Page 1


e c n e r e f n o C l a v ti s e F s d Awar

5 1 0 2 , 4 2 1 2 y Mao Centre for the Arts & Clubs fasc Do fasc

Cast your VOTE in the

E C I O H C S ’ E L P O E P thth 7 2 AWARDS by March info at m o .c s rd a w a ic s u m n to il m a .h w ww


2 CONTENTS COVER STORY 8 ARKELLS

ISSUE 3 VOL 1

2015

Hamilton’s sons talk about the junos, touring and the new album

FEATURES 12 FRANKIE VENOM

canada’s godfather of punk

18 MONSTER TRUCK

WORKING ON THEIR NEW ALBUM

20 WALK OFF THE EARTH

TOURING, Videos and recording

24 BILL POWELL

BILL TALKS ABOUT FESTIVAL OF FRIENDS

FRONTLINE 4 HAMILTON’s MUSIC STRATEGY 6 NEWS 10 VOX METROPOLIS 22 B TOWN SOUND 26 MCMASTER’S LIVELAB 28 HAMILTON’S JUNO NOMINEES 32 DANIEL BANKO 34 REMEMBERING BRIAN GRIFFITH 38 DUANE RUTTER 40 REMEMBERING HARRY AYLWARD 42 LISA BRETON

FILTER 7 DIRTY NIL 31 THE BARBERSHOP PODCAST URBAN HAMILTON ARTISTS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Glen T Brown ASSISTANT EDITOR Kathryn Dunmore ART DIRECTOR & DESIGNER Cormac Figgis PRINTER Premier Impressions INC GBR Publications

115 Adeline Avenue, Hamilton, ON, L8H 5T5 5,000 copies distributed at JUNOFest venues, Tourism Hamilton, music stores and select music industry locations throughout the greater Hamilton area. ISSN 2292-1338 / ISBN 978-0-9936186-0-4 Comments, writing and advertising queries may be sent to glen@gbrpublications.com More local musician news can be found at www.hamiltonmusician.com © 2015 by GBR Publications

2

Cover photograph and this page Arkells Double award nominees, JUNO 2015 By Brooks Reynolds


DIRECTORY 44 AGENTS, PROMOTERS & TALENT BUYERS

ASSOCIATIONS MUSICIANS GUILD, SAC, SOCAN

COMMUNITY INSTRUMENTAL GROUPS

COMMUNITY VOCAL GROUPS

CONSULTANTS & GRANT WRITERS

CUSTOM MERCHANDISE CD & VINYL MANUFACTURERS

EVENT PLANNERS & PROMOTERS

FESTIVALS

46 GRAPHIC DESIGN

GUITAR SETUP & REPAIR

MEDIA BROADCAST, PRINT, WEB

MUSICIANS FOR HIRE BANDS, MUSICAL GROUPS

MUSICIANS FOR HIRE COMPOSERS, ARRANGERS, SONGWRITERS

MUSICIANS FOR HIRE INSTRUMENTALISTS

48 MUSICIANS FOR HIRE VOCALISTS

MUSIC RETAILERS INSTRUMENTS, SHEET MUSIC

MUSIC SCHOOLS & MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAMS

49 MUSIC THERAPISTS

OTHER PRODUCTS & SERVICES

PHOTOGRAPHERS

PRINTERS

PUBLICISTS, PUBLIC RELATIONS, MARKETING

RECORD COMPANIES & MUSIC PUBLISHERS

RECORD & CD STORES

RECORDING STUDIOS, RECORDING ENGINEERS, PRODUCERS

Bright Lights

EDITOR’S LETTER

Welcome to Hamilton, host city for the 2015 JUNO Awards! I feel a sense of pride because our ambitious city is being discovered anew. Since 1981, when I came here to study music at Mohawk College, Hamilton has been my home. From my own experience, Hamilton has been the best place in Canada to raise a child. Here in “The Hammer,” we’ve been doing a lot of things right and our future is bright for business, education, recreation, and the arts. Greater Hamilton Musician magazine and website (www.hamiltonmusician.com) is dedicated to documenting and supporting the history and performance of music in the greater Hamilton area. It’s pretty rich. As industry insiders know, several of the more piquant parts of Canada’s musical story can be “blamed” on The Hammer. This is our third edition. We have been delighted to meet and work with many people who are eager to cooperate and build our already supportive musical community into something even better. We keep meeting newcomers who are willing to join the conversation. That’s exciting. City council approved a Music Strategy that will help us steer our way. We now have a Music and Film Office. But best of all, we’ve got tons of talent. This special JUNOs edition includes two stories of historical importance: a piece about Bill and Lynne Powell, and a piece about

Frankie Venom and Teenage Head. These are people whose work, along with so many others, helped create the vibe we call the Hamilton Music Scene. We feature the Arkells band, along with several other past and present JUNO nominees such as Monster Truck and Walk Off The Earth. We have a JUNOs centre section for your reference. Building new audiences and figuring out new uses for music is every musician’s challenge these days. Our stories about The Barbershop Podcast, A Movement in 8 Seconds, and Vox Metropolis illustrate some ways of innovative programming that connects our music to other art forms and media. Our crowdfunding campaign to build our directory was a success. We wanted to create an opportunity for everyone to belong, and I believe we’ve made a good start. We probably missed some very important people and businesses, but rest assured we’re working toward creating a local directory that is complete, reliable, and useful. Thank-you to all of you who contributed! Best wishes to all the JUNO nominees. Here’s to 2015 being the biggest and best year for everything music in Hamilton and across the nation. We’ll see you at the next show!

Glen Brown

Contributing Writers Glen Brown, Stephanie Beatson, Kathryn Dunmore, David Fawcett, Michelle Heshka, Brent Malseed. Contributing Photographers Dan Banko, Cormac Figgis, Brooks Reynolds, Ivan Sorensen, Suzanne Steenkist.

50 REHEARSAL SPACE

VENUES, BARS, CLUBS, RESTAURANTS, COFFEE HOUSES

51 VENUES, THEATRE, DINNER THEATRE, CONCERT

VIDEO RENTAL, PRODUCTION

WEBSITE SERVICE

Greater Hamilton Musician is wholly owned and published by GBR Publications. All content copyright © 2015 and all rights to distribution are reserved by GBR Publications. The views expressed in the magazine are not necessarily those of the Publisher, Editor, other contributors, advertisers or distributors unless otherwise stated. Advertising and Pre-order Inquiries ads@gbrpublications.com www.hamiltonmusician.com 3


4 MUSIC STRATEGY


CITY OF MUSIC

HAMILTON’S MUSIC STRATEGY By Glen Brown

Hamilton’s Music Strategy Implementation Team (MSIT) has been given the task of taking practical steps forward in supporting Hamilton’s efforts to become a City of Music. The MSIT met for the first time in September 2014. How was it formed? And will it make any difference? Here’s the background. In 2012 city officials had considered music, along with other creative industries such as film and digital, to be an important economic sector with “growable” economic potential. Dedicated city staffer Jacqueline Norton was handed the ball. I met Jacqueline when she was tasked with a mission to discover and connect with members of our diverse musical community. The provincial government, in its 2013 budget, announced the creation of a multi-million dollar music fund: “We will continue to invest in arts and culture, including $45 million over three years to help support jobs in the music industry. This fund will help the industry create jobs as Ontario becomes a leading place to

record and perform.” Two music sector meetings ensued, originally hosted by the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce, but quickly outgrowing that setting. Eventually a large town hall meeting was held at the Hamilton Public Library. Anyone with an interest or an opinion about music in Hamilton was invited, so I was in attendance. Dozens of printed and online surveys were collected. At that meeting, Tim Poticic (Supercrawl, Sonic Unyon Records) and Lou Molinaro (This Ain’t Hollywood, Tongue Fu) volunteered to co-chair a “music industry working group” which would boil down and organize the survey results. At the end of 2013 the music industry working group produced a document called the “Hamilton Music Strategy” which was approved by Hamilton City Council in early 2014. The Hamilton Music & Film Office was soon opened. The implementation team was formed, and I was invited to join the committee along with 11 others through an applica-

tion process in the summer of 2014. The MSIT will focus their activities on the four goals and twelve objectives identified in the City of Hamilton’s Council approved Music Strategy. We are volunteers who represent different parts of the music scene. Among our first initiatives is a formal, systematic research activity called the Music Benchmarking Project. We are making sure that we have gathered all the existing information that is publicly available about the music sector in Hamilton from StatsCan, labour organizations, professional associations, and arts institutions. Then we will conduct a survey of our local music venues. We will also be researching the music economies in cities comparable to Hamilton. We’re excited about sharing our findings with the community very soon, and we’re especially proud to be able to join with all Hamiltonians in hosting the 2015 JUNO Awards. We’re proud to call ourselves A City of Music. Turn It On Hamilton!• www.tourismhamilton.com/music-film 5


6 NEWS THE MELO TREE

Hamilton musician Brian Melo, who won Canadian Idol in 2007, has been helping children develop as singers while working on new music with a new band. The youth program is the MeloTree, a collaboration between Melo and Teresa Cirillo, owner/director of Studio E Music and Arts and voice coach. “The MeloTree started two years ago,” said Melo. “I didn’t know where to go next in my music career so I decided to give vocal and songwriting lessons to local kids. Teresa asked me to do a composition class and I told her I was working on this mentorship program. She thought it was a great opportunity to introduce into her studio. Every program is one of the most fulfilling projects I’ve been lucky to be a part of.” The program runs for 10 weeks and incorporates developing self esteem in the youths as well as vocal techniques and training. “We mentor them in showing them they are enough, they are worthy of achieving successes,” said Melo. “We want to give life values to take with them when the program is done. We have seen awesome results. We all have a love for music and it’s a safe place to go within our community to share that passion.” Melo is leaving shortly with his band for Nashville to develop new music; however, the MeloTree will continue. “The long term goal of the MeloTree is to have like-minded teachers teaching this program. When I’m in town, I’ll do the program every chance I get. It brings immense joy into my life.” www.studioemusicandarts.com/programs/melotree

Burlington Teen Tour Band After returning from a successful tour of Ireland in March 2013, the Burlington Teen Tour Band (BTTB) keeps on marching. With upcoming performances in its hometown, this band is one display of heart and talent that nobody wants to miss. If you haven’t heard, the Burlington Teen Tour Band is the largest and oldest youth marching band in Canada. The band consists of youth from Burlington and the surrounding area ages 13-21. The band encourages all youth to join the band, including those who do not play an instrument; they welcome new colour guard members and majorettes. The BTTB is a fantastic way for young people to challenge themselves, represent their city and make some memories. The BTTB practices twice a week to prepare for their heavy volume of performances. The band has many Ontario-based performances throughout the year. Each year, the band embarks on one international tour. In 2013, the band ventured to Ireland. During their tour of Ireland, the BTTB participated in the Dublin St. Patrick’s day parade and won the title “Best Youth Band” over 16 other bands from across the world. They also picked up the “Best Overall Band” award at the All Ireland International Band Championship in Limerick. The band continues their success with many upcoming Burlington performances you won’t want to miss. They have a concert at the Burlington Performing Arts Centre in April, and in May will travel to The Netherlands for the 70th Anniversary of the liberation by Canadian Forces. 2017 marks the 70th Anniversary of the Burlington Teen Tour Band. If you are an BTTB alumnus, start practising now for the reunion band! The record to beat is 350 marching alumni. www.teentourband.org

BIG JOHNNY BLUE Big Johnny Blue, otherwise known as John Crawford, is a multi-instrumentalist, singer, songwriter and lover of Hamilton’s blues scene. He is committed to supporting local music and musicians, especially by supporting efforts to tell the story of Hamilton’s blues history. Crawford has written hundreds of songs and performs regularly as Big Johnny Blue and the Strange Cargo band. “You don’t just learn the blues, you live the blues, you feel the blues,” he said. “When you play, it’s 90 percent feeling, 5 percent sweating and 5 percent how you play your guitar.” Crawford is proud to be self-taught and has taught songwriting to others in the past. “I have never taken a lesson in my life,” he said. “It’s just what people have shown me; I learned from an old book to play the guitar. My dad bought me a $5 pink guitar and 50 cent chord book and I was set.” In 1974, at the age of 14, he wrote his first song called ‘You Drive Me Baby Blues’ about a boy hitch-hiking to see his girlfriend. Inspired by issues he sees around him, whether it is neighbourhood children playing with toy guns or people not taking a stance on important issues, Crawford said a good song is one that inspires you to feel. “Anybody can play a 12-bar blues song but you have to feel it to really play it,” he noted. “I’ve sang songs that have made me cry on stage because the musicians I’m performing with on stage made me feel it. You have to feel what you’re singing and trying to tell a story about but it’s not just vocals, it’s the instruments as well.” His love of blues stems from when he was a child. “When I first started playing music, I was going to be a rock star,” he recalled. “FM radio used to be like underground radio at one time; you could only get it at night and it came from the States. I would literally hide under my blankets with a flashlight and try to get a station spinning blues songs. Traditional blues has always turned me on.” www.bigjohnnyblue.com

Corey Lueck & The Smoke Wagon Blues Band In Hamilton, the blues scene is thriving with bands like Corey Lueck and the Smoke Wagon Blues Band and its large haul of Canadian classic blues. Corey Lueck, vocalist and harmonica player, felt the current version of Smoke Wagon Blues Band was so good after being around for 20 years he could record the band live off the floor. “I figured we’re hot so why not record live,” said Lueck. “We needed a big comeback for ‘It Ain’t Easy’ as you’re only as good as your last album.” ‘Live in Hamilton’, released in 2013, was a hit for the band resulting in extensive radio play, nominations for Hamilton Music Awards best blues album and media mentions. The album featured 70 minutes of live blues recorded at Stonewalls. “We wanted people to hear us live but I didn’t think it would be a good radio project as with playing live, we play lengthy,” noted Lueck. “I’m more proud of this album than any. The blogs and reviews were the best part, telling us how tight the band was and enjoying the feel and quality of the album.” The rest of the Smoke Wagon Blues Band is Nick Succi, piano and organ, Gordon Aeichele, saxophone, Jason Colavecchia, bass, Tibor Lukacs, drums, and Mike Stubbs, vocals and guitar. Last summer, as well as performing festivals such as Burlington Ribfest, Waterdown Ribfest and Hammer Bluesfest, the band started writing more material for a new album. “It’s going really well as it’s different now,” explained Lueck, noting songwriting duties have expanded from exclusively he and Mike Stubbs to include all members of the band. “Since the live album, with this new material, it’s a collaboration with all of us. It feels like when we were younger and all jammed together. It’s more fun than I’ve had in years. Everybody puts his mark on it and it seems to be for the better with these guys.” Lueck said the band is not rushing this album with no plans to release it before the fall. “I think people turn to the blues because it is so honest,” he said. “We’ve had so much great publicity all over the world and people asking me about Hamilton because so many incredible musicians have come from Hamilton. It’s a real roots city with so many great musicians.”


Swampy-Sweet Alt Country

Mississippi Bends has a bedrock of seasoned musicians to create a smooth mixture of Americana, southern rock and swampy country and showcases the product of this culmination in its debut recording, released in December. Formed a year ago, Mississippi Bends brings together Mary Simon, acoustic guitarist and vocalist, Andrew Aldridge, electric guitarist and vocalist, Carrie Ashworth as bass guitarist and Robin Pirson on drums, who brings a ‘swampiness’ to the music with his personally-restored vintage 1930s kit. Simon has performed with Pirson on and off throughout the past 10 years and he performed on Simon’s last four albums; Simon has performed with Aldridge, who played on her last record, for the last five years. Simon has performed on her own for more than 15 years, releasing her first solo full-length album in 2000. “We’re really happy with this release,” she noted. “We’re really proud and are already writing new material. There is something about bringing like-minded musicians together that is really inspiring.” The sound the band creates is definitely different from Simon’s solo sound. Simon recently visited the southern United States, planning to book a tour in the area in the spring. “I make regular stops down there because it’s our style of music. Alternative country or Americana, we like the organicness of the music. With this record, we did very little overdubs in trying to catch the live performance. We are trying to be really organic.” The self-titled EP was recorded mostly live off the floor, with songs written by the band except for one collaboration between Simon and Tom Wilson (LeE HARVeY OsMOND). Mississippi Bends performs every Tuesday from 10 p.m. at the Cat ‘N Fiddle in Hamilton. www.mississippibends.com

BLUES LOVING CITY Hamilton has several blues bands, and a few notable venues and festivals. In November 2014 the nascent Hamilton Blues Society created the Hammer Bluesfest, a one-day celebration of blues music. The Blues and Roots Festival at Westdale Village happens in June, as does the annual Blues With A Feeling fundraiser for the Hamilton Music Collective, in memory of Richard Newell a.k.a. King Biscuit Boy. Every Sunday, Bay City Music Hall hosts Sunday Blues featuring different artists each week. Musicians such as Jack de Keyzer, Paul James, Tim Gibbons, Sabrina Weeks, Joel Johnson have recently performed. Sunday Blues runs 2-6 p.m. with $5 admission.

FASTER AND LOUDER EVERY YEAR

DIRTY NIL

By Katherine Dunmore Photography Auteur Research

Two boys from Dundas lived across the highway from one another since they were five years old. In their teens, one bought a guitar and the other drums, which started them down a path leading to a band called the Dirty Nil. Recently asked to perform in Canadian Music Week and Vans Warped Tour, The Dirty Nil consists of Luke Bentham, guitarist and vocalist, Kyle Fisher, drummer and Dave Nardi, bass guitarist and vocalist. “Kyle and I have known each other all our lives but didn’t play music together until we were 15,” said Bentham. “We wanted to form a band and write our own music but we sucked as a two piece. In 2009, Dave joined us with his plugged-in, distorted bass and it was so huge we knew we now have a band.” Along with festivals and tours, the Dirty Nil is planning the release of new material in the New Year. “As a three-piece, our songwriting changed now that we have a bass to write with; it’s dynamically intricate and heavier,” said Bentham. “Things have really started for us in the last three years since the release of our 7-inch, Fuckin’ Up Young (2011). We all unofficially regard it as a turning point for the band. We try to play faster and louder every year.” In February, the band released Smite (a 10-inch release with five songs). “There was a definite progression with that release,” ex-

plained Bentham. “International blogs were writing about us, we cemented a following in southern Ontario, and played some really successful release shows, with some oversold. It was another landmark for us.” Then, this past summer, the band released ‘Cinnamon’, a 7-inch release. “We were hugely floored in terms of the attention,” noted Bentham. “We were able to tour the United States by ourselves; the shows were all awesome.” The band has performed in many festivals such as Hamilton’s Supercrawl. “Supercrawl is a great way to play with friends in downtown Hamilton and it is pretty surreal especially given its location,” said Bentham. Now Bentham said a lot of new music is on its way this year. “A lot of shows are coming up in the New Year across Canada and U.S.,” said Bentham. “There is a lot of new music coming. I can guarantee a few more installations of our record club.” Loud and distorted, Bentham said the band’s sound is rooted in rock and roll. “We congregate around classic rock,” he explained. “A lot of our songs start with guitar and vocal melodies; we play whatever excites us. There is usually very little dialogue until we are fine-tuning the song. We are smiling, playing really loud and having fun. That’s what we formed on, we still have fun now as when we were 15.” www.thedirtynil.tumblr.com 7


8 ARKELLS

8


LOVE OF MUSIC

ARKELLS

By Kathryn Dunmore “YOU WRITE ABOUT WHAT YOU KNOW AND SOME OF MY FAVOURITE SONGS ARE TALKING ABOUT THEIR NEIGHBOURHOODS.” Photography Ivan Sorensen

Arkells is looking forward to performing in the 2015 JUNOs broadcast, and showing off its hometown city of Hamilton to visiting guests. The band was nominated in two JUNO award categories: Group of the Year, and Rock Album of the Year. For February and March, Arkells will tour Canada, playing from British Columbia to Montreal before its first headlining European tour in support of its latest album, High Noon, in May. “It will be nice to nap in my own bed before the show [at the JUNOs],” said Max Kerman, vocalist and guitarist. “It will be cool to show off the city to visiting friends. It’s a beautiful, walkable neighbourhood city; and the fact people can hop from venue to venue during the JUNOs is great. We are proud of the city Hamilton is and what it has to offer.” Arkells formed almost 10 years ago when Kerman, Mike DeAngelis, vocalist and guitarist, and Nick Dika, bass guitarist, met in the first week of university at McMaster. “We met through an ice breaker game in Welcome Week and we started jamming together,” recalled Kerman. Tim Oxford on drums and Anthony Carone on vocals, keys and guitar joined to complete the band’s line-up. The band name comes from the street on which the group started practising, Arkell Street. Signed to Dine Alone Records in 2006, now signed to Universal Records Canada, Arkells first fulllength album, Jackson Square, was released in

2008 and immediately garnered critical and commercial praise. “I can be inspired by friends and neighbourhoods, which is natural as it is a very human thing to relate to; it’s where everyone comes from,” explained Kerman. “You write about what you know and some of my favourite songs are talking about their neighbourhoods. There is something charming about having that local aspect. Even with a lot of people not from Hamilton, and may not know what we’re talking about, the feeling of home transcends.” In 2010, Arkells won New Group of the Year at the JUNOs. The next year, the band released its second album, Michigan Left. In 2012, the group won another JUNO award for Group of the Year. “It was great,” said Kerman on winning a second JUNO award. “We know how hard it is to catch a break and there are many amazing musicians who never get a break or it takes a number of years to get one. So we know how lucky we were to be able to transition from graduating university into touring.” Arkells have toured with Metric, The Tragically Hip, Tokyo Police Club, British Sea Power, Anti-Flag, The Black Crowes, Sam Roberts and Lights. Released last year, the band’s new album, High Noon, was written in Hamilton and produced by Tony Hoffer (Beck, The Kooks,

M83). Even though the band is currently touring in support of High Noon, Arkells is usually writing new material. “We are not the type of band to come off the road and make another 12 songs on the spot,” said Kerman. “We’re always inspired to write. Our last collection of songs are from over a two -year period then we recorded them.” “We’re always kicking around ideas,” noted Kerman. “I will bring bare bones to the guys, everybody rips it apart and builds it back up again. It’s early days but we have a few songs.” In fact, it’s the creative process of the songwriting collaboration that feels most important to Kerman, despite his love of performing live and touring. “For me, the most gratifying part of the job is coming up with something we’re really excited about and recording it,” said Kerman. “Trying to nail it in studio can take a while which I usually don’t have the patience for. But that initial feeling you have when hacking away on an idea and it clicks, whether it’s lyrics or the band hitting its stride, that’s the important part.” As for the band, Kerman said they are looking forward to the upcoming tours then heading into festival season in the summer. “The Canadian tour leads us to the European tour which is our first headlining tour on this record. We will be announcing U.S. tour dates soon. Then festivals this summer.”• www.arkells.ca 9


10 VOX METROPOLIS

OPENING NEW PATHS TO NEW AUDIENCES

VOX METROPOLIS By David Fawcett

“I THINK IF PEOPLE DON’T NOTICE THE MUSIC GOING BY I’M PROBABLY DOING MY JOB.” Photography Sandy Jeronimo Poster Richard Talbot

The movement to cross-over and include music from different genres is a tempting path for musicians who must create their own gigs. Vox Metropolis is a Hamilton-based trio about that has created a three concert series where they will play original music accompanying three silent films. This is an accomplished and versatile group. Pianist/violinist David Jones is a fine classical pianist but also plays jazz and has composed film scores. Cellist/guitarist Kirk Starkey is, in addition to being an adept musician and composer, a sound engineer who has produced recordings including a prize winning CD. Flautist/saxophonist Sara Traficante won the City of Hamilton Award for an Emerging Artist in Music in 2012. I wondered how they managed to compose the music collaboratively. Starkey said that it was something of a work in progress but in this case the music is primarily from David Jones’ hand. Jones conceded that they were still developing their method and told me that the biggest challenges had been technical ones. “The films that I’ve played for before were accompanied in a general way (i.e. not synchronized tightly to the action). It wasn’t “to picture” which is what we are trying to do here.” he said. “There so much action going on, pratfalls and the stuff he (i.e.

Buster Keaton) does and we wanted to have the music connect to all that. The technical aspect of pulling that all together, to make that click track work, was a huge challenge.” They’ll each wear headphones and have a separate audio feed from the one the audience hears. I pointed out that movie music has been characterized as “the music no one listens to”. I asked if they considered that in putting together the music for this performance. “I don’t see it that way.” Jones said, “I think if people don’t notice the music going by I’m probably doing my job.” Kirk Starkey said that it reminded him of string arranging for pop music. “When you’re coming out of the texture too much it’s an issue when it seems to take away from the song. I’m always trying to find that middle ground of doing something compositionally interesting while at the same time serving the song. It’s like walking a line.” From David Jones: “The great thing about his group is that we’re willing to do anything. In a way are allowing the fates to take the course for us. What we want to avoid is being the group that has big lightning bolts on our costumes. We don’t want to be the rebel classical music group.” Kirk Starkey: “We all do crossover type

projects. There’s a proliferation of this sort of activity even with metal bands. We’re looking for a way of developing our voices in new avenues. We’re all big fans of popular song. Working as a fully functional back-up band, as doublers working with pop artists and doing legitimate crossover projects where we’re not working from charts, where every player functions like a member of a rock band, cocreating the music.” Sara Traficante: “The other part of it is that we still want to be able to play those Mendelssohn programs. In the three concert series we are presenting in Hamilton we’re trying to explore three avenues. The first is the movie concert, the next is more classical, we’re playing Debussy, Franck but we’ll also have some twists in the program to bring the audience in in a fresh kind of way. The third is a collaborative concert with a pop vocal duo from Hamilton who are on the cusp of big things.” She added: “Our projects are quite varied, and what we want is to do everything to a very high level. With the three of us working in a collaborative way, creating the projects, the programs, this is a hugely gratifying endeavour. We’re not just signing up for another gig. And we have some tricks up our sleeves for the interactive classics.”• www.voxmetropolis.ca


RECORDING | MIXING | MASTERING | EDITING & MORE DIGITAL & 24 TRACK TAPE RECORDING ONSITE ACCOMMODATION Date:

February 10, 2015

AD:

Carter

Client:

HPO

AM:

Sinclair

Docket:

4009

Version:

v01

Application:

3.64 x 4.82”, 4C

Media:

Hamilton Musician

PLEASE NOTE ;OPZÄSLOHZILLUVW[PTPaLKMV application only. For uses othe WSLHZLJVU[HJ[:LLKMVYHS[LYUH

***PLEASE DO NOT ADD KEYLINES TO THIS AD***

EMAIL: INFO@JUKASAMEDIAGROUP.COM PHONE: 905 765 4823 WEB: WWW.JUKASAMEDIAGROUP.COM

PHONE: 289.808.3064 EMAIL: CORMACFIGGIS@GMAIL.COM

Innovative. Exciting. Stimulating. Classic. Rediscover your HPO. hpo.org


12 FRANKIE VENOM


TEENAGE HEAD

FRANKIE VENOM By Stephanie Beatson

“HE REINVENTED THE STAGE SO IT WAS NO LONGER A SAFE PLACE.” Photography Suzanne Steenkist Memorabilia courtesy of Maggie Steele

Teenage Head was a band that pioneered the development of punk and quickly became heavyweights in the Canadian music industry. In the 1970s, a new wave of music began to take hold. Punk was an aesthetic and an attitude as much as a musical style. It was rebellious. It got a lot of negative press. It made a lot of people nervous. The do-it-yourself mentality that punk harboured was a bold statement that went against the corporate machine and inspired change on many levels. What began on the outskirts of society became a musical revolution that had a profound impact on the music industry. It encouraged spontaneity and individuality, which inspired raucous attitudes and fashion, including bold hairstyles and dress; men wore tight jeans and sometimes eyeliner. Energy and attitude was more important than perfection. What began underground evolved into the mainstream as major bands like The Clash, Ramones, New York Dolls, The Sex Pistols established credibility. Teenage Head influenced artists worldwide including punk contemporaries the Ramones, The Tragically Hip, Blue Rodeo and the Headstones. One of the most notorious faces of punk rock, especially in Canada, is that of Frankie Venom of Teenage Head. He was the epitome of a punk rocker both because of his attitude and his lifestyle. He was edgy, straight-forward and unapologetic both in his personal life and

professionally. Teenage Head represented the gritty, working class city of Hamilton. The music was hard, fast and fun; the way Frankie lived his life. Frankie’s visual style evolved from the early days of his career from a classic punk image with tight jeans and eyeliner, to colourful suits during the 1980s when the band was at the height of their success, to a more laid back look in his later years when he sported sneakers and a leather jacket held together with duct tape. Three things were an integral part of his show and image on stage: an SM-58 microphone, an Atlas microphone stand (round bottom) and a tambourine. Frankie was a fearless performer with captivating stage presence. He reinvented the stage so it was no longer a safe place. He is best known for his acrobatic stage maneuvers, which often left him injured, but never prevented him from finishing shows. Sometimes he would throw bottles and jump into the audience, or take a warrior-like stance and hold the microphone stand like it was a weapon. He created an air of danger. Filmmaker Colin Brunton witnessed Frankie climb up some piping at a Larry’s Hideaway show once, hanging himself upside down from the ceiling pipes for a while then letting himself go, landing on his head without bracing his fall and continuing to sing, unfazed. At another show he climbed atop a stack of amps, from which

he could have suffered a fatal fall if the tower had collapsed (Brunton 2014). Frankie represents artistic expression that is free from the confines of technique, but rather focuses on feeling. He wrote clever and poetic lyrics, working words into songs that you wouldn’t expect. In the late 1970s and 1980s, Teenage Head were possibly the hardest working band in Canada; the option to fail was nonexistent. By all accounts, they were far ahead of any other Canadian band in punk when they burst onto the scene in Toronto because they had rehearsed for over a year in Frank’s basement before they began playing live, had honed their craft well beyond any other band and hence raised the bar for other acts. “Picture My Face,” their first single, was wildly popular and by the end of the 1970s The Head were playing national headlining gigs. In 1980 they achieved gold status and broke through with their second album Frantic City, featuring hits like “Let’s Shake” and “Somethin’ On My Mind.” The album went platinum in 1983, selling over 100,000 units. The band would surely have achieved greater international success had they not been plagued by an uncanny amount of unfortunate circumstances. Their first record label folded after releasing the Head’s first EP, important gigs were cancelled due to rioting fans, record label managers forced them to play to the point of exhaustion, and perhaps 13


most devastating of all, in 1980 the band’s guitar player and songwriter Gord Lewis broke his back in a near fatal car accident that prevented him from playing for about a year, right before the Head had a series of showcase gigs booked in New York that were meant to attract a U.S. record label and put them on the road to international stardom (The Canadian Pop Encyclopedia 2014; Sutherland 330-331). It was nearly impossible to regain their momentum following these setbacks, though the band never stopped trying. Two notorious events in their career were at live shows. At the Horseshoe Tavern on December 1st, 1978, Teenage Head were the headliners. The venue ended up at about double the legal capacity, and hence ran out of beer halfway through the night, so people started drinking hard liquor. By the time Teenage Head were to start their set, the crowd had become almost unmanageable. The police decided to shut down the event just one song into the Head’s set. When they shut down the power, the fans went ballistic and a riot began. The Horseshoe was destroyed inside. Filmmaker Colin Brunton was on hand and filming, and later turned the night into a short film called “The Last Pogo” (Brunton, 2014). The second episode was on July 2nd, 1980 when Teenage Head were the headliners for a show at Ontario place. The event was expected to yield a few hundred people, but over 13,000 fans showed up and stormed the venue. The police shut down the show before Teenage Head hit the stage. This incident was cited as 14

the first and worst riot to break out at a concert at Ontario place, following which all rock concerts were banned there for several years. Despite everything that held them back, Teenage Head pressed on. After releasing Trouble in the Jungle (1986), Frankie left the band to focus on solo projects. Nick Stipanitz (drummer) also left, and the band continued on without them, until Frank returned in 1989. They continued to write and release albums, though none enjoyed the level of success that their early discs had. They did, however, achieve acclaim with their 2008 album Teenage Head with Marky Ramone, which was a crowning achievement for a few reasons. The album highlighted the mutual respect and admiration that the Ramones and Teenage Head shared, and cemented what an influential band Teenage Head was in the punk movement. Teenage Head were also the big winners at the 2008 Hamilton Music Awards with the album. They received seven awards including Punk Recording of the Year and the prestigious Record of the Year. Frankie also won the Male Vocalist of the Year award (Van Evra 2008). Unfortunately, Frankie didn’t get to witness these winnings since he was diagnosed with throat cancer in the latter part of 2008 and died just a few weeks later on October 15th. Coinciding with Frankie’s death, it was announced that Teenage Head would receive a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Hamilton Music Awards. To date, The Head are the only punk band to receive this honour.• www.facebook.com/teenagehead

THE BEGINNING

TEENAGE HEAD When in high school in 1971, Dave Rave (DesRoches) met Francis Kerr and approached him to jam, with Kerr on drums and Rave on guitar and vocals. They started jamming together in Frankie’s basement on Saturdays. The jam sessions evolved into a band (called Madonna Incorporated), which also included Steve Mahon on bass and Gord Lewis on guitar. Kerr had met Lewis in their high school wrestling class and heard he was a musician. It was Lewis who suggested they change their name to Teenage Head after a Flamin’ Groovies song. Rave was not a regular band member, rather filling in when needed, so early on, Frankie rigged up a microphone stand using coat hangers so he could sing while playing drums. It was obvious that Kerr was a natural singer, so when Nick Stipanitz joined the group as their drummer, Frankie moved up front and took his place as the singer and frontman we know as Frankie Venom. Teenage Head began performing in 1975, playing school dances. They had, however, been practising in the basement for two years before they began playing live shows, so when they did start playing shows, they were well rehearsed and already ahead of the majority of the other new bands in the scene, which helped them to stand out from early on.


the Professional Musician

THE HAMILTON MUSICIANS’ GUILD WELCOMES

Hamilton Musicians’ Guild & Canadian Federation Of Musicians Mission Statement

WHO ARE WE? MUSICIANS WORKING TOGETHER The Hamilton Musicians’ Guild was organized in the early 1900’s and was granted a Charter of Affiliation in 1903 with the American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada (AFM) and became known as the Musicians’ Protective Union, Local 293, AFM. The name was later changed to the Hamilton Musicians’ Guild, Local 293, AFM/CFM. For all its activities within Canada and its Territories, all Canadian Locals to the AFM have become known as the “Canadian Federation of Musicians (CFM). First and foremost we are advocates for musicians’ rights - the right to be compensated fairly for our work and the right to be treated respectfully in the workplace. As part of the American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada we negotiate collective bargaining agreements such as Theatre Agreements, Television Agreements, the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra Agreement etc. and set guidelines for freelance musicians. This includes pay scales and hours of work. Local 293 also pursues goals that enrich the musical community. We provide work through the Music Performance Trust Fund, we hold music business seminars, provide funds for the Mohawk College music scholarships and advocate for musicians’ rights in the public forum. The Hamilton Musicians’ Guild is the association for professional musicians and all we stand for is expressed in our Mission Statement as printed. Larry Feudo , President, Brent Malseed, Secretary-Treasurer, Hamilton Musicians’ Guild, Local 293, AFM/CFM

We are the American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada, professional musicians united through our Locals so that: We can live and work in dignity; Our work will be fulfilling and compensated fairly; We will have a meaningful voice in decisions that affect us; We will have the opportunity to develop our talents and skills; Our collective voice and power will be realized in a democratic and progressive union; We can oppose the forces of exploitation through our union solidarity.   We must commit to: Treating each other with respect and dignity without regard to ethnicity, creed, sex, age, disability, citizenship, sexual orientation, marital status, family status, or national origin; Honoring the standards and expectations we collectively set for ourselves in pursuit of that vision, supporting and following the Bylaws that we adopt for ourselves; Actively participating in the democratic institutions of our union.   With that unity and resolve, we must engage in direct action that demonstrates our power and determination to:   Organize unorganized musicians, extending to them the gains of unionism while securing control over our industry sectors and labor markets; Bargain contracts and otherwise exercise collective power to improve wages and working conditions, expand the role of musicians in work place decision-making, and build a stronger union; Build political power to ensure that musicians’ voices are heard at every level of government to create economic opportunity and foster social justice; Provide meaningful paths for member involvement and participation in strong, democratic unions; Develop highly trained and motivated leaders at every level of the union who reflect the membership in all its diversity; Build coalitions and act in solidarity with other organizations that share our concern for social and economic justice.


16


GEORGE ROSE BIG BAND

BOXO STUDIO

DANNY MEDAKOVIC

www.thegeorgerosebigband.com

www.boxostudio.com

www.jolleycut.com

ECHOES OF LEGENDS

SHAMELESS SUBVERSION

JOLLEY CUT

RECOMMENDED NEW MUSIC

ANDY GRIFFITHS

MARGARET LINDSAY HOLTON

NATHAN FLEET

www.andygriffiths.ca

www.bit.ly/SummerHaze

www.NathanFleet.com

MIND ON OTHER THINGS

SUMMER HAZE

TALK TO THE MACHINE


18 MONSTER TRUCK

18


FRIENDS AND FAMILY PLUS 18,000 OTHERS

MONSTER TRUCK By Kathryn Dunmore

“… JUST WHEN PEOPLE THINK THEY HAVE YOU FIGURED OUT, YOU GIVE THEM SOMETHING A LITTLE BIT DIFFERENT SO YOU KEEP THEM ON THEIR TOES.” Photography Cormac Figgis

Hamilton’s Monster Truck spent last year performing headlining shows throughout North America and Europe, breaking records along the way and has now returned home to work on its new album. Spending most of 2014 on the road, Monster Truck returned to Europe (after headlining there at the end of 2013 in support of the band’s album, Furiousity) to co-headline with Scorpion Child. The band then went to U.S. to perform, spending three weeks supporting Alice in Chains, before entering the summer festival season. Back home, Monster Truck headlined the Burlington Sound of Music Festival and broke record attendance numbers. “That broke a record for the band too for audience numbers,” said Jeremy Widerman, guitarist and vocalist. “It was a highlight for the band. We had just finished a 10-week Goliath tour and it was like coming home to friends and family plus 18,000 others.” The very next morning, Monster Truck was off to western Canada to continue performing festivals before returning to Europe and finishing the year by adding more Ontario dates in December. “Last year was nuts,” said Widerman. “Everyone was at different levels of fatigue. I was looking forward to getting home, celebrating Christmas and doing the album.” Now back home in Hamilton, the band will focus on recording a new album. However, Widerman said the band doesn’t feel the pressure in recording it. “We had been writing a lot of the material over the past year and a half,” he noted. “We’ve been chipping away at song ideas, talking about it. We are aware it has to be like Furiousity and more, but we’ve learned a lot and putting that into this recording. We have relaxed attitudes and don’t feel pressured as that has worked against us in the

past and we want everyone feeling comfortable with what is being put on the record.” Monster Truck consists of Jon Harvey, vocals and bass guitar, Brandon Bliss, vocals and organ, Steve Kiely, drums and vocals, along with Widerman. The band plans to have the new album out this summer then head back onto the road, returning to Europe and of course performing in Canada but keeping an open mind to where else, added Widerman. “We’re trying to be open-minded about the whole thing and seeing where the record gains momentum and be able to attack from that angle.” In the meantime, the focus is on creating a strong rock album to showcase the band’s development balanced with its tried and true sound. “It’s really about us trying to find that nice balance giving people what they’re familiar with but at same time expanding upon ideas put forth in the last album,” noted Widerman. “We’re really not trying to reinvent the wheel, we have a pretty solidified sound I think people have come to recognize so we’re trying stick with that but, at same time, add a couple songs on the record people aren’t expecting. It is, to me, about walking that line perfectly; just when people think they have you figured out, you give them something a little bit different so you keep them on their toes. It keeps it exciting so if you’ve been listening to our band for five years, we want to find ways to impress those people with an evolution while at same time as not alienating them so much they don’t recognize the band anymore.” Offering up the band’s sound to fans is how the band first started getting international recognition. Widerman credits the internet and said it should be every musician’s tool to gaining more fans. “ We put our first couple

EPs out for free, something important to me personally, think other guys understood value being able distribute your record to world for cost of hosting a website for $80 a year,” explained Widerman. “Seeing that web traffic come through just based on the fact we were serving our albums up in way that was successful for anyone with internet connection. I think there’s a huge stigma placed on online downloading and file sharing; I think a lot of time people lose focus on what’s really important about it. For a new band and upcoming musician, it is the most powerful tool invented for a musician to get heard. You always hear people saying, I just want to be heard, I want people to enjoy my music, well you have the ultimate tool at your disposal to do that now and it shouldn’t be taken lightly or for granted. That was something we capitalized on early on.” Despite reaching for fans on global scales, Monster Truck won’t forget its roots. “We’re in heart of Hamilton and we wave that flag and represent it all the way, it’s a point of pride for us. People always have their own vision of where they want to go. This band didn’t have that, we just wanted to play songs we liked for fun. We never expected success we’ve had. For bands trying to get heard, trying to get on tour, Hamilton is a great city to launch from as you have Toronto right there which is a major gateway to get to next level with a lot of music industry situated there. We’re based out of Hamilton, we grew up here and it’s a great place to be a starving artist with lot of places to call home and great support system in place as far as people here supporting live music.”• www.ilovemonstertruck.com 19


20 WALK OFF THE EARTH

20


LOVE AND POSITIVE VIBES

WALK OFF THE EARTH By Kathryn Dunmore

“WE ARE VERY PROUD OF R.E.V.O. BUT WE PUT IT TOGETHER SO QUICKLY, WE DIDN’T GET TO EXPLORE AVENUES WE WANTED TO WITH SOUND.” Photography Shawn Van Daele

Walk Off the Earth made itself known by its videos, most notably its five-people-playing-one-guitar cover of Gotye’s ‘Somebody I Used to Know’ which garnered more than 163 million views, yet last year the band spent the majority of its time on the road, but of course recorded videos of its international performances along the way. “We toured last January through May; it was our last big tour for R.E.V.O.,” said Sarah Blackwood, vocalist, of the band’s latest album. “We did a lot of tour videos to let people in on our little world of craziness. The tour was amazing, incredible. We put a lot into the live show. It was a successful tour, especially to wrap R.E.V.O.” Their debut album, R.E.V.O., is certified gold in Canada and includes the two-time platinum single ‘Red Hands’. To follow up on the release of R.E.V.O. in 2013, Walk Off the Earth is recording at home in B Town Sound and soon to release its next album. “This summer, we’re putting our heads on this new album,” explained Blackwood. “We wrote a lot while on the road and we also wrote when we weren’t touring. We started recording as soon as we were off the bus; some at home, some in Los Angeles, all over the place.” This album will show the band’s progression and the time in making the recording will allow the band to explore its creative

side. “There is a lot of new developments and massive progression,” said Blackwood. “We are very proud of R.E.V.O. but we put it together so quickly, we didn’t get to explore avenues we wanted to with sound. We’re taking more time with this one so it’s creative and dynamic. I think when people listen, they’ll feel amazing which is our goal.” Although the album is planned for the spring, a single will come first in January or February. “We wrote a lot about getting together and having a wicked time; it’s about feeling connected with people around with lots of love and positive vibes and positive outlooks, which is always our motto,” noted Blackwood. “We showed that in R.E.V.O as well. This one is more potent. This album is full with three lead singers. Our last album was older WOTE style where we threw in extra vocals where we could. This album goes deeper. We chose which singers were best for each song. There are a lot of harmonies and a lot of cool instrumentation.” The band members ensured they saw local bands in whichever city or country they were visiting, to appreciate the diversity and to gather inspiration. “We played around with being creative and were inspired by unique music,” added Blackwood. “A lot of bands inspire us. In Germany we saw a bluegrass band on the street and they were using an old instrument we just had to find and put in a song.”

Claiming to be homebodies despite international fame, Blackwood said the band is glad to be home to work on this album. “We are super excited to get the album out and the songs out to people’s ears. I’m excited to hop back into the album cycle machine: ton of touring, lot of shows and videos.” To help with the videos, Walk Off the Earth is working with Patreon in an online crowdfunding campaign. “We have the best fans in the world who are so supportive of our work. Patreon gives a portal for people to contribute for a consistent video budget. It allows us to put out more videos.” The band finished last year with an hourlong Christmas special, ‘A Walk Off the Earth Christmas: It’s a Wonderful Mic’, which premiered on YES TV on December 8th. “We did the Christmas special very fast and had been wanting to do for a couple years,” explained Blackwood. “Most people know we like visual content along with music. We were contacted to do one, we wrote out a story, shot it in October and put it out. It was a really awesome learning experience and has inspired us to make movies for all the holidays.” Despite a busy year, Blackwood said she hopes for more of the same. “Last year was crazy but hopefully there are a lot more crazy, busy years to come.”• www.walkofftheearth.com 21


22 B TOWN SOUND

ARTIST DEVELOPMENT DIVISION

B TOWN SOUND By Glen Brown

“IN OUR ARTIST DEVELOPMENT DIVISION WE TAKE THE BURDEN AWAY, WHILE YOU REMAIN CREATIVE AND FOCUSED ON WRITING, RECORDING, AND PERFORMING.” Photography Robyn Pauhl

B Town Sound in Burlington, Ontario is currently the recording studio of choice for international breakout band Walk Off The Earth, who have been working on their newest album in recent months. Studio owner and head engineer Justin Koop is working closely on the WOTE single “We Got Love.” With projects like this and an exciting future planned, the studio continues to grow and develop. A year ago B Town Sound was completing an expansion of its music recording, rehearsal and event facility by annexing the unit next door. After a year of fine tuning its mission and growing its client base, the studio will be launching A.D.D. | The Artist Development Division. Studio and Event Manager Robyn Pauhl says, “I want to take it from being a recording, rehearsal and event facility into a place where we can work more intimately with artists on their career development. We find people always have questions for us about CD design, manufacturing, grants, merch, video productions, social media, and overall business planning. If you’re alone as an artist you quickly discover that you need someone to discuss your career with and help you find your way.” “In our artist development division we take 22

the burden away, while you remain creative and focused on writing, recording, and performing. We guide you from the ground up with the business aspects of being an Artist or Band. From music and video productions to photo shoots and social media, we are the missing link in your struggles to getting ahead and staying on track with your goals when you feel like you are alone and without a plan. Whether you are just starting out or relaunching your career, we are the crew on the path to your vision.” The studio’s live room can easily be modified into a seating area with an acoustically excellent sound environment for CD release parties, private events or corporate functions, and also expand into the halls and foyer by opening up two “barn doors.” The studio is perfect for hosting multi-faceted events. B Town Sound also contains four additional studios for creative artists, engineers, or producers. These rooms are available for rent on a monthly or annual basis. Recording engineer/producer and owner Justin Koop has eighteen years of experience recording and producing bands and artists from many different genres of music. He opened the studio in 2007, and has recorded for artists such as Finger Eleven, Billy Talent,

New World Sun, Tomi Swick, Silverstein, and Grade. Robyn Pauhl’s background is in music performance, vocal instruction, and business/ event management. She won the 2009 Hamilton Music Award for People’s Choice Independent Music Teacher of the Year.

B Town Sound is located at 919 Fraser Drive, unit 9 & 10, near Walker’s Line and Harvester Road in Burlington, ON. The studio won a Hamilton Music Award in 2008, and was nominated for Recording Studio of the Year in 2013.• www.btownsound.ca


www.ballaghedward.ca 905.572.9300

Good Fences Make Good Neighbours. Intellectual property is the foundation of the knowledge economy and the entertainment industry. Intellectual property law is our strength. Let us build strong fences to protect your business.

Copyright | Trademarks | Licensing | Dispute Resolution | Patents

PLY438-GHMM-ad-FNL.pdf

1

2015-02-06

Ballagh & Edward LLP. half page ad Trim size: 7.5" x 4.82" Bleed: 0"

10:58 AM


24 BILL POWELL


THE DREAM TEAM

BILL POWELL

By Stephanie Beatson “IT SMOKED! IT JUST HAPPENED. THE SECOND YEAR GOT SO BIG THAT WE STARTED TO BLOCK TRAFFIC.” Photography (previous page) Festival of Friends, (this page) Lynne Powell

Bill Powell will be the first to tell you he’s the luckiest guy on the planet to have met his wife Lynne, who has been his partner in all things, since the two met in 1967. Bill and Lynne were involved with numerous festivals for 25 years until they retired in 2000. Bill was the “mouthpiece,” the talent recruiter and booking agent while Lynne worked to keep them in the black, making budgets and winning grants. Together, under the non-profit organization (later turned charity) Hamilton-Wentworth Creative Arts, they founded the Festival of Friends. The first festival debuted August 10-16, 1976 and featured over 200 folk musicians including Willie P. Bennett, John Allan Cameron, Shirley Eikhard, Ron Nigrini, Ray Materick, Bill Hughes and Sylvia Tyson. Serendipitously, the Festival of Friends began by accident. As Bill explains, his art studio was near Gore Park and the musicians, artists and dancers used to hang around. Bill decided to hold an art show in the park, during which some people brought bongos and other instruments. Word of mouth attracted many more people than anticipated. “It smoked! It just happened. The second year got so big that we started to block traffic,” said Bill, after which they had to relocate from Gore Park. When the Olympics came to Canada in 1976, Bill and Lynne were approached by the City of Hamilton who proposed that they jointly apply for a large grant that Creative Arts could use to organize and run a festival. They were awarded funding and the first official Festival of Friends was born. The festival was wildly successful, both in terms of attendance and financially. It simply had to continue and so the Powells, along with their many dedicated volunteers,

ran the festival year after year until they officially retired after the festival’s 25th run. The Powells had a few goals in mind with the Festival of Friends. They wanted it to be a family-friendly event, so they didn’t charge admission and they had a children’s area with various activities (they could build a musical instrument and learn to play it, they could dance, shop in a market). They also wanted to keep the festival Canadian. Their aim was to introduce audiences to new homegrown artists as well as expose artists to a broader audience. Finally, they wanted the festival to be as eco-friendly as possible. Bill would end each night by thanking the audience and asking people to pick up some trash on the way out. “The park was always left spotless” he said. The Festival of Friends began a chain of events, and following its success, Bill started up Earth Song, an international festival that hosted acts from countries all over the world, held at Cootes Paradise. The values and goals were similar to the Festival of Friends; to welcome one and all and to expose people to different artists and cultures. Creative Arts was called on to help with other festivals including the Tall Ships Festival, Jacques Cousteau Festival, the Dundas Busker Festival, Renaissance festivals, and Barton Street Bash. Bill and Lynne were like surrogate parents to hundreds of people in varying fields, from music and art, to radio, to acting and even to the volunteers who helped run the festivals. Lynne talks with pride about their involvement: “It gave them values and they were valued. It built self-esteem.” Bill pipes in, “I

know that those kids went on with their lives and used the skills that they got from us in another field.” In the days when Bill owned the Ebony Knight and Knight II coffee houses in Hamilton they would book musicians to play to the various festivals the Powells ran. They worked with people like Jackie Washington, Harrison Kennedy, Joni Mitchell, Murray McLaughlan, Valdy, Fred Eaglesmith, Brent Titcomb, Jude Johnson, Stan Rogers, Tom Wilson, David Bradstreet, David Essig, Dave Rave, Brian Griffith, Tom Jackson, Ian Thomas, Bill Hughes, Jesse Cook and countless others. Reflecting on what he considers his greatest contribution after over 40 years in the industry, Bill shares: “I was put on earth by the lord to lead, teach, share, and reward my fellow man. I was put here because I have a mind that has the ability to assess a person to find out what is good about that person, and how I can bring it about and help them rediscover it inside themselves and grow. I was extremely fortunate in finding [Lynne] who fell nutsy cuckoo in love with me, which was great, but she also had a mind that was like a steel trap. She could take my dreams and write them out so that other people could see the dream and share the dream. It’s important to be a good listener, a good questioner, and by all means help your fellow man.” This philosophy is what drew people in, motivated all they did, and gave meaning to their work. The contributions of Bill and Lynne Powell have had a ripple effect within the Hamilton area arts and music scene, which would most certainly not have developed the way it did without the “Dream Team.”• 25


26 LIVELAB

ASTOUNDING RESEARCH CAPABILITIES

MCMASTER’S LIVELAB By Kathryn Dunmore

“RESEARCH SHOWS THERE IS A PROFOUND EFFECT OF MUSIC ON SOCIALIZATION.” Photography McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind

Bringing a whole new level to live performance, the McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind (MIMM) has built LIVELab, a Large Interactive Virtual Environment, which opened to the public last fall. This 100-seat, $8-million acoustically isolated theatre is a one-of-a-kind performance hall where audiences are immersed in a 3D auditory experience in which reactions are biometrically measured. Brainwaves, heart rates and breathing is noted to collect physiological data marking personal reaction to music. The research can help musicians actually see where their music most hits home. “As we hosted a concert (for its opening event on September 27th featuring Laila Biali Trio, Coco Ma and Stephen Sitarski), we want to continue to position LIVELab as a unique concert hall. It’s not just a venue, it’s a venue with research capabilities,” said Janice Shearer, communications and research assistant

for MIMM. “Musicians can use the research capabilities to become better performers and engage with audiences better. McMaster’s research also includes looking at music as it relates to health.” One project includes studying biofeedback in performance anxiety, another focuses on hearing aid technology while another looks at music in socialization with infants. “Research shows there is a profound effect of music on socialization,” said Dan Busniak, technical director. “One function of music is to create group experiences that increases cohesiveness. The research team that worked together to get funding for this lab had the idea to study human interaction, especially music performance in a realistic environment.” The lab offers multi person EEG to measure brain responses from performers and audiences, active acoustics to manipulate sound environment to mimic any other acoustic space,

audience physiology to measure emotional and cognitive responses to performances, sound recording to evaluate and capture performances and to create complex stimuli, motion capture to measure how musicians, dancers and audiences coordinate and interact, Yamaha Disklavier to measure performance skills of pianists or to study music pedagogy, video wall to assess interactions between visual and auditory information as well as audience tablets to capture live behavioural responses from audiences en masse. “We don’t want to be considered a lab with secret experiments,” said Busniak. “We need participation from musicians and audiences. Musicians could help us and we could help them. If, for example, they had some anxiety then we could provide stress reduction benefits or help reduce repetitive strain. And we hope the public will experience what’s going on here.”• www.livelab.mcmaster.ca


OFFICIAL BROADCAST PARTNER

JUNO Awards Broadcast_Great Hamilton Musician full page ad.indd 1

2015-02-19 3:56 PM


JUNO AWARDS 2015

GROUP

OF THE YEAR

ARKELLS CHROMEO MOTHER MOTHER NICKELBACK YOU+ME

ROCK

VOCAL JAZZ

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

ARKELLS

ANGELA GALUPPO

BIG WRECK

DIANA PANTON

SAM ROBERTS BAND

ELIZABETH SHEPHERD

THE GLORIOUS SONS

JULIE CROCHETIÈRE

YOUR FAVORITE ENEMIES

MOLLY JOHNSON

Arkells met in school. Jackson Square, the band’s first full length LP was released in 2008 to critical and commercial acclaim, garnering the JUNO Award for New Group Of The Year in 2010. In 2011, they released Michigan Left, a collection of blue-eyed soul, sing-a-long anthems. In 2012 they won the JUNO Award For Group Of The Year, and the CBC Music award for Best Live Band. Arkells have toured with acts such as Metric, The Tragically Hip, Tokyo Police Club, British Sea Power, Anti-Flag, The Black Crowes.

When legendary multi-instrumentalist Don Thompson first heard Panton sing at age 19, he recommended she audition for the reputed jazz workshop at the Banff Center for the Arts, where she studied under Norma Winstone. Her impressive catalogue of internationally acclaimed albums have garnered numerous honours, including a second Silver Disc Award in Japan, three JUNO nominations, seven Hamilton Music Awards, a host of National Jazz Award nominations, Canadian and American Independent Music Award nominations.

SPONSORED BY SIRIUSXM CANADA

HIGH NOON GHOSTS

LO-FANTASY THE UNION

BETWEEN ILLNESS AND MIGRATION

ANGELA GALUPPO RED

THE SIGNAL

COUNTING DREAMS BECAUSE OF BILLIE


HAMILTON NOMINEES

INSTRUMENTAL

ROOTS & TRADITIONAL

SPONSORED BY STINGRAY MUSIC

GREAT WALL OF CHINA

BLACKIE AND THE RODEO KINGS

BELMONT BOULEVARD

FLESH AND MACHINE

ELLIOTT BROOD

SOLO RECORDINGS VOL.2

OFF WITH THE CUFFS

THE BROS. LANDRETH

ENCUENTRO

THE DEEP DARK WOODS

THE 24TH STREET WAILERS

SYMPHONY!

THE ONCE

THE HARPOONIST & THE AXE MURDERER

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

ALBUM OF THE YEAR : GROUP

CANADIAN BRASS DANIEL LANOIS JOHN STETCH QUARTANGO

SULTANS OF STRING

SOUTH

WORK AND LOVE LET IT LIE JUBILEE

DEPARTURES

BLUES

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

JW-JONES

STEVE HILL

STEVE STRONGMAN

LET ME PROVE IT TO YOU WICKED

A REAL FINE MESS

Throughout a storied career as a musician, producer and engineer, Daniel Lanois helped push the ambient genre forward into celestial new territory as Brian Eno’s foremost protégé; he has recorded landmark albums for U2 and Peter Gabriel and helped to revitalize the sonic dimensions of Bob Dylan and Neil Young. But Flesh And Machine marks the first time Lanois has truly deployed every sonic weapon in his arsenal and attempted to break virgin ground in support of his own music.

Lee Harvey Osmond, Stephen Fearing, Colin LInden. All three members were deeply committed to burgeoning solo careers they had no intentions of putting on hold, and had no plans to turn Blackie into an ongoing concern. Now into their second decade and with one JUNO award and several JUNO nominations under their belts, Blackie and the Rodeo Kings has organically evolved into one of the finest roots-oriented bands in North America.

Steve Strongman has played major blues festivals the world over including Rio de Janeiro, Mexico City & Memphis,TN, as well three appearances at The Montreal International Jazz Festival, multiple appearances at Mont Tremblant International Blues Festival and Cisco Ottawa Blues Festival. Having established himself as a musical force to be reckoned with, Strongman has quickly moved into the top ranks of Canadian Blues music, and is undeniably one of the most compelling young bluesmen in the scene today.


JUNO Week Events_Great Hamilton Musician full page ad_Final.pdf

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

1

2015-02-19

3:57 PM


TOP TEN

OVER 110 EPISODES OF LIVE AND LOCAL HD

BARBER SHOP

THE BARBERSHOP PODCAST

1. Steve Sinnicks. Our first video episode - great talent. 2. Edgar Breau. Old equipment in a haphazard set up but shone musically.

Kevin Barber wouldn’t have you on his Barber Shop Podcast if you don’t seriously have your feet wet in the Hamilton music scene. And if you’re not famous, Barber wants to push you in that direction. But if nothing else, after over 110 episodes, the show has been good therapy for all. Barber Shop has produced a virtual video pantheon of local personalities and ensembles. Truly unique programming. Some shows reached back into the sixties and seventies, revealing an astonishing number of key players who are still active in today’s music scene. Other shows tapped into the present by interviewing the latest up-and-comers. The unifying discussion thread is always, “Tell us what music has meant to you; what is unique about making music in The Hammer; how has music healed you or brought you through life’s struggles when nothing else could?” Every Wednesday at 8 PM Barber goes on camera behind his desk, looking his usual dapper self, speaking with gravelly candour. He teases out the music and the stories, steering the casual discussion with a can of beer in one hand and a microphone in the other. Everything is in HD, with credit due to

Barber’s teammate Ryan Cannon. The duo started with a desk, a microphone, a couple of cameras, a couch of questionable origins, a decent laptop and a hodgepodge of other sound equipment. Despite some crazy technical glitches early on, they quickly got into their production groove. Musical mayhem in a scary basement. The 70s style wood paneling was the backdrop for every shot. Dropping F-bombs soon became a feature of the show: “Hey Kevin, you need to stop swearing on the podcast,” someone says. “Yeah, you’re f***ing right,” might be the reply. Efforts have been made to upgrade the studio (they finally got rid of the old couch - it was freaking out the ladies) but the Barber Shop Podcast retains its informal, homegrown character. Only one show, episode 99 (The Century Club) dropped below the line of minimum standards in Barber’s opinion. “Sometimes the seed of an idea grows into a mighty oak – other times it just gets wedged in your gums causing residual pain and regret.” His advice for #99? Don’t watch it. But make no mistake, Cannon and Barber will continue to produce a high quality product.• www.barbershoppodcast.com

3. Pretty Archie. Honorary Hamiltonians from

ARTISTICALLY AND MUSICALLY INSPIRED CREATIONS

8. Robin Benedict. Three weeks before a her

Cape Breton, they were super tired and cross crossing the country but the five great guys performed brilliantly and told their story with authentic honesty. 4. Trevor Howard. Although we had a number of top-notch singer songwriters come in before, Trevor Howard somehow broke the mould and made one guitar and one voice ring truer than we thought possible. 5. Tom & Thompson Wilson. Tom Wilson is super busy, and it took a great deal of skill to land the big fish. The fact he came with his son Thompson and even performed “Big Chief” as a duet was a golden bonus. 6. Fry Truck. A real challenge to capture the complexities and shifting focus of this group properly. Very pleased with the sound quality. 7. Varga. If Trevor Howard showed how intimate we could be, Varga proved how badass we can be.

Blondie cover went viral with over 3.5 million hits, Robin came in here with Duane and Bren-

Urban Hamilton Artists is a custom print and merchandise shop located on Main Street at Balmoral in Hamilton’s east end. Artistic director Maggie Ciere is bubbling over with excitement as she explains the services she provides. “We support local artists with whatever merchandise needs they have. Our specialized printing equipment, transfer materials and inks, and our huge selection of merchandise means we can basically print anything on anything.” “We focus on custom orders and pride ourselves in providing personalized service and a quick turnaround time. If you’re a musician and want to sell t-shirts and other merch we will set you up with a sales page on our website. Your fans can choose which of your chosen graphics they want, and the item they want it printed on. It will be shipped within a few days in the manner they choose, or they can stop by and pick it up. The best part is that you don’t have to lug the merchandise with you on the road. We only print what’s ordered.”

The Urban Hamilton Artists shop has a diverse display that includes custom photography prints, posters, CDs, guitar straps, vinyl stickers, buttons, mugs, and beer steins, plus several racks of clothing. All are custom printed. The shop is building a collection of photography of local artists. Musicians can sell their CDs off the Urban Hamilton Artists rack on a commission basis. The shop isn’t just for musicians. “Local cartoonist Alain Musafari found out about us and ordered a couple of custom t-shirts to help him with his promotions. He sent his colourful character drawings by email. The printed t-shirt, because of the process and the ink we used, will hold its colour and quality for a long time. His shirts looked amazing.” A singer-songwriter herself, Ciere finds it easy to connect with musicians. “This shop is where music and art collide,” she says. It’s always good to know where your local supplier can be found.• www.hamiltonartists.ca

nagh. A great show in its own right, the subsequent attention she received has made her episode the most popular to date, demonstrating the wicking effect of the internet. 9. Pearly Jenkins. He was someone else way back when, he is someone else now. This one strikes my memory as a guy who went from unsure and tentative to relaxed and comfortable within minutes, the result self evident, something we do better than anyone. 10. Jessica Blake. Two voices, one guitar, perfection. 10. Bonus! The Monarch Project. Six guys with all their stage gear and me behind a desk should not fit into the studio. They not only fit, but played beautifully. Ryan and Gary’s mixing skill delivered the goods worldwide in real time.

31


32 DANIEL BANKO

GLIMPSING THE ACT OF PERFORMANCE

A MOVEMENT IN 8 SECONDS By Glen Brown

“IT’S FITTING, IN AN ARTS COMMUNITY AS VIBRANT AS OURS, THAT THE MERGER OF THESE TWO ART FORMS WOULD RESULT IN SUCH A VISUALLY ARRESTING EXHIBITION.” Photography Dan Banko

(Opposite page) Clockwise from top left Marsha Moffitt (Cello): Stephen Pierre (Principal Clarinet); Robert Wolanski (Principal Double Bass).


A Movement in 8 Seconds by photographer Daniel Banko is a unique collection of 18 portraits of core Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra (HPO) musicians and their instruments which focuses on the act of performance, a key component of every musician’s character, often overlooked in favour of technological convenience in today’s society. Each image is a reflection of a performer enjoying their craft—a blur of movement specific to each artist, their instrument and the music. Carol Kehoe, Executive Director of the HPO says, “It’s fitting, in an arts community as vibrant as ours, that the merger of these two art forms would result in such a visually arresting exhibition.” Daniel Banko has worked as a commercial photographer and creative director since 1996. His work has been published across North America and the United Kingdom. Banko is a champion of the arts, working and volunteering with numerous arts organizations to promote culture in the community. This series of dramatic portraits celebrating the performing arts is a departure from his commercial career and a return to his studio roots. The exhibit can be seen until March 16, 2015 at the Nathaniel Hughson Art Gallery, 27 John Street North. Sound familiar? It’s the former location of Reggie’s Music.• www.nathanielhughsongallery.com www.hpo.org

33


34 BRIAN GRIFFITH


REMEMBERING

BRIAN GRIFFITH By Stephanie Beatson

BORN INTO A MUSICALLY GIFTED FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE LIKES OF HIS LATE FAMED UNCLE JACKIE WASHINGTON, LATE UNCLES BOBBY AND REGGIE WASHINGTON, BRIAN GREW UP SURROUNDED BY TOP SHELF MUSIC AND MUSICIANS. Photography Cormac Figgis

On November 14th, 2014, Hamilton was rocked with news of the sudden passing of Brian Griffith. The outpouring of grief began instantly and it was immediately obvious that many people in the local music community had been deeply touched by this gentle and talented man. Born into a musically gifted family, which includes the likes of his late famed uncle Jackie Washington, late uncles Bobby and Reggie Washington (of The Bishops, Hamiltonís first R&B band), Brian grew up surrounded by topshelf music and musicians. He once recalled, with laughter, his mother telling him, “If you’re going to play, don’t embarrass us!” The family has always had a strong reputation to maintain, and Brian never disappointed. After attending the Mohawk College music program, he began performing and quickly became a much sought-after player as he could play any style, be it blues, jazz, country, rock, folk, soul or reggae. Brian’s enormous skill led him to gig with one of his heroes, Willie Nelson, as well as

Emmylou Harris, Daniel Lanois, Tom Wilson, Lori Yates, Harrison Kennedy, Dave Rave and many others. He contributed his work on the recordings of many local artists, and his work as a studio musician inspired Daniel Lanois to hire him to play on several albums, including Willie Nelson’s ‘Teatro.’ He was awarded Hamilton Music Awards for Guitarist of the Year in 2004 and 2007. The following year Daniel Lanois, in a remarkable tribute, refused to accept the same award for Guitarist of the Year and publicly gave it to Brian. Brian did not release his own recordings, but he left a wealth of original compositions on tapes recorded on a four track. Eudena Luther, Brian’s partner, wrote, “I am listening to them and archiving them to put on CDs for the listening pleasure of his family and fans. I will eventually release them in some capacity. They are so beautiful and I donít want them in an undocumented pile of unmarked tapes in the basement - they represent untold hours of musical creativity and craftsmanship from their inception as 90 minutes of improvisa-

tion, through the development of melodies, arrangements of instrumentations, and then, finally, to mixed compositions. It’s been quite a trip for me to hear their progression on tape - wonderful, really. I only wish we could have heard them with Hamilton’s top musicians playing them along with Brian. That was what was supposed to happen until death snatched that away from Brian and his fans. So the best I can do is to put his mixed compositions done with a four track, synthesizer and a drum machine on CD. The ultimate indie (is that what they call it?) project, I guess.” Partially through the influence and teachings of his family, and partially through his own interpretations, Brian has left us with a rich musical legacy. On reflecting about what makes the Hamilton music scene special, Brian once said, “I think this city itself has a personality and you just get some of it in you.” Brian certainly had personality. He will be remembered not only for his phenomenal musical talent, but for his kindness, humour and wonderful nature.• 35


36 MUSIC LAW

10 ESSENTIAL LEGAL ARTICLES

MUSIC LAW HANDBOOK FOR CANADA By Glen Brown

“YOU DON’T GET WHAT YOU DESERVE, YOU GET WHAT YOU NEGOTIATE.”

Music Law Handbook For Canada: 10 Essential Legal Articles. Paul Sanderson, Barrister & Solicitor. Toronto: Seraphim Editions, 2014. 62 pages. $12.00 (paper). The world wants our music. But do we know the Canadian laws that underpin everything we do as as we pursue our rightful place in the music profession? Paul Sanderson’s Music Law Handbook For Canada is the place to start finding the answers. Sanderson begins, “If you are just chasing dollars you are in the wrong business and remember you don’t get what you deserve, you get what you negotiate.” Here are some highlights of his book. Ownership: The Basis of Making Money A songwriter’s or composer’s professional self-respect is largely determined by their understanding of ownership, especially if they know their music is really good! When music becomes something more than “just a thought” ie. it is written down or recorded, one instantly becomes the owner of that particular piece of intellectual property. The intellectual property is actually a bundle of rights: public performing rights, mechanical rights, synchronization rights, print rights, and subsidiary rights. The rights may be kept, or licensed for a time to someone else. If a song has potential to earn money, it may come into dispute who is the original creator and therefore the owner of it. It is always good practice (but not legally required) to formally establish the fact of ownership by creating evidence. A postmarked letter containing the words and musical notation of your music is a valid business record, and therefore can be used as evidence of ownership, but Sanderson suggests other ways to help prove ownership, such as: a) take advantage of registration 36

service provided by SOCAN, CMRRA or the Songwriters Association of Canada if you are a member, b) burn a CD, c) keep your own written and dated copies of the work, d) have a witness sign and date copies of your work, e) add the © symbol and date in print form to your work, f) pay the fee ($50 online) and register your creation with Canadian Intellectual Property Office (www.cipo.gc.ca - no file transfer required). Publishing: Doing Great Things With Great Songs Sanderson says, “Music publishing is the licensing and exploitation of musical copyrights. This could be done by the songwriter, whether or not they have formed a publishing company.” Songwriters and composers can set direction for their careers by seeking royalties in many different ways. If they’ve got great music, publishing will be the key to making some money by finding new people and places for it. Sanderson explains the types of publishing agreements in the most basic of terms. Music publishers step in to provide management and oversight of an artist’s music, to protect and create revenue streams. Business Entities And Contracts Business is done as an individual, as a partnership or as a corporation. Is a band a business partnership? Most likely, yes! When very little money is being earned or spent, it’s easy for business details to be overlooked. But problems can arise, especially if an accident, injury or theft happens. Ask any musician who because of being in a band, has gotten into financial hot water through no fault of their own. “Most bands do not understand that they are carrying on business as a partnership and they should have a partnership agreement in writing...” and, “In the absence of a written agreement, each partner will share equally in the debts, liabilities and as-

sets of the partnership.” For example, “if there is only one member of the partnership who has assets and the partnership is sued, then it could be the case that only the individual partner that has assets would be obligated to pay all the debts of the partnership.” “There’s lots of crying in the music business, but it gets you nowhere,” one industry insider said. Contracts: A Road Map How often have we heard stories of a musician showing up to a gig only to find that another band has been booked into the venue as well? With no clear communication trail the musician is left helpless. The venue thought no offer was made, the musician thought an offer was made and accepted! All three steps of an agreement must be clear: The offer, the acceptance, and the consideration (payment). “Prudent and clear communication” doesn’t have to include a formal written contract, but it certainly could mean a trail of email correspondence showing offers and acceptances. Of course, an oral contract, as evidence of a working relationship between two parties, sealed with a “hand-shake” is also the basis of much business. Trust and integrity always play a huge part in any successful business relationship. But a written contract helps the musician, and the event producer, take care of potential problems and provide a map if things go awry or need to change, such as a cancellation, bad weather, illness, a better booking shows up elsewhere, and so on. The Music Law Handbook For Canada should be on every musician’s shelf. By presenting his ideas in a short, simple format Sanderson has made the essentials of Canadian music law accessible to everyone.• Available for $12 at Bryan Prince Bookseller, 1060 King Street West, Hamilton (Westdale Village) or online at www.thebookband.com.


Neighbourhoods Rising is an unscripted urban anthology series and immersive website that delves into the tight knit communities of Canada’s infamous steel town. Told from the perspective of eccentric, remarkable and compassionate citizens, a story unfolds of a mighty industrial city that fell from grace and is again on the rise.

COMING SOON


38 DUANE RUTTER

SHARES A FEW FIRSTS

DUANE RUTTER By Glen Brown

“I’VE SPENT THE DAY IN THE FIELDS WITH A HOE PULLING WEEDS. YOUR HANDS GET BLACK WITH THE TAR AND YOUR SKIN GETS BLACK WITH THE SUN.” Photography Suzanne Steenkist

My home is in Port Rowan. I attended Valley Heights High School in Langton. FIRST BAND: My first rock and roll band was in high school. Bad Axe was our name. We would rent halls and put on shows, and play a lot of our own music. I was playing bass at the time. FIRST JOB: When I was a kid the crop duster planes would come over and we would drop our toys, run outside and stand there so we could feel it sprinkle down on us. We would play in the chemical barrels. I started in tobacco when I was 13, carrying and laying pipes for irrigation. In summers I would work in agriculture, whatever was available. I also worked as a gravedigger, and as a pin boy in a bowling alley. I’ve spent the day in the fields with a hoe pulling weeds and pulling the suckers from between the leaves and breaking the flowered tops off the plants. Your hands get black with the tar and your skin gets black with the sun. FIRST PAID GIG: For the life of me I can’t remember why they called me. It was a slimy slippery bat cave in Delhi. A rough bar. On stage I had on old arch top guitar and a borrowed amp. I learned the songs as we went. I even had to hide behind the amp to dodge a few bottles. I loved the whole vision of the rough and tumble bar. I kept playing whenever I could. 38

I started writing music immediately. I had always been writing poetry. FIRST RECORDINGS: I had been trying out my own recording at home, using a tabletop cassette player from Sears, and an 8 track player with a recording function. It thrilled the shit out of me because I was finally hearing what had been inside my head. Later, I would rent a 4 track player and invent my own way of getting different effects.

FIRST TEXAS TOUR: Steve Wood on pedal steel is my old buddy. He’s a secret weapon. I’m taking him to Texas when I do my Texas tour. I met him in Kitchener. We showed up at a gig and I heard Steve playing with another

act. We ended up playing the entire night and it just clicked. Currently I’m in talks with Garth and Maud Hudson about working together on my new record. Our plan is that I’ll go stay with them outside Woodstock NY and write and record. Garth and The Band have been a huge part of my life and musical journey. FIRST THINGS FIRST: A person’s dignity is foremost. Never make a person feel small, ever. Not everyone is able to speak for themselves. What I mean is that many of us feel that something is not right; that we’re misunderstood. We have our own playlists. Music brings out something that people can’t express. We all feel alone in a big world. You can walk into my conversation any time. Come on in and feel good. Where does that conviction come from? I’ve been the guy. I was left out, misunderstood as a kid, bullied mercilessly. It wasn’t a good time. If there’s another life after this one, great. But this life hurts. Everybody hurts. Everybody needs to see a warm smile. I’ve been that guy, I could’ve used that smile. What’s been happening at my shows is a feeling of inclusion and a sense of community; a palpable thing. It’s the best. If you come to my show, I know that there’s any number of other things you could be doing, and I respect that you’ve chosen to come.


PROGRAMMATI 2014-2015

NTRE E LE T DE RAL OTES URE

Concert series

BER Featuring Lisa Leblanc, Mélanie Brulée turel Les

hone

Chiclettes, Steph Paquette, YAO

Art and Music Festival La Franco-fête, July 4th and 5th, Gage Park Line-up annoucement in March 2015

dérer vités

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED AT BARTON & JAMES ST. NORTH, HAMILTON

me to

PROFESSIONAL RECORDING, MIXING AND MASTERING SERVICES ARTIST-FRIENDLY RATES

A

ca

Programme 2014 - 2015 WWW.CENTREFRANCAIS.CA

INFO DOWNTOWNSOUNDSTUDIO.COM WWW.DOWNTOWNSOUNDSTUDIIO,COM (289) 442-6147 39


40 HARRY AYLWARD

40


REMEMBERING

HARRY AYLWARD By Brent Malseed

WITH THE HELP OF HIS BROTHERÍS SIGNATURE, HE OBTAINED AN OLD SILVER CONN FOR $50 ON A ONE DOLLAR PER WEEK PAYMENT PLAN. Photographs courtesy of Joyce Aylward

Hamilton Musicians’ Guild Life Member Henry “Harry” Aylward passed away on November 10, 2014 peacefully in his 94th year at St. Joseph’s Villa, Dundas. Harry Aylward begain entertaining audiences in the 1930s, in his early teens, performing as a harmonica player in theatre reviews at Hamilton’s historic Tivoli Theatre. Soon after, on his older brotherís advice, Mr. Aylward decided to become a trumpeter. With the help of his brother’s signature, he obtained an old silver Conn for $50 on a one dollar per week payment plan. The purchase was made at drummer Jack Petts’ music shop in downtown Hamilton. The location later became the popular Paynes Music. To hone his skills, the new trumpet student studied with Jack Lougheed. His first band experience came with Bill Spera’s Orchestra. In 1944, Harry enlisted with the army’s Armoured Corps and was shipped overseas to England for further training as a tank man.

As fate would have it, and on the recommendation of his friend Earl Slack, Harry was selected to play first and second trumpet in his camp’s 4th Repatriation Orchestra. For the remainder of the war he criss-crossed Britain with the 4th Repats providing entertainment for war-weary troops. After returning to Hamilton, Harry decided to begin a professional career by joining the musicians’ guild. About 400 strong at the time, Local 293 was then called the Musicians’ Protective Association. Harry remembers being signed on by trombonist Jack Addison. The union office was in the basement of Mr. Addison’s home. Also around this time, Harry decided to branch out as a multi-instrumentalist, adding tenor and alto saxophone to his arsenal. He formed his own dance band, regularly working venues like the Steel Workers Hall and the Burgundy Room downtown on York Street. As a trumpeter, he was hired on by the Hamilton Frontiersman

Band. When that organization’s conductor Art Denton passed away, Harry was honoured to take the post. For 19 years, the Frontiersman Band entertained patients at the Ontario Hospital sometimes playing outdoors on the lawn so as to be seen and heard by the TB patients on the balconies above. Harry also found time to work with the 91st Argyll and Sutherland Band, the R.H.L.I. Band and the H.M.C.S. Star Band. As a baritone horn player, he lent his talent to the Lorn Scots Band of Oakville with conductor Mike Rehill. One wonders how Harry managed to balance so much musical activity with his 32 year career working for Canada Post. Recently, Harry continued to perform as a singer and harmonica player with the Thursday Afternoon Singers, a troupe that entertained at a number of nursing homes in Dundas. Harry was a lifetime member of the Hamilton Musicians’ Guild, and is survived by his beloved wife Joyce and family.• 41


42 LISA BRETON

CENTRE FRANÇAIS

LISA BRETON By Glen Brown

“WHERE ARTS SERVED TO DEFINE FRANCO-ONTARIAN CULTURE, IN HAMILTON WE WILL LEAN ON IT AGAIN TO HELP SHAPE AND DEFINE THE FRENCH SPEAKING COMMUNITY IN OUR CITY. ” Photography Suzanne Steenkist

GB: Where are your Francophone roots? LB: I grew up in Hanmer, Ontario; a small, proud, hard working town located 25 kilometers North of the City of Sudbury, which for us was a bustling metropolis. My community in Hanmer was strongly influenced by French language, arts and culture as such my childhood memories are laced with gatherings in times of jubilation and sorrow where the traditional folk call and answer songs; spoons, fiddles and podorythmy (the folk tradition of stomping feet while playing spoons to act as percussion) would fill our kitchen. GB: At what point did you realize that directing Centre francais in Hamilton was suitable for you? LB: I have moved to Hamilton to become Executive Director (ED) of Centre français Hamilton twice, at two different stages of my life. The first time was in 2004. At that time, Hamilton was on the edge of an artistic and cultural explosion; the building energy was palpable and it felt like home to me. In 2006 love got the best of me and I moved out of the country, to upstate NY to begin a family of my own. Returning to Hamilton I have seen some incredible changes in the past 10 years. Luck struck twice: ED of the francophone Centre was open once again and I set my arrow on the target to have the opportunity to serve such a burgeoning art and culture scene. We’ve made a ton of sacrifices to move back to Hamilton. Although it has been a challenge to uproot a family we have never looked back. Hamilton is worth the investment. We came back to our other home, guns a blazin’ ready to contribute 42

and be part of the change. GB: Tell us a few facts about francophones and francophone culture in Hamilton. LB: Over the past ten years, the francophone population in Hamilton has grown where elsewhere in Canada it been steady or decreasing. The sudden jump in francophone population in Hamilton brings a wonderful diversity to our community. Where arts served to define franco-ontarian culture, in Hamilton we will lean on it again to help shape and define the French speaking community in our city. There are more than 50,000 people who speak both French and English in our region. My goal is to celebrate this fact and make it known. It is a unique characteristic of our city that is found nowhere else. I believe it adds to our attractiveness and unique identity. GB: Give us an example of an artist we should check out. LB: Personally, I love all kinds of music in the right context. If I want to get into franco-ontarian culture and cry like a baby or laugh like I do with my sister over a glass of wine, I call on Stef Paquette. If I’m looking to mark the floors with my shit kickers all the while mosh pitting without feeling weird about it, I select Lisa Leblanc. If I’m looking to impress my friends and make them believe I know something about something – I call on the likes of Dayv Poulin. If I am looking to celebrate my quirky self and move my party of one to two – I call on Damien Robitaille. When musical nuances and admiration for artistic experimentation are in order I’ll play Mastik or Pandaléon. And Les Hay Babies are great to bring me back

to a Hanmer Valley Days’ familiar childhood memory – but injected with talent steroids. And finally, when the lights are low and romance is in the air, I casually glide over to the stereo and set my iPod to YAO. GB: What is a highlight of 2015 for the Centre francais Hamilton? LB: 2015 will be an exciting and pivotal year for Centre français Hamilton. This year marks the 400th anniversary of francophone presence in Ontario. First off: beer! We are seizing the opportunity to celebrate and create awareness throughout the province by distributing a commemorative beer listing facts on francophone culture in Ontario. During JUNO week we will be showcasing francophone artists in a variety of events. In May we have the potential of winning an award for which we were recently nominated by the APCM for best francophone music promoter in Ontario. The nomination serves as a validation for the tremendous work being done by our team, the vision of our board of directors and the unwavering support from a keenly aware community that values good music independent of language. Perhaps our most important highlight is our arts festival Franco-fête July 4th and July 5th at Gage Park. We are injecting it with superpowers this year. It is moving to a two-day event with a host of local and very well known artists! We will announce our lineup in March. There will be music, dance, circus and activities for the entire family! Everything is held in French which allows our festivalgoers to step into a completely francophone environment.•


EMMA RUSH

JOHN MAMONE

BRENDA BROWN

www.emma-rush.com

johnmamone@yahoo.ca

www.brendabrownmusic.com

FOLKLÓRICA

ORDER AND CHAOS

BRENDA BROWN EP

RECOMMENDED NEW MUSIC

JOJO WORTHINGTON

GINGER ST. JAMES

MISSISSIPPI BENDS

www.jojoworthington.com

www.gingerstjames.com/music

www.mississippibends.bandcamp.com

7

DIESEL & PEAS

MISSISSIPPI BENDS EP


44 DIRECTORY AGENTS, PROMOTERS & TALENT BUYERS TCE ENTERTAINMENT (TITAN CREATIVE) A full service entertainment and production company serving Fairs, Festivals, Casinos, Performing Arts Centers and Corporate clients with production services as well as planning, talent buying and promotion. TCE can deliver for your event international headline acts, regional bands or themed entertainment. www.titancreativeentertainment.com reggie@nas.net 905-572-6759 Big Time Productions Producers of major Music Festivals, Concerts, Corp. Events. Hamilton’s free Music in the City summer & xmas live music series. Promoting live music since 1974. www.pages.pathcom.com/~johnyb johnyb@pathcom.com 905-389-4265

ASSOCIATIONS MUSICIANS GUILD, SAC, SOCAN Choirs Ontario www.choirsontario.org Cobalt Connects www.cobaltconnects.ca 905-548-0111 Folk Music Ontario 508-B Gladstone Avenue, Ottawa www.folkmusicontario.ca 1-866-292-6233

Songwriters Association of Canada www.songwriters.ca sac@songwriters.ca 1-866-456-7664

COMMUNITY INSTRUMENTAL GROUPS Jane Clifton (ARCT) Free for amateur musical groups. Parts for obsolete instruments or in inconvenient clefs transposed and printed using music notation software. Your group’s older repertoire can sing again! cliftonjv@aol.com Hamilton All Star Jazz Bands www.hamiltonallstarjazz.org 289-768-0485 Hamilton Concert Band We have been sharing our love for music in the community since 1962 . Interested in us playing at your venue, or playing in the band yourself? www.hamiltonconcertband.com Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra www.hpo.org 905-526-7756 Hamilton Philharmonic Youth Orchestra www.hpyo.com 905-869-4796 Impact Percussion www.impact.hubbli.com

Hamilton Arts Council www.hamiltonartscouncil.ca 905-481-3218

Steeltown Symphony www.steeltownsymphony.com 905-528-2361

Hamilton Blues Society www.hamiltonbluessociety.ca

Symphony On The Bay www.symphonyonthebay.com 905-526-6690

Hamilton Folk Club www.hamiltonfolkclub.ca 905-628-5945 Hamilton Irish Arts www.irishhamilton.com/IrishArts.html Hamilton Musicians Guild 20 Hughson St. South www.hamiltonmusicians.org local293hmg@bellnet.ca 905-525-4040 Music Ontario (CIMA) 30 St Patrick St. Toronto www.music-ontario.ca 416-485-3152 ORMTA Hamilton-Halton www.ormta.org/hamilton-halton 905-333-3128 SOCAN 41 Valleybrook Drive, Toronto www.socan.ca 1-800-557-6226

Strata Vocal Ensemble A mixed chamber choir committed to excellency in classical works from 15th Renaissance to 21st C Contemporary, and also folk and jazz songs, with a particular emphasis on Canadian composers. www.stratavocalensemble.ca

The Dundas Valley Orchestra A community orchestra with 60 members. We are seeking new players. We play 7 concerts per year in nursing homes and at St. Paul’s United Church in Dundas. www.dundasvalleyorchestra.ca

COMMUNITY VOCAL GROUPS Bach Elgar Choir www.bachelgar.com 905 527-5995

CONSULTANTS & GRANT WRITERS Alysha Main Advisor & Coach for Creative Entrepreneurs Artist Management, Marketing & Career Planning services. Ginger St. James and Chris Altmann www.southernharmonyclub.com alysha@southernharmonyclub.com 905 518 1252

CUSTOM MERCHANDISE, CD & VINYL MANUFACTURERS Urban Hamilton Artists Custom Apparel, Promotional Products, Banners, CD Covers, Posters, T-shirts, Mugs, Lighters, Key Chains, Stickers, Signs, Flyers, Automotive Decorations, Vinyl Lettering, Sports Uniforms. You name it, we have it. We print anything on anything. info@hamiltonartists.ca

EVENT PLANNERS & PROMOTERS Hamilton Music and Film Office www.tourismhamilton.com/music music@hamilton.ca 905-546-4233 Hamilton Record & CD Show Saturday March 28th, Sunday June 7th & Saturday Sept 26th. Crowne Plaza Hotel 150 King St East. 35 Vendors. Over 35,000 records. Admission $4. Little Wing Media A comprehensive event promotion, coordination, and event services company specializing in the specific needs and challenges of the entertainment industry. Andrea Cassis andrea.cassis@sympatico.ca 905.518.6587

FESTIVALS

Because Beer Craft Beer Festival July 10-11, 2015 www.becausebeer.ca

Canadian Orpheus Male Choir Hamilton-based TTBB choir welcomes new members. Singing in the Golden Horseshoe to support charitable causes, to build community, and to entertain, since 1977. www.comc.ca

Burlington Sound of Music Festival June 13-14, 18-21, 2015 www.soundofmusic.ca 905-333-6364

Hamilton Geritol Follies www.geritolfollies.com 905-528-8095

Brott Music Festival www.brottmusic.com 905-525-7664


PUB & RESTAURANT

LIVE MUSIC 5 NIGHTS A WEEK JAZZ JAM EVERY WEDNESDAY AT 10PM WATCH FOR MOHAWK JAZZ ENSEMBLES ON WEDNESDAYS BRIAN GRIFFITH BRINGS ALONG A SPECIAL GUEST EVERY THURSDAY AT 10PM SUNDAY MATINEE AT 4.30PM WITH A JAZZ/BLUES FEEL (ALFIE SMITH ON ALTERNATE WEEKS) FOLLOWED BY THE BOB SHIELDS JAZZ TRIO AT 9PM

Serving Musicians in the Hamilton Area Since 1979

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE OR FACEBOOK PAGE FOR THE BAND LISTINGS FOR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY www.catnfiddlepub.com

174 John Street South, Hamilton 905-525-3855

Canada’s Music Store

3180 Mainway Dr. Burlington 905-319-3330


Canada’s Largest Ribfest September 7, 2015. www.canadaslargestribfest.com Canadian International Military Tattoo May 30-31, 2015 www.canadianmilitarytattoo.ca Dundas Cactus Festival www.dundascactusfest.ca Dundas International Buskerfest www.dundasbuskerfest.com 289-775-1620. Festival of Friends August 7-9, 2015 www.festivaloffriends.ca Golden Horseshoe Music Festival February 17-19, 2015 www.ghmf.ca Greater Hamilton Music Festival Offers students the opportunity to compete with others from Southern Ontario. The festival will be held at the Sheraton Hamilton Hotel on April 19th. Sign up at: www.greaterhamiltonmusicfestival.com Hamilton Blues & Roots Festival www.hamiltonbluesandroots.com Hamilton Music & Film Festival September 25-27, 2015 www.hmff.com Hamilton Music Awards May 21-24, 2015 www.hamiltonmusicawards.com

160 King Street East, Hamilton, L8N 1B2

CORPORATE �

SOCIAL

Hamilton World Music Festival July 17-19, 2015 www.hamiltonworldmusicfest.com

Downtown Hamilton Performance Theatre & Event Venue

Book Your Event Today! www.lincolnalexandercentre.com

905-528-5000

GUITAR SETUP & REPAIR L.C. Guitar Repairs Provides high quality repairs for any fretted string instrument. Located inside Mountain Music, 705 Mohawk Rd. East. 905-385-6500

MEDIA BROADCAST, PRINT, WEB Bizclip Provides affordable full video production services to businesses across North America. Photo-motion videos, On-Site filming, Animation etc. to match your vision and your budget. www.bizclip.com info@bizclip.com Toll Free: 877-249-2547 CBC Hamilton www.cbc.ca/hamilton 905-524-1985 Cut From Steel Hamilton Music Blog www.cutfromsteel.com Euphonious Radio For the love of music www.euphonious.ca Jamie Gunner Smith www.gunnersmith.ca

It’s Your Festival July 9-12, 2015 www.itsyourfestival.ca

Hamilton Musician Publishing on the web and in print. Our purpose is to document, support and promote musicians and the music business in the greater Hamilton area. To inquire about contributing or to register for our monthly e-blast go to: www.hamiltonmusician.com

Rotary Burlington Music Festival November 2-14, 2015 www.rotarymusicfest.org Supercrawl Sepember 11-13, 2015 www.supercrawl.ca

Hamilton Spectator www.thespec.com 905-526-3420 I Heart Hamilton www.ihearthamilton.ca The Hawk Radio Mohawk College Radio www.1015thehawk.ca

HAMILTON MUSIC AWARD WINNER

Humble Roots Media HARRISON KENNEDY Growing our clients, crafting beautiful

Photography Cormac Figgis 46

online content. We’re your producers and storytellers. Serving those who seek their video to be informative and their projects imaginative. Branching out across the GTA. www.humblerootsmedia.com 905-929-5417 Lee Skinner Music videos and media production. Award winning visuals to enhance your sound and attract press. www.LeeSkinner.ca HamiltonNights.CA List your Events free of Charge. HamiltonNights.CA is a place to promote Local Business, Artistic and Musically Inspired Events. We Support Shopping Local and the Music and Art Culture in the Greater Hamilton Area McMaster University Radio CFMU cfmu.msumcmaster.ca

Hamilton Blues Lovers www.blueshamilton.blogspot.ca

ENTERTAINMENT

SWITCHES DESIGN Design for CDs, 7”, 10” & 12” vinyl, any sort of merchandise and apparel, promotional material, press packs and websites. Cormac Figgis www.switchesdesign.com cormacfiggis@gmail.com 289-808-3064

Hammer Bluesfest www.hamiltonbluessociety.ca

Locke Street Festival www.lockestreetfestival.com

GRAPHIC DESIGN

MJM Media Creates great video productions, TV spots and radio commercials. We help companies like yours solve your marketing and communications challenges. Clients include MADD Canada, La-Z-Boy, Sleeman and Arby’s. mike@mjmmedia.com View Magazine www.viewmag.com THEZine Arts and Events www.thezine.ca

MUSICIANS FOR HIRE BANDS, MUSICAL GROUPS Andy Griffiths Rootsy Folkin Rock!!! www.andygriffiths.ca GEORGE ROSE 19 piece big band, 6 piece Dixie group, 5 piece brass ensemble or freelance trumpeter available for most occasions. Large repertoire. www.thegeorgerosebigband.com groseband@hotmail.com 519-752-4013 Amber A local singer-songwriter whose style touches primarily on singer-songwriter, pop and folk genres. With two albums released to date, she performs regularly around Hamilton and the GTA with her band. www.ambersings.com Andre Bisson Rhythm & Blues Experience 5-7 piece Rhythm & Blues, Funk, Rock, Swing and Soul Band for your festival, event, private function or music venue. www.andrebisson.ca loretta_hale@yahoo.ca 905-741-1837 Bucket List In addition to our own original music, Bucket List performs standard R & B, Blues and Rock tunes and add an R & B fla-


voured horn line. Our objective is to create a unique identifiable Forged in the Hammer (Hamilton) blues style. www.facebook.com/bucketfulloftunes Checkerboard Floors Four Piece Original Rock and Roll from the Hamilton area. An experienced and multitalented group that just released their debut album. wilsonite190@hotmail.com Danny Medakovic Singer, Songwriter, Musician, Storyteller, and engaging performer of a wonderful collection of melodic pop songs, colored with a country brush, that listeners will love. Affecting and soulful. www.jolleycut.com jolleycut@gmail.com Downtime A 3 piece blues and classic rock band playing a different mix perfect for your venue or private party. Contact Gary at: thedowntimeband@hotmail.ca 519-753-9135 Groove Corporation An award winning 8-piece horn band, specializing in funk blues, with a repertoire that strays from the same old standards, yet entertains with infectious, danceable music that “grooves”. www.groovecorporation.com Gypsy Americana Singer/Songwriter, Alt-Country. Azalea is a duo, perfect for any occasion; intimate to lively. Guitar, piano, percussion, and tight vocal harmonies. TV & film licensing available. www.AzaleaMusic.net info@AzaleaMusic.net 647-832-5243 KERRY NASH Hey Folks! I am a bass player and lover of all things musical. Like all type of music from Motown, Heavy Metal, Blues to World Music, Reggae, Classical etc. Email me at: kumaonbass@gmail.com The Jazz Connection Big Band 18 piece jazz band playing high energy, modern big band music. Available to play festivals, theatres, clubs and corporate events. Like us on Facebook. www.jazz connection.ca bigband@jazzconnection.ca 905-741-0941 Jojo Worthington This songstress is known for her mesmerizing vocals and infectiously whimsical melodies on the ukulele. Her music captures the heart of any audience creating a euphoric atmosphere for your next event. worthbookings@gmail.com Mario Pietrangeli A Hamilton guitar player and member of Toronto surf bands, The High Tides and The Blue Demons; and, the owner of Downtown Sound Recording Studios at Barton and James Street North. info@downtownsoundstudio.com 289-442-6147

The Michael Moses Band Proud to entertain your guests with their presentation of danceable vintage blues and roots music. For info please visit our webpage: www.michaelmosesbluesband.com

Shoulder The Blame Local rock band with a socially/politically conscious message. Music avalible at: www.Shouldertheblame.bandcamp.com. For booking inquiries email: dbristo@hotmail.com

Mimi Shaw An alt-country artist with a voice that bends the lines of folk, roots, country and Americana. Solo, duo or full band available to provide musical entertainment. mimi@mimishaw.ca

Splendor In The Brass Eleven musicians celebrating the music of the great pop and rock horn bands such as Chicago, Tijuana Brass, BS&T, Lighthouse. etc. We specialize in fund-raising dances and dinner/theatre shows. 80foxtrot@gmail.com

Mississippi Bends Featuring Mary Simon (vocals, acoustic guitar), Andrew Aldridge (electric guitar, vocals), Carrie Ashworth (bass guitar) and Robin Pirson (drums, percussion). Alt Americana band with many derivative influences which coalesce in a dark, swampy organic brew that will buckle your knees faster than a triple whiskey sour. Live at the Cat’n Fiddle, Hamilton every Tuesday from 10pm to 1:30am. www.mississippibends.com 905.510.0094 The Perfect Strangers Sue Leonard, Cindy Dell, and Brennagh Burns write and deliver harmony-laden songs reminiscent of the deep south and appalachia. www.reverbnation.com/theperfectstrangers8 Pip Available to perform in any live music situation. Unique, beautiful, original jazzinflected Pop (voice and guitar) with one or two covers. Pip is friendly, professional, and mature, and has a p.a. Contact him at: metroPhilmusic.com 289-938-2503 Prismind A Canadian metal band based out of Hamilton, Ontario. The group is known for its intricate guitar solos, amazing rhythm section and soaring vocals. www.facebook.com/prismindband www.twitter.com/prismindband 905-977-1980 Quarter To Nine Has been described as “the little jazz band with a big-band heart” with a repertoire of soulful jazz, torch songs and naughty blues, we pay homage to some of the greatest vintage vocal jazz artists such as Sara Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, Nina Simone and Billie Holiday to name a few. Audiences of all ages are drawn in by our unique and enthusiastic approach to the music and our sultry sound. www.q29.ca 905-536-7611 Duane Rutter Roots/Blues/Americana, Singer/Songwriter/Guitarist and studio session musician, producer and songwriter available as a sideman vocalist/guitarist and/or bassist. www.duaneruttermusic.com www.bustedflatrecords.com duaneruttermusic@gmail.com

JAMES FERRIS Style of Music: Original, Rock, Classic Rock, 80’s, Celtic/Traditional. Groups: James Ferris Band (original), uncorked (cover), Ferguson Young (traditional). www.getuncorked.ca 905-906-2877 SwingLine An inspired and enthusiastic 10-piece band of experienced local area musicians playing beloved big band standards and soulful R&B hits with Shari Vandermolen on vocals. Perfect for dancing and/or listening. www.swingline.webs.com 905-536-7611 The Vaudevillian A 1920’s blues and ragtime duo bound to get you dancing and drinking. brendanjstephens@hotmail.com www.brendanjstephens.bandcamp.com

MUSICIANS FOR HIRE COMPOSERS, ARRANGERS, SONGWRITERS

David Fawcett is an Associate Composer of the CMC and a member of the CLC. He writes and arranges songs and concert music for orchestra, band and choir, and writes about music for on-line and print publications. davidsfawcett@gmail.com NATHAN FLEET If you need a film & television composer, music video director, music video editor, advanced guitar & theory instructor or want your music video in the Hamilton Film Festival contact: www.NathanFleet.com nathan@nathanfleet.com Ian Brown Freelance composer looking to experiment and collaborate in production of video game soundtracks and ambient soundscapes. Contact Ian Brown for more information and samples - it_be@live.com

MUSICIANS FOR HIRE INSTRUMENTALISTS Emma Rush Award winning classical guitarist. World renowned performer, recent tour highlights include China, Mexico, Europe. Innovative programming, virtuosic technique. Available for solo and chamber music concerts. www.emma-rush.com 47


Chris Wheeler Experienced guitarist available for live,studio and TV sessions. Doubles include Mandolin and Lap Steel. Versatile in multiple styles. www.facebook.com/rockowheeler rockowheeler@yahoo.ca George Lardie Singer-songwriter and keyboardist writing in various genres and planning a recording project. Auditioning mature and experienced collaboraters and musicians. georgeslardie@gmail.com 905-561-0042 Nimal Agalawatte Upright and Electric Bass player who is as equally comfortable on stage as he is in the studio. Nimal can be contacted at: n.agalawatte@gmail.com Norman Ayerst Dobro, pedal steel, and lap steel are my specialties. I play guitar, acoustic & electric, and do vocals, lead & harmony. Open to all genres and can be reached at: normdfc@gmail.com Olivia Brown Bassist for hire! funk, jazz, blues, soul, r&b, rock - strong reader, can do back-up vocals as well! this.is.olivia@hotmail.com Ross Wooldridge The finest in clarinet, saxophone, piano. Jazz, dixieland, classical, pop, rock, country. Hire me as a killer sideman, musical director, producer, arranger... Groups from solo artist to big band. www.rosswooldridge.com rosswooldridgemusic@gmail.com

MUSICIANS FOR HIRE VOCALISTS Brenda Brown Brenda Brown’s “beautiful music and velvet voice” and her select repertoire of pop and jazz standards will take your corporate party, banquet or private special occasion up a notch. Duo, trio, or quartet. Contact Brenda to plan your special event. References available. www.brendabrownmusic.com Robyn Pauhl Country, R&B, Blues & Jazz Artist. Her live performances continue to keep audiences enthralled, not only through her ability to sing, but her ability to interpret her songs anew and bring them to life every time. www.robynpauhl.com Sarah Beatty Available for session work and live shows. Can write parts and/or take direction. For sounds similar to: Billie Holiday, Karen O, Patsy Cline, Sarah Harmer, Regina Spektor. Songwriter and scientist: info@sarahbeatty.ca Scott Whittington By request. Piano/vocalist specializing in bistro jazz and pop with a repertoire of 48

1000+ current and classic songs. www.scottwhittington.com.

Dundas Conservatory of Music 905-628-9220

Summer Haze Improvisational Jazz Piano by Golden Horseshoe Artist & Author Margaret Lindsay Holton. Order via: http://canadadaPHOTOGRAPHY.blogspot.com or pick up at Dr. Disc in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

The Hamilton Conservatory for the Arts Students of all ages can immerse themselves in over 100 arts programs including music, dance, visual arts, acting and more. 126 James Street South, Hamilton. www.HCArts.ca 905-528-4020

Tony G Music Guitar and voice performing Great Songs of the 60s and 70s; Music for Weddings and Memorial Services: Golden Classics for Seniors. tonygmusician@gmail.com 905-865-3038

MUSIC RETAILERS INSTRUMENTS, SHEET MUSIC

The Hamilton School of Music A progressive music school providing instruction in a variety of instruments and classes. Programs catering to each students interests include Tunes for Tots, Glee Club and Adult Rock Band. Contact us to sign up today! www.hamiltonschoolofmusic.ca 905-318-6923

Absolute Music Hamilton www.cheapguitars.org 905-318-7447

Hamilton Suzuki School of Music www.hssm.ca 905-577-6477

F Bass www.fbass.com 905-522-1582

MAD Creative Arts School www.judejohnson.ca 905-523-7142

Long and McQuade Music Burlington www.long-mcquade.com 905-319-3330

McIsaac Music School www.mcisaacmusicschool.com 905-561-1689

M.E.S. Music Equipment Sales www.mesonline.com 905-545-0404 Mountain Music www.mountainmusic.ca 905-574-2800 Picks and Sticks Music Lessons, instruments, repairs. www.picksandsticksmusic.com 905-528-6058

MUSIC SCHOOLS & MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAMS Richard Best Are you serious about drums? I have been teaching for more than 40 years and I can help you develop a strong rhythmical and musical foundation no matter what style of music you want to play. Call or email to discuss your drumming future. www.drumyoda.com rwdbest@gmail.com 905-844-2379 Avalon Music Academy www.avalonmusic.ca 905-627-6710 Centre For String Playing www.stringcentre.ca 509-528-9620 Creative Genius Songwriting Workshop Write the songs - Record the songs - Perform the songs - All in 6 weeks! www.loriyates.com

The Melo Tree Advance your vocal technique and showmanship to the next level. Plan, perform, and write your own music. 10 week sessions. themelotree@gmail.com Mohawk College Applied Music Program www.mohawkcollege.ca 905-575‐2144 McMaster University School of the Arts sota.humanities.mcmaster.ca 905-525-9140 x27038 Music Makers www.wearethemusicmakers.weebly.com 289-698-4789 The Music Stand Lessons www.themusicstandlessons.com 905-574-9212 Open Door Music www.opendoormusic.ca 905-628-0330 Studio E Music and Arts Voice, music, arts. Studio E provides a nurturing environment for students to explore and cultivate their musical and performing arts talents. 501 Arvin Avenue, Stoney Creek www.studioemusicandarts.ca 905-664-7000 Walker Guitar Studio www.davewalkerguitar.com 289-260-1003


MUSIC THERAPISTS

PHOTOGRAPHERS

KristenAnderson Music-centred therapy for individuals/ groups of all ages. Experience personal growth/enhanced creative potential using the Austin Vocal Psychotherapy™ method. KristenAnderson@Live.ca 289-339-0246 MMT MTA AVPT. Registered Psychotherapist (Qualifying).

CORMAC FIGGIS Live and portraits for album sleeves, press packs and other promotional material. Cormac has worked as resident photographer for many promoters, festivals and venues in Ireland, UK and Europe. www.cormacfiggis.com cormacfiggis@gmail.com 289-808-3064

Sasha Szlafarski Sasha is a composer, music producer and instructor offering services in music therapy, meditation and guided imagery for people with anxiety and depression. For more info, contact: sasha@szlafarskimusic.com

Bill Watson Gallery 29 Photography. Having over 30 years in photography experience we can supply the needs for most clients. Gallery 29 specializes in Concerts, Portraits, Boudoir, Aerial and General Photography. b_watson@gallery29.ca

Fermata Music Therapy www.fermatainc.ca

Ivan Sorensen A well known Hamilton based band and musician concert, portrait and promo photographer. Available for location and studio sessions. www.ivansorensenphotography.com

OTHER PRODUCTS & SERVICES Ballagh & Edward LLP Barristers and Solicitors, Patent and Trademark Agents. www.ballaghedward.ca 905-572-9300 Dickert Guitars It’s about making dream guitars come true. This is about one-of-a-kind custom handmade instruments. It’s about tone! From traditional woods and designs, to going rogue. It’s about making guitars you can truly call your own. www.dickert.ca The Hamilton Store For people who love their city. 165 James Street N. www.thehamiltonstore.ca 905-973-2932 Mustang Sally 1968 Ford Mustang Spiro, Jeff Tweedy, Caracol, Stephen Fearing, Andy White, Scott Nolan, Del McCoury Band, Rogues Gallery Band, Wax Museum, Dan Mangan. www.sarahcollard.com Hill’s Video Productions Has a generation of experience making affordable series television, music videos, commercial and corporate video. www.hillsvideo.com studio@hillsvideo.com 905-335-1146 Judy Marsales Singer. Interactive Music Nights with our band Judy Marsales and the Noteworthies. Selling Homes and Assisting Buyers of Homes or Commercial Property through Judy Marsales Real Estate Ltd. www.judymarsales.com

Low Key Studio A full-service video production and photography company, led by director/photographer Christoph Benfey, in the heart of downtown Hamilton. We make you look cool and we have fun doing it. www.lowkeystudio.com SuZImages Creative Photographer and multi-media artist Suzanne Steenkist. Commercial and private events, performance plus portraits with a twist. View some of my work here at: www.facebook.com/suzimages suzimages3@gmail.com

Maisonneuve Music www.maisonneuvemusic.com Schizophrenic Records Long standing Hamilton based punk record label. Recent releases include vinyl from Tongue Fu, Simply Saucer, Evelyn Dicks, TV Freaks, Born Wrong & international titles. www.schizophrenicrex.com Sonic Unyon Records www.sonicunyon.com 905-777-1223

RECORD & CD STORES

Cheapies Records 67 King E, Hamilton www.cheapiesrecords.ca 905-523-0296 Crash Landing Music 1182 Cannon St. 905-548-0039 Dr. Disc Sells new, used and imported records, CDs and DVDs and specializes in sales, rentals and repairs of DJ equipment and related accessories. We can special order music worldwide for you! 20 Wilson Street, Hamilton www.drdisc.ca 905-523-1010 Hammer City Records Hamilton’s vinyl-centric record shop specializing in Punk HC Metal Ska Reggae. Open every day at noon! 228 James Street North Basement Entrance off Robert Street alley 905-546-7869

PRINTERS

25 years designing for the arts. Over 70 album packages. Posters, handbills, ads, lammies, one-sheets, programs, merch, displays, websites. chrispyramone@gmail.com www.chrispeters.ca

PUBLICISTS PUBLIC RELATIONS, MARKETING Kristen Jerry A marketing professional - Graphic Design, Social Media, Online and Traditional Marketing. Previous work has included: Duane Rutter & Dave Pomfret www.kristenjerry.com kristenjerry.marketing@gmail.com

RECORD COMPANIES MUSIC PUBLISHERS Hidden Pony Records www.hiddenpony.ca 905-963-1077

RECORDING STUDIOS, RECORDING ENGINEERS, PRODUCERS Catherine North Studios Hamilton www.catherinenorth.com 905-528-7142 Chris Rhodes A full featured, studio for all of your audio and video production needs. Featuring 64-bit recording technology, we offer the perfect environment for your professional recording needs. dreamsound@sympatico.ca 905-383-5364 Downtown Sound Recording Studio A boutique downtown Hamilton recording studio directed towards the independent artist, producer and label seeking professional recording, mixing and/or mastering services. www.downtownsoundstudio.com 289-442-6147

49


Grant Avenue Studio Hamilton www.grantavenuestudio.com 905-522-5227 Green Room Recording A home-based project studio that offers an ideal balance between pro studio (variety of pro gear, separate acousticallytreated control room and live room) and home studio. Near Mac. www.greenroomrecording.ca 289-440-DEMO Hive Studios Where your buzz begins. Four-time winner of Best Recording Studio. Providing professional and affordable recording, mixing, mastering and post production audio services in Hamilton for over a decade. www.hivestudios.ca 905-549-5576 Porcelain Records Big Room, Big Gear, Big Sound. Canada’s Premier Tracking Room is Located in The Hammer! Those Guys Make Masterpieces ~ Dan Lanois. Best Room Ever ~ Nick Blagona big@porcelainrecords.com 289-933-5544 www.porcelainrecords.com

B Town Sound Burlington www.btownsound.ca 905-308-0026 Lou’s Music www.lousmusic.com 905-297-0882 Toneland Studio Burlington www.tonelandstudio.com 289-828-0107

VENUES, BARS, CLUBS, RESTAURANTS, COFFEE HOUSES 447 Wing 3210 Homestead, Mount Hope 289-280-0157 Absinthe 38 King William, Hamilton 905-529-0349 Acoustic Blend Cafe 86 Homewood Ave 905-522-1323

QED Media Hamilton 1-416-534-3735 www.qedmedia.ca

Anchor Bar 102 King St. W. 905-308-7888

River 16 Recording Studio Oakville www.river16.com 905-469-1102

Artword Artbar 15 Colbourne www.artword.net/artbar 905-912-9083

Soundcave Productions www.soundcave.ca

Baltimore House 43 King William 289-396-4830

Studio 13 Live sound recording studio in Flamborough for solo artists, small ensembles and bigger bands. 1200 square feet of studio space with first class gear and experienced audio engineer. studio13recording@gmail.com Studio 410 Hannon, ON www.studio410rocks.com 905-730-4871 The Jazz Kitchen Recording and Mastering Studio Award nominated studio specializing in mastering. bsimmons@sympatico.ca 416-709-7102 Threshold Recording Studio www.thresholdrecordingstudio.com Toneland Studio Burlington www.tonelandstudio.com 289-828-0107

50

REHEARSAL SPACE

Bay City Music Hall 50 Leander Dr. 289-389-9900 Binbrook Grill 3020 Binbrook Rd. Binbrook 905-692-0909 Black Bull 1124 Guelph Line, Burlington 905-332-4282 Black Swan 1-4040 Palladium Way, Burlington 905-336-1200 Boston Manor 4460 Fairview St. Burlington 905-3-637-1984 Brassie Pub 73 Wilson St. W. Ancaster 905-304-8935 Brown Barrel 1515 Upper Ottawa 905-575-4606

Buddy’s Roadhouse 1360 King St. E. 905-545-1456 Carrigan Arms 2020 Upper Middle Road, Burlington 905-332-6131 Casbah 306 King Street W. 905-741-7625 The Cat ‘N’ Fiddle Pub 174 John Street S, Hamilton offers a wide variety of live entertainment 7 nights a week. We are a great supporter of local musicians. www.catnfiddlepub.com catnfiddle@sympatico.ca 905-525-385 Clancy’s 4490 Fairview, Burlington 905-333-6805 Coach and Lantern 384 Wilson St. E. Ancaster 905-304-7822 Come By Chance 78 Melvin 905-545-6120 Corktown Pub and Fare 175 Young 905-572-9242 Dickens 423 Elizabeth, Burlington 905-333-4991 Endzone Bar and Grill 1900 King St. E. 905-545-5922 Fisher’s 554 James St. N 905-526-9622 Fool and Flagon 2255 Barton St. E. 905-573-7430 Gallagher’s 69 Augusta 905-577-6900 Gasworks 141 Park St. N. 613-583-7140 George Hamilton 152 King St. W. 905-381-9820 Germania Club 863 King St. E. 905-549-0513 Gladstone Tavern 1385 Main St. E. 905-545-4125 Homegrown Hamilton 27 King William 289-683-4330


Jersey’s Bar and Grill 1450 Headon Rd, Burlington 905-319-0525

Stonewall’s 339 York Blvd. 905-577-0808

Lazy Flamingo 19 Hess St. South 905-527-0547

This Ain’t Hollywood 345 James St. N. www.thisainthollywood.ca 905-529-9500

The Pearl Company Arts Centre Houses a perfect black box theatre-inthe-round and an acoustically fabulous concert hall. 16 Steven Street, Hamilton www.thepearlcompany.ca info@thepearlcompany.ca 905 524-0606

Underground 41 Catherine St. N. 905-527-7488

Player’s Guild 80 Queen St. South 905-529-0284

Vicar’s Vice 2251 Rymal Rd. E. Stoney Creek 905-560-1586

Staircase Theatre 27 Dundurn St. N. 905-529-3000

West End Pub 151 Emerson 905-524-3655

Theatre Aquarius 190 King William St. 905-522-7529

Windjammer By The Lake 5353 Lakeshore Rd. Burlington 905-632-2333

Zoetic 526 Concession 905-902-5683

Lionshead 137 John St. South 905-522-7090 Masque 13 Hess St. South 905-522-1271 Mills Hardware 95 King St. E. 905-777-1223 Moonshine Cafe 137 Kerr St. Oakville 905-844-2655 Pepperwood Bistro 1455 Lakeshore Rd. Burlington 905-333-6999 Pheasant Plucker 20 Augusta 905-529-9000 Pour House 1115 Fennel Ave. E. 905-389-6602 Powerhouse 21 Jones, Stoney Creek 905-930-7381 Queen’s Head 400 Brant St. Burlington 905-632-1300 Radius 151 James St. S. 905-393-1658 Rebel’s Rock Irish Pub 537 King St. E. 905-777-1771 Sarcoa 57 Discovery Drive 905-528-5757 Slainte Irish Pub 33 Bowen 905-528-8000 Slye Fox Pub 4057 New St. Burlington 905-639-3900 Snooty Fox 1011 King St. W. 905-546-0000 Southcote 53 534 Garner Rd, Ancaster 289-239-8888 Spice Factory 121 Hughson St. N. 905-522-1112

VENUES, THEATRE, DINNER THEATRE, CONCERT Bay City Music Hall 50 Leander Dr. 289-389-9900 Burlington Performaing Arts Centre 440 Locust, Burlington 905-681-6000 Citadel Theatre 28 Rebecca St. 905-540-9862 Core Entertainment, Venues and Events FirstOntario Centre, Hamilton Place, Molson Canadian Studio. www.coreentertainment.ca 905-546-3100 Dundas Valley Orchestra Upcoming Concerts: Sunday May 25/15; Arts Dundas Weekend Sunday November 8/15; Winter Concert Sunday January 24/16; Spring Concert Sunday May 29/16 Concerts 3-5PM at St. Paul’s United Church, 29 Park St. Dundas, ON. Concerts are free.

VIDEO RENTAL, PRODUCTION

Crafthaus Ltd Music Videos and EPKs. We’re a team of media makers dedicated to the craft of visual storytelling, proudly located in Hamilton ON. www.crafthaus.ca. Spinning Gear Creative Online video and social sharing is the fastest growing medium on the internet. Spinning Gear will create dynamic content that works to generate attention. 289-389-7999

WEBSITE SERVICE

Front Porch Tuneup For busy musicians who need a website. www.frontporchtuneup.info. Vivid Image Website Development and Social Media Consulting. We create custom websites and social media strategies, designed to enhance your image or brand. vivian@vividimageweb.com 289-799-9787

Innsville 1143 Hwy 8, Stoney Creek 905-643-1244 Lincoln Alexander Centre Historic downtown Hamilton performance theatre & event venue. Corporate, social and entertainment events. 160 King Street East, Hamilton www.lincolnalexandercentre.com 905-528-5000 LIUNA Station 360 James St. N. www.liunastation.com 905-525-2410

51


MORE THAN 23 NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL BANDS + DJS FOOD VENDORS | BEER GARDEN | ARTS & CRAFTS MARKET CDS & MERCHANDISE | FAMILY FRIENDLY AREA

HAMILTON WORLD MUSIC FESTIVAL JULY 17-19, 2015

GAGE PARK | HAMILTON, ON | FREE ADMISSION www.hamiltonworldmusicfest.com

                

Music AD.pmd

1

2/20/15, 2:

HUMBLE ROOTS MEDIA THANK YOU TO THE MANY ADVERTISERS AND PARTNERS WHO HAVE MADE THIS PUBLICATION POSSIBLE SUBSCRIBE TO OUR MONTHLY e-BLASTS OF LOCAL MUSIC NEWS WATCH OUT FOR OUR WEBSITE RELAUNCH COMING SOON

WE’RE YOUR

PRODUCERS STORYTELLERS PARTNERS 905-929-5417 hello@humblerootsmedia.com

GROW WITH US


ALL WEEK $9.75 Domestic Mini Pitchers SUNDAY Caesar Sunday Gourmet Caesars $1 OFF 1oz, $2 OFF 2oz Labatt 50 Pints on Special MONDAY $12.75 Pitchers of Pabst Blue Ribbon Industry Monday Comedy at Ceili 9PM TUESDAY $1 OFF Domestic Bottles WEDNESDAY High Ball Wednesdays $6.75 Ceilioke 10PM-2AM THURSDAY $1 OFF Premium Bottles Lounge Lizard 9PM FRIDAY $4.50 Pabst Blue Ribbon Cans Rotating Events SATURDAY $5 Pabst Blue Ribbon Pints Rotating Events Kitchen Open Everyday 12PM-Late Best Selection of Local Rotating Craft Beers

YOUR JUNO DESTINATION

FOR FINE FOOD, BEVERAGES AND EVENTS 107 George Street Hess Village For private and/or booking, please call 905-528-5256 or e-mail ceilihouseinfo@gmail.com

Instagram @ceilihouse facebook.com/ceilihousehess


Greater Hamilton Musician 2015 JUNOs Edition & Directory  

Feature story: Arkells plus Monster Truck, Walk Off The Earth (WOTE) and much more. CORRECTION NOTICE: Page 13 photo of Frankie Venom is cre...

Greater Hamilton Musician 2015 JUNOs Edition & Directory  

Feature story: Arkells plus Monster Truck, Walk Off The Earth (WOTE) and much more. CORRECTION NOTICE: Page 13 photo of Frankie Venom is cre...

Advertisement