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november / december 2012

CROSSROADS Changing Times in Our Industry

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Your SOURCE for Top Quality Registered & Commercial Brangus Cattle

Proud Members of

Circle Land & Cattle Co., Ltd. Bobcat Bottoms Ranch • Persimmon Creek Ranch • Camp Cooley Spring Valley Ranch • Windy Hill Ranch • Vista Ridge Ranch 2 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

located just off Hwy. 6 and OSR P.O. Box 4747 • Bryan, Texas 77805 Office: (979) 776-5760 • Fax: (979) 776-4818 Website: www.circlexbrangus.com Steve Densmore, Cattle Mgr., (979) 450-0819, cell • (979) 778-1055, home Chris Duewall, Operations Mgr., (979) 777-6803, cell


Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 1


Volume 60, Issue 6

The Official Publication of the International Brangus® Breeders Association.

Subscriptions: Frances Miller 210.696-8231 x203 frances_miller@int-brangus.org

The Brangus Journal is an international publication serving the Brangus seedstock producer. Published bimonthly, this archive is designed to highlight accomplishments and improvements within the association. The purpose of the Brangus Journal is to serve the best interests of the members while showcasing IBBA member breeding programs, efforts and achievements to other Brangus seedstock producers. The Journal also provides a venue for the IBBA to communicate directly with their members providing updates related to the association, publishing feature stories, or announcing results. Publication #ISSN0006-9132. Periodicals postage paid at San Antonio, Texas, and additional entries. Postmaster: Send address changes to Brangus Publications, Inc., 5750 Epsilon, San Antonio, Texas 78249. Subscription Rates: Domestic Periodicals—1 year, $25; First class—$55. Foreign—1 year, periodicals, $25; air mail to Mexico, $70, Canada, $70, Australia, $115; air mail to all other countries, $115. Contact: Address: 5750 Epsilon, San Antonio, Texas 78249 Telephone: 210.696.8231 Fax: 210.696.8718 Web site: www.brangusjournal.com Email: brangusjournal@int-brangus.org The International Brangus® Breeders Association does not verify claims made by the advertisers in this publication.

BPI Officers and Board of Directors Chairman : Ron Flake (662.509.2233) President : Dr. Joseph Massey (210.696.8321 x212) Secretary/Treasurer : Steve Densmore (979.778.1055) Director : Fred McCreary (251.578.4750) Director: R.L. Robbs (520.384.3654) STAFF Dr. Joe Massey: Executive Vice President (x212, joemassey@int-branugs.org) Ben Spitzer: Marketing Programs Director (x215, ben@int-brangus.org) Garrett Thomas: Director of Membership & International Promotion (x217, garrett@int-brangus.org) Tyler Dean: Director of Youth Programs and Shows, Publications Representative (405.867.1421, tyler@int-brangus.org) Jim Bulger: Information Technologies Manager (x207, jim_bulger@gps-beef.com) Frances Miller: Controller (x203, frances_miller@int-brangus.org) Patti Teeler: Accounting (x205, patti@int-brangus.org) Rosanne Sralla: Registry Specialist (x206, rosanne_sralla@int-brangus.org) Lindsey Matli: Customer Service Representative (x204, lindsey@int-brangus.org) Brittni Drennan: Communications Coordinator (x202, brittni@int-brangus.org) ADVERTISING IBBA office: (210.696.8231), advertising@int-brangus.org Tyler Dean: (405.867.1421), tyler@int-brangus.org

2 | November BrangusJournal Journal november / december 2012 Brangus


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On the Cover. An icy cold morning has Brangus heifers lined up at the fence ready for the feed truck. Photo by Jessica Dean.

DEPARTMENTS

4. IBBA Connection 18. IJBBA Connection 19. IBA Connection contents 20. Marketing Update What Does 2013 Bring for the Seedstock Industry Facing the Crossroads 22. Membership Flashback: 60 Years of the Brangus Journal Past President Feature: Ludwig Brand 24. Special The Professional Cattleman The Time for Changes 40. Feature Articles Crossroads Looking Forward 48. Sale Reports An Industry and a Breed at a Crossroads Swords Honored by Peers 56. Show Results Southern Accent Farm Receives Agricultural Environmental Leadership Award IBBA Members Asked to Consider Bylaw Revision 69. Brangus Plus Proposed IBBA Bylaw Revision 2012 Board Candidate Biographies 70. State Directory IBBA Announces Significant Changes to Annual Convention, Global Roundup The Importance of Strategic Planning 73. Services IBBA STRATEGIC PLAN Strong Cattle Prices and Production Challenges in 2013 76. Advertiser’s Index Intrepretation and Use of Calving Ease EPDs The Brangus Opportunity in Costa Rica and Central America 76. Calendar of Events

8 10 12 13 14 16 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 33 37 38 40 44 46

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IBBA Connection - staff Executive Vice President

Dr. JOSEPH MASSEY 210.696.8231 x212 joemassey@int-brangus.org

Contact Dr. Massey for: • Association Questions • Feedback for Continued Association Improvement

Marketing Programs Director

BEN SPITZER

210.696.8231 x215 or 864.723.3779 ben@int-brangus.org Contact Ben for: • IBBA’s Marketing Programs Opportunities • Brangus Gold • Feeder Cattle Marketing

Director of Membership & International Promotion

GARRETT THOMAS

210.696.8231 x217 or 936.714.4591 garrett@int-brangus.org Contact Garrett for: • Upcoming Brangus Events • IBBA’s Online Video Questions or Suggestions

Controller

FRANCES MILLER

210.696.8231 x203 frances_miller@int-brangus.org Contact Frances for: • Brangus Journal & Frontline Beef Producer Subscriptions • Accounting Questions • THR Questions

Accounting Specialist

PATTI TEELER 210.696.8231 x205 patti@int-brangus.org

Contact Patti for: • Accounting Questions • THR Questions

Registry Specialist

ROSANNE SRALLA

210.696.8231 x206 rosanne_sralla@int-brangus.org Contact Rosanne for: • THR Questions • Registry Questions • DNA Questions • Ultrasound Questions

Director of Shows & Youth Programs Publications Representative

Customer Service Representative

TYLER DEAN

210.696.8231 x204 lindsey@int-brangus.org

405.867.1421 or 405.207.6921 tyler@int-brangus.org Contact Tyler for: • Brangus Journal & Frontline Beef Producer Advertising and Content • Upcoming Regional & National Shows • Junior Activities

LINDSEY MATLI Contact Lindsey for: • Commercial Marketing Administration • Enrollment • Tag Orders • Big Blue Program Information • Membership & Educational Information • Event Planning & Convention

Communications Coordinator Information Technology Manager

JIM BULGER Jim is Responsible for: • Software Development • Database Management

4 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

BRITTNI DRENNAN 210.696.8231 x202 brittni@int-brangus.org

Contact Brittni for: • GoBrangus Online Advertising • Social Media Inquiries • News Related to Brangus • Publication Content


IBBA Connection - staff IBBA Staff Involvement Continually working with industry partners to promote and advance the Brangus breed Registry management Communications development Compile publications and promotional items Answer calls and questions Total Herd Reporting IBBA Convention Planning NCBA Convention & Trade Show Preparation Big Blue Project- Ben Spitzer, Garrett Thomas & Lindsey Matli Brangus Gold Tag Orders- Lindsey Matli Farm Bureau Livestock Marketing Seminar- Lindsey Matli TSCRA Ranch Gathering- Lindsey Matli Sales, shows and IBBA meetings attended and/or coordinated: • IBBA Board and Committee Meetings- IBBA Staff

• • • • • • • • • •

GeneTrust Sale at Chimney Rock, Concord, AR- Garrett Thomas National Show of Merit, Shreveport, LA- Tyler Dean IJBBA Board of Directors Meeting, Shreveport, LA- Tyler Dean Three Trees Ranch Bull Sale, Sharpsburg, GA- Ben Spitzer The Cattleman’s Kind Sale at Blackwater Cattle Company, Lake Park, GA- Garrett Thomas Hill Country Brangus Breeders Association Sale, San Angelo, TX- Brittni Drennan World Series of Brangus Sale, Palo Pinto, TX- Dr. Massey & Lindsey Matli GeneTrust Sale at Cavender’s, Jacksonville, TX- Garrett Thomas Cain Cattle Dispersal, Pickens, MS- Garrett Thomas Texas Brangus Breeders Association Sale, San Saba, TX- Ben Spitzer

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 5


IBBA Connection - Board President R.L. Robbs, Area 6

Cody Gariss, Area 3

Term: 2012-2015 520-384-2478 | robbs.brangus@powerc.net

Term: 2011-2014 417-398-2836 | cody_gariss88@hotmail.com

Fred McCreary, Area 1

Don Cox, Area 7

Term: 2010-2013 251-578-4750 | mccrearyfarms@hotmail.com

Term: 2011-2014 281-395-1277 | cxcattle@brangusworld.com

Frank Perry, Area 5

Mike Burke, Area 11

Term: 2010-2013 405-833-5189 | dfrankp@yahoo.com

Term: 2011-2014 706-551-3025 | mike@burkebrangusfarm.com

Angelo Zottarelli, Area 7

Traci Middleton, Area 4

Term: 2010-2013 512-422-3123 | zott@sbcglobal.net

Term: 2012-2015 731-676-0807 | tracimiddleton@hotmail.com

Steve Densmore, Area 9

Brandon Belt, Area 7

Term: 2010-2013 979-778-1055 | s.densmore@bre.com

Term: 2012-2015 254-248-5260| brandonbelt@aol.com

Larry Parker, Area 10

Robert Field, Area 8

Term: 2010-2013 520-508-3505 | jddiane@vtc.net

Term: 2012-2015 662-793-4746 | calyxstar@aol.com

Ron Flake, Area 2 Term: 2011-2014 662-509-2233 | rflake@ms.metrocast.net

Contact the Director from your area with any questions or concerns you have have about our assocation.

Events Attended: • • • • • • • • •

IBBA Board and Committee Meetings – All • Heart of Alabama Sale, Uniontown, AL – Robert Field GeneTrust Sale at Chimney Rock, Concord, AR – Cody • GeneTrust Sale at Cavender’s, Jacksonville, TX – Steve Gariss, Mike Burke, Robert Field Densmore, Cody Gariss, Robert Field November Oklahoma Brangus Association Meeting – Frank • Cain Cattle Dispersal – Robert Field Perry • Texas Brangus Breeders Association Sale, San Saba, TX – National Show of Merit – Shreveport, LA – Fred McCreary, Steve Densmore, Don Cox, Brandon Belt Traci Middleton • December Oklahoma Brangus Association Meeting – Frank Ranch Visits in Tennessee – Don Cox Perry IJBBA Board of Directors Meeting, Shreveport, LA – Steve Densmore, Traci Middleton The Cattleman’s Kind Sale at Blackwater Cattle Company, Lake Park, GA – Mike Burke Hill Country Brangus Breeders Association Sale, San Angelo, TX – Steve Densmore, Brandon Belt World Series of Brangus Sale, Palo Pinto, TX – Steve Densmore, Don 2012-2013 IBBA Board of Directors Cox, Mike Burke, Brandon Belt Back Row (L to R): Mike Burke, Cody Gariss, Frank Perry, Don Cox, Brandon Belt, Traci Middleton, Larry Parker, and Robert Field. Seated (L to R): Dr. Joe Massey, Steve Densmore, R.L. Robbs, Ron Flake, Fred McCreary, and Angelo Zottarelli.

6 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal


We are building the future of TM

Brinks Brangus cattle.

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BW -0.4

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YW 54

Milk 16

M&G 30

SC 1.00

Top 25% Top 25% Top 25% Top 15% Top 20% Top 10%

REA 0.44

IMF FT -0.03 -0.002

BW 52 (80)

AWW AYW REA IMF 519 1266 12.81 4.19 (119)

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FT .19 (114)

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Private Treaty Bulls Now Available Other Sires Include:

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Westall Ranches, LLC Registered Brangus Cattle

Tate Pruett, Ranch Manager 575.365.6356 (cell)  575.653.4842 (ranch) Ray & Karen Westall, Owners 575.361.2070 (cell)

Raised in the rocks at 6,000 feet in arabela, NM Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 7


IBBA Connection What Does 2013 Bring for the Seedstock Industry

T

here has been little surprise in the beef industry in 2012 since we have continued to kill cattle as predicted and the droughts have persisted over many areas of the country. We will end up with the smallest beef herd since about 1950, and since our peak in 1996, we have been in a decline for the better part of the last sixteen years. Until this year we have been able to produce the same amount of pounds of beef for consumption as when we had more cattle. The U.S. beef herd has produced better performing cattle with larger carcasses. I believe the principles of quantitative genetics have worked as predicted and expected, but we are now being challenged to understand these principles even better since, for the first time, we will probably be producing two to three percent fewer pounds of beef for consumption, and the short fall is being made up from imports. What this means for the beef industry is that we will probably move into a period where trying to increase cow numbers will run head-on into the demand for more pounds of beef and probably an increase in killer prices, particularly as our economy improves. This does not change the fact that as commodities continue to increase, like fuels and feeds, the cost of production will also be challenging for the beef industry. The next several years could bring a rather unique opportunity

by Dr. Joseph MASSEY IBBA Executive Vice-President

for the seedstock producer where good cattle will be in good demand, but I would also expect that marginal cattle may have a difficult time finding a place to go. As cattle numbers decline, you might think all cattle will increase in value, which is generally true, but buyers will become more discriminating in all types of cattle as poor performing cattle will become a liability rather than an asset. I see the opportunity as particularly good for seedstock producers who understand and produce cattle with high predictability in performance and produce a significant number of similar types of genetics. When one thinks about replenishing a cowherd you need a large number of animals that will produce in a similar manner. Variability is the one thing you would not want to be buying. The single most noticeable observation I have made during this bull selling season is that good cattle sell well and average cattle do not sell. In discussions with a number of large commercial producers, they have been frustrated with having to go to so many producer sales to find enough good quality bulls to buy with unique expected performance. The commercial producers put a lot of emphasis on calving ease, weaning weights and expected carcass quality, since they are feeling the pressure to have a larger supply of calves that will all perform in the feed yards. So I see great opportunity for seedstock producers breeding highly predictable sires to a large number of cows in order to produce a significant supply of predicable genetics in both bull and heifer calves. As the supply of cattle becomes tighter, the more important good records of producing predicable EPDs will be, and they will pay dividends. Most, if not all, of us need to realize we are going into a period of time in the cattle cycles we have never experienced. Keep your eyes open. BJ ABOUT THE AUTHOR Dr. Massey has served as Executive Vice President of the IBBA since 2004. In 2007, he started Genetic Performance Solutions, LLC, a breed registry services and performance analysis company serving the cattle and breed association industry— an IBBA owned company. GPS manages online registry programs for breed associations and the data base management of performance data like multi-breed EPDs.

8 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal


DEEP DOWN RANCH patricia

atalie

kali

meoquanne

Bob & Lauren Savoie (337) 540-1124 Phyllis Pinch, Jami Pinch, Aaron & Ashley Pinch (337) 540-8066 19282 Dama Landry Road Jennings, LA Show Cattle Management:

James Hux * (979)418-1021

dior

The Legacy Lives On.....

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 9


IBBA Connection Facing the Crossroads

Y

by RL ROBBS IBBA President

our Board of Directors has been very involved in developing a very crucial organizational strategic plan during the past six months. It is imperative that we establish both short-term and long-term goals and business objectives that we are able to successfully accomplish in the years ahead. We have worked hard to construct a workable plan that covers many areas prevalent to the Brangus breed. The Board of Directors has utilized many different resources as well as their own personal time to develop this strategic plan. My hope is that you, as a member of the IBBA, will take on the challenge of reading and studying this plan that your board has adopted. Whether you are interested in Brangus genetic research, developing relationships and marketing opportunities, or helping to increase the Junior IBBA’s involvement, I ask that you select an area that is most important to you and dedicate Look for IBBA’s Strategic Plan on pages 38-39. Find complete convention information on pages 33-35 of this issue.

yourself to helping our breed prosper and grow over these next crucial years. Most importantly, I hope that we can unify all of our IBBA members to help this valuable organization grow and succeed. Also in this issue is information about our Annual IBBA Convention and the upcoming Global RoundUp. Several changes have been made this year. First off, our headquarters will be at the Crown Plaza Hotel across the street from the Reliant Center. In addition to that, our Global RoundUp will be held on Thursday at the Crown Plaza. This will make it much easier for our members to meet, mingle and build relationships with our International guests. We are looking forward to a great and exciting convention this year. Please make plans early to attend. See you there! R.L . bj ABOUT THE AUTHOR: R. L., current president of the IBBA Board of Directors, has been actively involved in breeding, showing and promoting Brangus cattle for the last 45 years. R.L. served a previous term on the IBBA Board of Directors, and he has served on the Breed Improvement and Membership and Education committees. He has been a vital member of the Southwest Brangus Breeders Association for the past 40 years serving as President and Secretary/Treasurer. R. L. has been actively involved in the Southwest Junior Association helping the junior breeders with a draw pot program. R.L. and his wife, Sally, have two grown daughters. Shari resides in Broadview Heights, Ohio, with her two children, Mollie and Trey. D’Lynn and her husband, Josh, reside in Wellsville, Kan.

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IBBA Connection Flashback: 60 Years of the Brangus Journal

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s the use of the Internet and digital media exploded, newspapers and magazines decreased in relevance and circulation quickly declined. News and information can now be retrieved from online immediately. However, marketing research has shown many people, especially farmers and ranchers, still appreciate the feel of pages between their fingers. 2012 marks 60 years of publishing the Brangus Journal- sixty years of documenting legacy, history and tradition. Nevertheless, we cannot afford to remain idle. We must adapt to the technological advancements made in the industry, or we will be left behind. As the IBBA has made advancements along with the industry, the association now has more flexibility and offers more marketing options.

30 Years Ago

Brangus Journal staff in 1982:

Managing Editor – Martha A. Hollida Advertising Manager – Joy Weinheimer Production Manager – Billy J. Smallwood Circulation Manager – Carmen Ortiz Editorial Assistant – Debbie Brashear Production Assistant – Mike Bass 12 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

Brangus Journal SEPTEMBER 1982 VOLUME 30, NUMBER 8

Both Brangus publications can now be read online at gobrangus.com/brangus-publications/. Also, online advertising is available on the IBBA website at GoBrangus.com, which includes placement in the weekly online eNewsletter and the Beef Tips blog found at www.gobrangus.wordpress.com. The latest news is now published in the weekly eNewsletter rather than in the Brangus Journal and is instrumental in distributing news, deadlines and information to IBBA members. Go to www. GoBrangus.com and submit your email address to the eNews sign-up. Call Brittni Drennan at the IBBA office at 210-6968231 or Tyler Dean at 405-207-6921 to find out how you can take advantage of the opportunities presented online. Capture the attention of a wider audience and start building relationships with new customers. bj


IBBA Connection

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Past President Feature: Ludwig Brand

n article in the August 1983 issue of the Brangus preventing the association from incurring any debt. The Building Journal uses three words to describe Ludwig Fund Drive and the Art Fund Drive alone generated $900,000 Brand- dedication, determination and enthusiasm. from Brangus breeders. Many breeders and IBBA members This past IBBA president was born in Hamburg, remember The Crowning Event in which Brand and Judy were Germany, in 1933. His family moved to instrumental in organizing that completely Poland where they were in the business of paid off the new building located on 5750 selling and exporting hides having offices in Epsilon in San Antonio, Texas. Ground Houston and in Europe. Brand’s father was breaking for the new building started April in the United States on business when World 11, 1985. War II erupted. After weathering the war in “People were willing to give something of Poland, Brand and his mother were able to themselves and wanted to further the breed,” join his father and move to the U.S. in 1949. said Brand in an article recorded in the When Brand enrolled in the University August 1999 issue of the Brangus Journal. of Houston at age 16, he took a full load of “IBBA members truly built this building. college courses during the day and studied We had members in all phases who had and learned to speak English at night. Just expertise, and they gave their knowledge and after five years of living in the U.S., Brand time freely.” received a Bachelor of Science degree in Brand became an IBBA member in animal husbandry in 1954. Brand then 1967 and has since fervently served the served two years of active duty in the U.S. association, its members and the Brangus Coast Guard before returning to Houston to breed. He served on too many committees to Ludwig Brand join the family’s hide business, Southwestern mention and served as president of the Texas IBBA Board of Directors President 1980-1981 Trading Company. In 1965, he bought the Brangus Breeders Association (TBBA). He present ranch in Round Top, Texas. was recognized as IBBA’s Breeder of the Year Brand began using Brangus genetics after he purchased four in 1982 and received the Pioneer Award in 2010. Brand was also Brangus bulls from Diamond M Ranch to breed his Hereford an inductee into the Brangus Breeder Hall of Fame sponsored by cows and has since been a devoted leader and avid supporter of the Heart of America Brangus Breeders Association. the breed and the IBBA. Brand started his registered herd with With his longevity and experience in the industry, he a group of 25 heifers bred by Bud Adams Ranches and gradually recognizes the opportunity cattle producers are being provided grew his herd count and obtained more land. Brand and his wife, and encourages Brangus breeders take initiative. Judy, hosted annual sales for approximately 12 years. They use “The future of the entire beef industry looks brighter than proven genetics derived from their own breeding program and ever,” Brand said. “We have a rare situation when the inventory introduce new bloodlines from time to time. While concentrating is the lowest it has been in some fifty years and the domestic on increasing weights at weaning and yearling, Brand said his demand and exports are increasing.” goal is to produce a very consistent calf crop year after year. He said the Brangus breed needs a unified effort, one voice and Perhaps Brand’s biggest contribution to the breed was his unselfish dedication to this great breed to make advancements in integral role in organizing and leading the three fundraisers the industry. bj essential for establishing the IBBA headquarters building and

“Any Country is Brangus Country” Predictable / Adaptable / Profitable Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 13


IBBA Connection The Professional Cattleman

A

s the 2012 fall bull sale season is drawing to an end, I think it is safe to say that demand for Brangus genetics, and more specifically Brangus bulls, has grown and is still improving as we head toward the spring. Commercial cattlemen have done the research and realize the true value in the versatility of a Brangus bull. As seedstock producers, we should all ask the simple question, “Are we meeting the demands of the commercial producers?” A few of the most common needs are easy to identify when your customers say, “I need a bull to put on my heifers this year”, “I need a calving ease bull”, or “ I want my calves to wean heavier”. These needs are easy to address if you have the right information. But ask yourself this; if you sell 20 to 30 bulls annually or even more, would you rather sell them one or two at a time throughout the year, or would you prefer to sell them all to one or two people in a matter of days? I would venture to say that many of you would like to move your bulls out in bigger groups; the pure economics of that idea make it enticing. If you would prefer to sell your bulls in big chunks, then maybe you should consider addressing the demands of the “professional cattleman”. As Brangus bulls see increased use across the country, we are going to see more professional cattlemen making the choice to turn out Brangus bulls on their commercial females. There is no question there are environments in this country where using Brangus bulls is easily the most profitable choice. So naturally it is time you, the seedstock provider, consider the needs of the professional cattlemen, and by professional cattlemen, I mean the commercial producer who depends on his or her calf crop to keep the lights turned on in their homes and put food on the table for their families. Now, do not take this wrong. I am not saying we should turn our backs on the smaller producer. I am merely suggesting we consider the needs of the larger producer who rely on their calf crop as their main source of income. Those cattlemen know what traits impact their profitability the most. I have attended many sales this fall and visited with various bull buyers, and in my conversations I have found a common need/demand I would like to share with you. The common thread with all the commercial producers I get the visit with is CONSISTANCY. No matter what their program is, whether they sell all their calves at weaning, retain ownership or make their living raising Brangus Gold replacement females, they all want consistency. 14 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

by Garrett Thomas IBBA director of membership & international Promotion

Now it is our job to improve the consistency and predictability in our Brangus cattle. Many of these bull buyers who are looking for a large quantity of bulls do their homework in their sale catalog long before they arrive at the sale because, in large, their selection criteria is based on things like performance, EPD’s and pedigree. After they have narrowed their selection and graded the bulls on paper, they do what every good cattlemen does- they go look at the bulls. This is not groundbreaking news, but when you are looking to increase consistency in your calf crop, the people who do it for a living have come to realize that studying the genotype is the more reliable way to achieve your goals. As a seedstock producer, this is important to know because the last thing you want to do is take your bulls out of consideration before your potential customer even arrives to look at the bulls. This brings me to the idea of producing “like genetics”. Some may say this is just some idea pulled from the academia world. However, I would challenge that argument by simply saying this is the way of the future; the demand is out there. It is important to understand what I mean by like genetics. This is a direct contradiction to the idea of mating one cow to one bull and moving more toward the idea of population genetics. How far you take the concept is completely up to you. Several have taken this idea to the far ends of the spectrum while others have started to implement this idea and have experienced success along the way. For example, if you own fifty registered cows, I am suggesting you limit the number of sires you use in that group of cows to less than three. If you are currently using 15 different sires on your herd of 50 cows, this probably comes across as a bold statement, but hear me out first. A concept that has been used before in various seedstock operations is using a proven herd sire in their artificial insemination (AI) program and cleaning up with two sons of the proven AI. This is unquestionably going to allow you to achieve a new level of consistency. If you are committed to creating a program based around the sale of commercial bulls and you are looking to target the professional cattleman, then this may be something you should discuss with your customers to see how you can adjust your breeding program to better fit their needs. This is something that probably does not fit everyone’s programs. I simply ask you to do the research for yourself, and give this idea fair consideration. Whether or not you embrace the concept of producing like genetics, I think it is worth mentioning an idea I believe we,


IBBA Connection as a breed, need to address if we want to legitimately compete in the beef industry. We MUST consistently artificially inseminate more cattle annually. As a whole, the Brangus breed does not utilize AI nearly as effectively as other breeds we compete with. This has to improve if we want to keep up with the pace. I am a firm believer that if you are not moving forward, you are getting left behind. In the agriculture world this is especially the case. If you have not embraced the idea of AI’ing your cattle, you are quickly getting left in the dust. We are in a time where here in the U.S. we have access to the most proven and valuable genetics in the world, and too many of us are sitting on the sidelines. If you have weathered the storm, the recent drought or lagging economy and have survived in the cattle business, now is the time to push ahead and take your program to the next level. The cattle business is thriving right now and all indications show it is going to stay that way for the foreseeable future. If you want to survive in the competitive world of agriculture, let this be your call to action. It is time you look at your operation as more of a business and less of a hobby. In doing that, we need to do the things that are going to best address

the needs our customers, the professional cattleman. We need to implement the necessary practices of management such as artificial insemination that will allow you, as a seedstock producer, to stay on the cutting edge. And finally, we have to always consider what is best for the beef industry because we are ultimately all in the beef business. It has been a great 2012; let us strive together as a membership and association to make 2013 an even better year. bj ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Garrett Thomas has extensive experience in the seedstock industry having grown up on the family operation that included both registered and commercial cattle. At an early age Thomas was very involved in showing and active in the International Junior Brangus Breeders Association. Highlights of that experience include serving as President of the IJBBA and claiming Reserve Champion Female honors at the National Junior Brangus Show. His professional experience includes working as the ranch manager of a large Brangus operation in Texas where he was named Herdsman of the Year, and prior to coming to the IBBA, he served on the faculty at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas. As the Director of Member Relations and International Promotion, Thomas works to increase communication with the membership while increasing exposure of the breed to higher levels across the globe.

Wishing you and yours a very Merry Christmas!

Whitfield of Brinks 209U23 Whitfield is the 6th ranked trait leader for WW and ranks in the top 1% REA, 2% YW, 15% IMF, and 20% SC. He is sired by IMF trait leader Lambert of Brinks 317R3 and out of the powerful Ms Brinks Brigh Side 209L11.

Give us a call today to order your semen on the great young herd sire.

Wyliss & Brenda Kemp 5K Cowbelle Ranch 550 Hall Road, Pontotoc, MS 38863 (662) 488-1360 wylisskemp@aol.com

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 15


IBBA Connection The Time for Changes

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s we start to wind down to the end of 2012, it is time to start looking ahead to the New Year. Of course, a big part of that New Year is the changes we are hoping to make. Whether it is to lose a few pounds or kick a nasty habit, this is the time of year that we all excited about what the future holds for us. I know that Brangus Publications, Inc. (BPI) and the International Junior Brangus Breeders Association (IJBBA) have a lot of exciting changes planned for the New Year that hold promise of sparking a renewed interest and excitement among members. BPI has made and continues to make a lot of changes to improve our publications. We understand print publications are in a newer world than they were even as recent as five years ago. The technology that drives our world has put the most current information at our fingertips. What took months to circulate to large groups is now distributed in a matter of minutes. BPI has joined in the technology and is now offering advertising spots on gobrangus.com. The advertisers in these spots are now experiencing a monthly average of 2,500 views of their advertisement and about 25 clicks for more information each month. But BPI remains committed to our publications. The past few months have seen a major push to improving the content, quality and timeliness of them. I feel this issue shows our dedication to making our publications all they can be. We are working hard to inform each and every member of what is happening within our association. We are working to promote Brangus and build excitement in our membership. We are working to cover the nation publishing members’ successes with sales, shows and even outside organizations. We are working to highlight new ideas, new technologies, genetic advancements and much more. We have worked to change scheduling of issues to allow advertisers the prime opportunity to capitalize prior to their important events as well as allow us to showcase the most current news and events of the association. Print media will continue to be an important aspect of our industry and remains a viable way to keep your operation in the forefront of your fellow members’ thoughts. I strongly encourage each and every one of you to consider how BPI can work for you. Think about new ways to showcase your entire PROGRAM rather than just a bull or female sale, and whether you are interested in large or small scale, I am here and willing to find a way to make BPI your choice for your advertising and promotional needs in the upcoming years. 16 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

by Tyler DEAN IBBA director of shows & youth Programs

In an issue focused on changing times in our industry, I would be remiss to not mention anything about the IJBBA. In the July/August 2012 Issue of the Brangus Journal, Dr. Massey states “The Future of the Beef Industry Lies within our Youth,” and I could not agree more. Being a product of our great youth organization and working with IBBA Board Members and fellow staff members who themselves grew up through our or other youth organizations, only re-confirms my strong devotion to the IJBBA. The IJBBA Board is diligently working to host an Inaugural “Legacy” Conference. This conference will be open to all IJBBA members to be held January 4-6, 2013, in San Antonio, Texas, and will focus on building leadership skills as well as providing a great opportunity for members to gather for fellowship and fun. I along with the IJBBA Board of Directors would greatly appreciate any help you might provide in spreading the word about this new event to any Brangus juniors you might know. More information follows on the next page or you can contact me directly with any questions. The 2013 National Junior Brangus Show will have some important changes and updates to it this year to provide new incentives and opportunities for members to get more involved in the week’s activities. Make sure and read Jacob Brosh’s article on page 18 to learn about some of these impending changes. As 2012 comes to an end, I encourage each and every one of you to consider what changes are in your future and how you will implement and work with those changes. If I can ever be of assistance with anything regarding BPI advertising, BPI content or IJBBA issues, please do not hesitate to get with me. bj ABOUT THE AUTHOR: As a third generation Brangus breeder, Tyler Dean grew up believing in Brangus cattle. At the age of eight, Dean joined the IJBBA to show Brangus heifers and asended the ranks to serve as President of the Board of Directors in 2004-2005. Professionally, Dean oversaw operations as ranch manager of a growing commercially focused Brangus operation. Under Dean’s guidance the ranch grew to be the largest source of Brangus bulls in the state of Oklahoma. Additionally, Dean has worked with a large scale commercial ranch in the Oklahoma Panhandle on genetics and management. Before joining IBBA, Dean worked independently managing sales as well as doing independent advertising and catalog design and production. As the Director of Shows and Youth Programs, Dean coordinates IBBA’s four National and four Regional Shows along with coordinating and executing all IJBBA activities. Additionally, as the Brangus Publications Representative, Dean works on layout and production of all Brangus print media as well as coordinates advertising sales and publication content for Brangus Publications, Inc.


Come have fun with your Brangus Family, but leave your cows at home!

IJBBA’s Inaugural

LEGACY CONFERENCE IJBBA is pleased to announce our Inaugural LEGACY CONFERENCE to be held in San Antonio, Texas, January 4-6, 2013. Open to all IJBBA members this conference will focus on building Leadership Skills as well as provide a great opportunity for IJBBA members to gather for fellowship and fun without stalls to clean or cattle to feed! Pre-registration will cost $100 and be open until December 15, 2012. A late registration will be available until December 21, 2012 for $150. For more information or your registration form, visit: http://junior.gobrangus.com.

International Junior Brangus Breeders Association

PO Box 696020, San Antonio, Texas 78269-6020 Tyler Dean, IBBA Director of Shows and Youth Programs (405)867-1421 - Office • (405)207-6921 - Cell • tyler@int-brangus.org

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 17


IJBBA CONNECTION Crossroads

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s this year comes to an end, a new beginning awaits the Brangus Association. Opportunities to improve the abilities of the youth in our breed along with the exciting prospect of next year’s National Junior Brangus Show are what lie ahead for those who support our junior association. As we start the year, we almost immediately begin with our newly introduced leadership conference! On January 4-6, 2013, in San Antonio, Texas, juniors will be given the opportunity to improve their leadership skills through experience and education by skilled leaders in the cattle industry all while enjoying a relaxed environment and the company of fellow leaders in the junior association. With the skills gained from the conference, juniors will be able to take and apply them to their time at our National Junior Brangus Show (NJBS) and truly enjoy what we have to offer. Be sure to tell any juniors you know about this exciting opportunity to get involved in the IJBBA. This year, NJBS will be held July 14-20, 2013, in West Monroe, La., and has been subject to several changes. This year’s theme will be “Vegas”! The final touches on the slogan and other details are still being finalized, but look for this year to be bright and bold just like Las Vegas. I hope everyone is ready to have some fun, and remember “what happens at NJBS stays at NJBS!” Another new thing will be the requirement of juniors to participate in at least three contests to be able to show. With NJBS offering nine unique contests, this should be fairly easy to accomplish for most juniors. Hopefully this new idea will provide the extra push for

2012-2013 IJBBA Board of Directors (L to R) Racheal Sharp, Emily Jackson, Hunter Bosarge, Luke Johnston, Adrian Whipple, Kelsey Munoz, Jacob Brosh, Emily Jackson, Kacie Wallace, Ali Congdon, Tanner Bosarge.

18 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

by Jacob Brosh IJBBA Vice President

some to realize their fullest potential! So now is the time to start thinking about writing a speech, designing a computer generated ad, or capturing that extra special photograph! But enough on what is brand new for this year’s NJBS because this year we are bringing back the livestock judging contest. It will be individual based and give the juniors a chance to show off their evaluation skills. Because of time constraints, the judging contest will replace salesmanship for 2013. Without salesmanship the board had to find another way to incorporate the Calcutta auction. So instead of sponsoring a team for salesmanship, adults will be able to “put their money where their mouth is” when we auction off Brangus Jeopardy teams! I hope everyone is excited about NJBS 2013! If you are still unsure, this last change might be just what you needed to hear. We will be enjoying the food of a different caterer. On that bright note, I would like to remind everybody of the Leadership Conference and wish everyone well for the coming year! bj ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Now in his second year on the IJBBA Board, Jacob Brosh is currently a senior at Arkadelphia High School. A longtime IJBBA member and NJBS participant, Brosh first started in the Brangus breed because of his family’s involvement with the breed. Brosh plans to attend Arkansas State University to major in Geological Engineering and was recently elected to serve the upcoming year as Vice President.

2012-2013 IJBBA Board of Directors

President Kelsey Munoz, Pearland, TX kmunoz@munozcattlecompany.com

Ex-Officio Emily Smith, College Station, TX emily.smith2015@gmail.com

Vice President Jacob Brosh, Arakadelphia, AR jbrosh23@gmail.com

“Source of Champions” Sale Chair Luke Johnston, Waxahachie, TX jcccattle@yahoo.com

Secretary Kacie Wallace, Bryan, TX goinshowin02@yahoo.com

Reporter Adrain Whipple, Burton, TX showinonfaith@gmail.com

Director Hunter Bosarge, Evergreen, AL hunterbosarge@hotmail.com

Director Ali Congdon, Repton, AL ali_cdancingauburncowgirl@yahoo.com

Director Director Racheal Sharp, Konawa, OK Tanner Bosarge, Evergreen, AL sharpk@konawa.k12.ok.us tannerbosarge@yahoo.com IBBA Queen Emily Jackson, Waco, TX emily_jackson18@yahoo.com


IBA Connection Looking Forward

by Mary Beth FARRIS IBA co-vice president

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hat is the old saying, “You can’t go back…”? Well there are not many of us in West Texas, or the whole country for that matter, who would want to go back to the summers of 2011 or 2012. The were the days when you stepped outside and it felt like you stepped into your dryer; when even my drought resistant plants were begging for mercy. Well, thank God all droughts have come to an end leaving us stronger and even more resilient. Watching my husband, and our herd, persevere through three severe droughts over the years has taught me to be thankful for our blessings, to always pray for rain and to look forward to tomorrow, which is always one day closer to that rain. The IBA looks to the future by providing scholarship opportunities to deserving IJBBA members. Scholarships are available to IJBBA members who are high school seniors, current college students, or students attending technical colleges. The forms can be downloaded from the IJBBA website at

http://junior.gobrangus.com/. The NEW DEADLINE for applications is Jan. 15, 2013. We are also looking forward to our annual meeting in Houston during the IBBA Convention in March. Please watch our column for more details. Last year we had a great time catching up with our Brangus family and had an informative fashion show to boot! Hope to see you there! One way to support the IBA is by purchasing some of our Brangus goodies. The note cards we sell feature art by IJBBA members from the NJBS Illustration contest. We would also accept donations at any time that can be mailed to our Treasurer Sharron McCreary at 13465 Brooklyn Road Evergreen, AL 36401. I have written this column while riding shotgun with my husband through some beautiful West Texas ranch country delivering bulls, another blessing to be thankful for. bj

Support our Junior Breeders with IBA’s

Brangus Goodies Stadium Seats ..........$15.00 each ONLY 4 LEFT! Coffee Mugs, Stadium Seats, Hoodies

Qty: _____

Total: ________

Youth Hoodies - LIMITED QUANTITIES: Y-S...........................$10.00 each Qty: _____ Y-M .........................$10.00 each Qty: _____ Y-L ..........................$10.00 each Qty: _____

Total: ________ Total: ________ Total: ________

Brangus Tumbler.....$15.00 each Clear, Insulated, Holds 16 oz Note Card Styles:

(Clockwise from top left corner)

Brangus, All American, Calf, Christmas

Qty: _____

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Note Cards ..............$10.00 (Package of 15) Style: __________________ Qty: _____ Style: __________________ Qty: _____ Style: __________________ Qty: _____

Total: ________ Total: ________ Total: ________

Email your order to: mbfarris63@gmail.com Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 19


Marketing Update An Industry and a Breed at a Crossroads

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he United States beef industry has been evolving ever since Desoto brought the first cattle to the New World. As an industry, we have lived through some quite tumultuous times. Dwarfism, the frame race, genetic defects, ill-informed media bias, and the list goes on. We are now faced with challenges on par with the most difficult we have seen. Some of our biggest problems are self created, and in a lot of ways, it has been positive. Our efficiency at producing pounds of beef with the least amount of inputs is unparalleled in any other part of the world. This has decreased the number of beef cows needed, and that makes growth tough. As seedstock producers, we have also focused on swinging for the fences and have been successful in producing “uniqueness” in our genetic package. As a breed, we are definitely at a crossroads. We must decide where we fit in the beef industry. Will we continue our innovative approach to genetic evaluation and improvement through Total Herd Reporting (THR), incorporating DNA technology and population genetics? Or will we go down the path of many once prevalent breeds that ignored the needs and innovations presented and resigned themselves to a social club mentality? In Brangus we have a genetic product that is extremely useful in much of the areas of the U.S. and the world that are available for cattle production. Our biggest challenge is embracing the new opportunities available and being leaders rather than late adopters and relying solely on marketing our cattle to other registered breeders. For long-term, large-scale success, we have to be relevant to profit driven professional beef producers and willing to fill their genetic and marketing needs. In the IBBA Strategic Plan (which you will be hearing more about in future issues), your board of directors has put a strong emphasis on genetic research and commercial marketing, two absolutely critical areas for our future success. The entire breed must embrace this approach and be 100 percent committed to the success of the Strategic Plan. Without continued genetic improvement and demonstration of what Brangus bring to the table as well as assisting users of Brangus genetics in garnering more profit, we will fail to address the needs of the beef industry. Genetic Research In the coming months, you will be hearing more about specific research projects aimed at demonstrating the strengths of Brangus as well as ways to add accuracy to young sires through a structured program. Without research to prove and improve our breed, our breed will decline. We must continuously demonstrate our worth to the industry. The future of the Brangus breed 20 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

by Ben SPITZER IBBA MARKETING PROGRAMS DIRECTOR

depends on each of you actively participating and championing the cause. Commercial Marketing We must also be proactive in our marketing efforts. Are you taking advantage of existing marketing avenues that might be beneficial to your customers using Brangus genetics? Why not share your successes with all so we might devlop more pull through demand for everyone? As the old saying goes, “a rising tide lifts all ships”. We must find more ways to work together for increased market share and increased profit opportunity. If you or your customers are selling groups of Brangus influenced commercial females, you should take advantage of the Brangus Gold program. Many ask what the premium for those females might be. That is a good question. We have not had the volume sold to adequately gauge the success of the program. We desperately need more seedstock producers helping spread the message about the Brangus Gold program and being an advocate for Brangus. Please contact me if you have anyquestions about the Brangus Gold program. Additionally, we must develop more innovative other ways to market Brangus influenced commercial cattle. In the end, we as a breed are left with a choice. Will we flourish or perish because of the approach that the IBBA membership takes in regards to genetic improvement and commercial marketing? In the future, other aspects of all breed associations will be secondary to those two areas. Are we ready to all join forces and move the Brangus breed to the forefront of the commercial beef industry? There are tremendous financial rewards ahead for those who can see the future. bj ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Ben Spitzer grew up in the cattle business with his family involvement going back several generations and has included both commercial cattle and registered cattle of several breeds. His family has been in the Brangus seedstock business since 1982. Spitzer served as Communications/Member Services Director for the Red Angus Association of America (RAAA ) in Denton, TX. Prior to joining the staff at IBBA, he managed a registered Brangus operation in Georgia. Ben was a founding member of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) Young Producers Council (YPC) and served as the YPC delegate to the NCBA Membership Committee. He served as Chair of YPC in 2010 and in an advisory role to YPC as Immediate Past Chair in 2011. He remains an active member of NCBA and Texas and Southwestern Cattleraisers Association (TSCRA). As Marketing Programs Director, he oversees IBBA’s Commercial Marketing Programs as well as advertising and promotion of the Brangus breed.


Once again, Brangus breeders have a huge opportunity to partner with IBBA as well as other Brangus breeders to create a tremendous promotional atmosphere at one of the most well attended cattle industry events of the year.

NCBA Annual Convention and Trade Show February 6-9, 2013 Tampa, Florida

The IBBA is offering space within the Brangus booth to members who wish to participate. The booth will be “Brangus Central” offering areas to visit with customers, friends and potential Brangus buyers.

Commit by December 15, 2012 Materials must be submitted by January 4, 2013

Prime Member- $1000

• Fully furnished booth with seating, carpet and lighting • Digital sign spot on 45-second rotation throughout the show • Promo video (3 min) or slideshow (90 seconds) to play within booth • 1/2 pg ad in the Brangus NCBA Convention special brochure • 1/2 pg narrative on your operation • Space for one promo piece (not to exceed 8.5”x11”, suggest 500 minimum) • Two passes to NCBA Trade Show (first 10 to reserve space) • Space is limited!!!

Choice Member- $500

• Digital sign spot (15 seconds in rotation) inside booth throughout the show • 1/4 pg ad in the Brangus NCBA Convention special brochure • Space for one promo piece (not to exceed 8.5”x11”, suggest 500 minimum)

Select Member- $250

• Group logo listing inside booth throughout the show • Contact information listed in the Brangus NCBA Convention special brochure • Space for one promo piece (not to exceed 8.5”x11”, suggest 500 minimum

You have the opportunity to get in front of Commercial Cow/Calf Producers, Feedlot Operators and many other segments of the Beef Industry. Florida is Brangus Country, and we should have wide acceptance by the attendees.

Take advantage today! Contact Ben Spitzer | 210-696-8231 or ben@int-brangus.org www.facebook.com/GoBrangus

www.twitter.com/GoBrangus

www.youtube.com/BrangusVideo

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 21


membership Welcome New Members BULL’S EYE RANCH, LARRY L SMITH COOLIDGE, TX

MARO FARMS, ROBERT RYNAREZEWSKI SHEPHERD, TX

CACTUS CATTLE COMPANY, HILTON HOLMAN & DONNA STEEN LINGLEVILLE, TX

PERSIMMON CREEK BRANGUS, WAYNE & SELENA BARRON MCKENZIE, AL

COLLIER LAND & CATTLE CO, CLARK COLLIER BEAUMONT, TX

TALLENT BRANGUS PATTON, MO

EVITTS FARM, JASON EVITTS DIXON SPRINGS, TN

THREE S FARMS, MARK & SCOTT SHELTON SOCIAL CIRCLE, GA

FELIPE M AVILA WESLACO, TX

THOMAE RANCH, DENNIS & GALYN THOMAE SAN BENITO, TX

G 5 FARMS GLADEWATER, TX

VEASLEY RANCHES, KEVIN & CARL VEASLEY HOUSTON, TX

GERARDO MORALES FLORESVILLE, TX

VICTORIA DANIEL TROUP, TX

HANEGAN FARMS, TRENT HANEGAN COLLINS, MS

WAHLBERG RANCH, RICK WAHLBERG SPICEWOOD, TX

KEVIN SHIRK BROOKSVILLE, MS

WIND ROSE RANCH, BOB OR VALINE TEDDER MOUNTAIN HOME, AR

L 2 CATTLE COMPANY, CASEY FOX CYPRESS, TX

Swords Honored by Peers

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huck and Norma Sword of Char-No Farm near Williamson, Ga., won the 2012 Mid-Georgia Cattlemen’s Hall of Fame award last Thursday, November 8, 2012. This award recognizes a past or current MGCA member or couple who has supported and impacted the association and the beef industry. Mid-Georgia Cattlemen’s Association is a group encompassing six counties within the Georgia Cattlemen’s Association. Chuck and Norma both have served numerous positions in the Georgia Cattlemen and Cattlewomen Associations as well as state, regional and international levels of the International Brangus Breeders Association. bj Norma & Chuck Sword accepting their Hall of Fame award from Mid-Georgia Cattlemen’s Association President, Ray Brumbeloe.

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MEMBERSHIP Source: florida departmentof agriculture and consumer services

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Southern Accent Farm Receives Agricultural Environmental Leadership Award

allahassee, FL– Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam recognized Allen and Nicki Smith, owners and operators of Southern Accent Farm of Okeechobee, Fla., as the recipients of the 2012 Agricultural Environmental Leadership Award. Sponsored by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, the award recognizes agricultural enterprises that demonstrate leadership in developing and implementing innovated and progressive techniques to safeguard the environment and conserve n a t u r a l resources.

Deroose Plants, Inc., also received recognition for conservation and sustainability. “Agriculture is not your stereotypical Norman Rockwell painting,” said Commissioner Putnam. “These operations are just two examples of how the industry is using high-tech solutions and innovation to maintain its position as one of the state’s strongest economic pillars, but also ensure that the natural resources Florida is known for are available for generations to come.” Southern Accent Farm is a purebred Brangus and commercial cattle operation, which utilizes a full suite of water quality best management practices, allowing the farm to harness the natural pressure of an artesian well to supply a series of water troughs to their pastures. The ranch is also home to the largest commercial solar array in the glades Electric Coops territory, producing enough electricity for the operations of the 824-acre ranch. Commissioner Putnam recognized Southern Accent Farm as well as Deroose Plants, Inc., with the awards at the Florida Farm Bureau Federation’s Fall Annual Meeting October 24-26, 2012, in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. For more information about the Agricultural Environmental Leadership Award, visit www.florida-agriculture.com/ business/awards/agenviron/. Visit www.GoBrangus.com to learn more about the benefits of Brangus genetics. bj

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 23


Special ibba decides IBBA Members Asked to Consider Bylaw Revisions Comments from Dale Kirkham, Eureka, KS

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Breed Improvement Committee Member Former IBBA Board of Directors Member Former IBBA Board of Directors President

he members of the International Brangus Breeder’s BALLOT for Association have the opportunity to make a ByIBBA Membe rs Law change that will give members the ability 2013 IBBA BY L A W to breed up to Brangus utilizing Ultrablack* REVISION animals. This initiative will allow the incorporation of new Angus genetics into the Brangus population by an alternative Check one For Against Abstain Approval of By method compared to the traditional process starting with law Revision Angus and Brahman as the first cross. Offspring of first cross Ultrablacks (Angus X Brangus) mated back to Brangus Member’s Nam are genetically 3/4 Brangus. When these individuals are e (print): mated back to Brangus, their calves will be 7/8 Brangus IBBA Membersh ____________ ip Number: ____________ ____________ and considered to be purebred Brangus and eligible for ____________ __ __ ____________ Signature: _____ registration as such according to the proposed amendment Da to Seciton I of Article V in IBBA By-Laws. te: This approach provides an opportunity for seedstock If you have an y questions reg arding the ma Massey, 210-6 producers to incorporate new and proven Angus il ba 96-8231 or an IBBA Board Me llot or the by-law revision, ple mber in your are ase contact Dr genetics into individual Brangus herds and the breed . Joseph a. with confidence in the outcome of matings used. Angus animals with high accuracy EPDs and predictable INSTRUCTIO 1. A copy of NS the proposed by -law revision is Brangus Journa characteristics traits can be used to strengthen traits printed in the De l and is enclose cembe 2. If you plan d with the ballo to VOTE IN t mailed to IBBA r issue of the in individual Brangus animals as well as the breed PERSON, at th members. Friday, March e membership m 1, population. Breeders can expect less variation and fewer eeting scheduled Houston, TX 77 2013 at the Crown Plaza, for near Reliant, 054 then ignor 8686 Kirby Dr 3. If you are e the “Mail Ba culls in the offspring using this approach compared to not goin llot.” . and return it in g to VOTE IN PERSON, th en complete th traditional breeding up with Angus X Brahman. Like the pre-addres e sed envelope “Mail Ballot” Postmarked no (which is inclu later than 12:0 ded) so that it the traditional approach, using Ultrablacks to create Please do not 0 P.M. MOND is include paymen AY, DECEM BER 31, 2013 ts on your acco this ballot. new Brangus will require three crosses to reach the . unt or work fo r processing wi 4. Ballots po th stmarked after purebred endpoint. 12:00 P.M. M will not be co ONDAY, DECE unted. Ballots MBER, 31, 20 MUST BE M *Comments also apply to Ultrareds. bj votes CANNO 13 AILED. T be

Proposed revisions are shown on Page 25. Contact Dr. Joseph Massey, (210)696-8231 or an IBBA Board Member in your area with any questions.

accepted accord Faxed ballots or 5. Print and sig ing to the IBBA emailed n your name th Bylaws. e same way as 6. List your IB your IBBA mem BA membersh bership is listed ip number. If call the IBBA . you do not know office at 210/69 your number, pl 6-8231. 7. Ballots that ease do not include th e name and nu member are no mber and signa t valid and will ture of the IB 8. The CPA not be counted BA firm of Akin, . Doherty, responsible for tabulating the ba Klein and Feuge, San Anto nio, TX will be llots.

Every IBBA me mber should rec eive a ballot lik e this to vote on

24 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

the proposed rev

ision to the IBB

A Bylaws.


special ibba decides Proposed IBBA Bylaw Revision Section 1 of Article V of the Bylaws is amended to read in its entirety as follows: Section 1 Animals Eligible for Registration The following animals are eligible for registration by the Assocation: A. “Brangus®” or “Red Brangus™” Cattle These by definition are animals of 3/8th Brahman breeding and 5/8th Angus breeding, are black or red, respectively, with no white in front of the navel; and are polled or scurred. “Brangus®” or “Red Brangus™” may be registered in and by the Association provided they are produced from breeding as follows: 1. Known Brangus® or Red Brangus™ sire and dam registered in and by the Association; 2. Known purebred Angus animal enrolled in and by the Association and a known animal of 3/4th Brahman breeding and 1/4th Angus breeding certified in and by the Association; 3. A known animal of 1/4th Brahman breeding and 3/4th Angus breeding certified in and by the Association and a known animal of 1/2 Brahman breeding and 1/2 Angus breeding certified in and by the Association; or 4.  Known progeny from animals recorded in the Brangus®/Red Brangus™ Appendix Program that meet all Association requirements for registration other than those specified in 1, 2 or 3 of this paragraph A. B. “Ultrablack®” or “Ultrared™” Cattle These by definition are animals of Brangus breeding and Angus breeding, are black or red respectively, with no white in front of the navel; and are polled or scurred. “Ultrablack®” or “Ultrared™” may be registered in and by the Association provided they are produced from breeding as follows: 1. Known Ultrablack® or Ultrared™ sire and dam registered in and by the Association; 2. Known purebred Angus animal enrolled in and by the Association and a Brangus® or Red Brangus™ animal registered in and by the Association; 3. Known purebred Angus animal enrolled in and by the Association and animals recorded in the Brangus®/Red Brangus™ Appendix Program that meet all Association requirements for registration other than those specified in 1 or 2 of this paragraph B; or 4. Known progeny from animals recorded in the Ultrablack® or Ultrared™ Appendix Program that meet all Association requirements for registration other than those specified in 1, 2 or 3 of this paragraph B. C. Brangus Produced from “Ultrablack®” or “Ultrared™” Cattle These by definition are animals of Brangus breeding and “Ultrablack®” or “Ultrared™” breeding, are black or red respectively, with no white in front of the navel; and are polled or scurred. Brangus produced from “Ultrablack®” or “Ultrared™” may be registered in and by the Association provided they are produced from breeding as follows: 1. Known Brangus sire or dam registered in and by the Association: a. mated to the progeny of known Ultrablack® or Ultrared™ sire or dam registered in and by the Association and known Brangus sire or dam registered in and by the Association, and b. that results in at least a 7/8ths Brangus; or 2. Known progeny from animals recorded in the Brangus registry produced from Ultrablack® or Ultrared™ Appendix Program that meet all Association requirements for registration other than those specified in 1 of this paragraph C.

“Any Country is Brangus Country” Predictable / Adaptable / Profitable Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 25


special ibba decides 2012 Board Candidate Biographies Area 1 Chuck Sword

I would like to share a little about myself for those who do not know me. Norma, my wife, and I live about 50 miles south of Atlanta, Ga., in the little community of Hollonville where we purchased our farm in 1969, a journey we are still on! During the 1970s, we established a commercial cow-calf operation and row-cropped several hundred acres of soybeans along with a custom straw and hay business. In the early 1980s, we decided to scale down our operation to focus on cattle. After much research, in 1983 we purchased our first registered Brangus cattle, in large part because of the success we had with Brangus type commercial cattle. We named our farm “CHAR-NO” from Charles and Norma. We both have been, and are, active in local, state, regional and national cattle associations. I have had the privilege of serving as president of the Georgia Cattlemen’s Association as well as an IBBA Board of Directors member from 1991 to 1997. My interests in returning to the IBBA Board of Directors is to help keep our association membership driven and hope that we can strengthen our committee system. Our standing committees should be the backbone for all of our members. This is where good ideas come from and our leadership development forms. Our Brangus cattle have a lot to offer the beef industry. We must work harder and smarter to achieve more of the industry piece of the beef genetic pie. We can through research, education and promotion. I am a strong proponent of a transparent association. The members should be kept in the loop of what is happening within our breed. I will be open and available for you at any time, whether positive suggestions or problem concerns. If elected, I will come with a smile on my face, a positive attitude, willing to work together to improve our breed, membership and association. With your support, there is much we can accomplish. bj

Remember, if you are mailing your ballot in, it must be postmarked by:

DECEMBER 31, 2012

26 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

Area 2 Ginger Pritchard

Ginger Pritchard currently serves as the chairman of the International Brangus Auxiliary scholarship committee and 2nd vice president for this important organization of breeders that promote education and leadership among our Brangus youth. She has traveled to the annual IBBA Houston meetings and shows for several years. She enjoys the reunionwith her Brangus family and is encouraged with the progress the breed has made within the domestic cattle industry and international markets. After graduating from high school, Ginger moved from the east coast to Oklahoma State University where she majored in animal science. There, she met her husband of 35 years, Steve, an agriculture education instructor. She became employed by a large national bank in central Oklahoma where she accepted their offer to sponsor further college training and earned a degree in banking and finance. She quickly moved up the ladder at the bank and became their Consumer Compliance Officer and assistant Internal Auditor. During her tenure in the banking industry, she and her husband adopted their daughter, Lindsey. Her natural talent for teaching became evident while conducting training for banking personnel. It was at this time that she would return to her first love, science and youth. She returned to college, this time earning her Bachelor of Science in Biology Education. She has since been awarded excellence in teaching by the Oklahoma State House of Representatives twice and is sought after for service on state and regional STEM education committees. A year after beginning her teaching career, the couple was blessed with the adoption of their second child, a daughter Tatum whom has now given them their first grandchild, Michael. Soon after Tatum’s arrival, Steve traveled to Texarkana for a Brangus show to evaluate where the Brangus breed was in phenotype and learned the adaptability of the breed and about the superior mothering ability of the females. That was it! He came back home, and Steve and Ginger began raising Brangus cattle in 1992. When asked to become the Oklahoma Junior Breeder’s advisor in 1995, Ginger accepted the opportunity to give back to the youth of the state. Ginger served in this capacity for fifteen years. During these fifteen years, Ginger has not only


special ibba decides 2012 Board Candidate Biographies served as the junior breeder’s advisor for the state of Oklahoma, but is also currently an advisor to the International Junior Brangus Breeder’s Board of Directors. She has served the breed in many capacities. Ginger partnered with long-time Brangus breeder and former director Stanley Dotson to bring the 50th anniversary of the Brangus breed celebration to Enid, Okla., and again was instrumental in bringing the National Junior Brangus Show and Futurity to Oklahoma in 1999 to Stillwater. She has served in several officer positions for the Oklahoma Brangus Association. Ginger served on the Oklahoma Brangus Summit committee and was instrumental in the success of this event when it was held in Oklahoma City. She has served as Oklahoma Brangus President, Promotions Vice-President, Junior Breeder’s Vice-President and on sale committees. Under her leadership, important changes to sales management for the Indian Nation’s Brangus Sales resulted in the restoration of two sales per year with increasing participation of members and quality in offerings. The association took on a web presence with the publication of the first ever OBA website and gave the association a central place to post association sale catalogs and ads for members as well as membership contact information for buyers seeking Brangus genetics. During Ginger’s time as the superintendent for several Brangus shows in the state of Oklahoma, she paved the way for the Oklahoma State Fair to host one of the four major Brangus shows, the Western National. She was able to accomplish this by working toward compromises between the Oklahoma State Fair staff, Oklahoma juniors and the IBBA in order to bring Brangus to the state fair as a Showcase Breed for that Oklahoma Statewide Fair. Ginger and her husband, Steve, two daughters and grandson, run their Brangus cattle operation, Keystone Ranch located in central Oklahoma. The ranch operates as the agricultural division of the family business, Keystone Management Group, LLC. Ginger and her family have dedicated 20 years to the Brangus breed in raising both quality Brangus cattle and giving back to the association. She believes that in the Brangus breed, every voice should be heard and everyone’s opinion valued. She believes there is a place at the table for everyone’s views, but that once a decision is made, the board should work as a collective team to accomplish set goals. Ginger does not have any ties or association with any large cooperative of breeders. She comes to the board with an open mind and without a pre-conceived agenda.

Ginger still enjoys keeping her hand in the world of finance and works part-time for a Certified Financial Planner and performs the compliance and accounting work for a small Broker Dealer. This keeps her up-to-date on the investment needs of the individual and a small business. Ginger is uniquely qualified for the International Board of Directors. She is fair minded and will represent Oklahoma’s small and large registered and commercial breeders. She and her family have struggled with high fuel and feed costs and the drought right alongside every other Brangus breeder in the state. She is informed about the needs of a small business, the importance of strategic planning, a thorough knowledge of genetics and animal science with her degrees in Biology and hands-on experience coupled with a dedication and service to the Brangus breed. Ginger earned her Master’s in Education/Administration and has administered a large Math and Science Institute funded through a large Federal Grant for the past five years providing professional development opportunities for teachers in five different school districts. Through this experience she has learned what it takes to coordinate a large group of adults in reaching a defined set of goals, not unlike the skill set needed to serve as an IBBA director. She is excited about the future opportunities for the breed and wants to assure the direction of the IBBA captures a foothold in the global market and that the policies of the IBBA equate to economic benefit to those on the ranches of Oklahoma. Ginger is passionate about building leaders and fosters participation of every breeder in the decisions made by the association. She is asking for your endorsement and the opportunity to serve you as Oklahoma director to the International Brangus Breeders Association. bj

Area 2 Mike Vorel

Mike Vorel is the owner and operator of Vorel Farms. Mike has been involved professionally in the agricultural industry for more than 40 years. Mike and his wife, Robin, live in Luther, Okla., on a farm that has been in Mike’s family for more than 100 years. Mike has lived in Luther all his life and has always been involved in some aspect of agriculture. (continued on page 28) Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 27


special ibba decides 2012 Board Candidate Biographies (continued from page 27) Mike’s love and respect for the land and cattle comes from his family’s involvement in agriculture for all of his life. During his youth, Mike was active in FFA showing both cattle and hogs, serving on the FFA judging team, and working on his family’s farm. He was awarded the State Farmer Degree through FFA. Mike operated a registered Berkshire hog operation in the early 1970s and 1980s. Vorel Farms had the opportunity to sell Berkshire hogs all over the United States as well as in Japan. Mike served on the National Board of Directors of the American Berkshire Association. Mike has always been involved in the commercial cattle business and has gradually moved toward raising and selling registered Brangus cattle. He purchased his first registered Brangus cattle 14 years ago. After being around registered Brangus for a short time, the decision was made to replace the commercial cattle herd with a registered Brangus herd. The commercial cows are now used as embryo transfer recipients. Mike believes the future of Brangus cattle is a bright one. He believes that, as a breed, Brangus cattle are at a time where they should be gaining commercial demand on a daily basis. This gain should result in a growth in the number of Brangus breeders. Mike also believes as Brangus breeders, it is an important time to take positive steps to align the IBBA membership to act on every opportunity to promote the breed. As we enter a new era, now is the time to move forward with collecting all data and information available on the cattle to give us added value with our registered Brangus cattle. Mike has been active with the IBBA and has served on several committees. He currently serves on the Breed Improvement Committee. Mike has always had a desire to serve in his community. He has served on the local school board and has served as a member of the Oklahoma County Planning Commission where he chaired the Commission while developing a new master plan for Oklahoma County. Mike and Robin are long-time, active members of Life Church and enjoy working in missions, including serving at the Oklahoma City Rescue Mission and building homes in Honduras and Mexico for less fortunate families. Mike and Robin have four children and four grandchildren: Paul, Kim and Kelsey; Justin and Charli; Emily, Phil, Tanner, Hunter and Max; and Lauren and Jeff. They hope to instill in their children and their grandchildren a love of farming and livestock. bj 28 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

Area 7 Buck Thomason

I grew up on the family ranch, which has been in our family for four generations and is still operated as a commercial cattle ranch, in Huntsville, Texas. Following graduation from Texas A&M University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Economics, I attended the University of Houston Law School. After completing law school, I went to work for the Federal Intermediate Credit Bank of Houston and became Vice President and General Counsel. I then moved to Sulphur Springs, Texas, as President of North Texas Production Credit Association. Both of these jobs gave me a chance to see the lending side of the cattle business and to better understand what is required for the cattleman to survive and prosper. In 2003, Sidney and I acquired Indian Hills Ranch and started our registered Brangus herd. We moved from the Dallas/Ft. Worth metroplex to Cranfills Gap, a little town of 281 people. I sold Sidney on the idea that this would be retirement and only a few cows. It has not exactly worked out that way, and after two years of drought, we may be forced back to a few cows. I have enjoyed breeding our cattle and seeing the progress over the years of good genetics. It has been most helpful to see how improved genetic breeding can perform in different climates and conditions. I feel that my experience on various boards of different organizations over many years will help me as your director of the IBBA. These organizations include church, museum, art center, Production Credit and the 12th Man Foundation. I have served on various committees of the IBBA, President of the Texas Brangus Breeders Association and am a member of both the Hill Country Brangus Breeders and West Texas Brangus Breeders Associations. One major problem I have seen in most organizations is that they lose focus of the purpose and go off in too many different directions. The IBBA has two main purposes, and they are to register Brangus cattle and promote the Brangus breed. I believe that if the IBBA will focus on these two items and devote its resources to these items, we will be successful. Also our board needs to make decisions based on what is best for the members.


special ibba decides 2012 Board Candidate Biographies I believe there are several things that can be done to benefit the membership. These include strengthening our committee system, reform Total Herd Reporting, continue to improve our data system by making it more user-friendly and promote the Brangus breed. I believe this is a unique opportunity for the Brangus breed to expand its influence with the start of rebuilding the cow herd in the United States. What better time to promote the great qualities of our cattle and move our Association forward? If you elect me, I pledge that I will strive to move our association in that direction. Thank you for your consideration. bj

Area 7 Russ Williamson

Russ Williamson grew up on the family farm in Northern Indiana. His late father, Lester, and late mother, Helen, older sister, Nancy, and two brothers, James and Michael, had the average farm in that area raising corn, soybeans, pigs, chickens and a herd of about 100 registered Angus cattle. Russ started showing Angus steers at the age of eight and continued until he entered college at Manchester College. James, his older brother, had a brain tumor as a child and one of the first brain operations as a child. James was progressing well but steadily worsened and died in 1960. Nancy retired from being an art teacher in Auburn, Ind., and Michael is still farming in Etna Green, Ind. During his youth, Russ was involved in baseball, basketball, track and cross-country. He was the class president his senior year and was always a leader in the local 4-H club. While attending college at Manchester, Ind., he was involved again in basketball, track and cross-county but could not get himself settled on a career path. Although he had never flown an aircraft, Russell had always been fascinated with the possibility of a career in aviation. Then one day the service recruiters presented him with the plan for his career. Russell joined the United States Marine Corps as an Aviation Cadet in September 1962, and began flight training in Pensacola, Fla., in February 1963. His Primary and Solo was done in Pensacola in the T-34 Mentor. He was selected for jet training at that point and went to Meridian, Miss., where he received basic jet training in the T-2 Buckeye straight wing jet. He got his instrument rating, started

formation flying and made his first carrier landings in the T-2 on the USS Lexington in the Gulf of Mexico. At that point, Marine Aviation Cadet Williamson was transferred to Beeville, Texas, where he flew the F-9 and TF-9 Cougar and the F-11 Tiger and finished the advanced training course with instruments, tactics, bombing, air to air gunnery and more carrier landings on the USS Lexington. It was then after 18 months of rigorous training that Russ received his Wings of Gold and his commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps on September 18, 1964. Russ’ first active duty squadron was VMA 223, an A-4 Skyhawk squadron at Marine Corps Air Station El Toro, just south of Los Angeles, Calif. Vietnam was getting into high gear at that time, and in less than one year Russ, found himself at Chu Lai South Vietnam flying missions in both North and South Vietnam. The Chu Lai airfield was made of 4,000 feet of aluminum matting, and since the Skyhawk needed about 8,000 feet of runway, the take offs were made with Jato assist (two solid rockets attached to the fuselage), which were jettisoned after takeoff, and then the landing was made into arresting gear like on the aircraft carrier. After a year of those missions, Lt. Williamson was selected to fly the Birddog aircraft whose mission was to find targets and direct strikes against them. After five months of this and nearly 300 total missions, Lt Williamson was transferred back to the U.S. in Beeville as an instructor teaching air-to air tactics and carrier landings. It was in Beeville that then Captain Williamson married Kathleen Simms and where his son James R Williamson was born. Jim graduated from the University of Tennessee as an architect and is living in Chattanooga, Tenn., with his wife, Lydia, and three sons Wyatt, Owen and Dean. In July of 1969 Russ resigned from the USMC and accepted a job flying the brightly colored passenger jets for Braniff International. That was short lived, for in November he was furloughed when Braniff lost their Pac Mac contract. Fortunately, Captain Williamson had been accepted also into the USMC reserves at NAS Dallas flying the F-8 Crusader inVMF-112. When it appeared that the furlough from Braniff would be quite lengthy, Captain Williamson volunteered to go back to active duty and back to Vietnam, which he did for one more tour. When that tour was complete and after a selection to the rank of Major, he was recalled to Braniff and also back into the F-8 and VMF-112 at Navy Dallas. The Vietnam War had taken a toll on Major Williamson’s marriage and he found himself a single man until 1975 when he met and married Toni V Kirklin. After 36 years of marriage, Toni (continued on page 30) Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 29


special ibba decides 2012 Board Candidate Biographies (continued from page 29) lost her battle with the terrible disease, Alzheimer’s. In 1982 after Braniff International had made some risky expansion moves, they declared bankruptcy, and Russ found himself looking for another Job. Fortunately, Piedmont Airlines in Winston Salem, N.C., was expanding and in need of experienced pilots. Russ was hired there, and they were later purchased by U.S. Airways. LtCol. Williamson remained in the Marines and was selected to command VMFA 112 in 1982 and then the aircraft Group 42 after he was promoted to Colonel. He retired from the Marines in 1986 with 26 years of service. During that time, Colonel Williamson had been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, 23 Air Medals and the Meritorious Service Medal among numerous other service awards. Russ retired from U.S. Airways in 2002, when at that time the maximum age for a Captain was 60 years of age. Russ had always missed the cattle that he had enjoyed as a young man, and in 1980 purchased his first ranch in Athens, Texas, and a few registered Beefmaster cows. His ranch was named “Skyhawk” after the jet he loved to fly, and the jet that took care of him during the Vietnam War. He was not happy with the Beefmaster bulls and quickly switched to commercial and registered Brangus. Russ has been a member of the IBBA for more than 22 years and operates a herd of about 200 head registered cattle. He has raised numerous well known show animals of which the most well known is Skyhawks Presidente. Presidente tied for show bull of the year in 2008 and was Show Sire of the Year for 2011-2012. He was also awarded the Herdsman Award in 2011 and 2012 at the Houston International Livestock Show. Russ is now a newlywed to the former Miss Pamela K Farmer, and they currently operate their ranch near Tyler, Texas. They love the Brangus animal and are devoted to the improvement of the breed. Russ has been a board member for the TBBA for four years and is presently the president of the TBBA. He has been a leader as a child, a leader as a Marine, and a respected teacher and Captain in his profession as a pilot, and if elected, will be honored to serve as an IBBA board member. bj

Remember, if you are mailing your ballot in, it must be postmarked by:

DECEMBER 31, 2012

30 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

Area 9 Steve Densmore

Steve has been involved in the cattle industry his entire life. He grew up on the Essar Angus ranch in San Antonio, Texas, and has since gained thorough experience in the beef cattle industry. After high school Densmore worked for Alamo Angus Ranch as a cowboy and ultimately secured a management position on the ranch. In 1973, he began working for Camp Cooley Ranch, a leading breeder of Charolais cattle at the time, until he went to work for Granada Land and Cattle in Bryan, Texas, six years later. In 1996, Densmore became ranch manager for Horizon Land & Cattle Co. in Flynn, Texas, and then joined the J Bar L Jenkins in Normangee, Texas. Densmore had plenty of management experience under his hat when he was hired in 2000 as the cattle manager at Circle X Land and Cattle Co. Located in Bryan, Texas, Circle X is a registered and commercial Brangus operation in which Densmore oversees 350 registered cows and a commercial cow calf operation of 1400 females on the 13,000 acre ranch. Circle X has an extensive AI program and incorporates some embryo transfer work for genetic improvement. The Circle X commercial steer calves are back grounded on the ranch then marketed at 750-800 pounds. Circle X females, both registered and commercial, are in high demand as replacement females, and Densmore successfully markets 75-100 registered Circle X Brangus bulls each year. Densmore has been actively supporting the Brangus breed at every level for the last 33 years and has been an integral part of the association’s advancements. He has served on the Board of Directors for the East Texas Brangus Breeders Association, Pines & Plains Brangus Breeders Association and the Bluebonnet Brangus Breeders Association. He has served on many committees for the Texas Brangus Breeders Association, and in 2000 and 2005, he served as President of the association. In 1997 and again in 2000, Densmore was elected to serve on the IBBA Board of Directors and served a term as president in 2002-2003. In 2009 he was elected to the board to fulfill the unexpired term from area nine which was one year and was subsequently reelected to serve a three-year term. He has since served on numerous committees the past few years. He is currently on the IBBA Executive Committee, Chairman of the Finance Committee, serves on the Show Committee, a


special ibba decides 2012 Board Candidate Biographies representative on the National Junior Advisory Board, and on several ad hoc committees. Having a strong passion for the junior programs both at a state and national levels, Densmore served as an advisor for the Texas Junior Brangus Breeders Association from 1987 until 2007 as well as an adult advisor for the International Junior Brangus Breeders Association for five years. He believes the Brangus breed has the best junior program of any breed and that our future leaders will come from within. Densmore is enthusiastic and very eager to continue serving the Brangus breed while keeping the following priorities: 1) expand the breed’s acceptance in the commercial cattle industry, 2) retain members and encourage participation, and 3) increase opportunities to stimulate junior members. He has made many friends and, with his extensive experience in the industry, has supported this breed and this association and vows to continue to work hard for the advancement of all entities. bj

Area 9 Danny Farris

I believe it is essential to have a membership that is excited about what their association is providing to enhance the value or their investment in the seed stock segment of the beef industry. Strong leadership, personality, communication and integrity are what anchors confidence of anyone seeking an organization to actively participate in. I have enjoyed getting to know many fellow breeders over the past 27 years in the registered Brangus business. I also know there are many I haven’t had the opportunity to meet. Here’s a brief summary of my credentials and experience in the beef industry. In May 1983 I graduated from Louisiana Tech University with a B S in Animal Science. From there I went to West Texas State University, worked on a Masters of Ag while tending to the WTSU beef cattle herd. This was my first exposure to Brangus cattle. In June 1985 I was hired as manager of Escoba Cattle Company, a well established registered Brangus operation just south of Abilene, Texas. After ten years, I had the opportunity to purchase the Escoba herd. To date I have been operating as Farris Ranching Company. With God’s grace, determination

and a little luck I have managed to “cash flow” a seed stock operation. This has allowed me to provide to my family a unique rural “ranch lifestyle” to enjoy. Mary Beth and I have enjoyed 28 years of marriage. Our children, Katelyn and Payton grew up in the “Brangus family”. We have many fond memories of their IJBBA years. In the past I have served as board member for the IBBA, TBBA, WTBBA and HCBBA. I also served as president of WTBBA two separate terms. I have devoted my adult life to the Brangus breed. The demand for Brangus has provided for my family since 1985. I will serve to ensure this dynamic breed’s long-term success in the beef industry. bj

Area 10 Larry Parker

Parker Brangus (PARKER RANCH, LLC) family owned and operated since 1967 1958- Purchased home place 160 acres and 1,440 acres of graze land. 1963- Purchased pasture by river 1970- Purchased Dealey Quinn pasture 1972- Purchased Hookers pasture 1975- Purchased Poppy Canyon

Ranch 1993- Purchased Braid Foot Ranch 1996- Sold Poppy Canyon and Braid foot ranches 1996- Purchased ½ Allred Ranch 1998- Purchase San Simon Pasture 1998- Dr. Carter purchased PC

1965- Worked for Homer Redding – Redding Pump Service Became a member of the IBBA in the early to mid 1960s. 1967- Purchased seven registered Brangus heifers at Willcox sale from Bill Ramsey Early 70s- Purchased 20 Heifers from Dr. Richardson, Tyler Texas, and Glen Urband, Devine, Texas. Developed cow herd from these heifers – became a closed herd in 1978, no outside heifers brought in since 1978. Late 70s –Went to a class to learn how to preg test and AI his own livestock (continued on page 32) Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 31


special ibba decides 2012 Board Candidate Biographies (continued from page 31) 1970-1981- started his own engine business - San Simon Engine Service 1981-1986 moved to Hobbs, N.M. and started Parker Engine Service Early 80s and 90s- Purchased Brinks bulls from Sister Dale, Texas, Eureka, Kans., and Camp Cooley 1986- Opened Parker Engine Service at 4K Truck Stop which he continues to manage five days per week and the ranch on weekends Late 90s- Roswell Sale- very impressed withBill Morrison and Gayland Townsend bulls and started buying their bulls. Bought top bull at Roswell for five years. Currently Parker Brangus (PARKER RANCH, LLC) runs 200 head of Brangus cows (120 registered cows, 80 commercial

cows) and 14 herd sires on 38,400 acres of ranch land. He sells between 30 and 40 head of two-year-old Brangus bulls per year. Parker Brangus raised the Grand Champion Brangus bull at the Marana, Ariz., sale in February 2010, the Reserve Champion Brangus bull February 2011, and the Reserve Champion Brangus bull at the Roswell, N.M. sale in February 2010. The last three years he served on the Board of Directors for the IBBA. bj

Remember, if you are mailing your ballot in, it must be postmarked by:

DECEMBER 31, 2012

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special convention

T

IBBA Announces Significant Changes to Annual Convention, Global Roundup

he International Brangus Breeders Association is pleased to announce significant changes to its Annual Convention and Global Roundup in Houston, Texas. The 2013 Convention will be held February 27 – March 2 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel located at 8686 Kirby Drive. The Crowne Plaza has recently been renovated and will offer more spacious and comfortable facilities. It is within walking distance of the show grounds, and the hotel offers complimentary shuttle services to guests with shuttles running every 10 minutes. The IBBA will have a room block at the Crowne Plaza with rooms available on a first come, first serve basis. Please call the hotel to reserve your room. The Global Roundup will also be held at the Crowne Plaza and will take place on Thursday, February 28, from 1:30p.m. – 5:30p.m. The 2013 Roundup will be closer to the Grounds than ever before, making it easier for more international guests to participate. This will also be a great opportunity for more of our members to display cattle and network with our guests. This year’s Roundup program will be in a different format, making it easier for guests to view cattle and hear discussion.

Space is very limited and is available on a first come, first serve basis. If you would like to showcase cattle or set up a booth at the Roundup, please contact Garrett Thomas at the IBBA office as quickly as possible. The deadline to reserve pens is December 15, 2012, or until all pens and booth spaces have been reserved. The overall schedule of events will also be very different for 2013 with a more interactive and informative focus. The 2013 schedule will feature reviews and updates on current issues such as Total Herd Reporting (THR) and the Genotyping Project. It will also include a condensed business meeting with an open forum for members, committee reports and seating of the new Board of Directors. The week will wrap up with a fun and entertaining Membership Awards Banquet Friday night, followed by the IBBA Female Show at 10:00a.m. Saturday. Make plans now to join us for the 2013 IBBA Convention and Global Roundup! Contact Lindsey Matli at Lindsey@intbrangus.org or 210-696-8231 or Garrett Thomas at garrett@intbrangus.org or 210-696-8231 with additional questions. Keep referring to IBBA’s website at www.GoBrangus.com for further updates. bj

2013 IBBA Convention Schedule Wednesday, February 27, 2012 11:00 am Show Advisory Committee Meeting 2:00–5:00 pm IBBA Board of Directors Meeting Thursday, February 28, 2012 8:00–9:00 am THR report - Review of survey from the Ad Hoc committee for THR by Committee Chair. Plus discussion from THR Committee Panel & IBBA Directors. 9:00–9:30 am Presentation on Calving Ease EPDs – Direct & Maternal 9:30–10:00 am Overview of the 50K Molecular Genetic project. 10:00–10:20 am Break 10:20–11:20 am Update on Promotional Activity of IBBA 11:20–12:20 pm Update on Commercial Marketing Activity of IBBA 12:20 pm Adjourn 1:30–5:30 pm International Global Roundup at Crowne Plaza Hotel

Friday, March 1, 2012 7:30–8:30 am Members Breakfast 8:30–9:30 am Overview presentation of Strategic Plan and discussion by IBBA Board 9:30–9:50 am Break 9:50 am IBBA Business Meeting (IBBA President Introduction) 9:55 am Members Forum 10:55 am Committee Reports 11:55 am President’s Year in Review 11:55 am Recognition of Outgoing Directors 12:10 pm Introduction of new Board members and officers 12:25 pm Incoming IBBA President’s Remarks 12:30 pm Adjourn 2:00 pm International Bull Show 6:00 pm Membership Cocktail Reception 7:00 pm Awards & Membership Banquet Saturday, March 2, 2012 10:00 am International Female Show Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 33


Grab your boots and show stick and join us at the

2013

February 27 - March 2, 2013 Houston, Texas You are invited to join Brangus seedstock producers and International guests at the

5th Annual Global Brangus Roundup Thursday, February 28, 2013 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel 8686 Kirby Drive

Contact:

Lindsey Matli for questions about convention lindsey@int-brangus.org | 210-696-8231 Garrett Thomas regarding the Global Roundup garrett@int-brangus.org | 210-696-8231 34 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

line at n o r e t Regis om or c . s u g n GoBra Code R Q e h e scan t rtphon a m s r u with yo

Stay connected online to receive the latest updates facebook.com/GoBrangus twitter @GoBrangus youtube.com/BrangusVideo


International International Brangus Brangus Breeders Breeders Association Association International Brangus Breeders Association 2013 2013 Convention Convention 2013 Convention February February 27 -27 March - March 2 2

February 27 - March 2 Crowne Crowne Plaza Plaza Hotel, Hotel, Houston, Houston, Texas Texas Crowne Plaza Hotel, Houston, Texas TheThe purpose purpose of IBBA of IBBA is: is: The purpose of IBBA is: To enable To enable IBBA IBBA members members to serve to serve the the commercial commercial cattle cattle industry. industry. To enable IBBA members to serve the commercial cattle industry. Registration Registration is required is required in order in order to to Registration is required in order to attend attend all meetings all meetings and and social social activities. activities. attend all meetings and social activities.

Members Members mustmust pay Full pay Registration. Full Registration. Full Registration Full Registration includes includes Membership Membership Breakfast Breakfast and Meeting, and Meeting, Members must pay Full Registration. Full Registration includes Membership Breakfast and Meeting, Banquet Banquet with with hosted hosted bar and bar Global and Global Brangus Brangus Roundup Roundup program. program. Banquet with hosted bar and Global Brangus Roundup program.

FullFull Registration RegistrationBefore Before February February 18 18 February February 18-25 18-25 # of#People of People CostCost Full Registration Before February 18 February 18-25 # of People Cost IBBA IBBA Member Member $155$155 $180$180 X X_______ _______ = $_______ = $_______ IBBA Member $155 $180 X _______ = $_______ Guest Guest or Spouse or Spouse $100$100 $110$110 X X_______ _______ = $_______ = $_______ Guest or Spouse $100 $110 X _______ = $_______ On-site On-site Registration Registration $250$250 (no event (no event choice) choice) On-site Registration $250 (no event choice) Guest Guest or Spouse or Spouse may may choose choose any or any allorofall theofoptions the options below: below: Guest or Spouse may choose any or all of the options below:

Event Event Indiv. Indiv. CostCost # of#People of People CostCost Event Indiv. Cost # of People Cost Membership Membership Breakfast Breakfast & Friday & Friday Meeting Meeting $15 $15 X X ______ ______ = $_______ = $_______ Membership Breakfast & Friday Meeting $15 X ______ = $_______ IBBA IBBA Cocktail Cocktail Reception Reception & Awards & Awards Banquet Banquet $80 $80 X X ______ ______ = $_______ = $_______ IBBA Cocktail Reception & Awards Banquet $80 X ______ = $_______ Global Global Brangus Brangus Roundup Roundup Program Program $50 $50 X X ______ ______ = $_______ = $_______ Global Brangus Roundup Program $50 X ______ = $_______ IJBBA IJBBA Member Member Registration Registration IJBBA Member Registration

Event Event Event Banquet Banquet Registration Registration Banquet Registration Global Global Brangus Brangus Roundup Roundup Program Program Global Brangus Roundup Program

Indiv. Indiv. CostCost # of#People of People CostCost Indiv. Cost # of People Cost $65 $65 X X ______ ______ = $_______ = $_______ $65 X ______ = $_______ $35 $35 X X ______ ______ = $_______ = $_______ $35 X ______ = $_______

Name: Name: __________________________________ __________________________________ IBBA IBBA Member Member Number: Number: __________________ __________________ Name: __________________________________ IBBA Member Number: __________________ Ranch/Company Ranch/Company Name: Name: ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Ranch/Company Name: ____________________________________________________________ Address: Address: ________________________ ________________________ City:___________________ City:___________________ State: State: ___ ___ Zip: Zip: ___________ ___________ Address: ________________________ City:___________________ State: ___ Zip: ___________ Daytime Daytime Phone: Phone: ________________________ ________________________ Email: Email: ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Daytime Phone: ________________________ Email: ____________________________________ Please Please bill to billmy to IBBA my IBBA account. account. Please bill to my IBBA account. Name(s) Name(s) as it as will it will appear appear on your on your badge: badge: Name(s) as it will appear on your badge:

Name________________________________ Name________________________________ Name________________________________ Name________________________________ Name________________________________ Name________________________________ Name________________________________ Name________________________________ Name________________________________ Name________________________________ Name________________________________ Name________________________________

MailMail to: to: MailIBBA to: IBBA IBBA 5750 5750 Epsilon Epsilon 5750 Epsilon San San Antonio, Antonio, TX 78249 TX 78249 San Antonio, TX 78249 or or or Fax Fax to: to: Fax to: (210)(210) 696 696 - 8718 - 8718 (210) 696 - 8718 Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 35


36 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal


special strategic plan by Dr. Joseph MASSEY IBBA Executive Vice-President

A

good strategic plan will develop a clear direction for the association with very specific goals and objectives. This is significantly important for an association that changes a number of board members yearly and has a dynamic membership. No organization can ever achieve success if their business plan changes from year to year and new influences cause changes without well understood goals, objectives and accountability. While all strategic business plans should be revised and validated on a regular basis, success cannot be achieved if boards do not adhere to a plan and allow membership to influence changes in direction that are not fully understood. Strategic plans are only as good as the people who put them together and as successful as their willingness to adhere to the plan. This means that the group must buy into the plan. It is extremely difficult to get “buy in” if you ask staff to develop a plan, present it to the board and expect it to be accepted by the board as their plan. Instead, the board and staff should work together to create a plan, and we should always be mindful that the direction and decisions of the board throughout the year must always take the strategic plan into account if the plan is to achieve success. Strategic plans must be articulated over and over so that all people involved in the organization know the plan in order to ensure its execution. Therefore, a strategic plan must be sold and understood by the organization. In associations like IBBA, not only should staff understand and sell the strategic plan but the Board of Directors should understand and sell the plan to the membership. Good follow-through by staff and boards can lead to great success. Strategic plans cause all involved to explore the environments that influence the decisions to forge a plan that not only considers today but more importantly how it influences the future and the possible ramifications. The gathering of good information and the willingness to question data and environment are critical in developing a good strategic plan, as is understanding the

The Importance of Strategic Planning industry and it’s significant factors and influences. Consensus must also play a role in order to achieve a sellable strategic plan. Strategic plan development usually requires that a good independent facilitator knowledgeable about the industry is involved. Because all participants must be willing to express their thoughts, an unbiased facilitator can pull these independent thoughts into a common set of goals and objectives without fear of a partisan agenda being formed. We are the “accountable” group that must build and execute the strategic plan. Our plan belongs to the board, staff and association, and all must buy into the plan if we are to carry it out and achieve full success.

The Plan

The IBBA Board spent a good amount of time developing and updating a strategic plan for IBBA in 2012, which should serve as a road map for coming years. All strategic plans should be revised each year, but if the IBBA Board did their job this plan will be the backbone of IBBA strategic actions for the coming years. The entire document can be found on the IBBA web site but we will be highlighting parts of this plan over the next several months. This plan is not just for the board or staff but for all of our members. I want to encourage all members to read the following Strategic Intent Statement along with the Business Objectives and Core Strategies. While some of you will not have all the information that was available to our board and staff while developing this plan, I would encourage you to visit with our board members when possible to get their views on the process and plan. Remember that if we do not all pull or push in the same direction we will never reach our goals. Now is a good time to embrace this plan because if we do not, we will never know if it is a good plan, and we will not know what is working and what is not. Knowing what works or doesn’t work allows us to change the plan where needed over time. bj

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 37


International Brangus Breeders Association Strategic Plan

Strategic Intent Statement Increase the number of Brangus bulls sold by 4% annually by focusing on commercial cow/calf producers in temperate environments and providing the research, education and information services needed to document and communicate our breed’s ability to deliver a unique combination of maternal, growth and carcass traits that add value.

Business Objectives 1. Become an accepted supplier to at least one branded program within each of the 2. 3. 4. 5.

three major packers in the United States by 2017. Collect 1500 carcass records over the next 5 years through annual comparative carcass/feedlot performance/profitability tests Increase the number of cows in THR by 25,000 by 2017 Produce genomically enhanced EPD’s by 2014 Grow the international sales of Brangus genetics to become one of the top 3 breeds exporting semen/embryos by 2017

Core Strategies Invest in research to measure and improve the value of Brangus Genetics

Establish pull-thru demand programs for Brangus Genetics

Unify members around organizational priorities

38 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

Grow market share with targeted commercial cattlemen

Capitalize on global growth opportunities


Strategic Initiatives Core Strategy 1: Invest in research to measure and improve the value of Brangus Genetics • Develop a research trial to evaluate the feeding and carcass characteristics of Brangus and Ultrablack cattle versus Angus cattle • Develop and accelerate a project to produce genomic EPD's • Assess the benefits/risks of moving to a common base EPD across breeds • Establish a sire evaluation program to test Brangus sires against each other and against proven sires of other breeds • Identify additional traits and begin collecting data to more fully describe our genetic population

Core Strategy 2: Establish pull-thru demand for Brangus genetics • Capitalize on the opportunity to participate in the Big Blue project • Invest in developing relationships with JBS, Cargill and Tyson to understand how Brangus can fit into an existing/future branded program • Develop marketing opportunities to feature/sell Brangus Gold females and Optimax feeder calves • Work with innovative sale barns to create value-added sales opportunities for Brangus cattle

Core Strategy 3: Grow market share with targeted commercial cattlemen • Segment the commercial cow/calf market and define our target market (200+ cows, Angus or AngusX or other short-eared English based cows) • Invest in "peer marketing" campaign • Utilize the Frontline Beef Producer to highlight success stories of commercial cattlemen using Brangus genetics (write features and testimonials from satisfied commercial producers) • Engage and equip members to capitalize on opportunities at local, regional and state industry events to promote Brangus genetics (e.g. trade show booths)

Core Strategy 4: Unify members around organizational priorities • • • • • • • •

Communicate our strategic plan to our members Create opportunity for a breakout at our annual convention for an "open-forum" Create and promote opportunity for members to “speak-out” on our website Communicate the value our association delivers to our members Establish a culture of unity among the Board of Directors, IBBA members and IBBA staff Develop monthly “WebEx” or “teleconferences” to update/educate our members Initiate a Board Outreach program to members (phone call, e-mail, etc.) Increase the involvement of Juniors in the IBBA association

Core Strategy 5: Capitalize on global growth opportunities • Continually improve our global growth round-up and generate additional participation and support • Educate members on the opportunities/responsibilities of international marketing • Develop stronger relationships/alliances with semen companies (ABS and Genex, Accelerated Genetics) • Begin publishing a second international issue of the IBBA journal

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 39


Feature Strong Cattle Prices and Production Challenges in 2013

by Derrell S. PEEL extension livestock marketing specialist oklahoma state university

Based on information available as of November 13, 2012 Cattle Supply Continues To Tighten

Two years of drought have resulted in additional unplanned cattle liquidation. This follows unplanned liquidation since 2006 as a result of sharply higher feed grain prices, a recession and the continuing sluggish macroeconomic recovery in the U.S. I estimate that the U.S. beef cow herd will drop to roughly 29.4 million head in January 1, 2013, after another 1.5 percent cow liquidation in 2012. Beef cow slaughter in 2012 is down about 13 percent from 2011, a level that indicates some herd liquidation although significantly less than the sharp liquidation in the Southern Plains in 2011. Beef cow slaughter is down 25 percent in Region 6, which includes Oklahoma and Texas and the surrounding region.

The 2012 calf crop is estimated at 34.5 million head, down 2.3 percent from 2011. I expect the 2013 calf crop to be around 33.8 million head, down another 2 percent and the lowest U.S. calf crop since 1942 (based on estimates of calf crop prior to 1950). Additionally, fewer feeder cattle imports from Mexico and Canada will further reduce feeder supplies in 2013. Mexico, which exported 1.4 million head of cattle to the U.S. in 2011, is expected to reach similar levels in 2012. However, Mexico, like the U.S. is experiencing a severe drought and the record pace of Mexican cattle imports in the first half of 2012 has tailed off in the last part of the year as cattle supplies dwindle in Mexico. Mexican cattle imports in 2013 are expected to decrease by 600,000 to 800,000 head. Feeder supplies will tighten into 2013 and will reach the tightest level in 2014 at the earliest.

The Possibility of More Drought Will Add To Cattle Industry Challenges

This graph paints a very graphic picture of just how tight the United States Feeder Calf Supply is becoming.

40 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

Drought conditions remain very severe across much of the central U.S. In late 2012, drought in much of the Great Plains and Rocky Mountain regions directly affects roughly half of the U.S. beef cow herd. Forage and hay supplies seem appear to be marginally adequate for the coming winter but in some areas, limited water supplies may force producers to move cows in the coming weeks. The bigger question relates to continued drought in 2013. If conditions remain


Feature increase only fractionally in 2013 and a modest 1 percent in 2014 while cattle slaughter is expected to decrease 4.5 percent and over 5.5 percent in each of the two years.

Demand Challenges Will Be More Critical

Heifer retention will play a huge role in determining the challenges our industry faces in the upcoming year.

dry through the winter and into next spring, significant cow herd liquidation will happen early, with many cows sold in the MayJuly period. In this case, cow liquidation and early marketing of feeder cattle will briefly moderate decreases in feeder supplies and beef production, at the expense of even sharper decreases later. This scenario is much like drought of 2011. In a second scenario, drought continues but with spring moisture that results in early forage growth and hay production before continued drought conditions prevail in the second half of the year. This scenario is essentially a repeat of the drought of 2012. Relatively modest cow liquidation is likely with heifer retention and the beginning of herd rebuilding postponed another year. A final scenario is a return to average or better climate conditions. In that situation, herd inventories will likely stabilize with heifer retention beginning late in the year. Herd expansion is not likely to begin seriously until 2014, meaning that it will be into 2016 before calf crops and feeder supplies begin to increase. Limited heifer availability; high replacement female cost; and time needed for range and pasture recovery all suggest that herd rebuilding will be a slow process and require 3-6 years at a minimum.

Declining cattle numbers have resulted in record cattle prices that increasingly pressure beef wholesale and retail prices. Retail beef prices increased nearly 10 percent in 2011 but have actually decreased so far in 2012 as beef demand has slowed against a continuing weak economy. Beef demand is improving but at a very slow pace that is strongly tied to the slow recovery of the general economy. The pressure for higher wholesale and retail beef prices will increase sharply in 2013 and 2014 with the anticipated decreases in beef production. This becomes perhaps the most critical question going forward. Will beef demand allow wholesale and retail beef prices to move higher, fast enough to accommodate rising cattle prices? There is little doubt that wholesale and retail beef prices will rise but when and how fast will determine the impacts on various beef sectors in the next two years.

Relentless Margin Squeeze for Feedlots and Beef Packers

The squeeze between limited beef prices and rising cattle prices has the most dramatic impacts on the cattle feedlot and beef packing sectors. Three times so far in 2012, Choice boxed beef prices have approached the $200/cwt level but have so far been unable to move higher. Meanwhile, fed cattle prices are rising in the last part of 2012 and are expected to move up to and likely above the $130/cwt level in 2013. Packers are expected to face generally poor margins for many months as fed cattle prices will tend to push higher faster than wholesale beef prices. It is the feedlots though, which are really in a vice and will (continued on page 42)

Beef Production Will Drop Sharply

Cattle inventories have been generally falling since the mid1990s. In fact, the total U.S. calf crop has declined every year for the past 16 years. However, over most of those years total beef production was relatively constant as a result of increasing carcass weights; improved efficiency and the short term impact of consuming inventories as they decline. Eventually it is impossible to maintain beef production in the face of continual decreases in cattle inventories. Beef production began declining in late 2011 and is expected to decrease 1.5 percent in 2012 as higher carcass weights partially offset a 4 percent decrease in cattle slaughter. Beef production is forecast to decrease 4.2 percent in 2013 and another 4.8 percent in 2014. Carcass weights are expected to

Feedlots will continue to face enormous challenges in 2013 and 2014, with record feed prices, record cattle prices, and short cattle supplies.

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 41


Feature (continued from page 41) continue to face enormous challenges in 2013 and 2014. Feedlots are facing record high feed grain prices as well as record high feeder cattle prices and ever shorter feeder cattle supplies that make it impossible to maintain efficient feedlot inventories. Feedlots are caught at the crossroads of limited cattle supplies, aggravated by two years of drought in the short run, combined with the long term trend of chronic excess feedlot capacity and the beginnings of long term structural change to higher feed grain prices. The loss of some feedlot capacity is expected as additional feedlots exit the industry over the next two years. In the meantime, feedlots will continue to scramble for limited feeder supplies and pay record high feeder prices for an increasingly insufficient supply of feeder cattle.

Stocker Opportunities Will Continue

The beef industry, like all livestock industries, has been greatly impacted by higher grain prices in recent years. Though the drought of 2012 had a particularly dramatic effect, corn prices are expected to remain relatively high even after the market recovers from this drought. The apparently permanent shift to higher grain prices in the U.S. changes the economic signals for cattle production. The beef industry’s primary response to higher grain prices is to switch from the grain intensive production system used for many years to less grain intensive production that utilizes more forage. This is accomplished by switching cattle feeding back to more yearling-based and less of the calf feeding that has been more common in recent years. These changes in feedlot feeding incentives have direct corresponding impacts on the stocker industry. There are strong market signals for additional production and weight to be added to feeder cattle prior to placement in feedlots. The price structure for feeder cattle across weights has changed to provide incentives (high value of gain) to extend stocker production to higher feeder cattle weights. The beef industry’s primary means to maintain competitiveness and reduce demand for expensive grain is to enhance forage based production in the stocker phase. These incentives will continue in 2013 and 2014 despite record high feeder prices and limited feeder supplies.

Cow-Calf Profit Potential but Plenty of Production Challenges

Cow-calf producers hold the reins of this industry because they fundamentally control supply. Of course, Mother Nature controls production potential and will determine when we move through this drought and begin recovery. Ranges and pastures have been severely stressed and abused in many cases and will need time to recover. It is cow-calf producers that will determine when and how fast herd rebuilding will take place. In the meantime, calf prices will be the primary reflection of limited cattle supplies and 42 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

With record feed prices, stocker opportunities are expected to continue.

calf prices will continue to push record levels and be relatively insulated from the limitations of demand at the other end of the industry. High prices mean generally favorable profit potential for cow-calf producers but challenges will remain with respect to the ability to produce and the cost of production. Input costs will also remain high and managing cost of production will be the principal determinant of profits for most cow-calf producers. 2013 will be characterized by higher cattle prices, tighter cattle supplies and declining beef production. For cow-calf and stocker producers, production will be a bigger challenge than markets for the most part. In general cattle of all classes will sell well. However, drought, high prices for feed and other inputs, such as fuel and fertilizer will make cost of production a continuing challenge. BJ ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Derrell Peel is the Charles Breedlove Professor of Agribusiness in the Department of Agricultural Economics. He has served as the Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist since he came to Oklahoma State University in 1989. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees from Montana State University and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois. He previously served as the Superintendent of the Southeastern Colorado Range Research Station in Springfield Colorado. His main program areas at Oklahoma State University include livestock market outlook and marketing/risk management education for livestock producers. Derrell also works in the area of international livestock and meat trade with particular focus on Mexico and Canada and the North American livestock and meat industry. He lived in Mexico on sabbatical in 2001 and has developed an extensive knowledge of the Mexican cattle and beef industry and the economics of cattle and beef trade between the U.S. and Mexico.


Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 43


Feature Interpretation and Use of Calving Ease EPDs

C

alving ease (the opposite of calving difficulty or dystocia) is dependent upon several factors. The most obvious factor affecting calving ease is calf birth weight. But, a small heifer can calve without difficulty just as a very large heifer can experience calving difficulty as not only the calf size (as measured through birth weight), but the ratio of the calf size to the size of the pelvic opening is the most critical factor. Calves of the same birth weight may not be shaped the same; broadness of shoulders, degree of muscle expression, length of the calf, etc. may be very different across calves even when birth weight is similar. Calf size, particularly for first-calf heifers, explains most calving problems. Research conducted over the years has provided much useful information to understand calving difficulty. In the 1970s at the USDA Meat Animal Research Center, the Germplasm Evaluation (GPE) project was initiated to evaluate cattle breeds and sires bred to British females. Dystocia incidence across all sire breeds was reported to be 38.5 percent in two-year-old first-calf heifers, 13.3 percent in three-year-olds, and 7.4 percent in four- and five-year-old cows. Nix et al. (1998) studied 2,191 calving records from the Clemson University Beef Physiology Unit herd (1981-1993) and were analyzed to determine

Proper interpretation and use of Calving Ease EPD’s is an important step in getting a live calf on the ground.

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by Andy D. HERRING associate professor, department of animal science texas a&m university

factors affecting malpresentation, mortality and dystocia. Only 20 (0.91 percent) of these calvings involved improper presentation of the calf. Among the 20 malpresentations, 14 were posterior, three were leg deviations, two were head deviations, and one was a breech birth. Overall, 94 percent of the births required no assistance; of the six percent of births that did require assistance, the vast majority was due to calf size. Calf size and female parity explained most of the dystocia. Over the years, as breed associations recommended their members to collect birth weight records and eventually calculated birth weight EPDs, this provided breeders with tools to aid in reduction of dystocia. Dystocia is an added stress that increases postpartum anestrous, and this can be particularly harmful in first-calf heifers as they take longer to begin cycling after calving than older females even if no dystocia is experienced. Although birth weight EPD is useful in reducing incidences of dystocia, more precise measures of calving ease provide additional tools to breeders. The Calving Ease Direct (CED) EPD is expressed as a difference in percentage of unassisted births in the birth of progeny from that animal (as when bulls are bred to first-calf heifers), with higher values indicating greater calving ease. Comparison of the CED EPDs between two animals predicts the average difference in calving ease percentage by which the two progeny groups will differ when they are being born. The Calving Ease Maternal (CEM) EPD is expressed as a difference in percentage of unassisted births from daughters of the animal in question, again with a higher value indicating greater calving ease. If two bulls are being compared for CEM EPDs and are bred to heifers, the CEM EPDs will represent differences in expected calving ease percentage among the two sires’ groups of first-calf daughters. It predicts the average ease with which daughters will calve as first-calf heifers when compared to daughters of other animals in the breed. The table on the next page provides some EPD values on calving ease direct, birth weight and calving ease maternal from the IBBA fall 2012 genetic evaluation. Among active sires, the range in CED EPD goes from -14.2 on the low end to 13.0 at the top, a difference of 27.2 percent calving ease between these extremes with an average CED EPD of +5.2. These values were taken directly from the fall 2012 evaluation on the IBBA web site (except for the fictitious bull OMG ANONYMOUS 4321). The range in CEM EPDs is from -4.0 to 12.4 with an average of +7.2. The range and average for birth weight EPD is also shown.


Feature EPD comparison on four bulls in the Brangus Fall 2012 Multibreed cattle evaluation Calving Ease Birth Calving Ease Bull Direct Weight Maternal MC 661 JOHN WAYNE 535S9

11.9

-4.3

8.2

BRINKS BIG EASY 589F29

10.0

-5.7

5.5

OMG ANONYMOUS 4321

-9.0

6.5

-2.0

NMSU 94004

7.1

0.3

8.8

Average *

5.2

0.7

7.2

High*

13.0

8.3

12.4

Low*

-14.2

-7.9

-4.0

*Among active sires The interpretation of calving ease EPDs is similar in concept to other trait EPDs, but the units are different. If the four bulls in the table were bred to a genetically similar set of heifers that were managed the same way in the same location, it is expected that calves of MC 661 JOHN WAYNE 535S9 would have 20.9 percent more calving ease (difference between 11.9 and -9.0) than calves sired by OMG ANONYMOUS 4321, calves sired by BRINKS BIG EASY 589F29 would have 19 percent more calving ease than calves sired by OMG ANONYMOUS 4321 (difference between 10.0 and -9.0), and calves sired by NMSU 94004 would have 16.1 percent more calving ease than calves sired by OMG ANONYMOUS 4321 (difference between 7.1 and -9.0). It can be seen that in general birth weight EPDs are related to CED EPDs, but this relationship is not exact. Among these bulls, although MC 661 JOHN WAYNE 535S9 is expected to sire calves with slightly more calving ease than BRINKS BIG EASY 589F29, BRINKS BIG EASY 589F29 is expected to sire calves slightly lighter in birth weight than MC 661 JOHN WAYNE 535S9. The daughters of these four bulls (when all are bred to the genetically similar bulls and managed the same) would also be expected to express some differences in calving ease when they, in turn, are dams. Daughters of MC 661 JOHN WAYNE 535S9 would be expected to have calves with 10.2 percent more calving ease than daughters of OMG ANONYMOUS 4321 (8.2 minus -2.0); daughters of BRINKS BIG EASY 589F29 would have 7.5 percent more calving ease than daughters of OMG ANONYMOUS 4321 (5.5 minus -2.0), and daughters of NMSU 94004 would have 10.8 percent more calving ease than daughters of OMG ANONYMOUS 4321 (8.8 minus -2.0). Use of calving ease EPDs can offer additional tools for Brangus breeders rather than only using birth weight EPD for control of dystocia, particularly in first-calf heifers. Incorporation of

Calving Ease Direct EPD into breeding decisions is expected to give increased potential to reduce dystocia over birth weight EPD alone. No matter what location or expected market for calves produced, cattle breeders should always utilize balanced selection that considers reproduction and well as growth and size traits. Any trait or selection tool that provides increased potential for female fertility and calf survival should be economically advantageous. BJ ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Dr. Andy Herring is associate professor, section leader of beef cattle science, and holder of the John K. Riggs ’41 beef cattle professorship in the Department of Animal Science. He also is a member of the TAMU intercollegiate faculty of genetics. Herring was raised on a cattle and sheep ranch near Talpa, Texas, in Coleman and Runnels counties that has been in his family since 1886. He received a bachelor’s in animal science from Tarleton State University in 1988, a master’s in animal breeding from Texas A&M University in 1991, and a doctorate in genetics from Texas A&M University in 1994. Herring came to our department from Texas Tech University, where he was a faculty member in the Department of Animal and Food Sciences from 1994-2002. Herring has teaching and research responsibilities within the department. He teaches undergraduate and graduate level classes in beef cattle production and management (ANSC 406 and 605). His research interests focus on areas to increase production efficiency for cow-calf producers through coordination of breeding systems, environmental resources and marketing strategies. He has researched genetic and environmental influences on milk production in beef cows, breed differences for feedlot and carcass characteristics, and genetic influences on beef cow reproduction and productivity, cattle temperament and immune response. He also remains active in state and national beef cattle industry groups. Herring enjoys teaching undergraduate and graduate students and uses of a wide variety of techniques. He has trained or co-trained 7 Ph.D. students, 23 M.S. students and 7 M.Ag. students. He has received the national Teacher Fellow Award from the National Association of Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture (1998), the Outstanding Young Scientist Award for Education from the Southern Section of the American Society of Animal Science (2000), and the TAMU Vice Chancellor’s Awards in Excellence for Graduate Teaching (2009) and Team Research (2009).

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 45


Feature The Brangus Opportunity in Costa Rica and Central America

I

recently returned from judging the International Nelore & Gyr show in Guapilis, Costa Rica, a beautiful country with good cattle! Cattlemen and producers gathered to attend a great event and observe tremendous genetics of Brahman, Nelore and Gyr. It was outstanding to see their growing interest in composite breeds such as Brangus, which provides excellent opportunities for breeders here in the U.S.

Marcoes Borges recently had the opportunity to travel to Costa Rica to judge the International Nelore and Gyr Shows, but was also able to spend some time meeting and visiting with area producers.

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by Marcos BORGES

While on my trip in Costa Rica, good friends on the show management team provided us the opportunity to display two red Brangus animals during an intermission in the Nelore show and talk about the opportunities the Brangus breed could provide We spoke about the strengths of our breed and emphasized that Brangus and Zebu cattle can complement each other creating a hybrid that can meet their needs for quality and adaptability. The concept was well received by a crowd of 200 breeders and local cattlemen. Opportunities like these allow for the Brangus breed to become more prominent in Central America. We were also able to attend the first Costa Rican Brangus field day with our friends Juan and Miguel Soto. After a three-hour picturesque, curvy drive we arrived at the event site, each twist and turn of the tropical roads providing postcard worthy scenes. During our drive, Juan Soto told me about their new retail butcher shop that specializes in providing Brangus beef. The shop is even called “Brangus”. Juan mentioned they are having a difficult time finding animals to supply his growing demand. He believes paying up to a 20 percent premium for the Brangus steers will help to increase the supply of Brangus calves, which will provide a larger market to supply Brangus genetics. The host of the field day was the Oscar Villegas Ranch. They presented a very high-class event where Brangus genetics were well represented. Here the Brangus breed is showing their inherent ability to adapt to this very, very hot and humid climate. I was able to meet and visit with many breeders and would like to relay their valid comments and concerns about the breed. Breeders in Costa Rica pointed out that some of our bloodlines have too much hair causing these animals to suffer more heat stress. They also seem to have a difficult time breeding and adapting to the tropics. It was also emphasized they would like to see more Brangus animals with more skin and more Brahman and Nelore influence. Producers’ rationale is that animals with more skin have better transpiration and will adapt better to their environment. In addition, they commented that when they attend the show in Houston they see well-fitted and tremendous animals. However, they do not agree with the judges’ preferences for more Angus-looking animals. They would like to see winning cattle with more Brangus breed characteristics. After the field day, we returned back to the show that evening in time to see red Brangus embryo calves produced by the University of Costa Rica. The university presented three very


Feature nice heifers that represent the Brangus breed well. They are proud of the animals and explained the testing these animals have undergone to provide data and feedback to the commercial cattlemen proving that progressive cattlemen are seeking to obtain more data on their animals. The set of females posted strong ultrasound data and are now bred to collect reproduction data. Sunday followed with a steer show in which a Brangus steer was selected as Grand Champion and scanned 5.2 for marbling. I have been promoting Nelore and Brangus genetics in Mexico and Central and South America since 1993. It is a great pleasure to see after many years of educating Costa Rican cattlemen about the importance of carcass quality, they are starting to understand the advantages of Brangus genetics and the opportunities this breed can provide. The Brangus breed has a good foundation and is really starting to grow internationally. As suppliers of their seed stock genetics, we must listen to their comments and concerns and try to adapt some our cattle to their needs. I believe the international market will soon be 80 percent of our U.S. genetic sales. We have the Houston Livestock Show, Global Brangus Roundup, The Event Sale and other great events that really help us to reach our international clients. All these events are wonderful initiatives. However, the International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA), the International Red Brangus Breeders Association (IRBBA) and all Brangus entities must send more trade missions to these tropical countries. There is no better marketing strategy than going to their ranches and shows to get to know them and their genetic needs. Latin A m e r i c a n breeders are relationshiporiented and their interactions reflect the importance of relationships when marketing to them. Argentina is doing a good job of interacting with Brangus breeders all over the world. They come to almost every show and field day and also provide judges to the most important shows in the Latin American countries (the American Brahman Breeders Association (ABBA)

also does this). A judge is a person who can clarify many of their questions and help them select their genetics. The Brangus breed was developed and originated in the U.S., and we need to be an association of breeders that sets the standards for the Brangus breed. I strongly suggest we increase our international marketing and use the opportunity of their visit to interact effectively when our international clients are in the U.S. We need to openly approach and welcome our visitors. However, we need to also listen to their feedback, not just market to them. We will then establish a new course for growth that will place our cattle on the most competitive platform in the international market. BJ

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 47


Sale Report Southeast Brangus Breeders Association Female Sale

T

he Southeast Brangus Breeders Association Annual Female Sale brought buyers and Brangus cattlemen to Lake City, Fla., September 29, 2012. Almost 20 consignors contributed to the offerings that Saturday when 63 registered Brangus females grossed $169,550 for an average of $2,691. The high selling female consigned by Blackwater Cattle Co. of Lake Park, Ga., was lot two, a three-in-one, sired

by Real Deal. The heifer calf at side was bred by Blackwater’s herd sire, Nuff Said. The lot sold for $15,500 to Draggin’ M Ranch of El Dorado, Ark. Other high sellers included lot 55, a three-in-one, consigned by Twin Creek Farm purchased by Blue Ribbon Cattle for $4,250, and lot 10 was the high selling bred heifer consigned by Char-No Farm and purchased by Draggin’ M Ranch. bj

Demand Strong at Star G Brangus Complete Herd Dispersal Registered Brangus Females 16 lots ET calves grossed $78,250 to average $4,891 36 open heifers grossed $71,550 to average $1,988 6 spring bred heifers grossed $14,950 to average $2,492 9 spring bred cows grossed $19,900 to average $2,211 16 spring pairs grossed $38,650 to average $2,690 Registered Brangus Bulls 54 Brangus bulls grossed $156,050 to average $2,890 Semen Lots 17 semen lots grossed $9,969 to average $586 Commercial Females 91 commercial Brangus bred females grossed $150,050 to average $1,649

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large group of buyers and bidders were on hand at the Star G Dispersal sale to snap up the registered and commercial offerings at a swift pace. Buyers from eight states enjoyed a rainy day in Canton, Texas, September 29, 2012, and took advantage of the dispersal to add to their herds and to begin new ones. The top seller of the day was lot 100, Stonewall. He is a proven Csonka son that is balanced in his EPD traits. With progeny already on the ground in several herds, he is making a reputation 48 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

for his consistency of production on a variety of cow types. Salacoa Valley Farms, Fairmount, Ga., paid $10,000 to own this consistent breeding package. The second high seller was also a bull, lot 147. Hayman’s 7 11 of Kenansville, Fla., paid $7,200 to own SAB Brazile 675Y. He records in the top five percent of the breed in IMF EPDs and top 15 percent in WW and REA. His dam is a $10,500 daughter of Robertson. He was consigned by Stephen Boykin of Franklin, Texas. Selling for $5,000 was lot 134, SGR Patton 355X7. He is a growth machine with top 10 percent YW and 15 percent WW EPDs. This home raised herd sire prospect sold to Lloyd Easley of Canton, Texas. Also selling for $5,000 was lot five, Ms SGR LTD 99X. This big REA daughter of the popular AI sire, LTD, featured Picasso on the bottom side of her pedigree and sold with a Blanda granddaughter at side. She sold to Westall Ranches in Arabela, N.M. Lot 101, Blackjack 30X5 sold for $4,250 to Lide Ranch in Mexia, Texas. He is a balanced trait herd sire who is sired by Blanda and is out of Patton’s dam. He posted big Milk and REA EPDs. bj


sale report CX Advantage Sale

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attlemen, producers and international Brangus breeders collected in Weimar, Texas, for the CX Advantage Sale held October 13, 2012. Don Cox presided as sale manager and Leo Casas served as the sale auctioneer where 48 females sold for $126,800 averaging $2,850. Eight bulls sold that day grossing $33,500 averaging $4,188. The high selling female was lot 11, CX Ms Home Runs Major League 71/Z3 sired by CX Home Runs Major League 81/W. T. Dean Cattle Company of Maysville, Okla., bought the lot for $4,300. The second high selling female of the day was CX Ms Home Run 23/Y sired by CX Home Run 135/P. JLS International of Devine, Texas, bought lot 19 for $4,100. Of the bulls, lot three was the high seller. CX Mr Home Fun 208/Y was sired by CX Home Fun 135/P. This herd sire prospect was sold for $9,200 to Browns Brangus LLC, in Weimar, Texas.

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Lot one was the second high selling bull, CX Legends DRAMAKER 23/Y sired by CX Legends DREAM 610/U1. This herd sire prospect was bought by Steve and Vickie Mims of Pattison, Texas, for $5,000. High Star Ranch of Burton, Texas, was the volume buyer among 21 other buyers from three states and two countries. Find the CX Advantage video sale report on the GoBrangus website at http:// gobrangus.com/videofeed/. bj

Northern Stars Brangus Sale

he Northern Stars Brangus sale brought buyers from three states to Harrah, Okla., October 13, 2012. Jack Gorczyca served as the sale’s manager, Thad Gorczyca was the sale consultant, and JR McGraw was the auctioneer for the day. Ten registered Brangus female lots sold for an average of $3,065 grossing $24,500 while two registered bull lots sold for an average of $5,700 grossing $11,400. In addition, two commercial bull lots sold for an average of $5,700 grossing $11,400. Lot five, JG Miss Cadence Trend 711Z, was the high selling female of the day. Consigned by Gorczyca and Son of Harrah,

(L to R) Colby Davis, Andreya Mitchell, and Wyatt Holder were buyers of high selling lots at the Northern Stars Brangus Sale.

Okla., this female sired by JG Mr. 747 Blackjet went to Aimee Adamek from Schulenburg, Texas, for $4,500. JG Miss 747 Bright MVP 55Z, lot one, was the second high selling female also sired by JG Mr. 747 Blackjet. Colby Davis of Tahlequah, Okla., took her home for $3,800. The third high selling female was lot 10, JG Miss 747 Black Neut 243Z sired by JG Mr. 747 Blackjet. She was sold to Andreya Mitchell of Seminole, Okla., for $3,800. Lot three, JG Miss 747 Tender Jet 5114 sired by JG Mr. 747 Blackjet, was the fourth high selling female which sold for $3,100 to Haley Louann Nelson of Coalgate, Okla. Like the top three, she was consigned by Gorczyca and Son of Harrah, Okla. Of the bulls, JG Mr. On The Money 3146 in lot 11 was the high seller of the day. Sired by MC Onstar 924W4, full possession and half interest of this herd sire prospect went to Wyatt Holder of Hulbert, Okla., for $7,900. Volume buyer was Colby Davis of Tahlequah, Okla. bj Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 49


Sale Report Cow Creek Ranch and Southern Cattle Company “Own the Factory” Complete dispersal of the Cow Creek Ranch Spring Calving Cow Herd Registered Females 211 spring pairs grossed $681,000 to average $3,227 57 spring bred cows grossed $132,400 to average $2,295 4 open cows grossed $6,800 to average $1,700 274 total registered females grossed $820,200 to average $2,993 Commercial females 232 commercial Brangus females grossed $460,125 to average $1,983 Bulls 77 Brangus grossed $356,000 to average $4,623 64 Ultrablack grossed $254,500 to average $3,977 17 ¼ and ½ blood Brangus grossed $65,000 to average $3,823 15 Charolais grossed $49,500 to average $3,300 13 Angus grossed $49,500 to average $3,150 193 total bulls grossed $786,950 to average $4,077 701 total lots grossed $2,080,975 to average $2,969

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packed house was on hand October 12 and 13, 2012, for the “Own the Factory” Cow Creek Ranch and Southern Cattle Company complete dispersal of the spring calving Cow Creek Ranch cow herd and bull sale. Brangus and Ultrablack females and herd sire prospects shined as 128 accumulated buyers from 11 states snapped up the offering at a torrid pace. The top selling female lots were at $5,700 as Town Creek Farm, West Point, Miss., paid $3,100 to own lot 67, CCR Brandy 20T5, a 2005 Pathfinder bred female safe in calf. She boasted a 358-day calving interval. Matt Willey, L Ray Ranch, Beaumont, Texas, paid $2,600 to own lot 67A, CCR Brandy 20Z. She is the Integrity bred heifer calf at the side of 20T5. Lot 166 and 166A also fetched a bid

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price of $5,700 as Tanner Farms of Ellisville, Miss., paid $4,000 to own CCR Suger Esto 518T2. J&L Ranch, Blountstown, Fla., paid $1,700 to own the bull calf at side, lot 166A, 518Z5, her Pathfinder son. The third high selling lot was lot 47 and 47A. Larry Sasser of Bogue Chitto, Miss., paid $3,700 to own lot 47, CCR Queen Ruth 154x. Monica Farms, Laplace, La., paid $1,600 to own lot 47A, CCR Sleep Easy 154Z3, her bull calf at side. The top selling bred female was lot 168 at $5,000. She is a first generation cow that has been a feature in the Cow Creek International Donor program. She sold to Town Creek Farm of West Point, Miss. Top selling bull was lot 325, CCR Integrity 355S4. This featured herd sire had a powerful set of bull and heifer calves at side of the females selling. Town Creek Farm, West Point, Miss., paid $17,000 to own this proven powerhouse. Southern Cattle Company paid $15,000 for lot 350, CCR Sleep Easy 809Y3. This phenotypically pleasing Sleep Easy son was raised by Gary Townsend of Rosebud, Ark. Out of a seven-year-old dam, he was the leadoff prospect in the bull sale and combined “look” and data to the highest degree. He is big topped and smooth made with length and cleanliness of joint and structure. He is Southern Cattle Company’s selection to carry on the Cow Creek tradition of excellence. Lot 326, CCR Sleep Easy 46T3, was the third high selling bull. He was well represented by the calves at side of their dams with a powerful and popular set of prospects. This moderate, heavily muscled, young proven herd sire sold for $12,000 to The Branch Ranch, Mansfield, La. Wooldridge Land and Cattle, Oil City, La., paid $10,250 to own lot 365, CCR Integrity 145Y2. This calving ease herd sire prospect was the fourth high selling bull. In the commercial female sale, Harold Feltman, Oakman, Ala., purchased the high selling pen of fall bred heifers from Megehee Cattle Company of Macon, Miss. The purchase price was $2,900 per head. bj


Sale report Overflow Crowd Snaps up Doguet Diamond D Sale Offering registered females 2 donor cows grossed $ 25,000 to average $12,500 4 show heifer prospects grossed $44,750 to average $11,188 2 future flushes grossed $11,300 to average $5,650 3 open heifers grossed $11,550 to average $3,850 9 fall bred females grossed $29,950 to average $3,328 20 spring bred heifers and pairs grossed $68,400 to average $3,420 40 Total Registered Brangus Females grossed $190,950 to average $4,774 registered bulls 1 two-year-old bull grossed $15,000 to average $15,000 56.5 coming two-year-old bulls grossed $213,500 to average $3,779 13 yearling bulls grossed $50,500 to average $3,885 1 weaned herd sire prospect grossed $3,750 to average $3,750 71.5 total registered Brangus bulls grossed $272,750 to average $3,955 commercial females 18 commercial bred heifers grossed $32,250 to average $1,792 34 commercial bred $35,025 to average $1,030

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ne of the largest assemblies of commercial and registered Brangus breeders in recent memory gathered in South Texas for the Diamond D Ranch “Proven, Performance, Winning” Production Sale October 20, 2012. Mike and Lisa Doguet, Timmy Lucherk, Eric Otto and their crew at Diamond D extended South Texas hospitality in the form of their accommodating attitude and a steak dinner the night before the sale. An outstanding set of registered and commercial Brangus females and registered Brangus bulls were presented for the buyers’

Lanny Vinson, Ovalo, Texas, and Jake Johnston, Waxahachie, Texas, purchased high selling females at Doguet’s.

appraisal. Buyers from seven states snapped up the offering at a torrid pace. Lot seven, DDD Ms Chariti 88Z10, was the high-selling female at $20,000. This fancy May show heifer prospect is sired by DDD Masterplan 1019W10 and out of a Csonka daughter. She posts big growth EPDs in addition to her outstanding phenotype and promises stardom in the pasture as well. She sold to Jake Johnston in Waxahachie, Texas. Lot three, DDD Ms Ginger 804T51, was the second highselling female of the day. This full sister to DDD Lisa 804R1 and the 2007 International Reserve Champion female, DDD Miracle 804R8, with her Sparticus heifer calf at side sold for $15,000 and also went to Jake Johnston in Waxahachie, Texas. Vinson Ranches of Ovalo, Texas, purchased the third highselling female lot as they paid $10,750 to own lot eight, DDD Ms Mariah 804Z11. She is an Onstar daughter out of the 2007 International Reserve Champion female, DDD Miracle 804R8. The Eagles Ranch in Evergreen, La., paid $10,000 to own the fourth high-selling female, lot one, DDD Ms Reba 804S11. She is a full sister to the 2012 International Grand Champion bull, DDD Uppercuts Legacy 804X37 and to multi trait leader DDD UC Gentleman 804S21. In the bull sale, Foerster Show Steers of San Antonio, Texas, purchased the high-selling bull as they paid $24,000 to own full possession and one-half interest in lot 102, DDD Hercules 38Y. This big growth and REA son of the 2011 Show Sire of the Year, DDD Hercules 88S3, is long sided, heavy boned and moderate in his kind. Lot 130, DDD Hercules 246X, was the second high-selling bull. Pierce Cattle Company from West, Texas, paid $15,000 to own this phenotypic powerhouse and son of Hercules. Dalton Nix of Tolar, Texas, paid $6,500 to own the third highselling herd sire prospect. He was lot 167, DDD Eagle Ford 804Y35, a yearling son of Hercules and a maternal sister to Legacy and Gentleman. Wahlberg Ranch of Briarcliff, Texas, paid $2,000 to own the highselling commercial females in the sale. He paid the bid price on a set of Jasik Hay Farms heifers, safe for December and January calves out of Doguet Brangus bulls. bj Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 51


Sale Report Brangus Barn Burner in Georgia at Salacoa Valley Farms registered females 3 flushes grossed $25,000 to average $8,333 2 donor prospects grossed $16,500 to average $8,250 37 fall bred cows and pairs grossed $114,700 to average $3,100 10 fall bred heifers and pairs grossed $26.90 to average $2,690 12 open heifers grossed $29,300 to average $2,442 2 spring three-in-one’s grossed $9,350 to average $4,675 17 spring bred cows grossed $30,900 to average $1,818 45 spring bred heifers grossed $88,900 to average $1976 128 total Brangus females grossed $341,550 to average $2,668 69 Salacoa Valley Farms Brangus females grossed $210,400 to average $3,049 registered bulls 9 1/2 yearling Brangus bulls grossed $64,000 to average $6,737 64 coming two-year-old Brangus bulls grossed $240,000 to average $3,750 3 proven Brangus herd sires grossed $9,100 to average $3,033 76 1/2 total Brangus bulls grossed $313,100 to average $4,100 13 coming two-year-old Charolais bulls grossed $29,500 to average $2,269

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beautiful fall day, great Brangus cattle and a gorgeous setting at Salacoa Valley Farm in Fairmount, Ga., rewarded 110 registered buyers from 13 states for their attendance and participation in the registered Brangus female and bull offering October 25 and 26, 2012. The well-presented offering in the female portion included consigned animals from Clover Ranch, Marietta, Ga.; Three Trees Ranch, Sharpsburg, Ga.; NV Cattle, LLC, Cartersville, Ga.; and Truitt Brangus Farm, Auburn, Ala. Buyers rewarded the sellers with great prices and rapid acceptance of the cattle. The top selling female lot was lot three, 10 embryos from the buyer’s choice of the fall yearling heifers of Salacoa Valley Farm. Clover Ranch of Marietta, Ga., paid $11, 000 to own the choice embryos from these young breed powerhouses. Truitt Brangus farms paid $10,000 to own lot one-a, Ms Salacoa Lambert 209Y13. She was a pick lot sired by the number four ranked IMF trait leader in the Brangus Breed, Lambert. Her dam is breed icon MS Brinks Bright Side 209L11 who is the fifth ranked cow in the Brangus breed for YW EPD and seventh ranked for REA. Also selling for $10,000 was lot seven, SVF D Bar D ADA-RU. She is a Leadgun daughter from one of the 23D2 clones and sold 52 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

with a Stonewall bull calf at side. Murry Farms of Ovett, Miss., paid the bid price to own this long sided female who records EPDs ranking in the breed’s top three percent in WW and 10 percent in YW. Salacoa Valley Farms paid $10,000 to for the right to flush lot five, MS Brinks Bright Side 209L11. The flush of this big growth power cow was consigned by Three Trees Ranch of Sharpsburg, Ga. Lot 200, New Vision of Salacoa 209Y2, was the high-selling bull in the sale as Clover Ranch in Marietta, Ga., paid $19,000 to own half interest and full possession of this young breed stalwart. He is a full brother to the second high-selling female, lot one-a, and both are out of 209L11. New Vision is a yearling and writes EPDs ranking in the breed’s top two percent REA, three percent IMF, four percent YW and five percent WW. Addison Brangus Farm of Winfield, Ala., paid $15,000 to own full interest and full possession of lot 213, On Task of Salacoa Valley 23Y42. This Cadence sired, coming two-year-old, is a full brother to the longtime Salacoa Valley herd sire, 23S86. He posted top two percent of the breed in YW and 10 percent Milk EPD. The third high seller was another yearling herd sire prospect. Lake Majestik Farms of Flat Rock, Ala., paid $9250 to own half interest and full possession of lot 201, Eisenhower of Salacoa 23Y69. This light BW Patton son is out of the $10,000 23m28 donor cow. Hayman’s 7 - 11 Ranch paid $8,500 to own one half interest and full possession of lot 202, Bradley of Salacoa Valley 23Y68. He is a full brother to Eisenhower and recorded a 5.67 IMF scan and a big REA. The high selling Charolais bull was lot 300, RRCA Mr Silver Mark Y2160. W K Miller Angus, LLC, Collins, Ga., paid $ 3,300 to own this powerful Charolais bull. bj


Sale report GeneTrust Sale at Chimney Rock Cattle Company Concord, AR November 2 & 3, 2012 93 Registered Brangus Females $5,167 62 18-Month-Old Brangus Bulls $4,884 67 Yearlings Brangus Bulls $4,929 8 Ultrablack Bulls $4,750

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he weekend of November 2 and 3 found the largest ever gathering of registered and commercial Brangus enthusiasts enjoying great fall weather and the unparalleled hospitality of Bill and Gail Davis and the entire Chimney Rock crew. The cattlemen’s mission was to visit and compare notes on the Brangus breed, to evaluate progeny from the breed’s most outstanding sire line up and to bid on and secure for their breeding programs genetics from the outstanding offering available to them at the Friday night and Saturday sales. The highlight and high selling lot from the female sale was from Chimney Rock. Lot 91, a full sister to CRC Guardian 9U8U5, sold for $25,000 to repeat customer Tony and Lolita Westbrooks, Bushley Creek Cattle Company, Olla, La. The same buyer also added lot 56 and her Onstar heifer calf from Schmidt Farm’s to his new but preeminent herd of females for $16,000. Lot 89, an outstanding proven donor from Cavender Ranches, found a new home at $14,000 with Mike Coggins, Blackwater Cattle Co., Lake Park, Ga. Two ranches joined up to purchase another female with an elite pedigree and proven production record from Joe and Melanie Fuller for $13,000. The new owners are The Oaks Farm, Joe and Catherine Kassler, Newnan, Ga., and Ray and Karen Westall, Westall Ranches, LLC, Arabela, N.M. The sale also included a select group of Ultrablack females whose male counterparts have been extremely well received in past GT sales by both registered and commercial cattlemen. Lot 95 and lot 93 came from Johnston Farms and sold to Garry Clem,

Jacksonville, Texas, and Michael Bennett, Palestine, Texas, for $5,250 and $4,500 respectively. They were both daughters of Suhn’s Next Step 331R7 and out of registered Angus cows. Saturday’s bull and commercial female sale again brought out a large crowd on a beautiful fall day. The sale topping bull was from Suhn Cattle Co. Lot 227, Suhn’s New Concept 30Y24, had explosive growth, breed leading maternal plus an outcross pedigree to most of the Brangus breed’s most popular pedigrees. After very active bidding from several ranches, he commanded a final bid of $54,000 from Joe & Nancy Cavender, Cavender Ranches, Troup, Texas. The second high selling bull and first lot to sell was from Draggin’ M Ranch. Lot 153 DMR Heritage 894Y, a Next Step son that combined high growth with excellent maternal, sold to Bruce Roberts, Gulfport, Miss., for $34,000. Another yearling was the third high selling bull at $13,000 to Genesis Ranch, Mike and Gloria Weathers, Columbus, Texas, and Joe and Melanie Fuller, Cross F Ranch, Wheelock, Texas. He was Lot 267, Suhn’s Guardian 416Y14, who posted outstanding EPD’s and ratios. Lot 275 from Draggin’ M was purchased by Gayland and Patti Townsend, Milburn, Okla., for $8,000 to add to their herd sire battery at Townsend Cattle Co. The commercial female offering was well received and the high selling group of Brangus bred heifers sold to Stephens Farms, Jimmy Blagg, Prattsville, Ark., for $1,950. Buyers from Iowa to Georgia invested in this outstanding offering that averaged $1,800 on 178 lots. The volume buyer on the commercial females was Stephens Farms, Prattsville, Ark. Other volume buyers were Westall Ranches on the registered females and Leto Farms, Frank Johnston, Montgomery, Ala., added an excellent set of bulls to his commercial operation. One hundred sixty buyers from across the U.S. plus Mexico and Canada bid actively from the seats and over the internet on this excellent offering to make it the best sale the GENETRUST group has had at Chimney Rock Cattle Co. bj

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 53


Sale Report Indian Nations Fall Sale

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rangus and cattle enthusiasts gathered in McAlester, Okla., November 3, 2012, for the Indian Nations Fall Sale. Dotson and Dean served as the sale’s managers and Wes Dotson of Enid, Okla., served as the

auctioneer. Twenty-five registered Brangus bulls grossed $60,400 for an average of $2,416. Nineteen total registered Brangus female lots grossed $23,320 for an average of $1,227. Six open lots brought $7,320 to average $1,220, 10 bred females brought $11,400 to average $1,140, and three pairs brought $4,600 for an average of $1,533. Commercial females lots were also sold bringing $10,175 for an average of $1,130. Of the nine total lots, four opens grossed $4,050 to average $1,012, and five bred lots grossed $6,125 to average $1,225. The high selling bull was lot five, Honey Creek Affirmed 47T sired by Suhn’s Affirmed 894R34. Ragan Cattle Company, Ralph

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Ragan, of Milburn, Okla., bought the range bull consigned by BMR Brangus of Burbank, Okla., for $5,200. Mr Townsend Billy 300/1, lot 26, was the second high selling bull. Sired by Morrisons Mr Geronimo 74, Reeves Cattle Company, Randy Reeves, in Pottsboro, Texas, bought the range bull consigned by Townsend Brangus of Milburn, Okla., for $3,900. Lot 35, GH Ms Right Direction 9X5, was the high selling female lot sired by MC Right Direction 392T and bred to GH Mr Pinnacle 196X9. Harold Davis of Porum, Okla., bought the bred heifer consigned by Grasshopper Hill Farms of Jones, Okla., for $1,800. The second high selling female of the day was lot 45, MS L Cindy 184S2 sired by Mr L Tyson 59 K and her November 1, 2012, bull calf at side sired by Brinks Sonar 302P58. Rafter MG Farms, Myles Galyon, in Bonham, Texas, bought the pair for $1,800 consigned by Labrada Brangus of Boswell, Okla. bj

Blackwater Cattle Company’s “The Cattlemen’s Kind” Annual Sale

lackwater Cattle Company hosted The Cattlemen’s Kind annual sale in Lake Park, Ga., November 10, 2012. Mike Coggins and his crew welcomed more than 165 buyers to this

year’s sale. There were 18 registered Brangus females that grossed $154,000 for an average of $8,556. This year’s bull offering included 94 spring bulls that averaged $6,941, and 85 fall yearling bulls averaged $7,227. Overall, 179 bulls grossed $1,266,800 for an average of $7,077. Lot four, BWCC Ms Righteous 000Z8, was the high selling female bought by Red Bird Meadows of Montgomery, Texas, for $20,500. BWCC Ms Nuff Said 487Y9 in lot three was the second high selling female of the day. She went to Haynes Farms of Ashland, Ala., for $20,000. The next high selling female was lot seven, MC Ms Quiet Lady 000S50 selected by Vanna Farms in Royston, Ga., for $17,000. BWCCA Ms Something Special 468Z in lot five was the fourth high selling female going to A V Brangus of McMinnville, Tenn., 54 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

for $14,500. Lot 65, MC Something Special 541Y20, topped out the bulls selling for $55,000 for 2/3 interest to new breeder Don Wallace of Tampa, Fla. The second high selling bull was lot 132, MC Flight Deck 111Y15. Half interest and half possession sold for $47,000 to JOJ Brangus of Tyler, Texas. Rounding out the bull selection as the third high selling bull was lot 45, MC Something Special 889Y2, who sold to Sexing Technologies of Navasota, Texas. bj


You can now watch these sale reports in video form. The Brangus Sale Report includes photos and/or visual highlights from the sales. Check out the sale report videos on the GoBrangus website at:

www.GoBrangus.com/videofeed. To get your sale reported, please download the sale report form at

http://gobrangus.com/brangus-publications/

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Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 55


Show results Southeast Regional Junior Brangus Show, Huge Success

by Tyler DEAN IBBA director of shows & youth Programs

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lot of time and effort paid off on Friday, September 28, 2012, as 15 junior Brangus exhibitors brought 45 head of Brangus cattle to Lake City, Fla., for the Southeast Regional Junior Brangus Show. Ten Brangus bulls, 30 Brangus females and five Brangus cow-calf pairs were brought before Judge Chris Hardee for evaluation. Hardee, who is from Chiefland, Fla., is no stranger to the Brangus breed. Hardee served as President of the IBBA in 1998-1999 and

brought his kids up through the Southeast Junior Association as well as the International Junior Association. As the 1997 IBBA Breeder of the Year and the 2011 IBBA Commercial Marketer of the Year, Hardee brought a unique perspective to the ring with his experience in all sectors of our association. Many thanks go out to the numerous sponsors and donors who made the show such a success. bj

Grand Champion Female

Grand Champion Bred & Owned Female

Grand Champion Cow-Calf Pair

Reserve Grand Female

Reserve Grand Bred & Owned Female

Reserve Grand Cow-Calf Pair

SK MS ODYSSEY 748Y QUINN CARTER, HAINES CITY, FL

AV MS NUFF SAID JOLENE 419Z2 TREVOR VAUGHN, SMITHVILLE, TN

LB SOUTHERN GRACE 78Y6 EMILY LETELIER, CITRA, FL

PT MS ROCKSTAR 137Z2 TREVOR VAUGHN, SMITHVILLE, TN

SK MS BARNEY 192X2 QUINN CARTER, HAINES CITY, FL

MARVEL’S MISS WINDY 2/10 KATELYNN BAYLES, ALACHUA, FL

Southeast Regional Junior Brangus Show

2012 Sponsors AV Brangus Custom Threadworks Greuel Family Brangus Marvel Farms Stacey Keene Ranch

Blackwater Cattle Co. D&S Farms Hayford Brangus McCreary Farms The Rock Ranch

56 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

Bosarge Family Brangus Draggin’ M Brangus L&W Cattle Co. Quail Creek Brangus Vanna Farms

Char-No Farms Green River Farm Little Creek Farms Spitzer Ranch


Grand Champion Bull

Reserve Grand Bull

L2C MR DURAMAX 636Y QUINN CARTER, HAINES CITY, FL

Junior Showmanship 1ST - DANA PATTERON

LB MR JOHNNY RINGO 78Y5 EMILY LETELIER, CITRA, FL

Intermediate Showmanship

1ST - TANNER BOSARGE; 2ND - QUINN CARTER

Southeast Regional Junior Brangus Show JUNIOR ATTENDEES

Senior Showmanship

1ST - EMILY LETELIER; 2ND - TREVOR VAUGHN

Feb. 25 – March 17, 2013

INTERNATIONAL BRANGUS SHOW

BULLS

FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 2013 | 2 P.M. RELIANT CENTER | MAIN ARENA

FEMALES

SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 | 10 A.M. RELIANT CENTER | MAIN ARENA

INTERNATIONAL BRANGUS CATTLE SALE

SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 | 7 P.M. RELIANT CENTER | EAST ARENA

Open Show Entry Deadline: Jan. 5, 2013 Late Entry Deadline: Feb. 15, 2013

livestock@rodeohouston.com 832.667.1000

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 57


Show results West Texas Fair and Rodeo Junior Brangus Show Results

by Tyler DEAN IBBA director of shows & youth Programs

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ine Texas Junior Brangus exhibitors brought 13 head of Brangus females to Abilene, Texas, on Friday, September 7, 2012, for the West Texas Fair and Rodeo Junior Brangus Show. Rising to the top to claim Grand Champion Heifer honors after winning the Summer Heifer Division was CK News Lady Elizabeth

exhibited by Rachel McConnell of Gilmer, Texas. The Reserve Grand Champion Heifer, GT Miss Hercules 804X, first won the Senior Heifer Division and was exhibited by Kourtney Gardner of China Springs, Texas. Third Best Heifer honors went to Ms Jewelz 81Z exhibited by Katlyn Gardner from China Springs, Texas. bj

Grand Champion Heifer & Summer Champion Heifer

Reserve Grand Champion Heifer & Senior Champion Heifer

CK NEWS LADY ELIZABETH Rachel McConnell, Gilmer, TX

GT MISS HERCULES 804X KOURTNERY GARDNER, CHINA SPRINGS, TX

Other Champions included: Reserve Junior Heifer Calf Champion A2K Ms Roxy 40Z exhibited by Kourtney Gardner Senior Heifer Calf Champion VRXP Ms Snowflake 1111Y exhibited by Victoria Parkey Reserve Senior Heifer Calf Champion DDD Miss Roxie 814Y exhibited by Claire Smart Reserve Summer Heifer Champion JBR Ms Brightside 08Y exhibited by Kolton Jacobs Junior Heifer Champion JCC Ms Jaycee 390Y3 exhibited by Katlyn Gardner Reserve Junior Heifer Champion Smart Designer 804Y3 exhibited by Claire Smart Reserve Senior Heifer Champion Farris Ms MDX 1916X exhibited by Leddy McBride

58 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal


show results Western National Brangus Show Champions Named

by Tyler DEAN IBBA director of shows & youth Programs

B

rangus exhibitors from Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas paraded 94 Brangus entries at the 2011 Western National Brangus Show Saturday, September 22. The show was held in conjunction with the State Fair of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City, Okla. A total of 58 Brangus females, two brangus pairs, and 34 Brangus bulls were exhibited. Judge Brandon Callis of College Station, Texas, evaluated the entries. Callis attended Connors State College, Texas A&M University, and Kansas State University. He was on the Livestock Judging Team at both previous colleges and broke the all time record in individual points at the 2004 American Royal while on the Texas A&M University Livestock Judging Team. Coming from the Senior Heifer Calf Division, DDD Ms Barbara 804Y61 took home the Grand Champion Female title. The November 8, 2011, female is a daughter of Doguet’s Hercules 88S3 and is owned and exhibited by Doguet’s Diamond D Ranch from McCoy, Texas. Reserve Champion Female title went to KK Miss Chardonnay 157Y4 exhibited by Katy Knox of Hempstead, Texas. The September 14, 2011, female also came from the Senior Heifer Calf Division and is a daughter of Brinks Tracker 392R26. KK Miss Sidda Lee 317X4 claimed Grand Champion Red Female. Owned and exhibited by Katy Knox of Hempstead, Texas, Sidda Lee is a November 10, 2010, daughter of Sureway’s Rocky Street 227N and initially won the Red Senior Heifer Division. Coming from the Red Junior Heifer Division, Miss -C- Dutchess 30Y took Reserve Grand Champion honors. The January 6, 2011, female is a daughter of R2 Extra Style 880P and was exhibited by Lauren Savoie, Jennings, La. In the Red Cow/Calf Show, Grand Champion Honors went to CX Ms Payload 59/X and her May 14, 2012, heifer calf, CX Ms Home Run 59/Z. Owned and exhibited by Cox Excalibur of Katy,

Texas, 59/X is a December 27, 2009, daughter of CX Payload 307/ L1. CX Ms Home Run 67/W and her July 10, 2012, bull calf, CX Mr. Red Chief 67/Z took Reserve Grand Champion Red Brangus Pair honors. The January 5, 2009, female is sired by CX Home Run 135/P and is also owned and exhibited by Cox Excalibur, Katy, Texas. Quality ran deep in the bull show, and emerging from the Junior Bull division, SCC Sampson 313Y rose to the top to claim Grand Champion Bull. The April 6, 2011, bull is a son of Doguet’s Hercules 88S3 and was exhibited by Triple Crown Ranch in Angleton, Texas. Doguet’s Dillinger 38X6 took Reserve Champion honors. Owned and exhibited by Doguet’s Diamond D Ranch of McCoy, Texas, Dillinger is a May 18, 2010, son of Doguet’s Hercules 88S3. Rising to the top of the red bulls, Trio’s Yucatan 175Y first won the Red Junior Bull division. The Grand Champion Red Brangus Bull is a January 17, 2011, son of Trio’s Sequoia 112S and was exhibited by Trio Cattle and Genetics, Dallas, Texas. Dos XX’s Destiny’s NumeroUno took home Reserve Grand Red Bull honors for exhibitor Dos XX’s Cattle Company of Washington, Texas. The November 11, 2011, bull is a son of Dos XX’s Stout’s Destiny and first won the Red Senior Bull Calf division. In the group classes, Dillard Land and Cattle, LLC exhibited the Champion Produce of Dam with sons of Ms JLS Revenue 630U. Skyhawks Brangus swept the remaining group classes in the black division exhibiting both the Champion Junior Get-ofSire and Champion Senior Get-of-Sire with progeny of Skyhawks Presidente and Champion Breeder’s Herd. Trio Cattle and Genetics exhibited progeny of III Miss Fancy 175/4 to claim Champion Red Produce of Dam. bj

Grand Champion Female & Champion Senior Heifer Calf

Reserve Grand Female & Reserve Champion Senior Heifer Calf

DDD MS BARBARA 804Y61 DOGUET DIAMOND D RANCH, MCCOY, TX

KK MISS CHARDONNAY 157Y4 KATY KNOX, HEMPSTEAD, TX

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 59


Grand Champion Red Female & Champion Red Senior Heifer KK MISS SIDDA LEE 317X4 KATY KNOX, HEMPSTEAD, TX

Reserve Grand Red Female & Champion Red Junior Heifer MISS -C- DUTCHESS 30 Y LAUREN SAVOIE, JENNINGS, LA

No Photo Available.

Grand Champion Red Cow-Calf Pair

Reserve Grand Red Cow- Calf Pair

Grand Champion Bull & Champion Junior Bull

Reserve Grand Bull & Champion Intermediate Senior Bull

Grand Champion Red Bull & Champion Red Junior Bull

Reserve Grand Red Bull & Champion Red Senior Bull Calf

CX MS PAYLOAD 59/X COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

SCC SAMPSON 313Y TRIPLE CROWN RANCH, ANGLETON, TX

TRIO’S YUCATAN 175Y TRIO CATTLE & GENETICS, LLC, DALLAS, TX

60 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

CX MS HOME RUN 67/W COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

DOGUETS DILLINGER 38X6 DOGUET DIAMOND D RANCH, MCCOY, TX

DOS XX’S DESTINY’S NUMEROUNO DOS XX’S CATTLE COMPANY, WASHINGTON, TX


Western National Divisions

Champion Junior Heifer Calf MISS JLS GRACE 915Z8 KATY KNOX, HEMPSTEAD, TX

Champion Red Junior Heifer Calf

CX MS HOME RUN 59/Z COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

Reserve Champion Red Junior Heifer Calf

Reserve Champion Red Senior Heifer Calf

Champion Summer Heifer

Reserve Champion Summer Heifer

TRIO’S YOLANDA 175Y TRIO CATTLE & GENETICS, LLC, DALLAS, TX

CK NEWS LADY ELIZABETH RACHEL MCCONNELL, GILMER, TX

Champion Red Summer Heifer

Reserve Champion Red Summer Heifer

BROKEN A ABIGAIL 114YÂ TRIO CATTLE & GENETICS, LLC, DALLAS, TX

TRIO’S YELENA 175Y3 TRIO CATTLE & GENETICS, LLC, DALLAS, TX

Reserve Champion Junior Heifer

Reserve Champion Red Junior Heifer

JOJ’S MS ONSTAR 801Y ELLIE JORGENSON, TYLER, TX

TRIO’S YASMINE 1114Y3 TRIO CATTLE & GENETICS, LLC, DALLAS, TX

MISS -C- MEOQUANNE 59Z LAUREN SAVOIE, JENNINGS, LA

DDD AMBROSIA 150Y10 DOGUET DIAMOND D RANCH, MCCOY, TX

Champion Junior Heifer

MISS JLS KATHERINE 767Y ELLIE JORGENSON, TYLER, TX

Champion Senior Heifer

MISS JLS PATRICIA 915X71 LAUREN SAVOIE, JENNINGS, LA

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 61


Western National Divisions

Reserve Champion Senior Heifer

Champion Junior Bull Calf

Champion Red Junior Bull Calf

GT MISS IRON FARM ROCKSTAR 331X4 BRAELYN BERLOWITZ, CUSHING, OK

JG MR. ON THE MONEY 3146 JACK T GORCZYCA IV, HARRAH, OK

CX MR HOME RUN 10/Z COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

Reserve Champion Red Junior Bull Calf CX MR. RED CHIEF 67/Z COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

Reserve Champion Senior Bull Calf

DCC MR PAYCHECK 630Y1 DILLARD LAND AND CATTLE LTD, KATY, TX

Reserve Champion Red Senior Bull Calf ROJO GRANDE’S RADICAL COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

Champion Summer Bull

Reserve Champion Summer Bull MR JLS RUDY 915Y47 TOBI PARROTT, MAMOU, LA

Reserve Champion Junior Bull

RCC PATRIOT 1252Y STEPHEN ROOP, GRAPEVINE, TX

SKYHAWKS BACHELOR SKYHAWK BRANGUS, TYLER, TX

NOT PICTURED: Reserve Champion Junior Heifer Calf RG MISS ONSTAR 99Z1 TANNER BANKS, LINCOLN, TX

Champion Red Senior Heifer Calf

DOS XX’S DESTINY’S RUBY DOS XX’S CATTLE COMPANY, WASHINGTON, TX

Champion Senior Bull Calf

SKYHAWKS FDR SKYHAWK BRANGUS, TYLER, TX

Reserve Champion Red Junior Bull CX MR RED CHIEF 67/Y COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

Reserve Champion Intermediate Senior Bull DCC MR PAYDAY 630X DILLARD LAND AND CATTLE LTD, KATY, TX

62 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

Champion Red Senior Bull

M4 ALADDIN LAUREN SAVOIE, JENNINGS, LA


show results Champions Named at Oklahoma State Fair Junior Show

by Tyler DEAN IBBA director of shows & youth Programs

W

hile Brangus exhibitors converged in Oklahoma City on Saturday, September 22, 2012, for the Western National Brangus Show, 18 hard-working junior exhibitors participated in the Oklahoma State Fair’s Junior Brangus Show. The Junior Show was open to all IJBBA members regardless of their home state. Twenty-six Brangus females were presented to Judge Cody Sankey of Lansing, Mich. Grand Champion Female and Champion Oklahoma Female honors went to GT Miss Iron Farm Rockstar 331X4, a September 23, 2010, female exhibited by Braelyn Berlowitz of Cushing, Okla. JG Ms 314 On Time took home multiple honors for exhibitor Thad Gorczyca of Harrah, Okla. The December 3, 2011, female was named the Reserve Grand Champion Female, the Reserve Oklahoma Champion Female, and Bred & Owned Champion

Female. The honor of Reserve Champion Bred & Owned Female went to CPPT Ms NeNe 2061. The September 22, 2011, female was bred, owned, and exhibited by Tatum Pritchard of McLoud, Okla. In the Red Brangus Junior Show, Broken A Abigail 114Y4, born June 26, 2011, took Grand Champion Red Female honors home for Audrey Acord of Madisonville, Texas. Lauren Savoie of Jennings, La., led her January 18, 2012, female, Miss -CMeoquanne 59Z, to the backdrop as Reserve Grand Red Brangus Female. bj

Grand Champion Female & Champion Oklahoma Heifer

Reserve Grand Female & Reserve Champion Oklahoma Heifer

Grand Champion Red Female

Reserve Grand Red Female

GT MISS IRON FARM ROCKSTAR 331X4 BRAELYN BERLOWITZ, CUSHING, OK

BROKEN A ABIGAIL 114YÂ AUDREY ACORD, MADISONVILLE, TX

JG MISS 314 ON TRACK 2145 THAD GORCZYCA, HARRAH, OK

MISS -C- MEOQUANNE 59Z LAUREN SAVOIE, JENNINGS, LA

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 63


Show results Champions Named at 2012 Brangus National Show of Merit

by Tyler DEAN IBBA director of shows & youth Programs

B

rangus exhibitors from six states including Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee and Texas brought 79 head of Brangus cattle to Shreveport, La., for the 2012 Brangus National Show of Merit on Saturday, November 3. Vice President of Vermeer Corporation Mark Core judged the event. Mark and his family also own and operate their own personal cattle operation, Core Farms, a purebred based cow/ calf operation focused on selling to and supporting junior heifer exhibitors. A graduate of Iowa State University, Core has judged shows across the nation on every level from local to national including Louisville, Denver, Houston, California and San Antonio. His most notable judging experience with the Brangus breed came in 2011 when he judged the National Junior Heifer and Cow/Calf Shows. Throughout the day, Core evaluated 45 Brangus females, two Brangus cow/calf pairs, and 31 Brangus bulls. Coming from the Summer Heifer Division, CK News Lady Elizabeth took the Grand Champion Female title home for Rachel McConnell of Gilmer, Texas. The June 24, 2011, female is a daughter of MC Onstar 924W4. Reserve Grand Champion Female honors went to Doguet’s Diamond D Ranch of McCoy, Texas. DDD Ms Barbara 804Y61 a November 8, 2010, daughter of Doguet’s Hercules 88S3, first captured the title of Champion Senior Heifer Calf. KK Miss Sidda Lee continued her showring success for Katy Knox of Hempstead, Texas, by being named the Grand Champion Red Female. Sidda Lee is a November 10, 2010, daughter of Sureway’s Rocky Street 227N and was first named Champion Red Senior Heifer. The Champion Red Summer Heifer Dos XX’s Miss Mercedes, was named the Reserve Grand Champion Red Female. Exhibited by Dos XX’s Cattle Company of Washington, Texas, Mercedes is a May 3, 2011, daughter of Dos XX’s Chief ’s Mr. Stretch.

CX Ms Payload 59/X and CX Ms Home Run 59/Z took Grand Champion honors in the Red Brangus Cow/Calf Pair Show. 59/X is a December 27, 2009, daughter of CX Payload 307/L1. 59/Z is a May 14, 2012, daughter of CX home Run 135/P. CX Ms Home Run 67/W and her July 10, 2012, bull calf, CX Mr. Red Chief 67/Z, returned to the backdrop as the Reserve Champion Red Cow/Calf Pair. The January 5, 2009, female is a daughter of CX Home Run 135/P. Cox Excalibur Brangus in Katy, Texas, owns and exhibited both pairs. After first winning the Champion Intermediate Senior Bull title, Doguet’s Dillinger 38X6 was named the Grand Champion Bull. Exhibited by Doguet’s Diamond D Ranch, of McCoy, Texas, Dillinger is a May 18, 2012, son of Doguet’s Hercules 88S3. Following closely behind, SCC Sampson 313Y, an April 6, 2011, son of Doguet’s Hercules 88S3, was named Reserve Grand Champion Bull after first winning the Junior Bull Division. Sampson was exhibited by Triple Crown Ranch of Angleton, Texas. Cox Excalibur Brangus of Katy, Texas, led CX Mr. Red Chief 67/Y to first capture the title of Champion Junior Bull and eventually the Grand Champion Red Bull title. The April 16, 2011, bull is a son of Mr. CR Red Chief 485/M1. Following from the same division, Trio’s Yucatan 175Y claimed Reserve Grand Champion honors for Trio Cattle and Genetics, Dallas, Texas. Born January 17, 2011, Yucatan is a son of Trios Sequoia 112S. Dillard Land and Cattle, LLC, exhibited two progeny of Miss JLS Revenue 630U to claim the Champion Produce of Dam title in the black division. Progeny of SBR Coal Train 222WR swept the Get of Sire classes winning both the Junior and Senior divisions for Sunnybrook Farms. Skyhawk Brangus won the final group class in the black division exhibiting four head to win the Champion Breeders Herd. Cox Excalibur Brangus exhibited two sons of CX Ms Home Run 67/W to win Champion Produce of Dam in the red division. bj

Grand Champion Female & Champion Summer Heifer

Reserve Grand Female & Champion Senior Heifer Calf

CK NEWS LADY ELIZABETH RACHEL MCCONNELL, GILMER, TX

64 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

DDD MS BARBARA 804Y61 DOGUET DIAMOND D RANCH, MCCOY, TX


Grand Champion Red Female & Champion Red Senior Heifer

Reserve Grand Red Female & Champion Red Summer Heifer

Grand Champion Red Cow-Calf Pair

Reserve Grand Red Cow-Calf Pair

Grand Champion Bull & Champion Intermediate Senior Bull

Reserve Grand Bull & Champion Junior Bull

Grand Champion Red Bull & Champion Red Junior Bull

Reserve Grand Red Bull & Reserve Red Junior Bull TRIO’S YUCATAN 175Y TRIO CATTLE & GENETICS, LLC, DALLAS, TX

KK MISS SIDDA LEE 317X4 KATY KNOX, HEMPSTEAD, TX

CX MS PAYLOAD 59/X COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

DOGUETS DILLINGER 38X6 DOGUET DIAMOND D RANCH, MCCOY, TX

CX MR RED CHIEF 67/Y COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

DOS XX’S MISS MERCEDES DOS XX’S CATTLE COMPANY, WASHINGTON, TX

CX MS HOME RUN 67/W COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

SCC SAMPSON 313Y TRIPLE CROWN RANCH, ANGLETON, TX

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 65


Show of Merit Divisions

Champion Junior Heifer Calf

Reserve Junior Heifer Calf

Champion Red Junior Heifer Calf

MISS JLS GRACE 915Z8 KATY KNOX, HEMPSTEAD, TX

CS BUNNY 99TZ AUSTIN WALDROP, JACKSON, MS

CX MS HOME RUN 59/Z COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

Reserve Red Junior Heifer Calf

Reserve Senior Heifer Calf

Champion Red Senior Heifer Calf

MISS -C- MEOQUANNE 59Z LAUREN SAVOIE, JENNINGS, LA

MC RONNI 244Y2 TRACI MIDDLETON, PURYEAR, TN

DOS XX’S DESTINY’S RUBY DOS XX’S CATTLE COMPANY, WASHINGTON, TX

Reserve Red Senior Heifer Calf

Reserve Summer Heifer

Reserve Red Summer Heifer

BUFFALOE’S MS GENE 265Y2 TOBI PARROTT, MAMOU, LA

MISS JLS KALI 915Y42 LAUREN SAVOIE, JENNINGS, LA

TRIO’S YELENA 175Y3 TRIO CATTLE & GENETICS, LLC, DALLAS, TX

Champion Junior Heifer

Reserve Junior Heifer

Champion Red Junior Heifer

MISS JLS ATALIE 915Y5 LAUREN SAVOIE, JENNINGS, LA

MS. DDR DIOR 915Y1 LAUREN SAVOIE, JENNINGS, LA

66 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

CX MS RED CHIEF 71/Y COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX


Show of Merit Divisions

Champion Senior Heifer

Reserve Senior Heifer MISS JLS ALICE 157X6 RYAN DANOS, IOWA, LA

SBR COAL MINE 129UZ SUNNYBROOK RANCH, JACKSON, MS

Reserve Junior Bull Calf

Champion Red Junior Bull Calf

Champion Senior Bull Calf

MISS JLS PATRICIA 915X71 LAUREN SAVOIE, JENNINGS, LA

SBR NIGHT TRAIN 781RZ SUNNYBROOK RANCH, JACKSON, MS

Reserve Senior Bull Calf

DCC MR PAYCHECK 630Y1 DILLARD LAND AND CATTLE LTD, KATY, TX

Reserve Summer Bull

MR JLS RUDY 915Y47 TOBI PARROTT, MAMOU, LA

Champion Junior Bull Calf

CX MR. RED CHIEF 67/Z COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

SKYHAWKS FDR SKYHAWK BRANGUS, TYLER, TX

Champion Red Senior Bull Calf

Champion Summer Bull

DOS XX’S DESTINY’S NUMEROUNO DOS XX’S CATTLE COMPANY, WASHINGTON, TX

RCC PATRIOT 1252Y STEPHEN ROOP, GRAPEVINE, TX

Reserve Junior Bull

Reserve Intermediate Senior Bull

SKYHAWKS BACHELOR SKYHAWK BRANGUS, TYLER, TX

DCC MR PAYDAY 630X DILLARD LAND AND CATTLE LTD, KATY, TX

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 67


Show results Louisiana State Fair Junior Brangus Show Results

by Tyler DEAN IBBA director of shows & youth Programs

O

n Friday, November 2, 1012, the day before the National Show of Merit, Junior Brangus Breeders from the state of Louisiana participated in the Louisiana State Fair Junior Brangus Show. Billy Wayne Key of Madisonville, Texas, judged the event. In total, junior members brought 33 Brangus females and 13 Brangus bulls before Key to be evaluated. In the female show, Miss JLS Patricia 915X71 rose to the top to claim the title of Grand Champion Female for Lauren Savoie of Jennings,

La. Lauren also exhibited the Reserve Grand Champion Female, Miss JLS Atalie 915Y5. Taylor Faul of Rayne, La., Exhibited Ms TF Natalie 468Z to claim the Grand Champion Louisiana Bred Female and Lauren Savoie captured Reserve Louisiana Bred Female with Ms DDR Dior 915Y1. In the bull show, Ashton Turner of Bernice, La., led MCC Blackjack to claim Grand Champion and Grand Champion Louisiana Bred Bull. From the same class and capturing Reserve Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion Louisiana Bred Bull was MCC Rocky 213Y exhibited by Michael Arnold of Pelican, La. bj

Grand Champion Female

Reserve Grand Female

MISS JLS PATRICIA 915X71 LAUREN SAVOIE, JENNINGS, LA

MISS JLS ATALIE 915Y5 LAUREN SAVOIE, JENNINGS, LA

Grand Champion Bull

Reserve Grand Bull

MCC BLACKJACK ASHLYN TURNER, BERNICE, LA

Reserve Red Junior Heifer

SENDERO STRETCH’S MISS 14Y3 DOS XX’S CATTLE COMPANY, WASHINGTON, TX

MCC ROCKY 213Y MICHAEL ARNOLD, PELICAN, LA

NOT PICTURED FROM SHOW OF MERIT DIVISIONS Reserve Red Junior Bull Calf CX MR HOME RUN 10/Z COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX

68 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

Reserve Red Senior Bull Calf

GGCC-ROJO RADICAL GRANDE COX EXCALIBUR BRANGUS, KATY, TX


brangus plus

B

CATTLE TRIVIA

RANGUS PLUS is back in the Brangus Journal. Each month we will have some fun facts, recipes, photo contests, trivia, and/or games. We would love to hear any ideas from our readers about future content for this page. If you have ideas or suggestions, send them to Tyler at tyler@int-brangus.org.

• The U.S. supplies 25% of the world’s beef with 10% of the world’s cattle. • 90% of American cow herds have fewer than 100 cows. The average cow herd size in the US is 44. • The average cow has more than 40,000 jaw movements per day. • Hamburger meat from 1 steer would equal 720 quarterpound hamburgers, enough for a family of 4 to enjoy hamburgers each day for nearly 6 months. • The oldest cow ever recorded was Big Bertha. She reached 48 in 1993. She also holds the record for producing 39 calves. • Cattle outnumber humans in 9 states: Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Oklahoma, and Wyoming. • Cattle chew their cud for up to 8 hours each day and they spend approximately six hours eating. • Cows came to America with the Pilgrims. They arrived in the Jamestown colony in 1611.

March PHOTO CONTEST

The theme for the March Photo Contest is:

“Brangus Kids”

Send us your best “Brangus Kids” photo! All submissions must include Brangus cattle, must include a caption of the photo subject(s), must include the photographers name, be a 4x6, 300 dpi jpeg, and must be submitted via electronic format to Tyler at tyler@int-brangus.org. Winning photo will be featured in the September/October issue of the Brangus Journal. All submissions become the property of IBBA and may be used in IBBA publications, online media, or marketing materials.

source: http://weirdfacts.com/animal-facts/3252-cow-facts.html

Custom Word Search Puzzle

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Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 69


State directory ALABAMA

FLORIDA ARKANSAS

Fred & Sharron McCreary 13465 Brooklyn Road Evergreen, AL 36401

Phone: 251.578.4750 Cell: 251.230.0276 Fax: 251.578.5831 Email us at: mccrearyfarms@hotmail.com Visit our website: www.mccrearyfarms.com

P.O. Box 365  Concord, AR 72523 870/668-3414  870/668-3329 Fax chimney-rock@att.net Bill Davis Ed Slisher, Manager Cell: 336/210-1222 Cell: 870/612-4117

13465 Brooklyn Rd. Evergreen, AL 36401

Sean Parker, President

ARIZONA

hOme OF Wr duKe 228F BRANGUS John and Sherry Milam 753 Hinson Road El Dorado, AR 71730 Grady Green, Registered Cowherd Manager 870-314-3673, grady@dragginmranch.com Danny Roberson, Commercial Cowherd Manager 870-310-8134 www.dragginmranch.com

CALIFORNIA

70 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

The largesT regisTered brangus breeder in america Matthew Lyle Wynne Ft. Pierce, Florida

Cell: (772) 201-7500 matthew@wynneranch.net www.wynneranch.com

GEORGIA


State directory GEORGIA

MISSOURI

OKLAHOMA

TEXAS NEW MEXICO Lack-Morrison Brangus Bulls, Females, Semen and Embryos

www.theoaksfarm.com

Cobus Coetzee, Farm Manager - 678-378-0598 Cell Dex King-Williams, Asst. Farm Manager - 678-378-4697 Cell

MISSISSIPPI

Bill Morrison 411 CR 10 Clovis, NM 88101 (575) 482-3254 (575) 760-7263 Cell bvmorrison@yucca.net

www.lackmorrisonbrangus.com

NORTH CAROLINA

5K Cowbelle Ranch Wyliss & Brenda Kemp 550 Hall Road Pontotoc, MS 38863 Home: (662)489-5335 Cell: (662) 488-1360 Fax: (662) 494-0491 www.5kcowbelleranch.com wylisskemp@aol.com

Registered Brangus Cattle

Joe Paul & Rosie Lack P.O. Box 274 Hatch, NM 87937 P (575) 267-1016 F (575) 267-1234

ROBERT YATES RANCH, LLC 1644 Swan Creek Rd. Hamptonville, NC 27020

Registered & Commercial Brangus Cattle Vigortone Ag Products

Owners Robert Yates Pete Peterson

Barn: 336/526-6087 Cell: 336/466-0115 dep1111@yahoo.com

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 71


State directory TEXAS

www.ironfarmcattle.com

(210) 218-4804

To place your ad in the State Directory, contact: Tyler Dean at 405.867.1421 or the IBBA office at 210.696.8231

72 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal


Services Lakin Oakley Auctioneer 7081 Highway 82 West DeKalb, Texas 75559 903/667-3251 Home 903/277-9610 Mobile

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To place your ad in the Services Directory, contact: Tyler Dean at 405.867.1421 or the IBBA office at 210.696.8231

Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 73


74 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal


Brangus Fit Both Environments...

...The Market and Your Operation From Florida swamps to the high country of Oregon... Arizona deserts to the fescue valleys of Virginia...

The Brangus crossbred mother cow produces quality end-product that meets industry demand while fitting your environment better than any other.

Contact IBBA Today for Marketing Options Brangus Gold Commercial Females OptimaxX Age/ Source PVP Feeder Cattle International Brangus Breeders Association

(210) 696-8231 www.GOBRanGUS.com Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 75


ADVERTISERSINDEX 5K Cowbelle

15, 71

Barnes Farms, LLC

11

Blackwater Cattle Co.

1, 70

Don Thomas & Sons

71

IJBBA Legacy Conference

17

Robert Yates Ranch LLC

Double Creek Brangus Ranch

72

Iron Farm Cattle Co.

72

Southeast Brangus Breeders

Draggin’ M Ranch

72

JLS International

72

Texas Connection

71

E Darby Farms

70

Lack-Morrison Brangus

71

The Oaks Farms

Caldwell Farms

70

El Rancho Espanol de Cuyama

70

Lakin Oakley

73

Triangle K Farms

Carter Brangus

70

Elgin Breeding Service

73

Lingg Brangus

72

Trio Cattle & Genetics

CattleMax

73

Farris Ranching Company

72

Livestock Photos by Nancy

73

Triple JR Cattle Co

Cavender Ranches

71

Genex Custom Collection Services

55

McCreary Farms

70

Westall Ranches, LLC

Centralized Ultrasound Processing

73

Greeley Hat Works

32

Mill Creek Land & Cattle

Char-No Farm

71

Greuel Family Brangus

71

MO Brangus

Chimney Rock Cattle Co.

70

Hardee Farms

70

Mound Creek Ranch

Circle X Land & Cattle Co.

IFC & 71

Hayman’s 711 Ranch

70

Multimin 90

Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo

57

Hughes Cattle Service

73

Cox Excalibur Deep Down Ranch Dillard Land & Cattle Ltd. Doak Lambert Doguet’s Diamond D Ranch

71 9

58 8

Vineyard Cattle Co., Inc.

72

Wendland Farms

10

43

Wes Dotson

73

Perry Ranch

71

Wynne Ranch

70

Quail Creek Brangus

70

Zottarelli Ranches

72

72

70

36, 75

Red Bird Meadows Ranch

73

IBBA Convention & Global Roundup

34-35

Ritchey Livestock ID

21

72 IBC

71

IBBA

IBBA & NCBA

71

Valley View Ranch

71

72 & BC

70 IBC

Burke Brangus Farm

5

71

Robbs Brangus

1

8 43, 70

CALENDAROFEVENTS December - 2012 1

3-4 6

March - 2013

GeneTrust at Cavender Ranch Registered Bull and Commercial Female Sale

Jacksonville, TX

Cain Cattle Company Brangus & Angus Female Dispersal

Pickens, MS

TBBA Bull Sale

1-2

IBBA Convention

Houston, TX

1

International Brangus Bull Show

Houston, TX

2

International Brangus Female Show

Houston, TX

2

Genetic Edge XVI Sale

Houston, TX

9

Indian Nations Spring Sale

Ada, OK

9

TBBA/ICA Spring Sale

Beaumont, TX

Marana, AZ

10

Houston Junior Brangus Show

Houston, TX

Fort Worth, TX

23

West Texas Brangus Breeders Association Springtime Sale

Abilene, TX

23

Miller Brangus Sale

Waynesboro, TN

25

Oklahoma Youth Expo Junior Brangus Show

Oklahoma City, OK

26

GeneTrust at Suhn Cattle Company Registered Bull Sale

Eureka, KS

30

Salacoa Valley Farms Sale

Fairmount, GA

San Saba, TX

January - 2013 25 26

Best in the West Brangus Sale Fort Worth Junior Brangus Show

February - 2013 6-9

NCBA Convention

Tampa, FL

7

Forida State Fair Junior Brangus Show

Tampa, FL

8

Florida State Fair Open Regional Brangus Show

Tampa, FL

10

San Antonio Open Regional Brangus Show

San Antonio, TX

11

Dixie National Regional Brangus Show

Jackson, MS

14

San Antonio Junior Brangus Show

San Antonio, TX

15

San Antonio Junior Red Brangus Show

San Antonio, TX

23

Spitzer Ranch Professional Cattlemen’s Brangus Bull Sale

Fair Play, SC

23

Spitzer Ranch Brangus Gold Customer Commercial Female Sale

Fair Play, SC

20th Anniversary Roswell Brangus Sale

Roswell, NM

26

27

GeneTrust at Cavender Ranch Registered Bull and Commercial Female Sale

Jacksonville, TX

May - 2013 10-11 “Backdrop Bound with the Banner” Online Sale June - 2013 19-22 TJBBA State Show

Brenham, TX

July - 2013

27-28 IBBA Convention

Houston, TX

28

Houston, TX

IBBA Global Round-Up

April - 2013

76 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal

14-19 National Junior Brangus Show

West Monroe, LA

18

“Source of Champions” Sale

West Monroe, LA

20

Brangus Futurity

West Monroe, LA


Brangus Journal november / december 2012 | 77


Thank You for a great sale!

71.5 Registered Bulls Averaged $3,955 and 40 Registered Females Averaged $4,774

Semen Available

'''+HUFXOHV<SXUFKDVHGIRUE\ )RHUVWHU6KRZ6WHHUV6DQ$QWRQLR7;6HPHQ6WUDZ

'''+HUFXOHV6 Semen $50/Straw

Elite Show Heifer Sale

April 13, 2013

at the ranch, Poteet, Texas Selling 12 Elite Show Heifer Prospects Also Selling 50 Units of DDD Out Cross 804T30 Annual Production Sale

October 19, 2013

www.aspenedgemarketing.com

at the ranch, Poteet, Texas

Mike and Lisa Doguet, Owners 0LNH&HOO0LNH2I¿FH 3RWHHW0F&R\/RFDWLRQV(ULF2WWR   %HDXPRQW/RFDWLRQ/HVOLH'RXJHW   *HQHWLFV&RQVXOWDQW7LPP\/XFKHUN   6HFUHWDU\&KDUOHHQ/RZDN   ZZZGRJXHWUDQFKFRP 0DUN&RZDQ_PDUNF#DPVFDWWOHFRP_ 7UH\.LUNSDWULFN_WUH\N#DPVFDWWOHFRP_ 5LFKDUG+RRG_ULFKDUGK#DPVFDWWOHFRP_ %UDG:ULJKW_EUDGZ#DPVFDWWOHFRP_ ZZZDPVFDWWOHFRP

78 | november / december 2012 Brangus Journal


BJ November/December 2012