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June 2013

Tchaikovsky Tchaikovsky Extravaganza! Extravaganza! –– June June 21 21 Tchaikovsky’s Tchaikovsky’s 1812 1812 Overture Overture –– June June 28 28


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InConcert

JUNE 2013

A PUBLICATION OF THE NASHVILLE SYMPHONY

TABLE OF

TCHAIKOVSKY EXTRAVAGANZA!

CONTENTS

JUNE 21 Nashville Symphony Kelly Corcoran, conductor Cecile Licad, piano

Tchaikovsky - Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture Tchaikovsky - Suite No. 4 “Mozartiana” Tchaikovsky - Polonaise from Eugene Onegin Tchaikovksy - Piano Concerto No. 1

DEPARTMENTS 48 53 54 55 56 66 68 70 78

Conductors Orchestra Roster Board of Directors Staff Roster Annual Fund: Individuals Annual Fund: Corporations Capital Funds Donors Legacy Society Guest Information Advertising Sales THE GLOVER GROUP INC. 5123 Virginia Way, Suite C12 Brentwood, TN 37027 615.373.5557 MCQUIDDY PRINTING 711 Spence Lane Nashville, TN 37217 615.366.6565

PROGRAMS

20 20 22 27 37 40

CATERPILLAR FINANCIAL SUMMER SERIES

Video Games Live

June 4

CATERPILLAR FINANCIAL SUMMER SERIES

The The Baseball Music Project

June 16

CATERPILLAR FINANCIAL SUMMER SERIES

Tchaikovsky Extravaganza! June 21

SPECIAL EVENT

Patron Appreciation Concert June 26

CATERPILLAR FINANCIAL SUMMER SERIES

Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture June 28

Visit our blog, Inside the Nashville Symphony, at:

NashvilleSymphony.tumblr.com NashvilleSymphony.tumblr.com

InConcert

5


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CHAIKOVSKY’S 1812 OVERTURE


BACKSTAGE

MEET OUR MUSICIANS

Member of the Nashville Symphony since: 1998 Hometown: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Could you explain the role of the bass in the orchestra and what drew you to this instrument? The bass is the rhythmic and harmonic foundation of the orchestra — and although it’s vitally important, it’s also one of those things you may not notice until it’s not there. From the first time I played bass in an orchestra, I was astonished by how incredible it felt to be at the bottom of everything and having all the overtones of the other instruments stacking up on top of me. Also, just having your body behind this instrument that is vibrating and moving so much air is a unique physical sensation. Which composers write the best music for the bass? A lot of the best music for bass has been written by bass players. If you look back through history, various virtuosos of the instrument like Dragonetti, Bottesini and Koussevitsky wrote some of the best music for bass. Today we have Edgar Meyer, a wonderful composer and virtuoso whose music is some of the most beautiful and interesting ever written for the double bass. With an instrument that big, you must have some interesting stories about getting around with it. I actually drive a Honda Fit, which is one of the smallest cars on the road, and it’s not a problem to get a bass in there. But taking the bass from the car to the venue is always a little bit of a challenge. I have a wheel that fits onto the

endpin, which makes it a lot easier. You do get people asking, “Don’t you wish you played the flute?,” and my usual answer is “No.” One time I checked into a hotel with a big travel trunk, which looks like a big fiberglass coffin, and the guy behind the desk asked, “Is that an oboe?” I just told him yes. Do you have a favorite bass player? I got into playing bass because I was inspired by musicians like Jaco Pastorius, and I first became an electric bass player before I started playing the “real” bass. There are lots of jazz and classical players I enjoy, but some of my favorite bass players are my colleagues in the orchestra. We have some great musicians in this bass section. What do you enjoy about being a member of the Nashville Symphony? One of the most wonderful things about being in this orchestra is my colleagues. I feel very lucky to work in this beautiful facility and share the stage with so many wonderful artists. It’s really an honor. I could not be happier in the place I’ve landed. I have a family, and we just love Nashville. Although I’m originally from Pittsburgh, I never did become acclimated to those winters. What makes the Nashville Symphony audience special? It’s really inspiring to play for this audience because we play a lot of unusual music on a regular basis, and I’m amazed by how well it is received and how well it is understood. InConcert

19

BACK STAGE

JOEL REIST, Principal Bass


SUMMER AT THE SYMPHONY SUMMER

Tuesday, June 4, at 7 p.m.

VIDEO GAMES LIVE™

SERIES

Nashville Symphony Nashville Symphony Chorus Tommy Tallarico, host, creator, producer Emmanuel Fratianni, conductor Kelly Corcoran, chorus director Laura Intravia, vocals Matt Yelton, audio engineer Mike Runice, video operator Cesar Solorio, production & stage manager Mikey Trifillis, lighting director Selections to be announced from the stage.

WHAT IS VIDEO GAMES LIVE™? Incorporated in 2002, Video Games Live is the first and most successful video game touring concert in the world, having performed over 200 shows in 23 countries on five continents. Over 11,000 people were present for the debut performance at the Hollywood Bowl with the L.A. Philharmonic, and since then more than 1 million people have experienced the show live. Video Games Live has released two albums worldwide (both of which debuted in the Billboard Top 10) as well as an award-winning full-length feature DVD/Blu-Ray. In 2010 the show aired nationally on PBS and quickly became one of the top-rated PBS Specials of all time. Created, produced and hosted by game industry veteran Tommy Tallarico, this immersive concert event features music from the most popular video games of all time. Top orchestras and choirs around the world perform along with exclusive synchronized video footage and music arrangements, synchronized lighting, well-known Internet solo performers, electronic percussion, live action and unique interactive segments to create an explosive, one-of-a-kind entertainment experience.

20

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Video Games Live bridges a gap for entertainment by exposing new generations of music lovers and fans to the symphonic orchestral experience while also providing a completely new and unique experience for families and/or nongamers. Whether it’s the power and passion of the more recent blockbusters or the excitement of remembering the sentimental classics you played growing up, Video Games Live will be a special night to remember. Even if you have never played a video game, you’ve never heard or seen an orchestral performance quite like this. A NOTE FROM CRE ATOR AND P RO D U C E R TOM M Y TA L L A R I CO My dream when I started working on Video Games Live in 2002 was to demonstrate how artistic and culturally significant video games have become. Aside from opening the eyes of non-gamers to the industry, my goal is to help usher in a whole new generation of people to appreciate symphonic music. Video Games Live has become the most successful video game tour in the world. As we continue to travel around the globe, we carry on the commitment to reaffirm that video games


ABOUT THE CREATOR

NASHVILLE SYMPHONY CHORUS KELLY CORCORAN, chorus director

TOMMY TALLARICO Tommy Tallarico is a veritable video game industry icon. As one of the most successful video game composers in history, he has helped revolutionize the gaming world, creating unique audio landscapes that enhance the video gaming experience. He was instrumental in changing video game soundtracks from bleeps and bloops to real music now appreciated worldwide by tens of millions of fans. As a well-recognized on-air television personality, live performer and composer, he brings his in-depth knowledge, years of experience, and love of cutting-edge multimedia and video games to the masses. He has worked in the gaming industry as a designer, product manager, producer, writer, games tester and head of both music and video departments.  An accomplished musician, Tallarico has been writing music for video games for more than 23 years. He has won more than 50 industry awards and has worked on more than 300 game titles. In 2002, he created Video Games Live, the first and most successful video game touring concert in the world.

SOPRANO Stephanie Breiwa M. Kathleen Figaro Abbey Francis Alesia Kelley Jenny Lynn Marcy McWilliams Jessica Moore Carolyn Naumann Catie Pratt Lauren Price Mallory Street Iris Walton ALTOS Mary Callahan Cathi Carmack Shanon Freeman Liz Gilliam Judy Griffin Aynsley Martindale Shelly McCormack Stacy Reed Amy Russo Carmen Sanders Allison Thompson

TENORS Christon Carney James Cortner Michael Harrision Cory Howell Adrian Romero William Seminerio Daniel Sissom Bruce Williams Zach Thompson Jim White Jonathan Yeaworth BASSES Matt Adrian Kent Dickerson John Ford Stuart Garber Charlie Heimermann Clinton Johnson Adam Ketron Matt McDonald Greg Ray Paul Roark David Thomas

InConcert

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SERIES

 Tallarico was the first musician to release a video game soundtrack worldwide (Tommy Tallarico’s Greatest Hits Vol. 1). He has sold out shows on the biggest and most prestigious stages in the world, including London’s Royal Festival Hall and Hammersmith Apollo, the Olympic Park Stadium in Korea, the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., Pan-Chiao Stadium in Taipei, the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas and multiple shows at the Hollywood Bowl. Raised in Springfield, Massachusetts, he moved to Southern California on his own at age 21 to pursue a career in entertainment. Homeless with no means of financial support, he was discovered in a music store and started working in the video game industry within three days of arriving in California.  To learn more, visit his website at www.tallarico.com.

SUMMER

have evolved into a true art form that has become the entertainment of choice for millions in the 21st century. —Tommy Tallarico


SUMMER AT THE SYMPHONY SUMMER

Sunday, June 16, at 3 p.m.

SERIES

THE BASEBALL MUSIC PROJECT Nashville Symphony Robert Thompson, conductor Misty Castleberry, soloist Woody Mankowski, soloist Dave Winfield, narrator 'DYH:LQĂŽHOGnarrator JOHN STAFFORD SMITH / FRANCIS SCOTT KEY arr. Maury Laws wJOHN PHILIP SOUSA arr. Maury Laws

The National Game

J.R. BLODGETT arr. Maury Laws

The Baseball Polka

J.W. KELLY arr. Maury Laws

Slide, Kelly, Slide Misty Castleberry, soloist

MAURY LAWS & ERNEST LAWRENCE THAYER

WOODROW “BUDDY� JOHNSON arr. Fred Sturm

IRVING BERLIN arr. Fred Sturm ALAN COURTNEY & BEN HOMER arr. Fred Sturm

JOSE ENCARNCION

22

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Star-Spangled Banner

Casey at the Bat Dave Winfield, narrator 'DYH:LQĂŽHOGQDUUDWRU Did You See Jackie Robinson Hit That Ball? Woody Mankowski, soloist Always (from “Pride of the Yankeesâ€?) Misty Castleberry, soloist Joltin’ Joe DiMaggio Misty Castleberry & Woody Mankowski, soloists Momen (Tribute to Roberto Clemente) Misty Castleberry & Woody Mankowski, soloists


ALBERT VON TILZER & JACK NORWORTH arr. Maury Laws

Take Me Out to the Ballgame audience sing-along

FRED STURM text compilation by Paul S. Kitzke

Forever Spring I. From Altitude, The Diamonds II. The Miracle of Light III. A Place Where it Would Always Be Spring IV. When The Grass Was Real V. Night Game VI. Polo Grounds VII. The Green Fields of the Mind VIII. Shoeless Joe IX. Baseball’s Time Dave Winfield, narrator Let’s Keep the Dodgers in Brooklyn Misty Castleberry & Woody Mankowski, soloists

DAVE FRISHBERG arr. Fred Sturm

Van Lingle Mungo Woody Mankowski, soloist

DIANNA QUINN arr. Fred Sturm

Nolan Ryan’s Fastball Misty Castleberry, soloist

FRED STURM

arr. ROBERT THOMPSON

SERIES

ROY ROSS arr. Fred Sturm

SUMMER

INTERMISSION

Don’t Look Back (Tribute to Satchel Paige) Woody Mankowski, soloist Finale music from Field of Dreams (by James Horner) music from The Natural (by Randy Newman)

A Thompson Music Group/Double M Arts & Events Production. Presented in association with the National Baseball Hall of Fame & Museum.

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ABOUT THE BASEBALL MUSIC PROJECT SUMMER

Baseball and music have been indelibly intertwined since the sport’s inception. Nearly 100 songs were written about baseball between 1858 and 1900 alone, and the major collections of baseball music in the United States contain more than 1,000 works written about the sport, commencing with the first known piece of baseball music, J.R. Blodgett’s “The Baseball Polka,” composed in 1858. Founded in 2004 by a group of music professionals with a nearly uncontainable love and passion for both baseball and music, The Baseball Music Project is dedicated to fostering greater awareness of the cultural lineage and historical significance of music written about baseball.

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ABOUT THE ARTISTS DAVE WINFIELD, narrator

Dave Winfield’s career is a unique chapter in American sports history. Hailed as one of the greatest athletes ever to play professional sports, he is one of only seven players in the history of Major League Baseball to reach over 3,000 hits and over 450 home runs. The 12-time All-Star is among the all-time leaders in hits, home runs and RBIs. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2001, his first year of eligibility. Winfield began his career as a Williams Scholar at the University of Minnesota, where he played Big Ten basketball and baseball. An AllAmerican in baseball, he was voted MVP of the 1973 College World Series as a pitcher, was a No. 1 draft pick and never spent a day in the minor leagues. Even today, he remains the only athlete ever to be drafted by four professional sport leagues: basketball (NBA Atlanta Hawks, ABA Utah Stars), football (NFL Minnesota Vikings) and baseball (MLB San Diego Padres).

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Winfield’s professional career took off in 1973 with the San Diego Padres, followed by eight All-Star seasons with the New York Yankees. In 1990, he joined the California Angels, followed by a magical year with the Toronto Blue Jays, for whom he drove in the winning run of the 1992 World Series. Dave returned to his native Minnesota and reached the 3,000th hit milestone with the Twins. He ended his 22-year career after the 1995 season with the American League Champion Cleveland Indians. Currently a studio analyst for ESPN SportsCenter, Winfield is also an executive vice president/senior advisor for the San Diego Padres. Well-known for his philanthropy, he was the first active professional athlete to create a 501(c)(3) charitable foundation, the Winfield Foundation, and inspired many other athletes to do the same. ROBERT THOMSON, music director, founder & producer Robert Thompson grew up in Hawthorne, New York, the resting place of Babe Ruth. Together with former New York Yankee and Latin GRAMMY®-nominated musician Bernie Williams, he co-wrote the book Rhythms of the Game: The Link Between Musical and Athletic Performance. He is also co-author of Baseball’s Greatest Hit: The Story of Take Me Out to the Ball Game. Thompson is a two-time GRAMMY®nominated producer and musician, having toured and performed with an array of artists and groups, including the Moody Blues, Yes, The Temptations and The Four Tops. He served as


FORREST “WOODY” MANKOWSKI, soloist Forrest “Woody” Mankowski has been performing professionally since age 12. Besides singing, he also plays tenor, alto and soprano saxophones, as well as clarinet and flute. He has written more than 100 music transcription books for Hal Leonard Corporation, and he taught jazz saxophone at Lawrence University for six years. He has worked in many recording studios as a commercial singer/instrumentalist. As a freelance musician, Mankowski has backed up popular artists such as The Temptations, The Four Tops, Cheap Trick, Aretha Franklin, Peabo Bryson and many others. He has played in the pit orchestras for touring Broadway shows, including The Producers, Chicago and Hairspray.

PRODUCTION CREDITS

Michael Mushalla & Robert Thompson, producers Robert Thompson, founder & director Fred Sturm, artistic director Maury Laws, chief arranger Rob Hudson, research director Madeline Sturm, design director Jeff Sugg, video design Jenny Goelz, production & stage manager Chris Ericson, sound engineer Jason Boyd, lighting supervisor Nick Hussong, video show control Michael Cooney, company manager

Belmont University Musical Theatre Presents A new production of BOUBLIL and SCHÖNBERG’S

“Les Misérables is licensed by Music Theatre International (MTI) by arrangement with CAMERON MACKINTOSH LTD.”

All images used in this production are used by permission of The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum or Corbis, Inc. To learn more, visit baseballhalloffame.org or call 888-HALL-OF-FAME.

Belmont University’s Musical Theatre program will stage the country’s first university performance of the Tony Award-winning musical, Les Misérables. MARCH 15-17 & MARCH 21-24

For more information on student performances or majors, please visit www.belmont.edu/music or call 615.460-6408.

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MISTY CASTLEBERRY, soloist With a voice described as “breathtakingly beautiful,” Misty Castleberry has entertained audiences across the United States and Europe. A specialist in the music of Kurt Weill, she has presented several recitals of Weill’s music at Lincoln Center and sang the soubrette role in Mahogonny Songspiel at the Kurt Weill Festival in 1998. She has sung with symphonies in Seattle, Houston, Phoenix, San Diego, Detroit and Miami, with the Boston Pops and at the Chicago Ravinia Festival. Equally proficient in oratorio, Castleberry has served as soprano soloist in

Haydn’s Lord Nelson Mass and Harmonie Messe, Bach’s St. Matthew and St. John Passion, Mozart’s Mass in C Minor and Requiem. Her musical theater credits include Lily in The Secret Garden, Clara in Passion and Maria in The Sound of Music.

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music consultant to the film The Man Who Cried and has been successful in placing contemporary classical music in such major motion pictures as Fahrenheit 911, The Insider, Swept Away and Heaven. As a conductor, Thompson has conducted the Chicago, Seattle, Detroit, San Diego, Houston and Phoenix Symphonies, among others. He served as dean of music at SUNY Purchase College and holds a doctorate in music from the Eastman School of Music.


Christ Church Cathedral SACRED SPACE for the CITY

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Robert sings. He sings because it makes people happy, something he tries to do everyday. Robert is also blind.

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When you give to Goodwill, you give Robert a reason to sing. The simple act of donating the things that you no longer need means job training and opportunities for thousands of Tennesseans who have difficulty finding employment.

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celebrating the creative spirit christcathedral.org/sacredspace

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SUMMER AT THE SYMPHONY SUMMER

Friday, June 21, at 8 p.m.

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TCHAIKOVSKY EXTRAVAGANZA! Nashville Symphony Kelly Corcoran, conductor Cecile Licad, piano PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY

Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture

PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY

Suite No. 4 in G major, Op. 61 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mozartianaâ&#x20AC;? Gigue Minuet Prayer, after a transcription by Liszt Theme and Variations

INTERMISSION



PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY

Polonaise from Eugene Onegin

PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY 3,275,/<,&+7&+$,.296.<

Concerto No. 1 in B-flat minor for Piano, Op. 23 &RQFHUWR1RLQ%ĂŻDWPLQRUIRU3LDQR2S Allegro non troppo e molto maestoso Andantino semplice Allegro con fuoco Cecile Licad, piano

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P YOT R I LY IC H TC HA IKOV S KY SUMMER

PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY Born on May 7, 1840, in Votkinsk, Russia; died on November 6, 1893, in St. Petersburg, Russia Romeo and Juliet: Fantasy Overture

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Tchaikovsky composed the first version of his concert overture to Romeo and Juliet in 1869. He later revised the score twice, completing the third and definitive version in 1880. A breakthrough work for the young composer, then on the verge of turning 30, this music points ahead to the compelling emotional drama of his later symphonies and operas, all rendered with Tchaikovsky’s signature mastery of the orchestra. First performance: March 16, 1870, in Moscow, with Nikolai Rubinstein conducting First Nashville Symphony performance: April 8, 1947 (during the orchestra’s inaugural season), with Music Director William Strickland Estimated length: 20 minutes

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hakespeare helped provide the impetus for Tchaikovsky to find his authentic voice with this orchestral masterpiece. The idea for an independent concert piece based on the Bard’s star-crossed lovers seems almost predestined for the sensitive Tchaikovsky, though the actual idea was planted by Mily Balakirev, a fellow composer, conductor and promoter who served as a guru to the still-unknown young artist. Tchaikovsky wrote the score in six weeks near the end of 1869, but he was dissatisfied and later wrote a more effective ending for the standard version after he had already become famous. Instead of patterning the overture after Shakespeare’s narrative in an obvious, linear fashion, Tchaikovsky distills its main elements into recognizable sections. His musical architecture and thematic material reflect the powerful contrast of forces involved: feuding families and a love that transcends violence.

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Although Tchaikovsky termed the overture a “fantasy,” he didn’t write a loosely connected string of episodes; rather, he adapted well-worn classical form to his purpose in an original way. Three key elements from the play serve as the basis for his musical narrative: the understanding intervention of Friar Laurence, the division between the hostile families, and the young couple’s blindingly intense love.

W H AT TO L I ST E N FO R A somber introduction — part slow march, part chorale — is often associated with the Friar on account of the lower woodwinds’ quasireligious, contemplative strains. This accelerates into thrilling, rapid-fire music that almost cinematically evokes the clashing families. As familiar as the transcendent love theme has become, in its original context it expresses the lovers’ passion with extraordinary effectiveness


Suite No. 4 in G major, Op. 61 “Mozartiana” The Suite No. 4 — which Tchaikovsky in fact never numbered — was titled “Mozartiana” by the composer, who wrote it in the summer of 1887 as a tribute to his idol, as well as to mark the centenary of Mozart’s opera Don Giovanni. All of the music was originally composed by Mozart, with a small bit added on by Franz Liszt, but Tchaikovsky’s orchestrations reinterpret this music for his own time. First performance: November 26, 1887, in Moscow, with the composer conducting First Nashville Symphony performance: January 22 & 23, 1988, with guest conductor Kazuyoshi Akiyama Estimated length: 25 minutes

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omeo and Juliet naturally inspired Tchaikovsky to compose in his more familiar Romantic vein, but there’s a thread in his work that deliberately references “old-fashioned” styles or musical material within a contemporary context. In a way, this approach foreshadows the neoclassical phase of Stravinsky and other

W H AT TO L I ST E N FO R The “Mozartiana” Suite is a prime example of how we hear any music of the past through the filter of our own time. Tchaikovsky stated his aim was “to provide new occasions in which to perform these musical gems — so abundant in exceptional charms, though so unpretentious in their form.” While the orchestral textures are lighter than when Tchaikovsky is writing in his own voice, the ensemble is larger than what would have been typical in Mozart’s time. First comes a setting of a brief gigue (or “jig,” originally K. 574 in Mozart’s catalogue), a spirited dance type sometimes used to provide

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SERIES

The Overture is scored for 2 flutes, piccolo, 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, cymbals, bass drum, harp and strings.

20th-century composers. The “Mozartiana” Suite, though, shows this tendency in its most sincere form, without any touch of irony. Here Tchaikovsky doesn’t mimic the past but pays direct homage to the composer he claimed as his foremost idol: “The fact that I dedicated my life to music I owe to Mozart.” “Idol” isn’t a hyperbole: Tchaikovsky described his reverence for Mozart in quasireligious terms, referring to him as “the highest, supreme point attained by beauty in the sphere of music.” He considered Don Giovanni the ultimate musical masterpiece and treated Mozart’s autograph score as a sacred relic. So when the music world was observing the 100th anniversary of this opera in 1887, Tchaikovsky determined to make a contribution of his own by orchestrating a series of pieces by Mozart. He had already written three previous orchestral “suites” — a format that appealed to him because it offered more freedom than the symphony, with its conventions and constraints. The present suite differs from these predecessors, since here Tchaikovsky arranges preexisting music instead of composing his own. The first, second and fourth movements come from relatively obscure pieces Mozart wrote for the keyboard. The third is ultimately from a well-known, brief choral piece, the Ave verum corpus, written in Mozart’s final year — but for this Tchaikovsky used as his source a keyboard arrangement by Franz Liszt that included framing material added by the latter.

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through Tchaikovsky’s meandering, unexpected harmonic shifts and instrumental textures. Overall, Tchaikovsky’s palette alternates between darkly ominous colors and exciting full-on ensemble passages. The feud music, for example, gathers the orchestra into an unstoppable rush, while the English horn and viola that introduce Romeo and Juliet’s love theme suggest a melancholy oasis set apart from the swirling violence. But when Tchaikovsky later restates this theme, he elaborates it into a more extravagant confession of passion, which is in turn interrupted by the relentless music of battle. A dirge-like pattern in the final section underscores the tragic death of the lovers, while their theme soars one last time, only to be silenced finally by a chilling, abrupt fanfare.


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an ebullient finale to a Classical-era symphony or concerto. Another dance, the minuet, is the basis for the second movement (from Mozart’s K. 355). The third movement, titled “Prayer,” reminds us of Tchaikovsky’s religious feelings for Mozart: the Ave verum corpus (K. 618) is a motet celebrating one of the major Catholic feast days. Tchaikovsky soups up Mozart’s originally lucid textures with harp and high strings in a way that borders on kitsch to contemporary ears but that epitomizes the rarefied, “celestial” image Mozart sometimes conjured for the late Romantics. (It’s interesting to note that Mozart was also admired for the “demonic” character of his music for Don Giovanni.) Tchaikovsky ends the suite with a variations movement Mozart originally wrote based on a simple tune from an opera by Gluck (K. 455). It’s a poetically apt conclusion to the notion of Mozart himself as a theme reinterpreted by each era. The “Mozartiana” Suite is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani, cymbals, glockenspiel, harp and strings.

Polonaise from Eugene Onegin, Op. 24 Tchaikovsky composed his opera Eugene Onegin in 1877-78. Based on a classic verse novel by Pushkin, the opera is an innovative series of lyric scenes that explore the intimate emotional lives of its young couples. The Polonaise conjures the glittering social world in which they are fated to play out their roles. First performance: The opera was first performed on March 29, 1879, at the Moscow Conservatory, with Nikolai Rubinstein conducting. First Nashville Symphony performance: June 7, 2005, with conductor Byung-Hyun Rhee Estimated length: 5 minutes

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chaikovsky initially had doubts about a suggestion to transform Eugene Onegin into an opera. But this classic novel in verse by Russian master Alexander Pushkin, dating from the 1830s, turned out to have uncanny personal

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relevance. The story revolves around the worldweary, alienated title hero (or anti-hero), who coldly rejects the young Tatyana’s confession of love as a silly outburst. He reluctantly duels with and kills his best friend; by the end of it all, the tables — as Tennessee Williams might have put it — have “turned with a vengeance.” Tatyana has found a reserved happiness, or peace at least, by marrying the elderly Prince Gremin, and Onegin returns, this time confessing that he loves her. Tatyana’s feelings have persisted, but she rejects him out of respect for Gremin, explaining to the distraught Onegin that “you cannot bring back the past.” In his own life, Tchaikovsky had recently received a confession of love from a young woman and former student of his at the Conservatory. It coincided with a growing desire on Tchaikovsky’s part to quell ongoing gossip about his sexuality. The composer made the disastrous decision to marry, only to seek a way out as soon as possible. But amid all this turmoil, he crafted a boldly innovative opera of lyrical scenes that anticipate Chekhov in their moments of heartbreaking desperation and honesty.

W H AT TO L I ST E N FO R Dances serve an important function in Eugene Onegin, since they establish the social backdrop against which these private tales of misaligned longing and their consequences play out. The various waltzes and polonaises, with their familiar rhythms, insinuate a disarming texture of “normal” life that becomes a flashy, extroverted contrast to moments of inward lyrical intensity. A polonaise, originally associated with Polish folk music, refers to a dance in triple meter with an especially lively rhythmic “snap.” The vivacious polonaise that we hear sets the scene for a grand ball at Prince Gremin’s palace in the final act, where Onegin returns for his crushing renewed encounter with the more mature Tatyana. The Polonaise is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, timpani and strings.


Piano Concerto No. 1 in B-flat minor, Op. 23

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t was one thing to have Eduard Hanslick, a formidable music critic of the era, denounce Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto (1878). But try to imagine the composer’s outrage and betrayal when one of his strongest champions up till then declared that the First Piano Concerto was “so badly written as to be beyond rescue.” That was the judgment of conductor and pianist Nikolai Rubinstein, a respected musician who had led the premiere of the Romeo and Juliet Overture. Christmas Eve 1874 was not a happy one for the composer. He had arranged to give a private run-through of his ambitious new piano concerto, then still in progress. The stakes were high: Tchaikovsky had been winning advocates but still needed a decisive success with a major new work. Since he wasn’t a professional pianist, he hoped to solicit technical advice from Rubinstein, a celebrated keyboard performer. Tchaikovsky even fancied that Rubinstein might give his piece an extra seal of approval by premiering it himself. As Tchaikovsky recounted from the distance of a few years: “I played the first movement. Not a single word, not a single comment! If you knew how stupid and intolerable the situation of a man is who cooks and sets a meal before a friend, a meal the friend then proceeds to eat — in silence!... I summoned all my patience and played

W H AT TO L I ST E N FO R The opening is one of the most famous moments in Tchaikovsky — in all of Romantic music, in fact. A simple, four-note motif from the horns demands attention. Its insistent repetitions set the scene for the dramatic and passionate melody that then unfolds in the strings. Even if the hammer-chord gestures with which the pianist frames the tune have been endlessly parodied by Liberace stylings, this curtain raiser retains is ability to stir up a sense of excitement and grandeur. Brass chords form a bridge into the main

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SERIES

First performance: October 25, 1875, in Boston, with Hans von Bülow as soloist and Benjamin Johnson Lang conducting First Nashville Symphony performance: October 26, 1954, with Music Director Guy Taylor and guest pianist Gina Bachauer Estimated length: 35 minutes

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Tchaikovsky composed the first draft of his First Piano Concerto between November and December 1874 while living in St. Petersburg. He finished orchestrating it within a few months, but went on to revise the score in later years. Despite adverse reactions from his mentor, the Concerto shows the young Tchaikovsky consolidating his powers, and it has remained a beloved staple of the concert hall.

through to the end. Still silence. I stood up and asked, ‘Well?’ ” Rubinstein then launched into a vitriolic denunciation of the concerto. From the gist of it, Tchaikovsky notes, “an independent witness in the room might have concluded that I was a maniac, an untalented, senseless hack who had come to submit his rubbish to an eminent musician.” Rubinstein tried to soften the blow by suggesting the piece might work with massive rewrites, to which Tchaikovsky erupted, “I shall not alter a single note; I shall publish the work exactly as it stands!” In fact, Tchaikovsky, who was his own harshest critic, did later publish a revised version, though with only minor tweaks. But in the meantime the conductor and pianist Hans von Bülow took on the role of the concerto’s champion. Unlike Rubinstein, Bülow believed the score overflowed with original ideas that were expressed in a clear and mature form. Bülow gave the premiere as the soloist during an American tour. It probably comes as no surprise that Tchaikovsky vehemently rubbed Rubinstein’s name off the title page and replaced it with Bülow’s. Although he wasn’t present for the world premiere in Boston, Tchaikovsky soon heard of its triumph. It became so popular in America that on his own tour, Tchaikovsky conducted the Concerto for Carnegie Hall’s inaugural concert in 1891. Further vindication arrived when Rubinstein conducted the Moscow premiere in December 1875.


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movement proper. This whole first movement is vast — several minutes longer than the other two combined. Tchaikovsky speeds up the tempo and sends the soloist skittering across the keyboard in an agitated rhythm. Meanwhile, he returns us to the piece’s gloomy home key in the minor after that short-lived Grand Tune in the introduction, set in a velvety D-flat major. Tchaikovsky gets lots of mileage out of the pensive theme first played by the clarinet. This happens to be one of several imports from folk music — in this case, a Ukrainian tune Tchaikovsky claims he had heard whistled at the market fair by blind beggars. The richly episodic first movement mixes quieter musings with further brashly dramatic outbursts. The soloist’s finger-stretching virtuosity — from delicate, gracious figurations to thunderous double-octaves — is at the service of Tchaikovsky’s far-ranging emotional spectrum. All of these aspects come into play in an extra-long cadenza that resembles a play within a play. The Andantino movement merges the respite of a lyrical slow movement with scherzo fun times. Tchaikovsky orchestrates with chamberlike intimacy, particularly for the piano’s duets with flute and other solo instruments. It all makes for a striking contrast following the epic sprawl of the first movement. The scherzo parts intrude surrealistically, almost in a parody of a waltz. Folk music — again Ukrainian in character, if not an actual quotation — also fuels the fiery finale, with its intriguingly accented main theme seemingly tailor-made for the keyboard. Something of the jittery attitude from the opening movement finds its way into this music, while a contrasting second theme is tenderly songful. At the finale’s climax, this theme gets the same neon-light treatment we recall from the concerto’s big bold opening before Tchaikovsky speeds things up for a final, manic thunderclap of headspinning virtuosity. In addition to solo piano, the Concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, timpani and strings. —Thomas May is the Nashville Symphony’s program annotator.

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ABOUT THE SOLOIST

CECILE LICAD, piano Called “a pianist’s pianist” by The New Yorker, Cecile Licad blends daring musical instinct with superb training. Her natural talent was honed at the Curtis Institute of Music by three of the greatest performer/ pedagogues of our time: Rudolf Serkin, Seymour Lipkin and Mieczyslaw Horszowski. Among her 2012/13 engagements are returns to the Buffalo Philharmonic and the Adrian (Michigan) symphonies and performances with the Northwest Sinfonietta in Seattle and Tacoma. She plays recitals in Boston’s Isabella Gardner Museum and at the Harvard Musical Association as well as in San Jose, California, and in Bogotá, Colombia. Licad has appeared in North America with the Chicago Symphony, Boston Symphony, Philadelphia Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Los Angeles Philharmonic and many others. In Europe she has played with the London Symphony, London Philharmonic, Bayerisches Rundfunk Orchestra and the Moscow State Academy Symphony. In Asia, she has performed with the Hong Kong Philharmonic, Tokyo’s NHK Symphony and her native Philippine Philharmonic. As a recitalist, Licad has performed with Murray Perahia, Peter Serkin and Nadja SalernoSonnenberg, with whom she appeared at Lincoln Center, Orchestra Hall in Chicago and the Kennedy Center, respectively. She appeared as soloist in the Steinway Piano Sesquicentennial Celebration at Carnegie Hall and made television appearances with Mstislav Rostropovich.  Licad began her piano studies at age 3 with her mother, Rosario Licad, in the Philippines, and later studied with the highly regarded Rosario Picazo. At 7, she made her debut as soloist with the Philharmonic Orchestra of the Philippines. She is one of the youngest musicians to receive the prestigious Leventritt Gold Medal. 


Enjoy the lazy days and warm summer nights of June, bring your favorite lawn chair, pack a picnic dinner and immerse yourself in an evening of popular classics and favorite movie themes with the Nashville Symphony! 8 p.m.

Thursday, June 6, at East Park

8 p.m.

Friday, June 7, at Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park

7 p.m.

Sunday, June 9, at Crockett Park, Brentwood

7:30 p.m.

Tuesday, June 11, at Cumberland University, Lebanon Admission: $5

7:30 p.m.

Wednesday, June 12, at Key Park, Lafayette

7:30 p.m.

Friday, June 14, at Centennial Park

7 p.m.

Saturday, June 29, in Glasgow, KY. Except where noted, all concerts are FREE and will be led by Associate Conductor Kelly Corcoran. Sponsors: City of Brentwood

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Y OU H AVE M ORE C HOICES T HAN Y OU T HINK

intermission) of art and pushed Born on February 3, his imagination to its 1809, in Hamburg, limits. A little more Germany; died on than a year after Elijahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s November 4, 1847, in HopeLeipzig, Clinic for Women providestriumphant women andpremiere, men Germany with a safe environment for medical care, counsel, and the overworked practical support. With most services free of charge, composer suffered a Elijah, Op. 70 we rely on your generosity to help us grow! series of strokes and died at the age of 38. Mendelssohn initially Ask us about: conceived his oratorio t7PMVOUFFSPQQPSUVOJUJFT t*OLJOEEPOBUJPOT t'JOBODJBMTVQQPSUPQQPSUVOJUJFT t0QFO)PVTFT First performance: Elijah in 1837. He August 26, 1846, at composed the work www.hopeclinicforwomen.org the Birmingham Music in 1845-46, on a Festival in England, commission from the with Mendelssohn Birmingham Music conducting Festival, and later First Nashville revised the score. Symphony Marking the climax of performance: These his career, this hugely Established in 1983 and equipping women, men and families are the orchestraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first ambitious oratorio to make healthy choices with unplanned pregnancies, prevention, performances. provided a vehicle to pregnancy loss and postpartum depression. Estimated length: 128 reaffirm his faith in minutes (not including the elevating power

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SPECIAL EVENT Wednesday, June 26, at 7 p.m. SP E CI A L

PATRON APPRECIATION CONCERT

PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY

E VE NT

Nashville Symphony Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor Gabriel Cabezas, cello Simone Porter, violin Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 Peyzo in forma di sonatina: Andante non troppo - Allegro moderato Walzer: Moderato - Tempo di valse Elテゥgie: Larghetto elegiaco Finale (Tema Russo): Andante - Allegro con spirit CAMILLE SAINT-SAテ起S

Concerto for Cello No. 1 in A minor, Op. 33 Allegro non troppo Allegretto con moto Allegro non troppo (movements played without pause) Gabriel Cabezas, cello INTERMISSION

FELIX MENDELSSOHN

Concerto for Violin in E minor, Op. 64 Allegro molto appassionato Andante Allegretto non troppo - Allegro molto vivace Simone Porter, violin

GIOACHINO ROSSINI

Overture to Il barbiere di Siviglia [The Barber of Seville]

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ABOUT THE SOLOISTS SP E CI A L E VE NT

GABRIEL CABEZAS, cello Born in Chicago in 1992, cellist Gabriel Cabezas has been described as “an intense player who connects to the music naturally, without artifice, and brings a singing line to the cello” (The Oregonian). He has performed as a guest soloist with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, The Cleveland Orchestra, the National Symphony Orchestra of Costa Rica, the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra and the New World Symphony, among others. In March 2007, his first orchestral work, March, was premiered by the Northbrook Symphony. As a chamber musician, Cabezas has performed with Béla Fleck on the televised program From The Top – Live from Carnegie Hall and with the Sphinx Chamber Orchestra at the Sphinx Gala Concert at Carnegie Hall. He has made appearances on the National Public Radio programs From the Top, Bargemusic and Introductions. Most recently, he collaborated with cellist Yo-Yo Ma on The Tavis Smiley Show and ABC’s Good Morning America. Cabezas was awarded first prize at the 2008 Chicago Symphony Orchestra Youth Auditions and the Low Strings Concerto Competition of the 2008 Aspen Music Festival and School. The recipient of the gold medal in the Junior Division of the 2008 Fischoff Chamber Music National Competition, he is also First Prize Laureate of the Junior Division of the 2006 Sphinx National Competition as well as the Senior Division 2012 Sphinx Competition. Cabezas is the Dr. Bobby Ellen Kimbal Annual Fellow at the Curtis Institute of Music, where he studies under Carter Brey.

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SIMONE PORTER, violin At 15, violinist Simone Porter has been recognized as an artist of impassioned energy, musical integrity and vibrant sound. She made her professional solo debut at age 10 with the Seattle Symphony, and her London debut with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra at 13. The growing list of orchestras with which she has appeared include the City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong, the Northern Sinfonia and the Milton Keynes City Orchestra in the U.K., and the Olympia Symphony in Washington, among others. In May 2012, she made her professional recital debut on the Miami International Piano Festival’s “Prodigies and Masters of Tomorrow” series. Porter’s engagements this season have included her Aspen Music Festival debut performing Vivaldi’s Concerto for Two Violins with violinist Adele Anthony. In September, she made her debut with the American Youth Symphony at Los Angeles’s Royce Hall performing Paganini’s Concerto for Violin No. 1, followed by her debut with the Reno Philharmonic in October performing the same piece. In 2008, she had the honor of performing for the Dalai Lama at the opening ceremony of a five-day symposium on compassion in Seattle, Washington. Porter was recently selected as a 2011 Davidson Fellow Laureate by the Davidson Institute for Talent Development. Raised in Seattle, she studied with Margaret Pressley as a recipient of the Dorothy Richard Starling Scholarship for six years and was then admitted into the studio of Robert Lipsett, with whom she presently studies at The Colburn School in Los Angeles.


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SUMMER AT THE SYMPHONY SUMMER

Friday, June 28, at 8 p.m.

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TCHAIKOVSKY’S 1812 OVERTURE Nashville Symphony Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY

Cossack Dance from Mazeppa

PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY

Serenade in C major for Strings, Op. 48 Peyzo in forma di sonatina: Andante non troppo – Allegro moderato Walzer: Moderato – Tempo di valse Elégie: Larghetto elegiaco Finale (Tema Russo): Andante – Allegro con spirito

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Capriccio italien, Op. 45

PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY

1812, Overture solonelle, Op. 49

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PYOT R I LYIC H TC HA IKOV S KY Born on May 7, 1840, in Votkinsk, Russia; died on November 6, 1893, in St. Petersburg, Russia SUMMER

Cossack Dance from Mazeppa

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Tchaikovsky composed his three-act opera Mazeppa between 1881 and 1883. Based on an epic poem by Pushkin involving Ukrainian history, the opera is intensely tragic. Here Tchaikovsky sets the scene with an animated dance and the flavor of folklore. First performance: The complete opera premiered on February 15, 1884, in a production at the Bolshoi in Moscow. First Nashville Symphony performance: November 25 & 26, 2005, with conductor David Hamilton Estimated length: 5 minutes

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his concert of all Tchaikovsky music begins with a taste of the composer’s operatic work. As the perennial success of his ballets shows, Tchaikovsky commanded a powerful instinct for the theater, and his symphonic music contains some of the most electrifyingly dramatic passages in the repertory as well. For various reasons, only two of his operas are regularly staged in the West (Eugene Onegin and The Queen of Spades), but there’s an abundance of excellent music to be found in his neglected stage works. As with Eugene Onegin and The Queen of Spades, the work of Alexander Pushkin provided the source for Tchaikovsky’s seventh opera, Mazeppa. Part political thriller, part love story, the plot is based on a historical incident in the time of Peter the Great. It involves a 17th-century military commander, Ivan Mazeppa, who is caught between love for the much younger Mariya and vengeance against her father. Angry because his daughter has eloped with Mazeppa, Mariya’s father attempts to betray Mazeppa’s plans to lead a secession of the Ukrainian people, but his scheme backfires.

W H AT TO L I ST E N FO R The Cossack Dance (also known as the hopak) is played early in the first act. Like the polonaise or waltz, the hopak as a general type was transferred from folk culture to the concert hall by Russian composers striving for an authentic national style. In this specific case, the boisterous festivity of the dance contains no clue to the multiple tragedies that will unfold in the opera (rejection, a family broken up, torture, execution, warfare and insanity). The mature and respected Mazeppa is here being feted by Mariya’s parents, who are shortly to be astonished that he wants to claim their daughter in marriage. Tchaikovsky has the orchestra strike up an exciting rhythmic pulse before the rest of the ensemble bursts out in colorful phrases. A second folk-like tune takes the stage, and the ideas are traded back and forth. In the concluding passage, the tempo becomes more frenzied as the celebration of Ukrainian culture reaches its climax. The Cossack Dance is scored for 3 flutes (1 doubling piccolo), 2 oboes (1 doubling English horn), 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 2 cornets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion and strings. InConcert

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Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48

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Serenade for Strings dates from the fall of 1880. While in many ways Tchaikovsky expresses the Romantic temperament, Mozart always remained his artistic touchstone, and the Serenade represents a tribute to Mozart’s sense of musical beauty and proportion.

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First performance: December 3, 1880, in a special private performance arranged at the Moscow Conservatory; the first public performance took place on October 30, 1881, in Saint Petersburg. First Nashville Symphony performance: March 22, 2005, with Music Director Kenneth Schermerhorn Estimated length: 34 minutes

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chaikovsky was fashioning this orchestral serenade around the same time as the allstops-out 1812 Overture, which gives you an idea of how far this composer’s imagination could range. The enormous popularity of the latter piece makes for a bit of irony: The sound of the “festival overture” is now fixed in the public ear as perhaps the composer’s signature work, even though, as far as Tchaikovsky himself was concerned, he had put his heart into the Serenade for Strings. He later wrote that it had been written “from inner conviction.” One reason Tchaikovsky was so fond of the Serenade may have to do with his special reverence for Mozart. It was his early encounters with Mozart’s music that made him decide to devote his life to composing, and in 1887, he would write an orchestral suite based on pieces by Mozart to honor the 100th anniversary of his opera Don Giovanni. The Serenade for Strings also entails a Mozart homage, if a less direct one. By invoking the genre of the multi-movement, melody-rich serenade, Tchaikovsky is recalling a type of music that had been perfected by Mozart during his Salzburg years — a musical genre that was often used to celebrate special occasions (weddings, graduation ceremonies and the like). Tchaikovsky’s choice of instrumentation also reveals a Mozartian angle. While the classical serenade typically called for some mix of strings,

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woodwinds and possibly brass, Mozart’s beloved A Little Night Music was unusually cast for strings alone. Tchaikovsky echoes this example by confining himself to strings, since he admired the special clarity of textures this ensemble allows. The Serenade’s four movements suggest something “between a symphony and a string quartet,” as he put it — but in a more relaxed vein, without the heavy-duty working out of motifs conventionally associated with those genres. At the same time, Tchaikovsky writes a separate line for the double basses. This instrument is merely an optional addition in Mozart’s score for A Little Night Music, which can be performed by string quartet plus bass or a full string ensemble. Thus the Serenade was conceived with a more full-bodied sound in mind than the truly chamber-like dimensions of Mozart’s ensemble. Another contemporary touch is that Tchaikovsky unifies the entire Serenade through motivic echoes and internal connections — very much in line with the thinking of the later Romantics.

W H AT TO L I ST E N FO R A slow introduction sets the stage for the Allegro moderato first movement, which Tchaikovsky describes as “a piece in the form of a sonatina” (i.e., a typical first-movement sonata form, but without a central development section). The full ensemble plays a dignified chord sequence reminiscent of a stirring chorale. Its play on the basic idea of scalar motion — here in a pronounced descent — provides the seed for much of Tchaikovsky’s material throughout the work. The first movement proper launches with a simple motif of four notes. The gracefully tapered scales that dart in and out of the foreground suggest a further nod to Mozart’s ingenuity in giving “transition passages” a vivid life of their own. A reprise of the slower opening music ends the movement, but Tchaikovsky asks for a powerfully voiced extra-loud chord in the final measure. The classical poise of the minuet gets updated to a lilting waltz in the second movement. This is, after all, one of Tchaikovsky’s specialties — something choreographer George Balanchine


Tchaikovsky composed the Capriccio italien in 1879-80. Inspired by his stay in Rome, this orchestral postcard, decked out with Italian tunes, shows the composer in a fresher, more buoyant mood — though at the time he was going through a phase of intense personal turmoil.

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t can be a mistake to try to sync up an artist’s internal state of mind with the emotional character or mood of the artwork produced at the same time. This is especially true for a composer like Tchaikovsky, confessional tone poet that he is. If, as cliché has it, he went about continually shrouded in melancholy, how to explain the ebullient spirits of his unforgettable dance music? And in the case of the Capriccio italien, how could such a delectable piece be the product of one of the composer’s bleakest streaks of despair and world-weariness? Tchaikovsky soon came to realize what a mistake he had made by entering into

The Serenade is scored for a string orchestra divided into first and second violins, violas, cellos and double basses.

First performance: December 18, 1880, in Moscow, with Nikolai Rubinstein conducting First Nashville Symphony performance: February 28, 1975, with guest conductor Evan Whallon Estimated length: 16 minutes

a heterosexual marriage in 1877, and he experienced years of emotional freefall as he worked his way through its consequences. Following some stunning accomplishments, including the completion of the monumental Fourth Symphony, his creative work slowed down dramatically while the composer traveled about Europe in search of distraction. He became a “wandering recluse,” in the apt phrase of biographer David Brown. One of his journeys took him to Rome, where Tchaikovsky — always highly sensitive to impressions from his surroundings — made the rounds absorbing works of art and taking in the sights and sounds

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Capriccio italien, Op. 45

movement. The second is in a faster tempo and more clearly related to the dance. Tchaikovsky scores for the strings in a way that mimics native Russian instruments. A sudden modulation of key gives the cue for yet another gratifying tune, which is played high in the cello’s register. Before the unbuttoned final passage, Tchaikovsky makes it clear that the first notes of the Serenade’s opening chorale were simply a slowed-down version of the finale’s Russian dance tune, thus cleverly emphasizing the Serenade’s unity of conception. In his more outwardly ambitious works — above all, the symphonies — Tchaikovsky struggled over a lack of confidence in dealing with issues of formal design. But the Serenade represents one of his most delightfully balanced achievements, in which all the parts find a perfect place within the whole.

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recognized when he designed a ballet based on this music in 1936. The ascending scale shaping the main theme is yet another riff on the motivic pattern now familiar from the first movement. In contrast to the first movement’s ending, however, the music here comes to rest on gentle, barely audible plucked chords. The third movement, the Serenade’s emotional heart, is a slow movement Tchaikovsky titles Elégie. That sounds quite serious, but as biographer David Brown points out, “this is no funereal piece.” Like the first movement, the Elégie begins with a chorale-like passage, which is followed by the first violins intoning an elegant, songlike melody against plucked-string accompaniment. A delicately understated pathos emerges in the darker harmonies near the end. The Elégie fades out on a suspended high D in the first violins, which the finale picks up in its opening bars. Another slow introduction (with muted strings) presents one of two tunes borrowed from Russian folk music for this last


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of the Carnival season. The term capriccio, or caprice, is here meant to suggest the looser formal structure of the piece, with musical ideas laid side by side in a kind of impressionistic fantasy. This idea wasn’t a spontaneous invention by Tchaikovsky: The term alludes to earlier works that display colorful instrumental virtuosity, and Tchaikovsky was also familiar with the Spanish-themed orchestral music written by his predecessor Mikhail Glinka, one of Russian music’s founding fathers.

W HAT TO LIST E N F OR Tchaikovsky has us rise at the break of dawn with a bugle call he is said to have actually heard each morning from his hotel room, played by the soldiers at a nearby barracks. The fanfare spreads out over the brass section and is succeeded by an almost dirge-like melody in the strings — one of a handful that provides the material for the piece. These shadows are swept aside when the fanfare

again rings out in full, sunny glory, and they then return in mournful woodwind phrases. A genuinely cheerful mood settles in with the next tune, entrusted to the oboes. It’s easy to imagine a peddler singing this while going about the piazza, much as Tchaikovsky evokes a scene of wild dancing in one of the later melodies we hear, a fiery tarantella set to a furious rhythm. This folkdance was associated with the cure for (or the aftereffects of) the poisonous bite of a tarantula, and it also makes an appearance in the finale of Mendelssohn’s “Italian” Symphony. Tchaikovsky refracts all this material through his full orchestral spectrum, crafting a musical souvenir that has served as an instant passport ever since. The Capriccio italien is scored for 3 flutes (1 doubling piccolo), 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 2 cornets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion, harp and strings.

1812 Overture, Op. 49 Tchaikovsky composed the 1812 Overture in November 1880 for upcoming events to commemorate the Russian victory over Napoleon’s invading army in 1812. One of classical music’s blockbuster pieces, the Overture is an almost cinematically graphic depiction of warfare and patriotic jubilation.

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nyone who is burdened by the mistaken impression that classical music (or history, for that matter) is somehow “boring” simply needs to be taken to a live performance of the 1812 Overture to have their socks blown off. (For the record, the official title of this work is The Year 1812: A Festival Overture to Mark the Consecration of the Cathedral of Christ the Savior.) Around 1880, Tchaikovsky’s fortunes back at home in Russia were on the rise, and he was commissioned to write a patriotic piece that would be appropriate for a special exhibition as well as the opening ceremonies of a new cathedral commemorating the defeat of Napoleon’s

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First performance: August 20, 1882, in Moscow First Nashville Symphony performance: September 24 & 25, 1971, with Music Director Thor Johnson Estimated length: 15 minutes

invading Grand Army in 1812. The original plan for a coordinated performance in the cathedral square had the elements of site-specific “happening,” but in the end the actual premiere took place in a concert hall. Tchaikovsky also led a performance in New York for the opening of Carnegie Hall in 1891, not long before his death, but it wasn’t until just before the U.S. bicentennial nearly a century later that the 1812 became a standard ritual for July Fourth celebrations.. No matter that generations of snobs have wrinkled their noses at what is, admittedly, music of obviously calculated and even bombastic effect. Tchaikovsky would be the first to agree


Tchaikovsky’s ear for dramatic pacing is so well-tuned that a mapping out of musical events is hardly necessary. He almost anticipates the widely sweeping establishment shots of cinema with his gripping narrative, starting with the whole Russian nation joined in an Orthodox prayer (violas and cellos) as the impending threat approaches. Though the Marseillaise was actually the sonic slogan of the French Revolution, Tchaikovsky exploits its familiarity to represent the invading French forces. A sunlit melody

The 1812 Overture is scored for a large orchestra of 2 flutes, piccolo, 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 2 cornets, 3 trombones, tuba, percussion and strings. In the finale, the extra brass band part may be played by an organ, and percussion and recordings are usually substituted for the sounds of carillon bells and cannon fire in indoor performances. (You didn’t really want live cannon fire in the concert hall, right?) —Thomas May is the Nashville Symphony’s program annotator.

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followed by folk-tinged material sweeps us across a landscape filled with the watching peasantry. It’s especially fun to listen to how Tchaikovsky “stages” the battle in its phases of rout and retreat. At last, of course, victory is celebrated with a blazing, pealing, ringing triumph that sets off an epidemic of goose pimples in audiences no matter how many times they’ve heard this music.

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that this hardly represents his most profound artistic statement. (He even wrote his patroness, right after completing the score, and said the piece “will have no artistic merits at all.”) Still, under the constraints of having to produce music to commemorate a specific occasion — unlike his heartfelt Serenade for Strings, which he interrupted to dash off the 1812 Overture — Tchaikovsky created an exhilarating sonic panorama.


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CO N D U C TO R S

MUSIC DIRECTOR

GIANCARLO GUERRERO

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iancarlo Guerrero is Music Director of the Nashville Symphony Orchestra (NSO) and concurrently holds the position of Principal Guest Conductor of The Cleveland Orchestra Miami Residency. Last year, he led the Nashville Symphony to a GRAMMY® win for a second consecutive year with their recording of American composer Joseph Schwantner’s Concerto for Percussion and Orchestra. His previous recording with the orchestra of Michael Daugherty’s Metropolis Symphony and Deus Ex Machina won three 2011 GRAMMY® Awards, including Best Orchestral Performance. A fervent advocate of new music and contemporary composers, Guerrero has collaborated with and championed the works of several of America’s most respected composers, including John Adams, John Corigliano, Osvaldo Golijov, Jennifer Higdon, Michael Daugherty, Roberto Sierra and Richard Danielpour. In the 2012/13 season, Guerrero makes debuts with the BBC Symphony Orchestra, Deutsches Symphonie Orchester Berlin and Norwegian Radio Orchestra. He returns to the Boston, Indianapolis and Toronto Symphony Orchestras, Philadelphia Orchestra for both its subscription season and at Vail, Brussels Philharmonic, Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra, São Paulo State Symphony Orchestra and to Australia for performances with the Adelaide Symphony and Auckland Philharmonia. An advocate for young musicians and music education, Guerrero now returns annually to Caracas, Venezuela, to conduct the Orquesta Sinfónica Simón Bolívar and to work with young musicians in the country’s lauded El Sistema music program. This season he will also work with the student orchestras of Curtis Institute and the Colburn School. In recent seasons Guerrero has appeared with many of the major North American orchestras, including the symphony orchestras of Baltimore,

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Boston, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dallas, Detroit, Houston, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Philadelphia, San Diego, Seattle, Toronto, Vancouver and the National Symphony in Washington, D.C., as well as at several major summer festivals, including the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl, The Cleveland Orchestra at Blossom Music Festival and Indiana University’s summer orchestra festival. He is also establishing an increasingly visible profile in Europe, where his upcoming engagements will include a debut appearance with the London Philharmonic Orchestra. Last season, he led a five-city European tour with the Monte Carlo Philharmonic. Early in his career, Guerrero worked regularly with the Costa Rican Lyric Opera, and in recent seasons has conducted new productions of Carmen, La Bohème and Rigoletto. Future plans include productions at the Houston Grand Opera and Marseille Opera. In February 2008, he gave the Australian premiere of Osvaldo Golijov’s one-act opera Ainadamar at the Adelaide Festival, to great acclaim. In June 2004, Guerrero was honored with the Helen M. Thompson Award by the American Symphony Orchestra League, which recognizes outstanding achievement among young conductors nationwide. Guerrero holds degrees from Baylor and Northwestern universities. He was previously the Music Director of the Eugene Symphony in Oregon. From 1999 to 2004, he served as Associate Conductor of the Minnesota Orchestra, where he made his subscription debut in March 2000 leading the world premiere of John Corigliano’s Phantasmagoria on the Ghosts of Versailles. Prior to his tenure with the Minnesota Orchestra, he served as Music Director of the Táchira Symphony Orchestra in Venezuela.


ASSOCIATE CONDUCTOR

ALBERT-GEORGE SCHRAM

KELLY CORCORAN

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lbert-George Schram, a native of the Netherlands, has served as Resident Conductor of the Nashville Symphony since 2006. While he has conducted on all series the orchestra offers, Schram is primarily responsible for its Bank of America Pops Series. Schram’s longest tenure has been with the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, where he has worked in a variety of capacities since 1979. As a regular guest conductor of the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra, Schram in 2002 opened the orchestra’s new permanent summer home, Symphony Park. From 1990 to 1996, he served as resident conductor of the Louisville Orchestra. The former Florida Philharmonic Orchestra appointed Schram as resident conductor beginning with the 2002/03 season. In 2008 Schram was invited to conduct the Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional of Bolivia and the Orquesta Sinfónica UNCuyo in Mendoza, Argentina. His other foreign conducting engagements have included the KBS Symphony Orchestra and the Taegu Symphony Orchestra in Korea, and the Orchester der Allgemeinen Musikgesellschaft Luzern in Switzerland. He has returned to his native Holland to conduct the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic and the Netherlands Broadcast Orchestra. In the U.S., his recent and coming guest conducting appearances include the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, Tucson Symphony, Louisiana Philharmonic, Oklahoma City Philharmonic, Spokane Symphony, Dayton Philharmonic, Shreveport Symphony, San Antonio Symphony, Allentown Symphony and the Mansfield Symphony. Schram’s studies have been largely in the European tradition under the tutelage of Franco Ferrara, Rafael Kubelik, Abraham Kaplan and Neeme Järvi. He received his initial training at the Conservatory of The Hague in the Netherlands, then later moved to Canada to undertake studies at the universities of Calgary and Victoria. His training was completed at the University of Washington.

he 2012/13 season marks Associate Conductor Kelly Corcoran’s sixth season with the Nashville Symphony. During this time, she has conducted a variety of programs, including the Classical and Pops Series, and has served as the primary conductor for the orchestra’s education and community engagement concerts. She made her Carnegie Hall conducting debut in May 2012 with the Nashville Symphony during the Spring For Music Festival. This season she is also the Acting Director for the Nashville Symphony Chorus. Corcoran appears this season with The Cleveland Orchestra, Naples Philharmonic, Louisville Orchestra, Knoxville Symphony and as a Music Director candidate with the Topeka Symphony and FargoMoorhead Symphony. She has conducted major orchestras throughout the country, including the Atlanta, Detroit, Houston, Milwaukee and National Symphonies, often with return engagements. In 2009, she made her South American debut as a guest conductor with the Orquesta Sinfónica UNCuyo in Mendoza, Argentina, returning for multiple subscription programs in 2011. Named as Honorable Mention for the Taki Concordia Conducting Fellowship, Corcoran studied with Marin Alsop and shared performances with her and the Bournemouth (UK) Symphony and Colorado Symphony. Prior to Nashville, she completed three seasons as assistant conductor for the Canton Symphony Orchestra in Ohio and music director of the Canton Youth Symphony and the Cleveland-area Heights Chamber Orchestra. Corcoran attended the Lucerne Festival’s master class in conducting with Pierre Boulez. In 2004, Corcoran participated in the National Conducting Institute, where she studied with Leonard Slatkin. Her past posts include assistant music director of the Nashville Opera, founder/music director of the Nashville Philharmonic Orchestra and fellow with the New World Symphony. Originally from Massachusetts and a member of the Tanglewood Festival Chorus for more than 10 years, Corcoran received her Bachelor of Music in vocal performance from The Boston Conservatory and her Master of Music in instrumental conducting from Indiana University.

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RESIDENT CONDUCTOR


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2012/13 NASHVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA FIRST VIOLINS*

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Gerald C. Greer, Assistant Concertmaster

Mary Kathryn Van Osdale, Concertmaster Emerita

Denise Baker Kristi Seehafer John Maple Deidre Fominaya Bacco Alison Gooding Paul Tobias Beverly Drukker Anna Lisa HoepďŹ nger Kirsten Mitchell Erin Long+ Isabel Bartles SECOND VIOLINS*

Carolyn Wann Bailey, Principal

GIANCARLO GUERRERO Music Director ALBERT-GEORGE SCHRAM Resident Conductor KELLY CORCORAN Associate Conductor

Zeneba Bowers, Assistant Principal

Kenneth Barnd Jessica Blackwell Rebecca Cole Radu Georgescu Benjamin Lloyd Louise Morrison Laura Ross Lisa Thrall+ Adrienne Watkinson++ Jeremy Williams Rebecca J Willie VIOLAS*

Daniel Reinker, Principal

Shu-Zheng Yang, Assistant Principal Judith Ablon

Hari Bernstein Bruce Christensen Michelle Lackey Collins Christopher Farrell Mary Helen Law Melinda Whitley Clare Yang CELLOS*

Anthony LaMarchina, Principal

Julia Tanner, Assistant Principal James Victor Miller Chair

Bradley Mansell Lynn Marie Peithman Stephen Drake Michael Samis Matthew Walker

Radu V. Rusu,

BASSES*

Joel Reist, Principal

Glen Wanner, Assistant Principal

Elizabeth Stewart Gary Lawrence, Principal Emeritus

Kevin Jablonski FLUTES

Erik Gratton, Principal Anne Potter Wilson Chair

Ann Richards,

Acting Associate Principal/ 3rd Horn

Hunter Sholar Jennifer Kummer, Acting Assistant 1st Horn TRUMPETS

Jeffrey Bailey, Principal

Patrick Kunkee, Co-Principal

Preston Bailey, Acting Assistant Principal TROMBONES

Susan K. Smith, Acting Principal

Prentiss Hobbs, Acting Assistant Principal

Assistant Principal

Kathryn Ladner PICCOLO

Kathryn Ladner, Norma Grobman Rogers Chair OBOES

James Button, Principal

Ellen Menking,

BASS TROMBONE

Steven Brown TUBA

Gilbert Long, Principal TIMPANI

William G. Wiggins, Principal

Assistant Principal

Roger Wiesmeyer ENGLISH HORN

PERCUSSION

Sam Bacco, Principal

Roger Wiesmeyer

Richard Graber,

CLARINETS

Trent Leasure

Assistant Principal

James Zimmermann, Principal

Cassandra Lee, Assistant Principal

Daniel Lochrie E-FLAT CLARINET

Cassandra Lee BASS CLARINET

Daniel Lochrie BASSOONS

Cynthia Estill,

HARP

Licia Jaskunas, Principal KEYBOARD

Robert Marler, Principal LIBRARIANS

D. Wilson Ochoa, Principal

Jennifer Goldberg, Librarian

Principal

Dawn Hartley, Gil Perel

ORCHESTRA PERSONNEL MANAGERS

CONTRA BASSOON

Anne Dickson Rogers Carrie Marcantonio,

Assistant Principal

Gil Perel HORNS

Leslie Norton, Principal

Beth Beeson

Assistant *Section seating revolves +Leave of Absence ++Replacement/Extra

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53

ROSTER

photos by Jackson DeParis

Associate Concertmaster

Erin Hall,

HORNS

Christopher Stenstrom Keith Nicholas Xiao-Fan Zhang

ORCHESTRA

Concertmaster Walter Buchanan Sharp Chair

CELLOS*


B OA R D

2012/13 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

O F D I R E C TO R S

OFFICERS

DIRECTORS

Edward A. Goodrich Board Chair

Janet Ayers John Bailey III Joseph Barker Russell Bates Scott Becker David Black Jack Bovender Jr. Anastasia Brown Keith Churchwell Rebecca Cole * Michelle R. Collins * Lisa Cooper * Ben Cundiff Carol Daniels Robert Dennis Robert Ezrin Benjamin Folds Judy Foster James Gooch Alison Gooding * Amy Grant Carl Haley Jr. Michael W. Hayes

James Seabury III Board Chair Elect Kevin Crumbo Board Treasurer Betsy Wills * Board Secretary Alan D. Valentine * President & CEO

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S EPTEM B ER 2 0 1 2

Billy Ray Hearn Lee Ann Ingram Martha R. Ingram * Elliott Warner Jones Sr. Larry Larkin John T. Lewis Richard Miller Eduardo Minardi David Morgan Peter Neff Cano Ozgener Victoria Chu Pao Pam Pfeffer Deborah Pitts Jennifer H. Puryear Anne Russell Michael Samis * Nelson Shields Beverly K. Small Renata Soto Brett Sweet Van Tucker Steve Turner

Mark Wait Jeffery Walraven Johnna Watson Ted Houston Welch William Greer Wiggins * David Williams II Harry Williams Jr. * Jeremy Williams * Rebecca Willie * Clare Yang * Donna Yurdin * Shirley Zeitlin James Zimmermann * *Indicates Ex Officio Ingram Scholar Intern Marwah Shahid


BOX OFFICE/TICKETING & SALES Kimberly Darlington, Director of Ticket Services Emily Shannon, Box Office Manager Tina Messer, Ticket Services Specialist Missy Hubner, Ticket Services Assistant Sheridan Ernst-Cavanaugh, Group Ticket Services Specialist Jackie Knox, Director of Sales Marketing Associates: Alexandra Arekelian, Richard Bartkowiak, Linda Booth, Toni Conn, James Calvin Davidson, Kevin Davis, Kimberly DePue, Mark Haining, Lloyd Harper, Rick Katz, Deborah King, Misha Robledo, Dustin Skilbred DATA STANDARDS Tony Exler, Director of Data Standards Sheila Wilson, Sr. Database Associate DEVELOPMENT Erin Wenzel, CFRE, Sr. Director of Special Campaigns Maribeth Stahl, Sr. Director of Annual Campaigns Hayden Pruett, Major Gifts Officer Sara Davenport, Development and League Events Manager Jason Parker, Grants and Research Manager Dan Tonelson, Corporate Development Manager EDUCATION Blair Bodine, Director of Education and Community Engagement Andy Campbell, Education and Community Engagement Program Manager Kelley Bell, Education and Community Engagement Assistant FINANCE Karen Warren, Controller Pam Lindemann, Payroll and Accounts Payable Manager Sheri Switzer, Senior Accountant Steven McNeal, Staff Accountant FOOD, BEVERAGE AND EVENTS Steve Perdue, Sr. Director of Food, Beverage and Events Mauricio Bussolino, Executive Chef Tyler Smith, Executive Sous Chef Jake Van Denend, Sous Chef Lacy Lusebrink, Food and Beverage Manager Bruce Pittman, Catering & Events Sales Manager

HUMAN RESOURCES Ashley Skinner, Director of Human Resources Kathleen Conwell, Human Resources Coordinator Kathleen McCracken, Volunteer Manager and League Liaison Martha Bryant, Receptionist and Human Resources Assistant

STA F F

ARTISTIC ADMINISTRATION Laurence Tucker, Director of Artistic Administration Emma Smyth, Manager of Artistic Administration Ellen Kasperek, Manager of Pops and Special Programs Andrew Risinger, Organ Curator

Hays McWhirter,Catering and Events Manager Collin Husbands, Catering and Events Manager Staci Davenport, Food, Beverage and Events Assistant Johnathon McGee, Food and Beverage Supervisor Schuyler Thomas, Food and Beverage Supervisor Anderson S. Barns, Beverage Manager Garland Smith, Beverage Supervisor Debra Hollenbeck, Buyer/Retail Manager

SY M P HO NY

EXECUTIVE Alan D. Valentine, President and CEO Karen Fairbend, Executive Assistant to the President and CEO Myles McDonald, Interim COO Mark A. Blakeman, Senior Vice President, General Manager Katy Lyles, Assistant to the Senior Vice President and General Manager Michael Kirby, V.P. of Finance and Administration and CFO Jonathan Norris, V.P., Revenue Delaney Gray, Assistant to the V.P., Revenue

NA SHVI L L E

2012/13 NASHVILLE SYMPHONY STAFF

I.T. Dan Sanders, Director of Information Technology Trenton Leach, Software Applications Developer Chris Beckner, Technical Support Specialist MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Jonathan Marx, Sr. Director of Marketing & Communications Misty Cochran, Director of Advertising and Promotions Laurie Davis, Publicist Nancy VanReece, Social Media Strategist and Website Manager Jessi Menish, Graphic Designer Sean Shields, Graphic Design Associate PATRON SERVICES Eric Adams, Director of Patron Services Patron Services Specialists: Dennis Carter, Gina Haining, Paul Shearer, Judith Wall PRODUCTION AND ORCHESTRA OPERATIONS Tim Lynch, Sr. Director of Operations and Orchestra Manager Anne Dickson Rogers, Director of Orchestra Personnel Carrie Marcantonio, Assistant Orchestra Personnel Manager D. Wilson Ochoa, Principal Librarian Jennifer Goldberg, Librarian John Sanders, Chief Technical Engineer Brian Doane, Production Manager Mitch Hansen, Lighting Director Michelle Griesmer, Assistant Lighting Director Gary Call, Audio Engineer Mark Dahlen, Audio Engineer W. Paul Holt, Stage Manager Josh Walliser, Stage and Production Assistant VENUE MANAGEMENT Eric Swartz, Associate V.P. of Venue Management Danny Covington, Chief Engineer Kenneth Dillehay, Facility Maintenance Technician Wade Johnson, Housekeeping Manager Kevin Butler, Lead Housekeeper/Utility DeAndrea Mason, Housekeeper Tony Meyers, Director of Security and Front of House Alan Woodard, Security Guard

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I N DI VI DU A L S

The Nashville Symphony is deeply grateful to the following individuals who support its concert season and its services to the community through their generous contributions to the Annual Fund. Donors as of May 1, 2013:

A NNU A L

MARTHA RIVERS INGRAM SOCIETY Gifts of $25,000 +

F U ND

David & Diane Black Mr. & Mrs. John Chadwick

Carol & Frank Daniels III Mrs. Martha Rivers Ingram

WALTER SHARP SOCIETY Gifts of $15,000 - $24,999 Anonymous (1) Judy & Joe Barker

Martin Brown Family Dr. & Mrs. Howard S. Kirshner

Mr. & Mrs. Cano Ozgener Mr. & Mrs. Steve Turner

VIRTUOSO SOCIETY Gifts of $10,000-$14,999 Anonymous (1) Mr. & Mrs. Jack O. Bovender Jr. Richard & Judith Bracken Mr.* & Mrs. J. C. Bradford Jr. Mac & Linda Crawford Janine & Ben Cundiff Mr. & Mrs. Brownlee O. Currey Jr.

Giancarlo & Shirley Guerrero Carl & Connie Haley Patricia & H. Rodes Hart Jan & Daniel Lewis The Melkus Family Foundation The Honorable Gilbert S. Merritt Richard & Sharalena Miller

Dr. Harrell Odom II & Mr. Barry W. Cook Mr. & Mrs. Philip M. Pfeffer Mr. & Mrs. Ben R. Rechter Mr. & Mrs. James C. Seabury III Margaret & Cal Turner

STRADIVARIUS SOCIETY Gifts of $5,000 - $9,999 Anonymous (1) Mr. & Mrs. James Ayers J. B. & Carylon Baker Russell W. Bates Dr. & Mrs. Robert O. Begtrup Ann & Frank Bumstead Ann Scott Carell* Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Carlton Fred Cassetty Kelly & Bill Christie Mr. & Mrs. Tom F. Cone Mr. & Mrs. Kevin W. Crumbo Hilton & Sallie Dean Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Dennis Marty & Betty Dickens Dee & Jerald Doochin Laura & Wayne Dugas Mr. & Mrs. Jere M. Ervin

Annette S. Eskind The Jane & Richard Eskind & Family Foundation Marilyn Ezell John & Lorelee Gawaluck Allis Dale & John Gillmor Ed & Nancy Goodrich Mr. & Mrs. Billy Ray Hearn Helen & Neil Hemphill Mrs. V. Davis Hunt Mr. & Mrs. David B. Ingram Lee Ann & Orrin Ingram Keith & Nancy Johnson Elliott Warner Jones & Marilyn Lee Jones Anne Knauff Christine Konradi & Stephan Heckers

Ralph & Donna Korpman Mr. & Mrs. Fred W. Lazenby Dr. & Mrs. George R. Lee Jim Lewis Zachary Liff Robert Straus Lipman Ellen Harrison Martin Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. McCabe Jr. Sheila & Richard McCarty Edward D. & Linda F. Miles Anne & Peter Neff Dr. Barron Patterson & Mr. Burton Jablin Hal & Peggy Pennington Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Pruett Carol & John T. Rochford Anne & Joe Russell Joe & Dorothy Scarlett

Dr. & Mrs. Michael H. Schatzlein Dr. & Mrs. John Selby Mr.* & Mrs. Nelson Severinghaus Ronald & Diane Shafer Nelson & Sheila Shields Mr. & Mrs. Irvin Small Mr. & Mrs. Earl S. Swensson Dr. John B. Thomison* Mr. & Mrs. Louis B. Todd Jr. Alan D. Valentine Peggy & John Warner Ms. Johnna Benedict Watson Mr. & Mrs. Ted H. Welch David & Gail Williams Barbara & Bud Zander Mr. Nicholas S. Zeppos & Ms. Lydia A. Howarth

GOLDEN BATON SOCIETY Gifts of $2,500 - $4,999 Anonymous (1) Clint & Kali Adams Mrs. R. Benton Adkins Jr. Drs. W. Scott & Paige Akers Jon K. & Colleen Atwood Dr. & Mrs. Elbert Baker Jr. Ms. Marilyn Bell Mark & Sarah Blakeman Dr. & Mrs. Frank H. Boehm Jamey Bowen & Norman Wells Dan & Mindy Brodbeck Mr. & Mrs. Paul J. Buijsman Drs. Rodney & Janice Burt Mrs. Patricia B. Buzzell Mr. Philip M. Cavender

56

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Mr. & Mrs. Terry W. Chandler Drs. Keith & Leslie Churchwell Dorit & Donald Cochron Marjorie & Allen* Collins The Honorable & Mrs. Lewis H. Conner Richard & Sherry Cooper Mr. & Mrs. James H. Costner Mr. & Mrs. Justin Dell Crosslin Dr. & Mrs. Ben Davis John & Natasha Deane The Rev. & Mrs. Fred Dettwiller Donna & Jeffrey Eskind Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Ezrin Tom & Judy Foster Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Frist Jr.

Cathey & Wilford Fuqua Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Giacobone Harris A. Gilbert William & Helen Gleason Mr. & Mrs. Fred C. Goad Jr. James C. Gooch & Jennie P. Smith Tony & Teri Gosse Mr. & Mrs. C. David GrifďŹ n Suzy Heer Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Hilton Ms. Cornelia B. Holland Dr. & Mrs. Stephen L. Houff Mr. & Mrs. Donald J. Israel Donald L. Jackson Mr. & Mrs. John F. Jacques


Dr. & Mrs. Alexander Townes Drs. Pilar Vargas & Sten H. Vermund Mr. Vince Vinson Deborah & Mark Wait Mr. & Mrs. Jeffery C. & Dayna L. Walraven Mrs. W. Miles Warfield Jonathan & Janet Weaver Carroll Van West & Mary Hoffschwelle Art & Lisa Wheeler Charles Hampton White Mr. & Mrs. Jimmie D. White Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Wimberly Dr. Artmas L. Worthy Shirley Zeitlin

F U ND

Ms. Agatha L. Nolen Jonathan R. Norris & Jennifer Carlat Drs. Mark & Nancy Peacock Keith & Deborah Pitts Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Priesmeyer Mr. & Mrs. Gustavus A. Puryear IV Eric Raefsky, M.D. & Ms. Victoria Heil Anne & Charles Roos Geoffrey & Sandra Sanderson Mr. & Mrs. Scott C. Satterwhite Mr. & Mrs. J. Ronald Scott Stephen K. & Patricia L. Seale Mr.* & Mrs. Martin E. Simmons Jack & Louise Spann Christopher & Maribeth Stahl Pamela & Steven Taylor Rich & Carol Thigpin Scott & Julie Thomas

A NNU A L

Robin & Bill King Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Koban Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Kovach Robert & Carol Lampe Mr. & Mrs. Joseph B. Ledbetter Jr. John T. Lewis Myles & Joan MacDonald Red & Shari Martin Mr. & Mrs. Martin F. McNamara III Dr. Arthur M. Mellor F. Max & Mary A. Merrell Mr. & Mrs. Eduardo H. Minardi Christopher & Patricia Mixon Mr. David K. Morgan Ms. Lucy H. Morgan James & Patricia Munro Lannie W. Neal Mr. Mark E. Nicol

CONDUCTOR’S CIRCLE Gifts of $1,000 - $2,499 Anonymous (13) Jerry Adams Jeff & Tina Adams James & Glyna Aderhold Mark & Niki Antonini Ms. Teresa Broyles-Aplin Jeremy & Rebecca Atack Grace & Carl Awh Sallie & John Bailey Dr. & Mrs. Billy R. Ballard Mr. & Mrs. H. Lee Barfield II Barbara & Mike Barton Mrs. Brenda Bass Mr. & Mrs. James Beckner Betty C. Bellamy Mr. & Mrs. Louie A. Belt Dr. Eric & Elaine Berg Frank M. Berklacich, MD Mr.* & Mrs. Harold S. Bernard Mr. & Mrs. Raymond P. Bills Mr. David Blackbourn & Ms. Celia Applegate Dennis & Tammy Boehms Bob & Marion Bogen Mr. & Mrs. Robert Boyd Bogle III Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Bottorff Jean & David Buchanan Dr. & Mrs. Glenn Buckspan Mr.* & Mrs. Arthur H. Buhl III Sharon Lee Butcher Chuck & Sandra Cagle John E. Cain III Mr. & Mrs. Gerald G. Calhoun Mr. & Mrs. William H. Cammack Jan & Jim Carell Ann & Sykes Cargile Mr. & Mrs. William F. Carpenter III Clint & Patty Carter Dr. & Mrs. Dennis C. Carter Michael & Pamela Carter Anita & Larry Cash Mary & Joseph Cavarra Erica & Doug Chappell Barbara & Eric Chazen Donna R. Cheek James H. Cheek III Mrs. John Hancock Cheek Jr. Catherine Chitwood M. Wayne Chomik Mr. & Mrs. Sam E. Christopher David & Starling Clark George D. Clark Jr. Mr. Terry Clyne Esther & Roger Cohn Ed & Pat Cole

Chase Cole Mr.* & Mrs. W. Ovid Collins Mr. Brian Cook Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Cook Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Joe C. Cook III Joe & Judy Cook Teresa Corlew & Wes Allen Nancy Krider Corley Roger & Barbara Cottrell Mr. & Mrs. Roy J. Covert Mr. & Mrs. Donald S. A. Cowan James L. & Sharon H. Cox Dr. & Mrs. James Crafton Drs. Paul A. & Dorothy Valcarcel Craig Mr. & Mrs. J. Bradford Currie Greg & Collie Daily Mr. Charles E. Daley M. Maitland DeLand, M.D. Mr. & Mrs. Daryl Demonbreun Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Doochin Stephen & Kimberly Drake Laura L. Dunbar Mr. & Mrs. Glenn Eaden E.B.S. Foundation Dr. & Mrs. E. Mac Edington Mr. & Mrs. Thomas S. Edmondson Sr. Robert D. Eisenstein David Ellis & Barry Wilker Drs. James & Rena Ellzy Dr. Jack W. Erter Laurie & Steven Eskind Robert & Cassandra Estes Mr. Matthew Evers Mr. & Mrs. DeWitt Ezell Dr. Meredith A. Ezell Ms. Paula Fairchild Mrs. Nancye Feistritzer Mr. & Mrs. John Ferguson T. Aldrich Finegan John & Cindy Watson Ford Ms. Deborah F. Turner & Ms. Beth A. Fortune Drs. Robert & Sharron Francis Danna & Bill Francis Dr. & Mrs. John R. Furman Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas R. Ganick Carlene Hunt & Marshall Gaskins Mr. & Mrs. Roy J. Gilleland III Frank Ginanni Nancy & Gerry Goffinet Dr. Fred & Martha Goldner The Evelyn S. & Jim Horne Hankins Foundation Mr. & Mrs. James O. Hastings Jr.

Mr. & Mrs. John Burton Hayes Ms. Doris Ann Hendrix Carrie & Damon Hininger Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey N. Hinson Judith Hodges Ken & Pam Hoffman Mr. & Mrs. Dan W. Hogan Mr. & Mrs. Richard Holton Mr. & Mrs. Henry W. Hooker Mr. & Mrs. Ephriam H. Hoover III Vicki & Rick Horne Ray Houston Hudson Family Foundation Drs. James I. and Margo Hudson III Donna & Ronn Huff Mr. & Mrs. Thomas W. Hulme Dr. & Mrs. Stephen P. Humphrey Judith S. & James R. Humphreys Marsha & Keel Hunt Mr. & Mrs. Charles L. Irby Sr. Bud Ireland Rodney Irvin Family Mr. & Mrs. Toshinari Ishii Ellen & Kenneth Jacobs Lee & Pat Jennings George & Shirley Johnston Jan Jones & Steve Williams Mary Loventhal Jones Mrs. Robert N. Joyner Ray & Rosemarie Kalil Mr. & Mrs. James Kelso Michael & Melissa Kirby Tom & Darlene Klaritch Walter & Sarah Knestrick William C. & Deborah Patterson Koch Ms. Pamela L. Koerner Mr. & Mrs. Gene C. Koonce Heloise Werthan Kuhn Mr. & Mrs. Randolph M. LaGasse Bob & Mary LaGrone Larry & Martha Larkin Richard & Diane Larsen Kevin P. & May Lavender Sandi & Tom Lawless Dr. & Mrs. John W. Lea IV Sally M. Levine Don & Patti Liedtke Dr. & Mrs. T. A. Lincoln Dr. & Mrs. Christopher Lind Margaret & Bill Lindberg Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Lipman Dr. John F. Manning Jr.

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A NNU A L F U ND

Rhonda A. Martocci & William S. Blaylock Lynn & Jack May Bob Maynard Mr. Charles W. McDowell Joey & Beth McDuffee Tommy & Cat McEwen Mr. & Mrs. Robert McNeilly Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Richard D. McRae III Dr. Mark & Mrs. Theresa Messenger Mr. & Mrs. William T. Minkoff Jr. Diana & Jeff Mobley Mr. & Mrs. William P. Morelli Patricia & Michael Moseley Matt & Rhonda Mulroy Leonard Murray & Jacqueline Marschak Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. Nave Jr. Robert Ness Mr. & Mrs. Douglas Odom Jr. Representative & Mrs. Gary L. Odom Dan & Helen Owens The Paisley Family David & Pamela Palmer Victoria & William Pao Mr. & Mrs. William C. Pfaender Dr. Edgar H. Pierce Jr. David & Adrienne Piston Mr. Charles H. Potter Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Joseph K. Presley Mr. & Mrs. Paul E. Prill Dr. Gipsie B. Ranney Ms. Allison R. Reed & Mr. Sam Garza Drs. Jeff & Kellye Rice Mr. & Mrs. Doyle R. Rippee Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Riven Mr. & Mrs. John A. Roberts Margaret Ann & Walter Robinson Foundation

Mr. & Mrs. David L. Rollins Ms. Sara L. Rosson & Ms. Nancy Menke Georgianna W. Russell James & Patricia Russell David Sampsell Paula & Kent Sandidge Mr. & Mrs. John J. Sangervasi Samuel A. Santoro & Mary M. Zutter Mr. & Mrs. Eric M. Saul Dr. Norm Scarborough & Ms. Kimberly Hewell Mr. Paul H. Scarbrough Ms. Sandra A. Schatten Mrs. Cooper M. Schley Dr. & Mrs. R. Bruce Shack Joan B. Shayne Anita & Mike Shea Allen Spears* & Colleen Sheppard Bill & Sharon Sheriff Dr. & Mrs. Andrew Shinar Dr. & Mrs. Nicholas A. Sieveking Sr. Luke & Susan Simons Tom & Sylvia Singleton William & Cyndi Sites George & Mary Sloan Drs. Walter E. Smalley Jr. & Louise Hanson Mr. & Mrs. Brian S. Smallwood Suzanne & Grant Smothers K. C. & Mary Smythe Mr. & Mrs. James H. Spalding Mr. & Mrs. Hans Stabell Dr. Michael & Tracy Stadnick Mr. & Mrs. Joe N. Steakley Dr. & Mrs. Robert Stein Mr. & Mrs. David B. Stewart Jane Lawrence Stone

Mr. & Mrs. James G. Stranch III Ann & Bob Street Mrs. Susan & Volker Striepe M.D. Bruce & Elaine Sullivan Johanna & Fridolin Sulser James B. & Patricia B. Swan Brett & Meredythe Sweet Dr. Steve A. Hyman & Mr. Mark Lee Taylor Ann M. Teaff & Donald McPherson III Dr. & Mrs. William Thetford Dr. & Mrs. Clarence S. Thomas Mr. Dwight D. Thrash Candy Toler Norman & Marilyn Tolk Joe & Ellen Torrence Mr. & Mrs. Marshall Trammell Thomas L. & Judith A. Turk Christi & Jay Turner The Vandewater Family Foundation Larry & Brenda Vickers Kris & G. G. Waggoner Dr. & Mrs. Robert W. Wahl Mike & Elaine Walker Mr. & Mrs. Martin H. Warren Talmage M. Watts Erin Wenzel Mr. & Mrs. Thomas G. B. Wheelock Stacy Widelitz Mr. & Mrs. William G. Wiggins Mr. & Mrs. David M. Wilds Craig P. Williams & Kimberly Schenk Judy S. Williams Mr. & Mrs. Ridley Wills II Mr. & Mrs. William M. Wilson Ms. Marilyn Shields-Wiltsie & Dr. Theodore E. Wiltsie Dr. & Mrs. Lawrence K. Wolfe

CONCERTMASTER Gifts of $500 - $999 Anonymous (17) Carol M. Allen Andy & Karen Anderson Jeff & Carrie Bailey Dr. Houston A. Baker Richard W. Baker Mr. Randall B. Ball Susan F. & Paul J. Ballard George E. Barrett Mr. & Mrs. Edwin R. Barton Dr. & Mrs. Jere Bass Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Bateman Katrin T. Bean Marti Bellingrath Bernice Amanda Belue Ralph & Jane Black Randolph & Elaine Blake Mr. & Mrs. Bill Blevins Dr. & Mrs. Marion G. Bolin Irma Bolster Mr. & Mrs. William E. Boyte Mr. Randal Braker Robert* & Barbara Braswell Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Braun Dr. & Mrs. Phillip L. Bressman Berry & Connie Brooks Bob & Kay Brotherton Anastasia Brown Dr. Pamela E. Brown Dr. Roger & Mrs.* Donah Burgess Gene & Jamie Burton

58

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Mr. Peter L. Bush Dr. & Mrs. Grady Butler James Button Michael & Linda Carlson Bill & Chris Carver Mr. & Mrs. Christopher John Casa Santa Ms. Pamela Casey John & Susan Chambers Dr. & Mrs. Robert H. Christenberry Jay & Ellen Clayton Sallylou & David Cloyd Dr. & Mrs. Alan G. Cohen Mr. & Mrs. Domer Collins William & Margaret Connor Paul & Alyce Cooke Marion Pickering Couch Dr. Robert Crants III Ms. Susannah C. Culbertson Kimberly L. Darlington Mr. & Mrs. Edgar Davenport Maria Gabriella Giro & Jeff Davidson Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Davis Mrs. Edwin DeMoss Mr. Carl Denney Wally & Lee Lee Dietz Peter & Kathleen Donofrio Tere & David Dowland Ms. Katie Doyle Mr. & Mrs. Frank W. Drake

Mrs. Sheila D. Duke Dr. Jane Easdown & Dr. James Booth Dr. James E. Edwards Mrs. Clara Elam Dr. Christopher & Wendy Ellis Mr. Owen T. Embry Mr. & Mrs. William H. Eskind Dr. John & Janet Exton Bill & Dian S. Ezell Michael & Rosemary Fedele Bill Fialkowski, M.D. Ms. Fern Fitzhenry Bela Fleck Dr. Arthur C. Fleischer & Family Patrick & Kimberly Forrest Robert & Peggy Frye Suzanne J. Fuller Bill & Ginny Gable John & Eva Gebhart Dr. & Mrs. Harold L. Gentry Mr. & Mrs. H. Steven George Dodie & Carl George Mr. & Mrs. Stewart J. Gilchrist Mr. Benjamin L. Gordon Bryan D. Graves Richard & Randi Green RenĂŠe & Tony Halterlein Dr. & Mrs. Thomas L. Hardy Kent & Becky Harrell Dr. & Mrs. Jason Haslam


Virginia O'Brien D. Wilson Ochoa Mr. & Mrs. Russell Oldfield Jr. Mr. Sergio Ora Judy Oxford & Grant Benedict Dr. & Mrs. Harry L. Page Ms. Jeanne E. Pankow Mr. & Mrs. M. Forrest Parmley Ms. Lisa Pasho-Coughlin Grant & Janet Patterson John W. & Mary Patterson Drs. Teresa & Phillip Patterson Dr. & Mrs. Joel Q. Peavyhouse Mr. John S. Perry Linda & Carter Philips Gaynelle Pitner Ms. Julie B. Plexico Rick & Diane Poen Mr. John Pope Dr. & Mrs. James L. Potts J. Hayden Pruett George & Joyce Pust Mr. Edwin B. Raskin Charles H. & Eleanor L. Raths Franco & Cynthia Recchia Mary Riddle Susan B. Ridley Mrs. Julie A. Roe Mr. & Mrs. Doug Rogers Dr. & Mrs. Jorge Rojas Mr. & Mrs. David C. Roland Laura Ross Samuel L. & Barbara Sanders Philip & Jane Sanderson David M. Satterfield Pam & Roland Schneller

F U ND

George & Cathy Lynch Tim Lynch William R. & Maria T. MacKay Mr. & Mrs. Don MacLachlan Donald M. & Kala W.* MacLeod Joe & Anne Maddux James & Gene Manning Mr. & Mrs. Michael R. Manno James & Patricia Martineau Mr. & Mrs. Leon May Drs. Ricardo Fonseca & Ingrid Mayer Peg & Al McCree Dr. & Mrs. Alexander C. McLeod Ed & Tracy McNally Sam & Sandra McSeveney Dr. & Mrs. Robert A. Mericle Bruce & Bonnie Meriwether Cedric & Delberta Miller Drs. Randolph & Linda Miller Dr. & Mrs. Kent B. Millspaugh Dr. Jere Mitchum Dr. & Mrs. Charles L. Moffatt Ms. Gay Moon Beth & Paul Moore Cynthia & Richard Morin Margaret & David Moss Dick & Mary Jo Murphy Lucille C. Nabors Larry & Marsha Nager Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Nagle Leslie & Scott Newman Lonnie & Allene Newton William & Kathryn Nicholson Mr. Brian M. Norris Jane K. Norris

A NNU A L

Mr. Scott Hatcher Mr. & Mrs. Doug Hauseman Mr. & Mrs. Philip F. Head Lisa & Bill Headley Keith & Kelly Herron Mr. David Hilley Dr. Becky E. Swanson-Hindman Mr. & Mrs. Jim Hitt Dr. Elisabeth Dykens & Dr. Robert Hodapp Ms. Susan S. Holt Dr. Jian Huang Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Huljak Margie Hunter Mr. & Mrs. David Huseman Sandra & Joe Hutts Bob & Virginia Johnson Dr. Barbara F. Kaczmarska Mr. & Mrs. Michael Kane Mrs. Edward C. Kennedy John & Eleanor Kennedy Jane Kersten & Ray Sissom Ms. Janet Kleinfelter Nancy & Edd Lancaster Mr. & Mrs. Thomas W. Land Mr. & Mrs. Samuel W. Lavender Mrs. Martha W. Lawrence Ted & Anne Lenz Michael & Ellen Levitt Mr. & Mrs. Irving Levy Mr. & Mrs. John Lillie Burk & Caroline Lindsey Dr. & Mrs. Nicholas Lippolis Drs. Walt & Shannon Little The Howard Littlejohn Family Mr. & Mrs. Denis Lovell


A NNU A L F U ND

Dr. & Mrs. Timothy P. Schoettle Dr. Kenneth E. Schriver & Dr. Anna W. Roe Peggy C. Sciotto Mr. & Mrs. Robert Scott Mr. Roderick Scruggs Drs. Fernando F. & Elena O. Segovia Odessa L. Settles Max & Michelle Shaff Mr. & Mrs. Richard Shearer Smith Family Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Kevin Scott Smith Dr. Robert Smith & Barbara Ramsey Mr. & Mrs. S. Douglas Smith Mr. & Mrs. Douglas C. Snyder Mr.& Mrs. James M. Sohr Mr. & Mrs. Ronald M. Sohr Mickey M. & Kathleen Sparkman Ms. Maggie P. Speight Dr. & Mrs. Anderson Spickard Jr.

Mr. M. Clark Spoden Ms. Karen G. Sroufe Gloria & Paul Sternberg Jr. Dr. & Mrs. William R. Stewart Mr. & Mrs. James P. Stonehocker Mr. & Mrs. James E. Summar Sr. Craig & Dianne Sussman Dr. & Mrs. J. D. Taylor Mr. Marcus W. Thompson Lorraine Ware & Reid Thompson Mr. & Mrs. William D. Tidwell Mr. Michael P. Tortora Martha J. Trammell Monty Holmes & Van Tucker Kathryn G. Varnell Lois J. Wagner & Barbara M. Lonardi Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Warner Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Mark Wathen Mrs. William C. Weaver III

Mrs. James A. Webb Jr. Dr. Medford S. Webster Beth & Arville Wheeler Mr. & Mrs. Fred Wheeler Alyson Wideman Joe Wieck Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Wiesmeyer Mrs. Marie Holman Wiggins Adam & Laura Wilczek Vicki Gardine Williams Gary & Cathy Wilson The Rev. & Mrs. H. David Wilson Edward & Mary E. Womack Mr. Peter Wooten & Ms. Renata Soto Patrick & Phaedra Yachimski Mr. Payton H. Young Dr. Michael Zanolli & Julie K. Sandine Roy & Ambra Zent

FIRST CHAIR Gifts of $250 - $499 Anonymous (24) Drs. Oran Aaronson & Shannon Snyder Judith Ablon The Rev. Dr. & Mrs. W. Robert Abstein Ben & Nancy Adams Eric & Shannon Adams Mr. George E. Alexander Dr. & Mrs. John Algren Dr. Joseph H. Allen Newton & Burkley Allen Ruth G. Allen Mr. & Mrs. John Allpress Adrienne Ames Wm. J. & Margery Amonette Ken & Jan Anderson Newell Anderson & Lynne McFarland Mr. & Mrs. Carlyle D. Apple Patricia & Jay Armstrong Todd & Barbara Arrants Candy Burger & Dan Ashmead The Brian C. Austin Family Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Averbuch Dr. & Mrs. J. Kelley Avery Janet B. Baggett Lawrence E. Baggett Ms. Susie M. Baird Drs. Ferdinand & Eresvita Balatico Mr. & Mrs. J. Oriol Barenys Dr. Beth S. Barnett A. S. Barns Dr.* & Mrs. Thomas C. Barr Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Barr Mr. Curtis L. Baysinger Mr. & Mrs. William Beach Dr. Sammy F. Becdach Susan O. Belcher Mark H. Bell Ron & Sheryl Bell Mr. & Mrs. W. Todd Bender Ms. Margaret P. Bernado Dick & Gwen Berry Annie Laurie & Irvin Berry Cherry & Richard Bird Dr. & Mrs. Ben J. Birdwell Dr. Joel S. Birdwell Ms. Helen R. Blackburn-White Rick & Abby Blahauvietz Joan Bledsoe Ms. Mimi Bliss David L. Bone David Bordenkircher

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Jerry & Donna Boswell Robert E. Bosworth Mr. Brian Boxer Don & Deborah Boyd Jeff & Jeanne Bradford Mr. Mark D. Branstetter Mr. Charles Brasher Mary Lawrence Breinig Ms. Alexis Bright Betty & Bob Brodie Kathy & Bill Brosius Mr. & Mrs. Charles H. Brown Tom Bruce Burnece Walker Brunson Mr. Nicholas M. Buda T. Mark & D. K. Buford Geraldine & Wilson Butts Dr. & Mrs. Robert O. Byrd Mr. Richard Callahan Mrs. Julia C. Callaway Mr. Oscar Calles Claire Ann Calongne Mr. Richard A. Calvin Bratschi Campbell Gary E. Canaday Robert & Melanie Cansler Mr. T. James Carmichael Mr. Colin J. Carnahan Karen Carr Ronald & Nellrena Carr Mr. & Mrs. Edwin Carter Valleau & Robert M. Caruthers Kent Cathcart Evelyn LeNoir Chandler Mr. Caldwell Charlet Dr. Walter J. Chazin Mrs. Robert L. Chickey Barry & Janie Childers Ms. Dorothy H. Chitwood Mr. Won S. Choi Mr. Joseph B. Christy Dr. AndrĂŠ & Ms. Doreatha H. Churchwell Teresa C. Cissell Mr. Daryl Claggett Councilman & Mrs. Phil Claiborne Drs. Walter & Deborah Clair Charles & Agenia Clark Steven* & Donna Clark Dr. Paul B. Clark Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Roy Claverie Sr.

Mr. & Mrs. Neely B. Coble III Mark & Robin Cohen Mr. & Mrs. Robert T. Coleman Colonel (ret.) Dr. & Mrs. James R. (Conra) Collier Ms. Peggy B. Colson F. Michael Combs Mr. & Mrs. Randy Cook Ms. Anne G. Cooper Mike & Sandy Cooper Kathy & Scott Corlew Elizabeth Cormier Allie & Landford Correll Drs. Charles L. & Joy Cox Mr. & Mrs. George Crawford Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Jeff L. Creasy Mr. & Mrs. David Crecraft R. Barry & Kathy Cullen Mr. Brian B. Cuyler The Daly-Ark Family Ms. Margaret M. DAngelo Katherine C. Daniel James & Maureen Danly Mr. M. Bradshaw Darnall III Andrew Daughety & Jennifer Reinganum Janet Keese Davies Ms. Gloria Deaner Steve Sirls & Allen DeCuyper Dr. & Mrs. Roy L. DeHart Wade & Jeanine Denney Mr. & Mrs. J. William Denny Dr. & Mrs. Henry A. DePhillips Mrs. John S. Derryberry Ms. Molly E. Devine Mr. & Mrs. Arthur DeVooght Dr. Joseph & Ambassador Rachel Diggs Mr. Guy R. Dinwiddie Ms. Shirley J. Dodge Clark & Peggy Druesedow Mr. & Mrs. Bradley Dugger Kathleen & Stephen Dummer Mr & Mrs. Mike Dungan Bob & Nancy Dunkerley Mr. & Mrs. Jim Eades Jr. Kathryn & Webb Earthman Mr. & Mrs. Kevin B. Ebert Thomas D. Edmonds DVM Bonnie Edwards


Kenyatta & Tracey Lovett J. Edgar Lowe Mr. & Mrs. Jay Lowenthal Ms. Frances B. Lumbard Mr. & Mrs. James C. Lundy Jr. Patrick & Betty Lynch Mr. & Mrs. Michael C. Lynn Sr. Sharron Lyon Herman & Dee Maass Dr. & Mrs. Joe MacCurdy Mr. John Maddux Dr. Mark A. Magnuson & Ms. Lucile Houseworth Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Maier Mr. Cosmin E. Majors Audrea & Helga Maneschi Dr. & Mrs. N. H. Mann Jr. Sheila Mann David & Leah Marcus Sam & Betty Marney Dr. & Mrs. Harry D. Marsh Mr. Henry Martin Dr. & Mrs. Raymond S. Martin Abraham, Lesley & Jonathan Marx Mr. & Mrs. Brian S. Masterson Sue & Herb Mather Mr. Jimmy R. Mattingly Margery Mayer & Carolyn Oehler Mr. & Mrs. John D. McAlister Mr. & Mrs. Henry C. McCall Joanne Wallace McCall Chris & John McCarthy Kathleen McCracken Mary & John McCullough Mr. Evan A. McCutchen Bob McDill & Jennifer Kimball Ed & Carla McDougle Edward W. McFadden Mr. Brian L. McKinney Dr. & Mrs. Timothy E. McNutt Sr. Mr. & Mrs. Michael R. McWherter Ms. Virginia J. Meece Ronald S. Meers Janis Meinert Linda & Ray Meneely Drs. Manfred & Susan Menking Sara Meredith Ms. Brinkley Meyers Sherree Meyers Mr. & Mrs. Mike Hannold Dr. & Mrs. Philip G. Miller Dr. Ron V. Miller Dr. Fernando Miranda & Dr. Patricia Bihl-Miranda Mr. Michael Mishu Mr. Hershel Mitchell Mr. Steve C. Mitchell Mr. & Mrs. Steven Moll Dr. Michael F. Montijo & Mrs. Patricia A. JamiesonMontijo Mr. & Mrs. Jonathan Morphett Lynn Morrow Mr. Gary Morse Dr. Matthew K. Mosteller Mr. & Mrs. B. Dwayne Murray Jr. Mr. & Mrs. J. William Myers Allen & Janice Naftilan Ms. Carolyn Heer Nash Dr. Turner Nashe Ms. Lynise Nelson Mr. Hunter S. Neubert Dr. & Mrs. Harold Nevels Dr. John Newman & Ms. Rebecca Lyford

InConcert

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Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Hausman David & Judith Slayden Hayes Mr. Michael W. Hayes Peggy R. Hays Stephen & Deborah Hays Fred & Judy Helfer Doug & Becky Hellerson John Reginald Hill Ronald & Nancy Hill Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Hilmer Ms. Christina M. Hirsch Dr. & Mrs. Robert L. Hodum Mr. & Mrs. Donald Hofe Jim & Kim Holbrook Aurelia L. Holden Mr. & Mrs. James G. Holleman William Hollings Mr. James N. Hollingsworth Catherine J. Holsen Drs. Richard T. & Paula C. Hoos Mr. Gregory R. Horne Ken & Beverly Horner Dr. & Mrs. Robert W. House Allen, Lucy & Paul Hovious Samuel H. Howard Dr. & Mrs. Louis C. Huesmann II Mr. Kyle Huser Michael & Evelyn Hyatt Mr. Narum Hyatt Gordon & Shaun Inman Dr. & Mrs. Roger Ireson Dr. Anna M. Jackson Frances C. Jackson Nathan Jaco & Sharmaine Miller Haynie & Patsy Jacobs Mr. & Mrs. Alan R. Javorcky Mr. Richard W. Jett John T. & Kerrie Johnson Susan & Evan Johnston Dr. Amos Jones Jr. Mr. Patrick D. Jones Dr. & Mrs. Herman J. Kaplan Mrs. Michel G. Kaplan Mrs. Cynthia A. Keathley Jeffrey & Layle Kenyon Mr. Jason Kesler Mr. Patrick Kilby Bill & Becca Killebrew Mr. & Mrs. Monty Kimble Kathleen & Don King Louise & Joe Kitchell George McCulloch & Linda Knowles Mr. & Mrs. Rick Koelz David & Judy Kolzow Dr. Valentina Kon & Dr. Jeffrey L. Hymes Sanford & Sandra Krantz Tim Kyne Mr. & Mrs. John H. Laird Dr. & Mrs. Jeffrey Lawrence Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Lawrence Mrs. Douglas E. Leach Rob & Julia Ledyard Dorothy & Jim Lesch Ralph G. Leverett John & Marge Lewis Mr. & Mrs. Monty S. Ligon Mr. & Mrs. Ronald S. Ligon Robert A. Livingston Dr. & Mrs. John L. Lloyd Keltner W. & Debra S. Locke Jean & Steve Locke David & Nancy Loucky Thomas H. Loventhal

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Mr. & Mrs. James H. Ellis III Dan & Zita Elrod Dr. & Mrs. James Ettien Ms. Claire Evans Dr. Ann Evers & Dr. Gary Smith Ed W. Evins Jr. Tony & Shelley Exler Steven & Katie Ezell Chrtistopher Farrell & Kathryn Beasley Laurie & Ron Farris Mr. Edward Fedorovich Ms. Karen A. Fentress Dr. Robert G. Ferland Vince & Dorothy Fesmire Billy & Donna Fields Janie & Richard Finch Dr. & Mrs. Jack Fisher Doris T. Fleischer Nellie Folsom Dr. & Mrs. Armando C. Foronda Mr. Kent T. Forward Cathy & Kent Fourman Mrs. Katherine H. Fox Andrew & Mary Foxworth Sr. William H. & Babs Freeman Scott & Anita Freistat Dr. Henry Fusner Mr. Anderson C. Gaither Dr. & Mrs. Ronald E. Galbraith Ms. Elham Galyon Mr. William Gann Mr. & Mrs. Philip Ganske Mr. & Mrs. Craig E. Gardella Mr. & Mrs. George C. Garden Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Garrett Alan & Jeannie Gaus Nancy & Ken Gentry Jennifer George Miss Lindsay A. George Em J. Ghianni Mark Glazer & Ms. Cynthia Stone Linda & Joel Gluck Susan T. Goodwin Dr. & Mrs. Gerald S. Gotterer Dr. Cornelia R. Graves Mr. Chris Gray Mr. & Mrs. Luke Gregory Mr. Michael Grillot R. Dale & Nancy G. Grimes Teresa J. Grimes Mr. & Mrs. Russell D. Groff Mr. & Mrs. David C. Guth Jr. Dr. & Mrs. John D. Hainsworth Byron & Antoinette Haitas Ms. Leigh Ann Hale Scott, Kathy & Kate Hall Katherine S. Hall Walter H. White III & Dr. Susan Hammonds-White Mr. & Mrs. Harry M. Hanna Mr. Eric Hardesty Dr. John B. & Kathleen E. Harkey Cindy Harper Mrs. Edith Harris Mr. & Mrs. James M. Harris Dickie & Joyce Harris Mr. & Mrs. Jay Hartley Mr. James S. Hartman Dr. Morel Enoch & Mr. E. Howard Harvey Robert & Nora Harvey Mr. Jonathan Harwell

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Al Nisley Judy M. Norton Mr. & Mrs. Michael Nowlin Ann & Denis* O'Day Jason & Kelly Odum Dr. & Mrs. Wills Oglesby Hunt & Debbye Oliver Mr. & Mrs. Jack Oman Philip & Carolyn Orr Wayne Overby Dr. & Mrs. Ronald E. Overfield Frank & Pamela Owsley Terry & Wanda Palus Doria Panvini Dr. Fritz F. Parl Clint Parrish Lisa & Doug Pasto-Crosby John & Lori Pearce Anne & Neiland Pennington Dr. & Mrs. A. F. Peterson Jr. Claude Petrie Jr. Charles & Mary Phy Mr. & Mrs. James R. Pickel Jr. Mr. Maurice W. Pinson Gail Plucker Phil & Dot Ponder Mr. Jason E. Poole Katherine M. Poole Stanley D. Poole Ms. Elizabeth M. Potocsnak Mr. Sean Power Cammy Price Ann Pushin Mr. Daniel L. Rader & Mrs. Leah R. Jensen-Rader Edria & David Ragosin Mr. & Mrs. Ross Rainwater Mr. & Mrs. William C. Randle Randy & Carol Rawlings Buford L. & Ernestine S. Reed Don Reed & Lynne Wallman Mr. & Mrs. David R. Reeves Dr. William M. Regenold Lee Allen Reynolds Al & Laura Rhodes Mr. Cliff N. Rhodes Mr. & Mrs. Larry V. Rhodes Barbara Richards Don & Connie Richardson Mr. & Mrs. Michael Richardson Mrs. Jane H. Richmond Mrs. Paul E. Ridge Margaret Riegel Rob & Tammy Ringenberg Mr. Steven B. Robertson Fran C. Rogers Dr. & Mrs. Bruce D. Rogers Judith R. Roney Rodney & Lynne Rosenblum Edgar & Susan Rothschild Jan & Ed Routon Mr. & Mrs. Robert Rutherford Judith Ann Sachs Mr. Stephen Sachs Mr. Douglas L. Sadtler Ron & Lynn Samuels Dr. Glynis Sandler & Dr. Martin Sandler Jack & Diane Sasson William B. & Toni C. Saunders Mrs. Thomas W. Schlater III Molly & Richard Schneider Drs. Carl & Wendy Schofield Jack Schuett Dr. & Mrs. Stephen J. Schultenover Mr. Devin Schultz Mr. & Mrs. Chuck Self

Gene & Linda Shade Richard & Marilyn Shadinger Mr. & Mrs. Michael E. Shaw Mr. Paul Shearer Mrs. Jack W. Shepherd Dr. John O. Simmons Keith & Kay Simmons Mrs. Wilson Sims Dr. & Mrs. Manuel Sir Alice Sisk Pamela Sixfin Ashley N. Skinner Mr. Wesley A. Skinner Dr. & Mrs. David Slosky Charles R. Smith & Vernita Hood-Smith Dallas & Jo Ann Smith Mrs. Rebecca Smith Susan K. Smith & Joe Stegemann Ruth & William Smith Mr. Ryan Smokovitz Elaine & Robert Smyth Mr. James E. Snider Jr. Dr. Susan Snyder & Mr. William Snyder Marc & Lorna Soble Mr. Chris Song Nan E. Speller Tom Spiggle Mrs. Randolph C. St. John Tabor Stamper - KHS America Caroline Stark & Lane Denson* Lelan & Yolanda Statom Dennis & Billie Jean Stephen Mr. & Mrs. Lemuel Stevens Jr. Richard & Jennifer Stevens CAPT & Mrs. Charles E. Stewart Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Cyril Stewart

Bob & Tammy Stewart Mr. Timothy M. Strobl Tom & Gayle Stroud Mr. & Mrs. Samuel E. Stumpf, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. William C. Suchman Gayle Sullivan Dewayne & Kristy Sullivan Frank Sutherland & Natilee Duning Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Svennevik Dr. Esther & Mr. Jeff Swink Ms. Jeanette Tatman Mr. & Mrs. Eugene Te Selle Jeremy & Carrie Teaford Dr. Paul E. Teschan Dr. & Mrs. Edward L. Thackston Mr. & Mrs. Richard Theiss Mr. Gilbert Thibedore Richard & Shirley Thrall Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Thurman Scott & Nesrin Tift Ms. Shari L. Tish Mr. Lewid J. Tomiko Mr. Dan Tonelson Leon Tonelson Mr. & Mrs. Ray Troop Mila & Bill Truan Mr. & Mrs. Timothy True Mr. Phillip Trusty Richard, Kimiko, Jennifer & Lindsey Tucker Mr. & Mrs. John A. Turnbull Mr. & Mrs. James F. Turner Jr. Ms. Junita Turnipseed Rev. and Mrs. Jan P. Van Eys Mr. James N. Vickers Mr. Rory I. Villafuerte Kimberly Dawn Vincent Ms. Lucy A. Visceglia


Ms. Maria Voss Mr. Matthew D. Wardle Ms. Leslie P. Ware Lawrence & Karen Washington Dr. Adam E. Watkins Gayle & David Watson Shirley Marie Watts Frank & Jane Wcislo H. Martin & Joyce Weingartner Dr. & Mrs. Matthew B. Weinger Ms. Karen L. Weissman Mr. Kevin L. Welsh Dr. J. J. Wendel Joni Werthan Franklin & Helen Westbrook J Peter R. Westerholm Linda & Raymond White Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Whiteaker Mr. Michael T. Whitler & Mr. Mark Weber Jonna & Doug Whitman Ms. Eleanor D. Whitworth Ms. Judith B. Wiens Roger M. Wiesmeyer Mr. & Mrs. Donald R. Williams Jerry & Ernie Williams Frank & Marcy Williams Mr. & Mrs. Harry E. Williams Jeremy S. Williams John & Anne Williams Dr. Joyce E. Williams Tommy & Carol Ann Wilson The Wing Family Ms. Sandra Wiscarson Scott & Ellen Wolfe Mr. Robert H. Walle Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Stephen F. Wood Sr. Mr. & Mrs. Robert & Wnda Woods Mr. Howard F. Wright Gary & Marlys Wulfsberg Kay & Randall Wyatt Pam & Tom Wylly Vivian R. & Richard A. Wynn Ms. Na Yang Shu-Zheng & Li Li Yang Dr. Mary Yarbrough Mr. & Mrs. Samuel C. Yeager Donna B. Yurdin Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Zibart Mr. & Mrs. Glenn Zigli James & Candice Zimmermann HONORARY In honor of Bette Berry In honor of Darlene Boswell In honor of Marion P. Couch In honor of Thomas Wynne Cowan In honor of Jeanne Crossnoe In honor of George* & Jo Hall's 58 years of marriage In honor of Martha Ingram In honor of the marriage of Michael Thigpen & Kimhoung Nhep MEMORIAL In memory of Carole Slate Adams In memory of Mrs. Evalina Andrews In memory of Pauline Becker In memory of Mrs. Mary Jane Blount In memory of James Bradshaw In memory of Steven A. Clark In memory of Mr. & Mrs. Tom Crain In memory of Mrs. May Drummond In memory of Joe Ervin In memory of Mr. Charles K. Evers In memory of Mr. Patrick Francis Hamill


In memory of Mr. John Bachman Hardcastle In memory of T. Earl Hinton & Nora Smith Hinton From Hutt Family in memory of Dr. James Irvin Hudson Jr. In memory of Dr. James I. Hudson Jr. In memory of Virgil Davis Hunt In memory of Miles Stuart Hunter In memory of Lawrence Levine In memory of Katherine Ramage Love In memory of Volker Marschall In memory of Mr. J. Patrick Maxwell In memory of Lil McAdams In memory of Cate Myer In memory of Mildred J. Oonk In memory of Willis Page In memory of Mrs.Bert (Emily) Parrish In memory of Jean Pinson In memory go John Robert Sanders Sr. In memory of William Satterwhite In memory of Mr. Earl Scruggs In memory of Mr. Gerald E. Sheridan In memory of Martha B. Short In memory of Martin E. Simmons In memory of Mrs. Adele Youngberg Smith In memory of Frank Smith In memory of Lester Speyer In memory of Alex Steele In memory of Mr. James Albert Stein In memory of Caroline Suschnick In memory of Joe Tobias In memory of Fred Viehmann In memory of Dr. David L. Walker In memory of Mary Lee Watson *denotes donors who are deceased

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“There’s something special about this place.”

615.292.9465 www.ctk.org PREKINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 8


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CORPORATIONS, FOUNDATIONS & GOVERNMENT AGENCIES

The Nashville Symphony is deeply grateful to the following corporations, foundations and government agencies that support its concert season and its services to the community through generous contributions to the Annual Fund. Donors as of May 1, 2013

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SEASON PRESENTERS Gifts of $100,000+ The Martin Foundation

PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL Gifts of $75,000+

TM

DIRECTORS’ ASSOCIATES Gifts of $50,000+

PRINCIPAL PLAYERS Gifts of $25,000+ Mike Curb Family Foundation

GOVERNMENT Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County

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Mayor Karl F. Dean

Metropolitan Council


AmSouth Foundation Andrea Waitt Carlton Family Foundation The Ayers Foundation Bank of America Alvin & Sally Beaman Foundation Lee A. Beaman, Trustee Mr. & Mrs. Dennis C. Bottorff Ann* & Monroe* Carell Caterpillar Inc. & Its Employees The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee Mike Curb Family Foundation CaremarkRx Greg & Collie Daily

Dollar General Corporation Laura Turner Dugas The Frist Foundation Amy Grant & Vince Gill Patricia & H. Rodes Hart Mr. & Mrs. Spencer Hays HCA Ingram Charitable Fund Lee Ann & Orrin Ingram The Martin Foundation Ellen Harrison Martin Mr. & Mrs. R. Clayton McWhorter The Memorial Foundation Metropolitan Government of Nashville & Davidson County

Anne* & Dick Ragsdale Mr. & Mrs. Ben R. Rechter Estate of Walter B & Huldah Cheek Sharp State of Tennessee Margaret & Cal Turner Jr. James Stephen Turner Charitable Foundation Vanderbilt University The Vandewater Family Foundation Ms. Johnna Benedict Watson Colleen & Ted Welch The Anne Potter Wilson Foundation

Mr. Tom Black Dr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Frist, Jr. Giarratana Development, LLC Carl & Connie Haley Mr. & Mrs. J. Michael Hayes

HCA Foundation, in honor of Dr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Frist Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. McCabe Jr. Regions Bank Mr. & Mrs. James C. Seabury III

Estate of Anita Stallworth SunTrust Bank Tennessee Arts Commission Laura Anne Turner

$250,000+

American Constructors, Inc. Barbara & Jack Bovender American Retirement Corp. Connie & Tom Cigarran E.B.S. Foundation Gordon & Shaun Inman

Harry & Jan Jacobson The Judy & Noah Liff Foundation Robert Straus Lipman Mrs. Jack C. Massey* Mr. & Mrs. Henry McCall Lynn & Ken Melkus

Richard L. & Sharalena Miller National Endowment for the Arts Justin & Valere Potter Foundation Irvin & Beverly Small Anne H. & Robert K. Zelle

$100,000+

Mr. & Mrs. Dale Allen Phyllis & Ben* Alper Andrews Cadillac/Land Rover Nashville Averitt Express Barbara B. & Michael W. Barton BellSouth Julie & Frank Boehm Richard & Judith Bracken Mr. & Mrs. James C. Bradford Jr. Boult, Cummings, Conners & Berry, PLC The Charles R. Carroll Family Fred J. Cassetty Mr.* & Mrs. Michael J. Chasanoff Leslie Sharp Christodoulopoulos Charitable Trust CLARCOR Mr. & Mrs. William S. Cochran Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Fite Cone Corrections Corporation of America Estate of Dorothy Parkes Cox Janine, Ben, John & Jenny Cundiff Deloitte & Touche LLP The Rev. Canon & Mrs. Fred Dettwiller Marty & Betty Dickens Michael D. & Carol E. Ennis Family Annette & Irwin* Eskind The Jane & Richard Eskind & Family Foundation

The M. Stratton Foster Charitable Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Steven B. Franklin Front Brown Todd LLC Gannett Foundation / The Tennessean Dr. Priscilla Partridge de Garcia & Dr. Pedro E. Garcia Gordon & Constance Gee Genesco Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Joel C. Gordon Guardsmark, LLC Billy Ray & Joan* Hearn The Hendrix Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Henry W. Hooker & Family Mr. & Mrs. Elliott Warner Jones Walter & Sarah Knestrick ESaDesign Team Earl Swensson Associates Inc. I.C. Thomasson Associates Inc. KSi/Structural Engineers Lattimore, Black, Morgan & Cain PC Mr. & Mrs. Fred Wiehl Lazenby Sally M. Levine Andrew Woodfin Miller Foundation Morgan Stanley Dean Witter & Co. Nashville Symphony Chorus Nashville Symphony Orchestra League Pat & John W. Nelley Jr.

O’Charley’s Partnership 2000 Bonnie & David Perdue Mr. & Mrs. Philip Maurice Pfeffer Mr. & Mrs. Dale W. Polley Mary C. Ragland Foundation The John M. Rivers Jr. Foundation Inc. Carol & John Rochford Mr. & Mrs. Alex A. Rogers Anne & Joseph Russell & Family Daniel & Monica Scokin Bill & Sharon Sheriff Mr. & Mrs. Martin E. Simmons Luke & Susan Simons Mr. & Mrs. Michael W. Smith Barbara & Lester* Speyer The Starr Foundation Hope & Howard Stringer Louis B. & Patricia C. Todd Jr. Lillias & Fred Viehmann The Henry Laird Smith Foundation Mr. & Mrs. E.W. Wendell Mr. David M. Wilds Mr. & Mrs. W. Ridley Wills III Mr. & Mrs. David K. Wilson

$500,000+

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F U NDS

F U N DS

$1M+

C A P I TA L

C A P I TA L

CAPITAL FUNDS

The Nashville Symphony wishes to acknowledge and thank the following individuals, foundations and corporations for their commitment to the Symphony. This list recognizes donors who contributed $10,000 or more to one of the Symphony’s endowment or capital campaigns. These capital campaigns make it possible to ensure a sustainable future for a nationally recognized orchestra worthy of Music City.


Mr. & Mrs. David S. Ewing Ezell Foundation / Purity Foundation Mr.* & Mrs. Sam M. Fleming In Memory of Kenneth Schermerhorn Letty-Lou Gilbert, Joe Gilbert & Family James C. Gooch & Jennie P. Smith Edward A. & Nancy Goodrich Bill & Ruth Ann Leach Harnisch Hastings Architecture Associates, LLC Dr. & Mrs.* George W. Holcomb Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Clay T. Jackson KPMG LLP Mrs. Heloise Werthan Kuhn John T. Lewis Gilbert Stroud Merritt Mr. & Mrs. David K. Morgan Musicians of the Nashville Symphony

Anne & Peter Neff Cano & Esen Ozgener Ponder & Co. Eric Raefsky, M.D. & Ms. Victoria Heil Delphine & Ken Roberts Ro’s Oriental Rugs, Inc. Mrs. Dan C. Rudy* Mary Ruth & Bob Shell Mr. & Mrs. Richard Speer Stites & Harbison, PLLC Mr. & Mrs. Bruce D. Sullivan Alan D. Valentine Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP Estate of Christine Glenn Webb David & Gail Williams Nicholas S. Zeppos & Lydia A. Howarth

$25,000+

AMSURG Family of Kenneth Schermerhorn The Bank of Nashville Bass, Berry & Sims PLC Tom & Wendy Beasley The Bernard Family Foundation The Honorable Philip Bredesen & Ms. Andrea Conte The Very Rev. Robert E. & Linda M. Brodie Mr.* & Mrs. Arthur H. Buhl III Mr. & Mrs. Frank M. Bumstead Community Counselling Service Co., Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Cook Jr. Doug & Sondra Cruickshanks Mr. & Mrs. Robert V. Dale Gail & Ted DeDee In Memory of Ann F. Eisenstein Enco Materials, Inc./Wilber Sensing Jr., Chair Emeritus Nancy Leach & Bill Hoskins John & Carole Ferguson Estate of Dudley C. Fort

Mr. & Mrs. F. Tom Foster Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Keith D. Frazier John & Lorelee Gawaluck Giancarlo & Shirley Guerrero Mr. & Mrs. James Earl Hastings Hawkins Partners, Inc. Landscape Architects Neil & Helen Hemphill Hilton Nashville Downtown In Memory of Ellen Bowers Hofstead Hudson Family Foundation Iroquois Capital Group, LLC John F. & Jane Berry Jacques Mercedes E. Jones Mr. & Mrs. Randall L. Kinnard KraftCPAs PLLC Estate of Barbara J. Kuhn Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence M. Lipman The Howard Littlejohn Family The Loventhal and Jones Families Mimsye & Leon May Kevin P. & Deborah A. McDermott Rock & Linda Morphis Carole & Ed Nelson

Nissan North America, Inc. Odom’s Tennessee Pride Sausage, Inc. Larry D. Odom, Chairman/CEO Hal N. & Peggy S. Pennington Celeste Casey* & James Hugh Reed III* Renasant Bank Jan & Stephen S. Riven Lavona & Clyde Russell Dr. & Mrs. Michael H. Schatzlein Kenneth D. Schermerhorn* Lucy & Wilbur Sensing Nelson & Sheila Shields Michael & Lisa Shmerling Joanne & Gary Slaughter Doug & Nan Smith Hans & Nancy Stabell Ann & Robert H. Street Mr. & Mrs. William J. Tyne Washington Foundation, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. W. Ridley Wills II Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Wimberly Janet & Alan Yuspeh Shirley Zeitlin

$15,000+

Kent & Donna Adams Ruth Crockarell Adkins Aladdin Industries, LLC American Brokerage Company, Inc. American Paper & Twine Co. Mr. & Mrs. William F. Andrews Dr. Alice A. & Mr. Richard Arnemann Mr. & Mrs. J. Hunter Atkins Sue G. Atkinson Mr. & Mrs. Albert Balestiere Baring Industries Brenda C. Bass Russell W. Bates James S. & Jane C. Beard Allison & John Beasley Ruth Bennett & Steve Croxall Frank & Elizabeth Berklacich Ann & Jobe* Bernard Mr. & Mrs. Boyd Bogle III John Auston Bridges Mr. & Mrs. Roger T. Briggs Jr. Cathy & Martin Brown Jr. Grennebaum Doll & McDonald PLLC Patricia & Manny* Buzzell Mr. & Mrs. Gerald G. Calhoun Mr. & Mrs. William H. Cammack Terry W. Chandler Neil & Emily Christy Chase Cole

Dr. & Mrs. Lindsey W. Cooper Sr. Mr. & Mrs. Andrew D. Crawford Barbara & Willie K. Davis Mr. & Mrs. Arthur C. DeVooght Mr. & Mrs. Matthew H. Dobson V Mike & Carolyn Edwards Mr. John W. Eley & Ms. Donna J. Scott Sylvia & Robert H. Elman Martin & Alice Emmett Larry P. & Diane M. English Dr. & Mrs. Jeffrey B. Eskind Bob & Judy Fisher Karen & Eugene C. Fleming Mr. & Mrs. H. Lee Barfield II Cathey & Wilford Fuqua Mr. & Mrs. Paul J. Gaeto The Grimstad & Stream Families Heidtke & Company, Inc. Robert C. Hilton Dr. & Mrs. Stephen P. Humphrey Franklin Y. Hundley Jr. Margie & Nick* Hunter Joseph Hutts Mr. & Mrs. T.J. Jackson Mr. & Mrs. David B. Johnson Mr. & Mrs. Russell A. Jones Jr. John Kelingos Education Fund Beatriz Perez & Paul Knollmaier Pamela & Michael Koban Jr.

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth G. Langone Richard & Delorse Lewis Robert A. Livingston Frances & Eugene Lotochinski Mr.* & Mrs. Robert C.H. Mathews, Jr. Betsy Vinson McInnes Jack & Lynn May Mr. & Mrs. James Lee McGregor Dr. & Mrs. Alexander C. McLeod MR. & Mrs. Robert E. McNeilly III Dr. Arthur McLeod Mellor Mary & Max Merrell Donald J. & Hillary L. Meyers Christopher & Patricia Mixon NewsChannel 5 Network Susan & Rick Oliver Piedmont Natural Gas David & Adrienne Piston Charles H. Potter Jr. Joseph & Edna Presley Nancy M. Falls & Neil M. Price Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Pruett Linda & Art Rebrovick Mr. & Mrs. Doyle R. Rippee Dr. & Mrs. Clifford Roberson Mr. & Mrs. Walter M. Robinson Jr. Anne & Charles Roos Ron Rossmann Joan Blum Shayne

InConcert

F U N DS

Adams and Reese / Stokes Bartholomew LLP American Airlines American General Life & Accident Insurance Company Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz J B & Carylon Baker Dr. & Mrs. T.B. Boyd III William H. Braddy III Dr. Ian & Katherine* Brick Mr. & Mrs.* Martin S. Brown Sr. Michael & Jane Ann Cain Mike Curb/Curb Records Inc. The Danner Foundation Dee & Jerald Doochin Ernst & Young

C A P I TA L

$50,000+

69


L E GACY

Mr. & Mrs. Irby C. Simpkins, Jr. Patti & Brian Smallwood Murray & Hazel Somerville Southwind Health Partners® The Grimstad & Stream Families Dr. Steve A. Hyman & Mark Lee Taylor John B. & Elva Thomison Mr. & Mrs. Marshall Trammell Jr.

Eli & Deborah Tullis Mr. & Mrs. James M. Usdan Louise B. Wallace Foundation Mr.* & Mrs. George W. Weesner Ann & Charles* Wells In Memory of Leah Rose B. Werthan Mr.* & Mrs.* Albert Werthan Betty & Bernard Werthan Foundation

Olin West, Jr. Charitable Lead Trust Mr. & Mrs. Toby S. Wilt Dr. & Mrs. Lawrence K. Wolfe Dr. Artmas L. Worthy Mr. & Mrs. Julian Zander Jr.

SO CI E T Y

N A S H V I L L E SY M P H O N Y

LEGACY SOCIETY LEAVING A LEGACY, BUILDING A FUTURE When Schermerhorn Symphony Center opened to the public in 2006, we envisioned our concert hall serving many generations for decades to come. If you have that same vision for the Nashville Symphony, then a planned gift can become your ultimate demonstration of commitment and support. You can help us plan for our future — and your own — through this creative approach to philanthropy and estate planning, which allows you to make a significant contribution to the Nashville Symphony while also enjoying income and tax benefits for you and your family. Great orchestras, like all great cultural institutions throughout history, are gifts to posterity; they are built and bestowed to succeeding generations by visionary philanthropists. To find out more about planned giving opportunities, please visit NashvilleSymphony.org/plannedgiving, or contact Hayden Pruett, Major Gifts Officer, at 615.687.6615

Anonymous (2) Barbara B. & Michael W. Barton Diane and David L. Black Julie & Frank Boehm Mr. & Mrs. Dennis C Bottorff Charles W. Cagle Donna & Steven Clark Dr. Cliff Cockerham & Dr. Sherry Cummings Mrs. Barbara J. Conder Mr. & Mrs. Roy Covert William M. & Mildred P.* Duncan Deborah Faye Duncan Annette & Irwin* Eskind Judy & Tom Foster Dr. Priscilla Partridge de Garcia & Dr. Pedro E. Garcia James C. Gooch Ed & Nancy Goodrich Carl T. Haley, Jr. Billy Ray Hearn 70

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Judith Hodges Judith S. Humphreys Martha R. Ingram Elliott Warner Jones & Marilyn Lee Jones Anne T. Knauff Heloise Werthan Kuhn Sally M. Levine John T. Lewis Todd M. Liebergen Clare* & Samuel Loventhal Mrs. Ernestine M. Lynfoot Ellen Harrison Martin Dr. Arthur McLeod Mellor Richard L. Miller Cynthia & Richard Morin Anne T. & Peter L. Neff Mr. & Mrs. Michael Nowlin Pamela K. & Philip Maurice Pfeffer Joseph Presley Eric Raefsky, MD & Victoria Heil

David & Edria Ragosin Mr. & Mrs. Ben R. Rechter Fran C. Rogers Kristi Lynn Seehafer Mr.* & Mrs. Martin E. Simmons Irvin & Beverly Small Mary & K.C. Smythe Dr. & Mrs. W. Anderson Spickard Jr. Dr. John B. Thomison Sr. Louis B. Todd Judy & Steve Turner Alan D. Valentine Mrs. Johnna Benedict Watson Dr. Colleen Conway Welch & Mr. Ted Houston Welch Barbara & Bud Zander Shirley Zeitlin Anne H. & Robert K.* Zelle *deceased


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M USIC W I T H F R I E N D S INVIT ES Y O U TO JO I N TO D AY !

BECKY MITCHENER Corporate Director of Membership & Development bmitchener@musicwithfriends.com 704.907.1806 BEC PORTER Director of Membership / Nashville bporter@musicwithfriends.com 615.584.4255

www.MusicWithFriends.com


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PO G U PE S T S EI N R IF EOS R M A T I O N

GUEST

I N F O R M AT I O N

VISTING THE SCHERMERHORN RESTROOMS & WATER FOUNTAINS

Restrooms and water fountains are available on the Lounge Level, located one floor below the Main Lobby; on the east and west sides of the Founders and Balcony Levels; and outside the Mike Curb Music Education Hall on the Founders Level. Located on the Lounge Level, unisex restrooms are available for disabled guests needing special assistance. COAT CHECK

To enhance the acoustical experience inside Laura Turner Concert Hall, guests are invited to check their coats at one of several complimentary coatcheck locations on each seating level. The most convenient is on the Lounge Level, located one floor below the Main Lobby.

CAMERAS, CELL PHONES & OTHER DEVICES

Videocameras and recording devices are strictly prohibited in the concert hall or in any other space where a performance or rehearsal is taking place, but photographs are permitted anytime the house lights are illuminated. Cellular phones, beepers and watch alarms should be turned off once the performance starts. LATE SEATING

As a courtesy to the performers and other audience members, each performance will have designated breaks when latecomers are seated. Those arriving after a performance begins will be asked to remain outside the entrance door nearest their ticketed seats until the appropriate break.

GET INVOLVED! VOLUNTEER

The Nashville Symphony offers a wide variety of opportunities to engage volunteers from Nashville and surrounding communities. Tasks include providing office support, assisting on concert nights and much more. You’ll have the opportunity to meet fellow music lovers and to help out behind the scenes at the Schermerhorn! Volunteers can customize their schedules to fit their lifestyles. For more information, visit NashvilleSymphony.org/volunteer. NASHVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA LEAGUE

The Nashville Symphony Orchestra League (NSOL) is a membership-driven organization committed to supporting the work of the Nashville Symphony. Members help make a difference in our community by assisting with the Nashville Symphony’s music education programs, presenting pre-concert talks, providing administrative support to the Symphony Spring Fashion Show and more. For more information, visit NashvilleSymphony.org/NSOL.

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CRESCENDO CLUB

The Crescendo Club is a newly launched group of community leaders, philanthropists and music enthusiasts, ages 21 to 40-ish, who are interested in supporting the Nashville Symphony by participating in unique social events, fundraising initiatives and other music educational activities. For more information, visit NashvilleSymphony.org/CrescendoClub. NASHVILLE SYMPHONY CHORUS

Have you got an urge to sing? Consider joining the Nashville Symphony Chorus! Now numbering more than 130 voices in concert, the Chorus performs at least twice each season as part of the Nashville Symphony’s SunTrust Classical Series, in addition to Handel’s Messiah each December. For more information, including how to audition, visit NashvilleSymphony.org/NashvilleSymphonyChorus.


HOW MAY WE ASSIST YOU? CONCERT CONCIERGE

SERVICES FOR GUESTS WITH DISABILITIES

EMERGENCY MESSAGES

Guests expecting urgent calls may leave their name and exact seat information (seating level, door number, row and seat number) with any usher. Anyone needing to reach guests during an event may call the Security Desk at 615.687.6610. LOST AND FOUND

Please check with the House Manager’s office for any items that may have been left in the building. The phone number for Lost and Found is 615.687.6450.

PARKING & TRANSPORTATION NEW! FREE PARKING!

New for the 2012/13 season, FREE parking is available in Lot R at LP Field, with shuttles running to and from the lot for just $3 per person roundtrip. This shuttle service is available for all SunTrust Classical, Bank of America Pops and Jazz Series concerts, along with many special events. For more information, call our Box Office at 615.687.6400. PARKING AT THE PINNACLE

Located directly across Third Avenue from the Schermerhorn, the Pinnacle at Symphony Place offers Symphony patrons pre-paid parking at a discount! To purchase, please call 615.687.6401.

VALET

Valet parking, provided by Parking Management Company, is available on Symphony Place, on the north side of the building between Third and Fourth avenues. We also offer pre-paid valet parking; for more details, call 615.687.6401. CHAUFFEURED TRANSPORTATION

Official transportation provider for the Nashville Symphony, Grand Avenue offers town cars, sedans, limousines and bus transport for individuals and groups of all sizes. To help drive the spirit and vitality of Middle Tennessee, the Grand Gives Back program contributes a portion of proceeds from every transaction to community nonprofits. To learn more, email info@grandavenueworldwide. com or call 615.714.5466. Mention the code “symphony1” when making your reservation, and the Nashville Symphony will receive a portion of the proceeds.

TICKET SALES The Box Office is on the Fourth Avenue side of the building closest to Symphony Place. Tickets may be purchased with MasterCard, VISA, American Express, Discover, cash or local personal checks. Limited 15-minute parking is available on Fourth Avenue just outside the Box Office. Regular Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday Hours on Concert Days: 10 a.m. to intermission Monday-Saturday Call for hours on Sunday Tickets are also available by visiting NashvilleSymphony.org or by phoning the Box Office at 615.687.6400.

CAN’T MAKE A CONCERT?

If you cannot attend a concert, exchanges must be made at least 10 business days prior to the performance date; otherwise, you may donate your tickets for resale. You may also choose to put the value of your tickets on account no later than 10 business days prior to the performance. On-account money may be used for any concert in which we are allowing exchanges; please contact your Patron Services Specialist for details or contact the box office at 615.687.6400.

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INFORMATION

Schermerhorn Symphony Center has been carefully designed to be barrier-free and meets or exceeds all criteria established by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). All public spaces, restrooms, meeting rooms, offices, backstage dressing rooms and orchestra lounge, and production control rooms will accommodate performers, staff and guests with disabilities. Interior signage and all elevators make use of Braille lettering for directional signs in both public and backstage areas, including all room signs. An infrared hearing system is available for guests who are hearing impaired. Headsets are available at no charge on a first-come, first-served basis from the coat-check area on the Lounge Level, and from the Concert Concierge.

Accessible and companion seating are available at all seating and price levels with excellent acoustics and sight lines to the stage. Transfer seating is also available to allow guests in wheelchairs to transfer easily to seats in the hall. Please arrange in advance for accessible seating by calling a customer service representative at 615.687.6400.

GUEST

Have a question, request or comment? Please visit our Concert Concierge, which is available to help you with anything you might need during your visit. Located in the Main Lobby, Concert Concierge is open through the end of intermission.


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2013/14 SEASON TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW! Join the Nashville Symphony for our best season yet! TICKET PACKAGES START AT ONLY $88! 615.687.6400 NashvilleSymphony.org



Nashville Symphony InConcert