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The rraueling exhibition seruire of the Georgia Museum

of Art u supported in parr by the Office of the Piresident

for Pubtic Seruice and

Outreach

ar

Vice

.jr-!i ,::, :l:itri:r,j ,

the

Uniuersiry of Georgia. Sapportfu the naaseamls, exkibi.

tions and Programs Council 'tt

:"'

is

ako prouided by the Georgia

Gmrgia.':Grorroi

tAt1"*b!yr,.The

:

Co$ncit'is a pru,rner

agency of the Narional Endowmentfor

the Arts. Gcneral

opgrating suppnrt has been proaided by tlte

'

iill:liixi.

for the Arts through the aPProPriations of rhe

In*itite ,of

Museum and Library Seruices, a federal grantmafting ageacy that fosters leadership,, ixnoratian, and a ltfetirne

af

learning by sapporting 'n+useu.lns and- libraries.

Ind.iuidunls, foandati o ns,

'

an

d corpora tion

tional'q1+pport ilzraug,h their gifts

sp

rouid'e addi -

io the tlniaersity of

Ceorgia Foundation.

,Raqurnrturxrs&Gurotr,Iurs,,,',,, In addition'to the rental fee,,the' borower is'i'espons,ible 1f,or ,

,round-trip transportaiion

costs.

andrmust meet

,required standards for climate,control, securiry; and

, 'ligtlt levels (5-ro foot candles for works on paperi

:

,::'l',

:'l:.;l,t-:i:::

!.ti:,::ri:,:

.

'f,illqandeseent light only).'Bookings rnust be made ar . leastisix rnonths in advance (five months in advance

I

for insiitutions in Georgia)- Ohiect label copy and introdue tory, text material, if applicable, are provided :

on computer disk.

For furthir information, please contact the exhibition 1

loan coordinator at

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,

.

Covre lueea

Mary Cassatt (American, 18z5-926),

The: Cotffure,

r89r. Drypoint and aquatint on laid paper, t4 3/8 x ro

rlz

rnches. Georgis ,Museum

www.uga.ed u/gamuseu m

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of Art, Uni1eiii.y.rf,,

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Lltag:ru,:r Hiroshige (Japanese, ry 97 - t 8 58), F uj iftaua, Irl.tt. 3 8 fronr Famous Places on the Fifry-Tltree Stations, r855. Woodblock color

print,

r.3

Cleorgia;

t /z x 8 7/8 inches. Georgi:r Museum of Art, Universit,v of gift of Alfred H. Holbrook. cno,r r953.r369

Hiroshige and the Tokaido Road: Selected Views from the Georgia Museum of Art known

Utagawa Hiroshige (Japanese, t797-t858) was among

Famous Places on the Fifty-Three Stations, also

the last great uft.iyo-e masters of the color wood-block

the Vertical Tbftaido.

print. In r83z he traveled along the historic Tokaido, or

terized by minimal detail, simplified composition,

"Eastern Sea Road," that connected Kyoto, the ancient

flattened shapes, and distant views, qualities that

imperial capital, with Edo (now called Tokyo), the seat

appealed to artists in Europe and North America, such

of Tokugawa Shogun, in the early nineteenth century.

as Manet, van Gogh, Monet, Degas, Whistler, and

Fifty-three towns dotted the road, providing lodging,

Cassatt.

refreshments, and souvenirs

for travelers. Hiroshige

This popular print

views from the Georgia Museum of Art's complete collection of this series.

views of the surrounding landscape, towns, and people.

2() PI{INTS

These spontaneous impressions resulted in a series of

Rental fee: $r,5oo ($75o in-state)

in

series is charac-

This exhibition is composed of twenty selected

visited these ove rnight stations and recorded numerous

fifty-five prints published

as

1833-4 under the title

(]r:onr*r \'[r;slurt or Anr


Pierre-|ules M6ne (French, i8ro-r879), Nedjibe (Arabian Mare), c. 1852. Bronze, ro r/4 x 6 x 16 r/z inches. Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia; gift of Michael and Mary A. Erlanger.

cuoa rgg4.8r

Animals in Bronze: The Michael and Mary Erlanger Collection of Animalier Bronzes from the Georgia Museum of Art Animalier bronzes, which depict both wiid and

a wide

with their rejection of "unnecessary" detail, appear to

audience in

have been hastily executed, heightening their impres-

nineteenth- and early twentieth-century France,

sionistic feel. Also in this collection are sculptures by

England, and the United States. Animak in Bronze rep-

Romantic painter Rosa Bonheur and her brother

domesticated animals, gained

resents the

full range of

styles and many of the finest

Isidore-Jules Bonheur, as well as works by American

artists of this genre . Notable among the works in this

artists Herbert Haseltine and Charles Marion Russe11.

exhibition are several by Antoine-Louis Barye and

This collection is a gifr from Michael and Mary Erlanger

Rembrandt Bugatti's Bruhma Bull. Barye was one of

to the Georgia Mwseum of Art. The exhibition is accompa-

the earliest and most famous artists of the animalier

nied by an illwstrated catalogue ouith an essay by curator

school. His works often depict animals in violent con-

Eleanora Luciano.

flict and were inspired by his mentor, the

46 sculn'runrs, ro coprEs oF cATALocuE

noted

Romantic painter Antoine-Jean Gros. Bugatti's works,

Rental fee: $z,5oo ($r,ooo in-state)

Goorcra Musruu or Anr


lJnknor.vn artist (Frcnch), Un.titled (Anemones) , r9th century. Black and recl chalks heightcned rvith w,hite and ochre chalks on blue paper, 16 r 3/t6 x rz 5/r6 inches. Cleorgia N{useum of Art, University of Georgia; gift of i)r. Roy Ward. cxtol t9g6.z7

A Delicate Bouquet: French Flora! Studies from the Georgia Museum of Art These eighteen delicately detailed drawings were

included many of the flowers found in the drawings

created by an anonymous French artist following early

in this exhibition, but these works are rendered with

in French

a

floral

more delicate line and tone than in Berjon's better-

drawing. The unsigned works in this exhibition may

known drawings. A Delicate Bouquet demonstrates the

have been executed by a follower of Antoine Berjon

talents

(French, t754-t844), an important flower painter who

refinement that is both elegant and intimate.

taught at the F,cole Nationale des Beaux-Arts in Lyon,

The wor\s in this exhibition are a gift ro the Georgia

France, during the school's early years. Berjon fre-

Museum of Art from Dr. Roy Ward.

quently made careful black-and-white chalk draw-

r8 nn,qwrur;s

ings of bouquets upon colored papers. His subjects

Rental fee: $r,5oo ($75o in-state)

nineteenth-century conventions

Gponcrr Mrrserrl op Arr

of the French floral artists and displays

a


Art Roscnbaum (Arnerican, born r938), Sea lsland Singers, t98t. Charcoal on Georgia N'luseum of Art, University of Gcorgia;

paper, zz t/8 x z9 7/8 inchcs

transler from thc Sea Gr:rnt Collcge Program, School of Marine Progr:rms. cr.roa r996.t35

lmpressions of the Georgia Coast: From the Georgia Sea Grant College Collection of Contemporary Coastal Art

of opportunity to work with marine scientists. Their the School of Marine Programs at the University of resulting images focus on land and seascapes, wildlife, Georgia invited selected artists to pxrticipate in en aes- and the folk culture of African-American residents. thetic query that resulted in a collection of works on a This rich array of works of art represents the special variety of coastal subjects. Using art as a powerful and character of Georgia's coast and its culture. emotionally compelling medium to focus the attention This collection it o grft to the Georgia Museum of Art of Georgia's large inland population on coastal and from the Sea Grant College Program, Scltool of Marine marine re sources, the collection serve s the purposes of Programs, Uniuersity of Georgia. documentation, interpretation, and education, and 58 wonxs In

r98o, the Georgia Sea Grant College Program

equally important, provides aesthetic enjoyment. Rental fee: Eleven artists, most of whom live inland, were given

direct exposure to the coastal environment and

an

Gr:oncre Mrrsr-uu or,

Alt

$3,ooo ($z,ooo in-state)


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Francisco de Goya (Spanish, t746-t9z8), Con raz6n 6 sin ella. (With reason, or tuithout.) lrom The Diasters of War, r9o6 edition Etching, lavis, drypoint, burin, and burnisher on laid paper, 5 t5/fi x 8 r/8 inches. Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia; gift of James Il. Anderson. cuol r985. r r.z

The Disasters of War by Goya: Selections from the Georgia Museum of Art Francisco de Goya's The Dkasters of War documents

etchings are among the many works that Goya created

the brutality of the Peninsular War (r8o8-rttr4)

as political statements

between Spanish guerrilla forces and occupying

pleted the series around r8ro-r8r,1, but the prinrs

French troops in Spain and Portugal. Goya (Spanish,

were not published until r863, over thirty years after

ryq6-r8z8) recorded the death and destruction he observed on the battlefields in numerous drawings

his death. This exhibition is comprised of forty selected

and small paintings. From those sketches, he created

ofeighty prints from this series, published in r9o6.

the plates that comprise Tlte Disasters of War. Each

The worrt'' in this exhibition are a gift to the Georgia

print is a distinct comment on his observations; titles

Museum of Art from Mr. and Mrs. James B. Anderson.

slc.ch as

And they are li\e uild beasts, He deserued it, ar,d

Wlty? descrrbe the violence of the conflict. These

in support of

peace. He com-

works fiom the Georgia Museum of Art's collecrion

40

PRTNTS

Rental fee: $zooo ($rooo in-state)

Gloncra MusBuu or Anr


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Mary Cassatt (American, r9q5-ry26),The CoiJfure, t89t. Drypoint and aquatint on laid paper, 14 3/8 x ro r/z inches. Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia; university purchase. cMoA 1972.2777

Passport to Paris: Nineteenth-Century French Prints from the Georgia Museum of Art In recent years, printmaking in the nineteenth century has been rediscovered and

fbund to be

as

illustrious

Japanese

prints circulating in the French art market.

as

the painting of that century. Particularly in France,

This exhibition presents examples of themes, techniques,

there was a great deal of activity by artists interested

and styles which are representative ofthe portrayal of

in etching, lithography, and woodcut. Spurred by the

modern life characterizing original printmaking in

democratic impulses that continued after the French

nineteenth-century France.

Revolution, artists embraced a greater variety of sub-

by noted printmakers, such as Eugdne Delacroix,

jects, beyond the narratives of history painting and

Honor6 Daumier, Paul C6zanne, and Henri

portraiture. They fbund material to ignite their imag-

Toulouse-Lautrec.

inations in Parisian street

46 nnrNrs

sce ne s,

views of the French

countryside, the iandscape of North Africa, and in

It

also highlights works

Rental fee: $zooo ($rooo in-state)

Gloncra Musruu or Anr

de


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sBrnjng Stars sa:re togcf 6y. .ng

olG"d .shorrte.l lsr ioy

Willi:m

Blake (English, ry57-t\z), Canst Thou llind the Street InJluences of Pteiades..., Plate 14 fromTlte Booftof Job, r825. Etching on paper in bound volume, 8 r/4 x 6 j/8 inches. Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia; university purchase. cuoa r987.5.r5

visions of Nature: English Romantic Prints from the Georgia Museum of Art Romanticism in art was a complex movement that

to the more highly valued history paintings

occurred in Europe and America from the mid-eigh-

fushionable society port rrits.

teenth to the late nineteenth century.

In

and

England,

where the movement blossomed, the romantic artist's

Landscapes and visionary imagery dominated

profound sensitivity towards nature manifested itself

English art of this period. Created berween r8o8 and

in either an objective manner,

r83r, the prints in this exhibition presenr favorite

colors

as

in the oils and water-

of John Constable. or in a visionary or

exoric

romantic subjects-Norman and Gothic ruins, sublime

fashion, as in the works of William Blake and ]. M. W.

landscapes, and cataclysmic scenes from the Bible and

Turner. These responses contrasted with the conven-

Milton's Paradise Lost.

tions of the previous century

I7

in

England where,

generally, views of nature were considered secondary

PRINTS

Rental fee: $r,5oo ($75o in-state)

Grorcra Nlusruu or Anr


Isabel Bishop (American, rgoz r988), Noon Hour, tg35. Etching on \vovc paper, 6 r5lr6 x 5 inches. Georgia Nluseum of Art, Univcrsitv of Cleorgia; university purchase GMo,\ r 990.2

Prints by Women: Selected Works from the Georgia Museum of Art Although often overshadowed by their male counre r-

These works present a sampling of the various arrisric

parts, women artists have played and continue to play

movements and techniques in the field of printmaking

integral roles in the development of art in America

in the ninteenth and twenrieth

and Europe. This exhibition reflecrs the achievemenrs

range from domestic scenes bv Mary Cassatt and

of women artists and their changing roles, paralleling

Berthe Morisot to Joni Mabe's late twentieth-century

the increasing social freedom experienced by women.

lithograph, The Official Eluis Prayer Rug. 52

PRTNTS

Rental fee: $3,ooo ($z,ooo in-state)

Gloncre Nlusn;w op Arr

centuries. Images


Anna Richards Brewster (American, d7o-r952), Moulin, Huet, Guernsey, n.d. Watercolor on paper, t9 r/z.x zz r/4 inches. Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia; gift of William Tenney Brewster

crloa r954.465

Travels Abroad: Paintings by Anna Richards Brewster from the Georgia Museum of Art

This selection of oil paintings by Anna Richards

brushwork. This pioneering woman artist received

wster (American, t87o-t952) highlights the artist's

many awards and commissions throughout her career,

extensive travels and includes village and country

including an award from the National Academy of

in England, France, Italy, Norway, the Middle

Design in r89o. Following her death in rg5z, her hus-

East, and northern Africa. The daughter of William

band, William Tenney Brewster donated most of his

tost

wife's paintings to a variety of museums, including

Bre

scenes

Richards, an American landscape painter often

associated

with the Hudson River School, Brewster

a

large number of works to the Georgia Museum of Art.

was fascinated with natural light, which she depicted

29 PAINTINGS

with her use of warm, bright color and impressionistic

Rental fee: $3,ooo ($z,ooo in-state)

Gloncra Muspuu ol Anr


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I-amar Dodd (American, r9o9-t996), Monument, colorado, ry37. oil on canvas, 4 5/g x z9 5/g inches. Georgia Museum of Art, Unit'ersity of Georgia; extended ]oan lrom the University of Georgia Foundation, gifi of Mary and Lamar Dodd. cMoA rg75.20F

Lamar Dodd, Artist of Georgia: selections from the Georgia Museum of Art Lamar Dodd (American, 19o9,1996) is an arrisr imporrant

sojourns on Monhegan Island, from his international

to Georgia not only for his nationally recognized arristic

travels, and from his tenure as an official artist for

talent, but also for his role as an educator and founder

NASA. Featured are works that show his range from

of the University of Georgia's School of Art. From his

the realism ofhis earlier years ro the quasi-abstracrion

earliest works as

a child in LaGrange,

Georgia

of his later

career, when he developed a new visual

through his mature career in New York, Alabama,

vocabulary to express his perceptions of the cosmos.

and at the University of Georgia, Dodd experienced

Otlter exhibitions of Lamar Dodd's u,orfts are auailable

and absorbed every art-historical movement of the twentieth cenrury. This exhibition of twenty of his

through consultation uit/t the Georgia Museum of Artis exhibition loan coordinator.

works includes important paintings from his American

20 PAINTINCS

Scene period

ofthe

1930s

and 1940s, from his solitary

Rental fee: $3,ooo ($z,ooo in-state)

Groncra Musruu or Anr


]ohn Taylor Arms (American, r887-r953), From Knoedler's Windotu, r935. Etching on laid paper, 5 r/16 x 4 r5lr6 inches. Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia; gift of Anna D. Crosby, in loving memory of Dr. and Mrs. Robert R. Dince, Jr. cMoA 1999.73

Mannahatta: Images of New York City from the Georgia Museum of Art

In

1879,

Walt Whitman wrote of New York City,

"Mannahattal...how it

and ]ohn Taylor Arms, found similar fascination in

to rise with tall spires,

the life and architecture of Manhattan. This exhibi-

glistening in sunshine, with such New World armos-

tion of works on paper from the permanent collection

phere, vista, and action!" and made this great city

of the Georgia Museum of Art

seems

a

demonstrates how

central theme of his book of poems,Leaues of Grass. At

these and other artists responded to and represented

the beginning of the twentieth century, artists such

the people, entertainment, labor, transportation, and

as John Sloan

and Reginald Marsh, members of the

architecture of this dynamic American city.

so-called Ashcan School, were avid readers of

33 1VoRKS oN

Whitman and produced numerous visual interpreta-

Rental fee: $3,ooo ($z,ooo in-state)

tions of the city

in which they lived. Later

artists,

including Edward Hopper, Isabel Bishop, Lamar Dodd,

Groncrl Musluu or Anr

PAPER


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Susan Rothenberg (American, born 1945), Monlpy in a Tree, t984. Lithograph on wove paper, r7 r/4 x t3 r/z inches.

Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia; university purchase. cvo,l r989.I6

Techniques and Styles: A Sampling of Paintings, Drawings, and Prints from the Georgia

Museum of Art Developing an understanding of artistic techniques

watercolor, and gouache painting are included, in

aad styles is crucial to art appreciation and connois-

addition to drawing media such as ink and graphite,

seurship. The way in which a work of art is created

and the printmaking methods of woodcut, etching,

it

as

lithography, and screenprinting. Works date from the

important as what is depicted. This educationai exhi-

sixteenth through the twentieth centuries and highlight

bition provides an opportunity for audiences to study

artistic movements including Impressionism, Cubism,

a variety of techniques and media used in creating

German Expressionism, Surrealism, and Photo Realism.

two-dimensional works of art and to learn about

2(]

significant movements in Western art. Examples of oil,

Rental fee: $z,ooo ($r.ooo in-state)

along with the context in which

is created are

WORKS

(]norcra Musruu or Anr


Georgia Museum of Art Traveling Exhibitions  

The Georgia Museum of Art produced this brochure to market its traveling exhibitions, which have since been revised.

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