocols and preparation, but the injury rate of outdoor learning is no higher than that of indoor schools. “Children are building risk literacy—they climb trees, but only to safe heights; they step on wet rocks, but learn how to do so without falling,” says Jay. Classrooms without walls work because students have a sense of freedom within reasonable boundaries. “In winter, we dress warmly and do more hiking to generate body heat. We use picnic shelters in heavy rains. Children don’t have anxiety about the future—rain means puddles to splash in and snow means building snowmen,” says Jay.

Developing the Whole Child Outdoor learning naturally creates knowledge of local ecosystems, environmental stewards and a sense of place, but teachers also observe many other developmental benefits. At the Magnolia Nature School, at Camp McDowell, in Nauvoo, Alabama, Madeleine Pearce’s agile and surefooted preschoolers can hike three miles. Located in a rural county with a 67 percent poverty rate, the school

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Kindergarten means “children’s garden” and originally took place outdoors. It’s commonplace today in Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland.

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Parents and teachers often describe nature preschool students as being more observant, confident, inquisitive and engaged. partners with Head Start to secure tuition-free opportunities for families. Pearce attests how exploring the 1,100-acre property fosters language skills. “With less teacher instruction, children have more time to talk freely with each other.” Instead of loudly calling kids in, Purdy uses bird calls or a drum, which fosters a sense of peace and respect. During daily sit time students observe themselves as a part of nature. “As birds sing and wildlife appears, children see the rewards of quiet and stillness, so self-regulation becomes natural,” agrees Bailie. Bailie sees how children in forest kindergartens express better motor skills, physical development and cognitive abilities than those restricted to traditional playgrounds. Natural playscapes change with the season, are sensory-rich and provide extra oxygen to the brain—all factors that correlate to brain development. Such benefits are reported in Brain-Based Learning by Eric Jensen, Brain Rules by John J. Medina and the Early Childhood Education Journal. Outdoor preschools also foster microbial exposure, essential for healthy immune system development. “Without this exposure, children are at increased risk for developing allergies, asthma, irritable bowel disease, obesity and diabetes later in life,” says B. Brett Finlay, Ph.D., author of Let Them Eat Dirt, which cites supporting science. Kindergarten readiness is a goal of all preschools, but Pearce doesn’t believe a traditional academic focus is required. “By putting nature first, children are socially and emotionally ready for kindergarten,” she says. “They know how to conquer challenges and are ready to take on academics.” Meredith Montgomery publishes Natural Awakenings of Gulf Coast Alabama/Mississippi (HealthyLiving HealthyPlanet.com).

therapyspotlight

BIOLOGICAL DENTISTRY Makes a Healthy Difference by Astrid Sand

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iological dentistry, sometimes referred today as holistic or biocompatible dentistry, is based on the concept that the mouth and oral structures are an integrated part of the body. It is a paradigm, or philosophy, within dentistry, and not a specialty. Biological dentists recognize that the mouth is connected to the body and that it cannot be viewed as an independent system. It is a reflection of the overall health of the body, and much can be done to impact it, both positively and negatively. Biological dentistry supports the choice to live a healthier, more natural and less toxic life, bridging the gap between conventional clinical dentistry and natural healing modalities. All biological health care models share basic philosophical foundations. They promote health and well-being through healthful nourishment, elimination of toxins and the promotion of physical, mental and energetic balance. Some of the known mirrors of our physical condition are the skin, eyes, hair and nails. The teeth are even better mirrors, because they can reflect the condition of our inner organs. For example, the incisors have interrelations with the kidney and bladder, and the canines to the liver, gallbladder and eyes. Diseases of specific teeth can result in diseases in the related organs, and vice-versa. Healthy teeth are therefore a sign of a healthy body.

Biological dentists also make fillings, take X-rays and use anesthesia to numb teeth. However, they only use mercury-free, white restorations. More importantly, they take extra precautions when removing old “silver” amalgam fillings to minimize exposure to mercury vapor. They also use a digital, computer-generated X-ray unit that reduces exposure to radiation by as much as 70 percent. Biological dentistry does not advocate the indiscriminate use of fluoride in adults or children. These dentists do research and attend courses to find the safest and most biocompatible materials available for dental work and follow up-to-date (SMART) protocols in mercury filling removal. Because they recognize that each individual has a different threshold of tolerance for dental materials, biological dentists suggest further testing to determine their ability to tolerate a particular restorative material over long periods of time. Overall, they treat each patient as the unique individual and customize treatments to combine the best of modern dentistry and complementary therapies. Dr. Astrid Sand, DDS, practices at Smart Dentistry, located at 1140 SE 18th Pl., in Ocala. For appointments, call 352620-0093. For more information, visit DentistInOcala.com. See ad, page 7.

Biological dentists recognize that the mouth is connected to the body and that it cannot be viewed as an independent system. natural awakenings

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OCT

consciouseating

Coming Next Month photos by Stephen Blancett

Chiropractic

CARE Plus: Transformative Travel October articles include: Selecting a Chiropractor Bone-Density Exercises Life-Changing Travel and so much more!

FABULOUS FAN FARE Healthy Tailgating Foods to Cheer For by Judith Fertig

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at, play, party… and repeat. We may call it tailgating, fangating, homegating, a watch party or simply eating with friends before a big game. According to the American Tailgaters Association, in St. Paul, Minnesota, an estimated 50 million Americans tailgate annually. Whether we’re on the road or at home, making the menu healthy is a winning strategy for hosts and guests. Here, two experts divulge their winning ways. Says Debbie Moose, author of Fan Fare: A Playbook of Great Recipes for Tailgating or Watching the Game at Home, Ivy League schools like Princeton and Yale claim credit for pregame picnics that 19th-century sports fans packed into their horse and buggy for local road trips. Moose lives in the tailgate trifecta of the North Carolina triangle, home to Duke, North Carolina and Wake Forest universities. She enjoyed discovering that University of Washington sports fans from the Seattle area like to sail to their chosen picnic spots, while

University of Hawaii folks grill fish on hibachis in Honolulu. Moose naturally prefers healthy, Southern-style fare such as deviled eggs and marinated green bean salad, which can be served hot, cold or at room temperature. “At the game or at home, your guests will be moving around, so go for foods that can be eaten with one hand,” she suggests. She also plans her menu around color, universal appeal and variety because it’s healthier than just serving a mound of barbecued chicken wings and a big bowl of potato chips. She likes recipes that can do double duty; her black bean summer salad with cherry tomatoes and corn can function as a colorful side dish or as a salsa for nonGMO blue corn chips. “Recipes that you can do ahead of time make things easier on game day; just pull them from the fridge and go,” says Moose. Daina Falk, of New York City, grew up around professional athletes because her father, David Falk, is a well-known

Natural Awakenings recommends using organic, non-GMO (genetically modified) and non-bromated ingredients whenever possible.

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sports agent. Excitement-generating sports are in her blood and inspired her to write The Hungry Fan’s Game Day Cookbook. She knows that most of the tailgating in her area takes place for football and baseball games and NASCAR races. On HungryFan.com, Falk serves up tips for every fangating/homegating occasion, from the Kentucky Derby to the Super Bowl. “Keep your menu interesting,” says Falk. “I always like to feature a dish for each team. For instance, if you’re hosting an Alabama versus Washington watch party, you could feature an Alabama barbecue dish with white sauce and oysters or other fresh seafood. Both dishes are characteristic of the local foods in the universities’ respective hometowns.” Falk recommends buying more local beer than needed to make sure not to run out. Game day guests can get hot and thirsty, indoors or out. Supply lots of filtered water in non-breakable containers. For easy entertaining, Falk recommends biodegradable dishes and cups. “Whenever there are a lot of people in one room, especially when they’re drinking, a glass will likely be broken,” she says. “Save yourself cleanup and the risk of glass shards by committing to temporary cups and plates that are Earth-friendly and compostable.” Judith Fertig writes cookbooks and foodie fiction from Overland Park, KS (JudithFertig.com).

Healthy Tailgating Recipes Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Place the sliced onions in a colander over the sink. In a small bowl, stir together the oil, vinegar, salt and pepper until combined. Stir in the garlic. Set aside. When the water comes to a boil, add the green beans. Cover and cook for 5 to 10 minutes or just until the beans are bright green; do not overcook.

Crowd-Pleasing Marinated Green Beans Yields: 8 servings This simple salad is easy to double or triple. Make it the day before the game and refrigerate. ½ large red onion, thinly sliced 1 /3 cup extra virgin olive oil ¼ cup herb-flavored white wine vinegar or regular white wine vinegar Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 2 cloves garlic, crushed 2 lb fresh green beans, ends trimmed, but left long

Pour the beans and hot water over the onions in the colander. Rinse under cold running water to cool down. Drain well for a few minutes. Place the beans and onions in a large bowl or large re-sealable plastic bag. Pour the dressing in and mix with the vegetables. Refrigerate four hours or overnight, stirring or shaking occasionally. Let come to room temperature before serving. Courtesy of Debbie Moose, Fan Fare: A Playbook of Great Recipes for Tailgating or Watching the Game at Home.

Aging is not lost youth,

but a new stage of opportunity and strength. ~Betty Friedan

NASCF

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Chilled Red Bell Pepper Soup Yields: 4 small servings Quadruple this recipe to make soup for a larger gathering. Serve in small sipping cups—cold for games in hot weather or hot for games in cold weather.

Black Bean Summer Salad Yields: 8 side dishes or 4 light meals This salad is easily doubled to feed a crowd. 2 cups fresh or frozen corn kernels 2 (15 oz) cans black beans, rinsed and well drained 5 or 6 green onions, white and green parts, chopped 1 large sweet banana pepper, seeded and chopped 1½ cups halved cherry tomatoes 6 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil 2 Tbsp lime juice 2½ Tbsp red wine vinegar 1 tsp chili powder Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 1 /3 cup chopped fresh cilantro leaves In a large bowl, toss together the corn, black beans, green onions, banana pepper and tomatoes.

1 red bell pepper, stemmed ½ cup low-fat Greek or dairy-free yogurt ¼ yellow onion 2 Tbsp tomato paste 1 small/mini-cucumber ¼ cup rice vinegar 2 Tbsp Dijon mustard 4 large garlic cloves 1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil Garnish: Flat leaf (Italian) parsley (minced optional) Roasted and salted pumpkin seeds Blend all main ingredients, except garnish, in a high-speed blender into purée. Serve topped with the parsley and a sprinkle of pumpkin seeds. Adapted from Daina Falk’s HungryFan.com.

Vegetarian-Friendly Barbecue Cauliflower Nuggets Yields: 8 appetizer servings Plant-based barbecue is a home run or touchdown. 1 head of cauliflower 1 cup all-purpose or gluten-free flour 1 Tbsp barbecue spice blend 1 cup nut milk of choice 1 cup tomato-based barbecue sauce Accompaniment: Dipping sauce of choice Preheat the oven to 450° F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Rinse and separate cauliflower florets into small- to medium-sized pieces.

In a small bowl, whisk together the olive oil, lime juice, vinegar, chili powder, salt and pepper.

In a medium-sized mixing bowl, combine the barbecue spice, flour and nut milk until smooth.

Pour the dressing over the vegetables and toss to coat them all. Then stir in the cilantro.

Dredge each piece of cauliflower in the batter before placing it on the baking sheet.

Refrigerate from 1 to 3 hours to let the flavors come together.

Bake for 18 minutes or until golden brown. Brush the cauliflower with barbecue sauce and return to the oven for an additional 5 minutes.

Note: If using frozen corn, drain it well and lightly sauté in a couple of teaspoons of olive oil before adding it to the salad. This removes moisture that may make the salad watery. Courtesy of Debbie Moose, Southern Holidays: A Savor the South Cookbook. 24

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Remove the cauliflower from the baking sheet and plate alongside a dipping sauce of your choice. Adapted from Daina Falk’s HungryFan.com.


Cannabinoids

The Most-Studied Therapeutic Compounds on the Planet by Linda Sechrist

H

undreds of abstracts published on the results of cannabis research can’t be wrong. The links to 567 of them posted on GreenMedInfo.com, give viewers the opportunity to click their way to research that demonstrates the wide range of healing attributes and therapeutic properties of Cannabis sativa. This important herbaceous species, which was used in conventional medicine until the 1930s, is a virtual treasure trove of phytochemicals, antioxidants, essential oils and cannabinoids— a class of diverse chemical compounds that act on specialized receptor cells that repress neurotransmitter release in the brain. In 2016, Frontiers in Plant Science named cannabis “the plant of the thousand-and-one molecules.” From the Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology, in Germany, to Israel’s prestigious Hebrew University, in Jerusalem, which opened a cannabis research center and joined a consortium of 19 research teams at local academic institutions to study cannabinoids, the compounds of Cannabis sativa have become the most studied group of compounds on the planet. One of the most active of these cannabinoids is cannabidiol. Referred to as CBD, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration legalized it in 2014 and categorized it as a supplement. It was the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) by Israeli chemist Raphael Mechoulam, a leading pioneer in cannabis research at Hebrew University, that first alerted medical science to the largest receptor system in humans, and the fact that the human brain produces its own cannabinoids that stimulate this receptor system. This revelation is essentially what legitimized the study of a substance previously only on the margins of scientific research. The reason that Cannabis sativa works so efficiently is because of the human body’s ECS and its series of receptors that are configured only to accept cannabinoids, especially tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). Until recently, the focus was largely on THC, because of its mind-altering effects. That focus has now shifted, due to the fact that CBD, the major non-psychoactive component of Cannabis sativa, has acquired a long list of medical benefits. According to a 2013 study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, CBD acts as an anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, antiemetic,

anxiolytic and antipsychotic agent, and is therefore a potential remedy for the treatment of neuro-inflammation, epilepsy, oxidative injury, vomiting and nausea, anxiety and schizophrenia. “To activate the body’s endocannabinoid system, an individual needs to consume a minimum of 20 milligrams of CBD per day. We suggest front loading for four to five days to activate the system by taking 20 milligrams three times per day. Then find the milligram strength that works for the specific condition. Begin with more than needed to get desired results. After you get relief, reduce the strength and frequency to find the dosage that works best for the individual condition,” says Walter Wright. He is the Marketing Director for Wright Marketing & Consulting, and a spokesperson for Sunshine Global Services, a producer of premium, highly researched hemp CBD and skincare products backed by a minimum of three independent lab tests and field testing. They are the first in the Eastern United States to achieve a completely THC-free (no traces) phytocannabinoid-rich hemp oil. Some scientific reports even demonstrate that CBD benefits include anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic effects that inhibit cancer cell migration, adhesion and invasion. A 2006 study published in the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics found that CBD selectively and potently inhibited the growth of different breast tumor cell lines and exhibited significantly less potency in non-cancer cells. In the future, it is possible that cannabis-based remedies may take their rightful place in the worldwide pharmacopeia once again. In the meantime, with the proliferation of CBD products in health food stores and online, it is important to research the quality and potency of what is offered. Read labels and look for third-party International Organization for Standardization (ISO) lab testing for purity, as well as supercritical CO2 closed-clod extraction, a non-toxic and environmentally friendly botanical oil extraction method. Laboratories that are ISO-accredited have demonstrated that they are technically competent and able to produce precise and accurate test and/or calibration data. For more information about CBD, call 800-334-1236 or visit SunshineGlobalHealth.com. See ad, page 11. natural awakenings

September 2017

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North Central FL


calendarofevents FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 Mainstage Play – September 1-24. 1984. By George Orwell, adapted by Andrew White. What if one thought cost you everything? The Hipp and UF School of Theatre + Dance collaborate to bring George Orwell’s best-selling literary masterpiece to the stage. The Hippodrome, 25 SE 2nd Place, Gainesville. 352-375-4477. TheHipp.org.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 Readings – noon-5:30pm. With Many Deer. Choose Tarot, Palm Readings, I Ching or a combination. $35/half hour, $60/hour. Call to register. High Springs Emporium, 19765 NW US Hwy 441, High Springs. 386-454-8657. HighSpringEmporium.net

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 Women’s Sunday Brunch – 11am. An amazing assortment of women, locally grown food, an entertaining program in an atmosphere of quiet, respect and contemplation. Sliding scale from $10 to whatever you can contribute. Crones’ Cradle Conserve Foundation, 6411 NE 217th Pl, Citra. Reserve by noon the Friday before at 352-595-3377 or CatCrone@aol.com. CronesCradleConserve.org.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 Natural Eye Program – September 5-7. Learn what you can do about wet/dry macular degeneration, glaucoma, and cataracts without injections. Seating is limited, call to pre-register. Lemire Clinic, 11115 SW 93rd Ct Rd, Ste 600, Ocala. 352-291-9459. LemireClinic.com. Transformation, Detox/Healing Group series – 4pm. Decrease weight, lower A1C and cholesterol, increase energy. Seating is limited, must pre-register. Lemire Clinic, 11115 SW 93rd Ct Rd, Ste 600, Ocala. 352-291-9459. LemireClinc.com.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 Workshop and Pot Luck Dinner – 6pm. Explore your writing talents. Any level of writing skills welcome. Activities include reading discussions, editing and new ideas. Free with pot luck dish. Crones’ Cradle Conserve Foundation, 6411 NE 217th Pl, Citra. Call or email to reserve at 352-595-3377 or CatCrone@aol.com. CronesCradleConserve.org. Soul-to-Soul – 7-9pm. Hosted by Rev. Cindy Grimes. Bringing people together who want to change the world. Guest speakers, refreshments and live music. Love offering. Oakbrook Center for Spiritual Living, 1009 NE 28th Ave, Ocala. 352-629-3897. OakbrookCSL.org.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 Musical Meditation – 6:30pm. With Bruce Day. A program of togetherness with devotional songs to meditate, celebrate, share and simply sit in circle. Love offering. Unity of Ocala, 101 Cedar Rd, Ocala. 352-687-2113. UnityOcala.org.

SATURDAY, SEPTMEBER 9 Workshop – 2-4pm. Finding Your Soul Balance – the Deep Magic of Stellar Beam Calcite. With Sharron Britton. $20. Call to register. High Springs Emporium, 19765 NW US Hwy 441, High Springs. 386-454-8657. HighSpringEmporium.net

Class – 2-4:30pm. Psychic / Medium Spiritual Development. Includes meditation, lesson and practice. $30. Held at Unity of Gainesville, 8801 NW 39th Ave. International Foundation for Spiritual Knowledge. 407-247-7823. ifsk.org.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 Workshop – 1-3pm. Tibetan Bowl Meditation and Workshop. With Bruce Capin. $35. Call to register. High Springs Emporium, 19765 NW US Hwy 441, High Springs. 386-454-8657. HighSpringEmporium.net

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 Patient Education – 6pm. Learn about the clinic followed by Q&A. Free. Seating is limited, call to reserve your seat. Lemire Clinic, 11115 SW 93rd Ct Rd, Ste 600, Ocala. 352-291-9459. LemireClinic.com. Music Meditation and Conscious Concert – 6:30pm. Songs, silence, meditation, contemplation, celebration. Suggested Love offering $15-30. Unity Spiritual Center, 509 County Rd 468, Fruitland Park. 352-454-3120. UnitySpiritualCenterFL.org.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 Transformation, Detox/Healing Group series – 4pm. Decrease weight, lower A1C and cholesterol, increase energy. Seating is limited, must pre-register. Lemire Clinic, 11115 SW 93rd Ct Rd, Ste 600, Ocala. 352-291-9459. LemireClinc.com. Crystal Bowl Meditation – 7pm. A guided meditation using crystal bowls to get to that quiet still place. Love offering. Unity Spiritual Center, 509 County Rd 468, Fruitland Park. 352-454-3120. UnitySpiritualCenterFL.org.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 Iridology – 8am-5pm, by appointment. Learn about your health’s needs through your eyes. Lemire Clinic, 11115 SW 93rd Ct Rd, Ste 600, Ocala. 352291-9459. LemireClinc.com. Class – 1-3:30pm. Spiritual Dowsing. With Master Dowser Karen Durham. Learn the basics of dowsing. $35. Call to register. Fairy Dust Crystals & Such, 11781 SE Hwy 441, Belleview. FairyDustCrystals.com. Meditation – 6-7pm. Oneness with Dana. Oneness Blessing Meditation with certified Deeksha Blessing giver Dana Hawkins. Love donations accepted. Fairy Dust Crystals & Such, 11781 SE Hwy 441, Belleview. FairyDustCrystals.com. Class – 6-8pm. Introduction to Theta Healing. With LouAnn Saphos. Full class to be offered following week. $22. Call to register. Fairy Dust Crystals & Such, 11781 SE Hwy 441, Belleview. FairyDustCrystals.com. Class – 6:30-8pm. Mind Mapping for Productivity. Interactive class led by Helen Kornblum, MA, ADHD coach and organizer. If making To Do lists doesn’t help you accomplish anything, it’s time to explore how mind mapping can increase your productivity. Help with organization, memory deficits, impulsivity and creativity. $24. Register: SFCollege.edu/cied/communityed/ and click “Take a Class” or 352-395-5193. Location: Santa Fe College, 3000 NW 83rd St, Gainesville. Info: CoachOrganizer.com.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14 Event – 6:30pm. Peace in the Midst Annual World Day of Prayer Event. Unity Spiritual Center, 509 County Rd 468, Fruitland Park. 352-454-3120. UnitySpiritualCenterFL.org.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 Workshop – noon-3pm. Creating Flower Essences from Florida Native Plants. With Nicholas Pearson. $45. Call to register. High Springs Emporium, 19765 NW US Hwy 441, High Springs. 386-454-8657. HighSpringEmporium.net

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 Healing Sessions – noon-5pm. Tibetan Skull Healing Sessions. With Nicholas Pearson. $55/half hour, $88/hour. Call to register. High Springs Emporium, 19765 NW US Hwy 441, High Springs. 386-4548657. HighSpringEmporium.net

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 Thermography Screenings – 8am-5pm; by appointment. Thermography is a healthy alternative to mammograms. Lemire Clinic, 11115 SW 93rd Ct Rd, Ste 600, Ocala. 352-291-9459. LemireClinic.com. Class – 4pm. Diabetes Education. Seating is limited, need to pre-register. $25. Lemire Clinic, 11115 SW 93rd Ct Rd, Ste 600, Ocala. 352-2919459. LemireClinic.com.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 Health Screenings – by appointment. Life Line Screening at Unity of Ocala. Carotid Artery Screening, Hearth Rhythm Screening, Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening, Peripheral Arterial Disease Screening, and Osteoporosis Risk Assessment. Prices vary. Pre-registration required at 888-653-6450 or LifeLineScreening.com/Community-Partners. Location: Unity of Ocala, 101 Cedar Rd, Ocala. UnityOcala.org. Transformation, Detox/Healing Group series – 4pm. Decrease weight, lower A1C and cholesterol, increase energy. Seating is limited, must pre-register. Lemire Clinic, 11115 SW 93rd Ct Rd, Ste 600, Ocala. 352-291-9459. LemireClinc.com.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 Psychic Party – 2:30-4:30pm. With JoEllen Blue. $20 per person. Call to register. Fairy Dust Crystals & Such, 11781 SE Hwy 441, Belleview. FairyDustCrystals.com. Psychic Party – 5:30-7:30pm. With JoEllen Blue. $20 per person. Call to register. Fairy Dust Crystals & Such, 11781 SE Hwy 441, Belleview. FairyDustCrystals.com. Workshop and Pot Luck Dinner – 6pm. Explore your writing talents. Any level of writing skills welcome. Activities include reading discussions, editing and new ideas. Free with pot luck dish. Crones’ Cradle Conserve Foundation, 6411 NE 217th

natural awakenings

September 2017

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Pl, Citra. Call or email to reserve at 352-595-3377 or CatCrone@aol.com. CronesCradleConserve.org. Soul-to-Soul – 7-9pm. Hosted by Rev. Cindy Grimes. Bringing people together who want to change the world. Guest speakers, refreshments and live music. Love offering. Oakbrook Center for Spiritual Living, 1009 NE 28th Ave, Ocala. 352-629-3897. OakbrookCSL.org.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 Class – noon-4pm. Wirewrapping, Level 1. With Pat Zachry. Learn to make your own gemstone jewelry. $55. This class is a pre-requisite for Pat’s advanced classes. Call to register. High Springs Emporium, 19765 NW US Hwy 441, High Springs. 386-4548657. HighSpringEmporium.net

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 Class – noon-4pm. Wirewrapping, Level 2. With Pat Zachry. Learn to make your own gemstone jewelry. $55. Call to register. High Springs Emporium, 19765 NW US Hwy 441, High Springs. 386-454-8657. HighSpringEmporium.net

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 Monthly Meeting – 6pm. Big Scrub Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society. Visitors are encouraged to arrive early to enjoy the Belleview Public Library’s native wildflower garden. Free and open to the public. Belleview Public Library, 13145 SE County Hwy 484, Belleview. MarionBigScrub.fnpschapters.org

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 Save Your Mind Intensive Program – September 26-28. What can you do to clear mental fog,

28

North Central FL

remember, and sharpen your thinking? Seating is limited, need to pre-register. Lemire Clinic, 11115 SW 93rd Ct Rd, Ste 600, Ocala. 352-291-9459. LemireClinic.com. Discussion – 6-7:30pm. Lightworkers Gathering. Open Floor discussion. Love offering accepted. Fairy Dust Crystals & Such, 11781 SE Hwy 441, Belleview. FairyDustCrystals.com. Crystal Bowl Meditation – 7pm. A guided meditation using crystal bowls to get to that quiet still place. Love offering. Unity Spiritual Center, 509 County Rd 468, Fruitland Park. 352-454-3120. UnitySpiritualCenterFL.org.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 Class – 6:30-8pm. Understand Executive Function. With Helen Kornblum, MA, ADHD coach. Children and teens with executive function issues don’t necessarily think differently, they struggle with the process of coordinating, prioritizing or managing information needed to perform tasks successfully. This is an overview of the executive functions, highlighting strategies for parents to help their children develop new skills in these areas. $24. Register: SFCollege.edu/cied/communityed/ and click “Take a Class” or 352-395-5193. Location: Santa Fe College, 3000 NW 83rd St, Gainesville. Info: CoachOrganizer.com.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 Workshop – 11am-noon. Going thru Them Changes – the Fascinating World of Pseudomorphs. With Travis Hetsler. Free. Call to register. High Springs Emporium, 19765 NW US Hwy 441, High Springs. 386-454-8657. HighSpringEmporium.net

GoNaturalAwakenings.com

plan ahead SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 Health Fair – 10am-4pm. Health Through Awareness Health Fair. Speak with local practitioners to increase awareness of yoga, Ayurveda, massage therapy, postural awareness, metaphysics and more. There will be short presentations, demonstrations and healthy nutritious samplings. Free. Nadi Om Wellness, 6158 SW Hwy 200, Ocala. 352-525-0247. NadiOmWellness.com. Benefit Dinner – 5:30pm. 4th Annual Dining in the Dark to benefit The Florida Center for the Blind. Guests will walk and dine in total darkness to experience the same challenge faced every day by blind and visually impaired persons. Raffle, live music, dinner and dancing. $75/person, $140/couple. cash bar. Location: Trinity Catholic High School, 2600 SW 42nd St, Ocala. Info: 352-873-4700. Purchase tickets online: FLBlind.org.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11 Car Show – 10am-3pm. Hot Cars and Cool Cats Fall Car Show to benefit Endangered Animal Rescue Society in Citra. Auction, vendors, music, and great food. All cars, trucks, motorcycles welcome for $10 entry. Spectators free. Location: 2250 NE 70th St (Hwy 326,) Ocala. 352-266-2859. earsinc.net.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10 Fall Natural Foods Gala. Crones’ Cradle Conserve Foundation, 6411 NE 217th Pl, Citra. For info, 352-595-3377 or CatCrone@aol.com. CronesCradleConserve.org.


ongoingevents

classifieds

NOTE: All calendar events must be submitted via our website by the 10th of the month and must adhere to our guidelines. Visit GoNaturalAwakenings.com for guidelines and to submit entries. Simmons. Love offering. Unity Spiritual Center, 509 County Rd, Fruitland Park. 352-­454-­3120. UnitySpiritualCenterFL.org.

sunday Sunday Spiritual Service – 10am. Unity of Ocala, 101 Cedar Rd, Ocala. 352­-687-­2113. mail@UnityOcala.org. UnityOcala.org.

thursday

Unity Spiritual Center Sunday Service – 10am. Transformational message focuses on oneness, sustainability, the use of prayer, the power of your imagination and remembering who you are and why you are here. Unity Spiritual Center, 509 County Rd, Fruitland Park. 352­-454-­3120. UnitySpiritualCenterFL.org.

A Course in Miracles – 4pm. Discussion Group. Unity of Ocala, 101 Cedar Rd, Ocala. 352-687-2113. Mail@UnityOfOcala.org. UnityOcala.org.

Oakbrook Sunday Service – 10:30am; Guided Meditation – 9:45am. Awaken and LIVE. Oakbrook Center for Spiritual Living, 1009 NE 28th Ave, Ocala. 352-629-3897. OakbrookCSL.org. Brewery Yoga at First Magnitude – 1-2pm Bring your own mat for yoga in the warehouse. All experience levels. Suggested donation $5. First Magnitude Brewing Co., 1220 SE Veitch, Gainesville. 352-727-4677.

monday Course in Miracles – 9am. Unity Spiritual Center, 509 County Rd, Fruitland Park. 352­-454-­3120. UnitySpiritualCenterFL.org.

tuesday Course in Miracles – 9:30am. Unity Spiritual Center, 509 County Rd, Fruitland Park. 352-­454-­3120. UnitySpiritualCenterFL.org. Technology Help Center – 2-4pm. Free. Belleview Public Library, 13145 SE Hwy 484, Belleview. 352-438-2500.

wednesday Hearing Screenings – 8am-5pm. With Dr. David Ditchfield. By appointment. Qualifying Participants with hearing loss will receive a free Personal TV listening device. Free. Lemire Clinic, 11115 SW 93rd Ct. Rd, Ocala. 352-­291-­9459. LemireClinic.com. Qigong – 9-9:30am. With Dr. Neil Crenshaw and Dr. Don Mederios. Donations go to Connected Warriors. Van Ness Park Civic Center, G Ave and 7th St, McIntosh. 352-425-2975. Class – 6-8pm. Embracing Conflict, Creating Peace. A class based on the book The I of the Storm by Gary

friday Health Happens Farmers Market – 9am-2:30pm. Shop for fresh produce, seafood, honey, baked goods, gluten-free snacks and prepared meals for lunch. McPherson Governmental Complex field, 601 SE 25th Ave. Ocala. 352-438-2360.

Fee for classifieds is a minimum charge of $20 for the first 20 words and $1 for each additional word. To place an ad, email GoNaturalAwakenings@gmail.com.

ADVERTISING ADVERTISE HERE – Are you: hiring, renting property/office space, selling products, offering services, or in need of volunteers? Advertise your personal/business needs in Natural Awakenings classified ads section. To place an ad, email GoNaturalAwakenings@gmail.com.

FOR SALE SURPLUS SALE – We are relocating our office and have office and medical equipment for sale. Furniture, folding chairs, washer and dryer, instant heat machine, microdermabrasion and much more! Natural Medicine Physicians, 11115 SW 93rd Ct Rd, Ocala. Call Nuris or Kathy at 352-291-9459 or stop by!

OPPORTUNITIES

saturday Haile Farmers Market – 8:30am-12pm. Open rain or shine, heat or cold. Haile Village Center in Haile Plantation, SW 91st Terr, Gainesville. HaileFarmersMarket.com. Organic Pickup Hub – 9am-1pm. The Ocala hub to pick up Strawberry Passion Organics. Market Under the Oaks, 2250 NE Hwy 326, Ocala. ShariWin777@gmail.com. Farmstead Saturdays – 9am­3pm. Free. Crones Cradle Conserve, 6411 NE 217 Pl, Citra. 352-­595-­ 3377. CronesCradleConserve.com. Ocala Farm Market – 9am-2pm. Locally grown farm fresh seasonal produce, homemade jellies and jams, crafts and plants. Location: Corner of SE 3rd St and SE 3rd Ave, Ocala. 352-426-8244. OcalaDowntownMarket.com.

START A CAREER YOU CAN BE PASSIONATE ABOUT – Publish your own Natural Awakenings magazine. Home-based business complete with comprehensive training and support system. New franchises are available or purchase a magazine that is currently publishing. This local magazine is currently for sale. Call 239-530-1377 or visit NaturalAwakeningsMag.com/MyMagazine.

PLANS CHANGE! Please call ahead to confirm dates and times.

Yoga Teacher Training Program – 1-6pm. Program covers the 8-limbs of yoga, including meditation, asana, pranayama, relaxation techniques, philosophy, Yoga Sutras, chants and anatomy & physiology. After completing 180 hours, graduates receive a certificate to teach yoga and the ability to register with Yoga Alliance at RYT200. $50 per session. Florida Yoga Academy, 6369 E Place, McIntosh. 352-591-5739. FloridaYogaAcademy.com. Class – 2-4:30pm. One Saturday each month. Psychic / Medium Spiritual Development. Includes meditation, lesson and practice. $30. Call or check website to confirm date. Held at Unity of Gainesville, 8801 NW 39th Ave. International Foundation for Spiritual Knowledge. 407-247-7823. ifsk.org.

T hey always say time changes things,

but you actually have to change them yourself. ~Andy Warhol natural awakenings

September 2017

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communityresourceguide Connecting you to the leaders in natural health care and green living in our community. To find out how you can be included in the Community Resource Guide, email GoNaturalAwakenings@gmail.com to request our media kit.

AUDIOLOGY

COACHING/ORGANIZING

DAVID DITCHFIELD ACA BCHIS Audioprosthologist 352-291-9459

David has served the hearing needs of people in this area since the 1980s. He is the president of TriCounty Hearing Aid Inc. and has joined the audiology department of the Natural Medicine Physicians, formerly Lemire Clinic. His practice has fit thousands with hearing instrumentation and has been appointed exclusive area dispenser for Nuear products with the renowned Starkey engineering. By appointment. See ad, page 2.

BIOLOGIC DENTISTRY CORNELIUS A. LINK, DDS

NATURAL ORDER COACHING & ORGANIZING Helen Kornblum, MA 352-871-4499 • 352-505-0541 Helen@CoachOrganizer.com CoachOrganizer.com

Helen helps teens and young adults deal with the challenges of ADHD by working on strategies for positive change, building selfesteem and confidence. Students can develop better social skills and improve their organizing skills. See ad, page 9.

COLONICS GENTLE WATERS HEALING CENTER 352-374-0600 Gainesville Info@GentleWatersHealing.com

1140 SE 18th Pl, Ocala 352-620-0093 DentistInOcala.com

Dr. Link stresses a biologic balance in the mouth as part of total body health. Dr. Link announces the return to his former office in the Southwood Medical Center to practice as an associate of Dr. Astrid Sand, DDS and Dr. Manuel De Leon, DDS. The office is refurbished with the newest and latest dental digital technology, prompting the motto “Modern Dentistry the Old-Fashioned Way: We do it all with empathy, care and integrity.”

The therapists at Gentle Waters Healing Center assist each individual with detoxing using colon hydrotherapy, far infrared sauna, and/or aqua chi lymphatic drainage. Call Dawn Brower for more information or visit G e n t l e Wa t e r s H e a l i n g . c o m . MA41024, MM15426.

ENERGY WORK OUR SPIRITUAL JOURNEY, LLC

BODY WORK NEUROMUSCULAR MASSAGE BY DESIGN

Janice M. Puta On Top of the World, Ocala 352-615-7745 Spiritual-Healing-By-Janice.com

Patricia Sutton LMT, NMT, CRT MA22645 1920 SW 20th Pl, Ste 202, Ocala 352-694-4503 Offering Certified Neuromuscular Masssage, cranial release technique, ETPS acupuncture to treat the pain you were told you would have to live with. Specializing in back, neck and post-surgical pain, fibromyalgia, migraines and TMJ therapies. See ad, page 15.

SRA Certified Teacher and Consultant in Spiritual Response Therapy, Janice helps you claim the life you really want to be living through classes, and customized sessions, that clear past life energies, subconscious blocks, and negative programming.

W e are not victims of aging, sickness and death.

These are part of the scenery, not the seer, who is immune to any form of change. This seer is the spirit, the expression of eternal being. ~Deepak Chopra 30

North Central FL

GoNaturalAwakenings.com

FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE JAMES LEMIRE, MD

Natural Medicine Physicians 11115 SW 93rd Ct Rd, Ste 600, Ocala 352-291-9459 LemireClinic.com Dr. Lemire is both Board Certified in Family Practice for 40 years and is an Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM) Certified Practitioner. Some of the common protocols Dr. Lemire works with are: Thyroid conditions, Chronic Fatigue, MS, Fibromyalgia, Arthritis, Leaky Gut, Cancer, Hormone Unbalances, Heavy Metal Toxicity, Inflammatory and Auto Immune Conditions, Lyme Disease, Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, and Weight Management. Dr. Lemire sees children and adults. See ad, page 2.

HEALING ARTS SANDY WILSON, EFT-ADV, MCHT EFT Practitioner/Hypnotist 352-454-8959 EFTSandy@yahoo.com SandraWilsonPositiveChange.com

When nothing else works, call Sandy. With EFT, you can eliminate anger, guilt, fear and grief; you can release non-medical physical pain; you can remove blocks and achieve goals. See website or call to schedule your session.

HOLISTIC MEDICINE HANOCH TALMOR, M.D. Gainesville Holistic Center 352-377-0015 DrTalmor.com

We support all health challenges and the unlimited healing potential of God’s miracle: your body. Chelation, nutrition, cleansing, homeopathy, natural energy healing, detoxification, wellness education and more. See ad, page 10.

LOCALLY-GROWN PRODUCE CRONE’S CRADLE CONSERVE FOUNDATION 6411 NE 217th Pl, Citra 352-595-3377 CronesCradleConserve.org

The conserve is an ecological preserve, retreat center and organic farm. Local fresh produce can be bought at The Farm Store on property, through Farm to Fare weekly Baskets or delivered to your restaurant. The Farm Store is open 7 days a week. Certified kitchen honey house and event space available. See ad, page 28.


SCHOOL

CONNECT WITH OUR READERS!

BODHI SANGHA THAI MASSAGE AND SCHOOL OF TRADITIONAL THAI FOLK MEDICINE 813-417-6745 • BodhiSangha.com ArielaGrodner@yahoo.com

Students can advance in their studies of Thai Massage and Tr a d i t i o n a l T h a i F o l k Medicine. Courses offered are; Thai Foot Reflexology, Double Practitioner Thai Massage, and Thai Herbal Bundle Therapeutics. The Bodhi Sangha Shala is a place to grow and learn, to build community, to cultivate mindfulness and compassion, and to deepen one’s studies of the ancient healing art of Thai Massage. See ad, page 13.

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE SARAH USHER, LMT MA36244

LuDawn Spa & Salon MM36632 4620 East Silver Spring Blvd, Ocala 352-236-5353 or 352-362-4919 SarahUsherLMT.AMTAmembers.com Sarah is a Licensed Massage Therapist and Certified Reflexologist. She is trained in Prenatal Massage. Promoting wellness through the bodywork of Therapeutic Massage.

VETERINARY CARE MEDICINE WHEEL VETERINARY SERVICES Shauna Cantwell, DVM Ocala 352-538-3021 • ShaunaCantwell.com

Holistic veterinary medicine for small animals and horses. Arthritis, neurologic and hormonal dysfunction, skin, allergies, cancer, pain, immune and chronic disease. Certified veterinary acu-puncture, certified-AVCA animal chiropractic, herbal therapy, tui na medical massage, functional neurology, postural rehabilitation, ozone therapy, homotoxicology and nutrition. Available for workshops. See ad, page 13.

please recycle

T H R E E -MONT H E DIT OR IAL CALE NDAR AND MAR KE T ING PLANNE R

O C T

Transformative Travel

N O V

Diabetes Prevention & Reversal

plus: Chiropractic Our Readers are Seeking Providers & Services for:

Transformative Travel Companies Adventure Tour Groups • Travel Outfitters Personal Growth Retreats • Spiritual Pilgrimages Natural Habitat Adventures General, Advanced & Sports Chiropractors

plus: Silent Retreats Our Readers are Seeking Providers & Services for:

Functional Medicine Practitioners Fitness/Health Clubs • Herbalists Organic/Non-GMO/Sugar-Free Foods Eco-Retreats • Spiritual Centers • Spas

Uplifting Humanity

D E C

plus: Holidays

Our Readers are Seeking Providers & Services for: Charities • Community Services Ethnic Crafts • Gift Baskets/Certificates Natural Toys • Relationship Counselors Spiritual Centers/Healing

Contact us to learn about marketing opportunities and become a member of the Natural Awakenings community at:

352-629-4000

GoNaturalAwakenings@gmail.com natural awakenings

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You’re Living the Healthy Lifestyle Here is Your Business Opportunity to Share It with Others

The North Central Florida Natural Awakenings Magazine is FOR SALE • Be a Part of the Nation’s Leading Health/Green Lifestyle Magazine with 23 Years of Publishing Experience • Home-Based Operation with Proven Business System Including Exceptional Franchise Support & Training • Reliable Customer Base

Serving Alachua, Bradford, Marion and Sumter counties, plus The Villages.

• Powerful Prospect Database • Established Distribution Locations • Responsive Website, Email Database & Established Social Media Network

Call today for more information!

239-530-1377

or visit NaturalAwakeningsFranchise.com

32

North Central FL

GoNaturalAwakenings.com

*Natural Awakenings recently received the prestigious FBR50 Franchise Satisfaction Award from Franchise Business Review.

Natural Awakenings North Central Florida September 2017  
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