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GEORGETOWNER.COM

VOLUME 64 NUMBER 16

MAY 16-JUNE 5, 2018

SUMMER

ARTS PREVIEW

SINCE 1954

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IN THIS ISSUE IN THIS ISSUE

NEWS · 4-6,9

EDITORIAL/OPINION · 8 Editorials Jack Evans Report

Ins & Outs Sponsored Feature: Carr Workplaces

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Robert Devaney

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Charlene Louis

COPY EDITOR Richard Selden

FEATURES EDITORS Ari Post Gary Tischler

Up & Coming Town Topics Community Calendar The Village

BUSINESS · 10-11

PUBLISHER Sonya Bernhardt

“’Don’t Draw, Ralph! It’s a filthy habit ... ‘ Self-Poortrait,” 2006. Ralph Steadman. © Ralph Steadman Art Collection. Courtesy American University.

The cover of The Georgetowner’s Summer Arts Preview issue is a “self-poortrait” by illustrator Ralph Steadman, who turned 82 on May 15. Raised in North Wales, Steadman became famous as a collaborator with gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson. The American University Museum at the Katzen will open a retrospective of his varied and influential career next month. He has been creating original art for Flying Dog’s labels since 1995.

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Aidah Fontenot FASHION & BEAUTY DIRECTOR Lauretta McCoy GRAPHIC DESIGN Angie Myers PHOTOGRAPHERS Philip Bermingham Jeff Malet Neshan Naltchayan Patrick G. Ryan ADVERTISING Evelyn Keyes Richard Selden Kelly Sullivan

REAL ESTATE · 11

SENIOR CORRESPONDENT Peggy Sands CONTRIBUTORS Mary Bird Allyson Burkhardt Evan Caplan Jack Evans Donna Evers Michelle Galler Stephanie Green Amos Gelb Wally Greeves Kitty Kelley Rebekah Kelley Selma Khenissi Jody Kurash Travis Mitchell Shelia Moses Stacy Murphy Kate Oczypok Linda Roth Alison Schafer

Commercial Property

ARTS PREVIEW 12-16 Visual Arts Performance Art The National Museum of African Art: An Incomparable Treasure

DOWNTOWNER · 16 FOOD & WINE · 17 Dining Guide The Latest Dish

FEATURE · 19 Summer Camps: Looking Beyond the Spin

GOOD WORKS & GOOD TIMES · 20-21 Social Scene Events

BOOK CLUB · 22 Kitty Kelley Book Club Gala Guide

Christ Church Marks 200 Years BY STEPH AN IE GR EE N

After morning service for its 200th anniversary, Christ Church members proceeded to a picnic at Tudor Place. Photo by Robert Devaney.

Garden Tour Offered Verdant Variety BY PEGGY SAN D S

The garden and pool at Prospect House were impressive. Photo by Peggy Sands.

Bilingual Helen Hayes Awards for ‘In the Heights’ BY GARY TISC H L ER

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Please send submissions of opinions for consideration to: editorial@georgetowner.com For advertising inquiries email advertising@georgetowner.com or call (202) 338-4833

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Photo of the Week

“The Orange Step,” canvas panels set up at Rose Park by artist Kiril Jeliazkov. Photo by Robert Devaney.

MAY 16, 2018

The Georgetowner is published every other Wednesday. The opinions of our writers and columnists do not necessarily reflect the editorial and corporate opinions of The Georgetowner newspaper. The Georgetowner accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs and assumes no liability for products or services advertised herein. The Georgetowner reserves the right to edit, rewrite or refuse material and is not responsible for errors or omissions. Copyright 2018.

GALA Hispanic Theatre’s production of “In the Heights.” Photo by Stan Weinstein. Courtesy GALA.

To submit your photos tag #thegeorgetowner on Instagram!

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UP & COMING

May & June

Events Calendar

MAY 17

DUMBARTON AT DUSK At Dumbarton at Dusk, held the third Thursday of every month, visitors can tour the museum after hours and experience the grounds in a different light. The evening includes a cash bar, food, music and pop-up history activities. Admission is free. For details, visit dumbartonhouse.org. Dumbarton House, 2715 Q St. NW.

MAY 19

MAY 24

Volunteers age 12 and older are needed to help with parking lot line-striping; repainting picnic tables, fire rings and grills; placing stone dust pads at campground facilities; and removing invasive plant species and trash. Registration is required and Student Service Learning hours are available. For details, visit canaltrust.org. Little Orleans, Maryland.

Acclaimed interior designer, 2018 Kips Bay Show House designer and “top tastemaker” Alessandra Branca is the speaker at this Landmark Society seated luncheon in the Spring Garden Party tent on Tudor Place’s South Lawn. Tickets are $85. For details, visit tudorplace.org. Tudor Place, 1644 31st St. NW.

CANAL PRIDE DAY AT FIFTEENMILE CREEK

MAY 19 AND 20

COMMUNITY WEEKEND AT NGA National Gallery of Art visitors can play classic board and parlor games with an artistic twist, dance along with D.C.-based dance company Heart Stück Bernie and participate in a largescale collaborative sculpture and other artmaking activities. For details, visit nga.gov. National Gallery of Art, East Building, 6th Street and Constitution Avenue NW.

LANDMARK LUNCHEON WITH ALESSANDRA BRANCA

MAY 24 TO 28

Cirque Italia. Photo by Melinda Jean.

CIRQUE ITALIA

JUNE 1 AND 2

This new performance will feature an ultramodern water curtain that controls every droplet of water meticulously. Audience members will see words and beautiful patterns as the water falls to the “lagoon” below. Tickets are $25 to $50 for adults, $10 to $45 for children. For details, visit cirqueitalia.com. 16 Chestnut St., Gaithersburg, Maryland.

CRAFT BEER AT THE BUILDING MUSEUM

“Savor: An American Craft Beer & Food Experience,” presented by the Brewers Association, will serve up a selection of small bites paired with craft beer from independent breweries around the country. Tickets are $135. For details, visit savorcraftbeer.com. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW.

MAY 26

GEORGETOWN TREES WALKING TOUR Dwane Starlin, a member of the Guild of Professional Tour Guides, and Topher Matthews of the Georgetown Metropolitan will lead a scenic stroll through one of the truly green and well-shaded neighborhoods in “The City of Trees.” Tickets are $20. For details, visit dumbartonhouse.org. Dumbarton House, 2715 Q St. NW.

JUNE 2 AND 3

WASHINGTON FOLK FESTIVAL

Carly Harvy and Sol Roots at the 2016 Washington Folk Festival.

Presented by the Folklore Society of Greater Washington and the Glen Echo Park Partnership, the festival will feature more than 450 musicians, storytellers, dancers and crafters from the greater Washington area. Admission is free. Carousel tickets are $1.25. For details, visit glenechopark.org. 7300 MacArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Maryland.

JUNE 5

Weekend June 15-16, 2018 Cocktail Party & Silent Auction June 15th 7:00pm Georgetown Visitation

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Two Grammy winners will perform at Wolf Trap: Guitarist Nile Rodgers, co-founder of Chic, who pioneered a musical language that generated hits like “Le Freak” and sparked the advent of hip-hop, and “Queen of Funk” Chaka Khan. Tickets are $40 to $85. For details, visit wolftrap.org. 1645 Trap Road, Vienna, Virginia.

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MAY 16, 2018

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FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF EVENTS, VISIT GEORGETOWNER.COM


TOWN TOPICS

NEWS

BY P EG GY S A N D S A N D RO B E R T D E VA N E Y ELECTION NEWS

Initiative #77: Battle Erupts Over D.C. Tipped-Employees A battle between restaurant and bar servers who want to keep earning tips on top of a minimum wage much lower than the one in effect for all other D.C. workers — currently $3.33 and $12.50 an hour, respectively — and those seeking minimumwage parity has become an issue in the June 19 primary election. Initiative 77, which proposes to match the lower rate to the higher by 2026, is on the ballot. In Martin’s Tavern, on the corner of Wisconsin Avenue and M Street, named the most popular restaurant in Georgetown several years in a row, servers, bar hosts and owner Billy Martin all sport buttons with #77 crossed out. “Save Our Tips” posters hang on the bar mirror and have been circulated to restaurants throughout Georgetown by concerned staffers. But national advocacy organization Restaurant Opportunities Centers United sees it differently. ROC United, which proposed the initiative, is working to eliminate the tipcredit wage system for American restaurant workers, a system found mainly in the U.S. Its members are restaurant servers and bartenders who have direct customer contact. The tips they earn each day are counted as part of their guaranteed minimum wage. ROC United wants that system replaced by a set minimum wage of $15 for all restaurant workers no matter where they work, and is endeavoring to get it done state by state. It’s complicated. Both sides make good points. “Save Our Tips” proponents argue that restaurants guarantee that their tipped employees earn $15 an hour already through a combination of a set wage and tips, mainly those included on credit-card payments (the method by which 80 percent of customers pay their bills). “If the day’s take does not equal $15 an hour, the restaurant is required to make up the difference,” explained Martin. “There are strong protections in place to make sure that tipped workers receive that minimum. But it’s almost never necessary. With tips, all of our front staff make far more than $15 an hour,” Martin said. “Some make six-figure annual incomes.” But Martin’s Tavern is a popular, always crowded city tavern, full of history and atmosphere, tourists and regulars. Calling for “One Fair Wage,” ROC United argues that tipped workers at small local restaurants in other parts of D.C. and at franchised eateries cannot count on tips to reach a regular minimum wage of $15 an hour. In addition, ROC United argues that the mostly female restaurant workers — about 80 percent, the organization estimates — who depend on tips are vulnerable to sexual harassment and gender bias: “Women

“Many restaurants may increase the prices of their offerings to cover the fixed costs of wait staff,” Martin said. “Or some may add a surplus charge. Or have fewer wait staff.”

restaurant workers living off tips and subminimum set wages are twice as likely to experience sexual harassment and three times as likely to be told by management to alter their appearance and to wear ‘sexier’ more revealing clothing than women in singlewage states.” No one is claiming that customers will suddenly stop tipping if the $15-an-hour minimum wage for servers is established, at least not at first (unless, as in Europe, the menu so stipulates). But there can be other consequences. “Many restaurants may increase the prices of their offerings to cover the fixed costs of wait staff,” Martin said. “Or some may add a surplus charge. Or have fewer wait staff.” In addition, since the set wages of back-ofthe-house workers (from cooks to dishwashers and clean-up staff) are much higher than servers because they don’t get tips, it could be that, as the set wage for servers reaches parity and they continue to get tips, their colleagues will demand more. The change might also affect quality of service by reducing or eliminating the incentive that tipping provides. “I hire wait staff for their qualities as sales people, not just to hand out menus and take orders. Without tips, can I still get these quality people?” Martin asked. Proponents of Initiative 77 claim that the seven states where the minimum wage for tipped employees has been raised have not felt those negative effects. “But that’s because the wait staffs have nowhere else to go. D.C. fronts several states where wait staff can still earn tips. There is no doubt that many who work in D.C. will just work in Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania or Delaware instead,” said Martin. Some question why the initiative was forced onto a primary election ballot, which draws notoriously low interest and turnout (normally under 50 percent). “Even if the initiative does pass, the city council can overturn it,” Martin concluded. “No one seems to know that.”

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TOWN TOPICS

CRIME REPORT BY KAT E OCZ Y P OK A N D S TA F F

Raccoon Attacks! On May 9, a raccoon attacked several persons near the Thomas Sweet ice cream shop at 3214 P St. NW and elsewhere in Georgetown. Jumping out from under a car, the raccoon attacked Rick Murphy, a Georgetown advisory neighborhood commissioner, biting him twice. Murphy, who was treated at Medstar Georgetown University Hospital, hopes to finish his treatment in time for a trip. Jeni Hansen also came upon the creature, who merely bit her flip-flop. Other attacks occurred near Dumbarton Oaks on R Street. All in all, four persons were bitten last week by the possibly rabid masked mammal. Tending to those bitten, G.U. hospital had to ask other hospitals for additional human rabies immune globulin. Georgetown University police reported seeing a raccoon near GloverArchbold Park May 11.

Flower Thief Under Surveillance Don’t be pinching the irises at the corner of 27th and N Streets. The homeowner will be recording your theft.

Atkins Back on the Beat With a police van waiting in the PNC Bank parking lot, several Metropolitan Police Department officers pulled over an SUV at the intersection of Wisconsin Avenue and M Street May 9 to make an arrest. At the seemingly minor incident, one of the MPD officers was Antonial Atkins, who celebrated his retirement earlier this year. He has returned to MPD as a senior officer, he said, as some retirees do.

Love Banner Stolen The sidewalk banner at St. John’s Church on O Street about loving your neighbors has been stolen. Maybe the perpetrator needed it more, as some parishioners claimed. The Georgetowner liked this poster listing neighborly slogans — but, of course, the best line for us was: “Love your journalist neighbor.” FROM THE METROPOLITAN POLICE DEPARTMENT: Theft (partial listing) •2700 block of Dumbarton Street NW, April 24 •2400 block of M Street NW, April 24 •3200 block of M Street NW, April 29 •2800 block of M Street NW, May 6 •3000 block of M Street NW, May 6 •3200 block of O Street NW, May 6 •3200 block of Volta Place NW, May 6 •1300 block of 22nd Street NW, May 5 •1000 block of 29th Street NW, May 6 •1000 block of 30th Street NW, May 6

VOTE

Capital One Café Plans Proceed Plans for a combined Capital One bank branch, a multi-story café, a coop working center and at least one community organization board room at the famous Georgetown corner of Wisconsin Avenue and M Street are moving ahead. A “special exception” use application has been filed with the Board of Zoning Adjustment, according to a presentation by the CallisonRTKL architectural firm at the April 29 Georgetown-Burleith Advisory Neighborhood Commission meeting. The site was the home of Nathans bar and restaurant, a Georgetown landmark for decades that closed in 2009. Renderings of the new interior depict large open sections on three floors joined by a circular center staircase. There are areas for banking services, lounges with extra-wide sofas and chairs, a spacious coffee and pastry bar with high chairs, several coop work spaces with shared tables and two or three “board meeting rooms” that can be reserved by local nonprofits. Free WiFi will be available throughout.

Representatives from the Citizens Association of Georgetown had several criticisms of the exterior refurbishment plans, especially the painting of the whole building in a single unifying color. CAG suggested that painting each section of the building along M Street in a different color, as had been done before, better conformed to the small-shop feel of Georgetown. Similarly, CAG suggested that the wide front doors of reclaimed wood and glass that Capital One planned to install did not reflect the character of the brick fronts of Georgetown. Among other issues, the subtle nightlighting of the entire building was said to distract from the presence of the historic Georgetown bank building across the street with its gold dome. The brand signage was also criticized as too large and distinct, failing to meld into the marquee. No date has been confirmed for the opening of the café, although the designers anticipate an early 2019 completion.

in the Tuesday, June 19, 2018 Primary Election

During the Primary, only Democratic, Republican, DC Statehood Green, and Libertarian voters may vote on the candidates. However, every registered voter, including unaffiliated and minor party affiliated voters, may vote on the Initiative Measure that will appear on the ballot.

CONTESTS ON THE BALLOT: Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives Mayor of the District of Columbia Chairman of the Council At-large Member of the Council Ward Member of the Council for Wards 1, 3, 5 and 6 Attorney General of the District of Columbia United States Senator United States Representative National and Local Party Committee Members Initiative Measure No. 77, the “District of Columbia Minimum Wage Amendment Act of 2017”* * All voters, regardless of party affiliation status, will be asked to vote “YES” to approve or “NO” to reject the Initiative Measure in the Primary. For the complete text of the Initiative Measure, please visit our website at www.dcboe.org

POLLS WILL BE OPEN FROM 7AM TO 8PM WANT TO VOTE EARLY? Early Voting will start at One Judiciary Square on June 4, and at ward-based Early Voting Centers on June 8. Early Voting Centers are open daily (including weekends) through June 15, 2018 from 8:30am until 7pm.

EARLY VOTING CENTERS MONDAY, JUNE 4 — FRIDAY, JUNE 15 Ward 2: One Judiciary Square, 441 4th Street NW (Paper & Touchscreen Ballots) FRIDAY, JUNE 8 — FRIDAY, JUNE 15 (Touchscreen Ballots only) Ward 1: Columbia Heights Community Center, 1480 Girard Street NW

Ward 5: Turkey Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Avenue NE

Ward 7: Deanwood Recreation Center, 1350 49th Street NE

Ward 3: Chevy Chase Community Center, 5601 Connecticut Avenue NW

Ward 6: Sherwood Recreation Center, 640 10th Street NE

Ward 8: Malcolm X Opportunity Center, 1351 Alabama Avenue SE

Ward 4: Takoma Community Center, 300 Van Buren Street NW

Ward 6: King Greenleaf Recreation Center, 201 N Street SW

Need More Information? For more information on the upcoming election, on voter registration, to confirm your registration information, or to find your polling place, please visit www.dcboe.org or call (202) 727-2525.

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TOWN TOPICS

Hyde-Addison Construction Behind Schedule Almost a year has gone by since Georgetown’s only public elementary school, Hyde-Addison, located at 3246 P St. NW, was vacated to allow demolition for a two-year renovation and expansion project to begin. The original plans proposed that the new campus would include space for “a gym, art room, music room, group instruction spaces, an adequately sized library and an ADA accessible main entrance.” All was to be completed by the summer of 2019. Now, in mid-May 2018, the site is clear of all landscaping, children’s play equipment and

the like. Digging out of the new underground portion of the campus is underway. A large excavation is getting deeper and deeper and crews have been working on several recent weekends at the site. But construction seems to be behind schedule. The schedule posted on the website assigns the following work to the winter of 2018: “continue site clearing and demolition, grading, excavation and shoring/underpinning and concrete work including footings and foundation and a steel erection.” In the spring

of 2018, the plan specifies: “completion of steel erection and façade work begun.” Two million dollars has been added to the project budget of $33.6 million, according to a notation by DC Public Schools in the April 29 biweekly report issued regularly by Amanda Ou of DCPS. Some new additions to the plan have been indicated. The last school community meeting for the project was held Feb. 22, with no meetings currently scheduled for May.

Share Your Thoughts on Dockless Vehicles Washington, D.C., is starting to look like the capital not only of the country but of “dockless” mobile transportation. Suddenly, bikes and adult scooters of all colors and sizes, some with quiet electric motors (and others not), can be seen everywhere. According to the more than half a dozen bike-share and scooter companies in D.C., some 120,000 riders have collectively taken more than 300,000 rides on their vehicles since last September. In addition, the D.C. government has bought and maintains some 4,000 red-and-yellow Capital Bikeshare bikes, parked at bike stations throughout the city. The initial six-month contracts of the original five dockless bike companies, set to

end in April, were extended by the city through August. This month, the District Department of Transportation is conducting a survey to get a better understanding of how the program fits with the existing bike-share system and to fill in the profile of current dockless bikeshare users. The survey, open to riders and non-riders, is available at ddot.dc.gov/page/ dockless-vehicles-district until June 1. Perhaps the biggest issues with the program are the danger and annoyance resulting from the growing number of inappropriately parked bikes and scooters. They can be found in the middle of a sidewalk or a curb cut — even in curbside tree boxes. Volunteers at the Rock Creek Conservancy’s cleanup event

encountered abandoned dockless bikes and scooters in Rock Creek waterways this year. The public is asked to call 311 — not 911 — when finding an abandoned bike or scooter blocking a path or driveway. Meanwhile, city and bike companies are searching for the best solutions to stop the sloppy and dangerous practice, including fines, permits, impounding, service denials and a posted set of principles, according to David Alpert, executive director of DC Sustainable Transportation. In the meantime, DDOT will be analyzing the expected summer surge in ridership to decide whether future programs should be expanded, capped or reduced.

Norman Larsen: 1933-2018 Norm Larsen died peacefully April 23 in Williamsburg, Virginia, at home with family by his side. Larsen was best know in Georgetown for being manager of the George Town Club, where he worked for more than 27 years. He was also president of the Francis Scott Key Foundation, which completed Francis Scott Key Park on M Street in 1993, the year of Larsen’s retirement. He lived for many years in McLean.

He served in the Air Force and ran a children’s theater before coming to Washington, D.C., in 1960. He was graduate of Northwestern University and also went to American University. Larsen’s extensive private club work included Washington Golf and Country Club and Belle Haven Country Club. He is survived by his wife Janis Larsen and sons, David and Robert.

Party Noise Season Begins in Georgetown May is always a noisy month in Georgetown. Increased noise seems to come from everywhere: the doubling down of construction projects determined to finish by summer, stepped-up air traffic, birds in flirting mode and school graduation celebrations, especially by Georgetown’s numerous college graduates. One of several agencies that enforce regulations regarding noise, the District Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs has as its official and declared policy that “every person is entitled to ambient noise levels that are not detrimental to life, health, and enjoyment of his or her property. Excessive or unnecessary noises within the District are a menace.” However, DCRA’s primary responsibility is for noise related to activity under its

regulatory authority, such as that generated by trash removal and construction. The agency also deals with complaints about noise from licensed night clubs and restaurants serving alcohol, which in many cases occurs outside during the warm summer months. But loud noise from graduating seniors, mating fowls and such — in, around, over and sometimes under Georgetown residences — is another matter. One gathers that in much of the country most social noise on weekends has a flexible shutdown time of around midnight. Then, the appropriate enforcement agency to call is the local police. But before doing that, Eve Bachrach of Curbed LA suggests doing three things:

Calm down! Take a deep breath and consider whether the noise coming through the walls is merely aggravating, or likely to be in violation of your local noise ordinance. Have a nice chat Once you’ve calmed down (and really, don’t attempt to have a polite conversation while you’re seething — it won’t end well), knock on their door and ask your neighbor to quiet down. Get out of the house This isn’t necessarily a long-term solution, but go for a walk. Work at a cafe. See a movie. But after taking those steps, call the police if the noise is genuinely impeding your health and safety.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR FRIDAY, MAY 18 BIKE TO WORK DAY

100 Bike to Work Day pit stop events — with T-shirts, refreshments and prizes — will be held throughout D.C., Maryland and Virginia, including one at Georgetown Waterfront Park. Those interested in taking part, celebrating bicycling as a clean, fun and healthy way to commute, can find out more and register at biketoworkmetrodc.org.

SATURDAY, MAY 19 DDOT MEETING ON STREETLIGHTS

The District Department of Transportation will hold a public hearing from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Palisades Public Library, 4901 V St. NW, on a proposed project to modernize streetlights. For details, visit ddot.dc.gov.

TUESDAY, MAY 22 CAG ANNUAL MEETING

At the annual meeting, the Citizens Association of Georgetown will honor the people who have made significant contributions to the community in 2017 and elect new CAG officers and directors for 2018-19. The new member reception will begin at 6 p.m., the general reception at 7 p.m. and the program at 7:30 p.m., all at Dumbarton House, 2715 Q St. NW. For details, visit www.cagtown.org.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23 FOCUS ON PUBLIC SAFETY

The Georgetown Business Association will hold a meeting on the topic of public safety from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the City Tavern Club, 3206 M St. NW. For details, visit georgetownbusiness.org.

TUDOR PLACE GARDEN PARTY The 26th annual Spring Garden Party will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. at Tudor Place, 1644 31st St. NW. For details, visit tudorplace.org.

MONDAY, JUNE 4 DOCTORS SPEAK OUT ON STRESS

At “Stress, Mindfulness, and Your Health,” from noon to 2 p.m. at the Georgetown University Hotel & Conference Center, 3800 Reservoir Road NW, a panel will address stress — good and bad — as a health issue in people’s lives. For details, visit guevents.georgetown.edu.

ANC2E MEETING Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2E will meet at Georgetown Visitation School, 1524 35th St. NW, at 6:30 p.m. (ANC 2E will not hold a public meeting in the month of May.) For details, visit anc2e.com.

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EDITORIAL

OPINION

Jack Evans Report

Moving Forward on Public Education Send Your Feedback, Questions or Concerns, Tips and Suggestions to editorial@georgetowner.com or call 202-338-4833

Needed: A Spirit of Rotation A quick look at the District’s Democratic primary lineup reveals some worrisome features of our more-or-less one-party state. Serious opponents are lacking for most candidates, including Mayor Muriel Bowser — and we have not even mentioned the 27,000 Republicans who live in the nation’s capital, which just hit the population mark of 600,000. According to the D.C. Republican Party, there were 27,094 registered voters affiliated with the party two years ago, 6.29 percent of all registered voters in the District. Another telling example is the race between Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton and challenger Kim Ford, who worked in the Obama administration. While Norton has been dedicated and led the good fight, could we even think about hearing what Ford has to say and seeing what she might have to offer? However things turn out, we know we need fresh voices. Change in the District should be encouraged and embraced. Today, our politics seem defined — from the top down — by a stagnant air of self-congratulation. Problems such as education scandals, violent crime and the lack of affordable housing are played down as the city

pursues a bigger-is-better strategy. The list of those involved in community and political life seems fixated on the same faces. It’s great to have such dedication, but how can we expand the pool of those willing to help? Given the influx of newcomers, let’s find a way. Are term limits needed at all levels? With all the opportunities for service — such as board membership in local groups like the Citizens Association of Georgetown and various business organizations — care must also be taken to avoid conflicts of interest. A District Council bill, stuck in committee, outlines a code of conduct for D.C. government employees as well as for those who sit on advisory neighborhood commissions. Some commissioners, who are involved in other community groups (churches, senior clubs, Boy Scouts, etc.), have expressed concern about the ambiguity of the constraints and the severity of the penalties, but at least we have a starting point. How about a spirit of rotation all around, as that becomes increasingly possible? The pool will expand — and the possibility of conflicts of interest arising will diminish — as more and new residents get involved. Or so one hopes.

Voting at 16? Ward 6 Council member Charles Allen recently introduced legislation that would allow 16- and 17-year-olds to vote. If passed, District 16-year-olds could vote not only in local elections but also in federal elections, which is to say that these teens could vote in national elections in November and in 2020. The legislation was cosponsored by at-large Council member David Grosso and Ward 1 Council member Brianne K. Nadeau. Allen pointed out that there is nothing in our federal laws or in the Constitution that forbids this. As it stands now, the 26th Amendment prevents states or the federal government from denying the right to vote to those 18 or older on account of their age. Is the idea worth supporting? Let’s look at some things. In a jurisdiction where voter turnout is traditionally and disgracefully low, putting teens on the roll surely can’t hurt. Do we think that 16-year-olds in the District (and elsewhere, by inference) are well-informed enough to cast a meaningful vote? School’s out on that one, but we could make a wild guess that their vocabulary is probably the equal of what we read in presidential tweets.

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In terms of what young people know about the issues, voting at such an early age may reflect the state of our education system, perhaps revealing if there’s work to be done in that arena. For young people, getting the vote would likely serve as a motivational and inspirational tool, indicating that adults have some faith in their potential as change agents. The courage, tenacity and articulateness displayed by the teens from Parkland at the recent demonstrations in favor of gun control bodes well. We understand that even knowledgeable adults might hesitate before allowing persons this young to vote. We share some of that skepticism. But we also think that there are a number of upsides. Other jurisdictions (only local in the United States) allow it. At least two countries — Brazil and Austria — are also in the ranks. Is a trial run possible? The bottom line is, if 16-year-olds join the voting ranks, we don’t think it would result in some kind of disaster for the electoral process. You know, the kind of thing in which foreign entities attempt to interfere or a candidate with a winning margin of three million votes is defeated.

BY JAC K E VA N S The fiscal year 2019 budget season is coming to an end. For the past three months, the District Council has held hearings and discussed how taxpayer money should be spent in the coming year. Council committees have heard from passionate residents on many issues, and that testimony weighs heavily on our budget considerations. The nearly $14.5-billion budget will be the biggest in the District’s history, with a large portion of the money going to DC Public Schools. It’s crucial to keep in mind as we move closer to approving this enormous budget that the city and agencies need to do a better job of knowing exactly how our money is spent. When the District allocates money to DCPS — which has been hit hard by reports of multiple scandals in the past five months — it’s more important than ever to make sure it is used wisely and efficiently. These scandals, I believe, have hurt the credibility of DCPS with the public. For instance, students’ attendance records had been altered to ensure that graduation rates remain high. In addition, there have been findings of residency fraud at some schools. Not that long ago, the Council had a very tough decision to make when asked to increase the budget

for the Duke Ellington School for the Arts redevelopment project. And, in February, the DCPS chancellor was forced to resign for bypassing student transfer rules. I trust the mayor and District officials will be diligent in their oversight to correct these problems. It’s not all bad news, though. I still believe that DCPS has many great schools, where teachers provide a quality education for many of our children. The District has some of the best schools and teachers in the region. Last week, I attended the Ward 2 Education Network forum with Acting Chancellor Amanda Alexander. I was very impressed with her knowledge of Ward 2 schools, schools throughout the District and our successes and challenges. She has a solid plan to make changes and rebuild the trust in D.C. schools. All District residents deserve a well-funded school system that works to educate and to prepare children for life after high school. Our fiscal year 2019 budget makes the point loud and clear that education is a top priority. My hope is that we can move past these road blocks and focus on educating our children. Jack Evans is the District Council member for Ward 2, representing Georgetown and other neighborhoods since 1991.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Waterfront Park: With Help From Other Friends Thank you for the May 2nd Georgetowner article about Friends of Georgetown Waterfront Park. It highlighted the success our small group of FOGWP founders had in building the park, noting that three predecessor organizations “had all tried, but FOGWP was the one that finally accomplished it.” We formed FOGWP in 2005 to carry on the important work of earlier groups that had advocated for a park on the Georgetown waterfront and had raised funds to build it. We could not have finally succeeded in building the park without help from D.C. City Administrator Dan Tangherlini, Ward 2 Council member Jack Evans, National Park Service Regional Director John Parsons, and the generous support of the Percy and Rockefeller families and other donors. We carried the baton over the finish line, but we were part of a very large and dedicated team. — Grace Bateman, board member, Friends of Georgetown Waterfront Park

FYI, PETA While I understand advertising is different from your editorial product, I must comment on the PETA ad on page 5 in the May 2nd Georgetowner. The ad reads, “Donald Trump doesn’t have a pet. The last president without a pet got impeached. Adopt before it’s too late.” Well, the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals needs to know President Bill Clinton was impeached in 1998 and had a dog named Buddy. The Clintons also had a cat named Socks. Just sayin’. — Pet lover on P Street (name withheld upon request)

Will you be voting in the June 19 primary election?

YOUR OPINION MATTERS. Post your response to Facebook.com/TheGeorgetowner


D.C. PRIMARY ELECTION

JUNE 19 Four political parties have primaries on

THE VILLAGE

From the overwhelming number of Democrats follow the Republicans, D.C. Statehood Green party and the Libertarians. There are a few official challengers for Mayor Muriel Bowser or Council chair Phil Mendelson, but the primary election looks all right for incumbents. Later, on Nov. 6, the General Election may provide a few surprises with voters able to vote for any party’s candidate. But don't too excited: Washington, D.C., is a one-party town. The blue wave here is a deep blue swamp. The following is a list of elected positions and which political party is vying for that job.

MAYOR ANN WILCOX (G)

JAMES BUTLER(D)

MARTIN MOULTON (L)

ERNEST E. JOHNSON (D) MURIEL BOWSER* (D)

U.S. Representative

Attorney General

FRANKLIN GARCIA* (D)

KARL RACINE* (D)

U.S. Senator

National Committeewoman

Early voting June 4 through June 15 At-large Council Member

Council Chair

Ward 1 Council Member

Ward 5 Council Member

Ward 6 Council Member

MICHAEL BROWN* (D) MARIE JOHNS (D)

ANITA BONDS* (D)

PHIL MENDELSON* (D)

BRIANNE NADEAU* (D)

KENYAN MCDUFFIE * (D)

CHARLES ALLEN* (D)

ANDRIA THOMAS (D) NIKKI LEWIS (D)

Delegate to the House of RepresentativeS from D.C. MARCUS GOODWIN (D)

JEREMIAH LOWERY (D)

DAVID SCHWARTZMAN (G)

DENISE HICKS (L)

ED LAZARE (D)

Ward 3 Council Member

MARY CHEH* (D)

KENT BOESE (D)

GAYLE HALL CARLEY(D)

LISA HUNTER (D)

SILVIA MARTINEZ (D)

National CommitteEman LORI PARKER (D)

SHEIKA REID (D)

ballot initiative #77 asks voters to approve or disprove a wage increase for tipped workers. This vote is the talk of the restaurant industry and evokes the most interest in an otherwise predictable primary election.

NESTOR DJONKAM (D)

MICHAEL BEKESHA (R)

BRADLEY THOMAS (D)

Ward 6 Chair of the D.C. Republican Committee

LAMONICA JEFFREY (D)

ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON* (D)

KIM FORD (D)

JACK EVANS (D)

BRUCE MAJORS (L)

MARKUS BATCHELOR (D)

STEPHEN JACKSON

(See article on page 5)

*Incumbent

JOYCE (CHESTNUT) ROBINSON-PAUL (G)

NATALE “LINO” STRACUZZI (G)

For the listing of candidates for At-large Committeewomen and Committeeman of the Democratic State Committee, visit dcboe.gov.

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BUSINESS

INS & OUTS BY ST EP H A N I E G R EE N A N D RO B E R T D E VA N E Y

In: Sugar Lab

Out: No More Cream Puffs

On May 12, Georgetowners got another sweet spot. Sugar Lab, which specializes in local and handmade gelato and waffle cones, has rolled into 3279 M St. NW, billing itself as a “research institute of happiness.”

Sad to report: Beard Papa’s, the custard cream puff shop headquartered in Japan, has closed its Georgetown location at 1332 Wisconsin Ave. NW.

(for your sugar fix)

In: Rosewood Rooftop

(for a drink with a view) For those looking for treats of an alcoholic variety — along with cool views — the rooftop bar and lounge of the Rosewood hotel on 31st Street opened for the summer on May 11. You can head over for cocktails and light bites from 11:30 a.m. to midnight daily.

In: Illesteva

(for M Street sunsets) Should you require some chic new sunglasses for outdoor summer parties, Illesteva, the Italian optical company, is now welcoming Georgetown customers at its new location: 3306 M St. NW.

Coming: Restaurant by Owner of Mirabelle As Morton’s Steakhouse prepares to leave its 37-year-old spot in Georgetown Court, 3251 Prospect St. NW, Hakan Ilhan, who owns Mirabelle restaurant downtown, has signed a lease for the space, according to Miller Walker Retail Real Estate, which represented both landlord (Bob Elliott) and tenant. The property owner will renovate the space and push the entrance close to the Prospect Street sidewalk, shared by Cafe Milano and Peacock Cafe. As previously reported in this newspaper, Morton’s will close by Dec. 1. The as-yet-unnamed casual French restaurant will debut in late 2019. Ilhan’s 20 eateries include Al Dente and Ottoman Taverna.

Ladurée’s Premier Anniversaire Expanded: Salon L’eau Adds Barber Shop, Spa Salon L’eau, 3240 P St. NW, has expanded to a full-service, one-stop shop, according to LoAnn Lai, owner and stylist. The expansion includes the launch of Crew Cuts, an upscale men’s barber shop. The name Crew Cuts was inspired by the Georgetown University crew team, the salon said, “which represents so much of the charm, history and prestige that is Georgetown. Clients can relax in the private men’s area receiving various treatments from massage to waxing to manscaping. Or sit in the chair of a highly trained barber for a straight-edge razor shave and haircut.” Salon L’eau also offers massage therapy, facials, waxing with homemade sugar wax and manicures/pedicures.

Have some business news on people on the move or anniversaries? Email editorial@georgetowner.com.

Ladurée, 3060 M St. NW, celebrated its first anniversary May 11 with a breakfast. The deluxe French macaron shop plans to expand to Rosslyn, Virginia, later this year.

Merged: Chef Geoff’s and Clover Restaurant Group Chef Geoff’s Restaurant Group and Clover Restaurant Group joined forces to create a joint venture comprising four Washington restaurant brands and nine total restaurants, including Chef Geoff’s, Lia’s, Cafe Deluxe and Tortilla Coast. All the restaurants will be operated by Chef Geoff’s Deluxe Hospitality and family owned by father and son James and Brian Sullivan and brothers Geoff and Chris Tracy. The four have extensive experience in restaurant ownership and operations in the D.C., Virginia and Maryland markets. The Tracys have been partners at Chef Geoff’s for over a decade and the Sullivans have owned Cafe Deluxe and Tortilla Coast for more than eight years.

RE-ELECT H I L D E M O C R AT MeNDeLsON

DC COUNCIL CHAIRMAN

PROVEN. PROGRESSIVE. LEADER SHIP.

www.philmendelson.com D.C. PRIMARY ELECTIONS 10

MAY 2, 2018

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VOTE

JUNE 19


BUSINESS

Capital Appellate Advocacy: From ‘Big Law’ to Boutique Lawrence (Larry) S. Ebner had made it to partner in a law firm. In September of 2016, however, he decided to change his work environment by leaving what he calls “Big Law.” Ebner took space at Carr Workplaces at 1701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW and created his own boutique law firm, Capital Appellate Advocacy PLLC. The firm has a staff of one: Ebner himself. The location of his new work environment was important. He had fallen in love with downtown D.C. and wanted to continue working there. According to Ebner, changing his base of operations did not mean he was undertaking an encore career. Rather, he is continuing to do the work he has done for 46 years, including more than 30 years in the legal specialty he felt called to: appellate law. “What I’m doing now builds on more than 45 years of litigation and knowledge and expertise and skills development,” he said. Ebner has noticed that he is not alone in making such a professional change. Other lawyers with a lot of work experience have made similar moves, either to much smaller firms or to solo work. While he’s not sure about the reasons behind the trend, in his own case, he felt a strong desire to have more independence. For example, he doesn’t have to worry about logging non-billable time and has the power to set his own fees. Instead, Ebner focuses on contributing to the development of case law and to the civil justice system, of which appellate law is a key part. When taking on appellate law cases, his focus is on civil cases and not on criminal cases. His clients are primarily corporations and other companies. Ebner often represents the defense side of civil litigation, but he has been on the side of the plaintiff when a client is suing the government.

REAL ESTATE

Commercial Property 5117 MacArthur Boulevard NW This offering represents an extremely rare opportunity to acquire a retail/office building along the MacArthur Boulevard commercial corridor, which runs through the middle of the affluent Palisades neighborhood. The owner has operated out of the building for more than 30 years and will vacate that unit upon sale. This opens the door for an investor to reposition the asset or for an owner/user to occupy that space, benefiting from the income generated by the other two tenants. Offered at $1,200,000 Property Type: Retail Building Category: Class C Gross Leasable Area: 2,924 square feet

Lawrence (Larry) S. Ebner. Ebner said that he plays an important role in giving voice to industries, trade associations and professional groups. His work has also involved speaking to the Supreme Court. “I find what I do so intellectually rewarding,” he said. Though he misses certain things about having worked in a big law firm, Ebner has found ways to not neglect those aspects of his life. The main thing he misses is interacting with the other attorneys on a daily basis, but he and his former coworkers still stay in touch with one another. He also interacts with people at Carr Workplaces. However, Ebner does not recommend that most new lawyers follow suit. He said that joining a law firm is a great opportunity, but new lawyers should look into working in firms of all sizes as well as for companies and nonprofits and in government agencies. “For most law school graduates, these are equally satisfying opportunities,” he said.

The Feldman Group of Marcus & Millichap Josh Feldman 202-536-3730

The Genau Group is hiring commercial and residential leaders. Please call 202-735-5382 or email getpromoted@thegenaugroup.com for a private interview.

CULTURAL LEADERSHIP BREAKFAST with Augustus Casely-Hayford,

Director of the National Museum of African Art

S P O N S O R E D B Y C A R R WO R KPL AC ES

THOMAS LANDSCAPES 202.322.2322 | www.thomaslandscapes.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 8 - 9:30am

Design with Excellence

Derek Thomas / Principal - Certified Professional Horticulturist, Master Gardener

Member of the MD Nursery and Landscape Association & the Association of Professional Landscape Designers

Sponsored by

GEORGE TOWN CLUB 1530 Wisconsin Ave NW

$25 ($20 for George Town Club Members) RSVP: Richard@georgetowner.com Just four months after his arrival in Washington, D.C., the new director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art, Augustus (Gus) Casely-Hayford, will speak at the George Town Club as part of Georgetown Media Group s Cultural Leadership Breakfast Series.

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MAY 2, 2018

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AR T S P R E V IE W BY AR I POST

RALPH STEADMAN: A RETROSPECTIVE American University Museum at the Katzen June 16 – August 12 The upcoming Ralph Steadman retrospective at the American University Museum will offer a glimpse into the beautiful, twisted mind of one of our most acclaimed illustrators, cartoonists and artists. The exhibition will journey through Steadman’s prolific career, from the sketches he created as a student in the 1950s to the present day. On view will be works from Steadman’s collaborations with gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson, his illustrated literary classics, the inventive books he authored — such as “I Leonardo,” “The Big I Am” and children’s books “No Room to Swing a Cat” and “That’s My Dad” — plus artworks from his travels with Oddbins Wine Merchants and his packaging for Flying Dog Brewery.

Smithsonian Associates Presents

A Berkshires Cultural Sampler Sun., July 29 –Thurs., August 2

Join Richard Selden, the cultural editor of The Georgetowner for a splendid sampling of cultural attractions in the Berkshire Hills. Visit Edith Wharton’s Lenox estate, attend a concert at Music Mountain, explore Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, see a performance at the Tony-Award winning Williamstown Theater, and much more, then on the return trip visit Yale University Museum. For more information call 202 633-3030 or visit SmithsonianAssociates.org

“Ships in Distress off a Rocky Coast,” 1667. Ludolf Backhuysen. Courtesy NGA.

WATER, WIND, AND WAVES: MARINE PAINTINGS FROM THE DUTCH GOLDEN AGE National Gallery of Art July 1 – November 25 During the 17th century, the Dutch became leaders in marine travel, transport, commerce and security as their massive cargo carriers and warships traversed oceans and their small vessels and fishing boats navigated inland and coastal waterways. Water was central to their economic and naval successes, but was also a source of pleasure and enjoyment. Drawn largely from the National Gallery’s own collection, this exhibition will feature nearly 50 paintings, prints, drawings, rare books and ship models, exploring the deep, multifaceted relationship the Dutch had with the water.

KIDS VISIT

FREE

JULY 1 –SEP T. 3, 2 018* Ruth Bader Ginsburg | Larry Downing | Newsweek

VISUAL ARTS

NOW OPEN

*Enjoy free admission for up to four kids 18 and younger with each paid adult or senior admission, or Newseum membership. Learn more at newseum.org/summer.

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SU M M E R ART S P R E V IE W ONE YEAR: 1968, AN AMERICAN ODYSSEY National Portrait Gallery Opens June 29

Jimi Hendrix. Unidentified Artist. Color photolithographic poster on paper.

“One Year: 1968, An American Odyssey” is a one-room exhibition that relies on some 30 portraits to tell the story of 1968, the year when the Vietnam War reached a turning point, the Civil Rights Act was signed into law and television sets displayed everything from the Olympic Games to the first manned orbit of the moon. It was also the year that the National Portrait Gallery first opened its doors. Among the subjects featured in the exhibition, on view through May 19, 2019, are Martin Luther King Jr., Robert F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, the Apollo 8 astronauts and cultural figures such as Peggy Fleming, Arthur Ashe, Aretha Franklin, Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin.

The Paul Mellon Collection of British Sporting Art from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

April 13 - July 22, 2018

Sir Alfred Munnings, P.R.A. (British, 1878–1959), (Detail), Linin’ ’em Up, Newmarket, ca. 1940–53, oil on panel, 19 ¾ x 23 ½ inches, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Paul Mellon Collection. Photo: David Stover © Virginia Museum of Fine Arts This traveling exhibition is organized by Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

102 The Plains Road | Middleburg, VA | 540-687-6542 | Open Wed-Sun 10am-5pm NationalSporting.org

“The visitor goes through a direct experience walking in the immigrants’ feet, under their skin, and into their hearts.” — Alejandro G. Iñárritu.

CARNE Y ARENA

1611 Benning Road NE Through August 31 An immersive, conceptual virtual reality installation by Academy Award-winning director Alejandro G. Iñárritu, “Carne y Arena (Virtually present, Physically invisible)” explores the human condition of immigrants and refugees. Based on true accounts from Central American and Mexican refugees, it blurs and binds together the lines between subject and bystander, allowing individuals to walk in a vast space and live a fragment of a refugee’s personal journey. Awarded a special Oscar last year, the six-and-a-half-minute solo experience premiered at the 70th Cannes Film Festival, the first virtual reality project to be featured in the festival’s history. For reservations (required), visit carneyarenadc.com.

Sandra Rocha. Untitled (DR - Um Diário da República, 2012), 2014.

SECOND NATURE: PORTUGUESE CONTEMPORARY ART The Kreeger Museum June 12 – July 31

The first group exhibition of 21st-century Portuguese art to be presented in the U.S., “Second Nature” is both a portrait of recent artistic production in Portugal and an exploration of the relationship between human culture and the environment. The exhibition, the first to go on tour from Lisbon’s new Museum of Art, Architecture, and Technology, brings together approximately 30 works created over the past two decades by 16 artists from different generations, working in media ranging from watercolor to photography to video. Each employs modern technology and materials to capture, filter and reinvent the natural world, thereby generating a “second nature.”

HEAVY METAL: WOMEN TO WATCH 2018 National Museum of Women in the Arts June 28 – September 16

The fifth installment in the “Women to Watch” series at the National Museum of Women in the Arts will showcase contemporary artists working in metal. Featured artists in “Heavy Metal” investigate the physical properties and expressive possibilities of metalwork through a wide variety of objects, including sculpture, jewelry and conceptual forms. Works in the

exhibition range from large-scale installations to small objects intended for personal adornment. The exhibition seeks to disrupt the predominantly masculine narrative that surrounds metalworking and demonstrate that contemporary women artists carry on a vibrant legacy in the field.

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SU M M E R A R T S P R E V IE W

PERFORMANCE

B Y G A RY T I S C H L ER AN D R IC H AR D SEL D EN

THEATER

MUSICALS

‘The Remains,’ Studio Theatre. Picture this: 10 years after their marriage made history, Kevin and Theo celebrate with a dinner for their families. Billed as a comedy about the tragedy of loving, the play, by Ken Urban, is a world-premiere production directed by Studio Artistic Director David Muse. May 18 – June 17.

‘Hamilton,’ Kennedy Center Opera House. The hip hop-flavored Broadway smash about one of our founding fathers has finally arrived at the Kennedy Center — needing no description or introduction if recent ticket lines are any indication. June 12 – September 16.

‘Botticelli in the Fire,’ Woolly Mammoth. Jordan Tannahill’s play about the great Renaissance painter who, in the midst of painting “The Birth of Venus,” clashes with a conservative firebrand priest leading a populist revolution. An all-star cast for an all-star group of Renaissance characters. May 28 – June 24. ‘The Undeniable Sound of Right Now,’ Keegan Theatre. A new play by Laura Eason, who taps into the rock and pop sounds of the 1990s as one man struggles to keep his life and Kurt Cobain-era band together. Through May 27. ‘The Legend of Georgia McBride,’ Round House Theatre. In this play by Matthew Lopez, directed by Tom Story, Casey has a good job as an Elvis impersonator at a falling-down bar in the Florida panhandle. But now the owner is bringing in a full-blown drag show. June 6 – July 1.

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‘The Color Purple,’ Kennedy Center Eisenhower Theater. Riding alongside at the Eisenhower Theater is a blast from the past, the 2016 Tony Award winner for best revival, based on Alice Walker’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. July 31 –August 26. Salvatore Antonio in ‘Botticelli in the Fire’ at Woolly Mammoth. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann. ‘The Cherry Orchard,’ Eastman Studio Theatre, Gallaudet University. Washington’s classical comedy company Faction of Fools takes on Chekhov’s classic portrait of a troubled family living on a floundering estate in a swiftly changing Czarist Russia. May 18 – June 10. ‘Switch,’ Trinidad Theatre, Logan Fringe Art Space. From the playwrights’ collective the Welders, a play by Brett Abelman in which a couple switches genders in the aftermath of sex. June 6 – 23.

‘Ain’t Too Proud: The Life and Times of the Temptations,’ Kennedy Center Eisenhower Theater. For something new and something old all at once, there’s a new musical that traces the career of the Motown legends who racked up 42 Top 10 hits, including “Papa Was a Rolling Stone” and “Just My Imagination.” June 19 – July 22. ‘Camelot,’ Shakespeare Theatre. The company, which has added classic musicals to its menu in recent years, will wrap up the current season at Sidney Harman Hall with Lerner and Loewe’s Arthurianthemed show, directed by Alan Paul. May 22 – July 1.

‘The Color Purple’ at the Kennedy Center. The Scottsboro Boys,’ Signature Theatre. Joe Calarco directs Signature’s production of this Kander and Ebb musical centering on the fate of nine boys taken from a train in the 1931 Jim Crow South. May 22 – July 1. ‘Waitress,’ National Theatre. A baking contest may get a lonely waitress out of her small town and troubled marriage in this Broadway hit with music and lyrics by Sara Bareilles. Desi Oakley stars. May 15 – June 3. ‘Dave,’ Arena Stage. Remember the quite-some-time-ago (1993) movie about a presidential look-alike played by Kevin Kline taking over as CEO of the land? Now it’s fulfilling another destiny as a world-premiere musical directed by Tina Landau. July 13 – August 19.


SU M M E R ART S P R E V IE W

MUSIC The Anthem. The main live-music venue at the Wharf on the Southwest Waterfront is bringing in, among other acts: Janelle Monáe (July 20), the Arctic Monkeys (July 28) and Needtobreathe (August 17). The Birchmere. Some highlights: An Evening with 10,000 Maniacs (May 27), Ry Cooder (rescheduled date: June 11), Gordon Lightfoot (June 18), Robert Cray Band (June 20), Tower of Power 50th Anniversary (June 22 and 23), Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes (July 6), Poco & Atlanta Rhythm Section (July 12), The Bacon Brothers (July 20, 21 and 22), Johnny Gill (July 27 and 28), Thomas Dolby (July 30), Toad the Wet Sprocket (August 9 and 10), Morris Day & the Time (August 12), Jean Luc Ponty (August 19) and Tanya Tucker (August 23). Capital One Arena. Here’s where the big tours land, notably: U2’s Experience + Innocence Tour (July 17 and 18), Shania Twain’s Now Tour (July 15) and Shakira’s El Dorado Tour (August 11). Merriweather Post Pavilion. Along with the festivals at this storied Columbia, Maryland, venue, Merriweather Post is hosting such familiar names as the Foo Fighters (July 6), David Byrne (July 28), Phish (August 11 and 12), Cake and Ben Folds (August 18) and Kenny Chesney (August 22).

Strathmore. Talk about variety: Boz Scaggs (June 13), Herbie Hancock (June 24), Kristin Chenoweth (June 27) and Sarah McLachlan (June 29). The Wednesday-night “Live from the Lawn” series will include the Chuck Brown Band (August 1) and the finale of Ukefest (August 15). Wolf Trap. Everybody who’s anybody is performing this late spring and summer at the Filene Center, the outdoor amphitheater at Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts in Vienna, Virginia. Here is a sampling: the Washington Ballet’s “Giselle” (May 25), John Fogerty and ZZ Top (May 27), Alison Krauss and David Crosby (June 6), Harry Connick Jr. (June 14), Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo (June 19), Tony Bennett (June 23), Barenaked Ladies (July 2), the Indigo Girls (July 10), Queen Latifah and Common (July 20), Hanson with the National Symphony Orchestra (August 4) and Jeff Beck (August 20). Wolf Trap Opera. The company will present four operas at three locations: Mozart’s “Idomeneo” (June 22, 24, 27 and 30) and Gounod’s “Roméo et Juliette” (July 15, 17, 19 and 21) at the Barns; Weill’s “The Seven Deadly Sins” at Union Market (June 23 and 24); and Verdi’s “Rigoletto” (August 3) at the Filene Center.

SUMMER

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

THE WASHINGTON BALLET GISELLE WOLF TRAP ORCHESTRA

MAY 25

LIVE FROM HERE

WITH CHRIS THILE SPECIAL GUEST KACEY MUSGRAVES WITH COMIC SHENG WANG AND DUET PARTNER SARAH JAROSZ

MAY 26

ROGER DALTREY PERFORMS THE WHO’S TOMMY

STEVEN TYLER AND THE LOVING MARY BAND

JUN 10 + 12

JUN 21

MOTOWN THE MUSICAL

LUDOVICO EINAUDI

THE SISTERHOOD BAND

FESTIVALS Kingman Island Bluegrass & Folk Festival. The festival began in 2010 to raise awareness of this public park on an island in the Anacostia River. The lineup includes Gangstagrass, the American Songster Revue, Dori Freeman and Crys Matthews. June 9.

DC Jazz Festival. This citywide festival will feature performances at more than 40 venues in 22 neighborhoods. The lineup includes Leslie Odom Jr, Maceo Parker, Regina Carter, Frederick Yonnet, Edmar Castaneda, the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra and, at the Hamilton Live Series, Terence Blanchard and the E Collective. June 8 – 17. By The People Festival. Billed as an “epic arts and empathy festival,” this free celebration of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, brought to you by Georgetown-based Halcyon, will take place at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building, THEARC West, the Parks at Walter Reed, Union Market and Washington National Cathedral. June 21 to 24. Smithsonian Folklife Festival. This year’s festival of food, craft and dance on the National Mall will focus on the cultures of Armenia and Catalonia. Also, on July 8, there will be an evening concert tribute to the Sisterfire music festivals produced in D.C. by Roadwork in the 1980s. June 27 – July 1 and July 4 – 8.

JUN 26–28

The Anthem at the Wharf. Photo by Richard Selden. Capital Fringe Festival. The 13th annual Capital Fringe Festival is coming to the everhotter Southwest Waterfront neighborhood, with performances at Arena Stage, Blind Whino and several churches. A free preview will take place at Pearl Street Warehouse at the Wharf on July 8. July 7 – 29. Summer Spirit Festival. At Merriweather Post, this soul and hip hop-flavored festival will be headlined by Erykah Badu and Nas on Saturday and by the Roots and Anderson Paak & the Free Nationals on Sunday. August 4 and 5. Lockn’ Festival. Some big names will appear at this four-day jam-band event at Infinity Downs and Oak Ridge Farm in Arrington, Virginia: Widespread Panic, George Clinton & P-Funk, Tedeschi Trucks, Sheryl Crow and Blues Traveler, to name a few. August 23 – 26.

ESSENTIAL EINAUDI

JUL 8

JOHN FOGERTY | ZZ TOP: JAWS IN CONCERT BLUES AND BAYOUS TOUR NATIONAL SYMPHONY RYAN KINDER

ORCHESTRA

MAY 29 + 30

JUL 21

NILE RODGERS & CHIC CHAKA KHAN

VERDI’S RIGOLETTO

JUN 5

HARRY CONNICK JR.

A NEW ORLEANS TRICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION

JUN 14

WOLF TRAP OPERA NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

AUG 3

ALAN JACKSON

LEE ANN WOMACK AUG 16

LES BALLETS TROCKADERO DE MONTE CARLO JUN 19

GMG, INC.

TM & © UNIVERSAL STUDIOS.

Capital Jazz Fest. Held at Merriweather Post, this three-day event will feature headliners Earth, Wind & Fire, Diana Krall and Anita Baker. June 1, 2 and 3.

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SU M M E R ART S PR E V IE W

THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART:

DOWNTOWNER

BY KATE OC ZYPO K

AN INCOMPARABLE TREASURE

GW students want to trade in the Colonial for a hippo. The mayor kicked off the annual “innoMAYtion” campaign.

BY ARI POS T It’s not possible to understand Western art in the 20th century without African art. In fact, that is probably an understatement. Without African art, there would be no 20th-century art as we know it. Were it not for the museums across Europe and America displaying their African curiosities, the great Western artists of the early modern era — Picasso, Matisse, Modigliani, Brancusi, Klee, Dubuffet, even Pollock — would never have developed their groundbreaking visual languages, which moved beyond the naturalism that had defined Western art since the Renaissance. Interest in non-Western art by many of the most influential early modernists centered around the traditions of sub-Saharan Africa. For much of the 20th century, this interest was described as Primitivism, a woefully misguided term denoting a perspective of the non-Western as uncorrupted by Western progress and innovation. Treated as artifacts of colonized cultures rather than as works of art, African sculptures, textiles and paintings were exhibited in dimly lit, musky galleries as curious, primitive artifacts. They once held so little value that they were displayed in pawnshops and flea markets — a history that bears a striking resemblance to that of dinosaur fossils. Today, in the contemporary postcolonial era, the influence of traditional African aesthetics is so profoundly embedded in artistic practice that you often don’t even notice it. Go to any contemporary museum or art gallery in a Western city and you are bound to stumble across countless paintings by no-name artists that borrow from these traditions, almost untraceably far removed from their source. Much like the early modernists, most artists today that borrow freely from the visual lexicons of African art know nothing of its original meaning or function. Should anyone take the effort to truly understand the aesthetic foundation of fine art 16

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D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser kicked off the 2018 “innoMAYtion” campaign, an annual month-long celebration of people and companies shaping innovation in the District, at a May 4 event called “Digital TransforMAYtion.” The kickoff featured a discussion with civic innovation experts such as David Eaves, who lectures at Harvard’s Kennedy School, and Michelle Beaman Chang, founder and CEO of IMBY.

Dubbing it “extremely offensive,” George Washington University students are hoping to change the name of the schools’ teams, the “Colonials,” which dates to 1926. A petition by student Rachel Yakobashvili states: “The historically, negativelycharged figure of Colonials has too deep a connection to colonialization and glorifies the act of systemic oppression.” The top choice for a replacement is the “Hippos,” inspired by the bronze statue that stands in front of Lisner Auditorium. Already the unofficial mascot, a hippo figure revs up the crowd at some GW matches.

Dabney Chef Takes Home Beard Award

Fewer Homeless Families, More Singles

Talkin’ ’Bout My ‘innoMAYtion’

National Museum of African Art. Courtesy NMAA.

over the past century, an exploration of African influences is essential. This is just one reason why the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art is such an incomparable treasure. The arrival of its new director, acclaimed curator and cultural historian Augustus CaselyHayford, seemed an appropriate moment to reflect upon the value of this unique institution’s presence in our city. With more than 10,000 traditional African artworks in the collection, a casual walk through the permanent galleries has the potential to recalibrate one’s understanding of contemporary aesthetics. To see the origins of pictorial flatness and vivid earth-toned color palettes — which have been appropriated by every visual medium and style, from Cubism to comics and graphic design — is eye-opening. The works are also stunningly beautiful. Elongated, harrowing Baule masks from Côte d'Ivoire. Radiant Maasai neckbands and ear ornaments from Kenya. Woven geometric Mende blankets from Sierra Leone. Copper bells from what is termed the Lower Niger Bronze Industry. Africa’s artistic production is too diverse and too gorgeous for a viewer to understand its breadth and depth without experiencing it personally. Furthermore, in a wildly globalized art world, any distinct divide between Western and non-Western art is becoming increasingly irrelevant. In this sense, contemporary art coming out of Africa covers a remarkable range of territory. Synthesizing the traditional influences of their ancestors, the modernist Western tradition that invigorated and distorted it and the social and cultural ramifications of everything from colonialism through the continent’s modernday humanitarian and geopolitical burdens, contemporary African artists like El Anatsui, Victor Ekpuk, Yinka Shonibare and Jim Chuchu are bringing African art to the forefront of the 21st century.

Colonials May Become Hippos

Jeremiah Langhorne, executive chef of the Dabney — near the Washington Convention Center — was the recipient of the James Beard award for Best Chef: MidAtlantic at the May 7 awards ceremony in Chicago. Other chefs like Amy Brandwein of Centrolina and Tom Cunanan of Bad Saint were finalists in the category. Another familiar Washington face on the food scene, José Andrés, was recognized in February by the James Beard Foundation as 2018 Humanitarian of the Year.

Capitals Break 20Year Drought with Big Win On May 7, the Washington Capitals beat the Stanley Cup Champion Pittsburgh Penguins in overtime to advance to the NHL Eastern Conference finals. The law of averages finally swung in the Caps’ favor. The team’s 2-1 win was only the third time since the franchise began in 1974 that the Caps will move forward at this stage in the playoffs. As you read this issue of The Georgetowner, a series versus the Tampa Bay Lightning is underway.

An annual count of the homeless in D.C. has found that the number of homeless families has dropped by more than 20 percent. However, the number of homeless single men and women has gone up. The point-in-time count of people experiencing homelessness was conducted on Jan. 24 by the Community Partnership for the Prevention of Homelessness with the assistance of hundreds of volunteers.

Council Acts to Prevent ‘Food Deserts’ Earlier this month, the District Council passed the Grocery Store Restrictive Covenant Prohibition Act of 2018, which aims to prevent “food deserts.” The act prohibits property owners or operators from restricting the establishment of a grocery store on their properties. An early version of the bill came about in 2014, when Council member Mary Cheh got word that a Palisades Safeway was planning on not allowing another grocery store to replace it in a sale — this is, limiting its future competition in the area.


WASHINGTON DC’S FINEST RESTAURANTS

The Latest Dish BY LIN DA ROT H

ENO WINE BAR

CLYDE’S OF GEORGETOWN

HAPPY HOUR: Offered nightly Tuesday - Thursday from 5 - 7 PM & Sunday from 4 - 7 PM. Enjoy select $7 wines on tap. Join us on Wednesday’s for College Nights from 9 - 11 PM and Sunday’s for 30% off bottles. Our delightful wines are best enjoyed with local charcuterie, cheese and small plates.

This animated tavern, in the heart of Georgetown, popularized saloon food and practically invented Sunday brunch. Clyde’s is the People’s Choice for bacon cheeseburgers, steaks, fresh seafood, grilled chicken salads, fresh pastas and desserts.

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Courtesy Flower Child. Legendary bartender Sambonn Lek, who reigned at the Mayflower Hotel’s Town & Country Bar for over 30 years, has returned to D.C. from his native Cambodia. He’s now at the St. Regis Bar, still serving his “Sam I Am” cocktails. Chef & Manager Update: La Tomate owner Natalina Koropoulos has hired Domenico Apollaro as head chef of the 30-year-old restaurant. He was most recently at Lupo Verde … Evan Snyder is now executive chef at New Zealand-themed Cassatt’s Café in Arlington, Virginia. He was previously at Marcel’s and Volt … Juan Rivera, most recently chef de cuisine at Kapnos Taverna in College Park, is now executive chef at Isabella Eatery at Tysons Galleria in Virginia … Andrew Court is now executive chef of the Four Seasons Hotel in Georgetown, overseeing the Bourbon Steak and Seasons restaurants and the adjoining ENO Wine Bar … Tae Strain is now executive chef at Momofuku at CityCenterDC. He was previously at Progress in San Francisco and Public in New York … Johanna Hellrigl is now executive chef at Doi Moi on 14th Street. She comes from Via Umbria and Boulangerie Christophe … Sasha Felikson, previously of Doi Moi, is now helping Dacha Beer Garden refine its menu … Mark Slater is now operations manager at Corduroy in downtown D.C.’s Four Points Sheraton Hotel. He was most recently at Pennsylvania 6 … William Washington was named director of operations for the D.C.based restaurants that are part of Schlow Restaurant Group. He was previously with The Inn at Little Washington and Le Diplomate … Nadine Brown is now GM as well as wine director at Cathal Armstrong’s Society Fair in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. Victor Albisu’s Del Campo in D.C.’s Penn Quarter reopens with a duel concept. In front, Taco Bamba will serve breakfast, lunch and dinner seven days a week. Entering via the back patio leads you to Poca Madre, a new contemporary Mexican restaurant. Anna Bran-Leis, chef-owner of Taqueria Del Barrio in Petworth, plans to expand into the forthcoming food hall at Tastemaker in

Brookland at 2800 Tenth St. NE. Bran-Leis also owns and operates the DC Empanadas food truck. Tastemakers is the vision of Kirk and Juliann Francis, owners of Captain Cookie and the Milkman. Taqueria Del Barrio will be joined by Bullfrog Bagels, DC SteakHolders, DC Ballers and DC Vegan Catering when the food hall opens this spring. Ashok Bajoj opened Sababa, an Israeli restaurant, where Ardeo used to be in Cleveland Park. Ryan Moore, formerly of Minibar and Bistro Provence, is the chef. He’s spent a good deal of time in the Middle East as well. Sababa translates to “cool” in Hebrew slang. There’s a theme here, as Bindaas, also in Cleveland Park, translates to “cool” in Hindi. Michael Schlow will increase his hotel restaurant presence in D.C. when he takes over the old Juniper restaurant at the Fairmont. He currently has two other hotel restaurants: Casolare Ristorante in the Kimpton Glover Park Hotel and The Riggsby in the Carlyle Hotel in Dupont Circle. Quick Hits: New York-based The Meatball Shop plans to open its first restaurant outside the Big Apple where the relocated Cork Wine Bar used to be on 14th Street. A summer opening is targeted … Pizza Paradiso signed to open in Spring Valley Village at 4850 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Arizona-based Fox Restaurant Concepts plans to open its fast-casual concept, Flower Child, in the Travilah Square Shopping Center in Rockville, Maryland, in July. Fox also plans to open in Wildwood Shopping Center in nearby Bethesda in the first quarter of 2019. A third location of Flower Child — as well as another Fox full-service concept, North Italia — is slated to open in the first quarter of 2019 in a new building in downtown D.C. at 2112 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, brought to you by Papadopoulos Properties. Linda Roth is president of Linda Roth Associates, a public relations and marketing firm that specializes in the hospitality industry. Reach her at linda@lindarothpr.com.

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THE OCEANAIRE SEAFOOD ROOM

TOWN HALL

The Oceanaire blends a sophisticated atmosphere with simple, seasonal and regionally-inspired cuisine – the result is “the ultra-fresh seafood experience”. From our wines and cocktails to our seafood, steak and desserts, our commitment to sustainable and locally-sourced ingredients is apparent in everything we do. Reserve your table today for an extraordinary dining experience.

Situated just north of Georgetown on Wisconsin Ave, Town Hall has been a neighborhood mainstay in Glover Park since 2005. Whether you’re popping in for dinner, drinks, or weekend brunch, Town Hall is the spot you’ll want to call home to Gulp, Gather & Grub. Free parking is available nightly after 7 p.m., and, our outdoor courtyard is one of DC’s best kept secrets.

MALMAISON

FILOMENA RISTORANTE

Malmaison opened in June 2013 and features elegant French dining in Washington D.C’s historic Georgetown waterfront. Housed in a majestically refurbished industrial warehouse reminiscent of NYC’s Meatpacking District, the modern restaurant, pastry shop and event lounge features the culinary talents of legendary 2 Michelin Starred French Chef Gerard Pangaud and Pastry Chef Serge Torres (Le Cirque NYC).

A Georgetown landmark for over 30 years featuring styles and recipes passed through generations. Balanced cutting-edge culinary creations of modern Italy using the fresh ingredients and made-from-scratch sauces and pastas. Seen on The Travel Channel, Awardwinning Filomena is a favorite of U.S. Presidents, celebrities, sports legends, political leaders. “Don’t miss their bakery’s incredible desserts” - Best in D.C.

MARTIN’S TAVERN

CAFE BONAPARTE

Fifth generation Lauren Martin learns the family business from her dad, Billy Martin, Jr. Since 1933, the warm atmosphere of Martin’s Tavern has welcomed neighbors and travelers looking for great food, service and years of history within it’s walls. Fourth generation owner Billy Martin. Jr. continues the tradition of Washington’s oldest family-owned restaurant.

Captivating customers since 2003, Cafe Bonaparte has been dubbed the “quintessential” European café, featuring award-winning crepes and arguably the “best” coffee in D.C.! Other can't-miss attractions are the famous weekend brunch every Saturday and Sunday until 3 p.m. and our late-night weekend hours serving sweet and savory crepes until 1 a.m.

1201 F ST., NW 202–347–2277 | theoceanaire.com

3401 K ST., NW 202-817-3340 | malmaisondc.com

1264 WISCONSIN AVE., NW 202-333-7370 | martinstavern.com

2340 WISCONSIN AVE., NW 202-333-5640 | townhalldc.com

1063 WISCONSIN AVE., NW 202–338–8800 | filomena.com

1522 WISCONSIN AVE., NW 202–333–8830 | cafebonaparte.com

ROCKLANDS BARBEQUE

2418 WISCONSIN AVE., NW 202-333-2558 | rocklands.com This original location has served barbecue since 1990. We now have more space for you to sit down with family and friends at our new dining room Driving or walking up Wisconsin Avenue, you ask “mmmm, what’s that aroma??” That’s pork, beef and chicken coming out of our wood-only smoker, falling off the bone and ready for a dousing with our Original Barbeque Sauce.

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Workplace at corner of 25th and H St. NW, short walk from the Foggy Bottom Metro. Parking is provided if needed.

Personal Assistant to Former US Senator Larry Pressler $21hr (15 hr/wk) Job Description: Assist US Senator Larry Pressler (www.larrypressler.com), take dictation, type legal documents, skillfully and accurately enter names and addresses into database and assist in correspondence, press releases, emails, and newspaper columns. Involves keeping a complicated travel schedule for a busy executive. Preferably someone who plans to stay in the Foggy Bottom area for at least 2-3 years.

70wpm typing and grammar skills required. Take dictation on computer and be efficient all Microsoft office programs, OSX, and iOS. Advanced computer knowledge is a must. Previous office experienced required. Position Type: Part-Time; 15 hr./wk. Compensation: $21.00/hr; negotiable To apply, please send a letter of interest specifically addressing the requirements listed above in this ad and a résumé to lpressler@larrypressler.com.

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TOWN TOPICS

Summer Camps: Looking Beyond the Spin BY SEL MA K HENISS I When I was in second grade, my elementary school arranged for students in my grade to go to Summit Lake Camp, located near Emmitsburg, Maryland. To be honest, I don’t remember much of the experience in the way of camp. The most distinct memory I have — other than the awkwardness of sleeping on a bunk with a sleeping bag instead of normal sheets — are of a fellow classmate actually catching something in the way of fish. Based on my experience 22 years ago, when I come across a video about a camp where the experience is described as “amazing,” I need more evidence than empty words. When you’re looking for great summer camp experiences for your children, you should think about the quality of the camps you’re considering. One aspect of Washington, D.C., culture is that when people do something, they want to do that thing well. And that desire to overachieve is passed on to young Washingtonians. A good way to identify the best summer camp is to focus on your children’s strengths. By matching those strengths, you provide an opportunity for your child to go beyond the surface level of his or her areas of interest. Some children, for example, are very good at and interested in sports. US Sports Camps offers opportunities in 16 different sports — including tennis, swimming and volleyball

— advertising that its camps are “under the supervision of top-rated NCAA & professional coaches.” Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School also has sports camps on its campus, and Georgetown University has a summer tennis camp at Yates Field House. These programs encourage competitiveness, but all in good fun. However, the expected abilities of the young people can vary. Training at a lower level is often recommended, if not

required, before enrolling. Some camp programs have competitive admissions, with acceptance considered a big deal. One example is Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, which has a partnership program with College Prep. The program is designed for high school students who are interested in STEM and lack significant mentors, but is open to all high school students. One resource that should be looked into

for extremely intelligent youngsters is the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth, which requires assessment through its “Talent Search” feature. The program, for those who are accepted, has programs for both the gifted children and their families. These types of merit-based summer programs are given more weight than summer programs where, to get in, children only need their parents to foot the bill. Application anxiety, however, isn’t a prerequisite for a great summer camp experience. In the end, good summer camp programs deepen children’s knowledge bases. The River School in Washington, D.C., has a summer camp that focuses on having “a balanced schedule” for creative, intellectual and physical activities, seeking to develop well-rounded children who will go on to become well-rounded adults. Summer camps can also encourage camaraderie among young campers, a selling point of the Traveling Players Ensemble in Virginia — at the Madeira School in McLean and Lake Fairfax Park in Reston — and the French Woods Festival of the Performing Arts in New York’s Catskill Mountains. Among the notable alumni of French Woods are actress Zooey Deschanel and Maroon 5’s Adam Levine.

VOLLEYBALL CAMP @ THE UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

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ARLISA WILLIAMS IS THE FORMER HEAD VOLLEYBALL COACH OF GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY

Beauvoir Summer offers pre-kindergarten through fifth grade children swim lessons, sports, arts and crafts, and outdoor adventure camps.

New Offering: Tunes 4 Tots 6 months to 3 years old

Beauvoir Summer runs June 18 to August 3, 2018. www.beauvoirschool.org/summer

Our programs are located at Beauvoir, The National Cathedral Elementary School 3500 Woodley Road NW, Washington, DC 20016

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GOOD WORKS & GOOD TIMES

Japanese Embassy Hosts Young Concert Artists of Washington BY MARY BIRD On May 10, recently arrived Ambassador of Japan and Mrs. Shinsuke J. Sugiyama welcomed guests to their residence for a concert by Japanese award-winning violinist Mayuko Kamio accompanied by pianist Noreen Cassidy-Polera. Aniko Gaal Schott and Isabel (Didi) Cutler co-chaired the gala benefit evening, which included silent and live auctions as well as an abundant Japanese buffet. Young Concert Artists is a non-profit organization, which since 1961 has sponsored the Washington, DC debuts of extraordinary young musicians from around the world.

Gen. Curtis M. Scaparrotti, Gloria Estefan, former President George W. Bush and Howard Schultz. Courtesy Atlantic Council.

Bush Declares, ‘No New Tuxes’ BY STEPH AN IE GR EEN

Didi Cutler, violinist Mayuko Kamio, Aniko Gael Schott, Ambassador Shinsuke J. Sugiyama.

Fashion for Paws BY MARY BIRD The 12th annual runway event to benefit the Humane Rescue Alliance (HRA) was held at the Omni Shoreham Hotel on May 5. Television personality and celebrity stylist Carson Kressley hosted for the second straight year. HRA President and CEO Lisa LaFontaine introduced a video chronicling the organization’s work. The participants walking the runway are HRA ambassadors who raise funds for the honor of escorting their fashionably dressed dogs down the runway. This year’ top fundraisers were Teresa and Mark Del Russo, who raised $30,000 of the total $385,000 to support the life-saving programs for the thousands of animals served each year. VIP guests had enjoyed a pre-show seated diner and all took to the dance floor with DJ Seyhan.

A few weeks after his mother’s passing, former President George W. Bush was back in Washington to receive the Atlantic Council’s Distinguished International Leadership Award May 10. “All was well with her soul, so all is well with ours,” he said referring to the April 17 death of former first lady Barbara Bush. Speaking to a black tie crowd at the Ritz Carlton, Bush admitted he really didn’t like “awards banquets” and especially didn’t like getting dressed for them. “Read my lips: No new tuxes,” he joked when someone suggested he invest in some new evening attire. The 43rd president received the award for his work with AIDS relief funding in Africa. He explained his foundation is working on providing cervical cancer testing and prevention on the continent. “It’s the best kind of diplomacy there is. It’s soft power at its most beautiful.” Bush was joined by singer Gloria Estefan, who was presented with the Distinguished Artistic Leadership Award by her friend, philanthropist Adrienne Arsht. Howard Schultz, executive chairman of the Starbucks Corporation, received the Distinguished Business Leadership Award. Gen. Curtis M. Scaparrotti, Supreme Allied Commander Europe, was honored with the Distinguished Military Leadership Award.

Arena Stage board chair Judith Batty, Maurice Hines and Arena Stage trustee Beth Newburger Schwartz at the Arena Stage Gala Honoring Mayor Muriel Bowser. Photo by Cameron Whitman.

Stefanie Erkiletian, Michael Zingali, Lynda Erkiletian (T.H.E Artist Agency) and Timothy Lowery (General Manager, CityCenterDC). Photo by Daniel Delgado.

Arena’s Game-Changing Women BY C H R ISTIN E WARNKE The Arena Stage’s Gala held on May 10 celebrated both exceptional art and women in the community by bestowing leadership awards on Mayor Muriel Bowser and Jessica Stafford Davis — for commitment to expanding diversity in arts and education. The evening’s musical performance with Mary McBride was capped off by the tap dancing skills of emcee Maurice Hines.

Paul Wharton, Stacey Rusch. Photo by Vithaya Phongsavan Photography.

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Host Carson Kressley and Kimba. Photo by Moshe Zusman.

VIEW MORE PHOTOS & EVENTS ONLINE AT GEORGETOWNER.COM


GOOD WORKS & GOOD TIMES

Didi Cutler and Carlos Pareja, Ambassador of Peru. Photo by Robert Devaney.

Didi Cutler Art at Bistrot Lepic Ann Curry at American News Women’s Club Awards Dinner. Photo by Neshan H. Naltchayan.

Among the gala-goers were TWB Artistic Director Julie Kent and Lucy Bowen of Bowen-McCauley Dance. Photo by Patrick G. Ryan.

Ann Curry Saluted by News Women

TWB Raises the Barre at Anthem

Veteran TV journalist Ann Curry, who worked at NBC News for 25 years, was honored by the American News Women’s Club May 9 at the National Press Club. This year, Curry produced a PBS series, “We’ll Meet Again.”

The Washington Ballet hosted its annual spring gala “Raising the Barre” at the Anthem May 11. Lesli Foster of WUSA9 emceed; Sara and Christopher Lange co-chaired.

Nancy Taylor Bubes Honored by Georgetown Village BY PEGGY SAN D S

Gail Nordheimer of Georgetown Village, honoree Nancy Taylor Bubes and Council member Jack Evans. Photo by Bill Starrels.

Gathering in Foley & Lardner’s Law offices at Washington Harbour with its sweeping river views, Georgetown Village honored philanthropist, neighbor and realtor extraordinaire Nancy Taylor Bubes May 10 at its annual benefit. Council member Jack Evans read a city proclamation declaring Nancy Taylor Bubes Day. More than 100 supporters of the nonprofit dedicated to enabling Georgetown’s seniors to age in place celebrated continual generosity and dedication to the value of “neighbors helping neighbors” — with Bubes as its finest exemplar

The photography of Isabel “Didi” Cutler is on display — and for sale — through the month at one of Georgetown’s favorite French spots, Bistrot Lepic, on Wisconsin Avenue. Images of sea and sand fill the walls.

Women in Solidarity for Empowerment — and Shopping Smart and caring shoppers met at Hu’s Shoes, Hu’s Wear and Rag & Bone that banded together April 26 to support D.C. Wise., a group of women in residential real estate who invest in local non-profits by selecting one organization and spending the year fundraising for them.

Gio Gonzalez Uncorks for Hialeah, Nats Washington Nationals pitcher Gio Gonzalez held his third annual Uncork for a Cause by gathering some teammates, friends and fans — and his dad — on the rooftop of F1rst Residences near Nats Park May 3. Gio brought his own 2015 Sonoma Reserve Red Wine to the benefit for his alma mater Hialeah High and the Nationals Dream Foundation. Ryan Zimmerman of the Washington Nationals and his wife Heather. Photo by Robert Devaney.

Gio Gonzalez and his new Sonoma red. Photo by Robert Devaney.

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KITTY KELLEY BOOK CLUB

‘The Watergate: Inside America’s Most Infamous Address’ A fact-filled (if less-than-scintillating) primer on D.C.’s riverside complex REVIEW ED BY KIT T Y K E LLE Y

H

otels can intrigue, even captivate. In the pantheon of places, nothing tantalizes so much as a good story situated in a hotel, particularly a luxury hotel with hot- and cold-running bellhops, genuflecting valets and chandeliers that drip with crystal. Think the Metropol in “A Gentleman in Moscow” by Amor Towles. Built on superstition, few hotels have a 13th floor — most elevators go from 12 to 14 — but each floor can hold secrets, whether dreadful or delightful. As such, hotels have been the subject of movies (“Grand Hotel” with Greta Garbo, “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” with Judi Dench), novels (“Hotel Du Lac” by Anita Brookner), children’s books (“Eloise at the Plaza” by Kay Thompson), a rollicking BBC television series (“The Duchess of Duke Street,” the story of the king’s mistress, who owned the Cavendish Hotel in London) and even an Elvis Presley classic (“Heartbreak Hotel”). Hotel sites beguile, possibly because they provide escapes from the real world and adventures for the escapees, which translates into vicarious pleasure for the rest of us. Whether fact or fiction, the standard recipe for a good hotel story contains basic ingredients: 1 lb. scandal
 1 cup sex 2 cups eccentric guests 1 dash crime
 1 pinch skullduggery For added spice, mix in two cups of chopped celebrity and bake for 350 pages. Voilà! You’ve got the perfect hotel-story soufflé. Joseph Rodota followed this recipe to write his first book, “The Watergate: Inside America’s Most Infamous Address.” For scandal, crime and skullduggery, he provides the 1972 burglary in the Watergate office building of the Democratic National Committee, which led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon, which, in turn, spawned a great film, “All the President’s Men.” For eccentricity, Rodota showcases Martha Mitchell, wife of Nixon’s attorney general, and her midnight phone calls. Freshly sprung from a psychiatric ward in New York to move to Washington with her husband after Nixon’s inauguration, Martha soon gave hilarious definition to drinking and dialing. Belting back bourbon late at night, she frequently called Helen Thomas, UPI’s White House correspondent, to unload on “Mr. President.” For eccentric good measure and a smidge of sex, Rodota tosses in the Chinese hostess (cue Anna Chennault) who served “concubine chicken” at dinner parties in her Watergate residence. From John F. Kennedy to John Mitchell to the johns who paid for prostitutes, this book

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drops more names than a prison roll call. With the exception of Monica Lewinsky, who, in the 1990s, lived in her mother’s Watergate apartment — where she hung the blue dress that led to the impeachment of President Bill Clinton — most of the dropped names are Nixon-era Republicans: Elizabeth and Bob Dole, Rose Mary Woods, cabinet members like Maurice Stans, John Volpe and Emil “Bus” Mosbacher. With skillful research from old newspapers and magazines, oral histories from presidential libraries and a few interviews, Rodota has fashioned an interesting story about the white concrete edifice that looks like a giant clamshell. With three buildings of wraparound co-op apartments terraced with egg-carton balustrades, the Watergate, facing the Potomac River, sits adjacent to the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. To tell his story from the beginning, Rodota burrows into the complicated bureaucracy that surrounds any major construction project in the nation’s capital. He whacks through the weeds of proposals and counterproposals from the financiers, architects and developers to the National Capital Planning Commission, the D.C. Zoning Commission, the National Park Service, the Commission on Fine Arts, the committee overseeing the National Cultural Center (later named the Kennedy Center), Congress and, finally, the White House. All had to reach agreement before a shovel broke ground. Beginning in 1962, numerous hearings were held to discuss plans for Watergate Towne, a complex that would include a gourmet restaurant, a spa, a beauty salon, a grocery store, a liquor store, a cleaners, a florist, a bakery and a designer boutique. Still, there was concern, especially over the project’s financing and what the Kennedy White House called “the Catholic problem.” As the first Catholic to be elected president — and only by 100,000 votes — John F. Kennedy knew his religion was problematic to many. As president, he genuinely wanted to make Washington “a more beautiful and functional city,” which the Watergate project promised to do. But he would not sign off on the $50-million proposal because it was largely underwritten by the Vatican, then the principal shareholder in the development company Società Generale Immobiliare. The formidable columnist Drew Pearson stoked controversy over “popism” with a syndicated column headlined: “Vatican Seeks Imposing Edifice on Potomac.” A group called Protestants and Other Americans United for Separation of Church and State mobilized its members.

Gala Guide

MAY 20

WASHINGTON NATIONAL OPERA GALA Cocktails on the Kennedy Center River Terrace will be followed by a star-studded concert celebration of “Leonard Bernstein at 100” hosted by baritone Nathan Gunn in the Opera House. After the performance, various ambassadors will host black-tie dinners.

MAY 21

GALA’S NOCHE DE ESTRELLAS Luis Salgado, Craig Pascal, Victor Shargai and Ana Recio Harvey will be honored by GALA Hispanic Theatre at this year’s event, supporting GALA’s youth education programs. The black-tie evening, emceed by NBC-4’s Erika González, includes cocktails, silent and live auctions, a dinner, musical performances and poetry readings. Organization of American States.

JUNE 1

HALCYON AWARDS

Within weeks, the White House received more than 3,000 letters opposing construction of the Watergate and, according to one, “having Miami Beach come to Washington.” Most voiced outrage that Kennedy would be under clerical pressure to do the bidding of “the world’s richest church.” The Vatican soon divested its interest in the project, and, by Nov. 22, 1963, most objections were muted. Probably because there is no breaking news in Rodota’s book, his publisher sent a letter to editors and producers trying to burnish the fact that “The Vatican, the coal miners of Britain, and Ronald Reagan have something in common: They each owned a piece of the Watergate. Ronald Reagan held a financial stake in the Watergate complex shortly before becoming president, a fact that has never been made public before this book.” Wowza! Stop the presses! Yet the author does a good job of mixing historical facts with personal anecdotes to tell the story of what was both the most famous and most infamous hotel in Washington, D.C., until the presidential election of 2016. Perhaps Rodota will follow this book with another hotel story titled “Tales from the Trump International,” which might indeed provide some needed wowza. Among Kit t y Kelley’s many books is “Capturing Camelot: Stanley Tretick’s Iconic Images of the Kennedys.” In two 1988 cover stories for People magazine, Kelley broke the story of Judith Exner’s confession that, in addition to being JFK’s lover, she was also his conduit to the Mafia, carrying his messages to Chicago mob boss Sam Giancana.

The Halcyon Awards honor arts icons, social entrepreneurs and public policy visionaries who have dedicated their lives to pushing past traditional boundaries to create a movement, lead an organization or impact the world. The evening includes dinner, performances and an after-party. Washington National Cathedral. Email David Corson at d.corson@ halcyonhouse.org.

JUNE 5

FABERGÉ GALA Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens will celebrate the opening of the exhibition “Fabergé Rediscovered” with a black-tie evening of cocktails, an exhibition preview and dinner on the Lunar Lawn, supporting Hillwood’s enrichment and education programs. Sophie Hawkins, Mark Lowham and Marilyn Wald are co-chairs. Contact Allison Kingery at 202243-3974 or akingery@hillwoodmuseum.org.

JUNE 6

ARBORETUM DINNER UNDER THE STARS Each year in June, when the gardens are in full bloom, a relaxing evening overlooking the Capitol Columns is hosted by the Friends of the National Arboretum to benefit the arboretum’s gardens and programs. This year’s theme is “Celebrating the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.” A cocktail reception in the National Herb Garden precedes a feast in the meadow. Call 202-544-8733 or email cathy@fona.org.

JUNE 10

RAMMY AWARDS GALA Presented by the Restaurant Association of Metropolitan Washington, the RAMMY Awards gala celebrates the ability and accomplishments of the hard-working individuals and organizations of the region’s restaurant and food-service community. The reception and awards ceremony are followed by dinner and dancing. Walter E. Washington Convention Center. Call 202-331-5990 or visit therammys.org.


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MAY 16, 2018

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WESLEY HEIGHTS, WASHINGTON, DC One of a kind stone 8BR, 8BA, 5 half baths, built in 1927 & privately sited on a 1/2 acre of meticulously manicured gardens with 50 foot heated pool and separate pool/guest house. $15,900,000 Chuck Holzwarth 202-285-2616

MASS AVE HEIGHTS, WASHINGTON, DC Breathtaking Rock Creek Park views in over 10,000 square feet designed by Marshall/Moya. 4/5 bedrooms, 5 baths, media room, pool, sauna, gym, eight car garage. Beyond imagination. $10,750,000 Marilyn Charity 202-427-7553

SPRING VALLEY, WASHINGTON, DC Exquisite 8,100 SF home featuring 6 spacious bedrooms and 6.5 baths on almost ½ acre lot. Stunning kitchen, landscaped yard & gardens; pool! $5,800,000 Ellen Morrell 202-365-0196 Ben Roth 202-465-9636

OLD TOWN, ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA Historically significant detached brick residence. Recently renovated & on two lots with 6BR, 4.5BA, 2+ car parking and beautiful gardens. $4,495,000 Eileen McGrath 202-253-2226 Mark McFadden 703-216-1333

CLEVELAND PARK, WASHINGTON, DC 140’ frontage on coveted Newark Street with pool and nearly one acre of grounds. Sundrenched, open, and airy interior with large kitchen/family room. Steps to schools, restaurants, Metro! $3,995,000 Margot Wilson 202-549-2100

SPRING VALLEY, WASHINGTON, DC Renovated, stone 3BR/4.5BA, LR with bay, DR with fireplace and French doors to garden. Family room adjoins eat-in kitchen w/ island & breakfast bar. 1st floor MBR, circular drive & 2 car garage. $2,089,000 Chuck Holzwarth 202-285-2616

WESTMORELAND HILLS, BETHESDA, MD Pure perfection in coveted cul-de-sac! Gleaming with chic + sophisticated style – designer touches + custom finishes throughout 4,200 SF. 4BR/4.5BA with fantastic outdoor space. 1-car gar. $1,599,000 Sally Marshall 301-254-3020

GEORGETOWN, WASHINGTON, DC Stunning renovation of a 2BR, 2BA, 1,500 SF condominium with top of the line finishes! Features dramatic windows, gourmet kitchen with breakfast bar and spacious master suite! $1,499,000 Ellen Morrell 202-365-0196

POTOMAC, MARYLAND Thoughtfully renovated & expanded 6,000SF Colonial on 2 private acres. Near Potomac Village, this home offers an amazing sun-filled floor plan, chef’s kitchen, front porch, screened porch and pool. $1,323,000 Anne Killeen 301-706-0067

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MAY 16, 2018

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BETHESDA, MARYLAND Picture perfect 3 bedroom Colonial in coveted Westgate w/ updated kit & BAs, expansive FR, gar, Finished LL and move-in ready! 2 blocks from DC! $995,000 Kay McGrath 202-276-1235 Eileen McGrath 202-253-2226

KALORAMA, WASHINGTON, DC Bright, spacious apartment in sought-after California House with soaring ceilings, gleaming wood floors, classically renovated kitchen & private balcony. 2BR, + 3rd BR/study, 2BA, 1-car parking & storage. $879,000 Cecelia Leake 202-256-7804

DUPONT CIRCLE, WASHINGTON, DC NEW LISTING! Sunlit and spacious 2BR/2BA unit with spacious living room, separate dining room and inunit W/D! Fantastic building amenities - secure garage parking, extra storage & pool! $650,000 Ben Roth 202-465-9636

The Georgetowner May 16, 2018 Issue | Summer Arts Preview  

ON THE COVER: The cover of The Georgetowner’s Summer Arts Preview issue is a “self-poortrait” by illustrator Ralph Steadman, who turned 82 o...

The Georgetowner May 16, 2018 Issue | Summer Arts Preview  

ON THE COVER: The cover of The Georgetowner’s Summer Arts Preview issue is a “self-poortrait” by illustrator Ralph Steadman, who turned 82 o...