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GlobeMed 2016 - 2017 Annual Report


We want to live in a world where everyone has the opportunity to attain their highest level of health.

The GlobeMed at the University of Texas at Austin GROW team and members of Wuqu’ Kawoq celebrated successfully hiking and spending the night atop Volcano Santa María in Guatemala


a letter from the executive director Dear Friends, 2017 was a big year and marked the beginning of an exciting era at GlobeMed. As we embark on a new journey together, we hold true to our founding values. We reaffirm our belief that in order to achieve health equity — where everyone has the ability to attain their highest level of health — we must develop a generation of leaders who share our commitment to inclusion and social justice, and who, together with our partners, collaborate to shape the global health landscape of the future. Over the past eleven years, we have learned that if you try and solve a problem in isolation, you fail. We know that meaningful partnership and systems-level thinking help us approach global health challenges with humility and humanity. We also know that cultivating courageous and values-driven individuals who can lead from any sector, position, or corner of the world is a crucial step towards change. We are committed to increasing access to global health opportunities while fostering a truly global network of leaders. This year, we piloted our first international chapter at the University of Rwanda in Kigali. We continue to strengthen our signature curriculum, globalhealthU, which guides students through a process of self-discovery and reflective engagement within their chapters (see the student spotlight about Bhavana Survana on page 9 to learn more). In addition, we launched the GlobeMed Alumni Association to support our students after they graduate, and inspire lifelong learning and participation (see the alumna spotlight about Tana Chongsuwat on page 18). Our partnerships in Africa, Asia, and the Americas remain strong and prove that effective, sustainable solutions must be developed at the grassroots level and implemented by local communities (see the partner spotlight about Ruben Feliciano on page 14). To deepen our partnerships, we introduced Partnership Facilitation Visits, which provided us the unique opportunity to see GROW and GlobeMed partnership in action. As I reflect on my first few months as Executive Director, it is clear to me that our model works. We are proud of how far we have come (see GlobeMed at a Glance on page 4) and look forward to another great year! Thank you for your support. With GlobeMed love,

Naomi Sugar, MPH Executive Director

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our model OUR VISION We envision a world with health equity, where every person has the opportunity to attain their highest level of health. We aim to achieve this vision by developing student leaders who share our commitment to inclusion and social justice, and by partnering and collaborating with grassroots organizations to help us better shape the global health landscape of the future. OUR MISSION We develop university students into courageous and values-driven leaders for global health, and build longlasting partnerships between university-based chapters and grassroots organizations in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. These partnerships catalyze on-the-ground collaboration, amplify the work of our grassroots partner organizations, and guide students to develop the essential skills and perspectives necessary to advance health equity. OUR PROGRAMS Our core programs reflect a commitment to developing student leaders, partnering to support communitydriven health impact, and collaborating cross-culturally to advance health equity. We achieve this through leadership development, hands-on-learning, partnership facilitation, grant support, and collaboration and dialogue.

UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

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GRASSROOTS ORGANIZATIONS

COLLABORATIVE GLOBAL NETWORK


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Define a Project

Communicate

Mobilize & Learn

In the fall of every year, each university chapter and grassroots partner jointly define a project that meets a crucial health need in the community.

Students and partners talk via Skype, email, or phone, and build a strong relationship.

Students mobilize essential resources to ensure the project’s success while learning and training to become advocates for global health.

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Implement

Evaluate & Plan Ahead

Partner organizations receive 100% of funds raised by GlobeMed chapters. This support enables partner organizations to implement effective, sustainable projects in their own communities.

Every summer, students intern on-site with their partner organization and evaluate progress. Together, students and grassroots leaders plan their project for the following year.

Our impact lives in the day-to-day behaviors of our students, alumni, and grassroots partners. Together, our students and partners have increased resources at the grassroots level, supported community-driven impact, and facilitated action-oriented collaborations — across cultures, sectors, and borders — to achieve health equity.

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globemed at a glance

2000+

60

12

STUDENTS

CHAPTERS

MSIs

Gain knowledge, values, and skills to lead change and advance health equity

Effect change at universities across the United States of America

Provide access and inclusion for underrepresented students at Minority Serving Institutions

4000+

56

$3 million

ALUMNI

PARTNERS

FUNDRAISED

Further GlobeMed’s mission as professionals in health, public service, and other sectors

Drive impact at the grassroots level in Africa, Asia, and the Americas

Support and build capacity to amplify the impact of grassroots partners

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impact areas

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COMMUNITY HEALTH

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13

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

YOUTH EMPOWERMENT

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5

WATER, SANITATION & HYGIENE

INCOME GENERATION

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8

WOMEN’S HEALTH

FOOD & NUTRITION

Projects managed by grassroots organizations partnered with GlobeMed chapters.

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our students

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Cameron St. Germain (GlobeMed at The George Washington University), Quinton Jenkins (GlobeMed at Morehouse College), and Disha Waghray (GlobeMed at Indiana University Bloomington) at Leadership Institute


globemed chapters We prepare student leaders with the knowledge and skills necessary to build inclusive and collaborative teams, advance partnerships, and cultivate conversations for thoughtful leadership. Through our signature curriculum, globalhealthU, students are guided through a process of self-discovery to learn, discern, reflect, and lead. This curriculum provides a framework of overarching ideas, which moves students towards a systems-level understanding of global health, while integrating the voices of their partner organizations. With over 2,000 current members at 60 chapters in the United States and one pilot chapter in Rwanda, we engage passionate students through chapter advising, partnership facilitation, and annual leadership trainings.

leadership institute In August, rising chapter leaders kicked off the new academic year at our seventh annual Leadership Institute, hosted on the Northwestern University campus in Evanston. This three-day event prepared delegates for a year of leadership by providing a space for training and relationship building through workshops led by our staff and students. 126 students attended, including Co-Presidents and globalhealthU Coordinators from every chapter in the network!

“What sets GlobeMed apart is our focus on the health of a person in a holistic sense. Every single characteristic and experience can contribute to our existence and, therefore, our health. GlobeMed encourages me to ask big questions. I can be vulnerable and step into a space where other people are prepared to be vulnerable with me. I love the community we have built, and the commitment we have as an organization to active inclusion and understanding.� ATTICUS WOLFE GLOBEMED AT RHODES COLLEGE

We believe in developing empathetic and effective leaders in global health. To learn about our Leadership Practices, visit globemed.org/leadership-practices. 7


grow internships Grassroots On-Site Work (GROW) internships create the opportunity for students and partners to engage in face-to-face learning and relationship-building in over 20 countries across the globe. Every year, a team of two to five GROW interns from each chapter works with their partner organization to advance their collective impact. While on the ground, GROW interns and grassroots partners strengthen their partnership by evaluating the progress they have made and developing a strategy for the upcoming year of collaboration. Through this experience, which typically lasts three to eight weeks, students learn to view global challenges through a human lens and develop their commitment to community-driven solutions. Since 2007, more than 1,000 students have participated in GROW.

grow institute

Every spring, GlobeMed hosts GROW Institute to prepare GROW interns for productive and engaging field experiences, and help them maximize their potential during the upcoming GROW internship. This year’s GROW Institute, hosted in Chicago, brought together 136 students from the GlobeMed network. The pre-departure training focused on deepening critical skills that GROW interns needed to thrive in their international, cross-cultural internship experiences. Through dialogue centered on the power of storytelling, we trained students about the ethics of capturing and sharing stories of community and partnership during their field experiences. Students also learned from one another about their chapters, grassroots partners, and goals for their GROW internships. 8

91 GROW GRANTS Provided to students requiring financial support to participate in GROW!


student spotlights

ALBAN GEORGE JR (AJ) BHAVANA SURVANA GlobeMed at Lawrence University As an economics major, Bhavana Survana wanted to learn more about improving access to resources and reducing inequalities in order to improve quality of life. During her freshman year, she attended a chapter meeting and was immediately drawn to the collaborative space that GlobeMed created. Survana’s role as the Co-President of her chapter has taught her about leadership and how to work together as a team. “The executive board gives everyone in the chapter a chance to play a defined role in leading the chapter, and different roles complement one another,” she explains. “GlobeMed students have autonomy, and can bring new ideas and interests to the table.” Survana believes that GlobeMed is an environment for exploration and learning through globalhealthU and other thoughtful student-led discussions. She has learned to engage in a constant process of reflection to improve her understanding of systemic socio-economic issues in a wide range of contexts. “This started as something I only did during weekly chapter meetings and it is now something that I do on a daily basis.”

GlobeMed at the University of Maryland Baltimore County AJ is a student at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. He is currently a computer science major, but says that GlobeMed has inspired him to pursue his master’s degree in healthcare education. AJ credits GlobeMed with his deep personal interest in, and commitment to, ensuring equitable health access. Through GlobeMed, he has learned the skills necessary to speak up about the impact of health inequity both at home and around the world. “Anyone can make a difference - whether you’re working locally within your chapter, or with a partner organization abroad,” he says. Attending Leadership Institute as a Co-President enabled AJ to meet other passionate chapter leaders from across the GlobeMed network and hear their stories. “Our discussions, especially during chapter meetings, have given me a place to feel safe and open.” AJ believes that diversity is powerful, especially at a time in which it is being challenged in society. As he gains more exposure to the network, he believes that GlobeMed has reaffirmed the beauty of diversity and its place in the American story. 9


our partners

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Anil Parajuli, Program Coordinator at Himalayan HealthCare, and Pramesh Koju, Public Health Officer at Dhulikhel Hospital, at the first ever Partner Forum in Asia


globemed partnerships GlobeMed’s partnership model focuses on relationship building, mutual learning, and a community-driven approach to advancing health equity. Through our partnerships, we support grassroots organizations that mobilize and develop initiatives to create a positive impact within their local communities. Through our chapters, we provide students with the opportunity to work directly with, and learn from, exemplary grassroots leaders. Each year, every chapter works to amplify its partner organization’s impact through fundraising campaigns, research, and capacity building.

partner forum in asia The annual Partner Forum provides a space for grassroots partners working in the same region to build relationships, share best practices, and identify opportunities for collaboration. In July, we hosted our first Partner Forum in Asia, ‘Changing the Way Change Happens,’ and convened representatives from 12 grassroots organizations. Partner Forum delegates reflected on their experiences as grassroots leaders in the field of global health and their GlobeMed partnerships, and presented their visions for the futures of their communities. The Global Health Fellows Program (GHFP) II provided a presentation about ‘Storytelling for Change’ and shared ideas and insights about how grassroots organizations could use creative techniques in order to demonstrate and share their impact with stakeholders. Partners represented: Alternative for Rural Movement, Buddhism for Social Development Action, Build Your Future Today Center, Dhulikhel Hospital, Himalayan HealthCare, Kachin Women’s Association Thailand, Migrant Assistance Program Foundation, PHASE Nepal, Population Education Development Association, Social Action for Women, and Social Organization for Voluntary Action. With special support and participation by GHFP-II.

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partnership facilitation visits This summer, our Partnerships team undertook partnership facilitation visits in Africa, Asia, and the Americas in order to connect with GlobeMed partner organizations and gain a better understanding of their missions, operations, and impact within their local communities. These visits also helped our team gain insight into the annual Grassroots On-site Work (GROW) internship from the perspectives of partners and GROW interns in the field through interviews, meetings, and social visits.

Shengxiao Yu with staff members of A Ministry of Sharing Health and Hope (AMOS) in Managua, Nicaragua

Shengxiao Yu with Rajendra Rana, CEO of Alternative for Rural Movement (ARM) in Orissa, India

Brittany Zelch with staff members from Kyetume Community Based Health Care Program and the GlobeMed at the University of Missouri-Kansas City GROW team in Mukono, Uganda

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PARTNERS VISITED IN ASIA PARTNERS VISITED IN THE AMERICAS

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PARTNERS VISITED IN AFRICA

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“At Build Your Future Today, we believe that education is the key to changing mindsets and behavior, and reducing hardship. We are committed to providing Cambodian youth with opportunities to improved economic stability and personal wellbeing. We have been working in partnership with GlobeMed at the University of Virginia since 2008. Through the commitment of different GROW teams, the capacity of our organization has improved. That kind of impact will stay with us forever.” SEDTHA LONG FOUNDER, BUILD YOUR FUTURE TODAY 13


partner spotlights

RUBEN FELICIANO JESSICA N-KHUM Kachin Women’s Association Thailand The Kachin Women’s Association Thailand advocates for, and promotes the health of, Kachin women and children living in Thailand who have been displaced by the ethnic conflict in Burma. Jessica N-Khum believes that the organization’s partnership with GlobeMed at Dartmouth College illustrates how students can meaningfully support grassroots organizations. “It’s important to work with young people,” says N-Khum. “We are from developing countries working at the grassroots and we tackle many issues, including political struggle, ethnic struggle, and human rights.” This partnership is bolstered by mutual respect and an appreciation for the unique learning experiences that students and partners can share. N-Khum is particularly interested in the globalhealthU curriculum, and the ways in which GlobeMed students embody the knowledge and value of social justice in their work — whether it is through fundraising on campus or capturing and sharing the stories of migrant workers. “GlobeMed students are young and still learning. If they learn well, we believe that they will become good leaders in the future.” 14

Asociación AMMID Asociación AMMID, based in Guatemala, seeks to promote the social, cultural, political, economic, and environmental development of the Maya-Mam community, a Central American ethnic minority. When AMMID first partnered with GlobeMed at Cornell University, their focus was to find alternative solutions to the water crisis in Comitancillo, Guatemala. Since then, the partnership has expanded its focus to community development. The Maya-Mam community faces many challenges including poverty, malnutrition, and social exclusion. Ruben Feliciano believes that GlobeMed students understand these systemic issues, and are willing to help tackle them. “It’s important for students to have a really intimate understanding of the reality [of life in Comitancillo],” Feliciano shared. Some social change movements in Central and South America operate under a philosophy — buen vivir — that loosely translates to “good living” and relates to the process of achieving a high quality of life and improving health outcomes for local communities. This year, the chapter worked to deliver water filters to Asociación AMMID, which were a critical improvement especially for families with young children. “What we do is work together to help the community. In a partnership, even if they are small efforts, in the long term, they work towards buen vivir.”


SUMAIYA NAKAZIBA Uganda Development and Health Associates Sumaiya Nakaziba works for UDHA and has developed a deep appreciation for GlobeMed students. The longstanding partnership between UDHA and GlobeMed at Washington University in St. Louis is rooted in mutual learning and collaboration. “It’s not every day that you find that your partners come every summer to learn and share opinions,” she said. “The GlobeMed chapter works with us to meet the community’s needs. We make informed decisions together, and we agree about what is best for the community.” GlobeMed at WashU has supported UDHA’s work in the community of Iganga, Uganda, where they promote youth empowerment and women’s rights. This year, the students and UDHA collaborated on a project to evaluate and redesign workplans and materials in order to train the youth about reproductive health. Nakaziba recalls GROW memories with fondness. She laughs about a spontaneous hike in the mountains that was interrupted by the rain, and speaks proudly about supervising and guiding GROW interns through their experiences living and working in Iganga. “The students talk as if they have been here for two or three years. It is the best feeling because it shows that they understand the work that we are doing. I look forward to the GROW internship every year.”

Sumaiya Nakaziba with GROW interns Elena Downs and Ifeoma Ifediba at the Gaddafi National Mosque in Kampala, Uganda.

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our convenings Every year, we convene students, alumni, grassroots partners, and other stakeholders through collective learning and network engagement opportunities, which provide a space for like-minded individuals to connect, communicate, and form relationships grounded in the values of social justice and health equity.

annual summit The eleventh annual GlobeMed Summit, hosted for the first time in downtown Chicago, catalyzed collective learning and collaboration between students, alumni, grassroots partners, peer organizations, and other key GlobeMed stakeholders from around the world. This year’s theme, ‘Leading Bravely: Finding Strength in Diversity,’ activated a critical understanding of the intersection between global health and social justice, and helped delegates discern how their leadership styles could help them in their efforts to advance health equity. Delegates convened in larger keynote addresses and participated in four Leadership Tracks — Build, Innovate, Awaken, and Empower — which enabled them to engage with complex challenges in global health and develop an understanding of how diverse approaches can be used to collaborate and lead bravely. This year’s keynotes featured diverse women leaders. RAPtivist Aisha Fukushima (left) opened Summit with a powerful performance about ‘Art as a Catalyst for Change.’ Delegates participated in her session during the annual Story Slam, where they shared stories and experiences about different challenges they had faced, and how they had found the courage to lead bravely within GlobeMed and in their personal lives. Illinois Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky shared about ‘Courageous Public Leadership’ and her experiences serving with passion and commitment in a complex political climate and as an advocate for public health. Finally, the CEO of the Chicago Foundation for Women, K Sujata, and Children of Peace founder and director, Jane Ekayu, discussed ‘Women Leadership in the 21st Century,’ and how they harnessed power and resources to support and empower women and girls. 16


Founder of the Kachin Women’s Association Thailand, Shirley Seng

Northwestern students and GlobeMed Global Headquarters fellows, Udita Persaud and Nepheli Raptis

TOTAL SUMMIT DELEGATES: 275

12.7% Alumni

14.4% 6.5% Partners & Public Supporters

66.4% Students

alumni digital retreat In September, the GlobeMed Alumni Association hosted its inaugural Digital Retreat for alumni based in the United States and across the globe. The purpose of this convening was to engage alumni, reignite their passion for GlobeMed, strengthen the Alumni Association, and provide professional development opportunities for members of the Association. Focusing on the theme ‘GlobeMed: A Lifelong Calling,’ the day-long virtual event featured presentations by various committees of the Association, including the Knowledge & Skills-Sharing, Advocacy, and Fundraising committees. Dr. John Neafsey — a clinical psychologist with strong interests in spirituality, social justice, and human rights — served as a guest speaker, and shared about vocation and incorporating personal passion and 17 social conscience into one’s work.


alumni spotlights

TANA CHONGSUWAT, MD GlobeMed at Loyola University ‘10 Co-Chair, Alumni Association Tana Chongsuwat has learned to think critically about creating effective change by addressing problems through a systems-based and holistic approach. “Through GlobeMed, I have spent a lot of time understanding and listening to others, and this value has applied to many aspects of my life and career,” she says. Every year, over 500 GlobeMed members graduate from college and move on from their chapters to strengthen the movement for global health equity either through their professions or graduate degree programs. Chongsuwat believes that maintaining a connection to GlobeMed during this transition is essential for alumni who shape the many aspects of social justice and global health work. In 2016, a group of GlobeMedders launched the Alumni Association in order to create a post-college community, provide opportunities for professional development, mobilize resources and support, and promote ongoing engagement among alumni. 18

According to Chongsuwat, the Alumni Association allows GlobeMedders to connect not only with their own chapters’ alumni, but also across sectors and the world. “As a healthcare provider, I want to help transform the health system into a sustainable model, making it practical and meaningful for every person in every corner of the world,” she says. “Staying involved in GlobeMed makes me hopeful about the future, because we can continue to come together to discuss the social issues that matter to us most.” Over the past year, the Alumni Association has focused on revenue generation and member engagement. “As the Alumni Association grows, we are focused on developing the processes and tools necessary for alumni to communicate and collaborate with one another,” says Chongsuwat. “Our professional careers range across multiple fields and our skills also vary. We hope to build a strong online community through innovation, design, research, journalism, and more!”

“GlobeMed was always a constructive space where I could explore different perspectives in the fight against health inequity. The GlobeMed Alumni Association provides an opportunity for alumni like me to utilize the tools we gained during our time in GlobeMed to continue effecting positive change alongside a network of passionate, supportive people.” JESSICA NGUYEN GLOBEMED AT EMORY UNIVERSITY ‘14


“GlobeMed inspired me to turn my global health passion into concrete action, and it still does. It’s the only student group I know of with an alumni community, and it has kept me sustained both intellectually and emotionally as I navigate life after graduation.” COLIN MCWATTERS GLOBEMED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ‘15

JON SHAFFER GlobeMed at Northwestern University ‘09 PhD Candidate, Boston University As a former GlobeMed Executive Director, chapter President, and current alumnus, Jon Shaffer believes that GlobeMed was forged in a moment of possibility.

Colin McWatters and Mia Lei, GlobeMed at UNC Chapel Hill alumna

Shaffer’s involvement in GlobeMed began as a chapter member at Northwestern University, where he studied biomedical engineering and global health. “We felt an obligation to engage seriously and critically with the privilege, power, position, and posture of student engagement in global health,” he says. “We also felt and saw the profound potential to advance justice in health.” Currently pursuing his PhD in sociology, Shaffer recognizes that the world has changed since he first joined GlobeMed during the “golden age of global health” in the mid-2000s, and that the right to health movement is now on its heels. Therefore, he believes that it is important for GlobeMed alumni to acknowledge this change, stay engaged, and harness their collective energy and knowledge gained through GlobeMed in order to make a positive difference in the world. “As we go forth, we must assess our individual roles, power, and privilege, and imagine and enact real campaigns that can defend and work to advance the right to health far more broadly. Onward!” 19


financials *Pending financial audit.

4% Earned Revenue

1% Other

1.5% Corporations

9.5% Individuals 10% Universities

10% Corporate Foundations

TOTAL INCOME: $895,175

14% Private & Family Foundations 50% Government 3.5% Fundraising

TOTAL EXPENSES: $880,634

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80% Programs

16.5% Administrative


our people BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Ankur Asthana, Treasurer Graham Atkinson Paurvi Bhatt, MPH, Chair Roopa Dhatt, MD, MPA Anne Cohn Donnelly, DPH, MPH Nabil Foster, JD Brian T. Hanson Dominique Hazzard, Secretary (incoming) Candy Lee, EdD Linda Loving, Secretary (outgoing) Jean Claude Mugunga, MD/MS Jeff Richardson, JD, MPA Keith Sarpolis, MD Robert Topping, CFA, Vice-Chair Ethel Yang

GLOBAL ADVISORY COUNCIL Pamela Angwech Pamela Barnes, MBA Marjorie Craig Benton Henry Bienen, PhD Paul Farmer, MD, PhD Badi Foster, PhD Peter Luckow, MPH Reeta Roy, MA Victor Roy, PhD David Walton, MD, MPH

STAFF

Naomi Sugar, MPH, Executive Director Balungile Belz, MA, Communications Anna Blankenberger, MPH, Learning & Training Carolina Escobar, Operational Systems Priya Fremerman, Operational Systems Shengxiao Yu, Partnerships (Asia and the Americas) Brittany Zelch, Partnerships (Africa)

SPECIAL THANKS TO FORMER STAFF Alyssa Smaldino, Executive Director Alexis Barnes, MIPH, Learning & Training Caroline Nguyen, Communications

FELLOWS

Jason Kwon, Northwestern University Mariana Forero, University of Virginia Meg Martin, University of Michigan Caroline McClanahan, Northwestern University Nivedha Meyyappan, Indiana University Udita Persaud, Northwestern University Miriam Pierce, Loyola University Nepheli Raptis, Northwestern University Michelle Rodriguez, Emory University Emilie Umuhire, Northwestern University

THANK YOU TO OUR VOLUNTEERS Kaleigh Post, Development Associate Sarah Endres, Summit Program Design

GLOBEMED ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Ankur Asthana, Advocacy Jamie Cartwright, Co-Chair Tana Chongsuwat, MD, Co-Chair Katie Coakley, Program Development Jeremy Harding, Fundraising Meghan Kennedy, Student Support Jason Pace, Membership Parth Patel, Knowledge & Skills-Sharing Sanjana Patel, Knowledge & Skills-Sharing Kaleigh Post, Knowledge & Skills-Sharing Mizuki Sato, Student Support John Weatherly, Fundraising

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our supporters We gratefully acknowledge the generosity of Northwestern University’s Buffett Institute for Global Studies for its continued support over the past decade.

$100,000+

Global Health Fellows Program II

$75,000+

Abbvie Foundation

$50,000+

Northwestern University

$25,000+

Holthues Trust Howard University Student Association Segal Family Foundation

$10,000+

Bristol - Myers Squibb Foundation Casten Family Foundation Irvin Stern Foundation

$5,000+

Brian & Karen Hanson Graham Atkinson Keith R. Sarpolis Medtronic Foundation Sherry & Russ Galloway

$1,000+

AllPeopleBeHappy Foundation Armin & Esther Hirsch Foundation Becton, Dickinson & Company (BD) Charles Richardson Christoper & Anne Cohn Donnelly Christopher & Sheila Kennedy David B. Weinberg Devarati Rastogi & David Fremerman GlobalGiving Hanson Family Foundation Hugh R. McCombs Jamie Cartwright Jamie Gorelick Jeff Richardson Marjorie C. Benton Medical School for International Health Nabil Foster Paurvi Bhatt Richard Aaronson & Linda Loving Sidney Lee Dream Foundation, Inc. Tony Smaldino University of Cincinnati

$500+

Accenture David Crook Deborah DeMaria Elizabeth Larsen Ethel Yang Frank Phoenix John Galbraith

Every attempt has been made to ensure the accuracy of this information. However, omissions and misspellings sometimes occur. Please contact communications@globemed.org to advise us of a change. Thank you.

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$500+

John Tinder Leslie Larson & Donald Katz Robert R. Topping Roopa Dhatt Shanti Parikh Ted Shen William & Margaret Dicuccio

$200+

Adam Holyk Adam Schwartz Adam Voegele Al Lipton & Kathleen Roseborough Allyson Malecha Amit Aysola Amy Uecke Ana Reyes Ann & Denny Baglier Athriya Kumar Cameron St. Germain Carmen C. Montalbano Chrys Lemon Elliott Rebhun Ervin & Daphne Denham Ethan Boultinghouse Ethel Gofen Gabriel Rodriguez Gail A. Paserba Gregg A. Richardson Gregory Taylor Jason Pace

$200+

Jennifer Merdinger John III Kalindi Shah Katie Coakley Mane Williams Mary E. & David E. Setzke Maya McAllister Mia Lei Michael Canmann Michael Dienstbach Michael Mcguire Michelle Costa Nath Samaratunga Nicole Klein Parker Webb Richard J. Siok, Jr Richard Poulton Sagar Pathak Sarah Endres Sarah Stern Sharon Rudy Suki McClatchey Tana Chongsuwat Teniola F. Oke Thomas Forsythe Xinyi Sui

IN-KIND SUPPORT

Kellogg School of Management Mayer Brown Northwestern University Sidley Austin Starbucks Coffee Company 23


our partnerships in africa AMHERST COLLEGE BETHEL UNIVERSITY BROWN UNIVERSITY COLORADO COLLEGE COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY DUKE UNIVERSITY GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY HOWARD UNIVERSITY LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE NORTH CAROLINA CENTRAL UNIVERSITY NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY RUTGERS UNIVERSITY TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-KANSAS CITY UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA-CHAPEL HILL UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS INDIANA UNIVERSITY MOREHOUSE COLLEGE SPELMAN COLLEGE WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY 24

Heart and Sole Africa (previously “Imidido Project”) Facilitation for Innovations and Sustainable Productivity Ungano Tena Western Organization of People Living with HIV/AIDS Gulu Women’s Economic Development and Globalization Shirati Health, Education and Development Foundation Set Her Free Art and Global Health Centre Africa Nancholi Youth Organization Health Development Initiative Hope Through Health Gardens for Health International Young 1ove Kitovu Mobile AIDS Organization Adonai Child Development Center Komera COVE Alliance ChangeALife Uganda Mission for Community Development Mpoma Community HIV/AIDS Initiative Development Initiative Network Malawi Food and Rural Development Foundation Reach a Hand Uganda Kyetume Community Based Health Care Young 1ove Spark MicroGrants Network for Ecofarming in Africa Children of Peace Uganda Development and Health Associates Partnership Pending Partnership Pending Partnership Pending Partnership Pending


our partnerships in asia BOSTON COLLEGE DARTMOUTH COLLEGE EMORY UNIVERSITY TUFTS UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO BOULDER UNIVERSITY OF DENVER UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA WHITMAN COLLEGE

Chinmaya Organization for Rural Development Kachin Women’s Association Thailand Migrant Assistance Program Foundation PHASE Nepal Dhulikhel Hospital Social Action for Women Himalayan HealthCare Buddhism for Social Development Action Green Umbrella Social Organization for Voluntary Action Alternative for Rural Movement Build Your Future Today Center Burma Humanitarian Mission

our partnerships in the americas ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY CITY COLLEGE OF NEW YORK CORNELL UNIVERSITY FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY LOYOLA UNIVERSITY RHODES COLLEGE SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY ST EDWARD’S UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT SAN ANTONIO WILBUR WRIGHT COLLEGE

Project Bona Fide CCC-UNSCH Asociación AMMID Escuela de la Calle Primeros Pasos Centro Romero A Ministry of Sharing Health and Hope Jamba Huasi Asociación Tierra Population Education Development Association CHOICE Humanitarian Wuqu’ Kawoq Sacred Valley Health Logan Square Neighborhood Association

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GLOBEMED GLOBAL HEADQUARTERS

1800 Sherman Avenue, Suite 1-200, Evanston, IL 60201-3777 (847) 786-5716 | info@globemed.org | www.globemed.org facebook.com/globemedhq twitter.com/globemed instagram.com/globemed DESIGN BY Balungile Belz, Nivedha Meyyappan

2016-2017 GlobeMed Annual Report  

Featured on the annual report cover are Edwin Wetoyi and Ines Siepmann, a member of GlobeMed at Colorado College. Edwin serves as a Program...

2016-2017 GlobeMed Annual Report  

Featured on the annual report cover are Edwin Wetoyi and Ines Siepmann, a member of GlobeMed at Colorado College. Edwin serves as a Program...

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