Page 1

Since 1954

THE

georgetowner.com

GEORGETOWNER

APRIL 4-18, 2012

VOLUME 58, NUMBER 14

CO-CHAIRS STEPHANIE BOTHWELL & FRANK BABB RANDOLPH

At the Heart of the Georgetown House Tour ONE OF THE OLDEST, THE TOUR OPENS NINE HOMES ON APRIL 28TH

GREEN ISSUE

REAL ESTATE SPECIAL SPOTLIGHT: Long & Foster's Jeff Detwiller, President & COO LE DECOR: Tray for You or Two SOCIAL SCENE

Ballet's Wonderland House Beautiful Goes Green


Since 1954

THE

georgetowner.com

GEORGETOWNER

APRIL 4-18, 2012

VOLUME 58, NUMBER 14

CO-CHAIRS STEPHANIE BOTHWELL & FRANK BABB RANDOLPH

At the Heart of the Georgetown House Tour ONE OF THE OLDEST, THE TOUR OPENS NINE HOMES ON APRIL 28TH

GREEN ISSUE

REAL ESTATE SPECIAL SPOTLIGHT: Long & Foster's Jeff Detwiller, President & COO LE DECOR: Tray for You or Two SOCIAL SCENE

Ballet's Wonderland House Beautiful Goes Green


Dupont Circle, DC

Georgetown, DC

Georgetown, DC

McLean, VA

Michael Rankin 202.271.3344 Ann Hallman 301.802.2982

Michael Rankin 202.271.3344

Jonathan Taylor 202.276.3344

Penny Yerks, LLC 703.760.0744

This historic 1911 Washington, DC Mansion was built by noted architect Clark Waggaman. This 12,000 sf residence features unparalleled workmanship and detail. 21st century systems merge seamlessly with exquisite historical features to create this one-of-a-kind offering. Features include many imported period details from 18th & 19th century France. $10,900,000.

Located on historic Cox’s row, this Federal townhouse was built by Colonel John Cox circa 1805. Recently restored, the main level features a striking double parlor living room with 2 fireplaces and library with 19’ ceilings. With spaces allowing for both formal entertaining and comfortable living, this home has a total of 6 BR, 6 full-baths, 3 half-baths, 8 fireplaces and private parking for 3 cars. $7,900,000.

Sophisticated Federal in the East Village, ideal for grand entertaining. Restored with extensive improvements. Excellent scale, large formal rooms, high ceilings & 4 fireplaces. Inviting front library, FDR, chef ’s kitchen & a 2nd level doubleparlor LR with adjoining sunroom.  4 BR with 4 full & 2 half-baths. Backyard features private patio & garden.  Excellent views from the upper BR. 1 car garage & extra parking.  $3,995,000.

Stunning Galileo built custom home beautifully sited, overlooking a meandering stream and forest. The flawless interior includes thoughtful sightlines throughout, pristine hardwoods, custom stonework & 12’ ceilings. Offering a main level MBR with a cozy respite spa-like bath, library with floor to ceiling built-ins & private entrance, gourmet kit with the finest appliances & 5 generous sized secondary BRs. $3,900,000.

is pleased to announce that Great Falls, VA

Located on a spectacular 5 acre site is an elegant and inviting family residence. The expansive front terrace overlooks spacious gardens with views of the nearby private lake. Once inside, the inlaid herringbone & marble entrance foyer & extensive millwork introduce the elegant custom details which are reflected throughout. combining elegant details with the prefect amenities for the most discerning family. $3,795,000.

Grace Yang, Howard Fletcher, Megan Motherway, Michael Fowler & Roxane Nunes

Potomac, MD

Stunning contemporary home on over three acres designed by Thomas Pheasant. Located in close-in Potomac just past the Congressional Country Club with over 13,000 sf offering a grand foyer with 30’ ceilings, dramatic living and dining room, indoor lap pool and 6-car garage. $2,695,000.

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Penny Yerks, LLC 703.760.0744

Grace Yang 240.205.5671

Arlington, VA

Dupont Circle, DC

Foxhall, DC

Georgetown, DC

Jane Herrmann 202.997.0768

Jonathan Taylor 202.276.3344

Richard Seaton 202.907.8037 Claudia Donovan 202.251.7011

Gary Wicks 202.486.8393 Mary Fox 202.316.9631

Stunning penthouse, completely customized with the best finishes & views of DC. 3 BR, 3.5 baths, & 3,265 sf of truly spectacular living. Features hardwood living areas, carrera marble baths, Poliform custom closet systems, designer gourmet kit with all high-end finishes, 2 gas fireplaces & family room. Fabulous building amenities incl roof pool & sundeck, gym, Platinum level lounge for events, concierge & more. $2,385,000.

Spacious & superbly renovated 1902-built 4-level Victorian on a tree-lined block, west side of Dupont. Awesome mix of tradition & mod style. Main house: 4 BR, 4 baths, high ceilings, 6 fplcs, top-of-the-line kit w/ brkfst area, sep den, master suite w/ marble bath. Great light throughout. Beautiful rear garden with 2 decks. Lower level is 1 BR, 1 bath separately metered unit. 1 off-street parking space conveys. $1,995,000.

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NEW LISTING – Dynamite 5 BR, 5.5-bath Federal with grand foyer, premier kitchen, exciting living and entertaining spaces with views onto fantastic patio, garden and pool. Includes a study, gym, 2 family rooms, 2 fireplaces, fantastic roof terrace, built-ins, garage, and more. Located in a quiet neighborhood along the Potomac near Georgetown. $1,775,000.

Downtown, D.C. 202.234.3344

Georgetown, D.C. 202.333.1212

The incomparable 3303 Water Street – the most sought-after address along the Georgetown Waterfront. Two, large 1-bedroom residences featuring clean architectural lines, the finest finishes, and expansive C&O Canal views. Dramatic common areas, spectacular city and river views, rooftop pool, sun decks, doorman and concierge. $925,000–$1,049,999.

McLean, VA 703.319.3344

Chevy Chase, MD 301.967.3344

© MMXII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. The Sound, used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

TTR Georgetowner 2 April 4, 2012 GMG,04.12.12.indd INC.

1

4/3/12 8:50 AM


VOL. 58, NO. 14

SINCE 1954

CONTENTS N EW S 4-5

Up & Coming

6-7

Town Topics

8

THE AR T S 22 Performance: Kahn Tackles O’Neill’s Daunting ‘Strange Interlude’

Editorial/Opinion

DIRECT ORY

REAL ES TATE 12 Mortgage/Featured

Property

The Cherry Trees, One Hundred Years Later 13 14

Long & Foster’s Jeff Detwiler

Le Decor: A Tray for You, A Tray for Two 15

COVER

Getting to the Heart of the Georgetown House Tour

16-17 PAGE 21 Check out our list of the latest In Country events.

Classified/ Service Directory

24

Sales

11

Art Map: Canal Square and Beyond

23

Business

9 ON THE COVER Stephanie Bothwell and Frank Babb Randolph serve as cochairs for the Georgetown House Tour. The photo was taken by Phillip Bermingham; www.phillipbermingham.com. The photo shoot took place at Randolph’s 34th Street Home.

In Country Calendar

BODY & SOUL 25

Alone

Between The Sheets: His Time

FOOD & WINE 26-27 27 28

Cocktail of the Week Latest Dish

SOCIAL SCENE 29-30

I N COUN TRY

Dining Guide

Social Scene

18-21 Newport, Rhode Island: A Fresh Sense of History &

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1054 Potomac St., N.W. Washington, DC 20007 Phone: (202) 338-4833 Fax: (202) 338-4834 www.georgetowner.com The Georgetowner is published every other Wednesday. The opinions of our writers and columnists do not necessarily reflect the editorial and corporate opinions of The Georgetowner newspaper. The Georgetowner accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs and assumes no liability for products or services advertised herein. The Georgetowner reserves the right to edit, re-write, or refuse material and is not responsible for errors or omissions. Copyright, 2012.

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MEET THE PRESS THIS WEEK DONNA EVERS is the author of “Historic DC”

Donna Evers, devers@eversco.com, is the owner and broker of Evers & Co. Real Estate, the largest woman owned and run real estate firm in the Washington Metro area. The firm of 100 licensed real estate professionals maintains its premier reputation through a strong referral base and agents who enjoy access to Evers & Co.’s one-of-a-kind Agent Resource Center. Donna writes for three publications and publishes a report on Washington Metro area real estate each month. She is the proprietor of historic Twin Oaks Tavern Winery in Bluemont, Virginia, and a devoted fan of Washington history. Over the years, Donna has renovated 23 homes, including two apartments in Paris, France.

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Calendar

UP & COMING APRIL 7

Southwest Waterfront Fireworks Festival Enjoy eight hours of free music, water-related activities, live entertainment and delicious foods. At 8:30 p.m., fireworks will light up the Washington Channel and Kastles Stadium at The Wharf, a waterfront arena with multiple outdoor areas. For more information, visit NationalCherryBlossomFestival.org.

APRIL 14

Potomac Watershed Cleanup Annual Cleanup Day, April 14, 9 a.m. to noon. Throughout April, friends, families and those ecologically concerned can help remove trash from one of 276 sites along the Potomac River in D.C., Maryland and Virginia. Call 202-973-8203, or email potomaccleanup@fergusonfoundation.org to RSVP for Site Leader Training Workshops. For more information, visit FergusonFoundation.org Civil War Encampment on Tudor Place’s Grounds

Walk among and talk with Union and Confederate soldiers and slaves on the lawns of Tudor Place. See a Union Artillery Unit and attend the school of soldier, where children study arms and drills, try out period dress and play games. www.TudorPlace.org

APRIL 18

Preview Night Benefit Smithsonian Craft Show and Sale The Craft Show and Sale is widely regarded as the country’s most prestigious juried show and sale of fine American craft. Enjoy a cocktail buffet, first choice shopping, meet the artists, and groove to jazz by the John Paul Ensemble. $200 for advance reservation; the National Building Museum, 401 F St., NW. For more information, SmithsonianCraftShow.org.

Earth Day on the National Mall From noon to 7 p.m., the centerpiece of Earth Day in the United States will be a rally on the National Mall. Tens of thousands of environmentally-conscious people from all walks of life and all parts of the country will be joined by civic leaders and celebrities for this special event to galvanize the environmental movement.

APRIL 22

APRIL 21 TO 23

Earth Day at the National Zoo

APRIL 20

57th Annual Corcoran Ball The Women’s Committee of the Corcoran invites you to be a part of the 57th annual Corcoran Ball — recognized in Washington’s social and business communities as one of the signature events of spring. The Corcoran welcomes more than 1,000 guests for an evening of dinner, dancing, and socializing amid lavish decor. For more information and tickets, visit www.Corcoran.org.

APRIL 21

Green Rush 2012 Join hundreds of fellow eco-conscious adventurers in D.C. for an Earth Day scavenger

Georgetown House Tour 2012

Patron's Party: Wednesday, April 25th House Tour: Saturday, April 28th www.GeorgetownHouseTour.com 4 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

hunt unlike any other. Teams of two to five persons will compete in challenges and decode clues for a chance to win a $1,000 grand prize. Bust out your best green-themed costume and enthusiasm for a chance at the Green Spirit Award and a year’s worth of Honest Tea. Kickoff at Logan Circle Historic District at 2:30 p.m. Register at LiveGreen. net/greenrush2012

Earth Day. Photo Credit: Mehgan Murphy, Smithsonian’s National Zoo.

Celebrate Earth Day: meet the Smithsonian National Zoo’s Green Team experts, participate in green-themed crafts and learn simple daily actions that help you enjoy a more environmentally-friendly lifestyle. State Farm will host a special children’s area at the Kids’ Farm where children can make their own plant pots with recycled newspapers as well as a garden journal. The event runs from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

8th Annual National Sustainable Design Expo The Eighth Annual National Sustainable Design Expo will take place on the National Mall, April 21 through 23. The expo brings together students, scientists, engineers and business leaders whose innovative technologies are designed to advance economic growth while reducing environmental impact. It also provides a forum for government, nonprofits and businesses to show different ways to sustainability.

APRIL 28

Georgetown House Tour This year’s tour will feature nine of historic Georgetown’s homes and their impressive gardens. Homes on the tour will be open from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. Houses are arranged for easy walking at your own pace taken in the order you prefer. Your ticket price includes a tour booklet full of useful information, including a map of the houses. Visit www. GeorgetownHouseTour.com for more information. ★


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TOWN TOPICS

News Buzz BY RO BE RT DE VANEY

Town-Gown Truce? ANC, CAG, University Ask for Delay in Zoning Filing

Could there be peace in our time? In the April 2 meeting of Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2E, a joint statement by neighborhood groups and Georgetown University asked the D.C. Zoning Commission to delay the deadline for filings on the university’s 2010-2020 Campus Plan process by 60 days. Members of the Citizens Association of Georgetown, the Burleith Citizens Association and the ANC, all of which oppose the university’s expansion plans, and representatives from the university stood up at the meeting to affirm the surprising announcement. As it stands now, the university’s deadline for submissions is April 12, and neighborhood groups have until April 19 to respond. If the zoning panel agrees to the request for delay, the submission and response dates will change to June 11 and June 18, respectively. Only several weeks ago, Jennifer Altemus, CAG president, as well as student leaders and others on the university side, was lamenting the delayed decision by the zoning board. Why the 180-degree turn? ANC chair Ron Lewis said that the delay was requested so that “we can explore the possibility of reaching common ground in our talks about the campus plan. ... We’re giving a somewhat different report than we had expected.”

“This approach reflects our continued efforts to seek common ground and to engage with city and neighborhood leaders,” wrote Rachel Pugh, director of media relations for the university, in an email. “Joining with our neighbors in requesting an extension is a meaningful sign of progress in a long process.” Major sticking points between the parties, such as the demand that students be housed on campus by 2016, remain. But some persons in the process seem to be taking zoning commissioner Anthony Hood’s advice in February that residents and university officials meet more continually to resolve any issues affecting the neighborhood. At an earlier ANC meeting, Mayor Vincent Gray spoke of the town-gown tension and said he believed that common ground would be reached. Whether this small measure of unity displayed at the April 2 ANC meeting leads to a sea charge by which neighborhood and university leaders collaborate is anyone’s guess. At the same meeting, the ANC voted unanimously to oppose the redrawn designs for the university’s planned Athletic Training Facility.

Georgetown’s Jack the Bulldog to Welcome Puppy Mascot-in-Training, April 13

Georgetown University’s Jack the Bulldog is going to have to start making room on the couch and especially on the bleachers, because a bulldog puppy will arrive April 13 on campus to be trained by the boss, the veteran, the main

Great times.

four-legged mascot. The new guy, “Jack Jr.,” or “J.J.” for short, is a gift from Janice and Marcus Hochstetler, bulldog breeders in California, who have two children at Georgetown. This is their way, they say, of thanking the university for the education their children are receiving. Jack recently injured his left rear leg and is expected to have surgery this month. He will be returning this fall to continue cheering on the athletes and begin teaching J.J. what it means to be a Hoya. “Jack’s presence will provide important support to J.J. since the older dog is already comfortable with his life as a mascot at Georgetown,” says Rev. Christopher Steck, S.J., associate professor in theology. “J.J. will be looking for signals from Jack, and Jack’s enthusiasm in different environments will encourage J.J.’s own.” According to the American Kennel Club, Jack ranks 8th among 125 of the most famous dogs in pop culture. He spends his time cheering at Georgetown games (Hoyas say he is often seen attacking and eating cardboard boxes with the opposing team’s logo on them), or resting in the lobby of the Jesuit Residence before heading home to his New South apartment that he shares with Steck. The Washington Post reported that the new addition is not a replacement for 9-yearold Jack. J.J. was planning on moving across country since he was born in December. Steck tweeted last Friday, March 30, “Really excited about the new puppy, and just to be clear, Jack is NOT retired.” Join Jack and J.J. for a special welcome

Good friends.

Jerry McCoy, special collections librarian, Washingtoniana Division of the D.C. Pubic Library, will receive an individual award from the Historic Preservation Office of the D.C. Office of Planning which chose the Georgetown Neighborhood Library project for the 2012 District of Columbia Award for Excellence in Historic Preservation. The ceremony will be held June 21. McCoy is well known in Georgetown for heading up the Peabody Room at the R Street public library. It suffered extensive damage from an April 2007 fire. Nevertheless, firefighters and staff saved 95 percent of its historic collection, including the beloved portrait of Yarrow Mamout, a early 19th-century Georgetowner who emigrated from West Africa and a popular resident at the time. (Today, the library stands fully reconstructed.) That story was re-told in the Washington Post’s March 25 comics sections in the “Flashbacks” comic-strip. “I thought the denoument of the Yarrow story featuring the Peabody Room’s portrait and its rescue from the fire was pretty spectacular,” McCoy said. ★

Call us for a tour 202-338-6111

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Library’s McCoy Earns Historic Preservation Award; Tale of 2007 Fire in the Comics

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event at Healy Circle, 4 p.m. on Friday, April 13, when Steck returns to campus with the little guy from San Diego. Meanwhile, check the university website which will map the puppy’s travels across America to his destination in D.C.

2512 Q Street, NW, Washington, DC 20007 www.thegeorgetown.com


Community Calendar APRIL 7

Weeding Party in Dumbarton Oaks Park Volunteer with the National Park Service from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to help remove invasive plants from the park. Tools and gloves will be provided; meet at the top of Lover’s Lane and R Street. For more information, please contact Ann Aldrich at aaldrich@verizon.net.

APRIL 11

Cherry Blossom Tea at Tudor Place A traditional tea with sandwiches, scones, desserts and Japanese tea blends, and a tour through the historic house. 1 to 3 p.m. Members, $20; non-members, $25. Cheikh Lo at GW Lisner Auditorium Sengalese Afropop singer-composer Cheikh Lo will perform his strong and soulful songs that are a mix of West and Central African music, funk, Cuban and flamenco. 8 p.m. at the George Washington Lisner Auditorium. Admission cost: $15 to $45.

APRIL 14

Meet Officer Atkins and Commander Reese Metropolitan Police Department officers meet our community to discuss concerns and look at strategies to fight crime, 9:45 a.m. in Rose Park at the picnic tables on the south lawn.

APRIL 17

Sesquicentennial Commemoration of the Emancipation of the District of Columbia 9 to 11 a.m., Georgetown University, Copley

Formal Lounge. RSVP by April 10; space is limited: 202-687-5677 or cbm29@georgetown.edu CAG Meeting Featuring Carl Colby Carl Colby will talk to the Citizens Association of Georgetown about “The Man Nobody Knew,” his movie about his father, CIA Director William Colby. 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Georgetown Library.

APRIL 19

Dumbarton Oaks Park’s 71st Birthday Party at the Italian Embassy Hosted by the Embassy of Italy on 3000 Whitehaven St., N.W, the party’s guest speaker is Betsy Rogers of the Central Park Conservancy. The event is free and open to the public. RSVP to aaldrich@dopark.org or linzee@dopark.org. Go to www.DOpark.org for more information.

The Dermatology Center and Georgetown Smile present...

The Brighten & Whiten Event Monday April 16th, 2-5pm Come join us for an exclusive event in our DC office, along with Georgetown Smile! We will be featuring specials that will brighten your whole look! Join us for nibbles, beverages, and free consultations on brightening treatments, just in time for spring! When you attend the event you will receive specials for Fire & Ice Facials, Teeth Whitening treatments with Georgetown Smile, and Clear & Brilliant , our newest treatment to rejuvenate the skin and reverse the signs of aging. TM

20% off iS CliniCal products today only! ®

This event is being held at our DC location Please RSVP to info@dermskin.com

APRIL 21

Artist’s Talk at the Yellow Barn Stone Tower Marcela Olivia Dorantes is the artist in residence at the Stone Tower for the month of April. Her studio will be open daily from 9 a.m. to 7.30 p.m. On April 21, she will hold an art lecture from 1:30 to 3 p.m. The Yellow Barn Stone Tower, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Glen Echo Md. 5th Annual C&O Canal Pride Days On April 21 and 28 there will be volunteer events to improve the park. Advanced registration is required at www.canaltrust.org/trust/ canal-pride-days.php. Contact Becky Curtis for more information, curtis@CanalTrust.org.

Ins & Outs M&T Bank, which has a branch on Thomas Jefferson Street, will be adding another Georgetown location at 1420 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., where the clothing store, Commander Salamander, once sold its funky wares. Never mind: Crave, a sandwich and salad eatery on Potomac Street that opened a couple of weeks ago, was abruptly closed. A dispute between business partners led to the decision. Manager and co-owner Garrett Bauman, also of Annie Items from Crave were hastily removed from the restaurant Creamcheese vintage clothing, told the Georgetowner he hoped Gentlemen’s Quarterly opined: “The whole to find another location nearby. collection is still grounded in the archival, The men’s clothier, Gant, is coming to American sportswear Bastin and Co. have Georgetown in August and moving into 3239 perfected in the past few seasons but amped up M St. It could not be more different than its in the flair department, complete with special previous tenant, the free-wheeling, live-music details like the floral lining on an insanely bar, the Saloun. perfect M-65 jacket or the bold flecks of bright The 2,000 square foot space will sell yellow and orange on a Donegal tweed blazer.” Gant, Gant Rugger and Gant by Michael Bastian, according to Women’s Wear Daily. Georgetown just got more preppy, as if it Continues on page 9 needed more help.

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EDITORIAL / OPINION

Percy Plaza: A Uniting Symbol for Our Time In the divided, Red State-Blue State, conservative-liberal, right- and left-wing United States of America of today, there are very few proposals that elicit a unanimous, united response. Here’s one: Ward 2 Councilmember Jack Evans has proposed a measure that would ceremonially rename the corner of Wisconsin Avenue and K Street near Georgetown Waterfront Park’s people-friendly fountain in honor of Senator Charles Percy. We can only say: Yes and yes again. We applaud, we approve, for many good reasons. Wisconsin Avenue and K Street marks the entrance to the finally, fully blooming and operational Georgetown Waterfront Park. There is probably no single person who was more instrumental in getting the park project off the ground and on its way -- as a chairman of the Friends of Georgetown Waterfront Park and as out-and-out booster and promoter for the park’s completion. The park’s non-profit -- named “Georgetowners of the Year” for 2011 by this newspaper -advanced the idea of Percy Plaza a few years ago.

Percy passed away at the age of 91 just days after completion of the park. Percy was a Republican senator from Illinois of considerable achievement and reputation, counted at one time as a possible GOP presidential candidate. He also had an illustrious business career before entering politics. As a politician, a popular senator, he was the kind of man who honored the trade, a true moderate who worked both sides of the aisle with style and aplomb, the kind of Republican that seems today to be as rare as a unicorn in a deeply divided American body politic. When Percy left the Senate, he took up life as a Georgetown citizen and lived up to the highest standards of community citizenship by taking part with great fervor in the community’s affairs. The Georgetown Waterfront Park is rich evidence of his good works, and it contains a riverside National Park Service plaque about him. So: Name an intersection after Sen. Charles Percy? That’s the least we can do. See you at Percy Plaza. ★

Green D.C. BY EM MA WAT E RS

O

ur nation’s capital takes being green very seriously. We top the list of environmentally-friendly “firsts” time and again. The numbers don’t lie, D.C. stands above the competition in LEED certified commercial and institutional green buildings per capita. And any foodie will tell you, this town loves supporting local farms. Many embassies catch the eye with their beauty and grandeur, but only one prevents greenhouse gas emissions. The Embassy of Finland is the first LEED-certified embassy in the U.S. Years of retrofitting the modernist building has produced energy-efficient lighting, plumbing and ventilation. Mirroring Finland’s environmental commitment, the embassy is a pioneer in eco-friendly business practices. During those all too familiar summer scorchers, Pleasant Pops comes to our rescue. Inspired by paletas, a traditional ice pop from Michoacan, Mexico, the ingredients challenge our taste buds and support local farming. The Pleasant Pops mission dictates strict recycling practices and composting organic waste. Look for the new shop in Logan Square this summer. Eco-friendliness comes as second nature to Nusta spa, the first and only LEED certified spa in the U.S. Their goal is to approach green from the inside out. Renewable and

recyclable, Nusta’s interior meets the highest standards of sustainability. They thought of everything, down to the ink used in printed materials. Ever wonder where your seafood actually comes from? Not at Tackle Box, whose green philosophy supports local suppliers who are using habitat-friendly fishing gear. Their fluctuating menu combats over-fishing and poor practices that endanger our oceans. Tackle Box believes environmentalism means flexibility, education and community. Washington Nationals Park is the nation’s first major professional stadium to become LEED-certified. Sustainable design elements include energy-saving light fixtures, droughtresistant plants and a green roof over concessions. What about those pesky peanut shells sprawling the ground? A special ground filtration is system designed to catch shells and other debris before reaching the stormwater system. D.C.’s latest initiative is to keep our schools green. On March 20, the Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council released the Green Classroom Professional Certificate. The program educates pre-K–12 teachers, paraprofessionals, administrators and parents about environmentally healthy practices in schools and classrooms. ★ PUBLISHER

Sonya Bernhardt FEATURE EDITORS

Please send all submissions of opinions for consideration to editorial@georgetowner.com

Robert Devaney Gary Tischler Ari Post

Protecting Our Students … Beyond the Half Measures BY JOH N FEN ZEL “The gunman entered … and opened fire on ‘everything that moved... How can they attack something as sacred as a school?’” This witness account, from the school shootings in Toulouse, France, is reminiscent of the countless other incidents we have experienced across the United States, most recently at Chardon High School in Ohio. When a shooting incident occurs in any of our nation’s schools, news travels instantly.  Coverage of the incident dominates our television screens— images of students and faculty streaming outside, parents rushing to police lines, stacks of SWAT teams preparing to enter school doors, media vans lined up on roadways—all of it creating an alltoo-familiar scene. So familiar, in fact, that the images and details of each incident have become largely indistinguishable from others. As the discussion has become garbled, so have our strategies for dealing with shooting rampages in our nation’s schools. Following an incident, we’re riveted for a period of a week or so to the news coverage.  We’re systematically guided through the stages of grief by network anchors and pundits: through our guilt for not having recognized the signs earlier … through our anger at the perpetrators … and finally, to our collective view of the incident as an anomaly—something that “could never happen here.”  Months later, another school shooting occurs. This one seemingly disconnected from the one preceding it. And yet, the shooters’ characteristics are remarkably similar:  chronic truancy, religious or political fanaticism, a preoccupation with weapons, someone socially marginalized… on “the fringe,” who is struggling with addiction…and who has announced his intent to kill.  The symptoms and signs remain constant. And in our collective quest to better understand a shooter’s motives, the media narrative often conveys upon us a societal guilt-by-association for the carnage he inflicts.  

Defining the Problem

On occasion, we take a few steps back to gain perspective rather than catharsis. And in those moments, it’s possible to transcend our complacency and to see school rampages for what they are: acts of terror. Defining the problem in these terms is a crucial first step toward effective defense—but that step has proven to be surprisingly elusive as we tend to focus instead on the psychology and motivations of the shooter in an incident’s aftermath. But the problem has remained constant: our children are at risk from those who seek media attention through acts of mass murder.

MARKETING & ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Adra Williams

IN COUNTRY & ADVERTISING

Evelyn Keyes

WEB & SOCIAL MEDIA

Charlene Louis 8 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

The problem of active shooters in our schools is not new. The first school massacre incident occurred in 1764 at a schoolhouse near Greencastle, Pa., when four Delaware warriors killed ten children and their schoolmaster. In 1927, a school administrator bombed the Community School in Bath, Mich., killing 38 people—mostly children. Numerous other incidents have occurred through the years. The well known and often discussed, like Columbine and Virginia Tech, eclipse those that occurred decades ago, but are no less deadly, like South Pasadena Junior High School (1940) and University of Texas at Austin (1966).  

What Can Be Done?

Identifying students who display at-risk behavior remains key to stopping a school shooting before it occurs. Homicidal ideation is perhaps the most obvious indicator that a teen may be considering such an act, but there are a host of others, to include: cruelty to animals, suicidal tendencies, and abuse or neglect at home. Reporting comments and observations in advance have prevented many attacks; however, forecasting a school rampage is not always achievable.  There will be more attacks. As youth addiction to point-and-shoot video games grows, and as weapons become more powerful, a perfect storm of entertainment realism and lethality has gathered, making the potential consequences of future school attacks even more catastrophic than the last. Defending against school rampages is a sensitive topic—far more so than preparing for tornados or fire.  Active shooter drills involving all parties—students, faculty and first responders— are rarely conducted for fear that the visual of the drills alone will be met with cries of outrage from school commissions and PTAs.  The great irony is that school rampages are responsible for far more fatalities in our schools than severe weather, earthquakes or fires, combined. So, rather than shrink from tabletop exercises and rehearsals, perhaps we should be insisting on them. Even the simple act of identifying the locations for staging areas, police command posts, media cordons, and reunification sites expedite incident response.  Exercises also give faculty and students a reflexive understanding of school lockdown procedures, and how to effectively respond should they come face-to-face with a gunman. Drills and rehearsals have the added benefit of building relationships with local law enforcement before an incident occurs.  The time for police, first responders and school administrators to be introduced to one another should never be in the midst of a crisis. ★

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CONTRIBUTORS

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CONTRIBUTORS (CONT’D)

Donna Evers Amos Gelb Lisa Gillespie Jody Kurash Ris Lacoste David Post Alison Schafer Bill Starells


BUSINESS

Mayor’s 2013 Budget Biggest Ever BY JA CK EVANS

L

ast week, Mayor Vincent Gray submitted his fiscal 2013 budget proposal to the District Council. The total proposed budget for the District is $11.3 billion, the largest in our city’s history. Of that amount, our proposed local funds budget for fiscal 2013 is $5.9 billion, which is $237 million more than the fiscal 2012 approved budget of $5.6 billion, an increase of 4.2 percent. Once you add in certain dedicated revenues, the entire general fund revenue proposal is $6.6 billion. While we also receive federal money in our budget, it is in the same proportional ballpark as that received by any other state. There is a common misconception that the federal government makes a separate contribution to the District. However, this type of payment was eliminated in 1996. Over the past ten years, our local funds budget has gone from $3.7 billion to $6.1 billion, an increase of 64 percent. Much of this increase has been in the social services and education budgets. Today, almost 80 percent of our budget is used for social services, education, and public safety. In light of this extraordinary spending growth, I simply cannot understand the position of some of my colleagues and policy advocates who say we are not providing adequate funding for social services programs. An argument can perhaps be made that spending choices should be made more wisely, but we are not in need of any new revenue. Fortunately, the mayor seems to agree at least partially with those sentiments. I am pleased with certain aspects of the budget, such as the absence of any tax increases. I am also pleased to see at least a token increase in the homestead deduction, standard income tax deduction, and personal income tax exemption. I would go even further, however. Due to our large surplus from the past fiscal year and an increase in our quarterly revenue estimate, an argument could be made that we should return these tax dollars to taxpayers, and return the furlough money to our government employees. I also have concerns that certain revenue-raising proposals in the mayor’s budget may not generate the projected levels of funds. Of particular concern is a proposal to expand the hours during which alcohol can be sold, from 2 a.m. to 3 a.m. on weekdays and from 3 a.m. to 4 a.m. on weekends and holidays, for the apparent purpose of generating $1.3 million in increased sales tax revenue annually starting in fiscal 2013, and approximately $5.32 million in the four-year financial plan period. I believe many residents of Ward 2 will object to this type of change. Therefore, this will require that we find funding elsewhere. The mayor also proposes to raise $24.8 million in new revenue from increased speed and red light ticket cameras. I disagree philosophically with this nickeland-dime approach to balancing the budget. Last year, I expressed concerns about inadequate police funding in the budget. While I am encouraged by the mayor’s commitment to fund additional officer positions, I disagree that a staff of 3,900 officers would constitute a “fully funded” police force. I believe we should increase our force to a minimum of 4,000 sworn officers at all times to protect us from rapid changes, such as when we reach a “retirement bubble.” I also believe we should provide at least $10 million in funding for the Commission on Arts & Humanities as well as additional funds for libraries and parks. I will be working with my colleagues on the council to make improvements to the mayor’s proposal and hope to have your support. Last year, I voted “no” on the budget. I am hopeful that I will be able to support it this year. ★

Ins & Outs Continued from page 7 Ligne Roset and Natuzzi are setting up shop in Glover Park. The furniture retailers have jointly leased the storefront at 2209 Wisconsin Avenue, said property manager Cynthia Cumbo, who added, “The space should be ready in March.” The space was vacant after Mobili furniture departed more than three years ago. The clothing store, Riccardi & Sports, have left the Shops at Georgetown Park along with so many others. It can now be found at the main Riccardi at 3213 M Street -- 202-625-6687. Mega and green, too: Swedish fashion giant Hennes and Mauritz -- which has its H&M store on M Street at Georgetown Park -plans a separate luxury line for 2013. “We have many different

projects in progress and already next year we will be launching a completely new store chain. Like COS, which today is very successful with good profitability, the new chain of stores will be independent and complement the other offerings from the group,” CEO Karl-Johan Persson confirmed. On April 12, H&M will launch its Exclusive Glamour Conscious Collection, promoted by Amanda Seyfried and Michelle Williams and is made using sustainable materials including organic cotton, hemp and recycled polyester. Hair stylist Luigi Parasmo is set to open his first namesake salon with fellow stylist Javier Calvo in Georgetown. Luigi Parasmo Salon will be equipped with a staff of 14 hair, make-up and nail stylists and opens its doors to the public on Tuesday, April 10. It will be located on 1510 Wisconsin Avenue.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton welcomed benefactors to the U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council lunch at the State Department.

U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council Lunch With Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush BY M IC H EL L E KIN GSTON

H

onorees, distinguished guests, journalists and friends crowded inside the Benjamin Franklin room at the State Department on March 21 to congratulate the members of the U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council on the 10th anniversary of supporting the women of Afghanistan. Founded in 2002 by President George W. Bush and Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai, the council connects both U.S. and Afghan governments with the private sector, academia and non-governmental organizations to identify needs and to develop and implement initiatives to support Afghan women and girls. The council is based at Georgetown University. “There is an Afghan proverb: A good year is determined by its spring. I think that is a worthy proverb to keep in mind, and indeed it is a call to action for us to be sure that the spring sets the pace for the kind of good year we hope to see in Afghanistan,” Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said. “Let there be no doubt that even as the U.S. role in Afghanistan changes during the next few years of transition, we will continue to stand with and work closely with Afghan women.” “Some may wonder if these efforts and partnerships truly make a difference,” said Zala Ahmad, a student from rural Afghanistan who now studies at Brandeis University in Massachusetts thanks to the council. “I can tell you firsthand that they do.” While toasting the council with red glasses of hibiscus tea, dining on endive salads and Atlantic cod, and treating tastebuds to the sweet dessert served, a passion fruit clafouti, guests listened to Clinton, former First Lady Laura Bush, John DeGioia, president of Georgetown University, Ambasador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues Melanne Verveer and several other speakers from Afghanistan involved with the council share stories and astronomical differences in percentages of Afghan females now attending schools and even holding prominent

positions. “Girls make up about 40 percent of the nearly 8 million children going to school in Afghanistan today,” Foreign Minister of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Zalmai Rassoul said. “In 2000, there were no girls at that time.” He also noted that 30 percent of school teachers and 15 percent of university teachers are women. Today, 24 percent of doctors and medical workers across Afghanistan are women. Even with these positive numbers, he said Afghan women continue to be innocent victims, but the council has helped give them their opportunity back. “God created a couple,” said Vartan Gregorian, president of Carnegie Corporation of New York. “He did not create men first, women second. He created a couple at the same time. So, there is no way half of the couple can be inferior to the other half of the couple.” After several rounds of applause credited to the amount of effort and success that has gone into the council, both Clinton and Bush were presented awards for their dedication by Georgetown University. Clinton was given the Caring for Children Lifetime Achievement Award from the Center for Child and Human Development by DeGioia, who joked that Clinton has been fighting for the rights of women and children since she wrote her scholarly article in 1973 for the Harvard Educational Review. Bush received the Champion for Afghan Women Award from Verveer, who said Bush “led by example, mobilizing resources to ensure that Afghan women and girls gain skills, opportunities, and particularly the education that they were denied under the years of Taliban repression.” When the luncheon was finished, Verveer said the program was over but the journey to continue fighting for the rights of Afghan women is not. “We hope that we will all continue to work together,” she said. ★

GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 9


REAL ESTATE SALES Style

Address

Georgetown Real Estate

Sales Provided by

Washington Fine Properties. LLC

BA

List Price

Close price

Year Built

3400-3410 PROSPECT ST NW

Federal

5

9

$12,500,000

$11000000

1787

1533 28TH ST NW

Colonial

4

3

$3495000

$3000000

1976

3345 RESERVOIR RD NW

Federal

4

3

$1975000

$1900000

1950

3303 WATER ST NW #E-6

International

2

2

$1999000

$1850000

2004

3131 N ST NW

Federal

3

3

$1750000

$1650000

1939

4025 MANSION DR NW

Colonial

3

3

$1499000

$1447500

1990

1654 35TH ST NW

Colonial

5

4

$1350000

$1350000

1981

1345 27TH ST NW

Colonial

3

2

$1275000

$1275000

1870

3021 DENT PL NW

Colonial

3

3

$1100000

$1100000

1910

3301 DENT PL NW

Federal

2

2

$899000

$850000

1921

3721 T ST NW

Traditional

3

2

$765000

$757500

1924

1013 PAPER MILL CT NW #1013

Other

2

1

$569900

$560000

1900

3299 K ST NW #701

Traditional

1

1

$459000

$445000

1978

2500 Q ST NW #327

Other

1

1

$369000

$365000

1942

2605 39TH ST NW #104

Contemporary

2

1

$340000

$320000

1954

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MORTGAGE

Not Out of the Woods Yet BY BILL STA RRE L S

T

he economy is not out of the woods yet. In order for it to stabilize further, the housing market has to get stronger. A recently released S&P Case Shiller report was headlined, “2012 Home Prices Off to a Rocky Start.” In a comparison between January 2012 and January 2011 of major metropolitan areas, only Washington, D.C., Miami and Phoenix showed price increases. MerrillLynch pointed out that only Washington, D.C. and Miami had increases in unadjusted data. The worst performing metropolitan area was Atlanta, Ga., which posted a one year change of -14.8 percent. Even major metropolitan areas including New York, Chicago and Los Angeles posted declines. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke spoke at George Washington University, where he highlighted the same cautious tone he has been using for months. He was noted as saying that it’s too early to declare victory on the latest economic recovery. The Fed will continue its accommodative monetary policy. Bernanke said that the depression of the late 1920s and ‘30s was much more disruptive and severe than the recent “Great Recession.” He stated that without the forceful response by the Federal government the outcome would have been much more severe.

Bernanke spoke of a likely slowdown in the second half of the year and did not rule out future monetary easing by the Fed. Speaking on employment, he noted that the numbers were “significantly below pre-crisis levels” and that unemployment is well above sustainable levels. The chairman said the Fed is not paying attention to the election calendar and will not allow the election to influence its actions. If it enacts more simulative actions in the fall, it will be in reaction to economic conditions, not because of the pending election. Pending home sales for February showed a decline of 0.5 percent month-over-month in February. January posted an increase of 2 percent. The consensus was for an increase of 1 percent. This is another sign of the fragility of the economic recovery. The Washington area seems to be one of the more stable economic areas, and housing is doing better here than in most areas. Mortgage rates continue to be near-historic lows. Rates remain in a narrow range in the next several months. With the Fed’s cautious tone, the fear of a spike in interest rates seems remote at best.

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HISTORIC DC

The Cherry Trees, One Hundred Years Later

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his spring marks the 100-year anniversary of Japan’s gift of cherry trees to beautify the Tidal basin and National Mall. It has been one of the better years of perfect weather for the blossoms, though they came too early for most. They are the official sign of spring and also the beginning of the tourist season in Washington. Their clouds of pink blossoms offer a brilliant picture that is quite different from the project that faltered many times along the way. The plan to have cherry trees in and around the Mall came from a Washington socialite who worked hand-in-hand with President Taft’s wife — First Lady Helen “Nellie” Taft — to get the trees here from Japan, both as a symbol of our two countries’ friendship and as a way to spruce up the swampy, derelict Mall area. But the sacred trees, called Sakura in Japan, went through a series of mishaps which very nearly killed all these ambitious plans. When the first shipment of 90 trees arrived and were planted, they turned out to be the wrong variety and had to be dug up. Then a shipment of 2,000 trees arrived as a gift from the government of Japan, but when the Department of Agriculture inspected the trees, they were found to be diseased, so President Taft himself ordered them to be burned in huge pyres. The governments exchanged letters, and the deeply embarrassing incident was fixed diplomatically. Two years later, 3,000 disease-resistant cherry trees arrived and with great ceremony, were planted and thrived to the delight of the whole city. Fifty years after that, when Lady Bird Johnson greened the city with her pocket parks, the government of Japan sent 3,800 more to be planted around the Washington Monument.

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These trees have always brought an emotional response from Washingtonians. In 1938, during construction of the Jefferson Memorial, workers started to clear some of the cherry trees for the construction site, and an angry group of women protestors chained themselves to the endangered trees to stop them from being cut down. The government intervened and promised to replace any trees that had to come down. While the blossoming trees look tranquil, they are very high-maintenance. They last a maximum of 30 to 50 years, so the government is constantly replacing dying trees. The heavy limbs are susceptible to wind, hail and snow storms, and these damaged trees also have to be periodically replaced. In 1912, during the ceremony of the tree planting, the Japanese ambassador predicted, “Almost all the world is at peace today, and there will be peace for thousands of tomorrows. War has had its day.” Of course, that’s not how things turned out, and during World War II, Washingtonians took to calling the cherry trees “Oriental” instead of “Japanese.” Each spring, Washingtonians wait and worry, because they can remember years when the buds and blossoms froze or were decimated in wind and sleet storms. In Japan, and for the last 100 years in Washington, the clouds of blossoming trees which appear magically almost overnight, symbolize the precariousness of nature and of our own existence, all the things that are most important and over which we have the least control. ★ Donna Evers is the owner and broker of Evers & Co. Real Estate, the largest woman-owned and -run real estate firm in the Washington area, the proprietor of historic Twin Oaks Tavern Winery in Bluemont, Va., and a devoted student of Washington history. E-mail her at Devers@ Eversco.com.

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Arlington, VA

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GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 13


REAL ESTATE SPOTLIGHT

LONG & FOSTER’S DETWILER: Strategist in a Reviving Economy

F

BY RO B E RT DE VANEY

rom his Chantilly, Va., office near Route 28 and Dulles Airport, Jeffrey S. Detwiler, president and chief operating officer of the Long & Foster Companies, sees the dynamism and traffic of Northern Virginia. Here, he keeps tabs on the company’s wide-ranging real estate activities and checks updates on his iPad as he speaks confidently about the national and local real estate market, and a company that has become a real estate icon. “The epicenter of housing recovery is Washington, D.C.,” Detwiler says. Centered here, Long & Foster operates offices from Pennsylvania and New Jersey down through North Carolina and tracks the trends, such as seeing Richmond nine months behind the Washington area. “The Mid-Atlantic region is the best performing region in the nation,” he says. “The real estate market is so local, and Long & and Foster is the best place to be during tough times.” One thing is for sure: other corporate real estate giants have come and gone and have tried to buy the company, co-founded by chairman and CEO P. Wesley Foster, Jr., in 1968. Indeed, the legendary Foster is the one who has bought other firms adding to his army of 12,000 sales associates with 170 sales offices. In a competitive field during an economic downturn, Detwiler says he knows that agents need any extra edge they can get. We are in “a never-before-seen real estate market,” says the 50-year-old president. “It is harder today than ever before. From the agent to seller, we have to be 24/7 business-ready. We have an e-real estate team to help.” And he is well aware that the “next generation is using social media to find agents, too.” “The years 2003 through 2007 were an anomaly,” he says. “There was a mortgage bubble.” The additional agents who jumped into the market are gone now. As for the housing economy, he says, “The banks are scared to death and don’t want to make mistakes. Appraisers are scared, too, and people are scared to buy. Consumer confidence affects sales.” Detwiler lists four fundamental issues affecting housing: overly tight credit; negative equity; consumer debt, especially sub prime loans; distressed assets. “They complicate the system,” he calmly says. “The government can do more. So many loans are dinged up. In January 2010, we began to adjust to the new world. . . . it will return to normal in 2015 or 2016.” Nevertheless, “spring has been a great selling season,” relative to business last year, Detwiler says. In Georgetown, specifically, number of units sold is up 24 percent over last spring. Median sale price is down roughly 15 percent year-over-year, but inventory continues to tighten, which leads to a more balanced real estate market, and sellers in Georgetown are receiving about 95 percent of their list price when they sell, on average. Long & Foster made the biggest neighborhood and D.C. sale of 2011 with Evermay, the estate on 28th Street, going for $22 million. Right now, it is listing a 31st Street historic 14 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

Jeffery S. Detwiler. Photo by Robert Devaney.

home, across from Tudor Place, for $6.75 million. Over near Massachusetts Avenue, it has two listings within four blocks of each other: one on Benton Place for $12 million and another on Whitehaven Street for $6.95 million. A different company holds the highest-price listing in D.C.: a Chain Bridge Road property across from Battery Kimble Park for $16 million. Luxury home listings and million-dollarplus homes have become a greater part of Long & Foster’s strategy; it already has almost 30 percent of all the million-plus sales in the MidAtlantic region. Aware that local sales can go global, its Extraordinary Properties group includes exclusive affiliations with Christie’s International Real Estate, Luxury Real Estate and Luxury Portfolio International. More worldwide connections mean more sales. For these efforts as well as for Long & Foster’s mortgage and insurance entities, Detwiler has at least 25 years of finance and real estaterelated experience to draw upon. “My previous businesses share the same model,” he says. In fact, when Detwiler arrived at Long & Foster in 2009, the charming, down-to-earth, yet tenacious co-founder Wes Foster appeared incredulous. “At first, Wes could not fathom a non-real estate guy running the show,” he says. “What I brought to the table was a different view. The company is at a different point in its life: it has more structure and financial discipline.” A Princeton graduate who majored in psychology, Detwiler brought 20 years of experi-

ence in the mortgage industry along with his other work in traditional banking, insurance and portfolio management. “Detwiler has benefited from having direct responsibility as the senior executive for all facets of the mortgage business that included sales and production, capital markets and trading, finance and risk management, operations and technology, and servicing,” Foster announced at the time. According to Long & Foster, “Detwiler was the chief production officer for the Correspondent Channel at Countrywide/Bank of America. The Correspondent Channel included correspondent lending, warehouse lending and Landsafe origination services. In this role he was accountable for all revenue-producing activities. Prior to Countrywide, Detwiler worked on Wall Street for Credit Suisse First Boston in the mortgage trading and finance group. While at CSFB, he built and managed the warehouse lending business, and reengineered and oversaw the servicing operation. In addition, he designed, built and managed the mortgage conduit. Before Detwiler moved to Wall Street, he spent ten years at GMAC/RFC and was the chairman of the Conduit Operating Committee.” For a firm which began in a single, 600 square foot office in Fairfax, Va., and became the largest privately-owned real estate company in America, Detwiler looks like part of its continual plan for more firepower. Long & Foster has that developing foresight and zeal — and well-regarded, connected executives. Detwiler’s predecessor was David Stevens who left Long

& Foster to become head of the Federal Housing Administration and is now president of the Mortgage Bankers of America. Long & Foster’s headquarters in Chantilly opened five years ago just as the housing bubble burst. It is a massive Williamsburg-style office building, built with handmade, rough-hewn bricks and filled with art, sculptures along with murals depicting a developing Washington in the mid-1800s. There are other tenants in the five-story structure with adjacent land available for new construction in a healthier economy. In 2011, Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc., sold more than $22 billion worth of homes and helped more than 69,000 people buy and sell thier houses. The combined sales and equivalents for the Long & Foster Companies in 2011 were in excess of $42 billion. After Detwiler came from California to head the parent company — it includes Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc., Prosperity Mortgage Company, Walker Jackson Mortgage Corporation, Long & Foster Settlement Services, and Long & Foster Insurance Agency, Inc. — one corporate trait stuck him. “It was eye-opening to me,” he says. “People have been here 20 to 25 years. It makes a big company seem small.” Such staying power is owed in no small part to Wes Foster himself, now in his late 70s, and known for his honest, personal touch as well as hard-driving spirit. And you can bet that Detwiler with his ready smile and business acumen has a similar competitive glint in his eyes. Just what Foster ordered. ★


A Tray for You,

LE DECOR

A Tray for Two

BY M AR IT FOSSO

Serve tea, hors d’ouevres or cocktails on a decorative tray. Serve breakfast in bed to someone you care about. Or serve up some style: we like to use trays as a coffee table decoration, whether they’re filled with candles or stocked with our favorite magazines.

Michel Design Works Lemon Decoupage Serving Tray. $39.95. www.surlatable.com BoConcept Trays in different colors. $19 - $49. www.boconcept.us

Eva Solo Serving Tray. $108. www.royaldesign.com.

Mailroom Wood and Hardware Trays from Restoration Hardware. $129 - $199. www.restorationhardware.com.

Bedworth Saddle Leather tray from Ralph Lauren. $595. www.saksfifthavenue.com

GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 15


COVER STORY

Getting to the Heart of the

Georgetown House Tour BY GARY TISC H L ER

I

f you’re one of those persons who’ve been on a few Georgetown House Tours, you’ve begun to get a notion about some of the things the tour is about. The tour is about history, for sure—about the homes being shown, about the people who have lived in them and live in them now, about change in Georgetown and change in how people live. For all the historic, stately qualities of Georgetown, it’s a remarkably fluid place, and you can see that in the homes that are being shown. Those houses, acting like official greeters, may show a part of the past and a part of the present to visitors all at the same time Georgetown is, after all, a historic district where wholesale physical change is difficult to achieve—but things are often going on inside that speak to the modern and to the future, as well as individual style and taste. People flock to the Georgetown House Tour with expectations that they will see a portion of the lives and looks of the persons who occupy and own these houses, and that they will reflect the village of people who know how to live with style and grace. They also expect to see the living breath of his-

tory—the occasional antique piece of eye-popping furniture, paintings, gardens, the work of a fabulous interior decorator, the timeless touch of the history of the homes themselves. All of these elements come together in the annual spring Georgetown House Tour, sponsored by historic St. John’s Episcopal Church and benefitting many of its long-time charitable activities. Like many “festive” or “tour” events in the city, it has grown and branched out over the years, adding social occasions—the Patrons’ Party, for instance—and mini-events on the day of the tours like the hugely popular afternoon tea at St. John’s. And every year, there are people who gather together to lend their resources, talents, time and efforts to ensure the event’s success. There are volunteers, quasi-docents, ticket-takers, information providers and so on. There are corporate sponsors such as Washington Fine Properties, there are the folks who lend their name, time and effort as co-chairs, and the kind folks who open their homes. This year the co-chairs — Frank Randolph, a renowned interior designer and Stephanie Bothwell, who heads her own business called Urban and Landscape Design — combine with Frida Burling, long the soul and inspiration of the Georgetown

Left: Plaque on the home of Hugh Newell Jacobson’s home. Top: Stephanie Bothwell and Frank Babb Randolph. Photos by Philip Bermingham.

16 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.


COVER STORY

THE 2012

GEORGETOWN HOUSE TOUR AT A GLANCE:

House Tour, to bring together themes of history, interior and exterior designs. I.e., how we live in our homes and communities and share the best of those qualities with each other and the world. Randolph, known for his enchanting interior designs, is ideally suited for his role as co-chair: he is, without a doubt, one of the village’s most unabashed boosters, born and raised in Georgetown, a student at Western High before it became Duke Ellington School for the Arts. Bothwell is a relative newcomer to Georgetown, having lived here with her family for 12 years, but she brims with a passion for the community and ideas about achieving ideal and workable designs for urban living. Burling, has for years made sure that the tour would come off every year with an energy that surprises people to this day — by marketing, cajoling, persuading, charming, pushing and using her considerable contacts to make it happen. She became the face and voice of the tour, it’s most able, articulate promoter. In 2001, when Ben Bradlee and Sally Quinn hosted the tour’s patrons’ party, the Georgetowner newspaper arrived at their N Street home to take a cover photo. An editor asked Bradlee why he was involved, and the Washington Post executive editor roared back: “Because Frida told me to.” The combination of the three speaks the best of Georgetown, a sense of a community with historic offerings that presents a graceful face to the world and to itself, for that matter. “It goes without saying, “ Randolph says. “One of the key components is the fact that all of us, the residents of Georgetown, get to visit each other at one time or another. It’s a community thing that way.” Of course, Randolph combines the historic with designer know-how and appreciation as well as an articulate, busy knowledge of his favorite place. “I can think of only a few houses in Georgetown that I’ve not been in,” he says. “And, over the years, I’ve done the interior design for, I don’t know, 30 or 40 homes. Of course, that includes my own home.” It is on 34th Street near Dent Place and has a certain cache beyond his own ownership, which is no small thing either. “Henry Kissinger lived here for a few years,” he says. If you want cache, or just history chat, talk with Randolph. His father was a senator from West Virginia. Randolph was asked to redecorate the Vice President’s Residence when the Cheneys lived there. “I had a privileged upbringing, you could say, but not spoiled or extravagant,” he said. “I was and still am very appreciative of the opportunities.” The world comes to tour the nine Georgetown homes on Saturday, April 28. It used to spread over two days on a spring weekend but has since been held on Saturday only. “Georgetown presents one of the better illustrations of livable urban design. I’m not talking about showing off a collection of solar panels or being green. It’s about ease of movement, access and connection,” Bothwell said.

From the east side to the west side, from 28th Street to 35th Street and from N Street to Q Street, the Georgetown House Tour spreads its welcome mat over Washington’s most historic neighborhood, Saturday, April 28, from 11 a.m to 5 p.m. For the price of $40 ($45 after April 20), visitors and residents may walk through nine homes and the home’s grounds. It’s a chance to glimpse some history, to get some decorating and home improvement ideas and to feel the ease of city living. Who would open their doors to strangers? Try at least three architects, an artist, a designer, a real estate developer and agent, a financial manager, a high-tech manager, a college dean, a lawyer and another lawyer who happens to represent Georgetown as the Ward 2 councilmember. The following have opened their homes on behalf of the tour and deserve a big thank you from the community: Cherry and Peter Baumbusch; Kristin and John Cecchi; Pat Dixon; Michele and Jack Evans; Hugh Newell Jacobsen; Kristin and Greg Muhlner; Dale and Melissa Overmyer; Alice Hall and Peter Starr; Christian Zapatka. There is a tea at St. John’s Church parish hall (O and Potomac Street), from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, April 28, the day of the tour. The Patron’s Party is April 25 at Frida Burling’s house on 29th Street. For more information, visit GeorgetownHouseTour.com or call 202-338-1796.

Clockwise: Christian Zapatka’s home, Jack and Michelle Evans’ home and Kristin and Greg Muhlner’s home. Photos by Sonya Bernhardt. “The house tour shows people the history here, sure, but I think it also shows how you can manage change in interior ways, what you can do with old homes to make them more contemporary while keeping the history and beauty,” she said. “We have a remarkable variety in housing stock here — it’s not all mansions and big properties, although we have plenty of that here. It’s livable, manageable homes, some quite small. And the homes are very deceptive from the outside; they give off the historic feeling without revealing their depth or size.” Echoing that theme, Randolph said, “I absolutely love Georgetown. I have everything here I need. I can walk to the Safeway or Whole Foods and restaurants galore. We have the firemen at Dent Place nearby. It’s fluid, it changes and the people change. But it has tradition. It has history that’s permanent. And I think you can see that reflected on the tour. I’ve lived here most of

my life, and I wouldn’t live anywhere else.” Randolph, a Georgetowner par excellence, can tell you about the various schools—Hardy, Hyde, Western—and the people who have lived here. He knows lots of people and has a host of friends. “I live by myself,” he says. “I don’t even have a pet. I have a porcelain dog. He’s the perfect pet. You don’t have to walk or feed him, and he’s always there for you. But I share this place with my friends, this lovely village.” Frida Burling can tell you a little about life in Georgetown herself, too. At 96, she’s seen and done a lot in her community. In a phone conversation, she tells you she’s slowing down— then rattles off a series of activities, meetings with relatives, a church, another meeting Sunday afternoon—that indicates she still keeps a busy schedule. She is the tour chair emerita and is hosting the Patron’s Party April 25. She recalls how she first got involved in the house tour, which began during the Depression as a small thing. “My husband and I (the late Edward Burling, whom she still refers to as Eddie) used to go on weekends out to Middleburg, but that’s hunt country, and it’s not Georgetown. I got involved with St. John’s which is so much a center of all this with their many projects. Eventually, I got involved in the house tour, because that’s a way to support those charitable projects like the Georgetown Ministry.” No question about it, she propelled the house tour into its next incarnation to the point where it has become an institution, a must-do event and an integral part of the community’s traditions. She did it by example—her energy became legendary as she got older. She remembers asking best-selling author and biographer Kitty Kelley, a Georgetowner to the bone, to host the first patrons’ party in the late 1990s. The patron’s parties were a Burling innovation, and it enlarged the image of the tour, created a higher profile. “I think it’s one of the oldest house tours in the country,” she said. “I know it sets an example.” And, simply by being who she is, so does Frida Burling. ★

GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 17


IN COUNTRY

Newport, Rhode Island: A Fresh Sense of History

BY AR I POST

keswick, virginia 202.390.2323 www.castlehillcider.com events@castlehillcider.com

T

he city is known on the whole as a New England summer resort. It integrates the most desirable qualities of any leisure travel destination, with enough options and activities to accommodate any budget. While only a half-day’s drive or aerial puddle jump away from the Washington area, Newport, Rhode Island has a spirit all its own. Founded in 1638, it is enveloped in a rich and much-beloved history—and as our Georgetown House Tour approaches, it might be worth noting that Newport also has one of the highest concentrations of colonial homes in the nation. Also similar to Georgetown, Newport is very much a contemporary urban haven, proud of its history but residing in the cultural here-and-now. Not too crowded, not too hot, and as friendly as a summer evening is long, Newport, Rhode Island is just the ticket for a Washingtonian weekend getaway or an enriching weeklong stay. On top of the usual, year-round attractions the city has to offer, there is an array of summer events and activities on the horizon, far enough away to plan ahead but close enough to start getting excited.

Sailing and Boating

There are myriad choices when it comes to enjoying the famed waters off Newport. From

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FOX VALLEY FARM

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Ann MacMahon Walter Woodson

BEAVER CREEK

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Extensive recent improvements • Panoramic views • 11.5 acres • 4 bedrooms • 2 fireplaces • Hardwood floors • Pool with cabana • Barn and shop • Fencing.

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18 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

(540) 454-1930

(703) 609-1905

Philomont, Virginia • $1,495,000

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HARBORVALE

Middleburg, Virginia • $1,950,000

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International Tennis Hall of Fame

If you revere the racket, this is the place for you. The Tennis Hall of Fame at the Newport Casino was founded in 1954 by tennis innovator James Van Alen (among other

HIDDEN BROOK FARM

Unison, Virginia • $1,550,000 25 acres • Bright open floor plan • 1st floor bedroom • Pool • 16 stall stable with apartment • Lighted stone dust arena • Great ride out. Helen MacMahon

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RECTORTOWN ROAD

Rectortown, Virginia • $775,000

Quaint village setting • First floor master suite • 2 additional bedrooms • Charming guest home • 3 stall barn • 3 acres • Lovely setting.

Paul MacMahon

canoes and kayak rentals, to charters, excursions, harbor tours, and even sailing school for the adventurous, you can enjoy the rippling tide of Narragansett Bay in nearly any capacity. Kayaking and canoeing offer visitors the opportunity to pursue the waters, coastlines and hidden waterways of Newport intimately and at their own pace. Explore the islands and wildlife of Bluebell Cove, watch ospreys dive for fish along the Westport River, take in the waterfront homes of historic Bristol, or see the yachts of Newport Harbor. If you want to rent a boat or charter, the horizons open even further. Dozens of destinations are easy cruises in the Bay’s protected waters—only a couple of gallons of fuel if you’re motoring, and gentle breezes if you’re hoisting the main and fore. Want to be where all the urban action is? Stay in Newport Harbor. Itching for a day of fun boutiques? Sail west over to Wickford Village. Need some peace and quiet? Drop anchor for a day or two off Jamestown. Want to visit the America’s Cup Hall of Fame? Tie a bowline to the docks in Bristol Harbor.

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HISTORIC HOUSE IN PARIS

Paris, Virginia • $485,000 Circa 1890 • Unobstructed views of the protected Paris Valley • 3 BR • Additional 2 BR in-law suite w/second kitchen • Detached garage • Unlimited possibilities. Helen MacMahon Walter Woodson

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110 East Washington Street | Middleburg, Virginia 20117 (540) 687-5588


IN COUNTRY major contributions to the game, Alen invented the standard tiebreaker system used in regulation tennis matches today). It was host to the first U.S. National Championships in 1881. In 1997, the complex and museum were restored to their original splendor with the completion of a five year, $7.5 million renovation and endowment project. The Museum’s galleries chronicle the rich history of tennis through interactive exhibits and videos, as One of Rhode Island’s many lighthouses well as showcasing popuernous hall, including a fairy tale dinner and a lar memorabilia from historic champions and the superstars of today. party featuring famed magician Harry Houdini. Rosecliff is now preserved through the Dramatically set in the original clubrooms of the Casino, the style, class and good nature of generosity of its last private owners, who gave this gentleman’s sport comes vibrantly to life at the house, its furnishings, and an endowment in 1971 to the Preservation Society of Newport the museum. County, who maintains many of the areas tourhistoric mansion properties. The house Rosecliff Mansion: the “Great Gatsby” friendly has something of a Hollywood resume, having House played the lavish home to Robert Redford’s Jay There are endless mansions and historic Gatsby in the 1974 film, as well as “True Lies,” home tours to take in your visit to Newport. Steven Spielberg’s “Amistad” and most recently A standout among them, however, is Rosecliff “27 Dresses” starring Katherine Heigl. Mansion. Commissioned by Nevada silver heirThe mansion is also a host to the annual ess Theresa Fair Oelrichs in 1899, architect Newport Mansions Food & Wine Festival, Stanford White modeled Rosecliff after the where guests can eat and drink like true 1920s Grand Trianon, the garden retreat at Versailles. flappers. For more information on that, keep After the house was completed in 1902, at a reading! ★ reported cost of $2.5 million, Mrs. Oelrichs continues on next page Georgetowner.04.01_Layout 1 3/29/12 2:25 PM Page 1 hosted extravagant parties in its grand and cav-

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Offers subject to errors, omissions, change of price or withdraw without notice. Information contained herein is deemed reliable, but is not so warranted nor is it otherwise guaranteed.

THOMAS AND TALBOT REAL ESTATE LAND AND ESTATE AGENTS SINCE 1967 A STAUNCH ADVOCATE OF LAND EASEMENTS

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P. O. Box 500 s No.2 South Madison Street Middleburg sVirginia 20117 GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 19


Goodstone - Georget. Apr. 4th ad_Layout 1 3/26/12 4:01 PM Page 1

IN COUNTRY

Condé Nast Johansens Award Winner: “MOST EXCELLENT INN - 2011” / “MOST EXCELLENT INN - 2012” Finalist “MOST EXCELLENT ROMANTIC HIDEAWAY - 2012” Finalist

continued from previous page

UPCOMING FESTIVALS AND EVENTS IN NEWPORT The Great Chowder Cook-Off

June 2 On Saturday, June 2, the Great Chowder Cook-Off kicks off summer in New England. Be a part of the original, largest, and longest running chowder championship in America, and try a wide spread from national to regional competitors. Festival-goers will taste-test a myriad of traditional and exotic chowders from kitchens across the country, then vote for the best in three categories: clam, seafood and creative. For more information visit NewportWaterfrontEvents.com.

Newport Antiques Show

July 27 – 29 Celebrating its sixth year, the Newport Antiques Show has become a seminal event for antique lovers across the country. Over 40 of the industry’s finest dealers will showcase the best antiques the world has to offer to over 2,500 visitors at the Stephen P. Cabot and Archer Harman Ice Center at St. George’s School in Middletown. The show’s 2012 Loan Exhibit will highlight fine and decorative arts from the New Bedford Whaling Museum. The exhibit will include New Bedford art such as scrimshaw and Pairpoint Glass along with work from artists such as William Bradford. For more information visit NewportAntiquesShow.com.

OpenTable Diner’s Choice Award Winner: “TOP 100 BEST RESTAURANTS IN THE USA - 2011”

Newport Jazz Festival

Aug. 3 – 5 Founded in 1954, the Newport Jazz Festival was the first annual jazz festival in America. It has been host to numerous legendary performances and historic moments since its inception, including performances by Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, and a careerreviving performance by Duke Ellington in 1958. Referred to as the grandfather of all jazz festivals, the event draws thousands of people from all over the world. Highlight performances this year include Bill Frisell playing the John Lennon songbook, vocalist Diane Reeves, and legendary drummer Jack DeJohnette’s 70th birthday performance. For more information visit NewportJazzFest.net.

We thank our loyal patrons for another record-breaking year! Please join us for a special, new addition to our Mid-week Menu: Two-course and three-course lunch menus for $18 and $24 Three-course dinner menu for $39

Newport International Boat Show

Sept. 13 – 16 The 42nd Annual Newport International Boat Show will feature new sailboats and powerboats, and thousands of products and services from exhibitors worldwide, showcasing the latest innovations and trends in seafaring technology. Boating has never been more exciting; whether it’s an evening harbor cruise, a fun-filled day of fishing or an extended cruise on a yacht with all the luxuries you can imagine. Come discover the many new products, programs and opportunities on the oceanic

Call now for reservations for Goodstone’s Easter Dinner on April 8th.

WWW.GOODSTONE.COM 36205 SNAKE HILL ROAD, MIDDLEBURG, VA 20117

Please call 540.687.3333 to reserve your guest room or place at our table. GOODSTONE SPA Relax and rejuvenate with a massage or facial. Visit www.goodstone.com for a full spa menu.

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THE 91ST ANNUAL

SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 2012 Glenwood Park Racecourse Middleburg, Virginia Post Time 1:00 p.m. The Temple Gwathmey Handicap Sanctioned by The National Steeplechase Association

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Ticket Information (540) 687-6545 www.middleburgspringraces.com Photos by Tod Marks

20 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.


IN COUNTRY

In Country Calendar April 6

March 16- June 30

“Shooting Flying” in Literature and Art The National Sporting Library and Museum Exhibition at 102 The Plains Rd., Middleburg, Va. 20117, will be introducing visitors to the range of literature on shooting wild fowl that exists in the Library’s collection. The books on display range from the 18th century through the 21st century, with emphasis on the 20th century American sporting print. The 19th century ephemera provides an opportunity to view early shotguns and decoys. The exhibition takes its name from Pteryplegia: or, The Art of Shooting-Flying, A poem, by Mr. Markland, A.B., fellow of St. John’s College in Oxford, published in 1717. The book, of which the National Sporting Library and Museum has a third edition (1767), is one of the earliest works in English to give instructions on how to shoot flying birds with a gun. (540) 6876542, jsheehan@nsl.org

The Virginia Wine and Cigar Trail Virginia is the home of the American tobacco industry and the new home of one of the most desirable wine travel destinations in the U.S. Relax and indulge in both treats at the Unicorn Winery (489 Old Bridge Rd., Amissville, Va. 20106) on Saturday from 5 to 10 p.m. Ron Barker of CigarVolante, sponsor of The Virginia Wine and Cigar Trail, will share Panacea Pairings, cigars perfectly matched to the wines of Unicorn Valley. E-mail rwbarker@vawineandcigar.com

saved buildings in the county and why historic preservation is important, especially for the environment. Visitors will also have an opportunity to go inside the jail which is currently under construction. The program is sponsored by the Prince William Historic Preservation Foundation. Tickets are $15 per person. Call (703) 365- 7895 or visit PwcGov.org/brentsville

the Pavilion. Bring the family for the spring festivities or just come to experience CLS and The Farm (which already has redbuds, dogwoods, geraniums, tri-colored ginger, early summer annuals, hanging baskets, and recently hatched baby chicks!). RSVP by April 16 to Kelly at khendershot@communitylandscape.com (include name and number of guests attending).

April 14

Bogati Bodega & Winery Looking for a perfect girl’s getaway? Ditch the men and gather your friends for a fun, relaxing, music-filled and fortune telling evening including wine tastings with local experts and gourmet cupcake treats to devour. 35426 Harry Byrd Highway, Round Hill, Va. 20142. Reservations required, BogatiBodega.com, $30.

April 14- 15

Historic Preservation Talk/ Hard Hat Tour of the Jail The Brentsville Courthouse Historic Center at 12229 Bristow Rd. in Bristow, Va. 20136 will introduce participants to the ideas of historic preservation. Local experts will explore what makes a building worth saving, examples of

April 21- 28 April 21

Spring Fling at The Farm at Broad Run Community Landscape Services and The Farm at Broad Run (16015 John Marshall Highway, Broad Run, Va. 20137) are hosting their annual “Spring Fling” event. Join us for a day of fun activities, good food and spring weather! Activities to include spring arts and crafts, farm tours, a moon bounce and much, much more! Food and beverage will be provided at

Historic Virginia Garden Week Visitors are welcome to view over 250 Virginia gardens, homes and historic landmarks during “America’s Largest Open House.” The week will provide a unique opportunity to see unforgettable gardens at the peak of Virginia’s springtime color, as well as immaculate homes dazzling with style in over 30 towns. Tour prices range by location from $15 to $40 per tour. A statewide pass for $175 is also available. Visit VaGardenWeek.org for more information. In the Capital Region

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PERFORMANCE

Kahn Tackles O’Neill’s Daunting ‘Strange Interlude’ BY GA RY T IS CHL ER

I

n theater, as in other endeavors, there are Interlude” is a play, he said, “I’ve always plays and roles that sit like slumbering wanted to do, and for a time I thought I would challenges, just daring artists to tackle never get the opportunity.” He had come close once, but the project them. For actors, it’s Lear and the layer-upon- collapsed for various reasons. “But when this layer Hamlet, or Willie Lohman, or Maggie the anniversary came up, I thought it was a perfect cat or Blanche. And what opera director doesn’t opportunity to tackle the play,” he said. When you start thinking about this, you dream some nights of the Ring Cycle, tossing have to admire Kahn for thinking about it at all. and turning in a sweat. For directors, especially American directors His legacy in Washington and his whole career worth their salt, all they have to do is go to the is secure; he would be forgiven for resting on collected works of Eugene O’Neill. O’Neill his laurels. “Strange Interlude” is something wrote all sorts of plays, one-acts, surrealist fare, of a risk today, maybe even more than when it auto-biographical epics and four-hour sojourns opened. It’s a legend of size and scope—variwaiting for the iceman to cometh. The O’Neill ous stories have the original production running as long as four to six hours with an intermission canon is an ocean full of white whales. And none may be more elusive than break for dinner. Plus, O’Neill wrote some of “Strange Interlude,” a major hit in its day when the dialogue in a stream of consciousness style it finally opened in 1928 after years of labor in which the characters express their inner by O’Neill, controversial for its content and its thoughts. “Well, this production is more like three and style. It was hugely ambitious in trying to tell a story spanning decades of American life — a half or so.” Kahn said. “I don’t think today’s forward and backward, past, present and future. audiences will have trouble relating to it or For Michael Kahn, in the midst of a 25th the characters. It’s about something everybody anniversary season as the artistic director of has a stake in: the pursuit of happiness and the great difficulty and tragedy that the Washington Shakespeare Theatre, “Strange 120302 SI Craftshow Ad GTown DnTown qrtr page:Layout 1 4/2/12 2:14 PM Page 2 surrounds that

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pursuit.” While Kahn is also considered one of the consummate interpreters of the plays of Tennessee Williams, he’s no stranger to O’Neill. “He is the major figure in American theater,” Kahn said, “the father of American theater, with a huge and diverse body of work, a pioneer, a great writer whose work contained some of the finest work not only in theater but in American literature. I learned about him by reading. We had a lot of books in our house when I was young, and I ran across his first play, ‘Dynamo.’” “Ah, Wilderness!” and “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” both at Arena, and “Strange Interlude” are part of a unique and ongoing O’Neill festival in Washington right now. Kahn remembers seeing Frederic March playing the father in “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” a production he calls “remarkable.” Kahn—in a stellar career that included a vivid production of “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” on Broadway—directed O’Neill’s “Mourning Becomes Electra” twice. He got permission to edit “Electra” (as well as “Interlude”). Still, the idea of “Interlude” is daunting. In the 1920s, the play was shocking for its Freudian content, for a plot that included abortion, sex and an intelligent, strong woman dealing with the lasting wounds suffered after her fiancée is killed in World War I without the opportunity for consummation of their love. “The pursuit of happiness,” Kahn said, “that’s the American dream, that’s what we’re about as a country. There’s no society that places such a stress on the theme of happiness.” Francesca Faridany will perform the role of

STC Artistic Director Michael Kahn. Photo by Henry Linser.

Nina in this production. “Strange Interlude” is rarely performed, but that may be part of its appeal to audiences and certainly for Kahn, who presented the rarely performed “Camino Real,” by Tennessee Williams and the equally rarely staged “Timon of Athens.” Kahn is excited about “Strange Interlude” and thinks audiences will be, too. “It is one of the great works by our greatest playwright. It has a compelling story that resonates for today’s audiences. It’s about America and us, and we can see ourselves in those creations. It’s a great achievement on the part of O’Neill—the play spans 30 years and was written in the 1920s. So, he had to imagine what this country would be like in the ‘30s and ‘40s, and I think he did a good job of it.” Listening to Kahn talk about the play, you feel he relished the work, like opening up a lost, true book and bringing it to life. ★ “Strange Interlude” will be at the Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Sidney Harman Hall through April 29.


ART WRAP

BY AR I P OS T

N

Canal Square and Beyond

estled in a brick courtyard at M and 31st Streets, walking into Canal Square on the

20 year anniversaries. Just north of Canal Square, The Old Print Gallery and the Ralls Collection

evening of a First Friday feels like stumbling into the best social club you never knew

have also made their mark on the city’s artistic community (the Ralls Collection even used to re-

existed. The four galleries clustered in the space are teeming with admirers, friends,

side in Canal Square). Among the most longstanding and respected galleries in the city, this clus-

patrons and chance roamers, peering about the galleries or lounging in the benches just outside,

ter of art venues embodies what’s best about Georgetown: history, community, style and beauty

smiling and chatting. And what’s more—they’re chatting about art! These galleries are local in-

with an eye for the contemporary. ★

stitutions—Parish Gallery, Moca DC and Alla Rogers Gallery have all recently celebrated their

Parish Gallery

Moca DC

Gallery director David Quammen in the studio

Moca DC stands up for the little guy, in more ways than one. A nonprofit, part of the gallery’s mission is to be “Open to all artists all the time,” offering opportunities to artists at every stage of their careers. Moca gives more exhibits to emerging, first-time and beginning artists than almost any in the city. The gallery is also devoted to the tradition of figurative art, including three annual exhibits dedicated to the nude human form (this July, keep an eye out for the exhibit, “A Celebration of the Figure”). This April, the gallery will mark its twenty-year anniversary by expanding its scope to include three juried exhibits of figurative works a year, the first of which will focus on the interpretation of the figure within contemporary art practice. Moca’s 20th Anniversary Show, which will hold an opening reception on April 6, is also on display. www.MocaDC.org

Alla Rogers Gallery

The Old Print Gallery

The Alla Rogers Gallery, founded in 1990, focuses on accessible contemporary art from Eastern Europe and the countries of the former Soviet Union. The Gallery has curated hundreds of exhibitions and led artist exchanges between American and Eastern European artists. Currently on display is the artwork of Alla Rogers herself, who recently exhibited 42 of her own paintings in Kiev at the National Fine Art Museum of Ukraine. Her works on canvas play out like the geography of memories, folding and falling into one another. These are not works you want to miss.

“Blossom DC,” the latest exhibit at The Old Print Gallery, is inspired by the 100 year anniversary of the gift of the cherry blossoms from Japan to Washington. The exhibit celebrates the beauty and youthful energy of spring’s blossoms, featuring a large number of prints by local D.C. artists coupled with a selection of works by contemporary New York City artists and several early 20th century printmakers. Established in 1971, The Old Print Gallery has long been known for its wide selection of antique prints and maps, and has expanded recently into the world of contemporary printmaking. The gallery also hosts printmaking workshops and demonstrations, establishing itself as a source of inspiration and information for print artists, enthusiasts and new admirers alike. www.OldPrintGallery.com

The Ralls Collection The Ralls Collection is in the midst of a powerful group exhibition of gallery artists, which runs through June 15. It is difficult to encapsulate the significance of The Ralls Collection to Washington’s artistic community, much in the same way it is hard to grasp the broad archive of substantial artwork that has passed through the gallery since its opening over 20 years ago. The work present in the gallery’s current exhibit showcases a remarkable collection of beautiful contemporary artwork with a clear vision and impeccable taste. Many of the artists Ralls chose for the exhibition have been with the gallery since it’s beginning, and some are welcome additions. David Richardson, a personal favorite of this author whose show at Ralls last year garnered tremendous national attention (including a feature in the New York Times), uses planes of bold colors and textures, recalling landscape both foreign and familiar, contained yet effusive. www.RallsCollection.com.

Internationally recognized African painter, Bethel Aniaku, will be at Parish Gallery through April 17 in an exhibit titled “Instinct of Desire.” The culture explored in these paintings includes a blend of historical, literal, and artistic elements, which aim to reunite the viewer with their own culture and origins. Aniaku, by comparison, honors the trade of his own carpenter ancestors by using wood as the base for his paintings. His compositions play with color, light, space and mixed media, relying on instinct more than any direct intention, as if the painting was not being made but found as an artifact that has always existed. April 20, Parish Gallery will open its next exhibit showcasing the artworks of husband and wife Christine and Richmond Jones in a show titled “Two Views/One Vision.” Starting out as an illustrator and designer, Christine’s oil paint and pastel works represent the textures and colors, people and places in which she finds inspiration. Richmond, who also began his career as a graphic designer, found a new creative direction as a “transparent watercolor painter.” Since then, both artists have been exhibited in numerous juried exhibitions around the country and received many awards for their individual and collective work. www.ParishGallery.com

‘Inspiring!’ — Deepak Chopra ‘Great example of contemporary Irish art.’ — H.E. Collins, Irish Ambassador to U.S. ‘Clarity...realize the oneness.’ — Washington Post For apt with the artist call 347 549 0551 OPEN Mon-Sat, 11am-6pm & Thurs 7pm LaLunaGalleryDC.com | ArtistoftheLight.com

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To join other satisfied customers and place an ad in the classified or service directory email jen@georgetowner.com or call 202.338.4833

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Georgetown Media Group is the publisher of The Georgetowner and The Downtowner. We are a bi-weekly tabloid boasting a circulation of 50,000 in D.C. , Northern Virginia and Maryland. The following are opportunities that suit a career minded individual who is seeking exposure to the world of print publication.

MEDIA SALES GMG seeks an experienced sales professional to sell B2B print, web and social advertising. A qualified candidate has experience generating revenue, meeting deadlines and building partnerships with clients to bring the highest quality of service that we’re known for. Work from home with regularly scheduled staff meetings and office support; ideal for stay-at-home people or retirees. Send resume, three references and cover letter outlining why you fit the bill. E-mail Info@Georgetowner.com or call (202) 338-4833.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Part time: Graphic designer will assist head designer in layout of both publications, photo editing and correction, design ads for current and potential advertisers, upload and edit editorial web content. Requirements include: knowledge of Adobe CS5 (Indesign and Photoshop), availability on Deadline days (every other Mon. & Tues.) a must! Comfortable working in a high energy, deadline oriented environment

Experienced British nanny available to help you with your newborn. Long or short term daytime only excellent references provide. pandrewsdc@gmail.com

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BODY & SOUL

BETWEEN THE SHEETS: His Time Alone BY DR . DORREE LYNN

O

ne of the questions most frequently asked by women is, “Why does my boyfriend/husband still masturbate when we have such a good sex life?” Most men, especially younger testosterone-ridden men, find adding masturbation to what may be an otherwise satisfying sex life to be perfectly normal. It’s relatively easy, involves little fuss or muss, and satisfies an immediate urge. It’s only an issue of concern if that’s all he does in the relationship and avoids connecting to you physically. But if the sex is still good, no harm no foul, right? Masturbation is a natural way for men (and women) to learn about their bodies. Often, and to the shock of parents, male babies frequently find their penises infinitely fascinating. As boys mature and their hormones remain raunchy, whether or not they are in a relationship most men simply find masturbation fun. When you’re in a relationship, it can be easy for a woman to feel neglected or inadequate to learn that her male partner is flying solo behind her back. However, as long as you, as a couple, are on the same wavelength and can communicate your feelings, you are probably going to be okay. Many couples bring mutual masturbation into the bedroom as an extra way of having fun and being intimate. Try it! Self-pleasure for both men and women is

also a way of teaching one’s self about what you enjoy. The more a person understands what turns them on, the easier it is to show your partner what thrills and chills you or what smoothes and soothes you. Most people make love the way they want to be made love to. Unless their

partner tells them or shows them what they prefer, it’s akin to two engines full of steam who may miss being on the same track. Healthy masturbat ion — self-pleasure inclusive of a sexual relationship with your partner, not totally lacking mutual connection—can actually be beneficial. It causes your heart to race, increases the flow of blood throughout the body, releases endorphins in the brain, and flushes toxins from the body. Furthermore, some research has revealed that people who masturbate tend to have more frequent and more satisfying sex! Ladies, if you’re away for a while, do you really want your guy to be celibate, become a porn addict or seek release elsewhere? Relax, some single-handed sex is just fine, just ask

him to wash his own shirts, towels, socks, etc., as you may not want to be his hand maiden in this area. Remember when we used to joke about “blue balls”? Jokes aside, they do exist. The scrotum will actually turn a shade of blue when the blood flows into the penis and surrounding areas without the opportunity to flow out via orgasm. It leaves men with the need to “drain their veins,” and any guy will tell you that it can be a painful experience. So, guys learn an easy way to avoid pain. If it doesn’t prevent him from having sex with you, then is there really a problem? For the most part, it’s safe to assume that most men masturbate (religious prohibition and sense of shame aside). What we, as women, need to come to terms with is that just because your man masturbates, if you are having great and frequent sex, it doesn’t mean that he isn’t interested in you or that you’re not interested in fulfilling your sexual desires. I’ve never heard a man say, “Sorry, sweetie, I’ve already had sex with myself four times today, I’m beat!” But why does your man masturbate? He’s known his penis longer than you. It’s familiar, comfortable, stress relieving, and it just plain feels good. ★ Dr. Dorree Lynn, PhD, is a psychologist and life coach in Georgetown and author of ‘Sex for Grownups.’ www.DrDorreeLynn.com.

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Your Dining Guide to Washington DC’s Finest

1789 RESTAURANT

1226 36th St, NW With the ambiance of an elegant country inn, 1789 features classically based American cuisine – the finest regional game, fish and produce available. Open seven nights a week. Jackets suggested. Complimentary valet parking. www.1789restaurant.com

BANGKOK JOE’S

3000 K St NW (One block from Georgetown Lowe’s theatres) Georgetown introduces Washington’s first “Dumpling Bar” featuring more than 12 varieties. Come and enjoy the new exotic Thai cuisine inspired by French cooking techniques. Bangkok Joe’s is upscale, colorful and refined. Absolutely the perfect place for lunch or dinner or just a private gathering. www.bangkokjoes.com

(202) 965-1789

CHADWICKS

(202) 333-4422

CIRCLE BISTRO

BISTRO FRANCAIS

3124-28 M St NW A friendly French Bistro in the heart of historic Georgetown since 1975. Executive chef and owner Gerard Cabrol came to Washington, D.C. 32 years ago, bringing with him home recipes from southwestern France. Our specialties include our famous Poulet Bistro (tarragon rotisserie chicken); Minute steak Maitre d’Hotel (steak and pomme frit¬es); Steak Tartare, freshly pre¬pared seafood, veal, lamb and duck dishes; and the best Eggs Benedict in town. In addition to varying daily specials. www.bistrofrancaisdc.com

BISTROT LEPIC & WINE BAR

1736 Wisconsin Ave., NW Come and see for yourself why Bistrot Lepic, with its classical, regional and contemporary cuisine, has been voted best bistro in D.C. by the Zagat Guide. And now with its Wine bar, you can enjoy “appeteasers”, full bar service, complimentary wine tasting every Tuesday and a new Private Room. The regular menu is always available. Open everyday. Lunch & dinner. Reservations suggested. www.bistrotlepic.com

(202) 338-3830

(202) 333-0111

CITRONELLE

CLYDE’S OF GEORGETOWN

3205 K St, NW (est.1967) A Georgetown tradition for over 40 years, this friendly neighborhood restaurant/ saloon features fresh seafood, burgers, award-winning ribs, & specialty salads & sandwiches. Daily lunch & dinner specials. Late night dining (until midnight Sun.-Thu., 1A.M. Fri-Sat) Champagne brunch served Sat. & Sun. until 4P.M. Open Mon-Thu 11:30A.M.-2A.M. Fri-Sat 11:30A.M.-3A.M.Sun 11A.M.-2A.M.Kids’ Menu Available. Overlooking the new Georgetown Waterfront Park ChadwicksRestaurants.com

Featuring Happy Hour weekdays from 5pm-7pm, live music every Saturday from 8pm12midnight, and an a la carte Sunday Brunch from 11:30am-2:30pm.

(202) 333-2565

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DEGREES BISTRO

DON LOBOS MEXICAN GRILL

FILOMENA RISTORANTE

2311 Wisconsin Avenue, NW

The Ritz-Carlton Georgetown, Washington, D.C. 3100 South Street, NW, Degrees Bistro features a traditional French bistro menu with an innovative cocktail and wine list. The restaurant design complements the industrial chic style of The Ritz-Carlton, Georgetown, and welcomes diners to unwind in the simple, modern comfort of a neighborhood eatery while enjoying a savory lunch or dinner at the hip bar or in one of the stylish banquettes. www.ritzcarlton.com/ georgetown

26 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

(202) 912-4110

One Washington Circle, NW Washington, DC 22037 Circle Bistro presents artful favorites that reflect our adventurous and sophisticated kitchen.

Open dailyfor breakfast, lunch and dinner.

(The Latham Hotel) 3000 M St, NW Internationally renowned chef and restaurateur Michel Richard creates magic with fresh and innovative American-French Cuisine, an exceptional wine list and stylish ambiance. Open for Dinner. Valet parking. www.citronelledc.com

3236 M St, NW This animated tavern, in the heart of Georgetown, popularized saloon food and practically invented Sunday brunch. Clyde’s is the People’s Choice for bacon cheeseburgers, steaks, fresh seafood, grilled chicken salads, fresh pastas and desserts. www.clydes.com

CAFE BONAPARTE

1522 Wisconsin Ave Captivating customers since 2003 Café Bonaparte has been dubbed the “quintessential” European café featuring award winning crepes & arguably the “best” coffee in D.C! Other can’t miss attributes are; the famous weekend brunch every Sat and Sun until 3pm, our late night weekend hours serving sweet & savory crepes until 1 am Fri-Sat evenings & the alluring sounds of the Syssi & Marc jazz duo every other Wed. at 7:30. We look forward to calling you a “regular” soon! www.cafebonaparte.com (202) 333-8830

DAILY GRILL

1310 Wisconsin Ave., NW Reminiscent of the classic American Grills, Daily Grill is best known for its large portions of fresh seasonal fare including Steaks & Chops, Cobb Salad, Meatloaf and Warm Berry Cobbler. Open for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner.Visit our other locations at 18th & M Sts NW and Tysons Corner. www.dailygrill.com

www.circlebistro.com

2811 M Street NW Serving Washington since 1992, Don Lobos offers authentic Mexican cuisine. We use only the finest and freshest ingredients when making our traditional menu items. Famous for our Mole, and adored for our tamales. We also offer a wide range of tequila and the best margarita in Georgetown. Now serving Brunch Saturday and Sunday from 10-2. Hours: Mon-Thu 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-11pm Sun 10am- 10pm (202) 333-0137

1063 Wisconsin Ave., NW Filomena is a Georgetown landmark that has endured the test of time for almost a quarter of a century. Our old-world cooking styles & recipes brought to America by the early Italian immigrants, alongside the culinary cutting edge creations of Italy’s foods of today, executed by our award winning Italian Chef. Try our spectacular Lunch buffet on Fri. & Saturdays or our Sunday Brunch, Open 7 days a week for lunch & dinner. www.filomena.com (202) 338-8800

GOOD GUYS

Fine Dining & Exotic Entertainment in Glover Park since 1966. Monday-Thursday 11am-2am Friday-Saturday 11am-3am Sunday 4pm-2am The kitchen is always open!

A GENTLEMAN’S CLUB ONLY 21 AND OVER, PLEASE www.goodguysclub.com (202) 333-8128

(202) 337-4900

MAI THAI

3251 Prospect St. NW Authentic Thai food in the heart of Georgetown. The warm atmosphere, attentive service, and variety of wines and cocktails in this contemporary establishment only add to the rich culture and authentic cuisine inspired by Thailand. With an array of authentic dishes, from Lahb Gai (spicy chicken salad) and Pad Thai, to contemporary dishes like Panang soft shell crab and papaya salad, the dynamic menu and spectacular drinks will have you coming back time and time again. HAPPY HOUR 3:30 - 6PM www.maithai.com (202) 337-1010


FOOD & WINE

Cocktail of the Week

Once the ‘It’ Cocktail

1054 31st St, NW Lovers of seafood can always find something to tempt the palette at the Sea Catch Restaurant & Raw Bar. Sea Catch offers fresh seafood “simply prepared” in a relaxed atmosphere. Overlooking the historic C&O Canal, we offer seasonal fireside and outdoor dining. Private party space available for 15 - 300 Complimentary parking Lunch Mon. -Sat. 11:30am -3pm Dinner Mon.-Sat. 5:30pm -10pm Closed on Sunday Happy Hour Specials at the Bar Mon. - Fri. 5 -7pm www.seacatchrestaurant.com (202) 337-8855

n ta oli op

(202) 625-2740

SEA CATCH

m os

3251 Prospect St. NW Established in 1991, Peacock Cafe is a tradition in Georgetown life. The tremendous popularity of The Peacock Happy Day Brunch in Washington DC is legendary. The breakfast and brunch selections offer wonderful variety and there is a new selection of fresh, spectacular desserts everyday. The Peacock Café in Georgetown, DC - a fabulous menu for the entire family. Monday - Thursday: 11:30am - 10:30pm Friday: 11:30am - 12:00am Saturday: 9:00am - 12:00am Sunday: 9:00am - 10:30pm

eC Th

PEACOCK CAFE

BY JOD Y KU R ASH

SEQUOIA

3000 K St NW, Suite 100 Washington, DC 20007 Eclectic American cuisine, Coupled with enchanting views of the Potomac River make Sequoia a one of a kind dining experience. Offering a dynamic atmosphere featuring a mesquite wood fire grill, sensational drinks, and renowned River Bar. No matter the occasion, Sequoia will provide an unforgettable dining experience. www.arkrestaurants.com /sequoia_dc.html

SHANGHAI LOUNGE

1734 Wisconsin Ave. Shanghai Lounge’s is offering Lily’s family style traditional Chinese dining along with some very unique cocktails and a wide variety of beers and wines. It captures the flavors of Asia and we have created an exotic atmosphere, a place where you can unwind, have an exquisite meal, enjoy a drink and to share the experience.

Tuesday -Thursday 11am - 11pm Saturdays 11:30am - 11pm Sundays 12 Noon - 9:30pm Monday Closed Happy Hour: T-F 3:30pm - 7pm

www.shanghailoungedc.com (202) 944-4200

THE OCEANAIRE

1201 F St, NW Ranked one of the most popular seafood restaurants in , DC, “this cosmopolitan”send-up of a vintage supper club that’s styled after a ‘40’s-era ocean liner is appointed with cherry wood and red leather booths, infused with a “clubby, old money” atmosphere. The menu showcases “intelligently” prepared fish dishes that “recall an earlier time of elegant” dining. What’s more, “nothing” is snobbish here. Lunch: Mon-Fri- 11:30am-5pm Dinner: Mon-Thur 5-10pm. Fri & Sat 5-11pm. Sun-5-9pm. www.theoceanaire.com

(202) 338-1588

To advertise, call 202-338-4833 or email advertising@ georgetowner. com

M

aybe it’s the appealing pink color, the pleasing tart flavor or the swanky glassware. Perhaps it was the four liberated and stylish ladies of New York who adored them. But for one reason or another, the Cosmopolitan -- or Cosmo, for short -- was the “It” cocktail of the late 1990s and first half of the 2000s. This tipple hit its zenith of fame when it became the favorite drink of Carrie Bradshaw on HBO’s “Sex and the City.” But believe or not, the Cosmo pre-dates the prime time television show by years. It was also another trend-setting celebrity that lent her hand at influencing this drink’s destiny before Sarah Jessica Parker started to imbibe on this vodka, cranberry and citrus concoction. The Museum of the American Cocktail recently hosted a seminar on popular vodka drinks, which included the history behind the Cosmopolitan. Phil Greene, founding member of the museum and author of “To Have and Have Another : A Hemingway Cocktail Companion,” hosted the event, which was held at the Warehouse theater inside the Passenger bar. Several recipes for cocktails similar to Cosmopolitan have been uncovered. One recipe for a drink named “Cosmopolitan” that Greene dug up dates back to 1934, from the book “Pioneers of Mixing Gin at Elite Bar 1903-1933.” While this early recipe uses gin instead of vodka, its remaining ingredients are comparable to today’s version. Using gin in a cocktail during that time was commonplace. Vodka did not start to get a stronghold in the American drink scene until the 1950s. Another similar recipe from the Ocean Spray Cranberry Growers from the 1960s, was unearthed by Dale “King Cocktail” DeGroff which calls for one ounce of vodka, one ounce of cranberry and a squeeze of lime. The invention of the modern-day Cosmo is generally credited to bartender Cheryl Cook in Miami’s South Beach. According to Greene, “In the mid-1980s the martini was making a comeback, and many customers were ordering them, seemingly just to be seen holding the iconic martini glass. However, for many, including women, martinis were a bit too strong and powerful. So she came up with the idea to create a drink that was visually stunning and uses the martini glass. Using a new product called Absolut Citron, a splash of triple sec, a few dashes of Rose’s Lime and some cranberry juice to turn it pink, the Cosmopolitan was born.” The Cosmo further evolved when cocktail heavy-

DALE DEGROFF’S COSMOPOLITAN 1.5 oz. Absolut Citron Vodka .5 oz. Cointreau .25 oz. Fresh Lime Juice 1 oz. Cranberry Juice Shake all ingredients with ice. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a flamed orange peel. The Museum of the American Cocktail will be sponsoring evening of stories, cocktails and songs led by Dale DeGroff on Thursday, April 12. For more information, visit www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org.

weight DeGroff sampled it at the Fog City Diner in San Francisco. DeGroff decided he could improve upon this formula and created his own version for the Rainbow Room in New York. According to Greene, he used Absolut Citron, Cointreau, cranberry juice and fresh lime juice, along with a flamed orange peel garnish. It was at the Rainbow Room where the Cosmo’s superstardom began. Its prominence skyrocketed when Madonna was pictured sipping one at the Rainbow Room Grammy party, when the award show was held next-door at Radio City Music Hall. Next came “Sex and the City,” which cemented the Cosmopolitan’s place in drink history. Soon, Cosmos were on cocktail menus across the nation along with various drinks with names ending in “ini” and served in the cone-shape big martini glasses. While the Cosmo’s place in the sun has faded somewhat, it has earned a spot on the list of classic cocktails. Even our favorite New York girl seems to have cooled on her Cosmopolitan. In the film version of Sex and City, Miranda asks why the girls stopped drinking Cosmos. Carrie replies, “Because everyone else started.” ★

(202) 347-2277 GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 27


FOOD & WINE

The

Latest Dish BY LINDA ROT H CON T E

S

hopHouse Southeast Asian Kitchen is slated to open in the Georgetown space formerly occupied by Furin’s at 2805 M St., NW. It will be the second location (Dupont Circle was first) from Steve Ells, who also brought us Chipotle. Always secretive, this store will open sometime in 2012. It’s a two-fer: Mike Isabella plans to open Kapnos, a Greek restaurant and G, an Italian operation, both in a big space at 2201 14th St., NW. Kapnos is Greek for “smoke” (think whole, spit-roasted animals) and G is little sister to Graffiato. Both are slated to open sometime next year. Owners Au Dang and brother Di, along with Michael Jones, a former J Paul’s manager, plan to open Chasin’ Tails, a silverware-optional crab shack open in Falls Church where Bear Rock Café used to be. Cajun seafood and traditional seafood will be offered, along with drinks and entertainment. Their plan is to be open by the beginning of April. Nando’s Peri-Peri loves the D.C. market and has targeted more locations: Pentagon Row to open in the beginning of June; King Street in Old Town, Alexandria and Waugh Chapel area of Anne Arundel County by the end of 2012. They currently have locations in Penn Quarter, Gaithersburg, Bethesda Row, Silver Spring and

Mike Isabella is opening two restaurants

National Harbor. Eastern Market is looking forward to a new restaurant from some familiar D.C. restaurant talent. Former Komi cook and pastry chef Johnny Spero, Toki Underground chef Erik Bruner-Yang and Acqua al 2 chef Ari Gejdenson are the owners of Suna. Johnny takes the lead in the kitchen. Suna’s menu will be based on sustainability, supporting local farms, and what is available regionally and by season. Suna means “moss” in Lativian, and Johnny Spero is of Latvian descent. The plan is to open by year’s end.

NY STRIP STEAK $19.95

April 1-30 clydes.com

Clyde’s of Georgetown, Tysons Corner, Reston, Columbia, Chevy Chase, Mark Center, Gallery Place; Tower Oaks Lodge; The Tomato Palace; Willow Creek Farm; Old Ebbitt Grill 28 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

Chef Update: At Rasika West End, Vikram Sunderam will be in charge of both restaurants, but chef de cuisine Manish Tyagi will oversee the day-to-day operations. Christopher Morris has been named Executive Chef at BRIO Tuscan Grille in Rockville, Maryland. Previously, he worked as executive chef of O’Donnell’s Sea Grill and Cin Cin Tratoria. Aaron McCloud is the new chef at Cedar restaurant in Penn Quarter. Previously he was executive chef for Vintage Restaurant Group in Loudoun County, then chef at The Inn at Perry Cabin in St. Michaels, Md. Patrick Forest and Raina Hull, former managers at 8407 Kitchen Bar in Silver Spring, have joined forces to open Mealey’s Table in New Market, Md. They hired Nate Waugaman as chef. The restaurant will seat 80 with additional seating in the lounge. Previously, Nate had been at Addie’s in Rockville. Nate plans to produce his own charcuterie in-house with a farm-to-table strategy. His sous chef is Ian Benites, who worked with Nate at Addie’s. It is slated to open this month. In the meantime, Mallory Buford will run the kitchen at Addie’s, as he used to for Black Restaurant Group. A “philanthro-pub” called Cause, is planned for the Shaw neighborhood at 1926 9th St., NW in late April. Yes, it is a philanthropic-themed bar that plans to direct a percentage of profits towards charities. Cause is the brainchild of non-restaurateurs Raj Ratwani and Nick Vilelle. Their operators are John Jarecki and Dave Pressley, who run The Light Horse in Alexandria. They have restaurant ops chops, as between them they have helped to open 20 restaurants including Neighborhood Restaurant Group’s Tallula, Rustico, and Vermillion. Former Queen Vic chef Adam Stein heads the kitchen. The two-story space, which will also host non-profit events, will have a worldly theme with globes, maps, and photography from different countries. Renovations: Shelly’s Back Room at 1331 F Street, NW has added an additional 1,000 square feet (and 50 seats) for an outdoor patio, appropriately called “Shelly’s Front Porch,” offering the comfort of Adirondack chairs and

a limited food menu. This will be referred to as a fireplace room and bourbon room…. Alain Roussel renovated his Chevy Chase French country restaurant, La Ferme, to the tune of $150,000. This includes new paneling, carpet, lamp shades, window dressings, upholstery wall hangings and paint both in the main dining room and the private party room upstairs. Morton’s The Steakhouse in downtown D.C. is slated to undergo renovations, a part of their new ownership upgrade. Volt chef Bryan Voltaggio’s forthcoming D.C, restaurant, Range, is slated to open late fall in the Chevy Chase Pavilion showcasing lesserused cuts of meat including shoulders, legs, and offal. The cocktails will feature house-made bitters, sodas, and mixers. As is all the rage these days, there will be an open kitchen as well as a bakery and retail shop. Quick Hits: Rahama African Restaurant recently opened in the Shaw neighborhood at 1923 9th St., NW. Ripple in Cleveland Park has a “sister” next door, Sugar Magnolia, offering savory treats and sweets including homemade ice cream and sandwiches made by pastry chef Alison Reed, who joined Ripple in January after four years at Cafe Saint Ex. Chicagobased Matt Matros, owner of Protein Bar, signed a lease to open a Protein Bar in Penn Quarter at 7th and D Streets, NW. Working with Papadopoulos Properties, this promises to be the first of many in the area. First Watch plans to open in Chantilly at Greenbriar Town Center. This will make their third (Rockville, Fairfax) in the region. They plan to open by end of 2012. Scott Harlan is chef/owner of Green Pig Bistro, slated to open in Clarendon, Va., by the time you read this. He was previously with Inox. Nick’s Riverside Grille and Tony & Joe’s at Georgetown’s Washington Harbour should be up and running – inside and outside – by May. That’s the time it takes to re-open after a flood and everything else that goes with it. Kimpton Hotel & Restaurant group named Brian McPherson as chef at both Jackson 20 and The Grille at Morrison House in Alexandria. He takes the place of Dennis Marron, who was head chef at Poste restaurant at Hotel Monaco. McPherson was previously at New Heights and Butterfield 9. True Food Kitchen, a healthy, Mediterraneanthemed restaurant from Scottsdale, Ariz.-based Fox Restaurant Concepts, is scouting locations in the D.C. region. It will be their first East Coast expansion, which has four locations in Arizona and California. True Food will appeal to D.C.’s sophisticated-leaning palate and generally healthy lifestyle. It’s backed by P.F. Chang’s. Thank Tom Papadopoulos for bringing this to you. Shirlington Village’s Curious Grape returns – as more than a wine shop. Now it’s The Curious Grape Wine, Dine & Shop. Owner Suzanne McGrath says the food will focus on dishes that pair well with or feature wine. In addition to the restaurant, there is a cheese bar, traditional bar and private dining space. ★


SOCIAL SCENE

N Street Village

BY RO B E RT DE VANEY N Street Village, the social services agency that provides shelter and support to homeless and low-income women, held its annual gala at the West End’s Ritz Carlton March 21. The upbeat, always joyous event brought together women who benefitted from the non-profit, volunteers and benefactors, especially those in government and media. Comcast’s Melissa Maxfield and A.B. and Jill Cruz were gala co-chairs; Byron and Kim Dorgan were honorary co-chairs. Founders’ Awards were given to Sen. Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.) and his wife Diana, and also to Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.).

Wonderland at the Washington Club BY M ARY BIR D The Washington Club was transformed into Wonderland on March 23 as guests enjoyed a preview performance from the Washington Ballet’s upcoming Alice in Wonderland. Company dancers Emily Ellis and Corey Landolt enchanted as Alice and the Mad Hatter as did members of the Studio Company and School of Ballet. In his remarks at the four-course dinner with cards urging “eat me” and “drink me,” Artistic Director Septime Webre spoke of Alice’s “outsize sense of imagination” as he created a ballet about “girl power.” Guests departed with White Rabbit cookies auguring a happy adventure down the rabbit hole. Vickie Ladt and Michele Lebar

Trey Hardin, a senior vice president at VOX Global, Kate Bolduan, CNN anchor and reporter, White House drug czar Gil Kerlikowske.

Diana Enzi and Sen. Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.) with Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine).

N Street Village executive director Schroeder Stribling, Scripps Networks senior VP Cindy McConkey and Food Network chef Sunny Anderson.

Mayor Vincent Gray Addresses The Institute for Education

BY M ARY BIR D Mayor Vincent Gray recently spoke at a breakfast program of the INFO Public Policy Roundtable series hosted by IFE Diplomatic Steward Jan Matthysen, Ambassador of Belgium. The mayor outlined his plan to bring vitality back to the city and its budget. Along with full democracy, including voting rights in Congress, housing and education remain central to the Mayor’s agenda. Many ambassadors, Judge William Webster and a diverse group of IFE interns and fellows attended.

Wines from Provence Tasting BY MARY BIRD On March 27, representatives of the Provence Wine Council stopped in Washington on their promotional tour of several U.S. cities. They held a lunchtime tasting at Againn restaurant. Guests could sample wines from the recognized rosé center of the world. Provence rosé is by definition not sweet. Rosé outsells white wine in France today, and dry rosé sales in this country are skyrocketing. Nicole d’Amecourt, Paul Chevalier with Shaw-Ross Importers who imports Caves d’Esclans - Sacha Lichine

James Beard Foundation

Peacock’s owners/brothers, Shahab and Maziar Farivar lent their culinary talents for the second year to the James Beard Foundation’s “Norouz: Persian New Year Celebration” dinner on March 21.

Nargesi-e Esfenaj (Spinach and Quail Egg Narcissus Flower) served at the James Beard Foundation’s Norouz: Persian New Year Celebration dinner.

Borani-e Labu (Yogurt with Roasted Beet)

IEF CEO and Founder Coach Kathy Kemper, Mayor Gray, Ambassador and Mrs. Matthysen

Washington Concert Opera Celebrates 25 Years BY M ARY BIR D The Washington Concert Opera celebrated its 25th anniversary at a black-tie gala under the auspices of Ambassador of the Russian Federation and Mrs. Sergey Kislyak at the embassy on March 28. Guests enjoyed a musicale and seated dinner with WCO alums, mezzosoprano Denyce Graves and Aleksey Bogdanov. The evening honored WCO benefactors Dorothy and Kenneth Woodcock, WCO Founder Stephen Crout and Former Artistic Advisor Peter Russell. “Weather Conductor” Bob Ryan emceed the evening noting that “music and art enrich our lives and I think that’s why we’re here.”

Philip and Nina Pillsbury, Bob Craft GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 29


SOCIAL SCENE

Upcoming Galas APRIL 13 Fight for Children School Night 2012

Chuck and Stacy Kuhn will chair School Night 2012 with a cocktail reception, silent auction, seated dinner, entertainment and dancing at the Ronald Reagan Building & International Center. Proceeds support Fight for Children’s education programs including the Quality School Initiative which awards and recognizes public, charter and independent schools improving achievement for low-income kids. Contact Simon Jackson at 202-772-0437 or simon.jackson@fightforchildren.org.

APRIL 14 Fashion for Paws 6th Annual Runway Show

Fashion for Paws is a high-caliber program supporting D.C.’s top animal charity, the Washington Humane Society. The runway show infuses the nation’s capital with cuttingedge high fashion and luxury lifestyle brand events. The heart and soul of the event are

the fundraising models who agree to raise a minimum of $5,000 in the weeks leading up to the event and participate in a friendly fundraising competition. The top male and female fundraiser will be awarded the title of “Model Washingtonian of the Year,” on the runway April 14. National Building Museum. For more information, visit RSVP@washhumane.org.

APRIL 16 GALA’s Night of the Stars GALA Hispanic Theatre will host its annual Noche de Estrellas benefit event at the Art Museum of the Organization of American States. The evening will feature a buffet, silent and live auctions, performances

and Latin dancing. Ricardo Montaner will be honored for his impact on Latin America music and charitable work on behalf of children, Janet Farrell for her business leadership and American Airlines for corporate philanthropy. For more information, call 202-234-774 or visit GalaTheatre.org.

APRIL 18 Folger Gala at the Folger Shakespeare Library The Folger Shakespeare Library’s annual gala, its most important fundraiser of the year, provides vital support to the outstanding cultural and educational programming the Folger offers to the greater Washington area and beyond. The elegant social evening will celebrate Shakespeare, games and foolery, while also marking the library’s 80th anniversary. This year’s entertainment, titled “Wait, Wait, Forsooth!” in the Elizabethan theater will be preceded by a cocktail reception in the Exhibition Hall and a black-tie dinner in the

Gail Kern Paster Reading Room. Visit Folger. edu/gala

APRIL 20 Medstar National Rehabilitation Network Las Vegas Night Benefit

MedStar National Rehabilitation Network will host its third annual Las Vegas Night benefit at the National Museum of Women in the Arts. The benefit will feature roulette, black jack and craps tables. Food and beverages will be provided throughout the night. All proceeds will go towards the network’s many programs helping those with disabilities, including brain, spinal cord injuries and stroke. To learn more, call 202 877-1781 or visit NRHrehab.org.

Night of Vision BY M ARY BIRD PHOTO S B Y N ESHA N H. NALT CHAYA N The Prevention of Blindness Society (POB) of Metropolitan Washington held Eye on Low Vision at the Four Seasons Hotel on March 24. The theme focused on POB’s programs and services that help individuals of every age or socioeconomic background save or improve their sight. A reception and silent auction were followed by dinner with Master of Tyrone Stanley. Virginia Lions Club, District 24-A, received the Community Service Award, and Suleiman Alibhai, O.D., was honored with the Professional Service Award. Guests eagerly took to the dance floor to the upbeat sound of Bob Jenets UpFront.

Caroline Lodewick, POB executive director Michele Hartlove and POB Board member and WHUR’s Tyrone Stanley with Alex Ovechkin signed jersey.

House Beautiful Goes Green

Scott Wertlieb and Dr. Ken Schwartz.

Room & Board (1840 14th Street NW) hosted House Beautiful Magazine’s Color It Green Chair Scavenger Hunt Wrap Party Thursday, March 15th at their 4th floor showroom space. Fans of the magazine, Room & Board and chair winners gathered to celebrate Rachel Cothran, Sarah Meyer Walsh, Kate Bennett the color green with a spread of green gourmet nosh provided by Design Cuisine. Earlier that day and the day before, House Beautiful dropped 19 green chairs, including Room & Board’s Otis Swivel chair in iconic places around the city and gave hints as to where the chairs could be found on their Facebook and Twitter pages. The first person to find the Scott Jusilla (General Manager, Room & chair got to keep it. Board), Sean Sullivan (Associate Publisher for Natasha Barrett, Sonya Angie Goff, Barbara Martin House Beautiful) Gavankar McKay

30 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

Jennifer Kaye, Nancy Shapiro and Dr. Marcie Oser Wertlieb

For more social scene visit georgetowner.com ★ Music for the Mind ★ Lady and the Tramp and Meatballs Too at Carmine’s ★ RAMMYS Nominations Party ★ For the Love of Sight Visionary Awards Dinner


GEORGETOWN 3007 Q STREET, NW $5,500,000 Jim Bell 202-607-4000

3274 P STREET, NW OFFERED AT $1,185,000 2 Bedroom - 2.5 Bath Federal-style Row Home Fantastic Georgetown Location Large Lot with Beautiful Garden Custom Woodwork and High-end Finishes Steps to “M” Street Shopping and Dining Jim Bell 202-607-4000

1514 21ST STREET, NW #9 OFFERED AT $1,295,000 Over 2,000SF, Soaring Ceilings in Turret Renovated Luxurious Baths by Case Design/Build Amazing Roof Deck with 360-degree Views Large Private Storage Space, Off-street Parking Steps to P Street/Metro/Embassy Row Trent Heminger 202-210-6448

GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 31


32 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.


Dupont Circle, DC

Georgetown, DC

Georgetown, DC

McLean, VA

Michael Rankin 202.271.3344 Ann Hallman 301.802.2982

Michael Rankin 202.271.3344

Jonathan Taylor 202.276.3344

Penny Yerks, LLC 703.760.0744

This historic 1911 Washington, DC Mansion was built by noted architect Clark Waggaman. This 12,000 sf residence features unparalleled workmanship and detail. 21st century systems merge seamlessly with exquisite historical features to create this one-of-a-kind offering. Features include many imported period details from 18th & 19th century France. $10,900,000.

Located on historic Cox’s row, this Federal townhouse was built by Colonel John Cox circa 1805. Recently restored, the main level features a striking double parlor living room with 2 fireplaces and library with 19’ ceilings. With spaces allowing for both formal entertaining and comfortable living, this home has a total of 6 BR, 6 full-baths, 3 half-baths, 8 fireplaces and private parking for 3 cars. $7,900,000.

Sophisticated Federal in the East Village, ideal for grand entertaining. Restored with extensive improvements. Excellent scale, large formal rooms, high ceilings & 4 fireplaces. Inviting front library, FDR, chef ’s kitchen & a 2nd level doubleparlor LR with adjoining sunroom.  4 BR with 4 full & 2 half-baths. Backyard features private patio & garden.  Excellent views from the upper BR. 1 car garage & extra parking.  $3,995,000.

Stunning Galileo built custom home beautifully sited, overlooking a meandering stream and forest. The flawless interior includes thoughtful sightlines throughout, pristine hardwoods, custom stonework & 12’ ceilings. Offering a main level MBR with a cozy respite spa-like bath, library with floor to ceiling built-ins & private entrance, gourmet kit with the finest appliances & 5 generous sized secondary BRs. $3,900,000.

is pleased to announce that Great Falls, VA

Located on a spectacular 5 acre site is an elegant and inviting family residence. The expansive front terrace overlooks spacious gardens with views of the nearby private lake. Once inside, the inlaid herringbone & marble entrance foyer & extensive millwork introduce the elegant custom details which are reflected throughout. combining elegant details with the prefect amenities for the most discerning family. $3,795,000.

Grace Yang, Howard Fletcher, Megan Motherway, Michael Fowler & Roxane Nunes

Potomac, MD

Stunning contemporary home on over three acres designed by Thomas Pheasant. Located in close-in Potomac just past the Congressional Country Club with over 13,000 sf offering a grand foyer with 30’ ceilings, dramatic living and dining room, indoor lap pool and 6-car garage. $2,695,000.

have joined the company.

Penny Yerks, LLC 703.760.0744

Grace Yang 240.205.5671

Arlington, VA

Dupont Circle, DC

Foxhall, DC

Georgetown, DC

Jane Herrmann 202.997.0768

Jonathan Taylor 202.276.3344

Richard Seaton 202.907.8037 Claudia Donovan 202.251.7011

Gary Wicks 202.486.8393 Mary Fox 202.316.9631

Stunning penthouse, completely customized with the best finishes & views of DC. 3 BR, 3.5 baths, & 3,265 sf of truly spectacular living. Features hardwood living areas, carrera marble baths, Poliform custom closet systems, designer gourmet kit with all high-end finishes, 2 gas fireplaces & family room. Fabulous building amenities incl roof pool & sundeck, gym, Platinum level lounge for events, concierge & more. $2,385,000.

Spacious & superbly renovated 1902-built 4-level Victorian on a tree-lined block, west side of Dupont. Awesome mix of tradition & mod style. Main house: 4 BR, 4 baths, high ceilings, 6 fplcs, top-of-the-line kit w/ brkfst area, sep den, master suite w/ marble bath. Great light throughout. Beautiful rear garden with 2 decks. Lower level is 1 BR, 1 bath separately metered unit. 1 off-street parking space conveys. $1,995,000.

www.ttrsir.com

NEW LISTING – Dynamite 5 BR, 5.5-bath Federal with grand foyer, premier kitchen, exciting living and entertaining spaces with views onto fantastic patio, garden and pool. Includes a study, gym, 2 family rooms, 2 fireplaces, fantastic roof terrace, built-ins, garage, and more. Located in a quiet neighborhood along the Potomac near Georgetown. $1,775,000.

Downtown, D.C. 202.234.3344

Georgetown, D.C. 202.333.1212

The incomparable 3303 Water Street – the most sought-after address along the Georgetown Waterfront. Two, large 1-bedroom residences featuring clean architectural lines, the finest finishes, and expansive C&O Canal views. Dramatic common areas, spectacular city and river views, rooftop pool, sun decks, doorman and concierge. $925,000–$1,049,999.

McLean, VA 703.319.3344

Chevy Chase, MD 301.967.3344

© MMXII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. The Sound, used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

TTR Georgetowner 2 April 4, 2012 GMG,04.12.12.indd INC.

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4/3/12 8:50 AM


VOL. 58, NO. 14

SINCE 1954

CONTENTS N EW S 4-5

Up & Coming

6-7

Town Topics

8 9 ON THE COVER Stephanie Bothwell and Frank Babb Randolph serve as cochairs for the Georgetown House Tour. The photo was taken by Phillip Bermingham; www.phillipbermingham.com. The photo shoot took place at Randolph’s 34th Street Home.

In Country Calendar THE AR T S 22 Performance: Kahn Tackles O’Neill’s Daunting ‘Strange Interlude’

Editorial/Opinion

DIRECT ORY

REAL ES TATE 12

Mortgage/Featured Property

The Cherry Trees, One Hundred Years Later 13 14

Long & Foster’s Jeff Detwiler

Le Decor: A Tray for You, A Tray for Two 15

COVER

BODY & SOUL 25

Alone

Getting to the Heart of the Georgetown House Tour

Between The Sheets: His Time

FOOD & WINE 26-27 27 28

16-17 PAGE 21 Check out our list of the latest In Country events.

Classified/ Service Directory

24

Sales

11

Art Map: Canal Square and Beyond

23

Business

Cocktail of the Week Latest Dish

SOCIAL SCENE 29-30

I N COUN TRY

Dining Guide

Social Scene

18-21 Newport, Rhode Island: A Fresh Sense of History &

GEORGETOWN MEDIA GROUP, INC.

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MEET THE PRESS THIS WEEK DONNA EVERS is the author of “Historic DC”

Donna Evers, devers@eversco.com, is the owner and broker of Evers & Co. Real Estate, the largest woman owned and run real estate firm in the Washington Metro area. The firm of 100 licensed real estate professionals maintains its premier reputation through a strong referral base and agents who enjoy access to Evers & Co.’s one-of-a-kind Agent Resource Center. Donna writes for three publications and publishes a report on Washington Metro area real estate each month. She is the proprietor of historic Twin Oaks Tavern Winery in Bluemont, Virginia, and a devoted fan of Washington history. Over the years, Donna has renovated 23 homes, including two apartments in Paris, France.

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Calendar

UP & COMING APRIL 7

Southwest Waterfront Fireworks Festival Enjoy eight hours of free music, water-related activities, live entertainment and delicious foods. At 8:30 p.m., fireworks will light up the Washington Channel and Kastles Stadium at The Wharf, a waterfront arena with multiple outdoor areas. For more information, visit NationalCherryBlossomFestival.org.

APRIL 14

Potomac Watershed Cleanup Annual Cleanup Day, April 14, 9 a.m. to noon. Throughout April, friends, families and those ecologically concerned can help remove trash from one of 276 sites along the Potomac River in D.C., Maryland and Virginia. Call 202-973-8203, or email potomaccleanup@fergusonfoundation.org to RSVP for Site Leader Training Workshops. For more information, visit FergusonFoundation.org Civil War Encampment on Tudor Place’s Grounds

Walk among and talk with Union and Confederate soldiers and slaves on the lawns of Tudor Place. See a Union Artillery Unit and attend the school of soldier, where children study arms and drills, try out period dress and play games. www.TudorPlace.org

APRIL 18

Preview Night Benefit Smithsonian Craft Show and Sale The Craft Show and Sale is widely regarded as the country’s most prestigious juried show and sale of fine American craft. Enjoy a cocktail buffet, first choice shopping, meet the artists, and groove to jazz by the John Paul Ensemble. $200 for advance reservation; the National Building Museum, 401 F St., NW. For more information, SmithsonianCraftShow.org.

Earth Day on the National Mall From noon to 7 p.m., the centerpiece of Earth Day in the United States will be a rally on the National Mall. Tens of thousands of environmentally-conscious people from all walks of life and all parts of the country will be joined by civic leaders and celebrities for this special event to galvanize the environmental movement.

APRIL 22

APRIL 21 TO 23

Earth Day at the National Zoo

APRIL 20

57th Annual Corcoran Ball The Women’s Committee of the Corcoran invites you to be a part of the 57th annual Corcoran Ball — recognized in Washington’s social and business communities as one of the signature events of spring. The Corcoran welcomes more than 1,000 guests for an evening of dinner, dancing, and socializing amid lavish decor. For more information and tickets, visit www.Corcoran.org.

APRIL 21

Green Rush 2012 Join hundreds of fellow eco-conscious adventurers in D.C. for an Earth Day scavenger

Georgetown House Tour 2012

Patron's Party: Wednesday, April 25th House Tour: Saturday, April 28th www.GeorgetownHouseTour.com 4 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

hunt unlike any other. Teams of two to five persons will compete in challenges and decode clues for a chance to win a $1,000 grand prize. Bust out your best green-themed costume and enthusiasm for a chance at the Green Spirit Award and a year’s worth of Honest Tea. Kickoff at Logan Circle Historic District at 2:30 p.m. Register at LiveGreen. net/greenrush2012

Earth Day. Photo Credit: Mehgan Murphy, Smithsonian’s National Zoo.

Celebrate Earth Day: meet the Smithsonian National Zoo’s Green Team experts, participate in green-themed crafts and learn simple daily actions that help you enjoy a more environmentally-friendly lifestyle. State Farm will host a special children’s area at the Kids’ Farm where children can make their own plant pots with recycled newspapers as well as a garden journal. The event runs from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

8th Annual National Sustainable Design Expo The Eighth Annual National Sustainable Design Expo will take place on the National Mall, April 21 through 23. The expo brings together students, scientists, engineers and business leaders whose innovative technologies are designed to advance economic growth while reducing environmental impact. It also provides a forum for government, nonprofits and businesses to show different ways to sustainability.

APRIL 28

Georgetown House Tour This year’s tour will feature nine of historic Georgetown’s homes and their impressive gardens. Homes on the tour will be open from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. Houses are arranged for easy walking at your own pace taken in the order you prefer. Your ticket price includes a tour booklet full of useful information, including a map of the houses. Visit www. GeorgetownHouseTour.com for more information. ★


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TOWN TOPICS

News Buzz BY RO BE RT DE VANEY

Town-Gown Truce? ANC, CAG, University Ask for Delay in Zoning Filing

Could there be peace in our time? In the April 2 meeting of Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2E, a joint statement by neighborhood groups and Georgetown University asked the D.C. Zoning Commission to delay the deadline for filings on the university’s 2010-2020 Campus Plan process by 60 days. Members of the Citizens Association of Georgetown, the Burleith Citizens Association and the ANC, all of which oppose the university’s expansion plans, and representatives from the university stood up at the meeting to affirm the surprising announcement. As it stands now, the university’s deadline for submissions is April 12, and neighborhood groups have until April 19 to respond. If the zoning panel agrees to the request for delay, the submission and response dates will change to June 11 and June 18, respectively. Only several weeks ago, Jennifer Altemus, CAG president, as well as student leaders and others on the university side, was lamenting the delayed decision by the zoning board. Why the 180-degree turn? ANC chair Ron Lewis said that the delay was requested so that “we can explore the possibility of reaching common ground in our talks about the campus plan. ... We’re giving a somewhat different report than we had expected.”

“This approach reflects our continued efforts to seek common ground and to engage with city and neighborhood leaders,” wrote Rachel Pugh, director of media relations for the university, in an email. “Joining with our neighbors in requesting an extension is a meaningful sign of progress in a long process.” Major sticking points between the parties, such as the demand that students be housed on campus by 2016, remain. But some persons in the process seem to be taking zoning commissioner Anthony Hood’s advice in February that residents and university officials meet more continually to resolve any issues affecting the neighborhood. At an earlier ANC meeting, Mayor Vincent Gray spoke of the town-gown tension and said he believed that common ground would be reached. Whether this small measure of unity displayed at the April 2 ANC meeting leads to a sea charge by which neighborhood and university leaders collaborate is anyone’s guess. At the same meeting, the ANC voted unanimously to oppose the redrawn designs for the university’s planned Athletic Training Facility.

Georgetown’s Jack the Bulldog to Welcome Puppy Mascot-in-Training, April 13

Georgetown University’s Jack the Bulldog is going to have to start making room on the couch and especially on the bleachers, because a bulldog puppy will arrive April 13 on campus to be trained by the boss, the veteran, the main

Great times.

four-legged mascot. The new guy, “Jack Jr.,” or “J.J.” for short, is a gift from Janice and Marcus Hochstetler, bulldog breeders in California, who have two children at Georgetown. This is their way, they say, of thanking the university for the education their children are receiving. Jack recently injured his left rear leg and is expected to have surgery this month. He will be returning this fall to continue cheering on the athletes and begin teaching J.J. what it means to be a Hoya. “Jack’s presence will provide important support to J.J. since the older dog is already comfortable with his life as a mascot at Georgetown,” says Rev. Christopher Steck, S.J., associate professor in theology. “J.J. will be looking for signals from Jack, and Jack’s enthusiasm in different environments will encourage J.J.’s own.” According to the American Kennel Club, Jack ranks 8th among 125 of the most famous dogs in pop culture. He spends his time cheering at Georgetown games (Hoyas say he is often seen attacking and eating cardboard boxes with the opposing team’s logo on them), or resting in the lobby of the Jesuit Residence before heading home to his New South apartment that he shares with Steck. The Washington Post reported that the new addition is not a replacement for 9-yearold Jack. J.J. was planning on moving across country since he was born in December. Steck tweeted last Friday, March 30, “Really excited about the new puppy, and just to be clear, Jack is NOT retired.” Join Jack and J.J. for a special welcome

Good friends.

Jerry McCoy, special collections librarian, Washingtoniana Division of the D.C. Pubic Library, will receive an individual award from the Historic Preservation Office of the D.C. Office of Planning which chose the Georgetown Neighborhood Library project for the 2012 District of Columbia Award for Excellence in Historic Preservation. The ceremony will be held June 21. McCoy is well known in Georgetown for heading up the Peabody Room at the R Street public library. It suffered extensive damage from an April 2007 fire. Nevertheless, firefighters and staff saved 95 percent of its historic collection, including the beloved portrait of Yarrow Mamout, a early 19th-century Georgetowner who emigrated from West Africa and a popular resident at the time. (Today, the library stands fully reconstructed.) That story was re-told in the Washington Post’s March 25 comics sections in the “Flashbacks” comic-strip. “I thought the denoument of the Yarrow story featuring the Peabody Room’s portrait and its rescue from the fire was pretty spectacular,” McCoy said. ★

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Library’s McCoy Earns Historic Preservation Award; Tale of 2007 Fire in the Comics

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event at Healy Circle, 4 p.m. on Friday, April 13, when Steck returns to campus with the little guy from San Diego. Meanwhile, check the university website which will map the puppy’s travels across America to his destination in D.C.

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Community Calendar APRIL 7

Weeding Party in Dumbarton Oaks Park Volunteer with the National Park Service from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to help remove invasive plants from the park. Tools and gloves will be provided; meet at the top of Lover’s Lane and R Street. For more information, please contact Ann Aldrich at aaldrich@verizon.net.

APRIL 11

Cherry Blossom Tea at Tudor Place A traditional tea with sandwiches, scones, desserts and Japanese tea blends, and a tour through the historic house. 1 to 3 p.m. Members, $20; non-members, $25. Cheikh Lo at GW Lisner Auditorium Sengalese Afropop singer-composer Cheikh Lo will perform his strong and soulful songs that are a mix of West and Central African music, funk, Cuban and flamenco. 8 p.m. at the George Washington Lisner Auditorium. Admission cost: $15 to $45.

APRIL 14

Meet Officer Atkins and Commander Reese Metropolitan Police Department officers meet our community to discuss concerns and look at strategies to fight crime, 9:45 a.m. in Rose Park at the picnic tables on the south lawn.

APRIL 17

Sesquicentennial Commemoration of the Emancipation of the District of Columbia 9 to 11 a.m., Georgetown University, Copley

Formal Lounge. RSVP by April 10; space is limited: 202-687-5677 or cbm29@georgetown.edu CAG Meeting Featuring Carl Colby Carl Colby will talk to the Citizens Association of Georgetown about “The Man Nobody Knew,” his movie about his father, CIA Director William Colby. 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Georgetown Library.

APRIL 19

Dumbarton Oaks Park’s 71st Birthday Party at the Italian Embassy Hosted by the Embassy of Italy on 3000 Whitehaven St., N.W, the party’s guest speaker is Betsy Rogers of the Central Park Conservancy. The event is free and open to the public. RSVP to aaldrich@dopark.org or linzee@dopark.org. Go to www.DOpark.org for more information.

The Dermatology Center and Georgetown Smile present...

The Brighten & Whiten Event Monday April 16th, 2-5pm Come join us for an exclusive event in our DC office, along with Georgetown Smile! We will be featuring specials that will brighten your whole look! Join us for nibbles, beverages, and free consultations on brightening treatments, just in time for spring! When you attend the event you will receive specials for Fire & Ice Facials, Teeth Whitening treatments with Georgetown Smile, and Clear & Brilliant , our newest treatment to rejuvenate the skin and reverse the signs of aging. TM

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This event is being held at our DC location Please RSVP to info@dermskin.com

APRIL 21

Artist’s Talk at the Yellow Barn Stone Tower Marcela Olivia Dorantes is the artist in residence at the Stone Tower for the month of April. Her studio will be open daily from 9 a.m. to 7.30 p.m. On April 21, she will hold an art lecture from 1:30 to 3 p.m. The Yellow Barn Stone Tower, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Glen Echo Md. 5th Annual C&O Canal Pride Days On April 21 and 28 there will be volunteer events to improve the park. Advanced registration is required at www.canaltrust.org/trust/ canal-pride-days.php. Contact Becky Curtis for more information, curtis@CanalTrust.org.

Ins & Outs M&T Bank, which has a branch on Thomas Jefferson Street, will be adding another Georgetown location at 1420 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., where the clothing store, Commander Salamander, once sold its funky wares. Never mind: Crave, a sandwich and salad eatery on Potomac Street that opened a couple of weeks ago, was abruptly closed. A dispute between business partners led to the decision. Manager and co-owner Garrett Bauman, also of Annie Items from Crave were hastily removed from the restaurant Creamcheese vintage clothing, told the Georgetowner he hoped Gentlemen’s Quarterly opined: “The whole to find another location nearby. collection is still grounded in the archival, The men’s clothier, Gant, is coming to American sportswear Bastin and Co. have Georgetown in August and moving into 3239 perfected in the past few seasons but amped up M St. It could not be more different than its in the flair department, complete with special previous tenant, the free-wheeling, live-music details like the floral lining on an insanely bar, the Saloun. perfect M-65 jacket or the bold flecks of bright The 2,000 square foot space will sell yellow and orange on a Donegal tweed blazer.” Gant, Gant Rugger and Gant by Michael Bastian, according to Women’s Wear Daily. Georgetown just got more preppy, as if it Continues on page 9 needed more help.

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EDITORIAL / OPINION

Percy Plaza: A Uniting Symbol for Our Time In the divided, Red State-Blue State, conservative-liberal, right- and left-wing United States of America of today, there are very few proposals that elicit a unanimous, united response. Here’s one: Ward 2 Councilmember Jack Evans has proposed a measure that would ceremonially rename the corner of Wisconsin Avenue and K Street near Georgetown Waterfront Park’s people-friendly fountain in honor of Senator Charles Percy. We can only say: Yes and yes again. We applaud, we approve, for many good reasons. Wisconsin Avenue and K Street marks the entrance to the finally, fully blooming and operational Georgetown Waterfront Park. There is probably no single person who was more instrumental in getting the park project off the ground and on its way -- as a chairman of the Friends of Georgetown Waterfront Park and as out-and-out booster and promoter for the park’s completion. The park’s non-profit -- named “Georgetowners of the Year” for 2011 by this newspaper -advanced the idea of Percy Plaza a few years ago.

Percy passed away at the age of 91 just days after completion of the park. Percy was a Republican senator from Illinois of considerable achievement and reputation, counted at one time as a possible GOP presidential candidate. He also had an illustrious business career before entering politics. As a politician, a popular senator, he was the kind of man who honored the trade, a true moderate who worked both sides of the aisle with style and aplomb, the kind of Republican that seems today to be as rare as a unicorn in a deeply divided American body politic. When Percy left the Senate, he took up life as a Georgetown citizen and lived up to the highest standards of community citizenship by taking part with great fervor in the community’s affairs. The Georgetown Waterfront Park is rich evidence of his good works, and it contains a riverside National Park Service plaque about him. So: Name an intersection after Sen. Charles Percy? That’s the least we can do. See you at Percy Plaza. ★

Green D.C. BY EM MA WAT E RS

O

ur nation’s capital takes being green very seriously. We top the list of environmentally-friendly “firsts” time and again. The numbers don’t lie, D.C. stands above the competition in LEED certified commercial and institutional green buildings per capita. And any foodie will tell you, this town loves supporting local farms. Many embassies catch the eye with their beauty and grandeur, but only one prevents greenhouse gas emissions. The Embassy of Finland is the first LEED-certified embassy in the U.S. Years of retrofitting the modernist building has produced energy-efficient lighting, plumbing and ventilation. Mirroring Finland’s environmental commitment, the embassy is a pioneer in eco-friendly business practices. During those all too familiar summer scorchers, Pleasant Pops comes to our rescue. Inspired by paletas, a traditional ice pop from Michoacan, Mexico, the ingredients challenge our taste buds and support local farming. The Pleasant Pops mission dictates strict recycling practices and composting organic waste. Look for the new shop in Logan Square this summer. Eco-friendliness comes as second nature to Nusta spa, the first and only LEED certified spa in the U.S. Their goal is to approach green from the inside out. Renewable and

recyclable, Nusta’s interior meets the highest standards of sustainability. They thought of everything, down to the ink used in printed materials. Ever wonder where your seafood actually comes from? Not at Tackle Box, whose green philosophy supports local suppliers who are using habitat-friendly fishing gear. Their fluctuating menu combats over-fishing and poor practices that endanger our oceans. Tackle Box believes environmentalism means flexibility, education and community. Washington Nationals Park is the nation’s first major professional stadium to become LEED-certified. Sustainable design elements include energy-saving light fixtures, droughtresistant plants and a green roof over concessions. What about those pesky peanut shells sprawling the ground? A special ground filtration is system designed to catch shells and other debris before reaching the stormwater system. D.C.’s latest initiative is to keep our schools green. On March 20, the Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council released the Green Classroom Professional Certificate. The program educates pre-K–12 teachers, paraprofessionals, administrators and parents about environmentally healthy practices in schools and classrooms. ★ PUBLISHER

Sonya Bernhardt FEATURE EDITORS

Please send all submissions of opinions for consideration to editorial@georgetowner.com

Robert Devaney Gary Tischler Ari Post

Protecting Our Students … Beyond the Half Measures BY JOH N FEN ZEL “The gunman entered … and opened fire on ‘everything that moved... How can they attack something as sacred as a school?’” This witness account, from the school shootings in Toulouse, France, is reminiscent of the countless other incidents we have experienced across the United States, most recently at Chardon High School in Ohio. When a shooting incident occurs in any of our nation’s schools, news travels instantly. Coverage of the incident dominates our television screens— images of students and faculty streaming outside, parents rushing to police lines, stacks of SWAT teams preparing to enter school doors, media vans lined up on roadways—all of it creating an alltoo-familiar scene. So familiar, in fact, that the images and details of each incident have become largely indistinguishable from others. As the discussion has become garbled, so have our strategies for dealing with shooting rampages in our nation’s schools. Following an incident, we’re riveted for a period of a week or so to the news coverage. We’re systematically guided through the stages of grief by network anchors and pundits: through our guilt for not having recognized the signs earlier … through our anger at the perpetrators … and finally, to our collective view of the incident as an anomaly—something that “could never happen here.” Months later, another school shooting occurs. This one seemingly disconnected from the one preceding it. And yet, the shooters’ characteristics are remarkably similar: chronic truancy, religious or political fanaticism, a preoccupation with weapons, someone socially marginalized… on “the fringe,” who is struggling with addiction…and who has announced his intent to kill. The symptoms and signs remain constant. And in our collective quest to better understand a shooter’s motives, the media narrative often conveys upon us a societal guilt-by-association for the carnage he inflicts.

Defining the Problem

On occasion, we take a few steps back to gain perspective rather than catharsis. And in those moments, it’s possible to transcend our complacency and to see school rampages for what they are: acts of terror. Defining the problem in these terms is a crucial first step toward effective defense—but that step has proven to be surprisingly elusive as we tend to focus instead on the psychology and motivations of the shooter in an incident’s aftermath. But the problem has remained constant: our children are at risk from those who seek media attention through acts of mass murder.

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The problem of active shooters in our schools is not new. The first school massacre incident occurred in 1764 at a schoolhouse near Greencastle, Pa., when four Delaware warriors killed ten children and their schoolmaster. In 1927, a school administrator bombed the Community School in Bath, Mich., killing 38 people—mostly children. Numerous other incidents have occurred through the years. The well known and often discussed, like Columbine and Virginia Tech, eclipse those that occurred decades ago, but are no less deadly, like South Pasadena Junior High School (1940) and University of Texas at Austin (1966).

What Can Be Done?

Identifying students who display at-risk behavior remains key to stopping a school shooting before it occurs. Homicidal ideation is perhaps the most obvious indicator that a teen may be considering such an act, but there are a host of others, to include: cruelty to animals, suicidal tendencies, and abuse or neglect at home. Reporting comments and observations in advance have prevented many attacks; however, forecasting a school rampage is not always achievable. There will be more attacks. As youth addiction to point-and-shoot video games grows, and as weapons become more powerful, a perfect storm of entertainment realism and lethality has gathered, making the potential consequences of future school attacks even more catastrophic than the last. Defending against school rampages is a sensitive topic—far more so than preparing for tornados or fire. Active shooter drills involving all parties—students, faculty and first responders— are rarely conducted for fear that the visual of the drills alone will be met with cries of outrage from school commissions and PTAs. The great irony is that school rampages are responsible for far more fatalities in our schools than severe weather, earthquakes or fires, combined. So, rather than shrink from tabletop exercises and rehearsals, perhaps we should be insisting on them. Even the simple act of identifying the locations for staging areas, police command posts, media cordons, and reunification sites expedite incident response. Exercises also give faculty and students a reflexive understanding of school lockdown procedures, and how to effectively respond should they come face-to-face with a gunman. Drills and rehearsals have the added benefit of building relationships with local law enforcement before an incident occurs. The time for police, first responders and school administrators to be introduced to one another should never be in the midst of a crisis. ★

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BUSINESS

Mayor’s 2013 Budget Biggest Ever BY J A CK EVANS

L

ast week, Mayor Vincent Gray submitted his fiscal 2013 budget proposal to the District Council. The total proposed budget for the District is $11.3 billion, the largest in our city’s history. Of that amount, our proposed local funds budget for fiscal 2013 is $5.9 billion, which is $237 million more than the fiscal 2012 approved budget of $5.6 billion, an increase of 4.2 percent. Once you add in certain dedicated revenues, the entire general fund revenue proposal is $6.6 billion. While we also receive federal money in our budget, it is in the same proportional ballpark as that received by any other state. There is a common misconception that the federal government makes a separate contribution to the District. However, this type of payment was eliminated in 1996. Over the past ten years, our local funds budget has gone from $3.7 billion to $6.1 billion, an increase of 64 percent. Much of this increase has been in the social services and education budgets. Today, almost 80 percent of our budget is used for social services, education, and public safety. In light of this extraordinary spending growth, I simply cannot understand the position of some of my colleagues and policy advocates who say we are not providing adequate funding for social services programs. An argument can perhaps be made that spending choices should be made more wisely, but we are not in need of any new revenue. Fortunately, the mayor seems to agree at least partially with those sentiments. I am pleased with certain aspects of the budget, such as the absence of any tax increases. I am also pleased to see at least a token increase in the homestead deduction, standard income tax deduction, and personal income tax exemption. I would go even further, however. Due to our large surplus from the past fiscal year and an increase in our quarterly revenue estimate, an argument could be made that we should return these tax dollars to taxpayers, and return the furlough money to our government employees. I also have concerns that certain revenue-raising proposals in the mayor’s budget may not generate the projected levels of funds. Of particular concern is a proposal to expand the hours during which alcohol can be sold, from 2 a.m. to 3 a.m. on weekdays and from 3 a.m. to 4 a.m. on weekends and holidays, for the apparent purpose of generating $1.3 million in increased sales tax revenue annually starting in fiscal 2013, and approximately $5.32 million in the four-year financial plan period. I believe many residents of Ward 2 will object to this type of change. Therefore, this will require that we find funding elsewhere. The mayor also proposes to raise $24.8 million in new revenue from increased speed and red light ticket cameras. I disagree philosophically with this nickeland-dime approach to balancing the budget. Last year, I expressed concerns about inadequate police funding in the budget. While I am encouraged by the mayor’s commitment to fund additional officer positions, I disagree that a staff of 3,900 officers would constitute a “fully funded” police force. I believe we should increase our force to a minimum of 4,000 sworn officers at all times to protect us from rapid changes, such as when we reach a “retirement bubble.” I also believe we should provide at least $10 million in funding for the Commission on Arts & Humanities as well as additional funds for libraries and parks. I will be working with my colleagues on the council to make improvements to the mayor’s proposal and hope to have your support. Last year, I voted “no” on the budget. I am hopeful that I will be able to support it this year. ★

Ins & Outs Continued from page 7 Ligne Roset and Natuzzi are setting up shop in Glover Park. The furniture retailers have jointly leased the storefront at 2209 Wisconsin Avenue, said property manager Cynthia Cumbo, who added, “The space should be ready in March.” The space was vacant after Mobili furniture departed more than three years ago. The clothing store, Riccardi & Sports, have left the Shops at Georgetown Park along with so many others. It can now be found at the main Riccardi at 3213 M Street -- 202-625-6687. Mega and green, too: Swedish fashion giant Hennes and Mauritz -- which has its H&M store on M Street at Georgetown Park -plans a separate luxury line for 2013. “We have many different

projects in progress and already next year we will be launching a completely new store chain. Like COS, which today is very successful with good profitability, the new chain of stores will be independent and complement the other offerings from the group,” CEO Karl-Johan Persson confirmed. On April 12, H&M will launch its Exclusive Glamour Conscious Collection, promoted by Amanda Seyfried and Michelle Williams and is made using sustainable materials including organic cotton, hemp and recycled polyester. Hair stylist Luigi Parasmo is set to open his first namesake salon with fellow stylist Javier Calvo in Georgetown. Luigi Parasmo Salon will be equipped with a staff of 14 hair, make-up and nail stylists and opens its doors to the public on Tuesday, April 10. It will be located on 1510 Wisconsin Avenue.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton welcomed benefactors to the U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council lunch at the State Department.

U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council Lunch With Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush BY M IC H EL L E KIN GSTON

H

onorees, distinguished guests, journalists and friends crowded inside the Benjamin Franklin room at the State Department on March 21 to congratulate the members of the U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council on the 10th anniversary of supporting the women of Afghanistan. Founded in 2002 by President George W. Bush and Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai, the council connects both U.S. and Afghan governments with the private sector, academia and non-governmental organizations to identify needs and to develop and implement initiatives to support Afghan women and girls. The council is based at Georgetown University. “There is an Afghan proverb: A good year is determined by its spring. I think that is a worthy proverb to keep in mind, and indeed it is a call to action for us to be sure that the spring sets the pace for the kind of good year we hope to see in Afghanistan,” Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said. “Let there be no doubt that even as the U.S. role in Afghanistan changes during the next few years of transition, we will continue to stand with and work closely with Afghan women.” “Some may wonder if these efforts and partnerships truly make a difference,” said Zala Ahmad, a student from rural Afghanistan who now studies at Brandeis University in Massachusetts thanks to the council. “I can tell you firsthand that they do.” While toasting the council with red glasses of hibiscus tea, dining on endive salads and Atlantic cod, and treating tastebuds to the sweet dessert served, a passion fruit clafouti, guests listened to Clinton, former First Lady Laura Bush, John DeGioia, president of Georgetown University, Ambasador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues Melanne Verveer and several other speakers from Afghanistan involved with the council share stories and astronomical differences in percentages of Afghan females now attending schools and even holding prominent

positions. “Girls make up about 40 percent of the nearly 8 million children going to school in Afghanistan today,” Foreign Minister of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Zalmai Rassoul said. “In 2000, there were no girls at that time.” He also noted that 30 percent of school teachers and 15 percent of university teachers are women. Today, 24 percent of doctors and medical workers across Afghanistan are women. Even with these positive numbers, he said Afghan women continue to be innocent victims, but the council has helped give them their opportunity back. “God created a couple,” said Vartan Gregorian, president of Carnegie Corporation of New York. “He did not create men first, women second. He created a couple at the same time. So, there is no way half of the couple can be inferior to the other half of the couple.” After several rounds of applause credited to the amount of effort and success that has gone into the council, both Clinton and Bush were presented awards for their dedication by Georgetown University. Clinton was given the Caring for Children Lifetime Achievement Award from the Center for Child and Human Development by DeGioia, who joked that Clinton has been fighting for the rights of women and children since she wrote her scholarly article in 1973 for the Harvard Educational Review. Bush received the Champion for Afghan Women Award from Verveer, who said Bush “led by example, mobilizing resources to ensure that Afghan women and girls gain skills, opportunities, and particularly the education that they were denied under the years of Taliban repression.” When the luncheon was finished, Verveer said the program was over but the journey to continue fighting for the rights of Afghan women is not. “We hope that we will all continue to work together,” she said. ★

GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 9


REAL ESTATE SALES Style

Address

Georgetown Real Estate

Sales Provided by

Washington Fine ProPerties. LLC

BA

List Price

Close price

Year Built

3400-3410 PROSPECT ST NW

Federal

5

9

$12,500,000

$11000000

1787

1533 28TH ST NW

Colonial

4

3

$3495000

$3000000

1976

3345 RESERVOIR RD NW

Federal

4

3

$1975000

$1900000

1950

3303 WATER ST NW #E-6

International

2

2

$1999000

$1850000

2004

3131 N ST NW

Federal

3

3

$1750000

$1650000

1939

4025 MANSION DR NW

Colonial

3

3

$1499000

$1447500

1990

1654 35TH ST NW

Colonial

5

4

$1350000

$1350000

1981

1345 27TH ST NW

Colonial

3

2

$1275000

$1275000

1870

3021 DENT PL NW

Colonial

3

3

$1100000

$1100000

1910

3301 DENT PL NW

Federal

2

2

$899000

$850000

1921

3721 T ST NW

Traditional

3

2

$765000

$757500

1924

1013 PAPER MILL CT NW #1013

Other

2

1

$569900

$560000

1900

3299 K ST NW #701

Traditional

1

1

$459000

$445000

1978

2500 Q ST NW #327

Other

1

1

$369000

$365000

1942

2605 39TH ST NW #104

Contemporary

2

1

$340000

$320000

1954

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10 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

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MORTGAGE

Not Out of the Woods Yet BY BILL STA RRE L S

T

he economy is not out of the woods yet. In order for it to stabilize further, the housing market has to get stronger. A recently released S&P Case Shiller report was headlined, “2012 Home Prices Off to a Rocky Start.” In a comparison between January 2012 and January 2011 of major metropolitan areas, only Washington, D.C., Miami and Phoenix showed price increases. MerrillLynch pointed out that only Washington, D.C. and Miami had increases in unadjusted data. The worst performing metropolitan area was Atlanta, Ga., which posted a one year change of -14.8 percent. Even major metropolitan areas including New York, Chicago and Los Angeles posted declines. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke spoke at George Washington University, where he highlighted the same cautious tone he has been using for months. He was noted as saying that it’s too early to declare victory on the latest economic recovery. The Fed will continue its accommodative monetary policy. Bernanke said that the depression of the late 1920s and ‘30s was much more disruptive and severe than the recent “Great Recession.” He stated that without the forceful response by the Federal government the outcome would have been much more severe.

Bernanke spoke of a likely slowdown in the second half of the year and did not rule out future monetary easing by the Fed. Speaking on employment, he noted that the numbers were “significantly below pre-crisis levels” and that unemployment is well above sustainable levels. The chairman said the Fed is not paying attention to the election calendar and will not allow the election to influence its actions. If it enacts more simulative actions in the fall, it will be in reaction to economic conditions, not because of the pending election. Pending home sales for February showed a decline of 0.5 percent month-over-month in February. January posted an increase of 2 percent. The consensus was for an increase of 1 percent. This is another sign of the fragility of the economic recovery. The Washington area seems to be one of the more stable economic areas, and housing is doing better here than in most areas. Mortgage rates continue to be near-historic lows. Rates remain in a narrow range in the next several months. With the Fed’s cautious tone, the fear of a spike in interest rates seems remote at best.

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$497,500 For further information call: Kay McGrath King 202.276.1235 kay.mcgrathking@wfp.com Washington Fine Properties, LLC

Bill Starrels is a mortgage loan professional who lives in Georgetown. He can be reached at 703-625-7355 or by email, bill.starrels@gmail.com

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GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 11


HISTORIC DC

The Cherry Trees, One Hundred Years Later

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his spring marks the 100-year anniversary of Japan’s gift of cherry trees to beautify the Tidal basin and National Mall. It has been one of the better years of perfect weather for the blossoms, though they came too early for most. They are the official sign of spring and also the beginning of the tourist season in Washington. Their clouds of pink blossoms offer a brilliant picture that is quite different from the project that faltered many times along the way. The plan to have cherry trees in and around the Mall came from a Washington socialite who worked hand-in-hand with President Taft’s wife — First Lady Helen “Nellie” Taft — to get the trees here from Japan, both as a symbol of our two countries’ friendship and as a way to spruce up the swampy, derelict Mall area. But the sacred trees, called Sakura in Japan, went through a series of mishaps which very nearly killed all these ambitious plans. When the first shipment of 90 trees arrived and were planted, they turned out to be the wrong variety and had to be dug up. Then a shipment of 2,000 trees arrived as a gift from the government of Japan, but when the Department of Agriculture inspected the trees, they were found to be diseased, so President Taft himself ordered them to be burned in huge pyres. The governments exchanged letters, and the deeply embarrassing incident was fixed diplomatically. Two years later, 3,000 disease-resistant cherry trees arrived and with great ceremony, were planted and thrived to the delight of the whole city. Fifty years after that, when Lady Bird Johnson greened the city with her pocket parks, the government of Japan sent 3,800 more to be planted around the Washington Monument.

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These trees have always brought an emotional response from Washingtonians. In 1938, during construction of the Jefferson Memorial, workers started to clear some of the cherry trees for the construction site, and an angry group of women protestors chained themselves to the endangered trees to stop them from being cut down. The government intervened and promised to replace any trees that had to come down. While the blossoming trees look tranquil, they are very high-maintenance. They last a maximum of 30 to 50 years, so the government is constantly replacing dying trees. The heavy limbs are susceptible to wind, hail and snow storms, and these damaged trees also have to be periodically replaced. In 1912, during the ceremony of the tree planting, the Japanese ambassador predicted, “Almost all the world is at peace today, and there will be peace for thousands of tomorrows. War has had its day.” Of course, that’s not how things turned out, and during World War II, Washingtonians took to calling the cherry trees “Oriental” instead of “Japanese.” Each spring, Washingtonians wait and worry, because they can remember years when the buds and blossoms froze or were decimated in wind and sleet storms. In Japan, and for the last 100 years in Washington, the clouds of blossoming trees which appear magically almost overnight, symbolize the precariousness of nature and of our own existence, all the things that are most important and over which we have the least control. ★ Donna Evers is the owner and broker of Evers & Co. Real Estate, the largest woman-owned and -run real estate firm in the Washington area, the proprietor of historic Twin Oaks Tavern Winery in Bluemont, Va., and a devoted student of Washington history. E-mail her at Devers@ Eversco.com.

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202.581.0911 12 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

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®

$1,895,000

Unique Victorian in Georgetown’s west village. 4 finished levels, 5 BR, 4.5 baths, landscaped garden. Grand double LR, family/ dining room, high-end kitchen, master bedroom suite, in-law suite ,ask agent about parking. Jennifer Wellde 301.602.1596/ 202.944.8400 (O).

Cathedral, DC

Chevy Chase, DC

$1,100,000

Includes basement, backyard shed, backyard and front yard, white picket fence,wrap around porch, gas fireplace, open concept, 3 levels. Vassiliki Economides 202.345.2429/ 202.944.8400 (O).

Wesley Heights , DC

$1,675,000

Exceptional seven NR, five and a half bath home filled with character and charm. Great sunlight, hardwood floors, and crown moldings marble baths, and walk-in closets. Landscaped garden and patio, a great entertaining space. Nancy Itteilag 202.905.7762/ 202.363.1800 (O).

$1,250,000

Extraordinary! This 3BRs, 3.5BAs TH on quiet tree-lined street feature Embassy size dining room, living room and family room, 9’ ceilings, three large skylights, NEW marble foyer, marble Baths and so much more! Friendship Heights Office 202.364.5200.

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Georgetown, DC

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Washington, DC

$2,495,000

Outstanding residence in sought after Kent neighborhood beautifully designed and built by Samuel Pardoe w/approx. 5,500 sf features, fabulous floor plan & grand, updated interiors on private 13,00+sf lot 7BR, 5FB, 2 HB. Lenora Lynham 202.274.2048/ 202.362.1300(O).

Woodley/Cathedral,DC

www.ExtraordinaryProperties.com Washington, DC

Bethesda, MD

$1,200,000

7-year old 5BR/ 3.5 + NA Colonial in sought after Wyngate neighborhood. Home features everything buyers seek in new construction: Open Kit, FR w/ Fp, formal LR, Dr large master suite, 4BR,3BA up, detached garage and finished lower level. Ferris/Levin 202.438.1524/202.364.1300 (O).

Chevey Chase, DC

Georgetown, DC

Arlington, VA

$1,199,000

Fantastic opportunity to own an outstanding newer luxury home near Ballston. Premium amenities: 8 area sound system, gourmet kit w/ 48’’ professional range, two Bosch dishwashers, two deluxe wet bars, library built-ins, wood floors. Marty Merriam 703.795.0099/ 703.522.0500 (O).

$1,425,000

JUST LISTED! Classic 1911 colonial w/5BD up, 4.5 BA,updated kit w/adjoining family room, oversized dining room, abundant light, beamed ceilings, charming side porch & beautiful gardens! Blocks to friendship height metro & amenities. Bethesda All Points Office 301.229.4000

$1,325,000

Rarely available TH in the original section of Hillandale with a 2-car Garage & elevator. Wide floor plan, hardwood floors throughout, 2fireplace, high ceilings & patio. 3 BR up and lower level den or 4th BR. Nancy Itteilag 202.905.7762/ 202.363.1800 (O).

$3,050,000

PRICE REDUCED! The ultimate Enclave. Custom built in 2007, 7BR, 7+BA, 6FPs,separate entrance au pair/in-law level, 2 car garage +4 spaces, elevator, gourmet 3 oven kit. Prime for gracious living & elegant entertaining. Spring Valley Office 202.362.1300 (O).

U Street Corridor, DC

$1,029,000

Built in 2001, w/ legal 1BR rental unit on main level with a separate entrance! 3 BRs &2.5 baths with an incredible MBR suite w/ sitting area. Gourmet kitchen, and dining rm area, w/spiral staircase to a private patio. Kimberly Cestari 202.253.8757/ 202.243.3310 (O).

$1,189,000

East Village Delightful,light filled semidetached 2BR/ 2.5BA + den. Includes LR w/ fireplace and windows opening onto a patio & large garden; a formal DR, eat-in kitchen, and MBR with a private sitting area. Woodley Park Office 202.483.6300.

Fairfax, VA

$1,649,000

Gorgeous Manor home with over 8800 finished sqft sits on almost 2 acres. Includes a stunning chef’s kitchen; octagonal great room; two master suites; a 7 car garage and energy efficient geothermal heating. Deck & screened Gazebo. Lilian Jorgenson 703.407.0766/703.790.1990 (O).

Washington, DC

$1,175,000

Truly exceptional in every respect this stunning 2 BR, 2 BA & media loft Penthouse lives beautifully inside & out, with incredible finishes, a gigantic 2 tier terrace & arguably the best views from a private residence the city has to offer. Gordon Harrison 202.557.9908/202.237.8686 (O).

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GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 13


REAL ESTATE SPOTLIGHT

LONG & FOSTER’S DETWILER: Strategist in a Reviving Economy

F

BY RO BE RT DE VANEY

rom his Chantilly, Va., office near Route 28 and Dulles Airport, Jeffrey S. Detwiler, president and chief operating officer of the Long & Foster Companies, sees the dynamism and traffic of Northern Virginia. Here, he keeps tabs on the company’s wide-ranging real estate activities and checks updates on his iPad as he speaks confidently about the national and local real estate market, and a company that has become a real estate icon. “The epicenter of housing recovery is Washington, D.C.,” Detwiler says. Centered here, Long & Foster operates offices from Pennsylvania and New Jersey down through North Carolina and tracks the trends, such as seeing Richmond nine months behind the Washington area. “The Mid-Atlantic region is the best performing region in the nation,” he says. “The real estate market is so local, and Long & and Foster is the best place to be during tough times.” One thing is for sure: other corporate real estate giants have come and gone and have tried to buy the company, co-founded by chairman and CEO P. Wesley Foster, Jr., in 1968. Indeed, the legendary Foster is the one who has bought other firms adding to his army of 12,000 sales associates with 170 sales offices. In a competitive field during an economic downturn, Detwiler says he knows that agents need any extra edge they can get. We are in “a never-before-seen real estate market,” says the 50-year-old president. “It is harder today than ever before. From the agent to seller, we have to be 24/7 business-ready. We have an e-real estate team to help.” And he is well aware that the “next generation is using social media to find agents, too.” “The years 2003 through 2007 were an anomaly,” he says. “There was a mortgage bubble.” The additional agents who jumped into the market are gone now. As for the housing economy, he says, “The banks are scared to death and don’t want to make mistakes. Appraisers are scared, too, and people are scared to buy. Consumer confidence affects sales.” Detwiler lists four fundamental issues affecting housing: overly tight credit; negative equity; consumer debt, especially sub prime loans; distressed assets. “They complicate the system,” he calmly says. “The government can do more. So many loans are dinged up. In January 2010, we began to adjust to the new world. . . . it will return to normal in 2015 or 2016.” Nevertheless, “spring has been a great selling season,” relative to business last year, Detwiler says. In Georgetown, specifically, number of units sold is up 24 percent over last spring. Median sale price is down roughly 15 percent year-over-year, but inventory continues to tighten, which leads to a more balanced real estate market, and sellers in Georgetown are receiving about 95 percent of their list price when they sell, on average. Long & Foster made the biggest neighborhood and D.C. sale of 2011 with Evermay, the estate on 28th Street, going for $22 million. Right now, it is listing a 31st Street historic 14 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

Jeffery S. Detwiler. Photo by Robert Devaney.

home, across from Tudor Place, for $6.75 million. Over near Massachusetts Avenue, it has two listings within four blocks of each other: one on Benton Place for $12 million and another on Whitehaven Street for $6.95 million. A different company holds the highest-price listing in D.C.: a Chain Bridge Road property across from Battery Kimble Park for $16 million. Luxury home listings and million-dollarplus homes have become a greater part of Long & Foster’s strategy; it already has almost 30 percent of all the million-plus sales in the MidAtlantic region. Aware that local sales can go global, its Extraordinary Properties group includes exclusive affiliations with Christie’s International Real Estate, Luxury Real Estate and Luxury Portfolio International. More worldwide connections mean more sales. For these efforts as well as for Long & Foster’s mortgage and insurance entities, Detwiler has at least 25 years of finance and real estaterelated experience to draw upon. “My previous businesses share the same model,” he says. In fact, when Detwiler arrived at Long & Foster in 2009, the charming, down-to-earth, yet tenacious co-founder Wes Foster appeared incredulous. “At first, Wes could not fathom a non-real estate guy running the show,” he says. “What I brought to the table was a different view. The company is at a different point in its life: it has more structure and financial discipline.” A Princeton graduate who majored in psychology, Detwiler brought 20 years of experi-

ence in the mortgage industry along with his other work in traditional banking, insurance and portfolio management. “Detwiler has benefited from having direct responsibility as the senior executive for all facets of the mortgage business that included sales and production, capital markets and trading, finance and risk management, operations and technology, and servicing,” Foster announced at the time. According to Long & Foster, “Detwiler was the chief production officer for the Correspondent Channel at Countrywide/Bank of America. The Correspondent Channel included correspondent lending, warehouse lending and Landsafe origination services. In this role he was accountable for all revenue-producing activities. Prior to Countrywide, Detwiler worked on Wall Street for Credit Suisse First Boston in the mortgage trading and finance group. While at CSFB, he built and managed the warehouse lending business, and reengineered and oversaw the servicing operation. In addition, he designed, built and managed the mortgage conduit. Before Detwiler moved to Wall Street, he spent ten years at GMAC/RFC and was the chairman of the Conduit Operating Committee.” For a firm which began in a single, 600 square foot office in Fairfax, Va., and became the largest privately-owned real estate company in America, Detwiler looks like part of its continual plan for more firepower. Long & Foster has that developing foresight and zeal — and well-regarded, connected executives. Detwiler’s predecessor was David Stevens who left Long

& Foster to become head of the Federal Housing Administration and is now president of the Mortgage Bankers of America. Long & Foster’s headquarters in Chantilly opened five years ago just as the housing bubble burst. It is a massive Williamsburg-style office building, built with handmade, rough-hewn bricks and filled with art, sculptures along with murals depicting a developing Washington in the mid-1800s. There are other tenants in the five-story structure with adjacent land available for new construction in a healthier economy. In 2011, Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc., sold more than $22 billion worth of homes and helped more than 69,000 people buy and sell thier houses. The combined sales and equivalents for the Long & Foster Companies in 2011 were in excess of $42 billion. After Detwiler came from California to head the parent company — it includes Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc., Prosperity Mortgage Company, Walker Jackson Mortgage Corporation, Long & Foster Settlement Services, and Long & Foster Insurance Agency, Inc. — one corporate trait stuck him. “It was eye-opening to me,” he says. “People have been here 20 to 25 years. It makes a big company seem small.” Such staying power is owed in no small part to Wes Foster himself, now in his late 70s, and known for his honest, personal touch as well as hard-driving spirit. And you can bet that Detwiler with his ready smile and business acumen has a similar competitive glint in his eyes. Just what Foster ordered. ★


A Tray for You,

LE DECOR

A Tray for Two

BY M AR IT FOSSO

Serve tea, hors d’ouevres or cocktails on a decorative tray. Serve breakfast in bed to someone you care about. Or serve up some style: we like to use trays as a coffee table decoration, whether they’re filled with candles or stocked with our favorite magazines.

Michel Design Works Lemon Decoupage Serving Tray. $39.95. www.surlatable.com BoConcept Trays in different colors. $19 - $49. www.boconcept.us

Eva Solo Serving Tray. $108. www.royaldesign.com.

Mailroom Wood and Hardware Trays from Restoration Hardware. $129 - $199. www.restorationhardware.com.

Bedworth Saddle Leather tray from Ralph Lauren. $595. www.saksfifthavenue.com

GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 15


COVER STORY

Getting to the Heart of the

Georgetown House Tour BY GARY TISC H L ER

I

f you’re one of those persons who’ve been on a few Georgetown House Tours, you’ve begun to get a notion about some of the things the tour is about. The tour is about history, for sure—about the homes being shown, about the people who have lived in them and live in them now, about change in Georgetown and change in how people live. For all the historic, stately qualities of Georgetown, it’s a remarkably fluid place, and you can see that in the homes that are being shown. Those houses, acting like official greeters, may show a part of the past and a part of the present to visitors all at the same time Georgetown is, after all, a historic district where wholesale physical change is difficult to achieve—but things are often going on inside that speak to the modern and to the future, as well as individual style and taste. People flock to the Georgetown House Tour with expectations that they will see a portion of the lives and looks of the persons who occupy and own these houses, and that they will reflect the village of people who know how to live with style and grace. They also expect to see the living breath of his-

tory—the occasional antique piece of eye-popping furniture, paintings, gardens, the work of a fabulous interior decorator, the timeless touch of the history of the homes themselves. All of these elements come together in the annual spring Georgetown House Tour, sponsored by historic St. John’s Episcopal Church and benefitting many of its long-time charitable activities. Like many “festive” or “tour” events in the city, it has grown and branched out over the years, adding social occasions—the Patrons’ Party, for instance—and mini-events on the day of the tours like the hugely popular afternoon tea at St. John’s. And every year, there are people who gather together to lend their resources, talents, time and efforts to ensure the event’s success. There are volunteers, quasi-docents, ticket-takers, information providers and so on. There are corporate sponsors such as Washington Fine Properties, there are the folks who lend their name, time and effort as co-chairs, and the kind folks who open their homes. This year the co-chairs — Frank Randolph, a renowned interior designer and Stephanie Bothwell, who heads her own business called Urban and Landscape Design — combine with Frida Burling, long the soul and inspiration of the Georgetown

Left: Plaque on the home of Hugh Newell Jacobson’s home. Top: Stephanie Bothwell and Frank Babb Randolph. Photos by Philip Bermingham.

16 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.


COVER STORY

THE 2012

GEORGETOWN HOUSE TOUR AT A GLANCE:

House Tour, to bring together themes of history, interior and exterior designs. I.e., how we live in our homes and communities and share the best of those qualities with each other and the world. Randolph, known for his enchanting interior designs, is ideally suited for his role as co-chair: he is, without a doubt, one of the village’s most unabashed boosters, born and raised in Georgetown, a student at Western High before it became Duke Ellington School for the Arts. Bothwell is a relative newcomer to Georgetown, having lived here with her family for 12 years, but she brims with a passion for the community and ideas about achieving ideal and workable designs for urban living. Burling, has for years made sure that the tour would come off every year with an energy that surprises people to this day — by marketing, cajoling, persuading, charming, pushing and using her considerable contacts to make it happen. She became the face and voice of the tour, it’s most able, articulate promoter. In 2001, when Ben Bradlee and Sally Quinn hosted the tour’s patrons’ party, the Georgetowner newspaper arrived at their N Street home to take a cover photo. An editor asked Bradlee why he was involved, and the Washington Post executive editor roared back: “Because Frida told me to.” The combination of the three speaks the best of Georgetown, a sense of a community with historic offerings that presents a graceful face to the world and to itself, for that matter. “It goes without saying, “ Randolph says. “One of the key components is the fact that all of us, the residents of Georgetown, get to visit each other at one time or another. It’s a community thing that way.” Of course, Randolph combines the historic with designer know-how and appreciation as well as an articulate, busy knowledge of his favorite place. “I can think of only a few houses in Georgetown that I’ve not been in,” he says. “And, over the years, I’ve done the interior design for, I don’t know, 30 or 40 homes. Of course, that includes my own home.” It is on 34th Street near Dent Place and has a certain cache beyond his own ownership, which is no small thing either. “Henry Kissinger lived here for a few years,” he says. If you want cache, or just history chat, talk with Randolph. His father was a senator from West Virginia. Randolph was asked to redecorate the Vice President’s Residence when the Cheneys lived there. “I had a privileged upbringing, you could say, but not spoiled or extravagant,” he said. “I was and still am very appreciative of the opportunities.” The world comes to tour the nine Georgetown homes on Saturday, April 28. It used to spread over two days on a spring weekend but has since been held on Saturday only. “Georgetown presents one of the better illustrations of livable urban design. I’m not talking about showing off a collection of solar panels or being green. It’s about ease of movement, access and connection,” Bothwell said.

From the east side to the west side, from 28th Street to 35th Street and from N Street to Q Street, the Georgetown House Tour spreads its welcome mat over Washington’s most historic neighborhood, Saturday, April 28, from 11 a.m to 5 p.m. For the price of $40 ($45 after April 20), visitors and residents may walk through nine homes and the home’s grounds. It’s a chance to glimpse some history, to get some decorating and home improvement ideas and to feel the ease of city living. Who would open their doors to strangers? Try at least three architects, an artist, a designer, a real estate developer and agent, a financial manager, a high-tech manager, a college dean, a lawyer and another lawyer who happens to represent Georgetown as the Ward 2 councilmember. The following have opened their homes on behalf of the tour and deserve a big thank you from the community: Cherry and Peter Baumbusch; Kristin and John Cecchi; Pat Dixon; Michele and Jack Evans; Hugh Newell Jacobsen; Kristin and Greg Muhlner; Dale and Melissa Overmyer; Alice Hall and Peter Starr; Christian Zapatka. There is a tea at St. John’s Church parish hall (O and Potomac Street), from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, April 28, the day of the tour. The Patron’s Party is April 25 at Frida Burling’s house on 29th Street. For more information, visit GeorgetownHouseTour.com or call 202-338-1796.

Clockwise: Christian Zapatka’s home, Jack and Michelle Evans’ home and Kristin and Greg Muhlner’s home. Photos by Sonya Bernhardt. “The house tour shows people the history here, sure, but I think it also shows how you can manage change in interior ways, what you can do with old homes to make them more contemporary while keeping the history and beauty,” she said. “We have a remarkable variety in housing stock here — it’s not all mansions and big properties, although we have plenty of that here. It’s livable, manageable homes, some quite small. And the homes are very deceptive from the outside; they give off the historic feeling without revealing their depth or size.” Echoing that theme, Randolph said, “I absolutely love Georgetown. I have everything here I need. I can walk to the Safeway or Whole Foods and restaurants galore. We have the firemen at Dent Place nearby. It’s fluid, it changes and the people change. But it has tradition. It has history that’s permanent. And I think you can see that reflected on the tour. I’ve lived here most of

my life, and I wouldn’t live anywhere else.” Randolph, a Georgetowner par excellence, can tell you about the various schools—Hardy, Hyde, Western—and the people who have lived here. He knows lots of people and has a host of friends. “I live by myself,” he says. “I don’t even have a pet. I have a porcelain dog. He’s the perfect pet. You don’t have to walk or feed him, and he’s always there for you. But I share this place with my friends, this lovely village.” Frida Burling can tell you a little about life in Georgetown herself, too. At 96, she’s seen and done a lot in her community. In a phone conversation, she tells you she’s slowing down— then rattles off a series of activities, meetings with relatives, a church, another meeting Sunday afternoon—that indicates she still keeps a busy schedule. She is the tour chair emerita and is hosting the Patron’s Party April 25. She recalls how she first got involved in the house tour, which began during the Depression as a small thing. “My husband and I (the late Edward Burling, whom she still refers to as Eddie) used to go on weekends out to Middleburg, but that’s hunt country, and it’s not Georgetown. I got involved with St. John’s which is so much a center of all this with their many projects. Eventually, I got involved in the house tour, because that’s a way to support those charitable projects like the Georgetown Ministry.” No question about it, she propelled the house tour into its next incarnation to the point where it has become an institution, a must-do event and an integral part of the community’s traditions. She did it by example—her energy became legendary as she got older. She remembers asking best-selling author and biographer Kitty Kelley, a Georgetowner to the bone, to host the first patrons’ party in the late 1990s. The patron’s parties were a Burling innovation, and it enlarged the image of the tour, created a higher profile. “I think it’s one of the oldest house tours in the country,” she said. “I know it sets an example.” And, simply by being who she is, so does Frida Burling. ★

GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 17


IN COUNTRY

Newport, Rhode Island: A Fresh Sense of History

BY AR I POST

keswick, virginia 202.390.2323 www.castlehillcider.com events@castlehillcider.com

T

he city is known on the whole as a New England summer resort. It integrates the most desirable qualities of any leisure travel destination, with enough options and activities to accommodate any budget. While only a half-day’s drive or aerial puddle jump away from the Washington area, Newport, Rhode Island has a spirit all its own. Founded in 1638, it is enveloped in a rich and much-beloved history—and as our Georgetown House Tour approaches, it might be worth noting that Newport also has one of the highest concentrations of colonial homes in the nation. Also similar to Georgetown, Newport is very much a contemporary urban haven, proud of its history but residing in the cultural here-and-now. Not too crowded, not too hot, and as friendly as a summer evening is long, Newport, Rhode Island is just the ticket for a Washingtonian weekend getaway or an enriching weeklong stay. On top of the usual, year-round attractions the city has to offer, there is an array of summer events and activities on the horizon, far enough away to plan ahead but close enough to start getting excited.

Sailing and Boating

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18 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

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International Tennis Hall of Fame

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canoes and kayak rentals, to charters, excursions, harbor tours, and even sailing school for the adventurous, you can enjoy the rippling tide of Narragansett Bay in nearly any capacity. Kayaking and canoeing offer visitors the opportunity to pursue the waters, coastlines and hidden waterways of Newport intimately and at their own pace. Explore the islands and wildlife of Bluebell Cove, watch ospreys dive for fish along the Westport River, take in the waterfront homes of historic Bristol, or see the yachts of Newport Harbor. If you want to rent a boat or charter, the horizons open even further. Dozens of destinations are easy cruises in the Bay’s protected waters—only a couple of gallons of fuel if you’re motoring, and gentle breezes if you’re hoisting the main and fore. Want to be where all the urban action is? Stay in Newport Harbor. Itching for a day of fun boutiques? Sail west over to Wickford Village. Need some peace and quiet? Drop anchor for a day or two off Jamestown. Want to visit the America’s Cup Hall of Fame? Tie a bowline to the docks in Bristol Harbor.

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HISTORIC HOUSE IN PARIS

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IN COUNTRY major contributions to the game, Alen invented the standard tiebreaker system used in regulation tennis matches today). It was host to the first U.S. National Championships in 1881. In 1997, the complex and museum were restored to their original splendor with the completion of a five year, $7.5 million renovation and endowment project. The Museum’s galleries chronicle the rich history of tennis through interactive exhibits and videos, as One of Rhode Island’s many lighthouses well as showcasing popuernous hall, including a fairy tale dinner and a lar memorabilia from historic champions and the superstars of today. party featuring famed magician Harry Houdini. Rosecliff is now preserved through the Dramatically set in the original clubrooms of the Casino, the style, class and good nature of generosity of its last private owners, who gave this gentleman’s sport comes vibrantly to life at the house, its furnishings, and an endowment in 1971 to the Preservation Society of Newport the museum. County, who maintains many of the areas tourhistoric mansion properties. The house Rosecliff Mansion: the “Great Gatsby” friendly has something of a Hollywood resume, having House played the lavish home to Robert Redford’s Jay There are endless mansions and historic Gatsby in the 1974 film, as well as “True Lies,” home tours to take in your visit to Newport. Steven Spielberg’s “Amistad” and most recently A standout among them, however, is Rosecliff “27 Dresses” starring Katherine Heigl. Mansion. Commissioned by Nevada silver heirThe mansion is also a host to the annual ess Theresa Fair Oelrichs in 1899, architect Newport Mansions Food & Wine Festival, Stanford White modeled Rosecliff after the where guests can eat and drink like true 1920s Grand Trianon, the garden retreat at Versailles. flappers. For more information on that, keep After the house was completed in 1902, at a reading! ★ reported cost of $2.5 million, Mrs. Oelrichs continues on next page Georgetowner.04.01_Layout 1 3/29/12 2:25 PM Page 1 hosted extravagant parties in its grand and cav-

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Offers subject to errors, omissions, change of price or withdraw without notice. Information contained herein is deemed reliable, but is not so warranted nor is it otherwise guaranteed.

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Goodstone - Georget. Apr. 4th ad_Layout 1 3/26/12 4:01 PM Page 1

IN COUNTRY

Condé Nast Johansens Award Winner: “MOST EXCELLENT INN - 2011” / “MOST EXCELLENT INN - 2012” Finalist “MOST EXCELLENT ROMANTIC HIDEAWAY - 2012” Finalist

continued from previous page

UPCOMING FESTIVALS AND EVENTS IN NEWPORT The Great Chowder Cook-Off

June 2 On Saturday, June 2, the Great Chowder Cook-Off kicks off summer in New England. Be a part of the original, largest, and longest running chowder championship in America, and try a wide spread from national to regional competitors. Festival-goers will taste-test a myriad of traditional and exotic chowders from kitchens across the country, then vote for the best in three categories: clam, seafood and creative. For more information visit NewportWaterfrontEvents.com.

Newport Antiques Show

July 27 – 29 Celebrating its sixth year, the Newport Antiques Show has become a seminal event for antique lovers across the country. Over 40 of the industry’s finest dealers will showcase the best antiques the world has to offer to over 2,500 visitors at the Stephen P. Cabot and Archer Harman Ice Center at St. George’s School in Middletown. The show’s 2012 Loan Exhibit will highlight fine and decorative arts from the New Bedford Whaling Museum. The exhibit will include New Bedford art such as scrimshaw and Pairpoint Glass along with work from artists such as William Bradford. For more information visit NewportAntiquesShow.com.

OpenTable Diner’s Choice Award Winner: “TOP 100 BEST RESTAURANTS IN THE USA - 2011”

Newport Jazz Festival

Aug. 3 – 5 Founded in 1954, the Newport Jazz Festival was the first annual jazz festival in America. It has been host to numerous legendary performances and historic moments since its inception, including performances by Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, and a careerreviving performance by Duke Ellington in 1958. Referred to as the grandfather of all jazz festivals, the event draws thousands of people from all over the world. Highlight performances this year include Bill Frisell playing the John Lennon songbook, vocalist Diane Reeves, and legendary drummer Jack DeJohnette’s 70th birthday performance. For more information visit NewportJazzFest.net.

We thank our loyal patrons for another record-breaking year! Please join us for a special, new addition to our Mid-week Menu: Two-course and three-course lunch menus for $18 and $24 Three-course dinner menu for $39

Newport International Boat Show

Sept. 13 – 16 The 42nd Annual Newport International Boat Show will feature new sailboats and powerboats, and thousands of products and services from exhibitors worldwide, showcasing the latest innovations and trends in seafaring technology. Boating has never been more exciting; whether it’s an evening harbor cruise, a fun-filled day of fishing or an extended cruise on a yacht with all the luxuries you can imagine. Come discover the many new products, programs and opportunities on the oceanic

Call now for reservations for Goodstone’s Easter Dinner on April 8th.

WWW.GOODSTONE.COM 36205 SNAKE HILL ROAD, MIDDLEBURG, VA 20117

Please call 540.687.3333 to reserve your guest room or place at our table. GOODSTONE SPA Relax and rejuvenate with a massage or facial. Visit www.goodstone.com for a full spa menu.

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THE 91ST ANNUAL

SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 2012 Glenwood Park Racecourse Middleburg, Virginia Post Time 1:00 p.m. The Temple Gwathmey Handicap Sanctioned by The National Steeplechase Association

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Ticket Information (540) 687-6545 www.middleburgspringraces.com Photos by Tod Marks

20 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.


IN COUNTRY

In Country Calendar April 6

March 16- June 30

“Shooting Flying” in Literature and Art The National Sporting Library and Museum Exhibition at 102 The Plains Rd., Middleburg, Va. 20117, will be introducing visitors to the range of literature on shooting wild fowl that exists in the Library’s collection. The books on display range from the 18th century through the 21st century, with emphasis on the 20th century American sporting print. The 19th century ephemera provides an opportunity to view early shotguns and decoys. The exhibition takes its name from Pteryplegia: or, The Art of Shooting-Flying, A poem, by Mr. Markland, A.B., fellow of St. John’s College in Oxford, published in 1717. The book, of which the National Sporting Library and Museum has a third edition (1767), is one of the earliest works in English to give instructions on how to shoot flying birds with a gun. (540) 6876542, jsheehan@nsl.org

The Virginia Wine and Cigar Trail Virginia is the home of the American tobacco industry and the new home of one of the most desirable wine travel destinations in the U.S. Relax and indulge in both treats at the Unicorn Winery (489 Old Bridge Rd., Amissville, Va. 20106) on Saturday from 5 to 10 p.m. Ron Barker of CigarVolante, sponsor of The Virginia Wine and Cigar Trail, will share Panacea Pairings, cigars perfectly matched to the wines of Unicorn Valley. E-mail rwbarker@vawineandcigar.com

saved buildings in the county and why historic preservation is important, especially for the environment. Visitors will also have an opportunity to go inside the jail which is currently under construction. The program is sponsored by the Prince William Historic Preservation Foundation. Tickets are $15 per person. Call (703) 365- 7895 or visit PwcGov.org/brentsville

the Pavilion. Bring the family for the spring festivities or just come to experience CLS and The Farm (which already has redbuds, dogwoods, geraniums, tri-colored ginger, early summer annuals, hanging baskets, and recently hatched baby chicks!). RSVP by April 16 to Kelly at khendershot@communitylandscape.com (include name and number of guests attending).

April 14

Bogati Bodega & Winery Looking for a perfect girl’s getaway? Ditch the men and gather your friends for a fun, relaxing, music-filled and fortune telling evening including wine tastings with local experts and gourmet cupcake treats to devour. 35426 Harry Byrd Highway, Round Hill, Va. 20142. Reservations required, BogatiBodega.com, $30.

April 14- 15

Historic Preservation Talk/ Hard Hat Tour of the Jail The Brentsville Courthouse Historic Center at 12229 Bristow Rd. in Bristow, Va. 20136 will introduce participants to the ideas of historic preservation. Local experts will explore what makes a building worth saving, examples of

April 21- 28 April 21

Spring Fling at The Farm at Broad Run Community Landscape Services and The Farm at Broad Run (16015 John Marshall Highway, Broad Run, Va. 20137) are hosting their annual “Spring Fling” event. Join us for a day of fun activities, good food and spring weather! Activities to include spring arts and crafts, farm tours, a moon bounce and much, much more! Food and beverage will be provided at

Historic Virginia Garden Week Visitors are welcome to view over 250 Virginia gardens, homes and historic landmarks during “America’s Largest Open House.” The week will provide a unique opportunity to see unforgettable gardens at the peak of Virginia’s springtime color, as well as immaculate homes dazzling with style in over 30 towns. Tour prices range by location from $15 to $40 per tour. A statewide pass for $175 is also available. Visit VaGardenWeek.org for more information. In the Capital Region

In the Virginia Countryside

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302 acres of paradise, close to town. Perfect mix of flat open land, woodland and Beaverdam Creek frontage as well. West views of the Blue Ridge. Incredible dairy barn ready for stalls, 3 tenant houses, multiple building sites for your dream home. Not in Conservation easement. $4,900,000. Kevin Keane 540-687-2221

Long views, a bold stream, ancient trees and verdant pastures on 100 glorious acres. Perfect country estate, family retreat, private polo/riding club or vineyard. 11000+ SF with grand rooms and every amenity. Guest cottage, pool, extensive gardens. $2,995,000. Cindy Polk 703-966-9480 David O’Flaherty 540-687-0383

Meticulously maintained & updated historic home (ca. 1750) with beautiful gardens. 5 BR house with spacious wellappointed rooms. Scenic setting on 32 acres with rolling pastures, mountain and pond views. Pool, barn, & apartment. Convenient to I-66 & easy commute to DC. $2,500,000. Gloria Armfield 540-687-2223

Atoka Road location! Just south of Middleburg. Style. Elegance. Apprx 6000 SF, 4BR, 4FP, great room with 11’ ceilings. Extensive stone terraces. Beautiful gardens, pool & cabana. Professionally landscaped. Pond with dock. Barn. All in mint condition. 39.4 ac. Priced below appraisal. $2,339,000. Ruth Ripley 540-687-2222

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A fine country home with FP in chef's kitchen, main floor master suite that opens to a courtyard and exquisite pastoral views. Office cottage, artist’s studio and 4 stall shed row barn on 56 fenced acres – 30 minutes to Dulles, an hour to DC. $1,975,000. Gloria Rose Ott 540-454-4394 Linda Norris 540-270-7560

Amazing views of Old Rag Mtn., Shenandoah Nat’l Park and the F.T. Valley from this charming 4 BR log cabin on 242 ac in Madison Co. Trout pond, larger pond, workshops, equipment barn with stall, run-in. Hunter's paradise with Bear, Deer and Turkey. A rare find in an area rich in natural beauty. $1,950,000. Anita Sisney 703-973-1987

The consummate Middleburg retreat with sophisticated country style, open floor plan, light filled rooms & porte cochere entry. Little River glides through with views from the Great Room, all surrounded by a canopy of trees and fabulously huge swimming pool with stone deck all on 7 acres. $1,649,000. Gloria Rose Ott 540-454-4394

Located in a quaint charming village, this lovely historic house (c. 1833) is in a superb setting with a large back lawn and garden with pretty plantings. 2 kitchens, solarium/sunroom with brick floor. Separate second house. Needs TLC, priced below assessed value. To be sold "AS IS." $455,000. Ruth Ripley 540-687-2222

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GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 21


PERFORMANCE

Kahn Tackles O’Neill’s Daunting ‘Strange Interlude’ BY GA RY T IS CHL ER

I

n theater, as in other endeavors, there are Interlude” is a play, he said, “I’ve always plays and roles that sit like slumbering wanted to do, and for a time I thought I would challenges, just daring artists to tackle never get the opportunity.” He had come close once, but the project them. For actors, it’s Lear and the layer-upon- collapsed for various reasons. “But when this layer Hamlet, or Willie Lohman, or Maggie the anniversary came up, I thought it was a perfect cat or Blanche. And what opera director doesn’t opportunity to tackle the play,” he said. When you start thinking about this, you dream some nights of the Ring Cycle, tossing have to admire Kahn for thinking about it at all. and turning in a sweat. For directors, especially American directors His legacy in Washington and his whole career worth their salt, all they have to do is go to the is secure; he would be forgiven for resting on collected works of Eugene O’Neill. O’Neill his laurels. “Strange Interlude” is something wrote all sorts of plays, one-acts, surrealist fare, of a risk today, maybe even more than when it auto-biographical epics and four-hour sojourns opened. It’s a legend of size and scope—variwaiting for the iceman to cometh. The O’Neill ous stories have the original production running as long as four to six hours with an intermission canon is an ocean full of white whales. And none may be more elusive than break for dinner. Plus, O’Neill wrote some of “Strange Interlude,” a major hit in its day when the dialogue in a stream of consciousness style it finally opened in 1928 after years of labor in which the characters express their inner by O’Neill, controversial for its content and its thoughts. “Well, this production is more like three and style. It was hugely ambitious in trying to tell a story spanning decades of American life — a half or so.” Kahn said. “I don’t think today’s forward and backward, past, present and future. audiences will have trouble relating to it or For Michael Kahn, in the midst of a 25th the characters. It’s about something everybody anniversary season as the artistic director of has a stake in: the pursuit of happiness and the great difficulty and tragedy that the Washington Shakespeare Theatre, “Strange 120302 SI Craftshow Ad GTown DnTown qrtr page:Layout 1 4/2/12 2:14 PM Page 2 surrounds that

30th Anniversary

Smithsonian Craft Show April 19 - 22 Preview Night Benefit April 18 National Building Museum Washington, DC

Produced by the Smithsonian Women’s Committee to support education, outreach and research at the Smithsonian Institution

www.SmithsonianCraftShow.org CHANDRA PLATTER BY JOSH SIMPSON

22 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

pursuit.” While Kahn is also considered one of the consummate interpreters of the plays of Tennessee Williams, he’s no stranger to O’Neill. “He is the major figure in American theater,” Kahn said, “the father of American theater, with a huge and diverse body of work, a pioneer, a great writer whose work contained some of the finest work not only in theater but in American literature. I learned about him by reading. We had a lot of books in our house when I was young, and I ran across his first play, ‘Dynamo.’” “Ah, Wilderness!” and “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” both at Arena, and “Strange Interlude” are part of a unique and ongoing O’Neill festival in Washington right now. Kahn remembers seeing Frederic March playing the father in “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” a production he calls “remarkable.” Kahn—in a stellar career that included a vivid production of “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” on Broadway—directed O’Neill’s “Mourning Becomes Electra” twice. He got permission to edit “Electra” (as well as “Interlude”). Still, the idea of “Interlude” is daunting. In the 1920s, the play was shocking for its Freudian content, for a plot that included abortion, sex and an intelligent, strong woman dealing with the lasting wounds suffered after her fiancée is killed in World War I without the opportunity for consummation of their love. “The pursuit of happiness,” Kahn said, “that’s the American dream, that’s what we’re about as a country. There’s no society that places such a stress on the theme of happiness.” Francesca Faridany will perform the role of

STC Artistic Director Michael Kahn. Photo by Henry Linser.

Nina in this production. “Strange Interlude” is rarely performed, but that may be part of its appeal to audiences and certainly for Kahn, who presented the rarely performed “Camino Real,” by Tennessee Williams and the equally rarely staged “Timon of Athens.” Kahn is excited about “Strange Interlude” and thinks audiences will be, too. “It is one of the great works by our greatest playwright. It has a compelling story that resonates for today’s audiences. It’s about America and us, and we can see ourselves in those creations. It’s a great achievement on the part of O’Neill—the play spans 30 years and was written in the 1920s. So, he had to imagine what this country would be like in the ‘30s and ‘40s, and I think he did a good job of it.” Listening to Kahn talk about the play, you feel he relished the work, like opening up a lost, true book and bringing it to life. ★ “Strange Interlude” will be at the Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Sidney Harman Hall through April 29.


ART WRAP

BY AR I P OS T

N

Canal Square and Beyond

estled in a brick courtyard at M and 31st Streets, walking into Canal Square on the

20 year anniversaries. Just north of Canal Square, The Old Print Gallery and the Ralls Collection

evening of a First Friday feels like stumbling into the best social club you never knew

have also made their mark on the city’s artistic community (the Ralls Collection even used to re-

existed. The four galleries clustered in the space are teeming with admirers, friends,

side in Canal Square). Among the most longstanding and respected galleries in the city, this clus-

patrons and chance roamers, peering about the galleries or lounging in the benches just outside,

ter of art venues embodies what’s best about Georgetown: history, community, style and beauty

smiling and chatting. And what’s more—they’re chatting about art! These galleries are local in-

with an eye for the contemporary. ★

stitutions—Parish Gallery, Moca DC and Alla Rogers Gallery have all recently celebrated their

Parish Gallery

Moca DC

Gallery director David Quammen in the studio

Moca DC stands up for the little guy, in more ways than one. A nonprofit, part of the gallery’s mission is to be “Open to all artists all the time,” offering opportunities to artists at every stage of their careers. Moca gives more exhibits to emerging, first-time and beginning artists than almost any in the city. The gallery is also devoted to the tradition of figurative art, including three annual exhibits dedicated to the nude human form (this July, keep an eye out for the exhibit, “A Celebration of the Figure”). This April, the gallery will mark its twenty-year anniversary by expanding its scope to include three juried exhibits of figurative works a year, the first of which will focus on the interpretation of the figure within contemporary art practice. Moca’s 20th Anniversary Show, which will hold an opening reception on April 6, is also on display. www.MocaDC.org

Alla Rogers Gallery

The Old Print Gallery

The Alla Rogers Gallery, founded in 1990, focuses on accessible contemporary art from Eastern Europe and the countries of the former Soviet Union. The Gallery has curated hundreds of exhibitions and led artist exchanges between American and Eastern European artists. Currently on display is the artwork of Alla Rogers herself, who recently exhibited 42 of her own paintings in Kiev at the National Fine Art Museum of Ukraine. Her works on canvas play out like the geography of memories, folding and falling into one another. These are not works you want to miss.

“Blossom DC,” the latest exhibit at The Old Print Gallery, is inspired by the 100 year anniversary of the gift of the cherry blossoms from Japan to Washington. The exhibit celebrates the beauty and youthful energy of spring’s blossoms, featuring a large number of prints by local D.C. artists coupled with a selection of works by contemporary New York City artists and several early 20th century printmakers. Established in 1971, The Old Print Gallery has long been known for its wide selection of antique prints and maps, and has expanded recently into the world of contemporary printmaking. The gallery also hosts printmaking workshops and demonstrations, establishing itself as a source of inspiration and information for print artists, enthusiasts and new admirers alike. www.OldPrintGallery.com

The Ralls Collection The Ralls Collection is in the midst of a powerful group exhibition of gallery artists, which runs through June 15. It is difficult to encapsulate the significance of The Ralls Collection to Washington’s artistic community, much in the same way it is hard to grasp the broad archive of substantial artwork that has passed through the gallery since its opening over 20 years ago. The work present in the gallery’s current exhibit showcases a remarkable collection of beautiful contemporary artwork with a clear vision and impeccable taste. Many of the artists Ralls chose for the exhibition have been with the gallery since it’s beginning, and some are welcome additions. David Richardson, a personal favorite of this author whose show at Ralls last year garnered tremendous national attention (including a feature in the New York Times), uses planes of bold colors and textures, recalling landscape both foreign and familiar, contained yet effusive. www.RallsCollection.com.

Internationally recognized African painter, Bethel Aniaku, will be at Parish Gallery through April 17 in an exhibit titled “Instinct of Desire.” The culture explored in these paintings includes a blend of historical, literal, and artistic elements, which aim to reunite the viewer with their own culture and origins. Aniaku, by comparison, honors the trade of his own carpenter ancestors by using wood as the base for his paintings. His compositions play with color, light, space and mixed media, relying on instinct more than any direct intention, as if the painting was not being made but found as an artifact that has always existed. April 20, Parish Gallery will open its next exhibit showcasing the artworks of husband and wife Christine and Richmond Jones in a show titled “Two Views/One Vision.” Starting out as an illustrator and designer, Christine’s oil paint and pastel works represent the textures and colors, people and places in which she finds inspiration. Richmond, who also began his career as a graphic designer, found a new creative direction as a “transparent watercolor painter.” Since then, both artists have been exhibited in numerous juried exhibitions around the country and received many awards for their individual and collective work. www.ParishGallery.com

‘Inspiring!’ — Deepak Chopra ‘Great example of contemporary Irish art.’ — H.E. Collins, Irish Ambassador to U.S. ‘Clarity...realize the oneness.’ — Washington Post For apt with the artist call 347 549 0551 OPEN Mon-Sat, 11am-6pm & Thurs 7pm LaLunaGalleryDC.com | ArtistoftheLight.com

GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 23


CLASSIFIEDS / SERVICE DIRECTORY JOB OPPORTUNITIES

To join other satisfied customers and place an ad in the classified or service directory email jen@georgetowner.com or call 202.338.4833

FOR HIRE ARE YOU A NEW MOM? Do you need some relief?

Georgetown Media Group is the publisher of The Georgetowner and The Downtowner. We are a bi-weekly tabloid boasting a circulation of 50,000 in D.C. , Northern Virginia and Maryland. The following are opportunities that suit a career minded individual who is seeking exposure to the world of print publication.

MEDIA SALES GMG seeks an experienced sales professional to sell B2B print, web and social advertising. A qualified candidate has experience generating revenue, meeting deadlines and building partnerships with clients to bring the highest quality of service that we’re known for. Work from home with regularly scheduled staff meetings and office support; ideal for stay-at-home people or retirees. Send resume, three references and cover letter outlining why you fit the bill. E-mail Info@Georgetowner.com or call (202) 338-4833.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Part time: Graphic designer will assist head designer in layout of both publications, photo editing and correction, design ads for current and potential advertisers, upload and edit editorial web content. Requirements include: knowledge of Adobe CS5 (Indesign and Photoshop), availability on Deadline days (every other Mon. & Tues.) a must! Comfortable working in a high energy, deadline oriented environment

Experienced British nanny available to help you with your newborn. Long or short term daytime only excellent references provide. pandrewsdc@gmail.com

CLEANING SERVICE Twentieth Anniversary European Style family owned and operated. Specializing in cleaning your prized antiques and your private residence. Best rates. Excellent referances and insurance. Call for free estimate. 703-869-5629

FOR SALE CUBAN SILKSCREEN MOVIE POSTER SALE!

100+ stunning silk-screens, plus scarce propaganda posters. Fabulous graphics, unusual gifts. $49-$129 For private showing: 202-725-0406, CubanPosterGallery@msn.com Open houses: 10-6 Saturday March 10, April 28, June 23319 “O” Street NW

HOME IMPROVEMENT DC MOULDINGS.

Submit resume and cover letter to jen@georgetowner.com

Interior trim. Crown, casings, pilasters, Built ins, bookshelves, and fireplace mantels. 202-269-3517

COPY EDITOR

MUSIC

For our printed and online publications. Excellent knowledge of AP style is a must, ability to clean up complicated copy, and let the writers voice still be heard. A minimum of two years of copy editing experience is preferred. A background on the DC area and its social scene is a plus. Please send resume to Jen@georgetowner.com

LUCAS CUSTOM TAILOR

PATIENT PIANO TEACHER Happy to help you have fun beginning or advancing your playing. I enjoy making music with both children and adults. Off street parking at my NW teaching studio. 202-234-1837

PET CARE PET CARE

DRIVERS CDL-A: Your current 10-20 have you down? Why not Get Home, Get Paid, 2012 tractors/trailers to boot? 888-219-8040

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BODY & SOUL

BETWEEN THE SHEETS: His Time Alone BY DR . DORREE LYNN

O

ne of the questions most frequently asked by women is, “Why does my boyfriend/husband still masturbate when we have such a good sex life?” Most men, especially younger testosterone-ridden men, find adding masturbation to what may be an otherwise satisfying sex life to be perfectly normal. It’s relatively easy, involves little fuss or muss, and satisfies an immediate urge. It’s only an issue of concern if that’s all he does in the relationship and avoids connecting to you physically. But if the sex is still good, no harm no foul, right? Masturbation is a natural way for men (and women) to learn about their bodies. Often, and to the shock of parents, male babies frequently find their penises infinitely fascinating. As boys mature and their hormones remain raunchy, whether or not they are in a relationship most men simply find masturbation fun. When you’re in a relationship, it can be easy for a woman to feel neglected or inadequate to learn that her male partner is flying solo behind her back. However, as long as you, as a couple, are on the same wavelength and can communicate your feelings, you are probably going to be okay. Many couples bring mutual masturbation into the bedroom as an extra way of having fun and being intimate. Try it! Self-pleasure for both men and women is

also a way of teaching one’s self about what you enjoy. The more a person understands what turns them on, the easier it is to show your partner what thrills and chills you or what smoothes and soothes you. Most people make love the way they want to be made love to. Unless their

partner tells them or shows them what they prefer, it’s akin to two engines full of steam who may miss being on the same track. Healthy masturbat ion — self-pleasure inclusive of a sexual relationship with your partner, not totally lacking mutual connection—can actually be beneficial. It causes your heart to race, increases the flow of blood throughout the body, releases endorphins in the brain, and flushes toxins from the body. Furthermore, some research has revealed that people who masturbate tend to have more frequent and more satisfying sex! Ladies, if you’re away for a while, do you really want your guy to be celibate, become a porn addict or seek release elsewhere? Relax, some single-handed sex is just fine, just ask

him to wash his own shirts, towels, socks, etc., as you may not want to be his hand maiden in this area. Remember when we used to joke about “blue balls”? Jokes aside, they do exist. The scrotum will actually turn a shade of blue when the blood flows into the penis and surrounding areas without the opportunity to flow out via orgasm. It leaves men with the need to “drain their veins,” and any guy will tell you that it can be a painful experience. So, guys learn an easy way to avoid pain. If it doesn’t prevent him from having sex with you, then is there really a problem? For the most part, it’s safe to assume that most men masturbate (religious prohibition and sense of shame aside). What we, as women, need to come to terms with is that just because your man masturbates, if you are having great and frequent sex, it doesn’t mean that he isn’t interested in you or that you’re not interested in fulfilling your sexual desires. I’ve never heard a man say, “Sorry, sweetie, I’ve already had sex with myself four times today, I’m beat!” But why does your man masturbate? He’s known his penis longer than you. It’s familiar, comfortable, stress relieving, and it just plain feels good. ★ Dr. Dorree Lynn, PhD, is a psychologist and life coach in Georgetown and author of ‘Sex for Grownups.’ www.DrDorreeLynn.com.

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Your Dining Guide to Washington DC’s Finest

1789 RESTAURANT

1226 36th St, NW With the ambiance of an elegant country inn, 1789 features classically based American cuisine – the finest regional game, fish and produce available. Open seven nights a week. Jackets suggested. Complimentary valet parking. www.1789restaurant.com

BANGKOK JOE’S

3000 K St NW (One block from Georgetown Lowe’s theatres) Georgetown introduces Washington’s first “Dumpling Bar” featuring more than 12 varieties. Come and enjoy the new exotic Thai cuisine inspired by French cooking techniques. Bangkok Joe’s is upscale, colorful and refined. Absolutely the perfect place for lunch or dinner or just a private gathering. www.bangkokjoes.com

(202) 965-1789

CHADWICKS

(202) 333-4422

CIRCLE BISTRO

BISTRO FRANCAIS

3124-28 M St NW A friendly French Bistro in the heart of historic Georgetown since 1975. Executive chef and owner Gerard Cabrol came to Washington, D.C. 32 years ago, bringing with him home recipes from southwestern France. Our specialties include our famous Poulet Bistro (tarragon rotisserie chicken); Minute steak Maitre d’Hotel (steak and pomme frit¬es); Steak Tartare, freshly pre¬pared seafood, veal, lamb and duck dishes; and the best Eggs Benedict in town. In addition to varying daily specials. www.bistrofrancaisdc.com

BISTROT LEPIC & WINE BAR

1736 Wisconsin Ave., NW Come and see for yourself why Bistrot Lepic, with its classical, regional and contemporary cuisine, has been voted best bistro in D.C. by the Zagat Guide. And now with its Wine bar, you can enjoy “appeteasers”, full bar service, complimentary wine tasting every Tuesday and a new Private Room. The regular menu is always available. Open everyday. Lunch & dinner. Reservations suggested. www.bistrotlepic.com

(202) 338-3830

(202) 333-0111

CITRONELLE

CLYDE’S OF GEORGETOWN

3205 K St, NW (est.1967) A Georgetown tradition for over 40 years, this friendly neighborhood restaurant/ saloon features fresh seafood, burgers, award-winning ribs, & specialty salads & sandwiches. Daily lunch & dinner specials. Late night dining (until midnight Sun.-Thu., 1A.M. Fri-Sat) Champagne brunch served Sat. & Sun. until 4P.M. Open Mon-Thu 11:30A.M.-2A.M. Fri-Sat 11:30A.M.-3A.M.Sun 11A.M.-2A.M.Kids’ Menu Available. Overlooking the new Georgetown Waterfront Park ChadwicksRestaurants.com

Featuring Happy Hour weekdays from 5pm-7pm, live music every Saturday from 8pm12midnight, and an a la carte Sunday Brunch from 11:30am-2:30pm.

(202) 333-2565

(202) 293-5390

(202) 625-2150

(202) 333-9180

DEGREES BISTRO

DON LOBOS MEXICAN GRILL

FILOMENA RISTORANTE

2311 Wisconsin Avenue, NW

The Ritz-Carlton Georgetown, Washington, D.C. 3100 South Street, NW, Degrees Bistro features a traditional French bistro menu with an innovative cocktail and wine list. The restaurant design complements the industrial chic style of The Ritz-Carlton, Georgetown, and welcomes diners to unwind in the simple, modern comfort of a neighborhood eatery while enjoying a savory lunch or dinner at the hip bar or in one of the stylish banquettes. www.ritzcarlton.com/ georgetown

26 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

(202) 912-4110

One Washington Circle, NW Washington, DC 22037 Circle Bistro presents artful favorites that reflect our adventurous and sophisticated kitchen.

Open dailyfor breakfast, lunch and dinner.

(The Latham Hotel) 3000 M St, NW Internationally renowned chef and restaurateur Michel Richard creates magic with fresh and innovative American-French Cuisine, an exceptional wine list and stylish ambiance. Open for Dinner. Valet parking. www.citronelledc.com

3236 M St, NW This animated tavern, in the heart of Georgetown, popularized saloon food and practically invented Sunday brunch. Clyde’s is the People’s Choice for bacon cheeseburgers, steaks, fresh seafood, grilled chicken salads, fresh pastas and desserts. www.clydes.com

CAFE BONAPARTE

1522 Wisconsin Ave Captivating customers since 2003 Café Bonaparte has been dubbed the “quintessential” European café featuring award winning crepes & arguably the “best” coffee in D.C! Other can’t miss attributes are; the famous weekend brunch every Sat and Sun until 3pm, our late night weekend hours serving sweet & savory crepes until 1 am Fri-Sat evenings & the alluring sounds of the Syssi & Marc jazz duo every other Wed. at 7:30. We look forward to calling you a “regular” soon! www.cafebonaparte.com (202) 333-8830

DAILY GRILL

1310 Wisconsin Ave., NW Reminiscent of the classic American Grills, Daily Grill is best known for its large portions of fresh seasonal fare including Steaks & Chops, Cobb Salad, Meatloaf and Warm Berry Cobbler. Open for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner.Visit our other locations at 18th & M Sts NW and Tysons Corner. www.dailygrill.com

www.circlebistro.com

2811 M Street NW Serving Washington since 1992, Don Lobos offers authentic Mexican cuisine. We use only the finest and freshest ingredients when making our traditional menu items. Famous for our Mole, and adored for our tamales. We also offer a wide range of tequila and the best margarita in Georgetown. Now serving Brunch Saturday and Sunday from 10-2. Hours: Mon-Thu 11am-10pm Fri-Sat 11am-11pm Sun 10am- 10pm (202) 333-0137

1063 Wisconsin Ave., NW Filomena is a Georgetown landmark that has endured the test of time for almost a quarter of a century. Our old-world cooking styles & recipes brought to America by the early Italian immigrants, alongside the culinary cutting edge creations of Italy’s foods of today, executed by our award winning Italian Chef. Try our spectacular Lunch buffet on Fri. & Saturdays or our Sunday Brunch, Open 7 days a week for lunch & dinner. www.filomena.com (202) 338-8800

GOOD GUYS

Fine Dining & Exotic Entertainment in Glover Park since 1966. Monday-Thursday 11am-2am Friday-Saturday 11am-3am Sunday 4pm-2am The kitchen is always open!

A GENTLEMAN’S CLUB ONLY 21 AND OVER, PLEASE www.goodguysclub.com (202) 333-8128

(202) 337-4900

MAI THAI

3251 Prospect St. NW Authentic Thai food in the heart of Georgetown. The warm atmosphere, attentive service, and variety of wines and cocktails in this contemporary establishment only add to the rich culture and authentic cuisine inspired by Thailand. With an array of authentic dishes, from Lahb Gai (spicy chicken salad) and Pad Thai, to contemporary dishes like Panang soft shell crab and papaya salad, the dynamic menu and spectacular drinks will have you coming back time and time again. HAPPY HOUR 3:30 - 6PM www.maithai.com (202) 337-1010


FOOD & WINE

Cocktail of the Week

Once the ‘It’ Cocktail

1054 31st St, NW Lovers of seafood can always find something to tempt the palette at the Sea Catch Restaurant & Raw Bar. Sea Catch offers fresh seafood “simply prepared” in a relaxed atmosphere. Overlooking the historic C&O Canal, we offer seasonal fireside and outdoor dining. Private party space available for 15 - 300 Complimentary parking Lunch Mon. -Sat. 11:30am -3pm Dinner Mon.-Sat. 5:30pm -10pm Closed on Sunday Happy Hour Specials at the Bar Mon. - Fri. 5 -7pm www.seacatchrestaurant.com (202) 337-8855

n ta oli op

(202) 625-2740

SEA CATCH

m os

3251 Prospect St. NW Established in 1991, Peacock Cafe is a tradition in Georgetown life. The tremendous popularity of The Peacock Happy Day Brunch in Washington DC is legendary. The breakfast and brunch selections offer wonderful variety and there is a new selection of fresh, spectacular desserts everyday. The Peacock Café in Georgetown, DC - a fabulous menu for the entire family. Monday - Thursday: 11:30am - 10:30pm Friday: 11:30am - 12:00am Saturday: 9:00am - 12:00am Sunday: 9:00am - 10:30pm

eC Th

PEACOCK CAFE

BY JOD Y KU R ASH

SEQUOIA

3000 K St NW, Suite 100 Washington, DC 20007 Eclectic American cuisine, Coupled with enchanting views of the Potomac River make Sequoia a one of a kind dining experience. Offering a dynamic atmosphere featuring a mesquite wood fire grill, sensational drinks, and renowned River Bar. No matter the occasion, Sequoia will provide an unforgettable dining experience. www.arkrestaurants.com /sequoia_dc.html

SHANGHAI LOUNGE

1734 Wisconsin Ave. Shanghai Lounge’s is offering Lily’s family style traditional Chinese dining along with some very unique cocktails and a wide variety of beers and wines. It captures the flavors of Asia and we have created an exotic atmosphere, a place where you can unwind, have an exquisite meal, enjoy a drink and to share the experience.

Tuesday -Thursday 11am - 11pm Saturdays 11:30am - 11pm Sundays 12 Noon - 9:30pm Monday Closed Happy Hour: T-F 3:30pm - 7pm

www.shanghailoungedc.com (202) 944-4200

THE OCEANAIRE

1201 F St, NW Ranked one of the most popular seafood restaurants in , DC, “this cosmopolitan”send-up of a vintage supper club that’s styled after a ‘40’s-era ocean liner is appointed with cherry wood and red leather booths, infused with a “clubby, old money” atmosphere. The menu showcases “intelligently” prepared fish dishes that “recall an earlier time of elegant” dining. What’s more, “nothing” is snobbish here. Lunch: Mon-Fri- 11:30am-5pm Dinner: Mon-Thur 5-10pm. Fri & Sat 5-11pm. Sun-5-9pm. www.theoceanaire.com

(202) 338-1588

To advertise, call 202-338-4833 or email advertising@ georgetowner. com

M

aybe it’s the appealing pink color, the pleasing tart flavor or the swanky glassware. Perhaps it was the four liberated and stylish ladies of New York who adored them. But for one reason or another, the Cosmopolitan -- or Cosmo, for short -- was the “It” cocktail of the late 1990s and first half of the 2000s. This tipple hit its zenith of fame when it became the favorite drink of Carrie Bradshaw on HBO’s “Sex and the City.” But believe or not, the Cosmo pre-dates the prime time television show by years. It was also another trend-setting celebrity that lent her hand at influencing this drink’s destiny before Sarah Jessica Parker started to imbibe on this vodka, cranberry and citrus concoction. The Museum of the American Cocktail recently hosted a seminar on popular vodka drinks, which included the history behind the Cosmopolitan. Phil Greene, founding member of the museum and author of “To Have and Have Another : A Hemingway Cocktail Companion,” hosted the event, which was held at the Warehouse theater inside the Passenger bar. Several recipes for cocktails similar to Cosmopolitan have been uncovered. One recipe for a drink named “Cosmopolitan” that Greene dug up dates back to 1934, from the book “Pioneers of Mixing Gin at Elite Bar 1903-1933.” While this early recipe uses gin instead of vodka, its remaining ingredients are comparable to today’s version. Using gin in a cocktail during that time was commonplace. Vodka did not start to get a stronghold in the American drink scene until the 1950s. Another similar recipe from the Ocean Spray Cranberry Growers from the 1960s, was unearthed by Dale “King Cocktail” DeGroff which calls for one ounce of vodka, one ounce of cranberry and a squeeze of lime. The invention of the modern-day Cosmo is generally credited to bartender Cheryl Cook in Miami’s South Beach. According to Greene, “In the mid-1980s the martini was making a comeback, and many customers were ordering them, seemingly just to be seen holding the iconic martini glass. However, for many, including women, martinis were a bit too strong and powerful. So she came up with the idea to create a drink that was visually stunning and uses the martini glass. Using a new product called Absolut Citron, a splash of triple sec, a few dashes of Rose’s Lime and some cranberry juice to turn it pink, the Cosmopolitan was born.” The Cosmo further evolved when cocktail heavy-

DALE DEGROFF’S COSMOPOLITAN 1.5 oz. Absolut Citron Vodka .5 oz. Cointreau .25 oz. Fresh Lime Juice 1 oz. Cranberry Juice Shake all ingredients with ice. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a flamed orange peel. The Museum of the American Cocktail will be sponsoring evening of stories, cocktails and songs led by Dale DeGroff on Thursday, April 12. For more information, visit www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org.

weight DeGroff sampled it at the Fog City Diner in San Francisco. DeGroff decided he could improve upon this formula and created his own version for the Rainbow Room in New York. According to Greene, he used Absolut Citron, Cointreau, cranberry juice and fresh lime juice, along with a flamed orange peel garnish. It was at the Rainbow Room where the Cosmo’s superstardom began. Its prominence skyrocketed when Madonna was pictured sipping one at the Rainbow Room Grammy party, when the award show was held next-door at Radio City Music Hall. Next came “Sex and the City,” which cemented the Cosmopolitan’s place in drink history. Soon, Cosmos were on cocktail menus across the nation along with various drinks with names ending in “ini” and served in the cone-shape big martini glasses. While the Cosmo’s place in the sun has faded somewhat, it has earned a spot on the list of classic cocktails. Even our favorite New York girl seems to have cooled on her Cosmopolitan. In the film version of Sex and City, Miranda asks why the girls stopped drinking Cosmos. Carrie replies, “Because everyone else started.” ★

(202) 347-2277 GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 27


FOOD & WINE

The

Latest Dish BY LINDA ROT H CON T E

S

hopHouse Southeast Asian Kitchen is slated to open in the Georgetown space formerly occupied by Furin’s at 2805 M St., NW. It will be the second location (Dupont Circle was first) from Steve Ells, who also brought us Chipotle. Always secretive, this store will open sometime in 2012. It’s a two-fer: Mike Isabella plans to open Kapnos, a Greek restaurant and G, an Italian operation, both in a big space at 2201 14th St., NW. Kapnos is Greek for “smoke” (think whole, spit-roasted animals) and G is little sister to Graffiato. Both are slated to open sometime next year. Owners Au Dang and brother Di, along with Michael Jones, a former J Paul’s manager, plan to open Chasin’ Tails, a silverware-optional crab shack open in Falls Church where Bear Rock Café used to be. Cajun seafood and traditional seafood will be offered, along with drinks and entertainment. Their plan is to be open by the beginning of April. Nando’s Peri-Peri loves the D.C. market and has targeted more locations: Pentagon Row to open in the beginning of June; King Street in Old Town, Alexandria and Waugh Chapel area of Anne Arundel County by the end of 2012. They currently have locations in Penn Quarter, Gaithersburg, Bethesda Row, Silver Spring and

Mike Isabella is opening two restaurants

National Harbor. Eastern Market is looking forward to a new restaurant from some familiar D.C. restaurant talent. Former Komi cook and pastry chef Johnny Spero, Toki Underground chef Erik Bruner-Yang and Acqua al 2 chef Ari Gejdenson are the owners of Suna. Johnny takes the lead in the kitchen. Suna’s menu will be based on sustainability, supporting local farms, and what is available regionally and by season. Suna means “moss” in Lativian, and Johnny Spero is of Latvian descent. The plan is to open by year’s end.

NY STRIP STEAK $19.95

April 1-30 clydes.com

Clyde’s of Georgetown, Tysons Corner, Reston, Columbia, Chevy Chase, Mark Center, Gallery Place; Tower Oaks Lodge; The Tomato Palace; Willow Creek Farm; Old Ebbitt Grill 28 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

Chef Update: At Rasika West End, Vikram Sunderam will be in charge of both restaurants, but chef de cuisine Manish Tyagi will oversee the day-to-day operations. Christopher Morris has been named Executive Chef at BRIO Tuscan Grille in Rockville, Maryland. Previously, he worked as executive chef of O’Donnell’s Sea Grill and Cin Cin Tratoria. Aaron McCloud is the new chef at Cedar restaurant in Penn Quarter. Previously he was executive chef for Vintage Restaurant Group in Loudoun County, then chef at The Inn at Perry Cabin in St. Michaels, Md. Patrick Forest and Raina Hull, former managers at 8407 Kitchen Bar in Silver Spring, have joined forces to open Mealey’s Table in New Market, Md. They hired Nate Waugaman as chef. The restaurant will seat 80 with additional seating in the lounge. Previously, Nate had been at Addie’s in Rockville. Nate plans to produce his own charcuterie in-house with a farm-to-table strategy. His sous chef is Ian Benites, who worked with Nate at Addie’s. It is slated to open this month. In the meantime, Mallory Buford will run the kitchen at Addie’s, as he used to for Black Restaurant Group. A “philanthro-pub” called Cause, is planned for the Shaw neighborhood at 1926 9th St., NW in late April. Yes, it is a philanthropic-themed bar that plans to direct a percentage of profits towards charities. Cause is the brainchild of non-restaurateurs Raj Ratwani and Nick Vilelle. Their operators are John Jarecki and Dave Pressley, who run The Light Horse in Alexandria. They have restaurant ops chops, as between them they have helped to open 20 restaurants including Neighborhood Restaurant Group’s Tallula, Rustico, and Vermillion. Former Queen Vic chef Adam Stein heads the kitchen. The two-story space, which will also host non-profit events, will have a worldly theme with globes, maps, and photography from different countries. Renovations: Shelly’s Back Room at 1331 F Street, NW has added an additional 1,000 square feet (and 50 seats) for an outdoor patio, appropriately called “Shelly’s Front Porch,” offering the comfort of Adirondack chairs and

a limited food menu. This will be referred to as a fireplace room and bourbon room…. Alain Roussel renovated his Chevy Chase French country restaurant, La Ferme, to the tune of $150,000. This includes new paneling, carpet, lamp shades, window dressings, upholstery wall hangings and paint both in the main dining room and the private party room upstairs. Morton’s The Steakhouse in downtown D.C. is slated to undergo renovations, a part of their new ownership upgrade. Volt chef Bryan Voltaggio’s forthcoming D.C, restaurant, Range, is slated to open late fall in the Chevy Chase Pavilion showcasing lesserused cuts of meat including shoulders, legs, and offal. The cocktails will feature house-made bitters, sodas, and mixers. As is all the rage these days, there will be an open kitchen as well as a bakery and retail shop. Quick Hits: Rahama African Restaurant recently opened in the Shaw neighborhood at 1923 9th St., NW. Ripple in Cleveland Park has a “sister” next door, Sugar Magnolia, offering savory treats and sweets including homemade ice cream and sandwiches made by pastry chef Alison Reed, who joined Ripple in January after four years at Cafe Saint Ex. Chicagobased Matt Matros, owner of Protein Bar, signed a lease to open a Protein Bar in Penn Quarter at 7th and D Streets, NW. Working with Papadopoulos Properties, this promises to be the first of many in the area. First Watch plans to open in Chantilly at Greenbriar Town Center. This will make their third (Rockville, Fairfax) in the region. They plan to open by end of 2012. Scott Harlan is chef/owner of Green Pig Bistro, slated to open in Clarendon, Va., by the time you read this. He was previously with Inox. Nick’s Riverside Grille and Tony & Joe’s at Georgetown’s Washington Harbour should be up and running – inside and outside – by May. That’s the time it takes to re-open after a flood and everything else that goes with it. Kimpton Hotel & Restaurant group named Brian McPherson as chef at both Jackson 20 and The Grille at Morrison House in Alexandria. He takes the place of Dennis Marron, who was head chef at Poste restaurant at Hotel Monaco. McPherson was previously at New Heights and Butterfield 9. True Food Kitchen, a healthy, Mediterraneanthemed restaurant from Scottsdale, Ariz.-based Fox Restaurant Concepts, is scouting locations in the D.C. region. It will be their first East Coast expansion, which has four locations in Arizona and California. True Food will appeal to D.C.’s sophisticated-leaning palate and generally healthy lifestyle. It’s backed by P.F. Chang’s. Thank Tom Papadopoulos for bringing this to you. Shirlington Village’s Curious Grape returns – as more than a wine shop. Now it’s The Curious Grape Wine, Dine & Shop. Owner Suzanne McGrath says the food will focus on dishes that pair well with or feature wine. In addition to the restaurant, there is a cheese bar, traditional bar and private dining space. ★


SOCIAL SCENE

N Street Village

BY RO B E RT DE VANEY N Street Village, the social services agency that provides shelter and support to homeless and low-income women, held its annual gala at the West End’s Ritz Carlton March 21. The upbeat, always joyous event brought together women who benefitted from the non-profit, volunteers and benefactors, especially those in government and media. Comcast’s Melissa Maxfield and A.B. and Jill Cruz were gala co-chairs; Byron and Kim Dorgan were honorary co-chairs. Founders’ Awards were given to Sen. Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.) and his wife Diana, and also to Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.).

Wonderland at the Washington Club BY M ARY BIR D The Washington Club was transformed into Wonderland on March 23 as guests enjoyed a preview performance from the Washington Ballet’s upcoming Alice in Wonderland. Company dancers Emily Ellis and Corey Landolt enchanted as Alice and the Mad Hatter as did members of the Studio Company and School of Ballet. In his remarks at the four-course dinner with cards urging “eat me” and “drink me,” Artistic Director Septime Webre spoke of Alice’s “outsize sense of imagination” as he created a ballet about “girl power.” Guests departed with White Rabbit cookies auguring a happy adventure down the rabbit hole. Vickie Ladt and Michele Lebar

Trey Hardin, a senior vice president at VOX Global, Kate Bolduan, CNN anchor and reporter, White House drug czar Gil Kerlikowske.

Diana Enzi and Sen. Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.) with Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine).

N Street Village executive director Schroeder Stribling, Scripps Networks senior VP Cindy McConkey and Food Network chef Sunny Anderson.

Mayor Vincent Gray Addresses The Institute for Education

BY M ARY BIR D Mayor Vincent Gray recently spoke at a breakfast program of the INFO Public Policy Roundtable series hosted by IFE Diplomatic Steward Jan Matthysen, Ambassador of Belgium. The mayor outlined his plan to bring vitality back to the city and its budget. Along with full democracy, including voting rights in Congress, housing and education remain central to the Mayor’s agenda. Many ambassadors, Judge William Webster and a diverse group of IFE interns and fellows attended.

Wines from Provence Tasting BY MARY BIRD On March 27, representatives of the Provence Wine Council stopped in Washington on their promotional tour of several U.S. cities. They held a lunchtime tasting at Againn restaurant. Guests could sample wines from the recognized rosé center of the world. Provence rosé is by definition not sweet. Rosé outsells white wine in France today, and dry rosé sales in this country are skyrocketing. Nicole d’Amecourt, Paul Chevalier with Shaw-Ross Importers who imports Caves d’Esclans - Sacha Lichine

James Beard Foundation

Peacock’s owners/brothers, Shahab and Maziar Farivar lent their culinary talents for the second year to the James Beard Foundation’s “Norouz: Persian New Year Celebration” dinner on March 21.

Nargesi-e Esfenaj (Spinach and Quail Egg Narcissus Flower) served at the James Beard Foundation’s Norouz: Persian New Year Celebration dinner.

Borani-e Labu (Yogurt with Roasted Beet)

IEF CEO and Founder Coach Kathy Kemper, Mayor Gray, Ambassador and Mrs. Matthysen

Washington Concert Opera Celebrates 25 Years BY M ARY BIR D The Washington Concert Opera celebrated its 25th anniversary at a black-tie gala under the auspices of Ambassador of the Russian Federation and Mrs. Sergey Kislyak at the embassy on March 28. Guests enjoyed a musicale and seated dinner with WCO alums, mezzosoprano Denyce Graves and Aleksey Bogdanov. The evening honored WCO benefactors Dorothy and Kenneth Woodcock, WCO Founder Stephen Crout and Former Artistic Advisor Peter Russell. “Weather Conductor” Bob Ryan emceed the evening noting that “music and art enrich our lives and I think that’s why we’re here.”

Philip and Nina Pillsbury, Bob Craft GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 29


SOCIAL SCENE

Upcoming Galas APRIL 13 Fight for Children School Night 2012

Chuck and Stacy Kuhn will chair School Night 2012 with a cocktail reception, silent auction, seated dinner, entertainment and dancing at the Ronald Reagan Building & International Center. Proceeds support Fight for Children’s education programs including the Quality School Initiative which awards and recognizes public, charter and independent schools improving achievement for low-income kids. Contact Simon Jackson at 202-772-0437 or simon.jackson@fightforchildren.org.

APRIL 14 Fashion for Paws 6th Annual Runway Show

Fashion for Paws is a high-caliber program supporting D.C.’s top animal charity, the Washington Humane Society. The runway show infuses the nation’s capital with cuttingedge high fashion and luxury lifestyle brand events. The heart and soul of the event are

the fundraising models who agree to raise a minimum of $5,000 in the weeks leading up to the event and participate in a friendly fundraising competition. The top male and female fundraiser will be awarded the title of “Model Washingtonian of the Year,” on the runway April 14. National Building Museum. For more information, visit RSVP@washhumane.org.

APRIL 16 GALA’s Night of the Stars GALA Hispanic Theatre will host its annual Noche de Estrellas benefit event at the Art Museum of the Organization of American States. The evening will feature a buffet, silent and live auctions, performances

and Latin dancing. Ricardo Montaner will be honored for his impact on Latin America music and charitable work on behalf of children, Janet Farrell for her business leadership and American Airlines for corporate philanthropy. For more information, call 202-234-774 or visit GalaTheatre.org.

APRIL 18 Folger Gala at the Folger Shakespeare Library The Folger Shakespeare Library’s annual gala, its most important fundraiser of the year, provides vital support to the outstanding cultural and educational programming the Folger offers to the greater Washington area and beyond. The elegant social evening will celebrate Shakespeare, games and foolery, while also marking the library’s 80th anniversary. This year’s entertainment, titled “Wait, Wait, Forsooth!” in the Elizabethan theater will be preceded by a cocktail reception in the Exhibition Hall and a black-tie dinner in the

Gail Kern Paster Reading Room. Visit Folger. edu/gala

APRIL 20 Medstar National Rehabilitation Network Las Vegas Night Benefit

MedStar National Rehabilitation Network will host its third annual Las Vegas Night benefit at the National Museum of Women in the Arts. The benefit will feature roulette, black jack and craps tables. Food and beverages will be provided throughout the night. All proceeds will go towards the network’s many programs helping those with disabilities, including brain, spinal cord injuries and stroke. To learn more, call 202 877-1781 or visit NRHrehab.org.

Night of Vision BY M ARY BIRD PHOTO S B Y N ESHA N H. NALT CHAYA N The Prevention of Blindness Society (POB) of Metropolitan Washington held Eye on Low Vision at the Four Seasons Hotel on March 24. The theme focused on POB’s programs and services that help individuals of every age or socioeconomic background save or improve their sight. A reception and silent auction were followed by dinner with Master of Tyrone Stanley. Virginia Lions Club, District 24-A, received the Community Service Award, and Suleiman Alibhai, O.D., was honored with the Professional Service Award. Guests eagerly took to the dance floor to the upbeat sound of Bob Jenets UpFront.

Caroline Lodewick, POB executive director Michele Hartlove and POB Board member and WHUR’s Tyrone Stanley with Alex Ovechkin signed jersey.

House Beautiful Goes Green

Scott Wertlieb and Dr. Ken Schwartz.

Room & Board (1840 14th Street NW) hosted House Beautiful Magazine’s Color It Green Chair Scavenger Hunt Wrap Party Thursday, March 15th at their 4th floor showroom space. Fans of the magazine, Room & Board and chair winners gathered to celebrate Rachel Cothran, Sarah Meyer Walsh, Kate Bennett the color green with a spread of green gourmet nosh provided by Design Cuisine. Earlier that day and the day before, House Beautiful dropped 19 green chairs, including Room & Board’s Otis Swivel chair in iconic places around the city and gave hints as to where the chairs could be found on their Facebook and Twitter pages. The first person to find the Scott Jusilla (General Manager, Room & chair got to keep it. Board), Sean Sullivan (Associate Publisher for Natasha Barrett, Sonya Angie Goff, Barbara Martin House Beautiful) Gavankar McKay

30 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

Jennifer Kaye, Nancy Shapiro and Dr. Marcie Oser Wertlieb

For more social scene visit georgetowner.com ★ Music for the Mind ★ Lady and the Tramp and Meatballs Too at Carmine’s ★ RAMMYS Nominations Party ★ For the Love of Sight Visionary Awards Dinner


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GMG, INC. April 4, 2012 31


32 April 4, 2012 GMG, INC.

The Georgetowner's April 4, 2012 Issue  

The Heart of the Georgetown House Tour, Real Estate Speical, Long and Foster's Jeff Detwiller, and Le Decor " Tray for you or two.

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