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Š 2013 GlobeMed

Co-president handbook GlobeMed


Co-president handbook Table of Contents VISION, MISSION, CORE VALUES.......................................................................................1 CO-PRESIDENT PURPOSE & GOALS..................................................................................2 ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES............................................................................................3-4 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

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HOW TO BE A GREAT GLOBEMED LEADER..................................................................6-7 SUPPORTING YOUR EBOARD.........................................................................................8-9 GIVING & RECEIVING FEEDBACK...............................................................................10-12 STRATEGIC PLANNING STRATEGIC PLANNING OVERVIEW............................................................................13-16 STRATEGIC PLAN EXAMPLES......................................................................................17-21 CHAPTER FACILITATION

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CHAPTER COMMUNICATION GUIDELINES...............................................................23-24 EBOARD SELECTION...................................................................................................25-27 EBOARD TRANSITION.................................................................................................28-29 EBOARD RETREAT.............................................................................................................30 RECRUITMENT.............................................................................................................31-32 NEW MEMBER ORIENTATION..........................................................................................33 MID YEAR REFLECTION...............................................................................................34-35 RESOURCES.................................................................................................................36-48


Co-president handbook GlobeMed Vision, Mission, Theory of Change, Core Values Vision

We envision a world in which health – the ability to not only survive but thrive – is possible for all people.

Theory of Change

We believe that human relationships are at the the core of social change. To allow everyone to live a healthy life, people have to change these broken systems by working together from the inside and outside, locally, nationally and globally. This belief is derived from a framework called reciprocal capacity building. Reciprocal capacity building describes a collaborative relationship in which two or more groups help clarify and address each other’s gaps in achieving goals and aspirations. The relationship facilitates an exchange of resources, such as skills, knowledge, processes and other intangible assets, that strengthen each party’s ability to reach their full potential. Through communication and collaboration, relationships of reciprocal capacity building: 1. Clarify gaps in reaching both parties’ goals and potential 2. Identify the resources and services needed to address both parties’ gaps 3. Facilitate a two-way exchange of needed resources and services to fill both parties’ gaps

Mission

GlobeMed aims to strengthen the movement for global health equity by empowering students and communities to work together to improve the health of people living in poverty around the world.

Core Values

Dig Deep - To cultivate wisdom, we approach ourselves, our communities and the world with openness and curiosity. See Possibility - In all people and situations, we see the ability to learn, connect, grow and contribute to positive change. Grow Together - We accompany each other, cultivating a global community that inspires, challenges, and sustains us. Be Bold - We put mission in front of ego and fear, doing what it takes to make the change the world needs. Stay Authentic - We let ourselves be known, remaining grounded and humble even as we aim for the boldest vision.

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Co-president handbook Co-President: Purpose & Goals Purpose Every movement begins with a vision. Gandhi had the vision that freedom, independence, and equality could be achieved through non-violent civil disobedience. Nelson Mandela had a vision of a united country, devoid of the segregation and apartheid of times past. And Martin Luther King Jr. had a vision that his four children would live in a nation where they would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. In GlobeMed, we have a vision that a world in which health – the ability to not only survive but thrive – is possible for all people, regardless of where they call home. To push our movement forward, we need leaders with the vision and drive to mobilize, empower, and ultimately transform our good intentions into practical action. As Co-Presidents, you will be that leader within your chapter. You will guide your chapter and its members towards this vision of health equity, continuously bringing your work to the why -- the reason why you give your time, efforts, and love to GlobeMed. You will support your eboard and your members in the learning process as they work to define and discern their values and beliefs and you will stand alongside them, learning from them as well.

Goals

1. Create a chapter culture that encourages respect, collaboration, and mutual learning. When people find value in their experience and in themselves, they will invest in the work and invest each other. Be conscious of the GlobeMed experience you are creating. Make sure it’s positive! 2. Bring the purpose of our work into all chapter happenings. Our organization exists because students believed that partnership and collaboration could solve some of the world’s biggest problems. Don’t lose sight of this belief. Engrain it in everything you do. 3. Support chapter members in their learning and their growth through listening and friendship. No matter how old we are or what position we hold, we are all still developing as human beings. We are trying to define what we believe in and how we can live through our beliefs. Co-Presidents should support their staff in this journey through open ears and open hearts.

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Co-president handbook Co-President: Roles & Responsibilities Co-President Role: As Co-President, you manage the eboard and, in turn, the chapter. You will provide your team with the vision, support, love, and guidance that will sustain your passion throughout the year. You will be the face of the organization, both to GlobeMed supporters on campus and in the community and within chapter, to all of the eboard and staff members. You don’t have to know everything -- you will definitely learn and grow through the experience -- but you will use your thoughtfulness, vision, and energy to lead the chapter in the right direction. As Co-President, you will: • Create a clear vision: You, along with your eboard, will define your chapter’s potentials for growth and the steps you will take to achieve them. Keep your partnership at the forefront of your mind when setting goals and don’t forget to reach for the stars! • Lead by example: As the leader of your chapter, people are naturally inclined to look to you for guidance and support. Be there to help when someone needs a hand -- offer your time, friendship, and love and set the standard for the rest of your chapter. • Empower: Every person has the potential to contribute. Make sure that they have the avenue and confidence to do so. Give people responsibility and watch them thrive! • Foster collaboration: Collaboration is at the heart of success. Create an environment in which your team has clear communication and continuous support. • Resolve conflict: Being a peer leader is tough. Keep your head level and resolve any conflicts with logic, understanding, and empathy.

Co-President Responsibilities: • Create a strategic plan and broad vision for your chapter, covering the next year and beyond • Empower and encourage all chapter members, allowing them to invest themselves further into the chapter, the partnership, and the movement for health equity • Foster collaboration among all chapter programs • Communicate important activities to chapter through meeting and to the National Office through advising calls • Inspire those around you!

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Co-president handbook Co-President: Roles & Responsibilities Co-President Responsibilities There are many benefits to having two leaders within chapter: differing perspectives, shared responsibilities, and multiple mentors for chapter members. In order to work together productively, however, Co-Presidents must clearly define “champions” or “point persons” or certain responsibilities to make sure they deadlines are met and work gets done. Here are the National Office’s suggestions on how to share and divide responsibilities: Shared responsibilities of Co-Presidents • Inspire a shared vision within the chapter and executive board • Work with each other and the executive board to develop and implement the chapter’s plan for the academic year • Oversee chapter operations • Communicate with each other and maintain a good working relationship in order to fully understand all chapter affairs • Ensure that all National Office financial and legal standards are met • Make sure that the chapter is on track to reach its goals by encouraging and adjusting to constructive feedback from eboard and staff External Co-President •

• • • • •

Communicate with the partner to identify project options, receive updates, and provide chapter updates Inspire staff enthusiasm for the campaign with updates about the partner and project Work with the GROW Trip Coordinator to prepare for the on-site visit Ensure that all National Office documents and tasks are completed on time Prepare for and lead executive board meetings Work with the Communications team to create a strategic plan for communicating with alumni and donors

Internal Co-President • • •

• • • •

Manage internal communications (send out meeting summaries, check in with staff, etc.) Ensure that the executive board keeps staff updated and engaged Work with executive board and staff members to ensure that all chapter and campaign tasks are completed on time Prepare for and lead staff meetings Work closely with the Director of Finances to ensure smart financial practices Communicate with the faculty advisor to gain university support on events and mentorship Work with the Community Building team to establish relationships with other peer orgs on campus and how GlobeMed can engage with them

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Co-president handbook

Leadership Development

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How to be a Great GlobeMed Leader How to be a Great GlobeMed Leader As Co-President, there are three main areas that you’ll want to excel in: • Inspiring and motivating your chapter • Thinking and acting strategically • Dealing with challenges Inspiring and Motivating your Chapter Everyone in GlobeMed is interested in global health and wants to make a difference—that’s a given. But throughout the year, schoolwork and other responsibilities pile up and members may become disengaged. It’s your job to inspire and motivate them to accomplish your chapter’s goals. The key here is to continually communicate to all members: • Why we’re here ◦ Remind members why they joined—the world today is plagued by tremendous inequity and widespread injustice. We come together in the belief that a different way is possible—that equity in health is not only worth fighting for, but is actually achievable. •

The progress we’ve made ◦ Demonstrate to members that they are making a positive impact. Update them on the campaign total, provide detailed recaps from conversations with the partner and how previous projects are progressing and the impact they’ve had on the local community.

Where we’re going ◦ Focus on the broader goals of the chapter. For instance, after updating the campaign total, remind members of the overall campaign goal and what needs to be done to get there. The important part here is convey to the chapter that, collectively, you are working towards a goal—to fund the health project, to become leaders in global health, and to work with your partner to improve the health of the impoverished.


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How to be a Great GlobeMed Leader How to be a Great GlobeMed Leader Thinking and Acting Strategically As Co-President, you get to model the vision for the chapter. But you also have to think and act strategically about how you’re going to achieve that vision. Here are some helpful hints to get you started: •

Set goals ◦ At the beginning of the year, work with the e-board to set goals for the organization. These will likely be based on GlobeMed’s core program areas. Be specific and ambitious, yet realistic. Come back to these goals throughout the year. ◦ Encourage e-board to make their own goals—they’ll much more motivated to achieve them.

Plan ahead ◦ Using your chapter’s Google calendar, map out all your GlobeMed events as far in advance as possible. It will help you see the bigger picture of what’s going on and keep members up to date on the chapter’s activities.

Enable staff members ◦ GlobeMed’s agenda is ambitious. You can’t do it on your own. Enable the e-board and staff members to have control over their projects. Doing this will get members engaged and allow the chapter to achieve its goals.

Dealing with Leadership Challenges As the leader of this organization, you will inevitably run into challenges with peer leadership and productive collaboration. Be thoughtful in how you handle situations and interact with your peers. Help your peers learn how to be leaders by continuously offer your support and experience. Look at the next few pages: Management Components, Giving Feedback, Receiving Feedback and Resources: Dealing with Challenges for details on how to create a positive learning experience within chapter.


Co-president handbook Supporting Your Eboard Supporting your Eboard

As Co-President, you act as manager of the eboard, who in turn act as managers of the chapter. Make sure that you are an effective and supportive manager by following these guidelines and ensuring that your eboard knows how to do the same with their team. 1. Sets expectations In order for a team to function well, each member of the team needs to carry out their role. Co-Presidents should work with each member of their team to define expectations. Expectations should be set around primary responsibilities and level of autonomy on each project. The manager commits to grounding all work, including and especially the “unsexy” work, in the “why”. Team members should understand how their work first into the team and the organization’s broader goals. 2. Provides team with resources In addition to setting up your team with the basic resources they need to perform their roles, Co-Presidents should also be thinking of team members’ professional and personal development.

"The leader is one who mobilizes others toward a goal shared by leaders and followers. ... Leaders, followers and goals make up the three equally necessary supports for leadership." — Gary Wills, Certain Trumpets: The Call of Leaders

3. Defines the timeline The Co-President is responsible for setting the vision and work plan for their team at the beginning of the year and making sure each team member is fully aware of the timeline and work plan. 4. Provides accurate and honest feedback Co-Presidents should orient team members to the communication guidelines and make it clear that they expect honest and direct feedback from team members as well.

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Co-president handbook Supporting Your Eboard Supporting your Eboard 5. Helps/redirects the team when necessary Part of the Co-Presidents role is to keep a barometer reading on the team to be on the lookout for pressure points, and actively work with team members to make sure they understand the significance of their work. 6. Let’s their team run with it Good Co-Presidents should provide their team with help and resources, but also know when to step back and let their team do the work! Trust and respect is an integral part of the management relationship, and Co-Presidents should treat team members as equal partners in the work. 7. Gives thanks and recognition, captures learning, and celebrates success One of the most crucial functions of the Co-President is to keep their eye on the big picture and celebrate successes throughout the process. Additionally, when challenges arise, the manager should synthesize learning outcomes for the team and the organization.

Browse through the Management Center’s databank for resources that will help you support your eboard.

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Giving & Receiving Feedback Philosophy Reciprocal capacity building and human relationships are at the core of GlobeMed’s model (see page 1). To live out our values and effectively drive this organization’s mission forward we must maintain deep integrity in our relationships with each other as well as our key stakeholders.

Giving & Receiving Feedback GlobeMed is a “learning organization.” Reflecting the rapidly changing world around us, we are in a constant state of reflection, innovation and improvement. As a staff, we are emerging leaders at the start of our careers. We are discovering ourselves as changemakers, team members, and individuals. Furthermore, we are working with others – undergraduates, partners, board members, peers – who are also learning and evolving along with us. High team turnover, rapid organizational growth, and a commitment to the highest quality mean that flux is the GlobeMed norm. How do we thrive as a team and community in this environment? The consistent exchange of honest, direct, and transparent feedback – vertically and horizontally – is a critical component to achieving our full potential as individuals and as an organization. GlobeMed will evolve only as effectively as the people who form its fabric. Therefore, we each are called to embrace the exchange of constructive criticism and open ourselves to transformation. To ensure that this exchange happens productively, we adhere to the following ground rules. These ground rules are derived from our core values, and we follow them strictly. This responsibility to uphold them falls to each of us in all our daily work and actions, as every person is an active contributor of our community culture.


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Giving & Receiving Feedback Giving Feedback Mouse or antelope: In the words of our friend Mark Arnoldy at Nyaya Health, “Lions can catch, kill, and eat mice, but they will die doing so because this is a calorie negative activity. Instead, they have to hunt antelopes. Give time-intensive feedback on the organizational antelopes, not the mice.” Before providing criticism, consider its importance and if now is the best time. There are many things we could all improve. What is most important for someone to address now? Honest & Objective: Feedback is only valuable if you can trust it. Whether the feedback you are giving is great or terrible, say so, respectfully. Stay aware of personal biases and make sure you’re evaluating people on the same scale of expectation and quality that you would want. Direct & Timely: Talk directly with the receiver of the feedback, especially if it’s negative. Abide by the golden rule: If you’d like others to share this feedback about you, sing those praises. If not, it goes directly and only to that person (and, if appropriate, your supervisor). The quicker feedback is shared, the quicker addressed, so be timely. In person, not email: If your feedback is more than a quick suggestion, set up a meeting or pick up the phone. Feedback, whether positive or negative, is most effectively delivered by human, not machine. A conversation: The exchange of feedback is a conversation, not a one-way street. It often best starts with a question that allows the person to share their awareness or perspective of the issue. Unless it’s from a supervisor, people aren’t obligated to take feedback. It’s a suggestion, not a mandate. Be ready to forgive: See quote to the left. Share it & let it go.


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Giving & Receiving Feedback & Management Resources Receiving Feedback At GlobeMed, feedback should be received (and given) in the same way. It is someone taking the time out of their day to help you reach your full potential. Why? Because they believe in you and your ability to improve. In a ballet class, the ballet mistress/master will often give the most criticism to the student who they think has the most potential. This attention is the result of a recognition of talent, work ethic, and an ability to improve. It is a gift and an honor. Be open: Don’t get defensive. If you feel yourself doing so, take a breath or a 5 minute walk. If you need to reschedule, it’s your responsibility as the receiver to do so. Be honest: About two things - what you’re struggling with and what you’re going to do with their feedback. If you need time to think about it, that’s okay. Say that. If you won’t be pursuing their suggestion, explain why. It will be a learning moment for both of you. Be proactive: Seek the feedback of your team members, commit to actions to address challenges, and demonstrate change.

Management Resources On What a Manager Should Be & Do Anne’s overview of Management basics Managing Up

“All effective and engaging learning experiences provide frequent and meaningful feedback. Without feedback on whether or not one is getting closer to a goal, progress is unlikely.” - unknown

On Seeing Possibility Practices for managing for the extraordinary in everyone. The Art of Possibility: Transforming Professional and Personal Life

On Managing, Advising, and Coaching Understand how to build stronger relationships with direct and indirect reports that lead to loyalty, higher productivity, and long-term development. People Follow You: The Real Secret to What Matters Most in Leadership


Co-president handbook

STRATEGIC Planning

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Strategic Planning Purpose The whole purpose of planning is to improve the chances of reaching your goals as a chapter doing this strategically means that there is intention in everything you do. Goals should not be pulled out of the air, but rather strategically designed. A strategic plan is an action-oriented document that will guide your chapter, based on a careful examination of internal and external factors that influence your chapter. A plan develops a clear statement of your mission and vision, identifies goals and objectives and formulates key strategies that address the factors essential to your success (WHY, WHAT, HOW). What is It? A strategic plan is a tool that provides guidance in fulfilling a mission with maximum efficiency and impact through careful evaluation and intentional goal setting. If it is to be effective and useful, it should articulate specific goals and describe the action steps and resources needed to accomplish them. Timeline Ideally, chapters should sit down to create a strategic plan at the end of the academic school year, as the previous year comes to an end. This timing allows for immediate reflection on the past year, while allowing for ample time to plan ahead for the new year. From a plan following this timeline, you should know what duties must be completed over the summer months and should start the new school year off on a strong note, with a clear vision of where the chapter is heading. Strategic planning can also be done at your first e-board retreat or you can schedule a strategic planning session. When thinking of who should be involved in strategic planning, be sure to involve all e-board members, possibly your chapter advisor, and anyone else you believe will help contribute to a fruitful session. A strategic planning session can take several hours to complete, so give yourself at least 2-3 hours with room to extend if necessary.


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Steps 1. Situation Analysis: Determine where you are a. Internal // external assessment b. SWOT analysis i. Determine Strengths and Weaknesses as a chapter (Internal Evaluation) ii. Determine Opportunities and Threats to success (External Evaluation) iii. http://mystrategicplan.com/resources/topic/swot-analysis/ - online video on how to conduct a SWOT analysis Remember: When doing a situation analysis, be completely open and honest so that your chapter can grow as much as possible. Use the Chapter Health Matrix to guide you and think critically about what people and resources you have in your chapter and community to really dig into your SWOT analysis. This analysis does not have to be included in the final document you produce, but will inform the entire thing so it is worth your while to put some time into this. 2. Direction: Determine where you want to be a. Goals // Objectives Remember: Your goals and objectives should not be entirely monetary. While this is one area for goal setting, GlobeMed has other programs besides Campaigns - your goals should reflect the strengthening of many programs as opposed to just one. 3. Alignment: Determine how you will get there a. Strategies // Chapter Teams Remember: When dividing your chapter into teams or strategies that will help you reach your goals, make sure you are honest about what you think you will need and go for it! If you think you will need $1000 in university funding to support your chapter members and run all of the events you would like to do, have a strategy for that. 4. Execution: Determine who must do what a. Action Plans // Accountability Remember: You cannot hold anybody accountable if roles are not clear in the chapter. Think about this as an e-board and as a chapter and make sure every single person has a clear understanding of their role in achieving the chapter goals. 5. Evaluation: Constantly revisit goals // objectives and ask “How are we doing?” Remember: Your strategic plan won’t do you any good if you create it and never look at it again. Make sure your goals are always at the forefront of your mind and the minds of your teammates.


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Resources: Strategic Planning Process Strategic Planning Processes Overview:

Useful Resources: http://www.tccgrp.com/pdfs/per_brief_tenkeys.pdf: This link takes you to an article called “Ten Keys to Successful Strategic Planning for Nonprofit and Foundation Leaders” by Richard Mittenthal. While not all of it is applicable to a GlobeMed chapter, it is fairly short and does offer some good advice when it comes to planning! The subsequent pages offer two examples of strategic planning documents from the University of Rochester and CU-Boulder can offer an idea of useful documents you can produce from your strategic planning session in order to move forward as a chapter.


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Resources: Strategic Plan Example GlobeMed at University of Rochester: One Year Strategic Plan Mission: To promote better health in communities by beginning with youth. To work with Kallpa Iquitos to enhance opportunity in Iquitos, Peru and act as a bridge between the communities of Iquitos and Rochester. To develop our own interpretations of global health challenges and strengthen our commitment to solving them. Vision: To support Kallpa Iquitos and the youth of Pampachica through sustainable programming. To become the most effective student group at the University of Rochester, by means of engaging our members and the larger campus community. To bridge the gap between the University and the city of Rochester through civic engagement and exposure. To be widely recognized as a highly effective, professional, and ambitious student-run nonprofit in Western New York. 2013-2014 Hard Goals: • to raise $12,000 for Kallpa Iquitos by the end of March 2014 • to develop a 6-8 person Community Advisory Board of professionals from Rochester who take on a one year term to advise our chapter • to pursue a local partnership with South Wedge Youth Engagement Network with opportunities for chapter members to better understand/appreciate the city of Rochester • to host an external professional website and an internal blog that serves as a hub for chapter information • hold our 5k, benefit dinner, art gala, ghU panel, and debate • to prepare for and conduct GROW 2014 • to communicate consistently and effectively with Kallpa through the school year, by producing quarterly reports and having regular email and skype communication • to implement a new member orientation program • mentor Mercy High School’s Global Health and help them hold successful educational, community service, and fundraising events this year. 2013-2014 Soft Goals: • to improve chapter understanding of Kallpa’s projects and community, as well as the function of the GROW internship • to promote GlobeMed at UR’s presence and model on campus to students, faculty, staff, and other student groups • to promote GlobeMed at UR to other organizations and individuals in Western New York through presentations, collaboration, volunteering, etc., particularly the Monroe County Dept. of Public Health • to foster a close-knit community internally • to develop and follow a flexible, chapter-specific ghU curriculum that informs and engages new and returning members • improve new member introduction


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These goals to be met with: • the creation of a Partnerships position • a distinct fund development committee, presentation, and training program • consultation and collaboration with the South Wedge Youth Engagement Network • holding fundraising and education events on campus and in Rochester • sending quarterly reports to Kallpa • a new member retreat as well as new member meetings to precede staff meetings for the first 6-8 weeks of fall semester Fundraising Goals: Event

Date

# of Staff

Goal Profit

Global Marketplace

9/14-9/15

Kaplan Auction

September

5K

10/19

Individual Giving

12/1-12/12

3

800

Art Gala

Early Dec

7

2500

Global Marketplace

Late Jan

min 8 per day

500

BenDin

Late Feb/Early March

7

4000

Brainery Classes

Feb/March

4

600

Individual Giving

Feb/March

3

2000

min. 8 per day

500

2

1000

10 (everyone day of)

2500

Tentative Timeline: FALL: • Sep 8: Info session (3-4:30pm) • Sep 6-8 (Fri-Sun): Yellowjacket Weekend/ GlobeMed Info Session? • Sep 8-15 (Sun-Sun): GlobeMed Media Storm • early Sep (14th?): Global Marketplace • Sep 15 (Sun): Applications Due • Sept 21 (Sat): New member retreat • Sep 22 (Sun): First new member meeting • Oct 1: MOU due • late Sep/early Oct: Kaplan Auction • Sep/Oct: TOTO? • Oct (20th-ish?): 5K • Nov 11-15?: ghU panel • Dec 6th: Art Gala

• •

!

Dec 1: GROW Interns selected Dec 1-12: 12 Days of GlobeMed (finances)

!

!

!

SPRING: • Feb 20 (Thurs): World Day of Social Justice • end of Feb (Feb 28/March 1?): Ben Din • Feb/March: SW-YEN Sexual Education Workshops • March/April: Individual Giving Push • March/April - March 28?: Brainery Classes • March: ghU documentary? • mid-April (14-23): ghU debate? • May-August (TBD): GROW Internship


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Resources: Strategic Plan Example GlobeMed One-Year Strategic Plan 2010-2011 Draft prepared on 8.11.2010 GlobeMed at CU-Boulder Mission: To engage students in the movement for global health equity by training students to generate resources and awareness, developing knowledge bases and skill-sets, and providing opportunities to work and learn alongside Himalayan HealthCare, our partner organization in Nepal. Vision: To be the most effective student-run nonprofit organization in the state of Colorado, giving students the knowledge, exposure, and skill sets to be effective within the movement for global health equity and social justice while making a tangible impact in the lives of the impoverished in Nepal through a long-term partnership with Himalayan HealthCare. Overarching “Hard” Goals for the 2010 - 2011 Year: • Raise $20,000 for Himalayan HealthCare • Build and utilize Campaign Council (and determine metrics for approving campaigns) • Build and utilize Community Advisory Board of 4-6 community members • Build a partnership with a local Rotary Club • Create an effective and useful “one-stop” calendar listing all events for the year • Create an annual profit-share dinner held at Nepal Cuisine • Create a strong annual Spring Staple Event (likely around March Madness) • Create a “recitation leader” as part of the globalhealthU structure • Host 2 public globalhealthU events per semester and 1 training session Overarching “Soft” Goals for the 2010 - 2011 Year: • Increase prestige and value of the campaign team leader position • Increase our GlobeMed brand and recognition within the communities of Boulder and Denver • Implement a mindset of highly effective use of resources and efficiency throughout the organization • Recruit a few new students with targeted skills sets in design, video, multimedia and technology • Create an alumni strategy through the Director of Community Building These goals will be met through the work of the following campaign teams: Benefit Dinner Short Description: Number of Members: 4-6 members Timeline: Held mid-October during Anil’s visit Expected Results: $5000 Special Notes: While we have been having dinners at a high frequency of late, this year will mark the beginning of an annual visit for Anil. Each year, we will only host one dinner, and it will be held in conjunction with Anil’s visit. It is important to try and find a venue this year that we can predictably use year after year. We need to begin marketing this as our “annual benefit event” for HHC and build reputation through consistency in style and appeal each year.


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Resources: Strategic Plan Example Marketing and Communications Short Description: Number of Members: 3-4 members Timeline: All-year Expected Results: Non-financial results Special Notes: * Need to recruit a graphic design person Spring Campus Staple Event Short Description: Number of Members: 3 - 4 members Timeline: January - May Expected Results: $1000  ???? Special Notes: Still a lot of room to determine what this needs to be, but it needs to be on campus and it needs to reach a lot of students in the spring. March Madness remains the largest spring event with other notable events including Valentines Day, St. Patty’s Day, and Spring Break. Other Campaign Team Possibilities: • Public globalhealthU & training sessions (led by e-board members) • (2 people team to support roohie and scott) • Peanut Butter Ball • Multimedia (maybe a subcommittee within communications) • Could just add a couple people to the marketing team Other Chapter Programs: • globalhealthU • GROW Timeline of Major Events August • Organizing GROW media (GROW Team) • Complete UROP proposal form (GROW Team) • Finalize projects for 2K10 – 2K11 with HHC ◦ Aug. 15th, list of 5 projects (Taylor) ◦ September 15th determine final projects & MOU (Taylor) • Recruitment and Selection  (Roz, Taylor, Adrien) ◦ August 19th Old member applications out ◦ August 31st Info, application out for old members ◦ Sept. 5th Apps due/interviews/selection ◦ Sept. 8th 1st mtg. • Global Health Conference (our chapter will play a minimal volunteer role) ◦ Sept. 25th • C.A.B. ◦ Initial commitments by August 20th ◦ Sept. 8th or 9th for 1st meeting


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Resources: Strategic Plan Example September • Trek the Bars ◦ Sept. 17th (Thurs/Fri) ◦ By Aug. 16th team determined ◦ Rely on old members (Taylor, Kristine, Lisa) ◦ $3000 goal • GROW/UROP Application Due ◦ UROP due Sept. 15th ◦ Winter Trip ◦ Team selected by Sept. 1st (Jill and Taylor) ◦ Application due Sept. 15h (Jill, Taylor + Team) ◦ GROW app out Aug. 25th • Other School Money ◦ CAS, SOFO, SGFB, CUPA ◦ Full calendar w/ deadlines by Aug. 23rd (Roz) • Bros Wit Prose $ ◦ Full calendar of grant deadlines by Sept. 1st (Ian and Jesse) • Global HealthU ◦ For Fall, short-list of potential speakers decided by Sept. 15th ■ 1 speaker in Oct. & 1 in December (Scott and Poonia) ■ 1 Skill Session: November (Scott and Poonia) • Campaigns ◦ Teams selected by:  Sept. 15th ◦ Presentation to Campaigns Counsel:  Sept. 29th • Community Advisory Board ◦ 1st mtg held on Sept. 8th or 9th • Executive Board Retreat ◦ September 11th-12th • Chapter Retreat ◦ Sunday, September 26th October • Handicrafts ◦ Order placed while in Nepal (Scott, Taylor, Roz) ◦ Sell all goods by Dec. 31st ◦ Sell $2,000 worth ◦ By Oct. 1st list of events where selling (Taylor and Handicrafts campaign team leader) November • Individual Giving ◦ No FB challenge this year, but there will be one major online giving push likely held in December in conjunction with Global Giving (Taylor + Campaign Team Leader) • Communications ◦ GlobeMed Newsletter 2x / year (Adrien) ◦ Thanksgiving day break & Spring Break • Annual Report (Adrien + e-board)


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Chapter facilitation

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Chapter Communication Guidelines Chapter Communication Guidelines

Communication within chapter is essential for mutual understanding. Keep your eboard and your chapter members in the loop by being in regular contact! Staff e-mail list • Create a staff email list using whatever tool you prefer (Google contact groups, university list-servs, or Google groups) E-board e-mail list • Add eboard members to a Google group so that all emails can go through a single stream and members won’t have to type out all names Send out every week: External Co-President E-board agenda form • E-board members write out project updates, priorities for the week, agenda items, and meeting needs at least 24 hours before eboard meeting • External Co-President creates agenda that can be accessed before e-board meeting and will be used to guide meeting

Internal Co-President Staff email • After the meeting, send out an e-mail to Staff outlining the week ahead • Meeting time and agenda • Information on any events happening that week

Writing effective emails Even if members are fully engaged, they probably don’t have a ton of time to read and respond to emails. Keep emails concise so that they are actually read. • •

• •

Limit frequency. When communicating to staff, try to aim for a few emails per week so that everyone has a day or two to read and absorb what you write. Make the subject purposeful. Your audience will be much more likely to read your email if you let them know why it is important.  “GlobeMed:  Updates for the meeting” is more compelling than “Updates.” Keep it short.  Even though it’s tempting to completely dump your brain into an email, keep it to a few paragraphs/bullets. Bullet, bullet, bullet.  Instead of putting everything into a paragraph or two, split up ideas into bullet points.  Also, consider adding color to make sections more noticeable.


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24

Chapter Communication Guidelines Chapter Communication Guidelines Keeping the chapter organized Create a Google Drive folder for your eboard and for your chapter where you can share information, update documents, and organize materials 1. Google Spreadsheets You can use spreadsheets to keep track of all your members, supporters, and alumni. • Contact lists: Collect staff’s contact information, enter it all into a spreadsheet and share it with the chapter so everyone will be able to contact each other. 2. Google Forms   If you have a quick-and-easy form (such as a suggestion form or survey) that you want everyone in your chapter to fill out, Google Forms may be the answer.   • Users will enter information into text fields, which will populate a spreadsheet that will allow you to view everyone’s answers at once.  For help with forms, click here. 3. Google Documents Google Docs allow you to do collective brainstorming and editing on a single form. Use it to collaborate on various projects and documents. 4. Google Calendar Google Calendar is an easy way to keep track of and share the dates, times, and locations of all your chapter’s activities.   • Using your chapter@globemed.org e-mail address, create a “GlobeMed” events calendar and share it with your chapter.  If you use Outlook, iCal, or Sunbird, you can sync the Google calendar with your desktop calendar.  For instructions, click here.


Co-president handbook

25 Eboard Selection

Eboard Selection Open positions All positions should be open for selection. Hopefully, all of your returning eboard members will have done such a stellar job that they’ll clearly deserve to keep their positions for next year. However, past eboard membership should count as a credential, not an automatic ticket for reselection. Dedicated new members should have the opportunity to rise up, and opening all of the positions is the surest way to guarantee that the most deserving members make it onto the eboard. Selection committees For both rounds of selection, the committee choosing chapter leaders live and breathe GlobeMed. They should thoroughly understand our mission and vision and be passionate about securing the best possible leadership for the upcoming year. Co-President selection committee • Who: Consists of outgoing Co-Presidents (and outgoing members on the e-board) • What they do: Selects the two incoming Co-Presidents E-board selection committee • Who: Consists of outgoing and incoming Co-Presidents • What they do: Selects the rest of the e-board Planning In order to ensure that the selection process is as thorough as it needs to be, the Co-President selection committee will plan the selection schedule for both rounds of selection. Four weeks before spring break, the Co-President selection committee will meet to finalize the schedule.


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26 Eboard Selection

Eboard Selection Timeline Timeframe

Co-President Selection

12 weeks before end of school year

Co-President application created & released

11 weeks before end of school year

Co-President application due; Selection committee reviews applications, schedules interviews

10 weeks before end of school year

Applicant interviews & decisions sent out

Timeframe

Eboard Selection

8 weeks before end of school year

Eboard application created & released

7 weeks before end of school year

Eboard application due; Selection committee reviews applications, schedules interviews

6 weeks before end of school year

Applicant interviews & decisions sent out

Applications The application allows the selection committee to get to know candidates on a deeper, more personal level. It will ask applicants to reect on their involvement in GlobeMed and aord them the opportunity to clearly present their goals for the organization. Look at samples of Co-President and eboard applications. Interviews Interviews help the selection committee to decide between the best applicants. Interviews transform an applicant from a piece of paper into an individual and allow you to make more informed decisions based on their personal qualities. Each committee will develop an in-depth interview with questions touching upon past accomplishments and future ambitions. Involve relevant case studies from the previous year. Look to the Resources section for examples of Co-President or eboard interview questions.


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27 Eboard Selection

Eboard Selection Decisions Once interviews are completed, the selection committee should meet to deliberate. The committee should aim for a consensus, since it is important for everyone to feel comfortable with the entire e-board for the next year. To make and announce decisions, the selection committee should: • Set aside a large block of time to discuss candidates • Be aware of dynamics between different members of the new e-board • Take an objective stance to applicants, weighing prior dedication and future potential • Call or email all candidates to notify them of their decisions before they are announced at the designated meetings (see timeline) Frequently Asked Questions Some issues that may come up in your selection process are unpredictable, but there are problems that every chapter has to deal with at some point. Here are some common questions that the selection committee might have, and suggestions for answering them: 1.If a candidate is going to study abroad for a semester, can they have an E-board position? You should think very carefully about choosing someone for an e-board position who won’t be around for a large chunk of the school year. If you have a dedicated member who deserves a leadership role, but plans to study abroad for a semester, you may want to give them a coposition (definitely not Co-President, though!) so their counterpart can fully take over when they leave. However, even this situation could lead to miscommunication and tasks falling through the cracks. So please keep the welfare of the chapter in mind when considering candidates. 2.What if we can’t reach a consensus? Sometimes, your debates may get so heated that it seems like you’ll never reach a consensus. Here are some strategies to try to get whole committee on board with your final decisions: • Pros and cons table: Try making a pros and cons table for each candidate under debate • Take a break! Move on to a different position or just schedule another meeting; most people don’t give up their convictions instantaneously, so allow some time for the whole committee to debate their ideas on their own. • Vote: If all else fails, but only if all else fails, you can do a vote. But seriously, this should be a last resort after hours of debate.


Co-president handbook

28 Eboard Transition

Eboard Transition Co-Presidents Meeting In order to have a smooth transition, you need to have a plan. The new Co-Presidents are responsible for making sure that the e-board is ready for the next year, but the old CoPresidents should provide them with guidance and help them become acclimated to their new roles. Follow the guide to cover your bases in the transition process: Schedule weekly Co-President meetings (~8 weeks before end of school year). Topics should include: •

Leadership development: • What does it mean to be Co-President? • How do you create a good team dynamic? • What are major leadership components to be aware of?

Transition administrative knowledge: • University specific issues (registration process, booking rooms) • Co-President roles & responsibilities • Faculty advisor relationship • Partner relationship • Ensure that outgoing e-board members have created or maintained proper documentation and informational materials for incoming e-board members

Plan out the e-board transition process • Co-Presidents should create a position-specific transition schedule with each outgoing e-board member and timeline out when outgoing members will meet with incoming members • Schedule a time and place for the e-board retreat. Contact the old and new e-boards for their availability, and try to find a time when everyone can attend. • When retreat is planned, make a calendar of the transition schedule and distribute it to the outgoing and incoming e-boards.


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29 Eboard Transition

Eboard Transition Position-Specific Meetings Outgoing eboard members meet with their incoming counterparts should meet up on a consistent basis after the new eboard is selected. All of the roles and responsibilities of each position will be easier to handle with guidance from an outgoing eboard member, so these position-specific meetings should happen for every position. These meetings should cover: • Position overview and discussion ◦ Review of the old eboard workplan ◦ Review of the new eboard workplan • Planning for next year ◦ Completion of the joint eboard workplan ◦ Handoff of vital materials to the new eboard ◦ A folder of all important electronic documents ◦ An overview of relevant online resources // where to find information Group Reflection and Planning Everyone should get back together so the whole group can reflect on the past year and: • Discuss successes from the past year • Identify areas for improvement from the past year • Discuss goals for the next year • Devise a specific plan for the summer ◦ Monthly conference calls ◦ New eboard get-together ◦ 1:1 between Co-Presidents and eboard members ◦ Benchmarks for projects during the summer (fall staff retreat, fall e-board retreat, fall campaign, recruitment, new member orientation)


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30 Eboard Retreat

Uniting your eboard

As the GlobeMed school year starts to get underway, it’s imperative that you take time to unify your e-board. Host an e-board retreat to strengthen your organization, bring your e-board closer together, and get the year off to a fantastic start. Before the Retreat • Discuss retreat objectives and plans with Director of Community Building. Co-Presidents should bear the bulk of the strategic planning, but Directors of Community Building can handle logistics and team-building activities when necessary. • Create an agenda outlining what your e-board wants to accomplish during the year. • Find and agree on a time and place that works for everyone—Try to go off-campus. • Have Exec members brainstorm ideas and prepare for the retreat--the more prepared they are, the more impactful the retreat will be. What to do at the Retreat (sample agenda) ✓ Introductions ◦ Share your personal narratives about why you’re passionate about global health ✓ Discuss last year's efforts ◦ What did you achieve and why were these things a success? ◦ Where were our shortcomings and how can they be avoided this year? ✓ Create a plan for the upcoming year ◦ Map out desired outcomes for the year, then what things you want to plan in each semester to meet your objectives and accomplish your chapter's goal ✓ Discuss the long-term plan for the chapter ◦ Brainstorm ideas and decide on where you want the chapter to be in the future ◦ Think from the perspective of the incoming freshmen, what will GlobeMed be like when they’re seniors? ■ Have raised at least $15,000 for specific projects, stronger relationship and regular communication with leaders at our partner organization, etc. Key Reminders • •

HAVE FUN!!! Find the right balance of work and play. Create a calendar with the events you want to host over the semester.


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31 Recruitment

Recruitment

Work with your eboard to plan on a recruitment strategy. Timeline ✓ During your eboard retreat, set the year-long goals and discuss the chapter culture that you wish to create. Use this vision to inform your recruitment strategy. - Fill out the recruitment projection worksheet to help guide your recruitment plan. ✓ Work with your communications team to create social media and marketing materials for recruitment. - Include info session details, application deadlines, and contact info on every piece of media. ✓ Create a timeline for chapter members to blast said marketing materials over their personal accounts. - Facebook: cover photo, profile picture, Facebook statuses - Twitter: tweets about info sessions, application deadlines - Flyers: informational flyers, quarter sheets to hang around campus - Photo campaigns, promotional videos, and all other assorted media materials ✓ Promote GlobeMed at your school’s large beginning of the year activity fairs. - Make sure that your chapter has a table or booth at the activities fair -- this is a great way to meet freshman or other students interested in joining organizations on campus. - Give them quarter sheet flyers so that they know dates for info sessions. - Bring your computer and have prospective applicants like your chapter’s Facebook page so that they can be updated on chapter deadlines and/or other happenings. - Have a contact sheet at the table so that all interested parties can write down their info and have you email them as deadlines approach. ✓ Send out an email to your school’s departments explaining GlobeMed and asking them to circulate the information around their list servs. - Be sure to send our your info to any and all departments, especially focusing on departments that are related to GlobeMed (anthropology, psychology, sociology, biology) or related to skills that you would want GlobeMedders to have (economics, accounting, film/media). We’re looking for diversity! ✓ At info sessions, stress the idea of partnership as the foundation for our organization and how that differentiates us from other peer organizations. - Look to the history of GlobeMed one-pager to gain insight on how GlobeMed’s founders wanted to think differently about how to affect global health. ✓ Create an awesome, engaging, and informative new member orientation // onboarding process.


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32 Recruitment

Recruitment A successful GlobeMed chapter relies on a diverse group of invested individuals. Create an intentional recruitment process to get the number of applicants and specialties you need to take your chapter to the next level! Fill this form out based on your IDEAL Chapter break-down, remember to be BOLD, but also be reasonable with your projections. Completing this process with care and thought, as well as input from all eboard members, is critical as this document will inform your recruitment process and how your chapter is structured. This is meant to give you some concrete goals - once you project your teams you should have a good idea of not only how many people you will need, but also the types of people (Business majors, Journalism majors, etc.) which will allow you to be intentional in your recruitment process and maximize your efficiency. Projections: Chapter Members, Teams, Fundraising Goals Fundraisers

Event

Ideal # of people

Projected Funds

Recurring Campaigns Teams

Benefit Dinner Individual Giving Kaplan Crepe Sale

4 3 2 3

$1500 $3000 $1500 $150/month --> $1050

New Campaigns Teams

Staple Event Grant Writing

4 3

$750 $500

Other Teams

Roles

Ideal # of people

--

ghU

Small Group Facilitators, public ghU event

6

Communications / Marketing

Graphic design, Videography, Blog, External Comms

4

Community Building

New Member Orientation, Chapter Spotlight

2

Total

31

$8300

Look at MoneyThink’s Best Practice Guide for Recruitment for more ideas!


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33

New Member Orientation New Member Orientation

Create a schedule for how to introduce new members to GlobeMed’s ideals and values. Joining GlobeMed can be one of the most wonderful moments of a person’s college experience. It can also be one of the most overwhelming: our mission, our model, partnership?? It’s a lot to take in! Integrate them in a way that allows them to understand the work that we are doing while also getting them to know one another. Orientation Meetings • Have at least one orientation meeting for new members separate from regular chapter meeting to cover the basics about GlobeMed. ◦ Here, you can present the history, model, and mission of GlobeMed without taking the rest of chapter through the steps again. ◦ Present any policies or rules that your chapter maintains. • Depending on the time of the year, have supplementary meetings to get new members up to date with chapter happenings. ◦ Topics may include: partner relations, ghU discussion from the previous quarter/ semester, past campaigns//upcoming campaigns. Innovative Ideas At Truman State, new members are initiated through a special program. Each week, outside of chapter meeting, new members meet to discuss different topics related to GlobeMed. New members work together to plan a cumulative campaign at the end of the semester (such as a bake sale or a restaurant fundraiser), which helps introduce them to the campaign aspect of GlobeMed while also getting them to work together as a team. Check out a description of their program in Resources: New Member Orientation.


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34 Mid Year Reflection

Mid-year reflection

Once the school year gets going, you’ll be hosting events, taking exams, and spending time with friends. It’s easy and essentially inevitable that you’ll get caught up in everything and lose sight of the bigger picture. Winter break is a great time to take a step back and evaluate how the chapter has performed and what needs to improve. Evaluating the Chapter The first step is to analyze your chapter’s progress. As an eboard, review your original objectives from the beginning of the year. Here are some questions to get you started: • What went well this semester? • What needs to be improved? • What are our goals for the upcoming semester? Evaluating the Co-Presidents It’s important to get feedback from your eboard about how they feel about their role in GlobeMed and also about how you’re leading the chapter. Each person is different and will have his/her own comments, so make sure you get everyone’s perspective. Here are some questions to ask of your eboard: • Are you satisfied with your role in GlobeMed? Do feel under/overwhelmed, or just right? • Are there other GlobeMed activities/responsibilities you would like to be involved in? • What do you think the Co-Presidents have done well this semester (please comment on each person individually)? • What do you think the Co-Presidents could improve upon? Note: Be sure to evaluate each other. Talk through these questions with each other and offer constructive criticism.


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35 Mid Year Reflection

Mid-year reflection Evaluating the eboard Just as you are developing as a leader, so are the other eboard members. By now, you’ve worked with them for a semester and know their strengths and where they can improve. Either in person or over a phone call, consider reviewing these questions: • What did [exec member] do well this semester? • What could he/she improve on? • What are his/her goals for the next semester? Key Reminders 1. 2.

Mid-year reflections are about improvement and empowering you and the eboard to be as effective and successful as possible. How this process works is entirely up to you. You can have a discussion at a meeting, or send out an e-mail survey and ask people to send feedback. You determine what’s best.


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Resources

36


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37

Resources: Dealing with Challenges Dealing with Leadership Challenges Challenge

Possible Solution

Possible Solution

Possible Solution

Delegation: CoPresidents have trouble handing off responsibilities to other e-board members or staff

Discuss the role of trust within teamwork and define how each member values and expresses trust

Read up on best leadership practices "A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: we did it ourselves." —Lao Tzu

Define internal communication guidelines that allow Co-Presidents to check-in on project progress without being directly involved with the work

Accountability: Staff members have little responsibility within chapter

Discuss role of chapter members in programming and how to best utilize staff energy and potential

Discuss staff member empowerment with e-board and allow staff members to take on larger responsibilities in conjunction with plan on how to measure progress and accountability

Have "Jr E-board" members who choose to take on leadership roles and act as grassroots leaders on the chapter level

Delegation & Support: E-board members feel overwhelmed by the work that they have to do // there is a lack of e-board support for campaigns or projects

Establish open feedback loops in which e-board members can ask for support (ie. agenda updates for e-board meetings can have a question: "Do you need 1:1 time with anybody this week?)

Help members take a step back—breathe in, breathe out, and look at the bigger picture. Ask people why they're in GlobeMed, reflect on how much they've accomplished, and what they want to focus on going forward.

Discuss role of chapter members in programming and how to best utilize staff energy and potential

Innovation: Little innovation at eboard position; directors are just getting by without adding anything new

Co-Presidents should lead e-board members through personal discernment section in which they can establish personal and GlobeMed goals; refer to these on a monthly basis to check growth

Discuss role of chapter members in programming and how to best utilize staff energy and potential

Co-Presidents should stimulate e-board and staff creativity by supporting unique and innovative ideas


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Resources: Dealing with Challenges Challenge

Possible Solution

Possible Solution

Possible Solution

Vision: E-board members are unclear of their role and lack vision for their programs

Discuss and define program goals at the beginning of the year; come back to visioning and redefine throughout year

E-board members should be actively reading up on other chapters' activities (via FB or chapter websites) to gather ideas from chapters across the network

Establish clear documenting process for future e-board members

Collaboration: Staff and e-board divide

Discuss importance of community building and individual roles within community building within e-board

Read through GlobeMed position resources; reach out to chapters in the network for ideas on how to run specific programs

Discuss and enact chapter wide team building activities with Director of Community Building

Accountability: Poor meeting and event participation and attendance

Establish guidelines for participation & consequences of nonattendance early on in year (ie. every staff member must be at staff retreat, people unable to attend will incur $5 fine)

Establish mentorship // comm building program between e-board and staff (ie pair staff members with e-board members for coffee, ghU discussions, CB activities)

Work on internal communication structure to stress importance and chapter wide knowledge of upcoming events

Accountability: Poor staff and/or eboard retention

Setup rigorous and strategic recruitment processes

Use e-board energy and enthusiasm to boost chapter participation; have e-board members or strong chapter members reach out to individuals

Work with Director of Community Building to create cohesive team environment and chapter culture

Communication: Poor communication between CoPresidents or across e-board leads to lack of collaboration

Set up structured communication guidelines for e-board (ie. filling out agenda forms before eboard meetings, best methods of contacting one another, weekly meetings between different board members)

Establish guidelines for evaluation process of eboard // staff members (present upon induction so that people have a clear reference of their roles & responsibilities)

Establish systems for transparency within e-board (Google Drive, Asana) so that all members are clear on the others' projects and progress


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Resources: Dealing with Challenges

Challenge

Possible Solution

Possible Solution

Possible Solution

Communication: Eboard or staff members are not informed on chapter happenings and events

Set up structured communication guidelines for both e-board & staff (weekly Co-President email, website updates, meeting announcements, etc.)

Create workstreams that clearly define specified roles and responsibilities of e-board members for each event

Post Google Cal on chapter website so that staff can access event calendar

Communication: Lack of feedback system between CoPresidents & eboard; e-board & staff

Discuss feedback strategies with e-board // what do people specifically want to hear back about, what is the best way to hear back

Internal Co-President utilizes staff email list, Google Docs & Cal, and meeting time to clearly outline upcoming events

Have 1:1 meetings with each e-board member to see how their actions align with their goals; determine next steps

Collaboration: CoPresidents and/or eboard members have trouble collaborating based on different ideals or communication strategies

Discern values, leadership styles, strengths // areas for growth and discuss how those personal characteristics may align or disalign with one another

Make feedback forms for both staff & e-board to comment on experience and further goals; use data to inform future programming

Address problems and conflicts in a timely and professional manner

Accountability: No structure to hold eboard members accountable for their projects or for following timelines for such projects

Create workstreams that clearly define specified roles and responsibilities of e-board members for each event

Establish method for communication (weekly meeting, email, etc.) and how information should be delivered (how do people best like feedback, who wants to know what information, who is in contact with who)

Establish open feedback loops in which e-board members can ask for support or Co-Presidents can determine progress or lackthereof


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Resources: Interview Questions Sample: Co-President Interview Questions 1. Give us your GlobeMed pitch. 2. What do you believe should be GlobeMed at [X University]’s main goal, and why? 3. What do you think are the 3 best things about GlobeMed, and what are the 3 things our chapter needs to work on (constructive criticism)? What are tangible action items on how to improve? 4. How will you further bridge the gap between the E-board and general members? 5. If you are selected for Co-President, what are your plans for preparing yourself and eboard over the summer? What are your plans for an e-board transition? 6. Explain your past, present, and future commitment to GlobeMed. (Evaluate your work this year.) How does this make you most qualified to be Co-President? 7. What are the responsibilities of a Co-President? 8. What should be our fundraising goal next year? 9. Name a time where you’ve showed leadership within GlobeMed outside of your committee. ---------------------------------------------------------------Case studies: 1. Your two campaign coordinators are trying to plan a large event during fall quarter. School is starting in three weeks and it is clear that the two have had poor communication over the summer. Nothing is planned including an idea or venue for the event. You are sure that a fall quarter event is necessary to make the fundraising goal for the year. What steps will you take to ensure that you have a successful campaign? 2. One of the chapter members on the ghU team has been delegated an important responsibility for an upcoming event. It has been two weeks and after several emails and texts, the person is unresponsive to the ghU coordinator. The task needs to be done, but it is unclear if this person will fulfill his/her responsibility. What do you do? 3. It is fourth week and an e-board member comes up to you and says that he/she is overwhelmed with balancing GlobeMed responsibilities and school work. He/she is unsure if she can continue on in his/her role. What actions will you take?


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Resources: Interview Questions Sample: Eboard Interview Questions 1. What does GlobeMed mean to you? 2. Why do you want to be on exec? What do you think it means to be a part of exec? 3. What are the most important components of leadership? 4. What has been your favorite part of GlobeMed so far? 5. What do you think GlobeMed's biggest improvement should be for the next year? How we would go about this? 6. What are specific ideas that you have for the position that you applied for? 7. What university or community resources would you look to utilize in a GlobeMed fundraising /global health education event? * 8. Where do you see GlobeMed at [X University] in 2 years? in 5-10 years? Make sure to ask position-specific questions as well as these general questions. Example: • Finance • How do you think that we can better access grants? How would you go about getting external sources of money besides our campaigns? • Communications • What types of media will be most useful on our campus? In our community? • Community building • What is the importance of community building within our chapter? How can community building be integrated into our other chapter programs?

Check out sample eboard & staff applications here: GlobeMed at UCLA 2013 Eboard Application GlobeMed at Rutgers 2013 Winter Staff Application GlobeMed at UCincinnati 2013 Staff Application GlobeMed at George Washington University 2013 Staff Application


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42 Resources: Retreat

Planning a Retreat http://www.wartburg.edu/orgs/leadership/retreatplanning.pdf

1. Assessment of needs Discuss e-board or chapter status with the Director of Community Building to determine concerns, needs, and desired outcomes of the retreat. To what extent should the retreat be focused on: • Team-building - emphasizing community building and chapter cohesiveness • Strategic Planning - focusing on possibilities and desired outcomes (where are we now and where do we want to be?) • Problem-solving - focusing on immediate problems or events

2. Define objectives Guided by the needs assessment, work with the e-board to define specific objectives for your retreat. Most retreats will be about learning, but specify what types of learning you hope to accomplish: • Knowledge Learning - What information participants possess after the retreat (Individual and organization goals, etc.) • Skill Learning - What skills should participants possess after the retreat (team management, planning / programming skills, leadership development, etc.) • Attitude Learning - What attitudes should participants possess after the retreat (group cohesiveness, trust, optimism, respect, value formation, etc.) For each objective, make a corresponding activity list & think about who should moderate those activities. • If one of the objectives is attitude learning -- building empathy or group cohesion -- make sure to plan an activity (perhaps a discussion on vulnerability) that applies to that objective. • If one of the objectives is skill learning -- discussing team management style -- ask the CoPresidents to plan, lead, and facilitate the discussion.


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43 Resources: Retreat

Planning a Retreat http://www.wartburg.edu/orgs/leadership/retreatplanning.pdf

3. Plan Logistics Think about budget, schedule, and materials needed when planning retreat details. •

Budgeting: Does your chapter have funding for hosting a retreat? If so, determine the best use of your money: food, space rental, materials. If not, think about what chapter members can bring. (Potluck style food, paper from their house, etc.) Date & Time: Consider what days of the week people are free and how long of a day you can ask of them. Try to plan a time that can satisfy and enlighten, rather than rush or bore! Location The setting should be one that promotes thinking and learning. Whether that is an open space, such as a park or campgrounds, or an enclosed space, such as a conference room or classroom depends on your objectives. Supplies Once activities are planned, make a list of materials needed for each activity. Create a spreadsheet of who can bring what.

4. Schedule Work with Director of Community Building on the objectives and lay out a preliminary schedule. • •

Present the e-board with a schedule for the retreat at least one week before retreat. Get feedback and see if there are any other topics that the e-board would like to touch on. Create a master schedule that will be accessible to all of e-board so that they know the logistics behind the events and can help out where necessary.

5. Blast Advertise necessary details to chapter as to get them excited for the event! • •

Announce retreat in advance (~2-3 weeks) so that members can plan their schedules around it. Reach out to individual members to make sure that they know the details and feel like a valuable part of the experience.


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44 Resources: Retreat

Eboard Retreat

Directors of Community Building should work alongside the Co-Presidents to plan e-board retreats throughout the year.The Co-Presidents will drive the strategic planning and goal setting for these retreats and Directors of Community Building should be integral in facilitating the activities that will foster community among the e-board. Because of the intensity with which the e-board will work throughout the year, these retreats should balance fun festivities and thoughtful visioning. Playing games, such as ice breakers, will allow e-board members to relax and have fun before digging deep to think about their goals for the chapter. While it will be important to think seriously about strategy, it is equally important for e-board members to be happy and excited as they begin to move forwards with their plans. Here is an example planning schedule for a fall retreat: • Late July: Begin discussions at least one month before school starts. Set out goals for the retreat and the structure of the day. • Late July/Early August: Brainstorm ideas for what locations or venues would be suitable for the goals you are trying to achieve. Create a list of materials. • Early August: Send schedule to e-board for feedback and adjustments. • Mid-Late August: Hold e-board retreat at least one to two weeks before school starts or before recruitment starts.

Staff Retreat

Staff retreats are the kickoff events that excite chapter members for the upcoming quarter/ semester. These retreats allow you to integrate new members while re-energizing old members and allow you to focus on maintaining a positive chapter culture throughout the year. Retreats should involve team-building and creating cohesiveness within the group -- take this chance to be creative and to play weird games! Staff retreats should have 80-100% attendance. If you have problems with staff attendance at these events, have your e-board boost their enthusiasm in meeting and personally reach out to people. If the e-board is genuinely plugging the event with excitement and creating a special spirit around the occasion, more members are likely to come. Make it a norm! Host the fall staff retreat at the beginning of the school year, within the two weeks of the year’s first meeting. Plan the retreat with input from e-board members and emphasize both collective fun with personal discernment.


Co-president handbook

45 Resources: Retreat

Sample Eboard Retreat Time

Location

Activity

Objective

Champion

Materials // Point Person

10:00am

Hunter Park

Meet & greet.

Open up space for casual conversation to set a relaxed tone for the day.

All

N/A

10:10am

Hunter Park

Ice-breaker: Global health Taboo

Attitude learning: Orients people for the day with a reminder of the broader reasons we’re here

Director of CB

N/A

10:30am

Hunter Park

Activity: Relay race (wheel barrow, whipped cream pie, marco polo with blindfolds)

Attitude learning: Team building activity that will get people up and moving; will inform strategies on how to work with one another (trust, group cohesiveness)

Director of CB

Whipped cream, pie tins, cloth or bandana, paper towels // Director of CB

11:10am

Hunter Park

Lunch: casual conversation.

Let people eat. Hungry people are grumpy.

All

N/A

11:30am

Hunter Park

GlobeMed mission dissection

Knowledge learning: think about our model, mission, and goals on the organization level

CoPresident

Large paper, markers // Director Community Building

12:00pm

Hunter Park

Goal setting: individual reflection & discussion.

Knowledge learning: how individual visionings for the year tie into one another.

CoPresident

Paper & pens // Director of CB

1:00pm

Hunter Park

What is leadership? Leadership development & team management.

Knowledge, skills learning: Develop cohesive leadership strategy and identify collective goals as leaders of chapter.

CoPresident

Sticky notes, pens // Director of CB

1:45pm

Hunter Park

Day’s reflection: write out day’s takeaways

Attitude learning: reflect on values discerned and articulated through the day.

Director of CB

Sticky notes, pens // Director of CB


Co-president handbook

46 Resources: Retreat

Sample Staff Retreat Time

Location

Activity

Objective

Champ ion

Materials // Point Person

10:00am

Ackerman

Meet and get into cars.

Logistics.

Director of CB

N/A

11:00am

Malibu Creek SP

Pitching Tents Competition

Attitude learning: Team building activity that allows people to work together. Builds group cohesion.

Director of CB

Tents, tarps // Director of CB

11:30am

Malibu Creek SP

Lunch: casual conversation.

Let people eat. Hungry people are grumpy.

Director of CB

Bread, PB, jelly, knives, plates, // Director of CB

12:00pm

Malibu Creek SP

Discussion: What is health? What is our role?

Attitude learning: discuss individual and group ideals; create group cohesion through shared values.

CoPresident

Sticky notes, pens // Director of CB

12:45pm

Malibu Creek SP

Goal setting: What do you want from the year?

Knowledge learning: discernment through goal setting for the year.

CoPresident

Sticky notes, pens // Director of CB

1:30pm

Malibu Creek SP

Write out personal / chapter goals on cloth & tie dye!

Knowledge learning: Write out goals on cloth & create a group project that articulates individual and group goals.

Director of CB

Cloth, dye, plastic bags // Director of CB

2:30pm

Malibu Creek SP

Unstructured bonding

Take a hike. Let organic conversations happen.

Director of CB

N/A

5:30pm

Malibu Creek SP

Dinner.

Let people eat.

Director of CB

Everything... // Director of CB

6:15pm

Malibu Creek SP

Human knot (done in groups).

Attitude learning: team building activity that involves physically attaching to one another and problem solving.

Director of CB

N/A

6:30pm

Malibu Creek SP

Discussion: what makes you vulnerable?

Attitude learning: build trust and group cohesion by sharing personal motivations and stories.

Director of CB

N/A

7:30pm

Malibu Creek SP

Yarn Toss: “I appreciate you for”

Attitude learning: create a web of appreciation for one another. Builds group cohesion and GlobeMed love.

Director of CB

Ball of yarn // Director of CB

8:00pm

Malibu Creek SP

Reflection: write out day’s takeaways

Attitude learning: reflect on values discerned through the day.

Director of CB

Stickies, pens // Director of CB


Co-president handbook

47

Resources: New Member Orientation GlobeMed New Members Program at Truman State

Purpose The new members program utilized by GlobeMed at Truman has two main goals. 1. To better integrate new staff members into the organization. 2. To encourage participation amongst new staff members in a way that is not intimidating or overwhelming. Additionally, the program provides an opportunity to gain valuable experience and build leadership skills. Overall the program strengthens intra-organizational community and make the chapter more productive.   New Member Coordinator The program is coordinated by the Community Building team. The Director of Community Building ordinarily takes on a Co-Chair because the new members program adds many more responsibilities to the position.  Some of the responsibilities of these coordinators include recruiting new staff members, planning informational and orientation meetings, running weekly new member meetings, providing support for the new members, and overseeing the new member’s campaign. Application Process To start off the year of community building, Truman State holds applicant sessions that allows both chapter members and prospective members to get to know each other a bit better. Below are the steps they take to meet prospective members: • Host 2-4 applicant sessions on two different nights. • On the application, there is a place to mark available times so that they can schedule everyone accordingly. • About 15-20 applicants are invited to each session, and a similar number of current members attend as well. (These members are the selection committee.) • For the first 15 minutes or so, they invite everyone to mingle (we provides snacks), stressing that the event is casual. • After that the applicants break into groups of 3-4 and sit down to answer a few questions with a few current members. It is usually 1 question relating to global health and 2 or more about that individuals' interests, skills, schedules. • The groups rotate so that every new applicant talks to every member on the selection committee.   • It is only after this process that we review the applications.  


Co-president handbook

48

Resources: New Member Orientation GlobeMed New Members Program at Truman State New Member Meetings All new members are required to attend a second meeting, often directly before the general staff meeting, each week. This meeting is a chance to get to know more about GlobeMed and each other, as well as plan the campaign. Incorporating some global health education and discussion into these meetings can be helpful for encouraging ghU participation amongst new staff members.  As soon as the new staff complete their campaign, these meetings end. New Member Campaign Each group of new staff members is required to coordinate a campaign at some point during the semester. The group must decide on what type of campaign they wish to organize with the one requirement that is it a fundraising campaign.  Generally, new members are entirely responsible for the campaign.  The group ordinarily organizes into several committees to oversee logistics, finances, and publicity. Unlike other campaigns, it is not mandatory that general staff members work the event or publicity tables. In addition to contributing to the MOU goal, this campaign is an opportunity to familiarize new staff members with the way the organization works. The best way to learn is through experience. The campaign is  meant to get the new staff involved as soon as they join and to encourage them to take on leadership positions in the chapter sooner.

GlobeMed Co-President Handbook  
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