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2013 – 2014 ANNUAL REPORT


AMHERST COLLEGE ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY BETHEL UNIVERSITY BOSTON COLLEGE BROWN UNIVERSITY COLORADO COLLEGE COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY CORNELL UNIVERSITY CSU-SB CU-BOULDER DARTMOUTH COLLEGE DUKE UNIVERSITY EMORY UNIVERSITY FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY HOWARD UNIVERSITY INDIANA UNIVERSITY LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHICAGO MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECHNOLOGY MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY OBERLIN COLLEGE PENN STATE UNIVERSITY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY RHODES COLLEGE RUTGERS UNIVERSITY SPELMAN COLLEGE ST. EDWARD’S UNIVERSITY TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY TUFTS UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI UCLA UNIVERSITY OF DENVER UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-KANSAS CITY UNC-CHAPEL HILL UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY WHITMAN COLLEGE XULA

Pastoral de La Salud | San Salvador, El Salvador ICOD Action Network | Lyantonde, Uganda Rural Economic Development Association | Svay Rieng, Cambodia CORD| Tamil Nadu, India Ungano Tena | Nairobi, Kenya WOPLAH | Western Kenya GWED-G | Gulu, Uganda CEPAIPA | Guayaquil, Ecuador ChangeALife Uganda | Migyera, Uganda Himalayan Health Care | Jawalakhel, Nepal Courage Is Change | Denver, Colorado Kachin Women’s Association Thailand | Chiang Mai, Thailand Salud Sin Límites | Siuna, Nicaragua MAP Foundation | Chiang Mai, Thailand Escuela de La Calle (EDELAC) | Quetzaltenango, Guatemala Rwanda Village Concept Project | Butare, Rwanda Community of Hope| Washington, D.C. Primeros Pasos | Quetzaltenango, Guatemala NECOFA | Moro, Kenya CEMOPLAF Cajabamba | Cajabamba, Ecuador Health Development Initiative | Kigali, Rwanda Jambi Huasi | Otovalo, Ecuador Hope Through Health | Kara, Togo Gardens for Health International | Gasabo, Rwanda Knowledge for Children | Kumbo, Cameroon Kitovu Mobile AIDS Organization | Masaka, Uganda Adonai Child Development Center| Namugoga, Uganda Center for Community Health Promotion | Hanoi, Vietnam ACUDESBAL | Bajo Lempa, El Salvador Medical AIDS Outreach | Montgomery, Alabama A Ministry of Sharing Health and Hope | Managua, Nicaragua CSSD | Phnom Penh, Cambodia Light for Children | Kumasi, Ghana Burmese Women’s Union | Mae Sot, Thailand Maison de Naissance | Torbeck, Haiti Nyaya Health | Achham, Nepal ASPAT | Lima, Peru Social Action for Women | Mae Sot, Thailand Mpoma Community HIV/AIDS Initiative| Mukono, Uganda BSDA | Kampong Cham, Cambodia Perkin Educational Opportunities Foundation (PEOF) | Morazán, El Salvador Joy-Southfield Community Development Corp.| Detroit, Michigan Kyetume Community Based Health Care (KCBHCP)| Mukono, Uganda Raising the Village | Kampala, Uganda PEDA | Vientiane, Laos Lwala Community Alliance | Lwala, Kenya Kallpa Iquitos | Iquitos, Peru Alternative for Rural Movement | Odisha, India CareNet Ghana | Hohoe, Ghana Clinica Ana Manganaro | Guarjila, El Salvador Build Your Future Today Center | Siem Reap, Cambodia Women’s Development Association | Phnom Penh, Cambodia COWS | Kampong Thom, Cambodia Dios es Amor | Lima, Peru Uganda Development and Health Associates | Iganga, Uganda Kigezi Healthcare Foundation| Kabale, Uganda Burma Humanitarian Mission (BHM) | Eastern Burma FORUDEF | Buea, Cameroon


GlobeMed aims to strengthen the movement for global health equity by empowering students and communities to work together to improve the health of people living in poverty around the world.

We envision a world in which health – the ability to not only survive but thrive – is possible for all people, regardless of where they call home.

We believe every human life has equal worth and every person deserves the chance to thrive. This belief has drawn together our network of students, communities, and supporters from all walks of life and from every corner of the world. Health for all is within our grasp, but we can only achieve it by working together.


Dear Friends, As co-presidents we are inspired by the passion, persistence and loyalty of our fellow GlobeMed members and supporters throughout this past year and are perpetually energized by our growing relationship with the MAP Foundation, stationed in Chiang Mai, Thailand. While you read through our latest accomplishments, we hope you share with us the incredible pride and honor we feel towards our chapter. Our chapter members have become community leaders and activists in their own unique ways. We hope that others can follow our lead and take action, however small or large, to promote social justice. This commitment does not concern only the migrant workers in Chiang Mai, but extends to the individuals facing similar circumstances across the nation. We wish to send our humble gratitude to all of our members, supporters, donors and friends. It goes without saying that we owe all of our success to you! In the words of Mother Teresa, “I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a stone across the waters to create many ripples.� Sincerely, Kristen Carroll and Monica Kim Co-Presidents 2013-2014 GlobeMed at Emory

Since our founding in April 2011, our chapter has grown from 12 members to 25 members.


.

GlobeMed at Emory was founded in the spring of 2011 and our partnership with the MAP foundation in Mae Sot, Thailand was formed the following summer. We raised approximately $2000 through numerous fundraising campaigns, sent off six of our fellow members on our second GROW trip, and maintained a staff of approximately 25 members through our weekly general body meetings and commitment to servicing our local Emory health community. We graduated our first alumni class this past year.


Our Partnership Migrant Assistance Program (MAP) Foundation

KEY FACT: An estimated 10% of migrants are legally registered in Thailand but most do not use the Thai health services; for example, children of migrant workers rarely receive immunizations.


Our Project GlobeMed at Emory raised $2000 to fund Women’s Exchange Meetings along the Thai-Burma border.

BY THE NUMBERS: Key metric: 600 direct beneficiaries (women) and 1000 indirect beneficiaries (children and friends)

Cost of project: $2000 What the money directly funded: Transportation, food, stationary, clothing (underwear)

During the 2013-2014 school year, GlobeMed at Emory raised $2000 to fund transportation, food, and stationary for Women's Exchange Meetings in 22 areas along the Thai-Burma border. Discussion topics include sexual and reproductive health and rights, domestic violence, migration issues, labor rights, family life, etc. The project directly impacted the 600 women who attended the meetings and indirectly impacted their collective 1000 children and friends. Part of our funds also help support clothing (underwear), transportation and food for women involved in rape cases.


Campaigns Campaigns are on-campus events and initiatives that raise funds for GlobeMed partner organizations' grassroots projects abroad.

GlobeMed at Emory Carwash

GlobeMed at Emory hosted a carwash in an effort to raise money and spread awareness about GlobeMed and MAP Foundation to the local Atlanta community.

Individual Giving

Members of GlobeMed at Emory were responsible for raising $50 each for our chapter in whatever manner they thought best.

Dorm Storms

GlobeMed at Emory Zombie 5K

Staff members go door to door throughout Emory residence halls, informing students about our chapter and partner, as well as asking for donations.

Runners were charged $10 each to participate in a race in which we had Zombies stationed throughout the course to steal their flags.

$73

$757.65 $110

$1030

Since the beginning of our partnership with MAP Foundation, GlobeMed at Emory has raised $9093.20


GlobeMed at Emory Zombie 5K GlobeMed at Emory charged runners $10 each to participate in our annual Zombie 5K. Each runner was given 3 flags to attach to their clothing. Volunteers and staff were dressed as zombies and stationed throughout the course, scaring runners and trying to steal their flags as they ran by. The first person to finish the race and the first person to finish the race with all of their flags won prizes donated by our sponsors. The other prizes donated were raffled off after the race. We also received food donations from Moe's and Whole Foods that the runners ate after the race. The 5K took place around the time of the "Walking Dead� premiere. There were approximately 70 attendees and others who donated online.


Through service and team-building events, community and camaraderie is fostered around global health and social justice within GlobeMed chapters, the GlobeMed network and surrounding communities.

Total number of chapter members in 2013 – 2014: 25 Number of community-building events: 4 The goal of Community Building for the year 2013-2014 was to create a welcoming community in which every member felt comfortable participating in discussion and each contribution was highly recognized and valued. We aimed to better connect our chapter members and foster our community with shared goals and mutual supports throughout the year. We emphasized the importance of collaboration via community building events like the staff retreat, GlobeMed tank design, Social Justice Speed Dating and two carwashes.


globalhealthU globalhealthU is GlobeMed’s signature year-long global health curriculum. This student-designed and driven program equips students with the critical thinking skills that will inform a life of leadership for global health. globalhealthU is an immensely important and impactful component of the GlobeMed chapter at Emory. It allows for staff and executive board members alike to explore their beliefs and expand their knowledge on the interaction of social justice and health. During ghU this year, there were 2025 discussions held. We discussed topics such as human rights, different types of health care systems, citizenship, the government's place in issues of public health, how individual identity impacts health, issues of diversity, and gender-specific health issues. All such topics required their own types of activities and discussions to fully engage the staff members.


Language Matters In this event, we separated the staff members into two groups. We gave each group a random item (one received a stuffed animal, the other a can of silly string) and told each group to come up with a skit to sell their product to the ghU coordinators, their judges. However, one group was instructed that they had to sell their product without speaking English. We gave the groups 5 minutes to come up with their skit, and had each group perform. After we announced the winners, we asked the groups discussion questions geared towards the advantages of speaking English. This activity brought to light the impact of language in receiving proper healthcare and services.

ACA “Obamacare� Debate In this activity, ghU coordinators presented and discussed the ACA, then split staff members into two groups and facilitated debate between them. Each group gave an introduction, a list of 3 main arguments, a rebuttal, and a conclusion. This provided a great platform for people to discuss their views on the ACA, point out its strengths, but also realize its weaknesses. This activity provided relevant information to staff members, and allowed them to interact with it in a dynamic way.


World Day of Social Justice February 20, 2014 If we apply the global statistics of various social justice/health problems to the Emory community, and talk about those numbers, will students have a better grasp of their prevalence?

We were curious because often times you hear a statistic about the number of illiterate people in the world, the number without clean water, the number disabled, the number sexually assaulted, etc. and if that number is not comprehensible, it is easy to write it off as a non-human statistic. However, we felt that if we applied these statistics to the smaller Emory community and showed, if Emory was representative of the world, how many people within our community would suffer various ails, people would have a getter grasp and sense of reality for these issues. We wanted to expand and make real the various health and social justice issues that plague our world by translating them into the Emory community, and thus we had these statistics showing, and also had participants draw from a "raffle" to see their likelihood of suffering from certain ailments.


2014 Summit “Breaking Barriers, Building Connections� The annual GlobeMed Global Health Summit brings together university students from across the nation for three days of intensive lectures and workshops with representatives from grassroots global health organizations and a range of experts. "Power and privilege are invisible to the privileged group; sometimes, it is hard to see the invisible barrier that prevents us from being open-minded about what happens to other groups of people living abroad or suffering from their underprivileged status; but the solution is not to blame the system but move forward, get to know the world as a whole, and give a hand to people who suffer at the moment.“ --Helen Li, c/o 2016

List of 2014 Summit delegates: Helen Li Beatrice Secheli


6 LENGTH OF STAY: 8 weeks DATES OF TRAVEL: 5/10/20147/05/2014 # OF GROW INTERNS:

GROW Internship Grassroots Onsite Work Through Grassroots On-site Work (GROW) internships, students build capacity of their partner organization, engage in mutual learning, and ensure long-term stability of their partnership. We held English classes (Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced) three times a week because staff members wanted to learn how to better communicate with international donors and visitors. We edited reports and grants written in English. We analyzed data collected from migrant workers and created graphs and multimedia presentations. To help staff members improve their data analysis and presentation skills, we created a full-day workshop on Google Drive (Excel, PowerPoint, Form) and Prezi. We also participated in community outreach events, such


Our Future GlobeMed at Emory

Dear Friends, We are very excited about embarking upon our fourth year as GlobeMed at Emory. Our primary goals for the upcoming academic year include increasing the GlobeMed at Emory presence on campus and strengthening chapter relations. To accomplish these goals, we have increased the number of fundraising and advocacy events hosted per semester. We are also looking forward to opening up the chapter meetings to the Emory community once a month for public ghUs. This provides an opportunity for the general student body to congregate with our chapter and learn more about global health issues, what we are doing on campus, what MAP Foundation is doing abroad, and ways in which they can get involved. If you are interested in donating to our chapter, please visit our Razoo page at: http://www.razoo.com/story/Globemedatemory?referral_code=sw. Sincerely, Alexis Walls and Beatrice Secheli Co-Presidents 2014-2015 GlobeMed at Emory


Finances In 2013-2014, GlobeMed at Emory raised $2000 for MAP Foundation to support projects in Thailand

Events (Campaigns) Individuals University

$1213 $757.65 $285

Corporations

0

Foundations

0

Internal Chapter Revenue

National Office Launch Grant TOTAL REVENUE

$240

NO $2210.65

Campaigns

$20.30

Operations

$220

TOTAL EXPENSES

Total sent to partner that was fundraised in the 2013-2014 academic year Total sent to partner that was fundraised prior to the 2013-2014 academic year TOTAL SENT TO PARTNER IN 2013-2014 Current Cash Position

$240.30

$2000 $0 $2000 $776.20


Stay Connected GlobeMed at Emory

Read more about our partner and project, and the GlobeMed network http://www.globemed.org/impact/emory/ “Like� us on Facebook to find out about upcoming events. https://www.facebook.com/globemedatemory

Follow us on twitter at https://twitter.com/globemedatemory Follow our blog and join in on the discussion. http://globemedatemory.tumblr.com/

Check out our photos on http://globemed.smugmug.com/GlobeMedatEmoryUniversity Find our chapter on http://www.razoo.com/story/Globemedatemory?referral_code=sw and make a donation to support our partner and project today. Email us at emory@globemed.org to find out how you can get involved!


Executive Board GlobeMed at Emory External Co-President

Monica Kim

| monica.kim@emory.edu

Internal Co-President

Kristen Carroll

| kcarro4@emory.edu

Beatrice Secheli

| beatrice.secheli@emory.edu

globalhealthU Coordinator

Audry Klossner

| aklossn@emory.edu

globalhealthU Coordinator

Corinne Grady

| corinne.grady@emory.edu

Campaign Coordinator

Alexis Walls

| awalls2@emory.edu

Campaign Coordinator

Rebecca Castor

| rcastor@emory.edu

Campaign Coordinator

Kelly Broen

| kelly.elizabeth.broen@emory.edu

Director of Communications

Yeji Park

| ypark69@emory.edu

Director of Communications

Martha Kraft

| mkraft@emory.edu

Helen Li

| yli2333@emory.edu

GROW Coordinator

Director of Community Building

Director of Finances

Sasicha Manupipatpong |sasicha.manupipatpong@emory.edu

Director of Finances

Kay Yuengling

INDIVIDUALS Dr. Carol Worthman

| kyuengl@emory.edu

ORGANIZATIONS Moe’s Southwest Grill Big Peach Running Co. Willy’s Mexicana Grill Zoe’s Kitchen Kroger SunO Dessert Whole Foods Market Doc Chey’s Dave’s Cosmic Subs The Running Doctor


GlobeMed National Office 620 Library Place Evanston, IL 60201 847-467-2143 www.globemed.org

Copyright 2014 Š GlobeMed. All rights reserved.

GlobeMed at Emory Annual Report 2013-14  
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