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STUDENT-RUN NEWSPAPER PROUDLY SERVING THE SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY SINCE 1927.

// 09.05.12

VOLUME LXXXXV ISSUE 2

CAL GRANT STUDENTS TAKE A CUT

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BY MICHELE BIRD | mbird@mail.sfsu.edu

ITH TOday’s economic struggles, another cut to California’s higher education budget looms over Cal Grant holders and college students this year. The California Student Aid Commission recently announced that Cal Grant awards have been reduced by five percent. The reduction was approved June 27 after Gov. Jerry Brown signed the 2012-13 Budget Act for the fiscal year’s spending plan. Other programs facing decreases based on the budget are kindergarten through 12th grade education as well as child care and development. “(SF State students will be impacted) negatively (and) $39 has to be covered somehow,” said Barbara Hubler, University director of   the student financial aid office. “More loans, more work hours or doing with less.” There are various Cal Grants available to California college students who qualify. Eligible students need a minimum 3.0 GPA, to be actively working toward their undergraduate degrees or certificates and be able to demonstrate financial need. Cal Grants are offered in three different categories ranging from A, B and C. All grants offered help fund student tuition and fees. The type of campus covered — public, private, occupational or career technical schools — depends on the Cal Grant the student holds. The grants are important assets for many attending college because they SEE REDUCTION ON PAGE 3

MOWING: Cox Stadium, home to SF State’s men’s and women’s intercollegiate soccer team, has been undergoing maintenance improvements since last February when John Cahill came on board as the new ground operation manager. Photo by Jessica Worthington

Grass greener on Gator’s side BY HEATHER ITO | hito@mail.sfsu.edu

Student athletes no longer need to worry about lumpy fields, tall forest-like grass or surprise water puddles. Starting this season, athletes will have the satisfaction of playing on wellkept fields now that Cox Stadium, Maloney Field and the softball field have undergone much needed makeovers by John Cahill, the ground operation manager. After joining the staff last February, he implemented different maintenance practices. “Right now we are going back to best practices on these (fields),” Cahill said. “We’ve purchased a roller for ‘em to move the surfaces out because that’s what the sports people want.” This new management comes as a huge relief for University coaches, who have been dealing with the campus’ “inadequate” field maintenance, according to Joe Hunter, head coach for the men’s soccer team. “In the past, it was just a lot of double talk (or) you wouldn’t get an answer,” Hunter said. “It was just ‘we’ll mow it,

we’ll water it and that’s about all we can do for you.’” The unsatisfactory outlook on the previous maintenance may have to do with how Phil Evans, the previous ground operation manager for 22 years and current director of site planning kept up the fields, according to Cahill. “Sports field maintenance is one of the many special challenges encountered in maintaining a heavily populated urban campus,” Evans said. “Athletic fields are heavily used, and repair and maintenance windows are severely limited by user and event schedules, as well as weather conditions.” Ever since Cahill took over Evans’ position, Hunter said he has been more aware of the arena conditions. “I think (Cahill) understands the issue,” Hunter said. “At least he’s willing to listen and say ‘OK, coach, I understand what you’re saying. Let’s see if we can help you out.’” It’s not a matter of working with a new budget or obtaining new equipment

sparking noticeable improvements in field maintenance, according to Cahill. He said all they’ve done is utilize basic practices: aerating, tuning up irrigation on the baseball diamond, and fertilizing and over-seeding them. He also has workers double-check the quantities used in their work. “Generally, my goal here is to bring these things up a couple of notches — all these fields,” Cahill said. “I think they need more attention (and) more maintenance.” Since Cahill joined the staff, Hunter has noticed a roller has been added to the grounds service arsenal, allowing grounds staff to keep fields flat and leveled. He has also noticed that groundskeepers now mow the lawn at Cox Stadium three times a week instead of once or twice a week, which helps maintain an even playing surface for the soccer teams that use it during the fall. SEE FIELD MAINTENANCE ON PAGE 7

Recreational field to replace Ruth Asawa School of the Arts BY VIKRAM SINGH | vpsingh@mail.sfsu.edu

With an estimated completion date of Spring 2013, SF State will soon be provided with a new green space for various student activities

WORK IN PROGRESS: A recreational field will take the place of the former Ruth Asawa School of the Arts. The space will accomodate student clubs and intramural leages, and potentially classrooms for nursing or physical therapy in the future. Photo by Sam Battles

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ONCRETE CRUMBLES to the ground while the sounds of steel bars being bent and ripped apart ring out like gunshots against the windows of the Humanities Building. SF State’s demolition of the Ruth Asawa School of the Arts, which stands on the corner of Font Boulevard and Tapia Drive, will provide students with a 2.5 acre recreational green space. Demolition is 40 percent complete, according to Nancy Hayes, SF State vice president and chief financial officer for administration and finance. The site was bought for $11.1 million from the San Francisco Unified School District. Greg Mowbray, the construction manager for Capital Planning, Design and Construction, explained the reason behind the wreckage. “As the demolition progresses, the contractor is separating the steel reinforcing bars from the concrete for recycling purposes. The concrete debris will be trucked to Lot 25 for additional crushing and stockpiling for use in future campus projects,” Mowbray said. The 51,000 square foot decaying structure

has been abandoned since 2002. Once the debris has been cleared, the University will construct a 2.5 acre green space for student activities like club events or intramural sports matches. Oakland-based group Byrens Kim Design Works will remove the concrete for the next three months. The University hopes to eventually build clinical classrooms on the site to accommodate disciplines like nursing or physical therapy, but this project has not been planned, according to Hayes. The athletics department will not be using the site, but it will be designated for student clubs and intramural leagues. By Spring 2013, the green space should be available for use. “We offer intramural leagues in the evening, so there will be lit games at night. But during the day the students will be able to have pickup games,” said Ryan Fetzer, the intramural and sports club coordinator for the Campus Recreation Department. With the current funding situation for CSUs, it’s come as no surprise that plans for the clinical classrooms are far away. “At this point, funds aren’t even in the picture to hire an architect for the project for at least a decade,” Mowbray said.


2 CAMPUS SF STATE SPEAKS OUT WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF YOUR FINANCIAL AID RAN OUT?

09.05.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

University sustains green prestige BY ERIN DAGE | erindage@mail.sfsu.edu

TRICIA BROOKS, 21 THEATRE MAJOR

I don’t get any, so it’s different for me. Fortunately, my parents help me out. It’s still stressful, though. How could someone work two jobs to pay for school, and still go to class?

BRANDON CUSAK, 28

CREATIVE WRITING MAJOR

I would still go to the classes, but just not pay for them. I would go to the dean or department chair and say, “What the bleep? Why am I paying $3000 for classes when I’m getting grad students that can’t teach?”

LAUREN BOW, 18

COMMUNICATIONS MAJOR

You don’t want to know. Tables would be flipped. Have you seen that video on YouTube of that guy in a panda suit trolling everyone? I’d hunt down some FAFSA people.

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F STATE IS GREENING its way up the ranks, according to the Princeton Review. The standardized test preparation and college admissions consulting company rated 806 colleges based on greenness and overall sustainability. Out of those colleges, SF State was one of the 21 to receive a perfect score. Sustainability Programs Manager Caitlin Steele attributes this success to the University’s numerous environmental initiatives. These include an extensive recycling program and a fuel cell plant installed by PG&E on campus that helps reduce energy and greenhouse emissions. Although SF State received a perfect score, there are still areas where the campus can improve, according to Steele. “SF State can always be more sustainable. We have a goal of zero waste by 2020,” Steele said. “We need to increase our diversion rate to reach that goal.” The University currently has a 70 percent diversion rate — the percentage of waste materials that gets diverted from traditional disposal, to be recycled, reused or composted. Steele hopes to achieve a 75 percent diversion rate with a campus-wide composting program this September. Students are upholding San Francisco’s green reputation. “Students are the reason we are one of Princeton Review’s greenest universities. We would not have gotten that ranking without them,” Steele said. “Students can continue to support sustainability efforts by creating their own events or student clubs around sustainability.” Savannah Volkoff is one of those students. A senior environmental studies major, Volkoff is one of the core members in the student-run organization, Environmentally Concerned Organization of Students. She has been involved in past campaigns such as Take Back the Tap, a program seeking to reduce disposable water bottle use. “It’s super important for people who want to see change, to get involved and see to it that it happens,” Volkoff said. “Students can make change on campus, they just have to be willing to put in the extra work that it takes, to see their dreams come true.” Alicia Fausto, a counseling graduate student, believes that she does her part. “I always try to make an effort to be green,” she said. “The things I use the most are the labeled trash dispensers, second to carrying a re-

GREEN REPUTATION: With 806 colleges being rated based on greenness amd overall sustainability, SF State was one of the 21 colleges to receive a perfect score. Photo by Alejandrina Hernandez

usable water bottle instead of buying drinks that have paper and plastic containers.” What Fausto doesn’t see is other students contributing. “Some people recycle and others don’t,” she said. “Every day I see someone throwing something in the recycling bin that isn’t meant to be there.” Kelly De La Cruz, a business management junior, is indifferent about the campus receiving a perfect green score. “The fact that SFSU got a perfect green score does not matter to me,” said De La Cruz. “I used to recycle when I was in Southern California, but I don’t do it up here.” Whether students are apathetic or lim-

ited in their awareness of the sustainability programs on campus, Volkoff feels that receiving a perfect green score is still a win. “It shows me that when passion and ambition collide, change happens,” Volkoff said. “It shows me that SF State is refusing to be mainstream, refusing to be irresponsible, listening to the student body, and making lasting change. That definitely matters.” Monthly on-campus events include Park(ing) day Sept. 20, which shows students’ design work changing parking spaces into parks. Students are also needed to help organize events for Campus Sustainability Day Oct. 24. 

CRIME BLOTTER Comedic interpretations of criminal events at or near SF State

Reporting by Brad Wilson

08.29 thourgh 09.04 JOSEPH ENRIQUEZ,21

ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES AND HEALTH EDUCATION MAJORS

I’d pull together certain Grassroots members. We would need to assemble again. This probably isn’t too far away. Maybe in a year or two we’ll need a new coalition. Photos by Adrian Rodriguez Reporting by Brad Wilson

Hide Your Keys, Hide Your Wives

We’ve Got a Situation

Between 8 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., a gentleman reported that his vehicle had been broken into at Lot 20 Aug. 29. The total reported value of losses included sunglasses and a CD changer at a reported $490. For the sake of the student body and all mankind, hopefully that CD changer contained the world’s only copy of Gotye’s CD so we never have to hear “Somebody That I Used To Know” ever again. Please, somebody cut him off.

There was an altercation on Pinto Drive Aug. 30. Officers responded to abate the fight and took the two subjects into custody for public intoxication. Presumably, following a fresh to death night at Karma, these two gentlemen — probably not the only ones — scuffled over who fathered Snooki’s baby and claimed that they never made smush-smush with her. We’re still waiting on Maury Povich for the results of the paternity test.

Sheriff of Nottingham Strikes There was a residential burglary at the Centennial Village Aug. 29. Additional officers were called in to check the area and reported the total loss was $7000. Next time, to prevent such a financial catastrophe, avoid leaving your liger-skinned rug in your living room with your dressage horse roaming in the backyard. Remember, unless you’ve found one of those elusive money trees our parents tell us don’t exist, seven grand is a sizable chunk of change.


CAMPUS 3

| 09.05.12

GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

Further grant reduction may be coming CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

help fund expenses like tuition, textbooks and living costs. SF State is one of many campuses that will be impacted by the reduction. All Universities of California, California State Universities, community colleges and numerous private universities are included under the new budget. “I think there should be more benefits for students (such as) less costly books and tuition,” said Marian Haamdy, a business marketing major at SF State. Nearly 2,000 SF State Cal Grant holders will be affected by the $39 reduction per semester. Negative repercussions may follow the Cal Grant reduction as tuition continues to rise each semester, according to Hubler. Cal Grants may face further adjustments if tuition increases or decreases during the academic year. “Most of us are full-time students and full-time working,” Haamdy said. “It’s hard for us to pay.” Since 2010, University tuition has continued to climb. In Fall 2010, a five percent increase was approved for undergraduate, graduate and credential students, raising tuition and fees to $2,507 for students registered for 6.1 or more units. The tuition

rose again in Fall 2011 with a 12 percent increase for students registering for 6.1 or more units to pay $3,138. Students currently attending this semester are paying another increased tuition fee of $3,469 to register for 6.1 or more units. “While we have reduced public support for higher education, student loan debt has been increasing,” said Beverly Voloshin, professor and chair of the English language and literature department. “Debt from student loans is often a considerable burden after college or graduate school, especially for people who take jobs that don’t come with high salaries.” Despite Cal Grants being reduced by five percent, there are still other avenues students can pursue for financial assistance including scholarships, federal financial aid, various grants and student loans. For more information on financial aid and the Cal Grant reduction, students can visit the One Stop center in the Student Services Building. “I believe that we should treat education as, at least in part, a public good rather than just a private good,” Voloshin said. “This also insures access to people from all walks of life.”

Cal Grant decrease by school Some students will suffer a partial loss in financial aid in the midst of ever-rising tutition and fees

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA STUDENTS Maximum Cal Grant A and Cal Grant B Tuition and Fee Award

Maximum Cal Grant B Access Award reduced from

$12,192

$1,551 to $1,473

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS Maximum Cal Grant A and Cal Grant B Tuition and Fee Award

$5,970

Maximum Cal Grant B Access Award reduced from

$1,551 to $1,473

COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENTS Maximum Cal Grant A and Cal Grant B Tuition and Fee Award

$1,551 to $1,473

Maximum Cal Grant B Access Award reduced from

$576 to $547

PRIVATE INDEPENDENT COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY OR PRIVATE CAREER COLLEGE STUDENTS Maximum Cal Grant A and Cal Grant B Tuition and Fee Award

$9,708 to $9,223 Maximum Cal Grant C Tuition and Fee Award

$2,592 to $2,462

COMPILED BY MICHELE BIRD

Maximum Cal Grant B Access Award reduced from

$1,551 to $1,473 Maximum Cal Grant C Book & Supplies award

$576 to $547

Source: mygrantinfo.csac.ca.gov


4 CITY

09.05.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

Students speak out about deferred action program

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BY ALEX EMSLIE | aemslie@mail.sfsu.edu

RESIDENT BARACK Obama’s unilateral change in immigration enforcement policy, announced June 15, could afford many undocumented students an opportunity U.S. citizens may take for granted — the chance to legally work in

their fields of study. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program does not formally change any U.S. law. Rather, it is a discretionary directive to defer the deportation — for two years ­— of law-abiding undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children and are current students, high-school graduates or GED holders, or honorably discharged veterans. The program also allows qualifying undocumented immigrants to apply for temporary work permits. For one undocumented SF State nursing student — who asked only to be identified as “Anne” because she fears repercussions from immigration enforcement and her community — deferred action relief means a chance at a nursing career. Anne applied for the DACA program a few days after forms became available Aug. 15. “Ever since I was young, I wanted to become a nurse,” she said. “It’s in me to just help people.” Many undocumented immigrants remain skeptical and even fearful of Obama, who has presided over tens of thousands more deportations than any other president through the controversial program Secure Communities, or S-Comm. S-Comm requires local police to automatically send the fingerprints of anyone they book to the Department of Homeland Security. Despite long-standing DHS policy not to deport law-abiding or low-level offending undocumented immigrants, more than one-quarter of those deported through the S-Comm program in California have never been convicted of a crime, according to Immigrations and Customs Enforcement data. The California Assembly and Senate have answered S-Comm with the Trust Act, or AB 1081, which would require local law enforcement to cooperate with U.S. Immigration and Customs En-

forcement only in cases in which the undocumented immigrant has been convicted of a serious felony. State representatives sent the Trust Act to Gov. Jerry Brown Aug. 24. The DACA requirement that undocumented residents register themselves and family members’ information with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, a bureau of the same federal department that oversees immigration deportations, is an additional source of worry. “That has been fueling a lot of the confusion and skepticism,” said Jen Low, immigrants’ rights community advocate at the Asian Law Caucus. “We believe that the Obama administration is doing this in good faith and that they will not hand over family member information to ICE.” One undocumented San Francisco resident, who requested anonymity because he fears immigration enforcement, called the DACA program “the DREAM Act light” referring to the  Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act. The DREAM Act has been introduced into every U.S. congressional session since 2001, but it has yet to pass both houses. The DACA program differs from the DREAM Act in that it could be terminated by the president at any time, and does not provide a pathway to permanent residency like the DREAM Act would. “I hope dreamers don’t stop fighting for their rights,” the undocumented resident said. “People might get relaxed because some people might be able to get work permits, and they will stop with the movement.” Low acknowledged that the DACA program equates to a somewhat mixed message from the Obama administration. “We have one program for dreamers that are eligible and one for others that are sitting in detention centers around the countries without any hopes of relief,” she said. “Deferred action is a temporary solution. We’re really hoping that we can pass the DREAM Act in the next couple of years.” Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has publicly stated that he would veto the DREAM Act. The 2012 GOP platform, unveiled at the beginning of the Republican National Convention Aug.

NEW OPPORTUNITY: Emmanuel Valenciano, 24, a biology major at SF State, applied for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program Aug. 15. He moved to the U.S. from the Phillipines when he was 13 years old. Photo by Jamie Balaoro

28, outlined some of the party’s planned immigration policies. “In order to restore the rule of law, federal funding should be denied to sanctuary cities that violate federal law and endanger their own citizens, and federal funding should be denied to universities that provide instate tuition rates to illegal aliens, in open defiance of federal law,” the platform states. San Francisco is a sanctuary city and SF State offers in-state tuition rates to undocumented students under its AB 540 program. Low said that even if Romney wins, it would be difficult to deport the huge number of people applying for DACA relief. “Being that it is an executive program, it’s administrative relief, Obama could terminate it at any time, and so could Romney if he wins in November,” she said. “It is very unfeasible for the U.S to detain and deport all of those under this program, though, and it would be a civil rights catastrophe.” Anne talked about the hurt she feels when she hears the words “illegal immigrant,” and said she hopes her generation can shed its apathy and try to care. “I bet you that you know one undocumented immigrant and you wouldn’t even know it. You wouldn’t know how they’re suffering and how they feel when you say something callous. They’re also a mother, a child, a classmate. They could be your teacher. They contribute to society. Many undocumented immigrants contribute, pay taxes, they do,” she said. “They’re just you and me, you know?”

City plans to install 900 new meters BY NOEMY MENA | mena@mail.sfsu.edu

More meters around AT&T Park and

Drivers, start digging under those couch cushions tation or carpool to save cash — or just avoid the area if Mission Bay could make parking because soon that spare change could be needed to feed possible.” more difficult and expensive the hundreds of new meters set for installation in San Businesses and residents, on the other hand, welcome Francisco. the new meters into their neighborhood. “This plan is meant to provide effective parking Stacy O’Connell, 18, an undeclared freshman, recently management that makes parking available, eases congestion and allows Muni to run fastmoved to the nearby South of Market neighborhood in hopes of grasping city life. She said er,” said Paul Rose, spokesman for the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. she moved to San Francisco because it is a city that is designed for public transportation. In an effort to improve the efficiency of transportation, whether public or private, “There’s no need for a car in San Francisco and I favor any proposal that would the city of San Francisco is planning to add 900 parking meters. According to Rose, the bring money into Muni,” said O’Connell, a Modesto native. “If that wasn’t the case, I funds from the new meters will help operate Muni, the seventh largest transit system in could have stayed home.” the country. Similarly, Bernard Birch, owner of Radical Tan on King Street supports the SFMThe new meters will be added mainly in Mission Bay, a neighborhood known for its TA’s decision because the agency would control an area where parking spaces are biotech companies, and AT&T Park, potentially affecting tens of thousands of Giants’ fans and becoming scarce. patrons visiting this vibrant part of the city. “Overall, anywhere in San Francisco is going to be an issue to park,” Birch said. Although adding the new meters may bring money to San Francisco, some are against “There’s more cars than parking spots. Plus the city knows what they’re doing.” the additions because it could result in customers being turned away from the area. The average meter rate can fluctuate from 50 cents up to $6 an hour, depending on Morris Davis, 37, regularly visits the adjacent South Beach neighborhood and relies its location and demand. Special events can increase the fee up to $7 per hour. on the free parking near South and Third streets, but new meters may turn him away Rose also commented on a speculated plan that more meters could appear in other from spending evenings in the area. sections of the city, including along Sloat Boulevard near the San Francisco Zoo. “I’m concerned implementing new meters would lead to price hikes for parking “There is no formal zoo plan,” Rose said. “It was mentioned to the supervisor (Sean (lots) during game nights,” Davis said. “If this is the case I may opt for public transporElsbernd) to gather feedback as a potential option going forward.”


CITY 5

| 09.05.12

GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

VOTERS PREPARE for new propositions in upcoming ELECTION The 2012 state election has 11 propositions on the Nov. 6 ballot, two of which concern the future of public education. The remaining nine propositions cover everything from car insurance to the death penalty.

CRIME Prop. 34 would repeal the death penalty in California and instead replace the maximum punishment with life in prison without parole. Supporters contend that it may save tens of millions of dollars that would otherwise be spent on murder trials. Prop. 35 would increase both fines and prison time for human-trafficking offenders. Sentences would be anywhere from 15 years to life and fines may be as high as $1.5 million. Training for human trafficking could potentially cost a few million dollars, but supporters speculate that increased fines would bring in millions of dollars for the state annually.

TAXES Prop. 30 would raise an estimated $6.8 billion for education by temporarily implementing higher state taxes for seven years. It will increase sales taxes for everyone, and personal income tax on earnings of more than $250,000 per year. California sales tax will be increased from 7.25 percent to 7.5 percent. If Prop. 30 fails to pass, the state government could decrease an estimated $250 million from the CSU system. Prop. 38 will temporarily increase taxes to help fund public schools and child-care programs. Personal income taxes for most Californians would increase for 12 years. Taxes would go up approximately $5 billion in the first year, $10 billion in the second year and continue to increase. Whichever proposition receives a larger percentage of votes would take priority concerning tax changes. There would only be one tax increase and any other changes called for by the propositions would still be in effect.

HEALTH Prop. 37 will label all genetically engineered foods. It includes raw or processed food made from plants or animals with genetic material that has been manipulated. It will also prohibit the use of the word natural for any genetically engineered food since natural is not currently regulated by the FDA. If passed, California would be the first state to enforce the label.

415-586-9400

VALUE MENU Parkmerced/ SF State/ Ingleside $ 99 each

5

Plus Tax

MEDIUM 1-TOPPING PIZZA

OVEN BAKED SANDWICH

TWO BREAD SIDES

BREADBOWL PASTA

CATHOLIC CAMPUS MINISTRY NEWMAN CLUB St. Thomas More Church

INSURANCE Unlike the other initiatives, Prop. 33 has no significant fiscal effects on the state, but will have huge effects on California drivers. Prop. 33 will allow automobile insurance companies to offer discounts to new customers who can prove they have been continuously covered for the past five years. Currently, California auto insurance companies can only offer discounts to existing customers.

Father Labib Kobti, Pastor 1300 Junipero Serra Blvd. San Francisco, CA 94132

(415) 452-9634

www.stmchurch.com/newman email: newman@stmchurch.com Weekly Meeting, For Current Activities: Cesar Chavez Student Center: St. Thomas More: (415) 452-9634 Mondays: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Close to campus! Please call Verbum Dei: (415) 573-9062

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS Every odd-numbered district supervisor is looking to be re-elected. Supervisor Sean Elsbernd — who oversees District 7, which includes SF State and Parkmerced — is finishing his term and will leave the position open. There are currently nine candidates in the running.

http://goldengatexpress.org CHECK US OUT ONLINE!

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6 ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

09.05.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

The Fashion Blueprint The fashion connoisseur outlines ways to avoid the fashion walk of shame. It’s true, you are what you wear and for him, every day is a runway.

Many layers of fashion make style light and easy by Bryan Vo | bryanvo@mail.sfsu.edu

It’s getting colder, but the sun is still here. Do you know what that means? Fall fashion! This season is all about layers. You might be afraid that layers are  thick and heavy. It’s time to get that out of your system. The trick to layering is to find pieces that are light and create slimming silhouettes. These are ways to show bold layers without feeling like you’re wearing bricks. Your goal should be to keep it light, but make a heavy statement. Impress with a  quarter-sleeve slub tee — for the calm — or rock an embellished top if you’re feeling crazy. Pull over a loose cardigan and chances are you won’t catch a dirty cold. There’s never enough sun for the ladies to pull off a daytime look. Without having to guess, wrap your legs in some black tights and slip them through some tailored mint-colored denim shorts. When it’s cold, no one wants to see your blown up goose bumps.  Finish it off with a pair of high heeled wing-tip brogue lace-ups to add a leaner and sexier look. A girl should never wear too many accessories. You don’t want to damage someone’s retina with all the bling you’re wearing. A tip for my fashionably impaired friends, never wear dangly earrings with a flashy necklace. You are not an Egyptian goddess. Add cute details, like a stone or a paved metal dome ring with a cross body bag. A chain strap usually catches the attention with those minor details. Guys, you look best when layered. A cool, casual denim button-up over a V-neck always makes the girls melt  —  even on a cold day. A thick collared flap shawl cardigan is a perfect layer. The open shawl neckline gives great detail around the neck, showing a hint of the denim collar eliminating that suffocated look.   Dark denim straight or slim-fit jeans pull the whole figure together & it will make you look sleek and hot. The tailoring makes everything continuous. Slip into some casual laced shoes or kick it up a notch with some weathered boots. If you’re planning to wear slippers or sandals for this outfit,  you’re obviously not seasoned for this fall. Don’t let fall intimidate your look in the morning. Your styling consultant is here to help whisk you around your wardrobe to help you pull something out for next week!

FROM SKIN TO PAPER: Orio Gavara, right, featured artist in the Ship-Shape! exhibit at the Cesar Chavez Student Center Art Gallery, tattoos Joe Cruz, left, at Rose Gold’s Tattoo & Piercing in the Haight-Ashbury District of San Francisco. The exhibit showcases the fine artwork of the local tattoo industry. Photo by Andy Sweet

Fine art ERUPTS from underground

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BY KIRSTIE HARUTA | kharuta@mail.sfsu.edu

HE NEATLY ARRANGED COLLAGES OF frames that fill the walls of the Cesar Chavez Student Center Art Gallery starkly contrast the bold, vivid designs that threaten to explode out of them. In styles perhaps more recognizable on skin than paper, every painting, drawing, photograph and sculpture in the Ship-Shape! exhibit was created by a local tattoo artist. San Francisco is a bubble of general acceptance when it comes to body art, according to Marie McCarthy of Rose Gold’s Tattoo & Piercing. Having encountered hidden and nonexistent tattoo cultures elsewhere, McCarthy knows there’s still a message to send. “(In Japan) there’s a very strong tattoo culture, but no one ever shows their tattoos in public because it kind of is more associated with the underground,” she said. “So I think coming from the culture like that, it might be interesting to see that in a gallery setting.” The display of tattoo art in a school gallery is a nudge to those who may not consider tattoos to be high-quality artistry; a small bit of stigma still remains. Despite the gallery’s original call for sketches on tracing paper, artists insisted on submitting completed pieces to express their level and variety of skill. “We thought it was important to show that a lot of tattoo artists are fine artists as well,” McCarthy said. It’s a fact sometimes forgotten in the business of tattoo artistry, she said. The emergence of more high-caliber tattoo artists over the years and her own fascination with the medium were factors that drove the Student Center Art Gallery manager Carolyn Ho to coordinate this exhibit. “There’s something about having tattoo art on campus that makes it a little risqué,” she said. “I think tattoos are still associated with, to conservative people, like bike gangs or junkies or something like that. And I think that’s totally changed now with the younger people. It’s something that I think is universally hip.” The gallery is a mix of the stylistic themes of “Old School” and “New Skool” that show the combination of classic sailor designs, as popularized by Sailor Jerry (Norman Keith Collins) in the 1930s and ‘40s, and newer, more intricate designs. The two styles don’t battle each other on the gallery walls, but instead have come together to highlight the merits of both techniques.

“It’s pretty subjective at this point,” said Ben Matthews, an artist from Rose Gold’s. “New Skool kind of has a basis in graffiti. (Old School style) is very simple; there’s not a lot of shading, very bold lines. In the last 15 years, people merged the two into old-new school.” Surprisingly, neither Ho nor any of the staff at the gallery have tattoos of their own. But the interest and appreciation for the art among them has only been ignited by the work they’ve put into the exhibit. “The whole time we’ve been doing this show, I’ve been thinking about what I would get as a tattoo,” said Janna Alfred, a second year studio art major who began working at the gallery this summer. “It’s just something that’s always been on my mind, and even more so now that we’re seeing the best of the best shops in San Francisco.” This is the type of reaction Ho hopes the exhibit will invoke in gallery visitors who don’t have any tattoos and may be unsure of their feelings towards such an intimate and permanent art form. Though hopeful for positive reception, Ho and her staff were met with some resistance, but not from who they expected. A few shops invited to participate showed skepticism and ultimately declined. Joe Paul, an artist at One Shot Tattoo, couldn’t imagine why local artists would flat-out refuse to display their work at a college gallery. “We get a lot of clientele from the colleges,” he said. “Why not share our artwork with them? It’s elementary, really.” Rejections were few, however, as many shops were eager to educate the public and show that tattoos can be fine artistry as well. “Most shops have well-versed artists,” Paul said. “There’s been a great surge in quality.” Ho is striving to generate new interest in the gallery while also getting the names of local artists out to the community by bringing high-quality art to campus. “For us, the main goal was to make tattoo art accessible,” McCarthy said. “Especially because the student body is really interested, so we try to reach out to the community.” Visit the Ship-Shape! exhibit Sept. 6, for its reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Featured artists hail from Black Heart Tattoo, Cyclops Tattoo, Diamond Club Tattoo Studio, Dragonfly Ink Studio, Everlasting Tattoo, Goldfield’s Tattoo, Lyle Tuttle Tattoo, One Shot Tattoo and Rose Gold’s.

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Field maintenance upgraded CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Although Hunter said his team is more than willing to do what they can to help maintain the field conditions, there was only so much they could do last season. When needed, he said his team would fill small holes in the ground with sand, pick up trash and do other tasks, totaling about a half-hour of outside work daily. The same applies to the University’s baseball team, which regularly spends an hour a day maintaining detail work on the ballpark. According to head baseball coach Mike Cummins, he and his team would do things like mow the terrain by hand, work on pitching mounds and dirt and clay FRESH TURF: Cox Stadium and the rest of the SF State outto the infield each day. door facilities will be maintained by a new staff, which is already Kylie Grabowski, a junior softball player, said making significant changes. Photo by Godofredo Vasquez she and a few teammates have been out on the softball field for some preseason practices and thought because they take pride in how it looks and how the field looked great. She said Lead Ground- they would want it to represent their team. Besworker Timothy Beall and his student workers cause of how much work Beall and the student have edged out the fields and taken out weeds workers have done to retain the look of each field, cluttering the batting cages. With these sorts of im- Grabowski thinks they won’t have to work on it as provements, Grabowski said she is “super excited” much from now on. Still, with the new semester and season just getto play on the newly improved field. “I think it’s gonna (make) a huge difference,” ting started, both Hunter and Cummins are excited Grabowski, 20, said. “I mean, the maintenance work- about the improvements made to the fields. “So far, so good,” Cummins said.  “You gotta ers have done a good job in the past, but Tim and the get (the fields) really tuned up because they’re gonstudent (workers) have gone above and beyond.” As far as the detail work the softball team na take a beating again next time you get in the does on their own field, Grabowski said she and season, then you come back and do it again. That’s her teammates take extra time to beautify the field what maintenance is all about.”

7


8 OPINION

09.05.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG STAFF EDITORIAL

KALE WILLIAMS

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF kale@mail.sfsu.edu

Recycling low priority for green campus

ANGELA RAIFORD

PRINT MANAGING EDITOR araiford@mail.sfsu.edu

MATT MAXION

ONLINE MANAGING EDITOR mmaxion@mail.sfsu.edu

ELISSA TORRES

ART DIRECTOR elissat@mail.sfsu.edu

JEFF SANDSTOE

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR jsandsto@mail.sfsu.edu

Lack of understanding about waste management leads to overrun trash cans and a disregard for the environment

CASSIE BECKER

PRINT COPY CHIEF cassbeck@mail.sfsu.edu

KEVIN SKAHAN

ONLINE COPY CHIEF kskahan@mail.sfsu.edu

SAM BATTLES

PRINT PHOTO EDITOR sbattles@mail.sfsu.edu

GODOFREDO VASQUEZ

ONLINE PHOTO EDITOR gvasquez@mail.sfsu.edu

BRAD WILSON

CAMPUS EDITOR bradw949@mail.sfsu.edu

CRISTINA RAMOS

CITY EDITOR cjramos@mail.sfsu.edu

ADRIAN RODRIGUEZ

A&E EDITOR arrodrig@mail.sfsu.edu

CAITLIN BYRNE

SPORTS EDITOR cmbyrne@mail.sfsu.edu

LAURA SAVAGE

OPINION EDITOR savymama@mail.sfsu.edu

JESSICA SCHIMM

SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR cmbyrne@mail.sfsu.edu

RACHELE KANIGEL

FACULTY ADVISER kanigel@mail.sfsu.edu

SCOT TUCKER

PHOTO ADVISER tucker@mail.sfsu.edu

ART BY MARIELLE ATANACIO

P

ICTURE A PLETHORA OF TRASH CANS, scattered about our beautiful campus, overflowing with half-eaten pizza, empty soda cans and discarded essays. We’ve all seen it before — the green and blue colored bins in the student center — that remain practically empty while the trash from the black bins spill onto the floor. The signs prominently placed above each bin — blue for recycling and green for compost — go largely ignored as trash piles up and eventually spills over the brim of both the black and traditional trashcans. For a school that has been placed on the Princeton Green Honor Roll for environmental sustainability, the general disdain for proper recycling protocol on our campus is disturbing. We live in San Francisco, one of the most progressive cities of the country, if not the world, yet our inability to follow simple instructions — printed in large block letters accompanied by pictures — makes us look lazy at best, and ignorant and out of touch at worst. There are ample reasons to recycle, some of them obvious, some not so much. First, it’s a law. Composting and recycling are requirements under a 2009 ordinance passed by the Board of Supervisors. The Mandatory Composting and Recycling Ordinance requires city residents and businesses to separate all compost and recycling into the appropriate bins. If every person in San Francisco followed the ordinance, 90 percent of all city waste would be diverted from landfills, according to the San Francisco Department of the Environment. As of 2010, the city

boasted a 77 percent diversion rate, one of the highest in the country. But SF State’s diversion rate tops out at 70 percent, a full 7 points behind our noncollegiate counterparts. Recycling also spares landfill space, something we’re eventually going to run out of if we keep chucking our recyclables onto random chunks of land. Starting Oct. 1, the city of San Francisco will officially outlaw any use of plastic bags, which is a baby step in the right direction. But baby steps aren’t going to get us where we need to be, especially when they come in the form of regulations passed down from above. Problems like these are better addressed from the bottom up. The Board of Supervisors can sign laws until their pens run dry, but if we don’t each take responsibility for our actions, nothing will ever change. As it turns out, recycling isn’t that hard. Recycling receptacles aren’t hard to find on our campus and most are clearly labeled with instructions on how to sort our undesirables. If you have the odd item that doesn’t fit into one of the categories listed on the handy receptacles, don’t fret. Sustainable SF State has a website that will tell you how to recycle just about anything, from cardboard to keys to kitchen grease. All it really takes is a couple extra seconds from each of us to look at the trash we’re holding, match it up to the picture and toss it in the appropriate bin. It’s easy to do, it’ll only cost you a couple extra seconds and you might just feel good about yourself when you do it. As a community, we must live up to San Francisco’s reputation for environmental excellence and make the right decision in the split-second when an empty bottle leaves our hands.

JESSE GARNIER

ONLINE ADVISER jgarnier@sfsu.edu

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DESIGN ADVISER gnusart@sfsu.edu

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STUDENT GRAPHIC DESIGNER marielle@mail.sfsu.edu

WRITE US A LETTER The Golden Gate Xpress accepts letters no longer than 200 words. Letters are subject to editing. Send letters to Laura Savage at: savymama@mail.sfsu.edu

ABOUT XPRESS The Golden Gate Xpress is a student-produced publication of the journalism department at San Francisco State University. For more information or comments, please contact Kale Williams at: kale@mail.sfsu.edu

SF State suffers from lack of diversity The beginning of each semester which compiles demographics of all BY LAURA SAVAGE | savymama@mail.sfsu.edu brings new students from various kinds for the campus, the number of Afribackgrounds. SF State students speak can-American students has dropped from a variety of languages and represent 1,662 (6.9 percent) in 2007 to 1,408 (5.6 all nationalities and races. At first glance, one might even think it rep- percent) in 2011. That is for all levels. In comparison, Chicano/Mexresents the state demographics. When looking at the numbers, however, ican-American students have increased from 2,432 (10.1 percent) in a disheartening trend emerges. 2007 to 3,400 (13.6 percent) in Fall 2011. Similarly, Latino students African-American student numbers are decreasing significantly. Ac- of other origin have increased from 1,872 (7.8 percent) to 2,339 (9.4 cording to the California State University’s Analytical Statistical Reports percent) within the same time frame. website, Fall 2011 shows only 159 African-American first-time freshWhat qualifies an institution to label itself diverse? Is it merely havmen, down from 218 in 2007. Transfer students accounted for another ing a large number of nonwhite students or does it require a student 160 students in 2011, down a tenth of a percentage point from 2007 data. population that reflects an even distribution of racial backgrounds? What are African-American students lacking that disqualifies them for It may seem when you walk around campus that there are more Afacceptance to SF State? Or perhaps a better question would be, what does rican-American students on campus than the numbers show, but are they the University do to attract African-American students? Does the adminis- counted as African-American and do they consider themselves a part of tration care to attract larger numbers of African-American students? that group? The numbers for nonresident students admitted and enrolled Part of SF State’s legacy is the 1969 school shutdown by a number between 2007 and 2011 are greater than African-American students. In of African-American students on campus in solidarity with other under- 2011, nonresident and African-American student admissions were nearly represented students and faculty of color. Together they succeeded in the same for first time-freshmen, almost double the amount of nonresirallying for ethnic studies to be offered and for more students of color dent transfers were admitted and triple the amount of graduate nonresito be admitted. That strike demanded an equal opportunity for Afri- dents compared to their African-American counterparts. These numbers can-American students to learn their own history. don’t even include the Latino, Mexican/Chicano population and Asian The years following the protests and school shutdown saw an students, all of which are enjoying an increase in admissions. increase in African-American enrollment. As of late, this number seems Yes, an increase in students of color from many different backto be headed in the opposite direction of what students protested for grounds helps make SF State wonderful! But, at the rate we’re going during the late 1960s. It is with this educational legacy in mind that I there won’t be any African-American students, even if they are qualiwonder why the African-American student population here is rapidly fied. The administration should put more effort into distributing admisdeclining, especially during the past six years. sions across all ethnic backgrounds. SF State has been deemed one of the most racially diverse campuses The facts page of the SF State website proudly boasts the in the country by the 2009 “US News & World Report” rankings, but University’s record of graduating people of color. I say it is time to what does that diversity really look like under a microscope? return to the roots of what made the University diverse to begin with by According to the San Francisco State University 2012 Data Book, increasing African-American student admissions.


| 09.05.12

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THE INS & OUTS A WEEKLY SEX COLUMN BY CASSIE BECKER cassbeck@mail.sfsu.edu

Sexually transmitted infections on the rise in San Francisco

T

HINK YOU CAN’T CATCH something from one brief sexual encounter? Think using a condom for vaginal or anal intercourse is plenty of protection? Think getting tested once every few years is plenty often? Think again. Rates of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis are all higher in San Francisco than they have been over the last five years, according to recently released statistics by the California Department of Public Health. Between 2010 and 2011, chlamydia increased 5 percent, gonorrhea 1.5 percent and infectious syphilis 18 percent. These particular sexually transmitted infections are especially heinous, and can lead to long-term repercussions and even death. Rates of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis remain highest among gay and bisexual men, and rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea among women under 26 years old. Here’s why you never want to run into any of these nasties: Chlamydia, known as the “silent” infection, is the most frequently reported bacterial sexually transmitted infection in the United States and can cause irreversible damage to the reproductive tract, including infertility. For both men and women, it can be tough to diagnose based on symptoms, although men could experience penile discharge and pain or swelling in the testicles. Gonorrhea is a bacterium that easily grows in moist, warm areas of the reproductive tract and can also pop up in the mouth, eyes, throat and anus. If women exhibit any symptoms, they can easily be mistaken for a bladder or vaginal infection. Most men don’t experience symptoms, but some will have white, yellow or green discharge leaking from the penis one to 14 days after contracting the disease. If left untreated, gonorrhea can lead to life-threatening complications. Syphilis, which can be contracted through a sore that the infected party doesn’t even know exists, can go unnoticed for years while still doing damage to the body. The second stage of the infection comes with a repulsive rash on the palms of the hands or bottom of the feet. If not treated, it can lead to organ damage, blindness, dementia and a host of other miserable symptoms that will inevitably lead to an even more miserable end. Use barrier methods: condoms (male or female), dental dams, finger cots and anything else as a barrier between your bodily fluids and your partner’s. This should be a given during all sexual encounters. Don’t take someone’s word on test results, even if you see

them. They could have contracted something since the test or have something that just hasn’t shown up yet. Even if you practice safe sex, you must always know your own status. No excuses. Regular testing is absolutely essential. How often you get tested, however, depends on you. “It is recommended that an individual be tested once every three to six months, depending on how sexually active you are and how frequent your barrier use is,” peer sexual health educator Brianna Williams said. “The time frame of three to six months is selected because STIs have different window periods, meaning if you’re exposed to an STI, it won’t necessarily show up before a certain time when a test can recognize it.” The cases of all three of these infections have also increased throughout California, with no clear reason, according to Dr. Susan Philip, director of STD prevention and control services at the San Francisco Department of Public Health, who spoke to Examiner.com. To add to this infection-ridden fun, people with sexually transmitted diseases are two to five times more likely to get infected with HIV than those who are uninfected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Anyone who is sexually active can contract an STI — there is no shortage of reasons to get tested. Testing involves either a urine or blood test. These tests take a few minutes at most, and the blood test is only slightly uncomfortable, Williams said, and “worth it in the end.” Don’t worry. There’s no lack of places to go to get a clean bill of health. “The health center is a great convenient place for students of SFSU to go to, but there are of course other sites around the city, especially if you’d like anonymous testing. There’s the API Wellness Center, Magnet and even Planned Parenthood. Or, of course, you can visit your primary health care provider,” Williams said. But she emphasizes that where you go isn’t what truly matters. “The where you get tested isn’t as important so much as the act of getting tested at some point.”

Since breaking up with her inner prude, Cassie Becker has done it all. Her interest in sexual exploration has led her to write several blogs and break even more beds. She’s extensively researched and written about it — all with a sexy smile.

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09.05.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

PLAYER

MEAGAN WRIGHT

WEEK

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

of the

Freshman Meagan Wright has been chosen as the Xpress Player of the Week. Wright had six put-aways against Marysville University last Friday, and helped to change the momentum late in the match with a kill. Later that day, Wright accumulated six kills, three block assists, and two service aces against University of Alaska Anchorage to notch another win for the Gators.

PHOTO BY TYLER DENISTON/SF STATE SPORTS

G AT OR S’ SP OR T S SCHEDUL E WEDNESDAY (9.05) MEN’S SOCCER SF STATE AT ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSITY

7 P.M. (SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.)

Old chemistry gains new edge

FRIDAY (9.07)

Men’s soccer team gears up for a successful season with old and new players, and high expectations

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL SF STATE VS. SF STATE VS. FRESNO PACIFIC ACADEMY OF UNIVERSITY ART UNIVERSITY 11:30 A.M. (HAYWARD, CALIF.)

4:30 P.M. (HAYWARD, CALIF.)

MEN’S SOCCER SF STATE AT UC SAN DIEGO 4:30 P.M. (SAN DIEGO CALIF.)

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL SF STATE AT UC SAN DIEGO 7 P.M. (SAN DIEGO, CALIF.)

SATURDAY (9.08) WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL SF STATE VS. CAL BAPTIST UNIVERSITY 11:30 A.M. (SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF.)

SF STATE VS. NOTRE DAME DE NAMUR UNIVERSITY 2 P.M. (SAN BERNARDINO,

SUNDAY (9.09) MEN’S SOCCER SF STATE AT CAL STATE SAN BERNARDINO

11:30 P.M. (SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF.)

WOMEN’S SOCCER SF STATE AT CAL STATE SAN BERNARDINO

2 P.M. (SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF.)

TUESDAY (9.11) WOMEN’S SOCCER SF STATE VS. UC SANTA CRUZ 3:30 P.M. (SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.)

BY GODOFREDO VASQUEZ | gvasquez@mail.sfsu.edu

BONDING: SF State Gators’ Kevin Johnson (13), center, celebrates with his teammates after scoring the Gators’ second goal against Notre Dame de Namur University. Photo by Godofredo Vasquez

W

HEN YOU SEE THE SF STATE men’s soccer team this year, you’ll notice a few things. They’re bigger. They’re agile. They’re athletic. Part of that is due to the fact that the 2012 Gators are welcoming nine new players this season. Among them are four freshmen, all of whom are 5

feet 10 inches or taller. The University’s men’s soccer team has 17 players coming back, nine of them seniors, and head coach Joe Hunter knows the team’s success relies heavily on their experience and their ability to lead. “If I have to think of one of the things that’s going to be very important to our success is that these guys have to be able to mentor and lead and be responsible,” Hunter said. “They know what they’re gonna be going through, they’ve seen it.” Having more than half the team in the offseason definitely helped build the Gators’ chemistry. “Chemistry-wise we worked a lot on that over the spring. We had a couple of tough matches (scrimmages) and that helped us a lot with our chemistry,” senior forward Edgar Villagrana said. With the team dynamics figured out, the Gators can try to address their biggest challenge from 2011 — scoring goals. SF State found the back of the net only 14 times last year, while opponents scored a total of 25 times. The Gators attempted more shots than rivals, however, only 31 percent of those were on target. In 2012 they need to be more accurate and better at finishing. Simply put, midfielders and forwards have to be able to convert those scoring opportunities, turning those missed shots into goals “Our biggest deficiency last year was that we didn’t score a lot of goals, and that’s the toughest thing to do,” Hunter said. “I think we will score a few more goals, which will be nice.” Sophomore midfielder Robert Gilbert agreed with Hunter and sounded confident about the Gators’ ability to finish in front of goal this year. “We have a lot more guys that can score this year, I think. A lot of the new guys — Sam Merritt is one of them —  we just need to put goals away,” Gilbert said.

S C O R E

SCORES FROM THE LAST WEEK OF GATOR SPORTS

B O A R D

Hunter also knows being sound defensively will be vital for a successful season. “The other thing is you’re gonna win games by being defensively tough, and that’s been the biggest thing we’ve been working on,” he said. “Just shape, defensive shape, good decisions and communicating with each other.” Hunter spoke highly of his freshman class. He described goalkeeper Guillermo Castro as experienced due to the time he spent playing with the El Salvador U-17 national team. Freshman Jared Magaoay, who stands at 6 feet tall, was described by Hunter as a “man-child,” due to his physicality and versatility to play many positions. The head coach also had high praises whenever he spoke about freshmen midfielder Sam Merritt. “I think this kid Sam Merritt, as a freshmen, is one that could vie for a freshmen of the year (award),” said Hunter. “He’s a very, very good player.” Merritt is hopeful to end the season as a starter for the Gators. “I like the way they play and it fits my style of play, too. Like possession and keeping the ball, and just waiting for the game to open up,” Merritt said. “Hopefully I’m starting by the end of the season, that’d be nice, or at least getting a lot of playing time.” The Gators will need seniors like defenders Jose Vitela and Sasha Chalak, midfielder Jose Monje, and Villagrana to play their best soccer. Coach Hunter also expects sophomores to make significant progress this year. Hayden Roberts, Juan Sanchez, Kevin Johnson and Gilbert all “need to take a big step and just continue to get better, because they’re key for us as well,” Hunter said. The Gators started the 2012 season with a 3-2 loss against Notre Dame de Namur University Monday afternoon. SF State will play Academy of Art University this Wednesday night at Kezar Stadium and won’t play at home until Sept. 16.

For the SF State Women’s Soccer preview go to

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VOLLEYBALL WIN

AUG. 31 SF STATE VS. MARYVILLE UNIVERSITY 4-0

WIN

SF STATE VS. SEATTLE PACIFIC 3-0

MEN’S SOCCER WIN

AUG. 31 SF STATE VS. UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE 3-0

LOSS

SF STATE AT NOTRE DAME DE NAMUR UNIVERSITY 2-3


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Golden Gate Xpress Fall 2012 Issue 2