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GOLDEN GATE XPRESS //

STUDENT-RUN NEWSPAPER PROUDLY SERVING THE SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY SINCE 1927.

// 04.25.12

VOLUME LXXXXII ISSUE 13

WEIGHING THE OPTIONS:

Panel begins reviewing bookstore proposals

RHYTHMS MUSIC FESTIVAL

Indie bands will highlight music fest BY DEVERY SHEFFER | dsheffer@mail.sfsu.edu

It all started as a joke three years ago. When one SF State student should have been studying, he instead make a Facebook group titled “If 1,500 people join this group then the campus will let us have a rave in the Annex.” To Franko Ali’s surprise, the group he created in jest was a big hit and more than 5,000 people joined in the first week. One year later Ali was elected as a member of the Associated Students, Inc., which put him in the position to make his vision of bringing a music festival to SF State a legitimate possibility. That same year, the ASI board voted on spending $16,000 in ASI fees, paid by students, toward bringing Travie McCoy of The Gym Class Heros to SF State for a one-time performance. Ali voted against it because he thought that much money could be put to better use, but he was outnumbered and the proposal was ap-

3

BANDS TO LOOK OUT FOR AT THE FESTIVAL

SEE MUSIC ON PAGE 6

UNDER REVIEW: SF State alumnus and General Books Floor Supervisor Justin Rhodes (left) takes a tour around the store with recently-hired Seth Anderson during a training session. Discussions will continue in the coming months as a panel explores management options for the SFSU Bookstore, currently managed by nonprofit Franciscan Shops. Photo by Henry Nguyen

BY ANGELA RAIFORD

araiford@mail.sfsu.edu

There has been no shortage of controversy surrounding the impending change of management for the SFSU Bookstore and, even with the open forums finished the decision may be quite a long time coming. While University Corporation is aware of concerns from both students and faculty surrounding the chances of Follett Corporation or Barnes & Noble taking over as for-profit corporations, UCorp chief operating and financial officer Agnes Wong Nickerson said the decision is left to the review panel. “The panel will review the information presented by each proposer, evaluate feedback

received and obtain any additional information needed in order to fully evaluate the proposals,” said Nickerson. Nickerson, who is also the SF State associate vice president of administration and finance, said that whether Franciscan Shops retains management, changes outlined in the selected corporation’s proposal will most likely be initiated in the coming semester. The only factor that would change this tentative date is the Bookstore panel running past its tentative deadline to select a proposal. “The target time frame was Summer 2012 in order to be prepared for the Fall 2012 semester,” she said. “That would be dependent on how long it takes to complete a thorough review of the

proposal responses.” Rumors surfaced two weeks ago suggesting that Barnes & Noble had already begun negotiations to take over the Bookstore management before the open forums had finished April 12. Nickerson dismissed the claim. “We are in the middle of the evaluation process,” she said. “It is too early to have a selected vendor.” In the course of the forums, audience members expressed concern over why the request for proposals were sent out in the first place. Student members of Occupy SFSU made appearances at all three forums, voicing their concerns about the potenSEE BOOKSTORE ON PAGE 9

UNIVERSITY PURCHASES VACANT BUILDING After lengthy negotiations, SF State has finally acquired the former San Francisco School of the Arts to expand campus.

A

BY CAROLYN COPELAND | carolync@mail.sfsu.edu

NEW BUILDING FOR students will be added to the University in the distant future. In the interim, there are plans for a new grass field for student recreation. After years of negotiations, the San Francisco Unified School District has finally agreed to sell the vacant property on Font Boulevard to SF State. The University bid approximately $11 million on the site through the California Department of General Services in early April. The former San Francisco School of the Arts has been vacant since 2002 and SF State has been interested in purchasing the property since it first went on the market. SFUSD rejected two previous offers in the last five years. “(SFUSD) has a responsibility to the children we serve to get a fair price for the property in order to put

those funds back into improving our existing schools,” said Gentle Blythe, a spokeswoman for SFUSD. “Until recently, SF State and SFUSD have been fairly apart in their positions on the value of the property. Recent negotiations and updated property RUNDOWN: The rundown property on Font Boulevard, which was recently purappraisal brought the parties to a common chased by the University after years of negotiations, is scheduled to be demolished and equitable position.” this summer to make way for a new recreation field. Photo by Henry Nguyen According to spokeswoman Monica Hassan, DGS is currently awaiting the written agreement from the district so that Before the 2 ½ acre property can be owned by SF the transaction can be finalized. State, DGS must first present the details of the sale to Until the construction on the clinical sciences the State of California Public Works Board in May. If building begins, the property will be transformed into a temporary grass field for students to play sports outside. approved, the Sacramento Department of Finance will release the funds for the sale. The earliest that SF State “Student surveys and feedback have indicated we will be able to gain legal access to the property will be are sorely in need of a recreation field for intramural July 2012. activities, outdoor activities and other such uses,” she said. “This would be a field for outdoor activities with appropriate lighting.” SEE CONSTRUCTION ON PAGE 9


04.25.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

2 CAMPUS

SF SPEAKS OUT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THE RHYTHMS MUSIC FESTIVAL THIS WEEKEND? DO YOU PLAN TO GO?

Forums, creative outlets help men cope with trauma BY BRITTNEY BARSOTTI | bbarsott@mail.sfsu.edu

Programs offered by the SAFE Place allow men dealing with emotional distress from sexual violence to form alliances, heal and redefine masculinity.

“I did not know about it. I probably won’t go just because finals are coming up so I’m going to be doing homework all weekend.”

RACHEL KEYWORTH, 21

3% OF COLLEGE MEN

REPORT SURVIVING RAPE OR ATTEMPTED RAPE AS A CHILD OR ADULT

82% OF RAPE

SURVIVORS SAY THE RAPE PERMANENTLY CHANGED THEM

ACCORDING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, 6-11% OF REPORTED SEXUAL ASSAULT CASES INVOLVE MALE VICTIMS

LIBERAL STUDIES MAJOR

“I’m not sure if I’m going to attend or not. I normally go to those kinds of things. It seems pretty interesting because it’s at the Annex, really close to school. We used to always joke about throwing something in the Annex, so it seems pretty cool.”

ALEX HUI, 19

KINESIOLOGY MAJOR

“I’ve actually heard about the Rhythms Music Festival, and I don’t plan to go, but I’m interested now. I’m sure it’s free. I’ll check it out, and I live close, so I don’t see why not.”

JEREMY SMITH, 23 BIOLOGY MAJOR

Justin Thielman came from a conservative town. There were no resources for victims of sexual abuse. It wasn’t until he was 20 that he was able to admit to himself the sexual abuse he suffered at the hands of his father for more than 10 years. He can’t remember exactly when it began. It was just a way of life. “It’s difficult to pinpoint an exact age when you realize you are being abused,” Thielman said. It wasn’t until his early teenage years that Thielman was able to identify just what was happening and that it was not normal; by the time he was 16, he was able to put an end to the abuse for good. It was too late for him to salvage his high school career; he took the GED instead. It took seven years before he was able to continue his education at SF State. “It took a long time for me to recover to go back to school,” said the 27-year-old. “The years I was not in school, I spent going to therapy. I was trying to figure out who I was and heal.” For many men, the stigma associated with sexual assault is very different from what women experience because of societal perceptions of masculinity and the socialization of men, according to Ismael de Guzman, coordinator of the Sexual Abuse Free Environment Place at SF State. “It’s difficult for men to be a victim of sexual violence because there is such a sense of the complete loss of power and masculinity,” de Guzman said. Thielman spent years in therapy, and when he found the SAFE Place, he came forward as a survivor of sexual abuse. He then got involved with the organization, and began to share his story as a means of healing. “There comes a moment when you choose that you don’t want to be miserable for the rest of your life,” Thielman said. “You’ve been living in the trauma and have that sick feeling in the gut. It’s time to move on or stay stuck in it.” For many who have suffered sexual abuse or violence, there can be a stigma for being a victim that is different from other crimes. People close to the victims are also at risk of emotional injury following a violent attack, according to Derithia DuVal, director of Counseling and Psychological Services. She said those close to victims can experience trauma vicariously. This was the case for Jeff Briz, SF State student and SAFE Place peer educator. Briz was out of town when his girlfriend was sexually assaulted after they had been together for a few months since they began college at San Diego State University. “When I first heard about what happened, I felt this incredible anger and rage and disbelief and confusion. The initial emotions

were so intense and completely took over. I didn’t know how to deal,” Briz said. According to Briz, his girlfriend had a very hard time being alone and there were certain acts that were off limits in their intimate relationship. They slowly drifted apart. It wasn’t until Briz moved to San Francisco, began his work with the SAFE Place and sought counseling that he was able to address his anger from the incident. He finally was able to acknowledge what happened and had the tools to move forward. De Guzman says that one of the focuses of the SAFE Place is providing a space for men to talk about their experiences around sexual violence and change the conversation about it being exclusively a women’s issue; it is a men’s program that focuses on teaching men to be allies. He said that the SAFE Place’s Men Can Stop Violence program is specifically aimed at shifting the conversation with sexual violence to a male perspective by creating male allies and challenging stereotypical views of masculinity. Since taking over SAFE Place, de Guzman has seen an increase in male survivors of sexual violence coming in to talk about their experiences, like Thielman. One of the forums that de Guzman has helped create is Cocktales, an annual performance where men express their experiences and emotions around sexual violence and masculinity through monologues or spoken word poetry. According to de Guzman, it is a creative space that can bring about healing for men who have experienced any sort of trauma or questioned societal perceptions of masculinity. “Cocktales serves a twofold purpose. It creates a space for men to talk about their own trauma and notions of masculinity. Also, men can talk about the pain as well as the healing and they have the opportunity to feel they are being heard, which can be a vindicating experience,” he said. Cortney Leung, a 24-year-old graduate student who works with the SAFE Place and a rape crisis counselor, who has worked with a number of victims, sees the power of acknowledging the victims’ experiences in the recovery process. “There is so much stigma around rape that listening to a victim and telling them, ‘I believe you’ and it’s not their fault can be a very healing experience for them, and then they can cope,” she said. It took a long time and a lot of help, but Thielman has faced his trauma and has since moved into a place of emotional restoration. “My story is of healing not for myself, but my family,” Thielman said. “It’s about breaking the patterns and learning to heal by being open and honest.”

CRIME BLOTTER Quasi-truthful ruminations loosely based on real events.

04.18 through 04.24

Compiled by Tamerra Griffin

A DIRTY D.I.Y. DEED “I plan on going, and all I know right now is that Toro y Moi is playing in the old Annex. They’re gonna have battle of the bands.”

MICHAEL GROVER, 20 CINEMA MAJOR

REPORTING BY TAMERRA GRIFFIN PHOTOS BY HENRY NGUYEN

University police took a report of a Parkmerced resident whose clothes had been damaged and sprayed with bleach April 16, amounting to up to $600 in losses. Perhaps the unknown perpetrator had been so inspired by the funky fashions they had seen during Coachella’s opening weekend that they decided to experiment with acid wash denim and ripped up concert tees at the expense of their roommate’s wardrobe. Either way, it’s a bold look.

SECONDHAND DRUNK

Officers cited a subject on Vidal Drive around 12:05 a.m. April 20 for underage possession of alcohol. While he was not reported as intoxicated, he had been drinking and was found shouting at the location. When one of your of age friends asks you to hold her vodka and cranberry while she pees, think twice before she stumbles off toward the Parkmerced hedges.

GOT MUNCHIES?

After questioning a suspiciouslooking subject near the Station Cafe around 10:30 p.m. April 20, officers found that he was in possession of narcotics and immediately took him to the county jail. UPD likely didn’t realize the celebrating stoner - who hadn’t figured out the cafe closed five hours earlier - was still waiting for his gallon of water and Nutella and banana bagel.


CAMPUS 3

| 04.25.12

GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

Connecting to the Campus Wi-Fi problem A WEEKLY COLUMN BY STAFF WRITER BRIAN BALISI ABOUT WHAT NEEDS TO BE FIXED AROUND THE SF STATE CAMPUS AND HOW TO GET IT DONE.

MR.

T I X FI

SUBMIT PROBLEM AREAS ON CAMPUS TO BBALISI@MAIL.SFSU.EDU I was in the Mr. Fix It headquarters the other day, excited to try on various outfits in hopes of finding the official Mr. Fix It uniform. I checked the time on my newly fixed clock and decided to spend a few minutes to browse the internet for the latest gadgets and accessories to add to my handy tool belt. I proceeded to try to log onto the internet, but to my dismay it wouldn’t let me access the Mr. Fix It email. I witnessed students nearby frantically reloading pages, restarting computers and furiously running around trying to find an internet connection. I immediately jumped out of my chair and stormed into action to determine why it is so difficult to connect to our Wi-Fi. Julianne Tolson, director of web and user services at SF State, said there are a multitude of reasons as to why the Wi-Fi gets slow or people are unable to connect to it. Over the years the demand for Wi-Fi has skyrocketed with so many people walking around with cell phones and computers, jockeying for a Wi-Fi signal. “You have to imagine that trying to connect to the Wi-Fi is like waiting in line at the grocery store,” Tolson said. “Imagine there are two lines open and one has six customers in it while the other line has one person. You’re eventually going to get served in either line, but it all matters on what line you end up in. It may take you a bit longer if you’re waiting behind a few people.” Tolson said there are numerous factors that affect the speed of the Wi-Fi such as location, the number of devices at a certain access point, the time of day and how much data is being transmitted, for example, if are you watching an HD video or sending out a Tweet. To ensure your computer is running properly and not affected by these variables she recommends updating your computer with the latest operating system, latest virus protection updates and keeping your firmware up to date. Firmware updates typically improve wireless performance. Devices infected with viruses often seem slow because the virus runs in the background using up system and network resources. Tolson said if you are in an area with a large number of devices trying to connect to the internet try moving to a different location to see if the signal strength improves. Typically the best spot to get a good signal is to be by a window because physical barriers, such as walls or pillars, can reduce the signal strength. If you’re using a laptop or a smart phone you can get a strong signal by going outdoors. With a little bit of research and a lot of leg work I found that I had the most trouble logging onto the internet at the Cesar Chavez Student Center, which was probably due to the number of people in there and the large cement pillars. When the library first reopened there was a large number of complaints about students not being able to log on, but Tolson’s department was able fix it recently. The library is now a solid choice when searching for a consistently strong connection. Tolson said she understands how important it is to stay connected to the internet and she would love to hear from people when they’re having trouble doing so. “From the deepest corner in Hensill Hall to the student center, we want to know where you can’t connect,” Tolson said. “We need help in figuring out the places that need our attention to keep everything working properly.” Contact the Division of Information Technology Help Desk if you are still having problems connecting to the internet or have any other computer needs at 415-338-1420 or helpdesk@sfsu.edu.

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4 CITY

04.25.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

Controversial study highlights bias BY KALE WILLIAMS | kale@mail.sfsu.edu

UNION SQUARE There are two words that come to mind when describing the food scene in the city’s bustling Union Square: tourist traps. Amid the plethora of seemingly promising restaurants that line Market and Powell streets, there are scant food treasures in need of weeding out, worthy of tourists as well as locals.

SWEET TOOTH

SAN FRANCISCO BAKING COMPANY HINT: Unlike most bakeries that sell all types of sweets, this baking company specializes only in what its good at: cookies. These all-natural cookies will hit the sweet spot, particularly the white chocolate cranberry and cookies ‘n’ cream. When shopping on Powell, don’t hesitate when a lady in red offers you a sample of warm shortbread. 106 Powell St.

CHEAP EATS

THEATRE TOO CAFE

HINT: This is no ordinary delicatessen; it has a Middle Eastern twist that gives a ridiculous amount of value for your buck. The girthy, zesty falafel wraps drenched with cooling tzatziki sauce are simply made to be eaten with the spicy red pepper hummus and toothy whole wheat lavash. 539 Sutter St.

ROMANTIC

When Rick Santorum recently decried California universities as dents get both points of view just by doing the readings.” bastions of liberal elitism based on a report he read from “the state Carcieri said he takes a similar approach to the question of bias of California” he instantly garnered nationwide criticism from the in the classroom. likes of Jon Stewart and Rachel Maddow. “I simply try to draw out the strengths and weaknesses on all Although the report, authored by the conservative National Assides of the cases we analyze,” he said. “In concluding some of sociation of Scholars, has come under criticism these discussions, further, after the students have for its content and methodology, some of its talked them through, I’ll sometimes lay my views on claims may ring true. the table, often suggesting some of the complexity of Martin Carcieri, a political science profesthe issues.” sor at SF State, said that a liberal tilt is almost In a city like San Francisco, known for its far-left assumed among faculty members. leanings, the faculty is bound to reflect the surround“While I work with some pretty good departing community, according to political science major ment faculty colleagues at SF State, in my five Ryan Simon. But he said most of them do a good job years here it seems very clear that many, though of separating personal views from their curriculum. perhaps not all, SF State faculty implicitly ex“One of my professors, who I’m pretty sure is While I work with pect that one is, so to speak, ‘drinking the Koolvery liberal, goes out of his way to make sure that some pretty good Aid’ of hard left ideology,” he said in an email. both sides of an argument are presented,” he said. “If department facThe report, released in April of this year, all we’ve heard is people agreeing on a liberal viewulty colleagues at studied social science departments within the point, he’ll usually step in and say ‘but try thinking SF State, in my University of California system and found that about it this (more conservative) way,’ at which point five years here it within the humanities, liberal leaning faculty it usually gets very quiet.” seems very clear outnumber their conservative counterparts by a Smith pointed to SF State’s history as a mainstay margin of 17 to 1 and that the views of liberal of liberal thought as a reason that many are attracted that many, though professors moved dramatically to the left in the to the University. perhaps not all, last 40 years. “I think a lot of people are attracted to the UniSF State faculty “This report is tapping into something that versity and the city because of its liberal reputation,” implicitly expect has been known for some time,” said Robert he said. “We are more liberal than other CSUs; we that one is, so to Smith, a political science professor who has might even be more liberal than UC Berkeley. There speak, ‘drinking taught at SF State since 1976. “But I think it is a certain energy at this school, with its history and the Kool-Aid’ of went a bit far in suggesting that there was an acreputation, that makes it a liberal bastion.” hard left ideology. tive liberal agenda that was being projected onto But Carcieri said that precisely because San Martin Carcieri the students, which I don’t think is generally the Francisco in general, and SF State in particular, leans POLITICAL SCIENCE case.” so far to the left, it is vital to teach students with a PROFESSOR Smith, who self-identifies as a liberal, said balanced approach. he goes to great lengths to ensure that both sides “The radical leanings of San Francisco politics of an argument are presented in his classes. should inspire SF State faculty to present conservative “I start off by telling my students that I come from the left libviews forcefully and in great detail, so to enable students to respond eral end of the spectrum, and that should take everything I say with effectively to such views in the real world, if indeed they disagree a grain of salt,” he said. “In my more advanced classes it doesn’t with them,” Carcieri said. “If people graduate from SFSU having come up as much because the texts we read speak for themselves. been exposed to only radical left views, SF State is crippling them Some of them are liberal and some are conservative, so that stufor citizenship.”

Program aims to help youths find jobs in SF

BISCUITS & BLUES

HINT: Watch out gravy, biscuits have found a new soulmate in this quaint jazz lounge and restaurant. Enjoy the complimentary buttery, flaky biscuits while listening to live bands performing covers of jazz greats. Be sure to try its highlight: the chicken and andouille sausage jambalaya with creole-style seasoned rice. 401 Mason St.

WILDCARD

PUNJAB KABAB HOUSE

HINT: This may seem like another hole-in-the-wall Indian food eatery, but what sets this place from the likes of Naan & Curry or Shalimar is that the food isn’t tamed down for a milder palate. The mutter paneer will challenge anyone’s heat tolerance with its fusion of coriander, chile, cumin and turmeric. Cool this down with the chicken tikka masala, which has a refreshing cooling effect from the coconut cream-based sauce. 101 Eddy St.

AN XPRESS GUIDE TO DINING IN THE CITY. COMPILED BY EAST BAY DWELLER AND VORACIOUS FOODIE MATT MAXION, WHO ENJOYS WRITING ABOUT THE BAY AREA FOOD SCENE. HE IS ALSO THE SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR FOR THE GOLDEN GATE XPRESS.

BY ANA PREZA | acpreza@mail.sfsu.edu

Ed Lee heeds Barack Obama’s call to create jobs for young people in order to give them experience in the workforce through summer jobs and internships.

G

OING OUT INTO THE WORKFORCE can be an intimidating and frightening experience, especially for those seeking their first employment. San Francisco’s Summer Jobs+ is a local program designed to get young people between 16 to 24 years old working summer jobs or paid internships as part of President Barack Obama’s call to create jobs. Youths can participate in mock interviews and improve their résumés with help from various participating organizations. “This is a program that’s geared towards youth in helping them find jobs,” said Maria Stokes, public relations director of United Way of the Bay, an organization that works to strengthen communities and decrease poverty. “It just really gives a leg up in their job search.” Mayor Ed Lee is asking businesses and nonprofit organizations to hire teens and young adults for entry-level positions. The goal is to get 5,000 youth working in San Francisco alone. United Way of the Bay and AfterCollege, a career network website that helps students leaving college find jobs, are collaborating with the program. “President Obama issued this call to the nation to create 250,000 jobs for young people, especially people who are considered disadvantaged, disconnected or at risk to help them find meaningful summer employment,” Stokes said. Twitter, Zynga, Jamba Juice and UPS are just some of the local companies offering jobs in the program. The city and county of San Francisco has also pledged to create 2,500 jobs for youth. So far, 3,000 jobs are available. Glenn Eagleson, senior planner and policy analyst for the Department of Children, Youth, and their Families, explained that

certain city departments already have summer job or internship programs but are creating more jobs to help achieve the goal. “Everyone has really stepped up,” Eagleson said. “Taking existing programs and making them bigger and adding more positions.” Roberto Angulo, CEO and co-founder of AfterCollege, said this program is challenging companies to create entry-level positions for youth who can benefit from the experience. “If you hire young people, it helps launch them in the workforce,” Angulo said. SF State creative writing major Hank Brown, 19, who is currently unemployed, said students like himself could really benefit from Summer Jobs+. “It’s always nice to have a helping hand or a nudge that we need,” Brown said. Youths are invited to attend the program’s Resource Fair May 12 and participate in free workshops for help with resumes, cover letters and completing applications. Stoke encourages those who attend the fair to bring their resumes and cover letters, and dress professionally to meet with potential employers. Stokes encourages people to take advantage of the various services provided before applying and going on interviews. SF Summer Jobs+ program is designed to prepare youth for the future. Those interested in the program can visit hiresfyouth.com to begin the job search and to get more information. Stokes encourages people to take advantage of this opportunity to gain experience and skills before it’s too late. “Now is a really important time to start working, don’t wait until school is over,” Stokes said. “Companies are interested and starting their hiring process now.” A new summer jobs program in San Francisco will give teens and young adults the opportunity to gain valuable work experience and skills they will need to facilitate this process in the future.


5

| 04.25.12

GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

I

N DIM CANDLELIGHT WITH A BURST OF semi-kinky spontaneity, you generously slather chocolate syrup onto the body of your partner. Using your fingers to blend it into your very willing victim’s body, you pause to sensuously lick clean one of your fingers with your tongue. You tease. Thanks to the chemical makeup of the chocolate, phenylethylamine - better known as PEA - begins to work its way through your system triggering the release of dopamine, a natural neurotransmitter also released during orgasm, according to Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa’s book “Chocolate, Science and Technology.” The result is a rush of euphoria and a natural high. Working food into your sex play has never sounded like so much fun. According to Maryanne Fisher in her “Psychology Today” article “The Relationship Between Sex and Food,” eating and sex involve all the same senses: touch, taste, smell and sight. Combining the two, naturally, heightens your already inflamed senses - especially when both food and sex are needs so fundamental, they’re practically primal. “Food is love. Touch is affection. Food and touch are the basic ingredients of life,” said Tiberio Simone, also known Since breaking up with her as The Sensual Chef, during inner prude, Cassie Becker an independently-organized has done it all. Her interest TED event in November in sexual exploration has led 2010. her to write several blogs and break even more beds. She’s And the two ingredients extensively researched and blend together better than written about it - all with a Simone might think. sexy smile. Chocolate isn’t the only food that can increase PEA in your system; apples, tomatoes, almonds and cheddar cheese all do the trick as well, Fisher says in her article. Even spices such as ginger, which increases circulation, and ginseng, which is said to increase the libido, could play a part in some spicy lovemaking. Get adventurous with your food play during sex. You never know what might get those internal chemicals going. But here comes the obligatory word of warning: Not all foods are conducive to sex play. It might seem fun to stick a fudgesicle inside your lady and guzzle up everything that drips out, but it pretty much guarantees her a yeast infection. Same goes for anything with a high sugar content, according to peer sexual health educator Nicole Sessions, 21. If you have to ask if it might cause her an itchy, burning sensation later on that means there will be no sex for over a week, keep it clear of the vulva and vagina. The same goes for anything that’s oily. “Oily or oil-based foods can tear condoms so even though you’re being safe and you’re having fun while doing it, the oil from the foods can cause a rip in the condom - even a tear that you can’t see with your eyes - so just be careful,” Sessions said. “Don’t put it by the genitals.” Unfortunately, even flavored lubes, condoms and edible body powder can be dangerous near the genitalia. But everything can still be immensely fun during foreplay, so bust out a strawberry-flavored condom for a pre-coital blow job and go to town with the whipped cream on the nipples to turn your partner into a sexy sundae. And then head to the shower together to wash it all off.

LEARN MORE about the bachelor’s degree completion programs in Business, Psychology, Health Sciences, Legal Studies, Liberal Studies, and Law Enforcement Leadership. PLEASANT HILL Saturday, April 28 10:30 a.m. 100 Ellinwood Way

SAN JOSE Saturday, May 5 10:30 a.m.

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WWW.JFKU.EDU

TODAY

Down and dirty with the sticky and sweet

Attend an OPEN HOUSE

RSVP

A WEEKLY SEX COLUMN BY CASSIE BECKER

CHANGE YOUR FUTURE. TODAY.

© 2012 JFKU 11002

THE INS & OUTS

JOHN F. KENNEDY UNIVERSITY

800.696.5358

Scholarships and financial aid available Individuals with disabilities needing special assistance should call 925.969.3362 before the event. An Affiliate of The National University System | www.nusystem.org JFK University is a nonprofit University accredited by WASC and an approved participant in the Yellow Ribbon Program.

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6 ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

04.26.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG


6

T H E RRRHHH YY TT HHMMM O

No l o n ge r a make s h i f t l i brary, the Annex will t ur n i n t o a t e nt of t rebl e and bass duri ng th e se co n d ann ual R h yt hms Musi c Festival .

FESTIVAL SCHEDULE \\BANDS\\\\\\ \\\\ STARTS AT T H U R S DAY A P R I L 2 6 Team Backpack Set Change Talk of Shamans Set Change Bang Data Set Change Grieves & Budo Set Change So Timeless Set Change BOTB Winner Set Change The Hood Internet Set Change Toro y Moi

1:00 p.m. 1:35 1:55 2:15 2:35 3:10 3:30 4:15 4:35 5:10 5:30 6:00 6:20 7:40 8:00

F R I DAY A P R I L 2 7 V-Techh Ear Jerker & Baan MPHD K Theory Long Beach City Kids Rico Tubbs

LAST YEAR DESIGNER DRUGS PERFORMS AT JACK ADAMS HALL AT SF STATE DURING THE RHYTHMS MUSIC FESTIVAL 2011.

9:00 p.m. 9:30 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:15

CAMPUS RALLIES FOR BIG ACTS AT MULTI-DAY MUSIC EVENT CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

proved. But when McCoy’s single “Billionaire” was performed on the TV show “Glee,” his booking prices went up and out of range for ASI, causing the proposal to fall through. Ali used this opportunity to present his counterproposal for a three day music festival. His proposal passed, and last March the first annual Rhythms Music Festival commenced. “It was kind of makeshift, we had never done it before at San Francisco State but the three days we had shows, we filled up,” Ali said of last year when the festival took place in the Cesar Chavez Student Center. “We had to turn people away because the venue wasn’t big enough.” The capacity for this year’s festival is estimated at 900 people at a time.

FRAMING FOR A NEW VENUE BY BARBARA SZABO | barbaras@mail.sfsu.edu

This time last year, the Annex served as a temporary library while the current one was under construction. But Thursday and Friday, April 26 and 27, a stage will take the place of desks, instruments will replace books and silence will be frowned upon as Toro y Moi headlines the Rhythms Music Festival. Franko Ali, vice president of student affairs of Associated Students, Inc., wanted to compile musicians from a diverse range of genres. The Depot’s booking manager Gio Acosta and booking assistant Stephanie Escoto contributed to the process, contacting numerous bands before compiling the final list. “Our approach was to find a headliner and let everything else fall into place from there,” said Escoto. Tonight, April 25, five SF State bands will compete in a Battle of the Bands from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on the bottom floor of the Cesar Chavez Student Center to win a chance to perform at the festival Thursday. The biggest change for this year’s festival is that it will take place in the

Annex. Ali initially wanted it to take place outdoors, but that didn’t pan out for several reasons. “There is so much politics on this campus and regulations, and we’re still exploring with big scale events,” said Ali. The event, organized by seven members of the Programs and Services committee of Associated Students, Inc., comes with a price. ASI spent close to $24,000 on the artists alone. The toppaid headliners are Toro y Moi, who received $13,000, and Hood Internet, who received $4,000. The committee has also faced some challenges in organizing such a large event in the Annex for the first time. The Annex is filled with power panels about every 10 feet that must be covered up for safety reasons. Also, the space is not meant to be a venue so sound quality posed a problem. To compensate, ASI hired a sound production and lighting company, straying from the usual in-house technical assistance. Ali hopes that the headlining act next year will be a hip-hop artist, because he believes more people favor that over a chillwave indie-rock artist such as Toro y Moi. “Until we are in everyone’s vision, a hipster headliner is difficult to sell,” said Ali. The committee initially wanted to book rapper Immortal Technique, who fell through when his availability didn’t coincide with the festival dates. Ali created Facebook pages for each festival event and received several less-than-enthusiastic responses from students when he announced the lineup. Some showed concerns that the artists weren’t mainstream enough, while others questioned ASI for spending students’ money on such an event, according to Ali. Each semester, students pay $51 specifically to ASI, a fee that is separate from tuition. The money is spent as ASI sees fit, which includes giving away scholarship funds, but also planning events students can enjoy such as this festival. “We just want to make sure everyone’s happy and that it all comes together well,” said Acosta.

3

PHOTO OF THE ANNEX BY HENRY NGUYEN


7

F REPURPOSING

3

BANDS TO LOOK OUT FOR AT THE FESTIVAL 1. TORO Y MOI

CAREERS IN THE MUSIC INDUSTRY:

PANEL AND EXHIBITION F R I DAY A P R I L 2 7 1 P. M . T O 4 P. M . Several key players in the San Francisco music scene and from SF State’s Music/Recording Industry school will host a panel Friday, April 27 at Jack Adams Hall in Cesar Chavez Student Center. These insiders will share their perspective on running a record label, booking artists, owning and managing a venue and promoting events. Each person will present for about five minutes, followed by a 45-minute Q&A segment and a mixer to interact and network with the industry professionals. “It’s all about promoting the legitimacy of the music industry in general and to raise awareness about it from a real world perspective,” said Elliot Lozano, the volunteer project consultant for Associated Students, Inc. Kerry Fiero, events and marketing instructor at MRI, will moderate the panel.

PANEL MEMBERS As the brainchild of Chaz Bundick, the sunbleached sounds of Toro y Moi have come to define the whole genre (sometimes jokingly) referred to as chillwave. But whatever it’s labeled, it’s good music to find your new summertime crush to. He’ll be gracing the stage at Lollapalooza this year, but first, SF State.

GIAN FIERO, a career planning and development specialist at MRI, will introduce the panel. He is responsible for discovering and developing Rozzi Crane, who appears on “The Hunger Games” soundtrack; Kehlani Parrish, lead vocalist of “America’s Got Talent” finalists Poplyfe; and representing Grammy-nominated music producer Cori Jacobs, who has worked with Beyoncé and Lauryn Hill among many others. Fiero has also been teaching the career planning course for 10 years. NOAH CUNNINGHAM spins music under the name DJ Dials and is also a concert promoter. For the last 14 years he’s been mixing songs from genres such as dubstep, ‘90s rap and throwback electronic, and has played alongside well-known artists Thom Yorke, The Roots, SBTRKT and several others. Cunningham will be speaking on his experiences in booking and producing parties in San Francisco.

2. GRIEVES AND BUDO

JON BENDICH teaches The Independent Record Label and History of the Popular Music Industry classes at MRI. He is the director of A&R for Positivity Records and is also a producer, musician and songwriter.

This pair, made of a rapper and producer, will be fresh off the plane from a European tour when they arrive to campus. They’re talented in separate ventures, but together they bring a blend of baritone verses and classy beats that will please indie fans and hip-hop heads alike.

JEFFREY PARADISE, a local DJ, created the Frisco Disco, the first multi-genre dance party in San Francisco. He went on to organize two well-known dance parties, Blow Up and Club 1994, in the city, where artists Chromeo, Interpol and Steve Aoki, among others, have performed. Blow Up won a national competition for “Party of the Year” in 2010. ANDREW KELSEY is the director of Liaison Artists Agency, a San Francisco-based international booking agency for electronic music. He will be discussing his experiences as a booking agent, how artists are represented at a booking agency and the ways in which this branch of the music industry has changed throughout the years. JACOBO JUAREZ is the owner of SOM music venue and bar in the Mission District. He will address the ins and outs of owning and running a venue. MICHAEL ACZON teaches Music Publishing and Music Artist Management at MRI. He has practiced entertainment law in the bay area since 1983 and his experiences will be the focal point of his presentation.

3. THE HOOD INTERNET

COMPILED BY BARBARA SZABO | barbaras@mail.sfsu.edu

Purists beware: This Chicago-based duo are armed with music mash-ups and they’re here to party. Mostly blending hip-hop and indie classics, they’ve expanded their tunes from thousands on the web to thousands at festivals. Catch them for a sneak peak of their nation-wide tour this summer.

ARTIST PHOTOS COURTESY OF WINDISH AGENCY

BAND INFO COMPILED BY HUNTER MULICH | hunter@mail.sfsu.edu


04.25.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

8 SPORTS PLAYER

LUISA MUSIKA

WEEK

TRACK AND FIELD

of the

Track and field athlete Luisa Musika has been chosen as the Xpress Player of the Week. Musika established a new Gator shot put record Friday at the Bryan Clay Invitational at Azusa Pacific University with a throw of 46 feet 2.5 inches, earning her fourth place in the event. She beat her own school record of 45 feet 9.25 inches in the process and is now ranked 13th nationally in shot put.

PHOTO BY TYLER DENISTON/SF STATE SPORTS

GATORS’ SPORTS SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, APRIL 27 BASEBALL

SF State vs. Cal State San Bernardino 3 p.m. (San Francisco, Calif.)

WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD SF State at Brutus Hamilton Invitational All Day (Berkeley, Calif.)

SATURDAY, APRIL 28 BASEBALL

SF State vs. Cal State San Bernardino 11 a.m. (San Francisco, Calif.) SF State vs. Cal State San Bernardino 2 p.m. (San Francisco, Calif.)

WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD SF State at Brutus Hamilton Invitational All Day (Berkeley, Calif.)

SUNDAY, APRIL 29 BASEBALL

SF State vs. Cal State San Bernardino 11 a.m. (San Francisco, Calif.)

Coaches struggle to allocate scholarship money BY SEAN DUFFY scduffy@mail.sfsu.edu

scholarships because When it comes to the he is rarely able to give sports of SF State, dedicaa full year’s worth of tion and commitment tuition to a wrestler. are two characteristics “If I had nine full that can directly lead to rides, then we would financial consideration. take into consideration For coaches, these are two how much money of the key components to we’d give a kid who’s consider when distributon full fi nancial aid,” ing scholarship money. Jensen said. “But we’re In order to maximize not looking at that too the value of limited much because a couple financial capabilities, the thousand here, a couple athletic program ensures thousand there doesn’t that its money is spent on make much of huge athletes who will contribdifference to them.” ute and be committed to Since other schools the team. Allocating these in the CCAA enjoy funds for scholarships is greater funding, their a task left to the coaches, programs are able to who use their discretion to give out much higher determine which athletes scholarship numbers, deserve or need money. which puts more presThe coaches face the sure on SF State to HURDLES: Track and field athlete Maya Cabiness is one of many Gator athletes who has received an athletic challenge of balancing dematch other schools’ scholarship. For most SF State athletes, the awards don’t cover all costs of attendance. Photo by Nelson Estrada pleting financial resourcstudent athlete incenes, while still funding tives. scholarships for athletes “We’re in the botwho either need or deserve money. While “Toward the end of the season, around that tom tier in terms of being funded for scholarcoaches tend to emphasize performance over time is when he started talking to me about ships. We offer kids $1,000, someone else financial need when distributing scholarships, getting some money. This year it’s helped me might offer them $6,000,” Jensen said. “So there is a shared struggle to distribute money. get by with books and stuff,” Cabiness said. where’s he going to go in these economic This can leave many student athletes without “It does help, but it’s not like I have all this times?” any money despite their commitment or need. money.” Some coaches consider financial need when In the 2010-11 school year, Cal State Los Cabiness, 20, competes in hurdles and the looking to give scholarship money. Women’s Angeles, another California Collegiate Ath4x100 and 4x400 relay teams. She set a new basketball coach Joaquin Wallace tries to balletic Association school, gave $533,000 to its school record in the latter event with a time of ance his scholarship money relatively evenly 131 female student athletes. Compared to SF 3 minutes and 47.03 seconds, second-best in among his players. State’s scholarship totals of $194,000 among Division II and in the nation that year. Due to “If they’re not financial aid qualifiers, then 185 female athletic participants, the financial her ability, Cabiness started receiving scholarthat’s a factor I have to take into account,” discrepancy is clear. Scholarships at the Univer- ship money and could possibly earn more if she Wallace said. “That kid may need a little bit sity vary from a few hundred to a few thousand, continues to improve. more money since they’re not getting financial based on the sport and the factors the coaches “Unlike anybody else in the conference, assistance.” consider. we’ve had walk-ons come in and become In order for the athletic program to remain “To get scholarship money, you have to All-Americans. We were able to give her some competitive, it needs to bring in talented players be top five in two events or more, or a provischolarship money,” Burke said. “We’ll bump who can lead the program to success. Wallace sional qualifier in an event,” said Terry Burke, (increase her financial aid) again this year.” explained that offering scholarships can help atwomen’s track and field coach. “With high Wrestling head coach Lars Jensen acknowl- tract athletes, but low funding limits the amount school people you’re projecting a little bit.” edged that he gives more money to wrestlers he can offer, which can hinder his ability to Student athletes often come to SF State as who perform well and that he has a general attract key players. walk-ons, players who tried out for the team scholarship threshold for athletes who earn “For the most part, it still comes down to rather than being recruited, with the hopes of significant achievements. dollars,” Wallace said. “It does make it a more eventually earning scholarship money. The “If you place at the conference tournament, diffi cult challenge to get the kids.” competitive process of distributing scholaryou get a certain amount of money. If he goes Cabiness feels that all athletes deserve ship money can act as an incentive for student to the national tournament, we have a baseline compensation for the time they commit to their athletes to perform at their best. of what kind of money he would get,” Jenrespective sports, but feels that the money Sophomore Maya Cabiness has benefited sen said. “If he’s an All-American or national should also go to worthy sources. from determination. After a successful freshchampion, then we would up them to that “We’re all equal. We’re out there six days a man season, Burke rewarded her with scholaramount.” week working hard and practicing. It’s hard to ship money. Fewer than half of the 27 wrestlers receive balance school, practice and work,” Cabiness Though not enough to cover tuition, she money. Jensen isn’t as compelled to make each said. “If you prove yourself, then you deserve explains that the money helps with various wrestler’s financial burden comparable through it.” school costs.

BASEBALL

SOFTBALL LOSS

SCORES FROM THE LAST WEEK OF GATOR SPORTS

WIN

LOSS

April 18 vs. Notre Dame de Namur University 3-4 April 18 vs. Notre Dame de Namur University 4-3 April 20 vs. Sonoma State University 0-3

LOSS

LOSS

LOSS

April 20 vs. Sonoma State University 0-5 April 21 vs. Sonoma State University 0-10 April 21 vs. Sonoma State University 0-10

LOSS

April 20 vs. Cal State Stanislaus 4-5

LOSS

April 21 vs. Cal State Stanislaus 1-14

LOSS

April 21 vs. Cal State Stanislaus 0-11

LOSS

April 22 vs. Cal State Stanislaus 0-8


| 04.25.12

GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

ACTIVISTS OPPOSE FOR-PROFIT BOOKSTORE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

tial of either Follett Corporation or Barnes & Noble taking over as for-profit businesses. “We certainly did not expect support from Occupy SFSU,” said Robert Strong, CEO of Franciscan Shops and general manager of the Bookstore. “However, we are grateful for expressions of support from any groups and have been impressed and encouraged by the large support from all corners of campus.” The activist group has anticipated the possibility of a for-profit corporation being selected and has circulated a petition against it. They have also facilitated two teach-ins in the quad to inform students about the situation and brainstorm tactics to keep SFSU Bookstore a nonprofit entity. “I find (UCorp’s) tactic of saying that the (Request for Proposal) was sent out to kind of see what was out there and get cheaper textbooks really insulting,” said Kaitlin Murphy, a member of Occupy SFSU. “Franciscan Shops has been a completely innovative source and we can’t be bought over with these lovely distractions from

corporations.” In an effort to increase student awareness, Occupy SFSU is currently meeting in the quad every day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to encourage students to sign the petition and create discussion about the pros and cons of the potential of a corporation taking over management. “This is not an empty threat,” 23-year-old Occupy member and criminal justice major Lalo Gonzalez said. “We are building resources and branching out to CFA in order to build the bridge between students and faculty to fight this issue, something that hasn’t happened in a long time. We are rebuilding old tactics from when Barnes & Noble originally tried to take over management in 1990.” Despite this opposition, the review panel will meet this week to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each proposal. Nickerson said that while the goal is to finish reviewing proposals before the end of the semester, they will use additional time as needed to ensure a careful and thorough review.

NEW CONSTRUCTION A LONG WAY OFF CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

“The important point was to acquire the land before the funds expired on June 30 so SF State would have the ability to plan for future construction on that site,” Hayes said. “As soon as we get all permits, we will demolish the existing hazardous building.” Purchasing the property is one of the goals in the 2007 Master Plan, which prepares the University for increased student enrollment over a period of 20 years. One of the objectives was to rebuild it as a clinical sciences building. The new building is expected to house classrooms and laboratories

for students in specialized programs including nursing and physical therapy. The demolition of the current building on the property is expected to take place sometime between July and September of this year. Hayes stressed that construction on the new building will likely take place roughly 10 years down the road, after another project. “Our next academic building in the Master Plan is a replacement for the Creative Arts Building,” Hayes said. “A clinical sciences building would come much later. It is all dependent on getting funding.”

9


04.25.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

10 O P I N I O N

KELLY GOFF

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF kgoff@mail.sfsu.edu

SARA DONCHEY

ONLINE MANAGING EDITOR sdonchey@mail.sfsu.edu

SCOTT GRAF

PRINT MANAGING EDITOR sgraf99@mail.sfsu.edu

GODOFREDO VASQUEZ

MEDIA EDITOR gvasquez@mail.sfsu.edu

NATALIE YEMENIDJIAN ART DIRECTOR nataliey@mail.sfsu.edu

MICHELLE OLSON

ONLINE COPY CHIEF maolson@mail.sfsu.edu

CASSIE BECKER

PRINT COPY CHIEF cassbeck@mail.sfsu.edu

TAMERRA GRIFFIN

STAFF EDITORIAL

CREATIVITY IGNITES THE ANNEX

CAMPUS EDITOR tgriffin@mail.sfsu.edu

LISA CARMACK

CITY EDITOR lcarmack@mail.sfsu.edu

HUNTER MULICH

A&E EDITOR hunter@mail.sfsu.edu

KC CROWELL

OPINION EDITOR kcrowell@mail.sfsu.edu

KEALAN CRONIN

SPORTS EDITOR kealancronin@mail.sfsu.edu

KRISSA STANTON

BREAKING NEWS EDITOR kstanton@mail.sfsu.edu

HENRY NGUYEN

PRINT PHOTO EDITOR nenhenry@mail.sfsu.edu

GIL RIEGO JR.

ONLINE PHOTO EDITOR griegojr@mail.sfsu.edu

JUAN DE ANDA

ASSISTANT CAMPUS EDITOR juand@mail.sfsu.edu

ELISSA TORRES

ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR elissat@mail.sfsu.edu

B

Y SPEARHEADing the Rhythms Music Festival in the old Annex space, ASI has brought a refreshing dose of ingenuity to the campus. While the Annex has served faithfully as an interim space, this is definitely a case of campus leaders taking lemons and making lemonade. By repurposing existing space as well as bringing in emerging and established artists to perform, it seems like we’re finally living up to the “creative spark” slogan that adorns SF State promotional banners around the city.

ART BY SARA DONCHEY | sdonchey@mail.sfsu.edu

Getting to enjoy two days of music seems like a pretty good gesture of goodwill after not having a real library for years. It is a clever way of giving the Annex an identity other than the makeshift study space we’ve all known it to be. Some may quibble about the event’s $24,000 budget. Perhaps instead of focusing on the numbers, they should think of this one-time price as a gesture of giving back to students who have certainly earned it. It feels like most of the time our tuition and fees contribute to services that are cut or downsized before we can use them anyway, so it’s refreshing to see something like a $51 fee being used to create something we can all actually enjoy. Additionally, if ASI can pull off a suc-

cessful festival this round they’ll be able to use that momentum to attract even bigger artists in the future. There’s no reason that SF State shouldn’t be able to host more live music events for students, and Rhythms sets a fantastic precedent for that. Perhaps this can be the start of a new tradition at SF State. For a campus with all the resources to host a music festival like this, it is surprising that it doesn’t happen more often. While it is often difficult for students and administrators to agree on issues like financial cuts and politics, it seems easy to recognize the positive impact of music and art. Regardless of what the future holds, making a bigger effort to promote the arts in campus life is a step in the right direction.

MATT MAXION

SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR mmaxion@mail.sfsu.edu

RACHELE KANIGEL

FACULTY ADVISER kanigel@mail.sfsu.edu

KEN KOBRE

PHOTO ADVISER kobre@kenkobre.com

JUSTIN OROZCO

CIRCULATION jaorozo@mail.sfsu.edu

ARUN UNNIKRASHNAN I.T. CONSULTANT arun@mail.sfsu.edu

EVA CHARLES

ADVERTISING & BUSINESS echarles@mail.sfsu.edu

MONICA QUESADA

PRODUCTION ggxads@mail.sfsu.edu

WRITE US A LETTER The Golden Gate Xpress accepts letters no longer than 200 words. Letters are subject to editing. Send letters to KC Crowell at: kcrowell@mail.sfsu.edu

ABOUT XPRESS The Golden Gate Xpress is a student-produced publication of the journalism department at San Francisco State University. For more information or comments, please contact Kelly Goff at: kgoff@mail.sfsu.edu

Disabled students lack support BY LISA CARMACK | lcarmack@mail.sfsu.edu

Suffering a brain injury just before my first year of college was obviously not in my plans. A month after my high school graduation and less than a month and a half before my first semester at SF State, I suffered a brainstem stroke, which damaged my brain’s ability to communicate with my eyes, a condition I was told could be permanent. My first concern, after visiting countless brain trauma doctors to determine the likelihood of regaining function in my brain stem, was how I could handle a course load without my eyesight. Seeking help is not in my nature, so when my mother pushed me to seek help at the Disability Programs and Resource Center, I was hesitant to go. The campus felt imposing and unfamiliar, and with everyone around me a stranger, it was hard enough to get out of bed in the morning, let alone share a very vulnerable part of myself with an office person I didn’t know. I ended up requesting audio materials to reconcile my inability to read well. I was told that someone from DPRC would contact me to ask me more questions and get me the help I needed. I never got that call. After a few times following up, I had too much school work and too little time to navigate the bureaucracy of SF State to stand up for myself and demand the resources I needed. I’m sure I wasn’t the first person left wondering where those service requests

went, and I probably won’t be the last. Nicole Bohn, the DPRC director, recently told me she wasn’t sure what had happened in my case, but that in the past couple of years the office has done some overhaul in the way that they process students. “What we ask for usually is the students register with us and then in most cases provide some documentation of disability that supports what their accommodation request is, pretty specifically,” she said. The DPRC has a relatively small staff and changes have been made in the past few years to improve the intake process. Bohn said the biggest challenge they face is the discrepancy between the disability law that supports high school students, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the amended Americans with Disabilities Act, which mandates equal access to public services specifically to adults. Though outreach to disabled high school students could help others, those like me who sustain trauma after they reach adulthood need a different kind of assistance. For those who have managed disabilities for a majority of their lives, the exhausting process of advocating for themselves is routine, and part of the process of adjusting to any new environment. It’s imperative that even within the constraints of a shrinking budget that services be made easily available to any and every disabled student. The latest numbers from this year say

that SF State had only a few more than 850 students with a disability out of 30,000 total enrolled. With specifically allocated state resources to uphold the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act and so few students to serve comparatively, I wonder how the school isn’t able to make sure that every one of them is given an equal chance to succeed. Students with any type of disability should never be marginalized or ignored. If students, or anyone for that matter, is made to feel unsafe or alienated because of an impairment there needs to be a viable source of help available to them. School should be the one place where everyone is given an equal chance to succeed and grow into whomever or whatever they want to be. A student should not be worried about whether or not they can find a note-taker or how to approach his or her teacher about having additional access to classroom materials. One of the problems is that there is currently no way for students to give anonymous feedback about overall services. “Whenever we hear from someone directly we do try to deal with it directly,” said Bohn. “But there’s currently no mechanism for feedback.” My eyesight will never be the same and I don’t get another chance at my first semester of college, but the lack of timely resources available is a problem that still weighs on me.


11

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Golden Gate Xpress Issue 13  

The 13th edition of the San Francisco State University Golden Gate Xpress