Page 1

DECEMBER 2016 :: Year-End Issue


2 : : DECEMBER 2016


3


IBBA CONNECTION

BOARD OF DIRECTORS AREA 1 :: Chris Heptinstall BOARD MEMBER 205-363-0919 | chris@salacoavalleybrangus.com Term: 2016 - 2019

AREA 2 :: Bill Davis BOARD MEMBER 870-668-3414 :: bill@billdavistrucking.com Term: 2014 - 2017

AREA 3 :: Cody Gariss BOARD MEMBER 417-425-0368 :: cody_gariss88@hotmail.com Term: 2014 - 2017 AREA 4 :: Davy Sneed BOARD MEMBER 615-904-5850 :: dsfarms1980@gmail.com Term: 2015 - 2018

AREA 5 :: Mike Vorel PRESIDENT 405-826-6959 :: vorelfarms@gmail.com Term: 2016 - 2019

AREA 6 :: Carolyn Belden Carson BOARD MEMBER 530-713-5111 :: cbcbeef@gmail.com Term: 2015 - 2018

AREA 7 :: Michael Kammerer BOARD MEMBER 936-449-5744 :: jlkamm@earthlink.net Term: 2014 - 2017

AREA 7 :: Brandon Belt 1st VICE PRESIDENT 254-248-5260 :: brandonbelt@aol.com Term: 2015 - 2018

AREA 7 :: Lee Alford BOARD MEMBER 979-820-4205 :: alfordcattleco.lee3@yahoo.com Term: 2016 - 2019

AREA 8 :: Doyle Miller SECRETARY-TREASURER 615-351-2783 :: dmiller@doylemillercpa.com Term: 2015 - 2018 AREA 9 :: Steve Densmore BOARD MEMBER 979-450-0819 :: s.densmore@bre.com Term: 2016 - 2019

AREA 10 :: Troy Floyd BOARD MEMBER 575-734-7005 :: tfloyd@leaco.net Term: 2016 - 2019

AREA 11 :: Eddy Roberts BOARD MEMBER 386-935-1416 :: wetfarm1@windstream.net Term: 2014 - 2017

STAFF Executive Vice President Tommy Perkins, PhD., PAS tperkins@gobrangus.com 210-696-8231

Director of Registry Services Rosanne Nelson rnelson@gobrangus.com 210-696-8231 Product Manager Emilio Silvas esilvas@gobrangus.com 210-696-8231

Education and Data Coordinator Jenny Pieniazek jpieniazek@gobrangus.com 210-696-8231

Communications Coordinator Peyton Waldrip pwaldrip@gobrangus.com 830-708-3195 Field Services Representative Taylor Shackelford tshackelford@gobrangus.com 903-327-5759 Accountant Ingrid Duran iduran@gobrangus.com 210-696-8231

Member Services Representative Raime Preston rpreston@gobrangus.com 210-696-8231

Director of Shows and Youth Programs

CONTACT THE IBBA: P.O. BOX 809, ADKINS, TX 78101 (210) 696-8231 info@gobrangus.com 4 : : DECEMBER 2016

Tyler Dean tdean@gobrangus.com 405-207-6921

Advertising Sales Manager Melanie Fuller mfuller@gobrangus.com 979-255-3343


ABOUT THE BRANGUS JOURNAL The Brangus Journal is the official publication of the International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA). This internationally-distributed publication provides Brangus® seedstock producers and the IBBA membership with information about news within the association and the industry. The Brangus Journal is published eight times annually, and is designed to highlight accomplishments, advancements and improvements made possible by IBBA members, staff, volunteers, and other industry leaders. The purpose of the Brangus Journal is to serve the best interest of IBBA members by showcasing breeding programs, efforts and achievements to other Brangus® seedstock producers. Lastly, the Brangus Journal serves as an outlet for the IBBA to provide updates by directly communicating with the membership. BRANGUS PUBLICATIONS, INC. (BPI) 8870 US Highway 87 E, San Antonio, TX 78263 P. O. Box 809, Adkins, TX 78101 P: +1-210-696-8231 F: +1-210-696-8718 GoBrangus.com/brangus-publications bpi@gobrangus.com

Publication #ISSN0006-9132: Periodicals postage paid at San Antonio, Texas, and additional entries. Postmaster: Send address changes to Brangus Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 809, Adkins, TX 78101 Subscriptions: Ingrid Duran // iduran@gobrangus.com // +1-210-696-8231 Subscription Rates: Domestic Periodicals—1 year, $25; First Class—$55. Foreign Periodicals—1 year, $25; air mail to Mexico or Canada, $70; air mail to other countries, $115. The claims made by advertisers in this publication are not verified by BPI or the IBBA.

BPI Officers & Board of Directors Chairman: Mike Vorel President: Tommy Perkins, PhD., PAS Secretary/Treasurer: Doyle Miller Director: Brandon Belt Director: Eddy Roberts

IBBA CONNECTION President’s Message............................................................................................................................9 EXPERT CONNECTION Next Generation: When Push Comes To Shove.............................................................................9 IBBA CONNECTION Progression For Brangus..................................................................................................................10 IBBA CONNECTION An Update From The Field...............................................................................................................13 EXPERT CONNECTION The Dance Steps of Genomics (Continued).............................................................................14-16 MEMBER CONNECTION The Story of a “Texas Rancher Girl”.......................................................................................18-19 IBBA CONNECTION 2017 Annual Meeting & Convention.......................................................................................... 20-21 MEMBER CONNECTION Striving for Greatness..................................................................................................................22 MEMBER CONNECTION Reminder: Cast Your Vote...........................................................................................................23 IBBA CONNECTION 2016: A Year In Review...............................................................................................................24-25 MEMBER CONNECTION Nine In Five................................................................................................................................. 26 EXPERT CONNECTION Reproduction, Twinning and Genomics.................................................................................26-28 IBBA CONNECTION Genetic Evaluation Schedule........................................................................................................... 28 IBA CONNECTION Friends And Mentors For The Next Generation............................................................................... 30 IJBBA CONNECTION A Busy Year Brought Unprecedented Heights................................................................................31 IJBBA CONNECTION A Program With A Purpose.............................................................................................................32 SBBA CONNECTION SBBA Awards Ceremony................................................................................................................. 30 SHOW CONNECTION Southeast Regional Junior Brangus Show......................................................................................36 SHOW CONNECTION Arkansas State Fair..........................................................................................................................36 SHOW CONNECTION State Fair of Texas...........................................................................................................................37 SHOW CONNECTION Brangus National Show of Merit.....................................................................................................37 SHOW CONNECTION Greater Jacksonville Agricultural Fair........................................................................................... 38 SALE REPORTS.......................................................................................................................................................... 40-41 SERVICE DIRECTORY......................................................................................................................................................... 42 STATE DIRECTORY......................................................................................................................................................44-48 CALENDAR..................................................................................................................................................................... 49 ADVERTISER’S INDEX........................................................................................................................................................ 50

5


In this issue...

14-16 20-21 26-28

The Dance Steps of Genomics Part 2: Using Genomics In Your Herd, Jared Decker, PhD. IBBA’s 2017 Annual Meeting & Convention: Information, Registration, and More

Reproduction, Twinning and Genomics, Joe Paschal, PhD.

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 6 : : Vo l u m e 6 4 : : Is s u e 8 6 : : DECEMBER 2016


7


WE’VE MOVED! INTERNATIONAL BRANGUS BREEDERS ASSOCIATION HEADQUARTERS Our new physical location is:

8870 US Highway 87 E, San Antonio, TX 78263

Please make note of IBBA’s new mailing address:

P.O. Box 809, Adkins, TX 78101 Can’t wait to see the new building?

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

& HERITAGE INTERNATIONAL BRANGUS BREEDERS ASSOCIATION

2017

ANNUAL MEETING AND CONVENTION

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS, USA

IBBA’s Annual Meeting & Convention will be held Feb. 10-11, 2017 in San Antonio, Texas. Join us for the Grand Opening of the new IBBA Headquarters building. We can’t wait to celebrate the history and heritage of the Brangus cattleman with you! (See pages 20-21 for details)

@GoBrangus :: #GoBrangus :: #BuildWithBrangus

8 : : DECEMBER 2016

GoBrangus.com


President’s Message by IBBA Board President Mike Vorel In my search for informative articles I feel would be beneficial to our membership, I found this article by Jared Wareham. We can all do better by evaluating disposition as a selection tool we utilize daily. We can all try to make ourselves believe that calves will grow out of that nervous, fast-moving phase because a bull or female is phenotypically exceptional. One cannot assume the animal will be calm and easy-going just because they look good. It is only a dream, and sooner or later you have to wake up from that dream. Hopefully it’s not underneath that ideal-looking, exceptional animal as they run over you. I hope everyone enjoys the holidays and thinks often of the true meaning of Christmas.

New Generation: When push comes to shove

by Jared Wareham

Currently, a calf’s end product value resides atop the heap of highly marketed attributes. For good reason, both grade and yield significantly impact fed cattle values. Health, growth and maternal function fall a rung below on the marketing ladder, but find themselves equally, if not more, valuable to the ranch and vertical supply chain as end product. There is another trait, often overshadowed by those already mentioned, that continues to gain steam for its linkage to profit and successful ranching: disposition. This attribute can only be managed through human and animal interface. Disposition is rarely mentioned when listing factors essential to profitable beef production; yet, it always makes the short list of required attributes when I visit with cattlemen from coast to coast. Justifiably so, corrosive dispositions can be financially draining in a multitude of areas. Reduced economic efficiencies from poor gains at weaning and commingling come to mind first. However, there are other factors that can be slightly more abstract and di­fficult to quantify; yet collectively, these fractions of lost profits can be substantial. For example, do a rough estimate on a set of calves that shrink 5% more, require 15% more labor units, use 20% more time and exacerbate an already stressful work environment compared to more docile contemporaries. It quickly becomes apparent disposition has tangible value. Time and labor availability are significant factors to the operation of all businesses. We have all become victims of the rat race. We are forced to cram cattle work into odd pockets of time and stretch our man or labor units per cow to the thinnest of margins. This magnifies the case for convenient, reliable labor sources that can facilitate smooth and e­fficient cattle processing. Disposition of cattle can have additional impacts on the human element. Workplace safety and best practice animal

handling are becoming increasingly more important, both inside and outside of the industry. The average age of cattle ranchers is more than 50 years old, but seasonal help can widen that scope considerably. Working problem cattle at any age only leads to more problems. Just like calving ease, a quiet disposition has a greater value than ever before. Problem-free cattle, enriched with convenience production traits, are in high demand for all types of cattle producers. Learning to care for cattle through the management of a beef enterprise is an increasingly desirable way to raise a family. Non-traditional producers appreciate the multitude of teachable life skills it offers their children. The threat of injury to any member of the family unit is unacceptable. Therefore, untrustworthy cattle present a clear obstacle that has to be avoided. Quality control, or eliminating negative product attributes and magnifying positive customer outcomes, starts with the genetic supplier. Embracing the decision to take a loss on an animal to remove the chance someone else will inherit the problem takes a genuine, professional commitment to building a quality brand. That burden falls squarely on the shoulders of your genetics partner. Leverage this relationship to create value for your ranch. Initiate a best practice action plan to keep potential “lost liters” in your pocket by avoiding feed, time, labor and safety ine­fficiencies linked to disposition. This is your chance to capture value you alone can create through properly executed genetic strategies and marketing plans. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Jared Wareham belongs to a team of beef-industry specialists called Allied Genetic Resources. Allied assists seedstock and commercial producers with education and support in the areas of marketing, customer service, genetics and sale management. Reprinted with permission from Drovers. 9


PROGRESSION for Brangus

by IBBA Executive Vice President Tommy Perkins, Ph.D., PAS

The holiday season is in full swing, and I’m guessing you are spending a lot of time with family while eating and traveling more than most desire. It is a great time of year for both young and old alike as we celebrate the birth of Christ. Hopefully everyone carried out my suggestion last year to purchase any big ticket items for the family, farm or ranch when the cattle prices were high. I don’t see the prices improving any time in the near future. Therefore, everyone will need to find ways to cut costs in order to have a profitable cattle enterprise. It is good idea to be more ruthless with your culling criteria in the years ahead. Reports indicate that there has been a high level of replacement heifer retention the past two years, thus bulls will still be in demand. However, I highly recommend that everyone sharpens their knives and cull stringently on potential breeding bulls. These culled bulls can be great candidates for retained ownership to capture more information on the genetics of your herd. It is difficult to put a value on the knowledge to be gained from feeding these cattle. I fully believe the data collected for feed intake, marbling score, ribeye size, yield grade, and other traits should outweigh the risk you will be incurring.

“These culled bulls can be great candidates for retained ownership to capture more information on the genetics of your herd. It is difficult to put a value on the knowledge to be gained from feeding these cattle.” International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) just released the newest set of genomic-enhanced expected progeny differences (GE-EPDs) completed by Livestock Genetic Services. The latest run includes nearly 9,000 animals with single-nucleotide polymorphism, or SNP, data in the IBBA database. Members continue to be dedicated to submitting DNA samples for testing on the higher density (30,000 to 150,000) panels, which further improves the strength of the expected progeny differences (EPDs). Continue sending DNA samples for low-density testing 10 : : DECEMBER 2016

on your young, unproven cattle and high-density testing on your donor dams and artificial insemination sires. The increase in EPD accuracy, due to DNA testing, is proving to be a game changer when buyers make purchasing decisions. The IBBA staff is getting closer to being settled into the new IBBA headquarters building. I can’t thank the staff enough for the hard work and extra effort during the move. The new space is greatly appreciated, and we thank the board of directors for getting us to this point. Please make plans to attend the ribbon cutting and open house ceremonies on Feb. 10, 2017 during IBBA’s 2017 Annual Meeting and Convention. Plan on a fun and educational two days in San Antonio, Texas. Board of director election packets were mailed out to all paid IBBA members in early November to members living in the four regions open for election. The ballot includes names of eight dedicated members seeking positions in these four areas that are opening for election. Please cast your vote by marking, signing and submitting your completed ballot to the accounting firm of Akin, Doherty, Klein and Feuge, PC in San Antonio, Texas. Do not hesitate to call me if you have any specific questions about the new headquarters building, GE-EPDs or Brangus genetics. For information about IBBA programs or other inquiries, please call (210) 696-8231 or visit www. GoBrangus.com. Stay connected to IBBA through Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter and YouTube, or receive news updates by joining our email list.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Tommy Perkins, PhD. is a graduate of West Texas A&M University, where he was recognized as a Graduate of Distinction by the Department of Agriculture in 2014. He also earned his doctoral degree in Animal Breeding from Texas Tech University. He served as a professor at Missouri State University and Texas State University for nearly twenty years, where his professional career is most noted for excellence in the field of beef cattle ultrasound. Perkins was elected to the Beef Improvement Federation’s Board of Directors and, also, serves as chairman for the End Product committee. Additionally, Perkins currently serves on the board of directors for the United States Livestock Genetics Export Association, Texas Beef Council, Beef Promotion and Research Council of Texas, and the National Pedigreed Livestock Council. He was recently elected Beef Breeds Council President. Currently, Perkins is the Executive Vice President of IBBA, Chief Executive Officer of Genetic Performance Solutions, and President of Brangus Publications, Inc.


11


BRANGUS BUILT THE TAG THAT WORKS FOR YOU! Brangus Built is the ultimate commercial female tagging program. Brangus Built tags can raise your profit, set your commercial females apart from others on sale day, and add value to your commercial brand within the Brangus breed. Brangus Built tags come in the form of a Temple Tag or a Z-tag and must be ordered from the International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA). There is a unique identification number for ease of traceability, and space is allotted on the tag to allow for customization (i.e. private herd numbers). The cost of the tag is competitive, and adopting this tagging system adds value on sale day. Orders may be placed over the phone or online, at GoBrangus.com. For more information, contact the IBBA today.

INTERNATIONAL BRANGUS BREEDERS ASSOCIATION P.O. BOX 809, ADKINS, TX 78101 O: +1 (210) 696-8231 | F: +1 (210) 696-8718 INFO@GOBRANGUS.COM | GOBRANGUS.COM 12 : : DECEMBER 2016


An Update From The Field

by IBBA Field Service Representative Taylor Shackelford

I want to take a brief moment to introduce myself; my name is Taylor Shackelford. I joined the Brangus team to serve the members as the field services representative. I grew up on a predominantly Hereford and commercial cattle operation north of Dallas, Texas. I studied agricultural communications at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. I was a member of two national champion collegiate judging teams, completed a congressional internship in Washington, D.C., worked for university executive offices, and recruited full time for administration, athletics and admissions as a campus tour guide. I am grateful to have the opportunity to work for the International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA), and I am ecstatic to hit the road running. Literally, my job is to meet you wherever you are. The purpose of ranch visits is to share in your joys and successes of producing Brangus and to hear your frustrations enabling us to work together toward a solution. I am responsible, in tandem with Tommy Perkins, PhD., PAS, IBBA executive vice president, for IBBA’s presence at production sales, trade shows, and everywhere in between. I would like to thank those breeders, whom I have met, for welcoming me with the utmost cordiality and support. I won’t impose my cattle market philosophies on you; my intentions for our visits is to encourage progressive conversations. Obviously, we started 2016 with more favorable beef prices than today’s, and the experts and economists predict a two-year depression in the cattle market. Our friends in the corn and swine industries are experiencing similar woes. If we are likeminded, you understand this is the age for cohesion in agriculture. We need to build together, build with Brangus, to strengthen the nation’s cowherd again. Be proud of your products, because you created a standard all your own. Your successes did not appear overnight, and I want to hear your story. Tell me what makes your cattle grow, maintain energy, breed back efficiently, and ultimately hang on the rail with the highest quality.

Brangus offer allure in the show ring, but maintain the predetermination of a weather-tolerant, disease-resistant, high-performing beef breed. I aspire to see us uphold that tradition by pushing our best to better together. Observe the benefits of working in unity through participation in IBBA’s carcass merit program. It is crucial for us to develop predictable carcass standards in the Brangus breed. If you, or a cattleman or cattlewoman you know, might be who we are looking for, send a request for more information to tshackelford@gobrangus.com. In this uncertain cattle market, now is the time to hang on to your investment. Retain ownership of your steers and feeder heifers through slaughter, and help us to build our database toward the guaranteed premium your cattle deserve. Look for me at the next sale you attend; I can’t wait to meet you. I hope you’ll join us Feb. 10-11 in San Antonio, Texas for the 2017 Annual Meeting and Convention. The IBBA team can’t wait to show off our new headquarters. We are working diligently to develop a worthy, dynamic curriculum. We secured a venue that provides a vacationlike destination for the whole family. If you would like to schedule a ranch visit or contact me with any other questions, please email me.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: A native of Prosper, Texas, Taylor Shackelford joined International Brangus Breeders Association with much agricultural experience. He grew up showing beef cattle, participating in a number of leadership and career development events, and even served the Texas FFA Association as first vice president in 2012. Shackelford acquired many experiences during the last four years at Texas Tech University studying agricultural communications. His collegiate career consisted of a range of involvement in his department, his college, and the university as a whole. His resume includes: a student government campaign at Texas Tech; a semester-long congressional internship in Washington, D.C.; active involvement among the agricultural education and communications department, the agricultural college, and university-wide programs, including the chancellor’s and president’s offices; as well as participation on several national-champion judging teams.

“Morning Brew & Brangus Crew is meant to help make engaging our membership more dynamic. This interaction will be laid back, but without sacrificing the informative theme of an interview. When you attend agricultural conventions and meetings, follow the aroma of freshly-brewed coffee and the sound of forward-thinking cattle raisers to IBBA’s booth.” - Taylor Shackelford

COMING SOON TO A FACEBOOK-LIVE SCREEN NEAR YOU: 13


The Dance Steps of Genomics Part II: Using Genomics in Your Herd by Jared Decker, PhD., University of Missouri Extension Genomics: We hear this word frequently in the beef industry. But, how do we actually use this technology? More importantly, how do we use this technology to be more profitable? In “Part I: Understanding Genomic Prediction” we discussed how expected progeny differences (EPDs) and genomic-enhanced expected progeny differences (GE-EPDs) work, the benefit of increased precision with GE-EPDs, and that beef farmers and ranchers can trust this technology. In Part II, we will discuss the steps you can take to start using DNA technology and genomics in your herd in order to be more profitable.

blood cards can be seen as a long-term storage solution for DNA samples. Further, the processing of blood cards can be completely automated at DNA testing facilities. There are various resources available to describe how to take a high-quality DNA sample. For a start, see the “DNA Sample Collection” factsheet at eBEEF.org (http://articles. extension.org/pages/73198/dna-sample-collection#). As some simple rules of thumb, try to make sure that the DNA card is as clean as possible. Also, be sure not to reuse needles or scalpels between animals; we don’t want the DNA sample to contain DNA from multiple animals. Seedstock producers should consider collecting and storing a DNA sample for every animal in their herd. This can be a resource for future DNA testing.

DNA SAMPLES

One of the easiest ways to get started with DNA testing is to use bulls with GE-EPDs. I would encourage all producers to only use natural service sires who have GE-EPDs. The easiest way to accomplish this is to simply buy bulls with GE-EPDs. When buying a bull with GE-EPDs you are substantially reducing your risk of making a bad purchasing decision. The genomic test provides the same amount of information as

The most basic step in getting started with DNA testing is collecting a DNA sample. There are many different ways to send in a sample for DNA testing, including a semen straw, ear punch, such as the AllFlex Tissue Sampling Unit, tube of blood, or hair and blood cards. One of the nice features of hair or blood cards is that these samples can be stored at room temperature for decades. Thus, the hair or 14 : : DECEMBER NOVEMBER2016 2016

BULLS


15


dozens of calves, with data reported and analyzed, out of the bull. Think about purchasing a bull to use as a clean-up sire on heifers. We want to be quite certain this bull is a calving ease bull. No one wants to be pulling calves the calving season after the new bull is used. Genomic information increases the reliability of EPDs and reduces risk when purchasing bulls. But, what if you have already purchased the bull— should you have him DNA tested? I would argue even in this case that you should test the bull. Compared with a single cow, a single bull has a much larger influence on the genetics of a herd. Not only does a bull have dozens of calves each year, but in many situations he is the sire of the next generation of cows. By having a better picture of the bull’s genetic merit, we better understand the genetic merit of the calf crop and how they should be managed and marketed. By better understanding the bull’s genetics, we have a clearer understanding of the replacement female’s genetic profile and can select mates to complement her strengths and improve her weaknesses. Genomic information is only valuable if it is used to improve how we make a decision. Genomic testing allows us to use younger bulls with greater confidence, thus shortening the generation interval, or the average age of parents, and increasing the rate of genetic progress. When testing bulls, we need to use genomic information to decide what semen to purchase, what bull to buy, or how to manage a bull’s calf crop.

COWS AND HEIFERS

While I argue all herd bulls should be DNA tested, much more thought and consideration should be put into the decision to DNA test females. Consider mature cows. The investment has already been made to purchase or develop this female. Given adequate performance, she will probably stay in the herd the duration of her productive life to see the full return made on the investment in her. There is little economic incentive to DNA test this female, as there is not a decision to be made about whether to keep her. An exception to this suggestion would be if we are considering keeping one of her bull calves as a herd bull. Heifers are a completely different situation. With each heifer we raise, we have to decide if she will be developed to be a replacement female in our herd, sold as a breeding female in someone else’s herd, or sold as a feeder calf. In many commercial herds there is little-to-no information available to make this decision. In seedstock herds we have EPDs and indexes, but one of the main weaknesses of pedigree EPDs is that they are imprecise for young animals. Genomic testing can solve both of these situations as the genomic test provides more information for the selection decision. When DNA testing heifers, a plan must be developed to map how we will achieve a return on the investment in genomics. If the genomic testing does not influence a decision, it will be difficult to see a return on the investment. As a general rule of thumb, it is recommended to test twice as many heifers as you plan to keep. This allows the genomic 16 : : DECEMBER 2016

prediction to re-rank the heifers compared with traditional selection criteria. By putting selection pressure on both the bull and cow side of the pedigree, we can make more rapid selection progress. If we are selecting for profit using economic selection indexes, our herds will become more productive and profitable. For commercial producers, genomic testing of the heifer crop can be used to market the steer crop. If the entire heifer crop is genomic tested or if a random sample of the heifers are tested, then the average of the heifer crop equals the average of the steer crop. Thus, by testing the heifers, a commercial producer can know the steers’ propensity to gain and grade in the feedlot and on the rail. This information can then be used as a tool to market the steers. Testing the heifers can happen at different points in time, based on the preferences of the producer and the production system. Some producers favor collecting samples at tagging. Others collect samples at weaning. Still, others wait until they have identified which heifers are AI bred, and only test those heifers carrying an AI pregnancy.

CONCLUSIONS

GE-EPDs and genomic predictions are an exciting new technology. Producers can be fully confident that this technology works, especially within a breed association evaluation setting. But, as with any technology, producers should be thoughtful about how they will see a return on this investment. Investing in genomics will result in more rapid genetic progress if the genomic information is used for selection decisions. Investing in genomics may require different market strategies to see a full return on the investment. From only testing herd bulls to testing their entire calf crop, beef producers need to identify what level of adoption of genomic technology makes sense for their herd. As the beef industry continues to adopt this technology, we will see increased genetic improvement.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Jared Decker is an assistant professor in the University of Missouri Division of Animal Science and Beef Genetics Extension Specialist. Decker received his Bachelor of Science in Animal Science, with a minor in Biology, from New Mexico State University. He earned his doctorate at the University of Missouri in genetics, with a minor in Statistics. Decker grew up on a small farm in northwest New Mexico, where his family raises registered cattle. He now owns a small farm in central Missouri to teach his kids the value of hard work. Decker is working to help stakeholders in the beef industry better understand the rapidly changing genetic technologies. His research focuses on understanding the history of cattle breeds and improving the cost and accuracy of genomic tests. He is active on social media and his website A Steak in Genomics.


The Story of a “Texas Rancher Girl” by IBBA Communications Coordinator Peyton Waldrip

Linda Jordens Galayda passion for ranching culture was enstilled in her from a young age as she grew up on a ranch in Katy, Texas. Her story is a perfect example of someone having roots and wings. In addition to her love of ranching, she spent 30 years in the fashion merchandising industry in New York City, New York. She worked in New York fashion by week, and she worked on her family’s Texas ranch by weekend. “When your family is in the ranching business, it’s a part of your family and a part of who you are,” Galayda says, “I commuted back and forth so that I could still be a part of the ranch.” During her time in New York, she was surrounded by an audience that didn’t understand the world of food production. “The people I worked with had no real knowledge of where their food came from,” Galayda says, “Now it’s common knowledge, but a few years ago there were people who didn’t know at all what we did.” She explains that an individual in New York put things in perspective for her: “the only piece of property I own is a 12-foot by 12-foot balcony.” She spent her weekends on the ranch and then went back to New York to report on her activities. “People were in awe of the stories I would come back with,” Galayda explains.

“‘I wanted to tell that story; I wanted to tell the things that we do every day.’” There is no question about whether or not Galayda has real passion for her roots, which are connected to the Brangus breed. By 1997, Galayda’s father was in poor health. “In an effort to set us up well for the future, knowing himself that he’d be eventually not be present, he wanted to make sure we had something worthwhile,” Galayda explains, “so he got us into the Brangus business.” “He thought Brangus was the up-and-coming breed; he thought this was the direction we should go for the markets; he felt that for our environment that it was going to be the perfect herd; it was more inline, he felt like, for what our future was; and where we needed to be,” Galayda says of her forward-thinking father. “He thought we’d be positioned when something did happen,” she continues, “we could take over and run the ranch.” Today, Galayda still owns and operates the ranch she grew up on with her husband. Her operation consists of about 400 mother cows, including Brangus, Angus and Ultrablack breeds. “This year my calves off the Brangus cows have actually given me more pounds than some of my Angus production,” Galayda says of her operation. “These [Brangus] bulls that I have bought have really produced some phenomenal calves for us.” 18 : : DECEMBER 2016

While she was excited and ready to work on the ranch full-time, she continued seeking information. “It’s one thing when your dad is making the decisions and telling you what to do and another thing when you have to be the decision maker,” Galayda explains. “I went to a lot of different places and I talked to a lot of different breeders and economists and other experts; I got into some programs with Texas A&M.” She says she was told she could do anything when she was growing up, and with that precedent in mind she has found success in asserting herself as a woman in the cattle industry. Her 30-year experience in New York cultured her in a way that made her want to connect the two cultures to which she had become accustomed. “Knowing when I left New York that I had that insight that so many people didn’t know what [ranchers] do,” Galyada says, “I wanted to do something about it when I got back here; I started Texas Rancher Girl to tell people about what ranchers do.” “Texas Rancher Girl” is Galayda’s online blog, where she posts about everyday ranching operations. “With my background in marketing and the fact that I don’t mind speaking out and I’m very passionate about this ranch and industry and my cattle,” she explains, “I wanted to tell that story; I wanted to tell the things that we do every day.” Galayda has certainly found her industry niche online with her blog. She says the objective for the blog is to share, inspire and connect by sharing stories of everyday tasks and occurrences to inspire others to know what ranching is all about. Texas Rancher Girl features posts written by the rancher girl herself, links to articles from industry experts, links to resources and associations for multiple facets of the overarching industries, and more. She has set the site up to be a go-to resource for cattlemen, cattlewomen, and others interested in the industry. Because of the wealth of information she provides on the site, she has acquired an international following. All in all, Texas Rancher Girl is an outstanding resource for the modern-day cattleman and an outstanding source of advocacy for the Brangus breed. Galayda says: “It’s all about sharing our story and being able to tell people what we’re doing.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: IBBA Communications Coordinator Peyton Waldrip received a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Communications in 2015 and a Masters of Agribusiness in 2016, both from Texas Tech University. Her agricultural background comes from growing up on her family’s beef cattle operation, in New Braunfels, Texas. In college, she continued expanding and strengthening her passion for the industry through active involvement in a


variety of agricultural activities and organizations. Prior to joining the IBBA, Waldrip worked in communications, marketing, and event planning for one of the nation’s top chambers of commerce.

STRAIGHT FROM THE SITE: ABOUT The following is printed, in part, as published online at texasranchergirl.com:

“Maybe you’re thinking – well, I am not a rancher – this is not for me. From experience, I think ranchers are defined by a spirit within – an attitude that defies expectations. Ranchers are clearly independent. Ranchers are fearless – courageous – fiercely loyal – and completely trustworthy. We are passionate about God, our families, the land and the daily trails we ride where ever they lead us. We are always ready to extend a helping hand to a neighbor – mentor the next generation – ride beside a hurting friend and just listen. Hospitality is just part of who we are – you are always welcome at our chuck wagon or beside our campfire. Ranchers know no prejudice because the work can be difficult, dirty, hot, cold – teamwork is not a concept – it is a necessity. But know this – ranchers will speak their mind – and always in truth. Our word is our bond. So if any part of this definition strikes a chord in your heart of who you are – who you want to be…… then saddle up and ride with us on a trail to being all you really can be and are meant to be. My attitude about life – this cowgirl spirit – was formed in my childhood. No silver spoon here – we were hard-working, God-fearing people. My family farmed rice and raised cattle in Katy, Texas when Katy

career lead me into a fast paced world of fashion – many weeks of travel to New York – Paris – St. Tropez – London – Madrid – Athens – Tel Aviv – Cairo – just to name a few. Ranchers are quick to tell you that everyone puts their pants on the same way. So my Dad did not care who – what designer – dignitary – celebrity I had dined with. Nor did he care about the chic new restaurant or club we had dined in. Week-ends belonged to the ranch. There was hay to haul – pastures to mow – fences to mend – cows to work. So I spent Monday through Friday in a fast paced world of fashion but home was always back at the ranch. It certainly kept me grounded. I would go from whistling down cabs to whistling in my horses – skyscrapers to barns – executives to cowboys – delis and 4 star restaurants to campfires and chuck wagon cooking – drivers and limos to pick-up trucks and trailers – fast talk to slow talk – Broadway stars to star studded night skies at the ranch. ... So you see – each one of us has a story and that story is worth telling. Life is not for existing – life is for living – ALL OF IT – from our childhood to our aged years. That’s right – “aged” – because there is only

was a small farm town. Much of who we are – what we think – truly is built into us in those formative years. So I was privileged to grow up in a very loving home with very involved parents – very “hands on” if you catch my disciplinary drift. Trust me – my independent spirit started out at a very young age. My Dad would buy me horses and guns while my Mom insisted I go for piano and ballet lessons. There were not enough teachers or books on social charm and graces to convert me from my tomboy ways. I wanted to be a cowgirl. But the combination did teach me that I could be all that I wanted to be. I could be that cowgirl I wanted to be, but I needed to maintain my femininity. Until my Dad took his last breath, he would say – that reining me in was part of his life’s work. My endless energy and enthusiasm for adventure exhausted my Mother. But they loved me unconditionally. We didn’t live in a town or a neighborhood – we did live in a community of other farmers and ranchers. Ranch families have each other – food and a good cup of coffee, story-telling, laughter, hugs and kisses – the sharing of life – and lots of prayer. Our families love us – ground us – hold us – comfort us – laugh together – get mad – get sad – forgive – and teach those valuable life lessons. My Dad used to say “we were like homing pigeons – we kept the back door swinging.” It didn’t matter – good news – bad news – we were going home with it. Ranching families – your family – there is nothing more important. Cherish every moment of what really is important. As my story unfolds, you will see that my life went from herding cattle in Texas to herding “cats” in New York City. My

one alternative to growing old – so stop whimpering about it and just live every day positively with purpose and enthusiasm. Growing up on a ranch taught me so much about life – how to handle life and death – success and failure – wins and losses – getting what I wanted and the disappointment of not getting what I wanted. Better yet – it taught me that it was better to get what I needed which would eventually lead to strength of character – dignity – self-worth – value. There really is the rancher (cowgirl or cowboy) in all of us. I have some great stories – great life lessons to share with you. I know who you are – I know where you have been – I know where you want to go. I have traveled the road of board rooms – designer clothes – stiletto heels. But I have also lived on the trails of open pastures with cattle grazing – Wrangler jeans – and a comfortable pair of boots and spurs. Location does not matter. What matters my “co-hearts” is who we are – the lives we touch – how tall we sit in the saddle no matter the adversity. So ride with me for a spell (as the cowboys say). I know there is something inside your soul that wants to saddle up and join this ride of a lifetime. That’s what it is – life!! This is one story – one trail that you don’t want to miss.” Photos on this page provided by Texas Rancher Girl Facebook page.

19


Feb. 10-11, 2017, San Antonio, Texas

MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND

IBBA’s 2017 Annual Meeting & Convention Make plans to attend the International Brangus Breeders Association’s (IBBA) 2017 Annual Meeting and Convention on Feb. 10-11 in San Antonio, Texas. IBBA’s staff is working diligently to ensure a relevant program and a trip that will feel like vacation for the whole family. Come one; come all. There will be a grand opening ceremony for the new IBBA headquarters building, educational programs, breakout sessions with staff members, and more. Attending the convention should prove to be rewarding for all who make the trip. In addition to visiting the IBBA’s new location, we’ll also be spending time at the convention hotel, JW Marriott San Antonio Hill Country Resort and Spa. The JW Marriott offers a number of amenities, including but not limited to: a spa, an 18-hole TPC golf course, and a water park – not to worry, the pool is heated. Make this trip a family affair. We encourage Brangus showmen to participate in the Brangus show at the San Antonio Livestock Exposition. The timing is right for you to have your show stock at the fairgrounds and attend the Annual Meeting and Convention before Sunday show day. For those of you interested, don’t delay; entries are due Dec. 15. Visit sarodeo.com for more information. IBBA staff members can’t wait to celebrate the history and heritage of the Brangus breed and association with you. We have made plans for the convention with you and your families in mind, we hope you’ll even consider booking an extended stay in San Antonio, Texas, where there is rich history of the American cowboy.

REGISTRATION & RESERVATIONS

Annual Meeting and Convention registration and JW Marriott reservations have both been made available online for your convenience. Links to online registration and reservations are available at GoBrangus.com/2017convention/. The deadline to make your JW Marriott reservations and receive discounted the registration rate is Jan. 19, 2017. After Jan. 19, 2017, IBBA-blocked room 20 : : DECEMBER 2016

rates are not guaranteed. IBBA-blocked rooms will not be guaranteed after the cut-off date.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Friday, Feb. 10: Brangus Publications, Inc., Genetic Performance Solutions, and IBBA board members will gather for meetings. Convention attendees will hear from IBBA’s staff on data entry, DNA testing and requirements, registry, and marketing. Following morning sessions, convention go-ers are in for a special Brangus-tasting treat. The Texas Beef Council team will provide talent in a cooking classroom before the ribbon cutting for the new IBBA headquarters building. In the afternoon, participants will benefit from educational sessions before returning to JW Marriott for a casino-night fundraiser for the International Brangus Breeders Foundation. Saturday, Feb. 11: After breakfast with Morning Brew & the Brangus Crew, members will dive into the history and heritage of the Brangus breed and IBBA in the Annual Meeting. We will also explore the hope and promise of IBBA’s future as we celebrate outgoing and incoming committee and board persons. At the Awards Banquet, the Breeder of the Year, Commercial Producer of the Year, and Pioneer of the Year winners will be honored. If you want to know more about these awards or have a nominee for these awards, click here for more information. IBBA Executive Vice President Tommy Perkins, PhD., PAS will explain EPDs and the concept’s history and then explain how to the heritage of your herd through genomic data collection. Attendees will enjoy a free afternoon to explore the numerous family-friendly amenities JW Marriott offers. In the evening, we’ll partake in a “wildly adventurous” night at the Natural Bridge Wildlife Ranch. Sunday, Feb. 12: Convention attendees are encouraged to attend or participate in the Brangus show at the San Antonio Livestock Exposition.


For discounted rates, register before Jan. 19, 2017. After this date, rates will increase. A full registration includes access to all activities and events. For an individual or guest not participating in full, tickets may be purchased to attend Annual Meeting and the Awards Banquet. International Junior Brangus Breeders Association members may attend convention for free. However, tickets for Annual Meeting and the Awards Banquet must be purchased for junior members. The following form may be filled out and returned to the IBBA office (P.O. Box 809, Adkins, TX 78101). -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------DATE: _____/_____/_______ MEMBER NAME: ___________________________________________ MEMBER #: _________________________________ RANCH NAME: _________________________________________________________________________________________ PRIMARY MAILING ADDRESS: ___________________________________________________________________________ CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE: _________________________________________________________________________________ PHONE: ______________________________ EMAIL ADDRESS: ________________________________________________ _____ IBBA Member Registration ($125) _____ IBBA Convention Guest Registration ($100) _____ Annual Meeting Guest Ticket ($25) _____ Awards Banquet Guest Ticket ($60) _____ Annual Meeting Junior Ticket ($25) _____ Awards Banquet Junior Ticket ($50)

For those interested in contributing to the 2017 Annual Meeting & Convention through sponsorship: A full sponsorship guide can be found online at GoBrangus.com/2017-convention/. You may also write in a contribution amount on this form: __________________ Please indicate your preferred method of payment: _________________________________________________

TOTAL: $__________ PAYMENT INFORMATION (Indicate Method of Payment) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - CREDIT CARD (BELOW)

ENCLOSED CHECK

ENCLOSED CASH

CARD TYPE (VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN EXPRESS): _________________________________ CARD NUMBER: _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ EXP DATE: _____ _____ / _____ _____

SECURITY CODE: _____ _____ _____ _____

CARDHOLDER’S NAME: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ BILLING ADDRESS: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ AUTHORIZE TRANSACTION (SIGNATURE): ________________________________________________________ DATE: ____________________________

#BrangusCon17 We hope you are as excited as we are for 2017 Annual Meeting & Convention - this is a perfect opportunity to visit with your friends in the Brangus community. Connect with IBBA’s Annual Meeting & Convention online. Tell your friends about convention, and tell us what parts you’re excited about online. RSVP to our Facebook, and then invite your friends. The event hashtags are #BrangusCon17 and #HisAndHer (for history and heritage). Follow IBBA social media accounts for fun countdown announcements and more.

21


22 : : DECEMBER 2016


Cast Your Vote! There are open four positions on International Brangus Breeders Association’s (IBBA) Board of Directors. Ballots for this election were mailed to IBBA members on Nov. 10. Members in areas two, three, seven and 11 should complete the ballots and return them to Akin, Doherty, Klein & Feuge, P.C., 8610 N. New Braunfels, Suite 101, San Antonio, TX 78217. Your returned ballots must be postmarked by Dec. 31. Refer to last month’s Brangus Journal to review candidate biographies.

CANDIDATES: AREA 2 - Bill Davis AREA 3 - Vern Suhn AREA 7 - Danny Farris AREA 7 - Gina Gill AREA 7 - Doug Muenchow AREA 11 - Jarrod Creasy AREA 11 - Dan Marvel AREA 11 - Eddy Roberts

23


2016 A Year in Review Top 10 States by IBBA THR Assessments State Texas Florida Arkansas Alabama Oklahoma Mississippi Louisiana Georgia New Mexico Missouri

# on THR 16333 3703 2585 2533 2379 2321 2043 1586 1124 929

Member WYNNE RANCH SANTA ROSA RANCH BRINKS BRANGUS CATTLE @ WESTALL RANCHES, LLC SALACOA VALLEY FARMS DRAGGIN' M RANCH THE BRANCH RANCH CAVENDER BRANGUS CHIMNEY ROCK CATTLE COMPANY BLACKWATER CATTLE COMPANY TOWN CREEK FARM

Top 10 States for Membership

Senior Members State Texas Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Oklahoma Georgia Arkansas Missouri Tennessee

24 : : DECEMBER 2016

# 507 81 74 72 61 60 39 37 32 25

# on THR 897 795 740 595 497 481 462 455 403 390

Top 10 States for Transfers

Junior Members State Texas Louisiana Florida Mississippi Oklahoma Arkansas Missouri Alabama Georgia Kansas

Top 10 IBBA Members by THR Assessments

# 310 53 44 30 25 18 16 11 3 3

Bull Transfers State Texas Florida Mississippi Alabama Oklahoma Arkansas Louisiana Georgia New Mexico Arizona

# 1297 520 226 211 200 180 176 97 76 70

Female Transfers State Texas Alabama Florida Mississippi Louisiana Arkansas Oklahoma Tennessee Georgia Missouri

# 1307 287 256 144 139 121 105 75 66 38


2016: A Year In Review Top 10 States for Data Reporting

Weaning Data State Texas Florida Arkansas Alabama Mississippi Louisiana Georgia Oklahoma Tennessee Missouri

# 6047 1207 1123 952 932 895 848 754 434 394

Yearling Data State Texas Florida Georgia Arkansas Mississippi Alabama Louisiana Oklahoma Tennessee New Mexico

Ultrasound Data

# 3326 764 637 581 506 457 416 403 262 256

State Texas Georgia Florida Arkansas Mississippi Alabama Kansas New Mexico Tennessee Oklahoma

# 2236 640 609 529 432 373 242 232 223 211

DATA REPORTING :: There is real value in thorough and accurate data reporting. The benefactors of the value reaped from complete data reporting are the breeder and the breed as a whole. The more we know, the more we know. When we have more information on registered animals, the genomic evaluations for animals are more credible because the analysis becomes more accurate, too. Thorough recordkeeping is key in successful herd management. For more information about data reporting, contact the IBBA (210-696-8231, info@gobrangus.com). We are happy to help you in person, through email, or over the phone.

25 Most Used Bulls (Based on Calves Recorded in 2016) Rank Calves

Reg No

Name

CED

BW

WW

YW

Milk

TM

CEM

SC

REA

IMF

FAT

1

360

R10244716

TJM THREE D 302A

4.0279

0.51488

39.148

69.499

8.8813

28.46

4.479

0.5285

0.41057

-0.08075

-0.05308

2

148

R10216038

CB PASSPORT 803Y11

1.538

2.8626

30.454

49.198

8.102

23.33

4.446

0.6823

0.33707

0.034444

-0.03176

3

146

R10204856 NEW VISION OF SALACOA 209Y2

3.5785

1.26489

22.467

44.905

7.2444

18.48

4.037

0.8567

0.67551

-0.03831

-0.03466

4

139

R10150860

STONEWALL OF RRR 222W6

5.2336

-0.32487

20.818

39.464

14.949

25.36

4.863

0.9136

0.65888

0.049246

-0.02658

5

113

R10239893

CB TRADITION 63A

4.8298

0.43432

32.022

58.674

11.177

27.19

4.341

1.0095

0.53153

0.009784

-0.02637

6

105

R10210625

ATLANTA OF SALACOA 488Z

4.9328

-0.2595

29.338

55.078

10.949

25.62

4.691

0.6073

0.59289

0.171387

-0.04424

7

90

R10227112

SUHN'S FOUNDATION 331Z28

0.6425

3.78515

44.418

79.423

8.3955

30.6

4.02

0.6926

0.64646

-0.12042

-0.03446

8

80

R10009407

TCB CATAWBA WARRIOR R532

5.2019

-1.00642

32.437

71.716

24.501

40.72

2.196

1.3416

0.79372

0.021075

-0.01353

9

71

R10193636

VF-OAKS ONLINE 918Y3

4.4512

0.95808

27.436

46.894

-1.15

12.57

4.695

1.6168

0.512

-0.02491

-0.04514

10

67

R10122023

CRC GUARDIAN 9U8U5

3.5363

2.11816

30.704

55.685

9.5356

24.89

6.586

1.5488

0.49389

0.139543

-0.06213

11

65

UB10275960

MC GRANITE 834B

6.9781

-0.02575

38.989

76.297

15.738

35.23

3.731

0.4296

0.85127

0.156901

-0.007

12

58

R10025207

SKYHAWKS PRESIDENTE

4.2637

0.41944

35.579

56.146

7.4213

25.21

3.98

0.2384

0.46966

-0.10147

-0.03729

13

56

3.3421

1.56364

30.427

55.789

6.3801

21.59

4.165

1.0639

0.69314

0.083682

-0.04123

14

52

UB10252952

SF BENCHMARK 535A74

4.1453

0.45149

32.837

64.104

9.2968

25.72

2.947

0.9365

0.59948

0.06292

-0.03652

15

49

R10084480

CCR INTEGRITY 355S4

7.5161

-2.18772

-5.518

-13.04

13.1

10.34

4.225

0.9895

-0.08873

-0.01031

-0.02765

16

49

R10201653

MC GAME CHANGER 127Y42

-0.276

4.80705

45.705

94.111

13.1

35.95

4.844

1.0265

0.84351

0.384575

-0.018

17

47

R10174448

BRB RAPIDREWARD 99W11

1.3058

2.40519

39.618

77.407

7.9732

27.78

4.752

0.8182

0.90091

0.050483

-0.02945

18

47

R10203561

SRR TAILOR MADE 361Y12

0.8987

4.46139

23.188

34.668

8.7838

20.38

3.951

0.8591

0.4368

0.171434

-0.02447

19

46

R10189274

CRC LANDAU 263X2

3.9194

1.61631

31.284

68.214

12.067

27.71

4.507

1.4654

0.59172

-0.12609

-0.03268

20

46

RR10235456

CX DREAM FOREVER 365/A

2.6059

1.52853

20.538

29.714

9.9926

20.26

4.072

0.2147

0.10821

0.022726

-0.04484

21

44

UB10278236

MC CRUSH 675B

-0.3124

5.06222

51.761

102.62

11.113

36.99

5.165

0.9604

1.03597

0.189797

-0.00996

R10251840 HOLLYWOOD OF SALACOA 23A53

22

43

R10099462

DDD OUT CROSS 804T30

2.1871

3.61449

48.982

72.87

2.0852

26.58

5.715

0.5329

0.43501

-0.12673

-0.03856

23

42

R10243006

TCF RAPIDREWARD 145Z3

1.1666

2.99754

30.16

54.924

9.0985

24.18

4.272

0.6893

0.57385

-0.00917

-0.03788

24

42

R10243314

JAK DIMENSION 98A

2.3357

1.84044

28.537

57.733

13.61

27.88

4.11

0.9338

0.32142

-0.03433

-0.04719

25

42

R10254680

DMR "THE CHAIRMAN" 415A11

4.2431

0.85015

26.084

42.438

9.7751

22.82

3.869

0.5107

0.41243

0.008811

-0.04935

25


Nine In Five by IBBA Communications Coordinator Peyton Waldrip IBBA member Clarence Tays births were unassisted; and all of the calves have survived,” is a Brangus breeder in Cookeville, Tays says. “The cow is the product of a Salacoa Valley bull Tennessee. An Ultrablack® female and a female from my operation.” named MISS LOF The first two sets of twins consisted of 144, or “Lollipop,” a bull and a heifer. The single birth was a was born into bull. Two heifers came from the fourth his herd on Aug. pregnancy, and the last set was a bull and 30, 2009. After Tays’s granddaughter, a heifer. Elizabeth, showed the heifer in 2010, Randolph says he tries hard to the female was sold to a neighbor: Randy practice good feed management and Randolph. herd management to make his operation Randolph is a commercial producer successful. He has participated in of Angus and Ultrablack® cattle. He says management classes when they are offered, MISS LOF 144 was two years old when he and he says he encourages other cattlemen bred her for the first time. “She was on a lot to participate, too. of feed and not a lot grass and she didn’t After hearing this story of a female breed the first year,” Randolph explains. producing nine calves in five years, we With the first breeding attempt behind asked Joe Paschal, PhD., to weigh in on her, MISS LOF 144 went on to have twins in the subject. For more information on 2011, twins in 2012, a single birth in 2013, reproduction and its heritability, continue twins in 2014, and twins in 2015 for a grand reading in the following article, entitled, total of nine calves in five years. “Reproduction, Twinning and Genomics.” Photo of MISS LOF 144 provided by “She hasn’t had hormones; her calves Elizabeth Dodson. have all been naturally-sired; all of the

Reproduction, Twinning and Genomics

by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Livestock Specialist Joe C. Paschal, PhD.

Reproduction in cattle is generally thought to be lowly heritable (0.10-0.20 percent), and as a result selection response is low. Regardless of what reproductive trait is being selected, there is not a lot of variability in breeding value from which to select. These reproductive traits include: age at first estrus, or ovulation, pregnancy or calving; reproductive tract score, an indicator of fertility; calving interval, one of my favorites; number of calves born in a lifetime, a useful measure if the time is a reasonable one. The added fact that the generation in cattle is between four and five years, which is the average length of time it takes for animals to be produced and then be replaced by their offspring. It is wonderful to find old cows that have produced a calf every year of their productive life. Although I would prefer single births, some cows make up the difference with a set, or two, of twins as in the case of MISS LOF 144. Calved in 2009, she apparently didn’t breed on time but still had twins in 2011, again in 2012, a bull calf in 2013, and 26 : : DECEMBER 2016

twins in 2014 and again in 2015. An amazing feat. Twinning in Bos taurus beef cattle accounts for around 1 percent of all calvings. In Bos indicus the rate is about 0.5 percent; while in dairy it is much higher: 4 to 5 percent, one source reported 8 percent. Twins were, and sometimes still are, sought as a method to improve the level of efficiency of beef production even though they are lighter individually at birth and at weaning their combined weight nearly doubles the weaning weight of singles. The U.S. Meat Animal Research Center has studied twins for many years and even successfully selected to increase twinning rate. However, twins are not produced without costs. Even naturally-occurring ones can cause calving difficulties and reproductive tract damage that decreases return to estrus and rebreeding pregnancy percentages, delaying the next calf crop. At worst, calving difficulties can cause the loss of the cow and calf. Usually one twin is larger than the other, and sometimes a cow will deliver her first calf and then walk away from it when she delivers her second, abandoning the first.


27


Twins actually come in two genetic types, identical and fraternal. Identical twins occur when the fertilized egg divides completely into two, instead of just dividing to increase the number of cells in the growing embryo, and makes a second viable embryo. This embryo is genetically identical to the first and both calves will be the same sex. The calves can still have some phenotypic differences in growth and markings, but usually these are minor. The second type of twin is called a fraternal twin, because it is produced from a separate egg ovulated about the same time as the first. Cows usually ovulate one egg, but as they get older and in the fall months they may ovulate more than one egg at a time under natural conditions. Both eggs are viable and can be fertilized but, in reality, not many are. If both eggs are of the same gender, then the twins are normal when calved. However, if the twins were fertilized by sperm cells carrying different X and Y chromosomes, then one calf would be a heifer (XX, the egg only has an X chromosome) and the other, getting its Y from the sperm cell, is a bull (XY). At least three sets of MISS LOF 144’s twins were this type. During development of these twins of different sex, the male fetus develops more rapidly and secretes a hormone that suppresses the sex organ development of the heifer fetus, creating an infertile female. This occurs about 90 percent of the time; in the other 10 percent, normal development occurs. Interestingly enough, there actually may be more freemartins than thought as often the twin is lost or absorbed early in the pregnancy. If the twin was a male fetus and the female survived to calving it could explain infertility in some heifers, perhaps those with infertile or small reproductive tracts. Females born to males can be tested to determine if they are freemartins with one of several commercial genomic tests, usually by looking for Y chromosomes in cells. Freemartins usually have very small and misshaped vulvas that have tufts of hair in addition to infertile reproductive tracts; but a genomic test is best to determine true freemartinism.

Researchers have been looking for genes that control fertility expression and timing. A least one gene has been identified by Australian researchers on chromosome 6 in the Booroola Merino sheep. One copy of the gene results in an additional lamb per gestation. Researchers have identified several markers in swine and at least six markers have been identified in cattle as being associated with fertility, particularly ovulation rate. A very promising one is located on chromosome 10, but none are commercially available yet for cattle. Fertility is still a trait we have to manage by providing an optimal environment, selecting heifers that express estrus early and attain 60-65 percent of their body weight by around 14 months of age, and selecting cows that breed and rebreed early and within a 12-month period. Fertility can also be selected by culling infertile or subfertile heifers and bulls based on reproductive tract scores in heifers and breeding soundness examinations in bulls.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Joe C. Paschal, PhD. is the Texas AgriLife Extension Livestock Specialist stationed at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Corpus Christi serving 37 counties in Extension districts 11 and 12. Paschal is a member of the animal breeding and genetics section in the Department of Animal Science and of the graduate faculty at Texas A&M University. He is also an external professor at Texas A&M University-Kingsville. He earned both his bachelor of science and master of science in animal science and his doctorate in animal breeding from Texas A&M University. Paschal assists county extension agents in conducting, developing and evaluating educational and applied research activities in livestock in Extension districts 11 and 12 in South Texas. His work and interests include animal breeding and genetics, reproduction, nutrition, management and marketing. “ABOUT THE AUTHOR” PROVIDED BY TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY’S WEBSITE.

GENETIC EVALUATION SCHEDULE The International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA)’s Board of Directors has approved the following schedule for annual genomic analyses. To be eligible for genetic merit recognition, members should ensure complete records with the most current information. All data should entered into the portal by the 10th of each month, preceding the GE-EPD release. It is also highly recommended that DNA samples are submitted well in advance of the data deadline, as it takes about 30 days to get the results once a sample is received in the genomics company lab. DNA submitted in a timely fashion, with results being received prior to the data entry deadline, will be included in the given genomic analysis. For more information, please contact the IBBA by phone (210-696-8231) or email (info@gobrangus.com). EPD RELEASE DATE February 1

28 : : DECEMBER 2016

DATA ENTRY DEADLINE January 10

May 1

April 10

September 1

August 10

December 1

November 10


Introducing

y c a Leg Female The 2017 IJBBA

offered by: JLS International

miss jls CLASSY 915d44 May 10, 2016 R10331130 Sire: Mr JLS My Way 767A6 Dam: Miss New Transformer 915R

JLS INTERNATIONAL Jeff Smith, Alabama (251) 947-5688 Myron Saathoff, Texas (210) 218-4804 www.jlsbrangus.com

She sells MARCH 2017 in Houston, TX! Watch the Brangus Journal and the IJBBA Facebook Page for more information!

T

he IJBBA is excited to introduce the 2016 Legacy Female. Designed to help fund the IJBBA Legacy Leadership Conference, the IJBBA Board of Directors, and the National Junior Brangus Show as well as build upon the legacy of proven Brangus leaders that the IJBBA is known to produce. This year’s Legacy Female comes from JLS International, a program who knows extremely well the benefits and value of the junior association. JLS understands that the juniors ARE the future of the Brangus breed and gladly, without a moment’s hesitation, accepted the opportunity to donate the 2017 female. Furthermore, they gave one of their absolute best! 2017 marks the third consecutive year that the IJBBA Legacy Female has been a descendent of the iconic ER Lady XS 915/C. Very few cows have had such an impact on the Brangus breed, the JLS program or the Brangus show ring as 915/C. 915/C will certainly have an impact on the IJBBA as her descendants have already raised $83,500 for them! Classy epitomizes the JLS breeding program and is a solid statement to the type and kind of cattle that keeps Myron and JLS International returning to the picture backdrop and stacking up IBBA Show Animal of the Year trophies. Incredibly feminine fronted, deep made, strong topped and beautifully built, she will make a powerful addition to anyone’s show string and/or breeding program, but will undoubtedly find her way to someone’s donor pen! You are invited to participate in a group effort to purchase this female. For more information, please contact Tyler Dean (405)867-1421. All proceeds go to benefit the Brangus juniors! Don’t miss this unique opportunity that supports a great cause. We’ll see you in Houston! 29


Friends And Mentors For The Next Generation

by Kay Gibson

Throughout each year, members of the International Brangus Auxiliary (IBA) have the awesome responsibility of devoting our time and energy to a worthy group of young people within the International Junior Brangus Breeders Association (IJBBA). IBA is made up of dedicated individuals whose sole purpose is to further the education of our next generation of junior Brangus members and to support them throughout the year at various events. Qualified high school seniors and college undergraduates, who are members of IJBBA, are presented scholarships each year to help further their own education. Often times this money is given in memory of someone who came before preceded them, individuals who dedicated their livelihood to raising Brangus cattle and wanted the next generation to be able to pursue their dream as well.

Expanding the IBA membership is an ongoing goal for each of us. Please join us in not only becoming a member, but also in attending the two IBA meetings that are held annually in conjunction with the IBBA Convention and the IJBBA Convention. As a member of International Brangus Breeders Association, your input and experience is invaluable to the IBA organization, but more importantly to our juniors. Please consider taking the next step, and join IBA as we celebrate our 40th Anniversary. We encourage you to be a part of an organization that supports such a fine group of young people.

JOIN THE IBA TODAY!

30 : : DECEMBER 2016


A Busy Year Brought Unprecedented Heights by IJBBA Vice-President Dana Patterson As I sit here, looking back at what a great year the International Junior Brangus Breeders Association (IJBBA) has had, I cannot help but realize how blessed I am to be a part of it. 2016 has certainly been a busy year for our breed. Our first major events of the year were the International Brangus Show and IBBA’s Annual Meeting and Convention held in conjunction with the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. Traveling to Houston gives IJBBA directors the opportunity to interact with breeders, participate in committee meetings, and really see exactly what powers our association. Attending Houston allowed me to get to know individuals who raise Brangus cattle across the nation. I thoroughly enjoyed having the opportunity to speak with members of the International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) and hearing their thoughts and ideas about how our association is doing and what could make it even better. Sitting in IBBA committee meetings was an eye-opening experience, because I had no idea how much work and planning went into making the IBBA and IJBBA successful. The IJBBA relies solely on donations and sponsorships to fund activities throughout the year. Houston brought our first major fundraising campaign: the IJBBA Legacy Female. The 2016 IJBBA Legacy Female was graciously donated by Diamond K Ranch of Hempstead, Texas. With the help of generous breeders and businesses, the IJBBA was able to raise a record-breaking $42,000. The IJBBA Legacy Female is the biggest source of funding and helps support junior activities throughout the year. The National Junior Brangus Show (NJBS) was held in Hattiesburg, Mississippi this year. NJBS is my favorite event that IJBBA offers annually, and I look forward to it all year. NJBS 2016 had a safari theme and some of the events throughout the week included a visit from the Hattiesburg Zoo, a wide range of contests for exhibitors to participate in, and the IJBBA Source of Champions Sale. I think it would be pretty safe to say that we all love getting together and having our cattle compete in the show. As much as I enjoy my time in the show ring, my favorite part of the week is all the contests and activities, which are designed to allow juniors to interact and really get to know each other. Whether juniors are competing against each other or working together on a team event, building friendships and relationships with other Brangus exhibitors is important. The memories juniors make, the networks they build, and the lessons they learn will certainly last a lifetime. The work for the IJBBA Board of Directors does not stop after NJBS; the fall months were a particularly busy

time this year. Our board members attended the Western National Show in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, as well as the National Show of Merit in Shreveport, Louisiana. While representing the IJBBA and the Brangus breed at these shows, directors enjoyed the opportunity to interact with Brangus exhibitors while they assisted with weighing and measuring animals, as well as helping out in the show ring. The knowledge and leadership gained from assisting with these shows is invaluable to IJBBA directors. Additionally, the IJBBA Board of Directors had our annual Fall Meeting. We met in Texarkana, Arkansas, and were able to tour the facilities for the 2017 NJBS, make decisions to continue to improve the IJBBA, and plan upcoming events. The 2017 NJBS holds a lot of promise and excitement, and is considered a monumental historical event for both the IJBBA and NJBS. Plans are already in the works to celebrate this milestone; watch IJBBA news sources to stay informed of all developments. One of the biggest events we have been working on is the 2017 IJBBA Legacy Leadership Conference, which will be Apr. 6-9. Activities for the weekend include touring some of Florida’s Brangus ranches, visiting several of the nation’s largest commercial cow/calf operations, and hearing from some great speakers. This will be a great opportunity to interact with other juniors, gain valuable leadership skills, and learn more about the cattle industry. Be sure to keep an eye on our Facebook page for more information about the Legacy Conference. Lastly, I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who helps to make our organization a success. The IJBBA Board of Directors is very grateful to have generous and dedicated supporters, because we could not have such a strong junior program without your help. The IJBBA is looking forward to the years ahead, and we hope that you will continue to help us grow and achieve new, unprecedented heights.

IJBBA Board of Directors 31


A Program With A Purpose by IBBA Director of Shows and Youth Programs Tyler Dean The leaders of the International Junior Brangus Breeders Association (IJBBA) are proud of the remarkable success achieved in 2016. The IJBBA Board of Directors put a lot of hard work into not only planning great events but following through and making them happen. One of the association’s biggest and most exciting accomplishments its ever improving financial stability. That stability is due to the support from Brangus breeders and industry partners. IJBBA has experienced unprecedented success and support the past few years, which has resulted in a sound position for the future of the junior association. The IJBBA remains a program with purpose because of its sound financial position. That purpose is to develop the next generation of agriculturists, beef cattle industry leaders, and Brangus breeders. Whether they all stay with the breed or put their talents to use outside of production agriculture, juniors’ solid ties to our industry will remain regardless of where life takes them. Association ties and the strong foundation of responsibility, honesty and integrity IJBBA provides will guide them as they mature and become the leaders of tomorrow. I am confident the best days are ahead of us with the caliber of youth we have in the Brangus breed. In an effort to strengthen our future leaders, IJBBA hosted its inaugural Legacy Leadership Conference in March 2015 for youth of the beef industry. The next conference is scheduled for Apr. 6-9, 2017 in Haines City, Florida, and is shaping up to be an even bigger and better experience than the first conference. The 2017 IJBBA Legacy Leadership Conference will offer youth a unique opportunity to see some of the nation’s largest cowherds firsthand. Additionally, participants will hear from leaders in the agricultural community and grow their teamwork and leadership skills. IJBBA is excited to offer this experience to the membership and to other youth in the beef industry. Follow the IJBBA Facebook page for important updates and information. 2017 marks the 40th Anniversary for IJBBA. This is a milestone to celebrate, and the IJBBA board intends to

do just that. Watch for exciting news and updates each month as we prepare for the 35th Annual National Junior Brangus Show (NJBS). A tremendous number of youth, breeders and other industry partners have contributed to 40 years of success. Everyone who has been involved in IJBBA is invited to gather at the NJBS for a celebration of the association’s accomplishments. The IJBBA Legacy Female has been a staple of the junior organization for numerous years, and plays a major role in helping IJBBA maintain financial stability. IJBBA is excited to introduce the 2017 female in this issue of the Brangus Journal. Longtime junior supporter and dedicated advocate, JLS International of Robertsdale, Alabama and Devine, Texas, immediately stepped forward with one of their best, young females, Miss JLS Classy 915D44, to be the 2017 IJBBA Legacy Female. Classy will add a wealth of good to any herd, and can be viewed on page 33 of this issue. The IJBBA Board of Directors will once again work to build a Legacy Female Buyer Group to provide an opportunity for everyone to take home this unique female. Feel free to contact me or a member of the IJBBA Board of Directors to participate in the buyer group. I wrote the following for an article in a previous issue of the Brangus Journal, and it holds true today: “I cannot express how amazing it is to work with each and every breeder or business who donates time, resources, products or money to the future of our association. We have an elite group of juniors because of our elite supporters, and I am lucky and blessed enough to get to work with both groups on a daily basis.” IJBBA is a program with a purpose, which shines bright for our future.

Arkansas Brangus Breeders Association :: Don Hall, hallbran72019@yahoo.com Heart of America Brangus Breeders Association :: Jim Mussulman, jmussulm@yahoo.com Hill Country Brangus Breeders Association :: Brandon Belt, brandonbelt@aol.com International Red Brangus Breeders Association :: Marcos Borges, marcos@mbjranch.com Louisiana Brangus Breeders Association :: Bob Savoie, bobsavoie@charter.net Mississippi Brangus Breeders Association :: Bill Wells, wwells@bellsouth.net Oklahoma Brangus Association :: Jack Gorczyca, gorczycabrangus@juno.com Southeast Brangus Breeders Association :: Michael Candler, michael@candlerappraisal.com Southwest Brangus Breeders Association :: Larry Parker, jddiane@vtc.net Texas Brangus Breeders Association :: Gary Clem, ggclem69@aol.com West Coast Brangus Breeders Association :: Pam Doiron, doiron@spanishranch.net West Texas Brangus Breeders Association :: Alan Wedeking, wedekingfarms@hotmail.com

32 : : DECEMBER 2016


Introducing

y c a Leg Female The 2017 IJBBA

offered by: JLS International

miss jls CLASSY 915d44 May 10, 2016 R10331130 Sire: Mr JLS My Way 767A6 Dam: Miss New Transformer 915R

JLS INTERNATIONAL Jeff Smith, Alabama (251) 947-5688 Myron Saathoff, Texas (210) 218-4804 www.jlsbrangus.com

She sells MARCH 2017 in Houston, TX! Watch the Brangus Journal and the IJBBA Facebook Page for more information!

T

he IJBBA is excited to introduce the 2016 Legacy Female. Designed to help fund the IJBBA Legacy Leadership Conference, the IJBBA Board of Directors, and the National Junior Brangus Show as well as build upon the legacy of proven Brangus leaders that the IJBBA is known to produce. This year’s Legacy Female comes from JLS International, a program who knows extremely well the benefits and value of the junior association. JLS understands that the juniors ARE the future of the Brangus breed and gladly, without a moment’s hesitation, accepted the opportunity to donate the 2017 female. Furthermore, they gave one of their absolute best! 2017 marks the third consecutive year that the IJBBA Legacy Female has been a descendent of the iconic ER Lady XS 915/C. Very few cows have had such an impact on the Brangus breed, the JLS program or the Brangus show ring as 915/C. 915/C will certainly have an impact on the IJBBA as her descendants have already raised $83,500 for them! Classy epitomizes the JLS breeding program and is a solid statement to the type and kind of cattle that keeps Myron and JLS International returning to the picture backdrop and stacking up IBBA Show Animal of the Year trophies. Incredibly feminine fronted, deep made, strong topped and beautifully built, she will make a powerful addition to anyone’s show string and/or breeding program, but will undoubtedly find her way to someone’s donor pen! You are invited to participate in a group effort to purchase this female. For more information, please contact Tyler Dean (405)867-1421. All proceeds go to benefit the Brangus juniors! Don’t miss this unique opportunity that supports a great cause. We’ll see you in Houston!


SBBA Awards Ceremony by Janet Greuel The Southeast Brangus Breeders Association (SBBA) presented the awards for 2016 at the annual banquet on Sept. 23 in Lake City, Florida. The fourth inductees into the SBBA Hall of Fame were Fred and Sharron McCreary from Evergreen, Alabama. They began their Brangus herd in 1984 and have since included commercial, registered, and show-champion cattle. Both Fred and Sharron have served Brangus associations at the state, regional and national levels as secretary, treasurer, sales chairman, IJBBA advisor, treasurer, IBBA board member, and many more. The SBBA Showcase Sale was dedicated to them. SBBA members are thankful for their service. The Award of Excellence honors SBBA members, owners or managers, who have made a significant contribution to the breed and the association. This year our outstanding recipients were Evon Crooks, Chris Heptinstall, and Tom and Vicki Hayford. Evon Crooks is a past president of SBBA, and has been raising cattle since he was a child in Jamaica. He recently retired from R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, where he was principal scientist/director. He is the inventor on many patents in the U.S. and foreign countries in the area of combustion chemistry and filtration. Chris Heptinstall, manager of Salacoa Valley Farms in Georgia, has worked all areas of cattle production. He

was nominated for the Award of Excellence because of his tremendous help in allowing the Seminole Tribe of Florida to expand into the seedstock business utilizing his knowledge of the business and his cutting-edge expertise of the Brangus breed. Chris is currently on the IBBA Board of Directors. Tom and Vicki Hayford were nominated for the Award of Excellence for their dedication to reviving and improving the Southeast Regional Junior Brangus Show. This show has grown in numbers of exhibitors and cattle yearly because of their efforts. Tom’s woodworking ability has added to the juniors’ funds at multiple levels. Appreciation of their work is demonstrated by the gift they received from the juniors and the Georganne Myers Award given to them at the National Junior Brangus Show. Their grandson, Cason, participating in the pee wee events brings the family to the fourth generation of showmen. Doug Williams was presented a president’s plaque. Williams is only the second president to serve this association for two separate terms. The juniors received their awards from the show, and a fun auction was held to support the SBBA.

SBBA President Doug Williams; Jason & Carrie Hayford; their son, Cason; Vicki & Tom Hayford; Janet Greuel

SBBA President Doug Williams; Sharron & Fred McCreary; their grandson, Slade; Awards Chairman Janet Greuel

SBBA President Doug Williams, Evon & Carol Crooks; their grandson, Nicolas

IJBBA directors, Dana Patterson, Quinn Carter, and Cassidy Polston presented John Milan, owner of Draggin M Ranch, a clock for donating the 2016 donation heifer, which will support the 2017 show.

SBBA President Doug Williams; David & Susan Vaughan, owners of Salacoa Valley Farms; Chris Heptinstall; Todd Harvey, sales/marketing for Seminole Tribe of Florida

Outgoing SBBA President Doug Williams and Janet Greuel

34 : : DECEMBER 2016


35


SHOW RESULTS SOUTHEAST REGIONAL JUNIOR BRANGUS SHOW Sept. 23, 2016, Lake City, FL

Grand Champion Owned Heifer Trevor Haney, WAT Ms Foundation 596C3

Reserve Champion Owned Heifer Grand Champion Bred & Owned Heifer Allyson Polston, R3P Ms Night Train 36D

Reserve Champion Bred & Owned Heifer Cassidy Polston, R3P Ms Coal Trains Caroline 32C

Grand Champion Cow/Calf Tatiana Pis, Marvels Taylor 214

Reserve Champion Cow/Calf Sarah Perales, LCF Miss 21 Duke 27B1

Grand Champion Bull Allyson Polston, R3P Mr Coal Train’s Smoke 37B1

Reserve Champion Bull Cassidy Polston, R3P SK Mr Lambert 37C

Champion Ultrablack Heifer Trevor Haney, WAT Ms Guardian 541C3

Reserve Champion Ultrablack Heifer Trevor Haney, WAT Ms Passport 917C

ARKANSAS STATE FAIR

Oct. 16, 2016, Little Rock, AR OPEN SHOW

JUNIOR SHOW

Grand Champion Heifer (pictured top left) Eli Gosha Imboden, AR Reserve Champion Heifer Kaleb & Chrisie Smith, Gentry, AR

Grand Champion Heifer Eli Gosha, Imboden, AR Reserve Champion Heifer Layne Thompson , Lockesburg, AR

Grand Champion Bull (pictured bottom left) Wyatt Marshall, Horatio, AR Reserve Champion Bull Kaleb & Chrisie Smith, Gentry, AR

Grand Champion Bull Wyatt Marshall, Horatio, AR Reserve Champion Bull Wyatt Marshall, Horatio, AR

Grand Champion Cow/Calf Kaleb & Chrisie Smith, Gentry, AR Reserve Champion Cow/Calf Racheal Jarrett, Arkadelphia, AR

36 : : DECEMBER 2016


SHOW RESULTS STATE FAIR OF TEXAS

Oct. 21-23, 2016, Dallas, TX

Champion Heifer Calf Molly Pack Reserve Heifer Calf Gracie E. Smith

Champion Red Heifer Calf Megan Rogers Reserve Red Heifer Calf Trey Ivey III

Champion Junior Heifer Calf Anna Arnold Reserve Junior Heifer Calf Kascie Shifflett

Champion Red Junior Heifer Calf Karagen Dreibrodt Reserve Red Junior Heifer Calf Cassandra Burkhammer

Champion Senior Heifer Calf Anna Arnold Reserve Senior Heifer Calf Emma Pack

Champion Red Senior Heifer Calf Shelby Boswell Reserve Red Senior Heifer Calf Reagan Dreibrodt

BRANGUS NATIONAL SHOW OF MERIT AT THE STATE FAIR OF LOUISIANA October 29, 2016, Shreveport, LA

Grand Champion Heifer Doguet’s Diamond D Ranch, TX

Reserve Champion Heifer JLS International, Devine, TX

Grand Champion Bull Doguet’s Diamond D Ranch, TX

Reserve Champion Bull JLS International, Devine, TX

Grand Champion Red Heifer Dos XX’s Cattle Company, Washington, TX

Reserve Champion Red Heifer Cox Excalibur Brangus, Katy, TX

Grand Champion Red Bull Cox Excalibur Brangus, Katy, TX

Reserve Champion Red Bull TRIO Cattle & Genetics, Ponder, TX

JUNIOR SHOW Grand Champion Female Kilee Pickett, Robeline, LA Reserve Grand Champion Female Maddline Mathews, Bossier City, LA Grand Champion Bull Kilee Pickett, Robeline, LA Reserve Grand Champion Bull Cathryn Ellis, Athens, LA 37


SHOW RESULTS GREATER JACKSONVILLE AGRICULTURAL FAIR Nov. 12, 2016, Jacksonville, FL Grand Champion Heifer Allyson Polston, Lakeland, FL Reserve Champion Heifer Allyson Polston, Lakeland, FL

Grand Champion Red Heifer Sandra Marvel, High Springs, FL Reserve Champion Red Heifer Sandra Marvel, High Springs, FL

Grand Champion Cow/Calf Pair Emily Lettelier, Citra, FL Reserve Champion Cow/Calf Pair Sarah Perales, Newberry, FL

Grand Champion Red Cow/Calf Pair Sandra Marvel, High Springs, FL Reserve Champion Red Cow/Calf Pair Sandra Marvel, High Springs, FL

Grand Champion Bull Allyson Polston, Lakeland, FL Reserve Champion Bull Cassidy Polston, Lakeland, FL

Grand Champion Red Bull Sandra Marvel, High Springs, FL Reserve Champion Red Bull Sandra Marvel, High Springs, FL

To promote a show, contact Melanie Fuller (mfuller@gobrangus.com). To report a show/results, contact Peyton Waldrip (pwaldrip@gobrangus.com).

38 : : DECEMBER 2016


39


FALL SALE REPORTS The Oaks Farms Brangus Bull Sale

Oct. 1, 2016 • 62 Brangus bulls grossed $212,100 to average $3,421

Doguet’s Diamond D Sale of Proven Producers

Oct. 15, 2016 • 1 Lot of Brangus Frozen Embryos grossed $6,300 to average $6,300 • 4 Brangus Show heifer Prospects grossed $47,500 to average $11,875 • 15 Spring Bred Brangus Pairs/3N1’s grossed $96,750 to average $6,450 • 33 Fall Bred Brangus cows/pairs grossed $193,000 to average $5,848 • 14 Spring Bred Brangus Heifers grossed $58,250 to average $4,161 • 67 total Brangus female lots grossed $401,800 to average $5,997 • • • • • • • •

2 Brangus Semen Lots grossed $18,750 to average $9,735 51 Coming Two/Brangus Herd Sires grossed $260,800 to average $5,114 19 Yearling Brangus Bulls grossed $80,350 to average $4,229 72 Brangus bull lots grossed $359,900 to average $4,999 10 Commercial Brangus Pairs grossed $26,250 to average $2,625 25 Bred Brangus bred second calf cows grossed $50,500 to average $2,020 5 Bred Brangus heifers grossed $7,750 to average $1,550 40 Commercial Brangus female lots grossed $84,500 to average $2,113

Photos provided by Town Creek Farm.

Town Creek Farm Sale

Oct. 15, 2016 • 151 Brangus bull lots averaged $4,435 • 279 Commercial Bred Heifer lots averaged $1,942 • Total Sale Gross Income: $1,184,503

Little Creek Farms & Friends Black Bull Sale Oct. 21, 2016 • 79 bull lots averaged $3,981

Miller Brangus Ranch Fall Bull & Female Sale

Oct. 22, 2016 • 9 Brangus donors grossed $40,700 to average $4,522 • 1 Brangus Pick Lot grossed $4,500 to average $4,500 • 1 Brangus Embryo Lot grossed $4,000 to average $4,000 • 8 Brangus Spring 3N1 grossed $23,900 to average $2,987 • 8 Brangus Fall Bred/Pairs grossed $20,400 to average $2,550 • 6 Brangus Spring Bred Heifers grossed $14,200 to average $2,367 • 41 Brangus Female Lots grossed $107,700 to average $3,241 •

71 Brangus bulls grossed $255,550 to average $3,599

Oklahoma Brangus Association’s Indian Nation Fall Brangus Sale

Oct. 29, 2016 • 24 Coming Two/Brangus Herd Sires averaged $3,502 • 5 Yearling Brangus Bulls averaged $2,900 • 2 Coming Two/Ultrablack Herd Sires averaged $4,750 • 2 Yearling Ultrablack Bulls averaged $5,250 • 72 bull lots averaged $3,648 • • • • • • 40 : : DECEMBER 2016

3 Brangus & Ultrablack Pairs averaged $2,434 1 Bred Brangus Cow averaged $2,900 2 Bred Brangus Heifers averaged $1,550 7 Open Brangus Heifers averaged $1,950 4 Open Ultrablack Heifers averaged $1,162 17 female lots averaged $1,859


FALL SALE REPORTS GENETRUST Seedstock Females at Chimney Rock Cattle Company

Nov. 4, 2016 • 14 3-IN-1 lots grossed $88,800 to average $6,343 • 5 Bred Brangus Cow lots grossed $18,000 to average $3,600 • 3 Brangus Donor lots grossed $64,000 to average $21,333 • 54 Open Brangus Heifer lots grossed $281,443 to average $5,193 • 17 Bred Brangus Heifer lots grossed $111,500 to average $6,559 • 2 Pregnant Recip lots grossed $6,650 to average $3,325 • Total Sale Gross Income: $570,393 to average $6,004

GENETRUST Bulls & Commercial Females at Chimney Rock Cattle Company Nov. 5, 2016 • • • • • • • • •

52 Coming 2-Year-Old Brangus bulls grossed $291,000 to average $5596 86 Yearling Brangus bulls grossed $341,000 to average $3965 Total 138 Brangus bull lots grossed $632,000 to average $4580 28 Bred Commercial cows grossed $45,700 to average $1632 120 Bred Commercial heifers grossed $224,500 to average $1871 100 Open Commercial heifers grossed $124,125 to average $1241 54 Commercial Pairs grossed $119,800 to average $2219 15 Spring Commercial heifer calves grossed $9875 to average $658 Total 317 Commercial female lots grossed $524,000 to average $1653

Photos on this page provided by GENETRUST.

41


NEW IBBA MEMBERS 42 : : DECEMBER 2016

Garrett Clyde Keeling – Elgin, TX Mason P. Bourque – Franklin, LA Fernando Franco – Houston, TX Madison Rose – El Campo, TX Gary Warner – Elgin, TX Lindsey Gulotta – Independence, LA Tom L Hudson – Houston, TX Ty Salisbury – Wills Point, TX Lauren Boettcher – Lexington, TX Jaycie Bice – Hempstead, TX Hollis Holmes – LA

Orlando Nava – Pasadena, TX Clay Trahan – Lake Charles, LA Rylie Huff – Henderson, TX Rachelle Yepez – Austin, TX Liza Garcia – Pasadena, TX Kayla Boettcher – Lexington, TX Reagan Burke – Bellville, TX Rosemont Plantation – Jacksonville, FL Hannah Strickland – Auburndale, FL Samantha Muniz – Pasadena, TX


DO YOU KNOW THE BENEFITS OF

IBBA MEMBERSHIP?

Benefits of an International Brangus Breeders Association (senior) membership include, but are not limited to the following:

Registration Privileges, Hybrid Registration, Ownership Transfers, Online Herd Management Software, Documented Pedigrees, Genetic Evaluation, Summit Animal List Eligibility, Performance Leader Award Eligibility, DNA Parentage Verification, Advertising and Marketing Opportunities, Membership Networking, Brangus Publications Subscription, eNewsletter Subscription, Association Business Voting Rights, Performance Data Collection Using Total Herd Reporting, National Cattle Evaluation EPDs ... and more! For more information, visit GoBrangus.com/member or call 210-696-8231. Membership in the International Junior Brangus Breeders Association is available to youth under 21 years of age who own registered Brangus cattle or have an interest in Brangus. Membership in the organization benefits you in several ways. It allows you to participate in all junior activites, apply for available scholarships, participate in the Herd Improvement Program, and receive three junior newsletters throughout the year. IBBA associate memberships are for any person, of reputable character, interested in promotion of the best interests of the Brangus breed of cattle, but said associate memberships shall be without voting power or the right to register, certify or enroll cattle at member rates.

IBBA MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION DATE: ____________________________

SENIOR MEMBERSHIP

JUNIOR MEMBERSHIP (UNDER 21 YEARS OF AGE)

ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP

MEMBER NAME: _______________________________________________________________________________________ RANCH NAME: _________________________________________________________________________________________ PRIMARY MAILING ADDRESS: ___________________________________________________________________________ CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE: _________________________________________________________________________________ PHYSICAL RANCH ADDRESS: ____________________________________________________________________________ CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE: _________________________________________________________________________________ HOME PHONE: ____________________________________ WORK PHONE: ______________________________________ EMAIL ADDRESS: ___________________________________________ DATE OF BIRTH (JUNIORS): _____/_____/_______ PARENTS’ MEMBERSHIP NO. (JUNIORS): _______________________ Application is hereby made for membership to be issued in the name given above. I agree to be bound by and abide by the rules, regulations, constitution and by-laws of the association as amended from time to time and to keep a written memorandum of breeding and exact birth dates of my (our) Brangus cattle. Further, that I (we) will furnish promptly any information concerning same at any time requested to do so by the association. Eligible cattle owned at present are ______ (bulls over 36 months of age) and ______ (females over 24 months of age). FEES ---- Senior Membership: Jan-Dec $125, Apr-Dec $100, Jul-Dec $75, Oct-Dec $50 (Senior Renewal Dues received after Dec. 31 will be $145.)

Junior Membership: $25 annually Associate Membership: $35 annually PAYMENT INFORMATION (Indicate Method of Payment) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - CREDIT CARD (BELOW)

ENCLOSED CHECK

ENCLOSED CASH

CARD TYPE (VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN EXPRESS): _________________________________ CARD NUMBER: _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ EXP DATE: _____ _____ / _____ _____

SECURITY CODE: _____ _____ _____ _____

CARDHOLDER’S NAME: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ BILLING ADDRESS: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ AUTHORIZE TRANSACTION (SIGNATURE): ________________________________________________________ DATE: ____________________________ INTERNATIONAL BRANGUS BREEDERS ASSOCIATION, P.O. BOX 809, ADKINS, TX 78101 | INFO@GOBRANGUS.COM | FAX: 210-696-8718 43


FIND A BREEDER NEAR YOU ALABAMA

ALABAMA

ALABAMA

ALABAMA

ALABAMA

ALABAMA

Michael Candler, President 386-208-3881

ARIZONA

ARIZONA

ARIZONA

ARKANSAS

ARKANSAS

ARKANSAS

CALIFORNIA

FLORIDA

FLORIDA

To place your ad in the State Directory, email Melanie Fuller (mfuller@gobrangus.com). 44 : : DECEMBER 2016


GoBrangus.com/breeder-search/ FLORIDA

FLORIDA

FLORIDA

FLORIDA

GEORGIA

GEORGIA

GEORGIA

GEORGIA

GEORGIA

GEORGIA

KANSAS

LOUISIANA

LOUISIANA

LOUISIANA

MISSISSIPPI

To place your ad in the State Directory, email Melanie Fuller (mfuller@gobrangus.com). 45


FIND A BREEDER NEAR YOU MISSISSIPPI

MISSISSIPPI

MISSISSIPPI

MISSOURI

MISSOURI

NEW MEXICO

NEW MEXICO

NEW MEXICO

NORTH CAROLINA

OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA

TENNESSEE TRAIT LEADERS AND

MONEY MAKERS

Doyle Miller

615-351-2783 doyle@millerbrangus.com

Bill Felton

Sales & Marketing

901- 494-0554 bill@millerbrangus.com

Bart Pope

Ranch Manager www.millerbrangus.com

To place your ad in the State Directory, email Melanie Fuller (mfuller@gobrangus.com). 46 : : DECEMBER 2016

931-722-0244 bart@millerbrangus.com


GoBrangus.com/breeder-search/ TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

JLS International, Inc. Where winning tradition and performance collide Brangus bulls and heifers available year-round at private treaty.

www.jlsbrangus.com Jeff Smith, Owner Myron Saathoff myronsaathoff@yahoo.com

TEXAS

TEXAS

251-947-5688 210-218-4804

TEXAS

To place your ad in the State Directory, email Melanie Fuller (mfuller@gobrangus.com). 47


FIND A BREEDER NEAR YOU TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

MEDIA GUIDE

TEXAS

INSIDE FRONT COVER PAGE 3 (Inside Right) INSIDE BACK COVER BACK COVER FULL PAGE 1/2 PAGE ISLAND 1/2 PAGE 1/3 PAGE 1/4 PAGE

YOUR OPERATION Brangus Publications, Inc. offers many opportunities for you to promote yourself. CONTACT: MELANIE FULLER

mfuller@gobrangus.com

PREMIUM AD SPOTS

$1,400 for 1 time // $1,200 for 1 year* $1,160 for 1 time // $1,000 for 1 year* $1,160 for 1 time // $1,000 for 1 year* $1,400 for 1 time // $1,200 for 1 year*

$725 CAR** // $580 for 1 time // $485 for 1 year* $495 CAR** // $395 for 1 time // $335 for 1 year* $465 CAR** // $370 for 1 time // $300 for 1 year* $345 CAR** // $275 for 1 time // $225 for 1 year* $262 CAR** // $210 for 1 time // $175 for 1 year*

BLACK & WHITE RATES

STATE DIRECTORY $350 Total for 1 year See black and white rates. Add $170 for single color or $340 for full color.

COLOR RATES

*1 year: All 8 issues of the Brangus Journal // **CAR: Commercial Ad Rates

For more information, contact Advertising Sales Manager Melanie Fuller. 979-255-3343 // mfuller@gobrangus.com

To place your ad in the State Directory, email Melanie Fuller (mfuller@gobrangus.com). 48 : : DECEMBER 2016


DECEMBER 2016 3 Alabama Brangus Breeders Bull Sale, Uniontown, AL 9 Content Deadline for January Brangus Journal 27-31 Arizona National Livestock Show, Phoenix, AZ JANUARY 2017 1 Arizona National Livestock Show, Phoenix, AZ 10 Content Deadline for February FRONTLINE Beef Producer 16 Fort Worth Regional Brangus Show, Fort Worth, TX 21 Fort Worth Junior Brangus Show, Fort Worth, TX FEBRUARY 2017 1-3 NCBA Cattle Industry Convention, Nashville, TN 10 Content Deadline for March Brangus Journal 10-11 IBBA Annual Meeting & Convention, San Antonio, TX 10-12 San Antonio Regional Brangus Show, San Antonio, TX 12 Dixie National Regional Brangus Show, Jackson, MS 14-17 San Antonio Junior Brangus Show, San Antonio, TX 25 26th Annual Roswell Brangus Sale, Roswell, NM 25 Hunt H+ Brangus Professional Cattlemen’s Bull Sale, Calhoun, GA MARCH 2017 10 Content Deadline for April Brangus Journal 10 International Brangus Bull Show, Houston, TX 11 International Brangus Female Show, Houston, TX 11 Genetic Edge XXII Sale, Houston, TX 12 Oklahoma Youth Expo Junior Brangus Show, Oklahoma City, OK 17 Houston Junior Brangus Show, Houston, TX 18 Tested by Time Sale at Mound Creek Ranch, Leona, TX 19 Houston Junior Red Brangus Show, Houston, TX 25 Brinks Brangus @ Westall Ranches Bull Sale, Arabella, NM 25 Indian Nations Spring Brangus Sale, Ada, OK APRIL 2017 6-7 TBBA Miss America Sale, Salado, TX 6-9 IJBBA Legacy Leadership Conference, Haines City, FL 10 Content Deadline for May Brangus Journal MAY 2017 6 JLS International Sale, Devine, TX 15 National Junior Brangus Show Entry Deadline 28 National Junior Brangus Show Ownership Deadline JUNE 2017 1 Futurity Entry Deadline 1 National Junior Brangus Show Late Entry Deadline 9-10 Arkansas Junior Brangus Breeders State Show, Arkadelphia, AR 14-17 TJBBA State Show, Bryan, TX

UPCOMING EVENTS

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

JULY 2017 23-28 National Junior Brangus Show, Texarkana, AR 27 IJBBA “Source of Champions” Sale, Texarkana, AR 28 IJBBA Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet, Texarkana, AR 29 Brangus Futurity, Texarkana, AR 49


Advertiser’s Index 5K Cowbelle Ranch.....................................................45 Amrich Ranch............................................................ 46 Arizona National Show.............................................. 38 Blackwater Cattle Co..................................................45 Bobby and Bobbie Brangus....................................... 46 Brinks Brangus @ Westall Ranches.......................... 46 Burke Brangus Farm..................................................45 Bushley Creek Cattle Company..................................45 Calyx Star Ranch....................................................... 46 Carter Brangus........................................................... 44 Cavender Ranches......................................................47 Char-No Farm.............................................................45 Chimney Rock Cattle Co............................................ 44 Circle X Land & Cattle Co...................................IFC, 47 Collins Brangus........................................................ IBC Clark Cattle Services.................................................. 42 Clover Ranch............................................................. 44 Cox Excalibur..............................................................47 Cross N Farms............................................................45 Diamond K Ranch......................................................47 Dillard Land & Cattle..................................................47 Doak Lambert............................................................ 42 Doguet’s Diamond D Ranch................................47, BC Don Hall Brangus...................................................... 44 Don Thomas & Sons.................................................. 46 Double Creek Brangus Ranch....................................47 Double W Ranch........................................................ 46 Draggin M Ranch....................................................... 44 E3 Ranch.....................................................................47 Elgin Breeding Services............................................. 42 Farris Ranching Company..........................................47 Galloway Brangus...................................................... 44 Garry Clem Brangus...................................................47 Genesis Ranch............................................................47 GENETRUST............................................................. 39 Greuel Family Brangus ..............................................45 Hardee Farms............................................................ 44 JLS International........................................................47 Johnston Brangus...................................................... 44 K & R Broken Bar Ranch........................................... 46 K & L Brangus.............................................................47 Lack-Morrison Brangus............................................ 46

Lake Majestik.............................................................. 15 Lakeside Brangus...................................................7, 44 Lakin Oakley.............................................................. 42 Lawman Ranch.......................................................... 46 Little Creek Farms......................................................45 Midsouth Cattle..........................................................45 Miller Brangus........................................................... 46 MO Brangus................................................................45 Mound Creek Ranch...................................................47 Parker Brangus.......................................................... 44 Pennridge Ranch........................................................47 Perry Ranch............................................................... 46 Peterson Brangus....................................................... 46 Quail Creek Brangus.................................................. 44 Red Bird Meadows Ranch......................................... 48 Robbs Brangus........................................................... 44 Roop Cattle Co........................................................... 48 Salacoa Valley Farms............................................35, 45 Santa Rosa Ranch.................................................. 3, 48 Schmidt Farms Brangus............................................ 48 Shooting Star Land & Cattle...................................... 48 Southeast Brangus Breeders Association.................. 44 Spanish Ranch........................................................... 44 Suhn Cattle Co. ..........................................................45 Sunshine Acres.......................................................... 44 T3 Brangus................................................................. 46 Terry Reagan............................................................. 42 The Oaks Farms.................................................... 11, 45 Town Creek Farm.......................................................27 Triple Crown Ranch.................................................. 48 Triple J-R Cattle Company........................................ 48 Valley View Ranch..................................................... 46 Vineyard Cattle Co..................................................... 48 Vorel Farms............................................................... 46 Ward Brangus............................................................ 48 Wes Dotson................................................................ 42 W.E.T. Farms..............................................................45 Wyman Creek Cattle.................................................. 42 Wynne Ranch.............................................................45 Zotarelli Ranches....................................................... 48 BC: Back Cover, IBC: Inside Back Cover, IFC: Inside Front Cover

YOUR OPERATION Are you interested in advertising in Brangus Publications? See a condensed version of our Media Guide on page 48. For more information, contact Advertising Sales Manager Melanie Fuller, mfuller@gobrangus.com. 50 : : DECEMBER 2016


51


52 : : DECEMBER 2016


December 2016 Brangus Journal  
Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you