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IMESA The official magazine of the Institute of Municipal Engineering of Southern Africa

infrastructure development • Maintenance • service delivery

Infrastructure

INSIGHT Building social justice and communities

The future with

Grundfos

Cement & Concrete Benefits of slipform paving ISSN 0257 1978

Trenchless Technology Cape advances in microtunnelling

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INSIDE

volume 43 no. 09 September 2018

The official magazine of the Institute of Municipal Engineering of Southern Africa

INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT • MAINTENANCE • SERVICE DELIVERY

INFRASTRUCTURE

INSIGHT Building social justice and communities

The future with

Grundfos

Cement & Concrete Benefits of slipform paving ISSN 0257 1978

Trenchless Technology Cape advances in microtunnelling

City of eThekwini Spatial development that works

V o l u m e 4 3 N o . 9 • S e p t e m b e r 2 0 1 8 • R 5 0 . 0 0 ( i n c l . VAT )

Grundfos for Well Drillers is a beneficial programme providing the best knowledge, training and tools to ease workflows and grow businesses. It’s about working smarter, thanks to product innovation. P6

Regulars

13

Municipal Focus | eThekwini

Spatial development that works

Sweating your pipe assets

23

Going underground to meet Cape development

25

Plastic pipe trends and trenchless technology

26

HDD and pipe bursting with Ditch Witch and HammerHead

29

Editor’s comment

3

Pipes, Pumps & Valves

President’s comment

5

Options for optimising pressure

33

8

Welcome to our world

34

Africa round-up Index to advertisers

56

A first for polymeric reinforcement 35

Cover story The future with Grundfos for Well Drillers

Geotechnical Engineering Fast and effective drainage retrofit 36

6

Building Systems

19

Infrastructure Insight

Bricks that celebrate life

38

Building social justice and communities

Virtual project execution

39

10

Cement & Concrete

NCHLESS RE www.sastt.org.za

WS NE

T

Municipal Focus | eThekwini

The all-rounders in concrete paving 40

Spatial development that works

13

Building a concrete future

42

Umgeni pipe delivery

15

Made to last

44

Game, set and match

46

Quality defined in stone

47

African Infrastructure Leveraging the African market

16

Transport, Logistics, Vehicles & Equipment

Risk Management Risk-taking for SMEs

17

Why fleet audits are essential

49

Portland and FAW strengthen ties 51 The final link pipe assets Optimising your nd to Going undergrou lopment meet Cape deve

38

21 23 25

s Plastic pipe trend ology and trenchless techn ing with HDD and pipe burst HammerHead Ditch Witch and

Building Systems Bricks that celebrate life

26 29

SASTT Trenchless News The final link: Cape Flats 3 Bulk Sewer

40

21

Cement & Concrete The all-rounders in concrete paving

Plant solutions for emerging contractors

55

Tough operator

56

Infrastructure

INSIGHT

10

The Independent Development Trust (IDT) is making a major difference through the implementation of strategic projects, which will help shape current and future societies that are integrated, inclusive and equipped with the skills to compete in the local and international arena.


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EDITOR’S COMMENT Publisher Elizabeth Shorten MANAGING EDITOR Alastair Currie SENIOR JOURNALIST Danielle Petterson JOURNALIST Liesl Frankson Head OF DESIGN Beren Bauermeister Chief SUB-EDITOR Tristan Snijders SUB-EDITOR Morgan Carter ContributorS Gavin Clunnie, Alejandro Duque, Michael Ferendinos, Nigel Webb CLIENT SERVICES & PRODUCTION MANAGER Jayshree Maharaj Production COORDINATOR Jacqueline Modise financial Director Andrew Lobban DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Nomsa Masina Distribution coordinator Asha Pursotham SUBSCRIPTIONS subs@3smedia.co.za Printers United Litho Johannesburg +27 (0)11 402 0571 ___________________________________________________ Advertising Sales Jenny Miller Tel: +27 (0)11 467 6223 Email: jennymiller@lantic.net ___________________________________________________

150 Rivonia Road, Morningside, 2196 Publisher PO Box 92026, Norwood 2117 Tel: +27 (0)11 233 2600 Fax: +27 (0)11 234 7274/5 www.3smedia.co.za Annual subscription: R600.00 (INCL VAT) ISSN 0257 1978 IMIESA, Inst.MUNIC. ENG. S. AFR. © Copyright 2018. All rights reserved. ___________________________________________________ IMESA CONTACTS HEAD OFFICE: Manager: Ingrid Botton P.O. Box 2190, Westville, 3630 Tel: +27 (0)31 266 3263 Fax: +27 (0)31 266 5094 Email: admin@imesa.org.za Website: www.imesa.org.za BORDER Secretary: Celeste Vosloo Tel: +27 (0)43 705 2433 Fax: +27 (0)43 743 5266 Email: celestev@buffalocity.gov.za EASTERN CAPE Secretary: Susan Canestra Tel: +27 (0)41 585 4142 ext. 7 Fax: +27 (0)41 585 1066 Email: imesaec@imesa.org.za KWAZULU-NATAL Secretary: Ingrid Botton Tel: +27 (0)31 266 3263 Fax:+27 (0)31 266 5094 Email: imesakzn@imesa.org.za NORTHERN PROVINCE Secretary: Rona Fourie Tel: +27 (0)82 742 6364 Fax: +27 (0)86 634 5644 Email: np@imesa.org.za SOUTHERN CAPE KAROO Secretary: Henrietta Olivier Tel: +27 (0)79 390 7536 Fax: +27 (0)86 629 7490 Email: imesasck@imesa.org.za WESTERN CAPE Secretary: Michelle Ackerman Tel: +27 (0)21 444 7114 Email: imesawc@imesa.org.za FREE STATE & NORTHERN CAPE Secretary: Wilma Van Der Walt Tel: +27 (0)83 457 4362 Fax: +27 (0)86 628 0468 Email: imesafsnc@imesa.org.za

Economic infrastructure

R

These 2017 figures show that significant funds have been allocated and expended. However, was this well spent and how much money could have been saved if more advanced technologies had been adopted, as well as more efficient programme management tools? Plus, were the right capex decisions made in terms of plant and equipment? In this edition, our Trenchless Technology feature showcases a number of local projects where major time and cost benefits were achieved for public and private sector clients. Yet, compared to other parts of the world, the number of trenchless projects carried out locally is still too low. It’s an indication that we are not keeping pace with global municipal engineering best practice and wasting money unnecessarily on open-cut trenching. Another topic covered in this September issue is slipform concrete paving – a decades-old construction method that is ideal for achieving affordable and high production rates with exacting quality finishes. To date, however, slipform paving has had ver y limited traction in South Africa. One of the misconceptions is that it competes with labour-intensive construction. However, this is not the case. India, for example, is one of the world’s largest slipform markets, and yet shares similar challenges in terms of unemployment and poverty, financial constraints and developmental challenges. The point here is that adopting slipform paving is helping India accelerate the pace of development and transformation. In the process, that acts as a catalyst for new industries, creating work opportunities, promoting fresh investment inflows, and leaving room for labour-intensive programmes that facilitate skills transfer initiatives. It’s not a simple task but if it is driven by the best engineering practices and a common private and public stakeholder vision and mission, the possibilities are endless.

Alastair Currie To our avid readers, check out what we are talking about on our website, Facebook page or follow us on Twitter and have your say.

struc www.infra

turene.ws

@infrastructure4

magazine The official of the Institute l Engineer ing of Municipa Africa of Southern

INFRAS TRUCTU

RE DEVELO

PMENT • MAINTE

NANCE • SERVIC

Cover opportunity

INFRASTRUCTU

IN SIGgHT social

Buildin justice and communities

Th e fut ure

In each issue, IMIESA offers advertisers the opportunity to get to the front of the line by placing a company, product or service on the front cover of the journal. Buying this position will afford the advertiser the cover story and maximum exposure. For more information on cover bookings, contact Jenny Miller on +27 (0)11 467 6223.

wi th

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rete

Benefits of g slipform pavin 7 1978 ISSN 025

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Infrastructure News

E DELIVE RY

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All material herein IMIESA is copyright protected and may not be reproduced either in whole or in part without the prior written permission of the publisher. The views of the authors do not necessarily reflect those of the Institute of Municipal Engineering of Southern Africa or the publishers.

Importance of technology

epositioning and revitalising stateowned companies (SOCs) is a critical factor in ensuring that South Africa remains on a sustained growth path, with Minister of Finance Nhlanhla Nene recently announcing positive steps in this direction. The measures put forward include the implementation of public sector par ticipation frameworks (PSPs), and SOC costing and developmental mandates. PSPs are geared towards fast-tracked infrastructure deliver y, so clearly this is a positive financing mechanism. However, to work effectively, PSPs need some level of private sector participation. They must also have a measurable socio-economic impact. Ideally, then, it’s a case of identifying priority funding that yields the best rate of return. This also has a future bearing on how SOCs set up their budgets and programmes to avoid getting bogged down on loss-making projects and acquisitions. According to Statistics SA’s Capital Expenditure 2017 report, total expenditure by all public sector institutions came to around R271 billion, which is a 4% contraction on the 2016 period to 31 March. Of this, approximately R188 billion was spent on new construction works (some R5.3 billion down on 2016). Overall, public corporations were the largest contributors to total spend, at some R134 billion; municipalities were ranked second highest, at R63 billion – R52.7 billion of which was spent on new construction works. A high-level breakdown of overall public sector construction spend shows that electricity topped the list at R74.7 billion (R71.3 billion of which was expended by public corporations), while roads, streets and bridges accounted for approximately R22.7 billion and water R11.9 billion. In other key segments, sewage and sanitation’s spend was recorded at R2.7 billion, non-residential buildings at R17.7 billion and residential buildings at R1 billion. A further R54.4 billion was spent under the category of ‘Other new construction works’.

nology Trenchless Tech ces in Cape advan lling microtunne

n c l . VAT ) R50.00 (i r 2018 • Septembe

kwini City of eThe opment Spatial devel that works

IMIESA September 2018

3


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President’s comment

IMESA

Time for a team approach We are now just weeks away from the 82nd IMESA annual conference, which will be held in Port Elizabeth this year from 31 October to 2 November. As in previous years, we’re looking forward to a great turnout and proactive engagement on all things municipal.

F

or IMESA and our public and private sector stakeholders, we have a broad area to cover, and this is well represented in the papers being delivered that address challenges and opportunities. As the host metro, Nelson Mandela Bay will share its experiences in infrastructure delivery, including an opening address by the executive mayor. Alongside these presentations, we are excited about showcasing our biennial Excellence Awards, which serve to demonstrate how every engineering field, combined with the broader built environment disciplines, plays its part. The latter include the architectural, construction management, finance, project management, environmental, health and safety, town planning, and quantity surveying disciplines. Another function that definitely has an overriding and vital influence is information technology and the evolutionary advantages of drone technology. As IMESA, our primary goal is to promote the interests of municipal engineers and their profession, with the aim of expanding knowledge and best practice in all municipalities. Many are under pressure due to skills shortages that impact on service delivery and the completion of immediate and medium-term National Development Plan objectives. That’s common knowledge. It’s an obstacle that hampers socioeconomic development, but it’s certainly not insurmountable. Very few things are if we invest in the process of change; in this respect, local private sector and foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows are critical. That’s because the money generated by government via taxation can only stretch so far.

Bonds and PPPs Another way, and a current practice, is the raising of funds for large-scale infrastructure projects via the bond market. For example, the JSE’s website states that “more than R1 trillion is currently listed on the JSE’s Debt Board and that these instruments account for 90% of all liquidity reported to the JSE.” Borrowing to build a hospital or road is fine, since it meets a service delivery requirement; but going forward, we’ll need to find new approaches to ensure they’re more financially sustainable. That’s aside from the need to minimise project overruns, which push up costs and unnecessarily increase debt burdens. Wherever possible, projects that are self-funded are therefore clearly more attractive, which is where public-private partnerships (PPPs) come in. For example, South Africa’s recently tabled National Health Insurance Bill and Medical Schemes Amendment Bill open the door to PPP participation in this sector. Generally, though, PPPs have been slow to gain traction in South Africa. However, there are some excellent examples that have worked, such as the Gautrain Rapid Rail Link, and the Trans African Concessions (TRAC) toll road, extending from Gauteng through to Maputo. These projects have all served as a positive catalyst for micro and macro initiatives, and would probably not have come to fruition without the PPP model. Another approach that works well is the publicpublic partnership model; a classic example being the Lesotho Highlands Water Project, with Phase II promising to create major work opportunities for the construction sector. Talking about the change we need is one thing, but implementing it is another matter. In this respect, it is encouraging to see that, within the South African municipal space,

steps have been taken by the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (Cogta) to turn around “distressed and dysfunctional municipalities”. According to a Cogta statement, only around 55 out of 257 municipalities currently have engineers leading their technical divisions. Cogta’s current intervention programmes are clustered into three main critical areas, namely governance and administration, financial management, and service delivery. The first batch of engineers and allied disciplines has already been recruited and seconded to designated municipalities, with Cogta’s technical support programme scheduled to run until the end of April 2021. As IMESA, we are excited about making our contribution to this process. Working infrastructure is essential and so too is a vibrant construction industry.

IMESA president Gavin Clunnie


Cover story

The future with Grundfos for Well Drillers

A

mbition is a core value instilled in the work and culture at Grundfos. Our aim is to ensure the best water supply worldwide, which can only be realised in collaboration with leading professionals. Therefore, your business is our business and we want to play an active part in your success. Grundfos for Well Drillers provides you with a fast and simple way to boost your well drilling skills. Completely tailored to a common well driller’s need, the beneficial programme offers on-the-go tools, professional training and business support, and countless networking opportunities. Member benefits include:

Training and networking events We want to get to know you and your business challenges. Therefore, as a member of Grundfos for Well Drillers, you will receive invitations to training and networking events with our professionals, or at your nearest distributor.

Grundfos for Well Drillers is a beneficial programme providing the best knowledge, training and tools to ease workflows and grow businesses. It’s about working smar ter, thanks to product innovation. Special offers and product news As a member of Grundfos for Well Drillers, you will be the first to know about our new submersible products, intelligent control and monitoring solutions, as well as special promotions in the market.

Business support We offer a direct hotline for technical support, accessible to all members of Grundfos for Well Drillers.

Tips and tricks Access tips and tricks on how to strengthen your business, e.g. through optimising your online presence and getting to know your customer base. Furthermore, on the Grundfos for Well Drillers website, you can access expert knowledge through brochures, manuals and a series of ‘meet-the-expert’ videos. Here, experienced professionals share their best tips and tricks

on how to ensure maximum optimisation when working with Grundfos pumps and solutions.

We know the water industry With more than 70 years of experience as an innovative frontrunner within the domestic and commercial groundwater business, Grundfos is setting the standard for water solutions all over the world today. We take pride in being responsible, thinking ahead and being innovative while dealing with the world’s water challenges – just as we take pride in adding value to what you do and to what we can do together. We build strong partnerships with all our customers, partners and suppliers, and Grundfos for Well Drillers is part of our efforts to build such a relationship with well drillers around the world, while benefiting your business.

Adapting for the future The world is ever changing and so is the water industry. Yet different parts of the world experience different challenges regarding water. Our global presence ensures that we are ready to assist you in whatever challenges you

With more than 70 years of experience as an innovative frontrunner within the domestic and commercial groundwater business, Grundfos is setting the standard for water solutions all over the world today 6

IMIESA September 2018


COVER STORY

Forestalling Day Zero

meet, wherever you are. And with Grundfos for Well Drillers, you have easy access to our knowledge and assistance. Some challenges are global, such as digitalisation, which will not bypass the water industry. And as intelligence and integration in pump solutions increase, so does the skill set needed to keep up with the demands of both customers and technology. With Grundfos for Well Drillers, we provide you with the information and training you need in order to select, install and maintain the best, stateof-the-art pump solutions for your customers – beneficial to you, your customers, and us.

Other challenges are local, such as the current South African drought, said to be the worst in more than 100 years, with Cape Town facing a potential scenario referred to as ‘Day Zero’, when the dams run dry. If this were to occur, it would leave Cape Town without tap water. Capetonians are increasingly shifting their focus from the skies to the ground. Rather than looking up in hopes of a long-awaited supply of rainwater (or divine intervention), they are now looking down, hoping to find drought relief in the Cape Flats, Table Mountain and Atlantis aquifers. Extracting water from the large, natural underground reservoirs can potentially provide Cape Town with an extra 150 Mℓ/day of water, combined. But well drilling is not entirely new to Capetonians. With currently more than 22 000 registered boreholes, Cape Town’s citizens are already making use of the underground water; however, for the City of Cape Town, drilling for groundwater is a first in history. And the increasing focus on groundwater in South African public water supply can create an interesting business opportunity for well drillers. Because when you do something new, you want to do it right, meaning that expert knowledge on well drilling and groundwater extraction is likely to become an increasingly valuable asset in the South African water industry.

Get ahead with Grundfos for Well Drillers At Grundfos, we have a long history of providing groundwater pump solutions, especially for public water supply. We offer complete systems with pumps, controls and motor protection with high efficiency and low operational costs, never jeopardising a steady water supply. The SP pump is one of the strongest candidates in this field; it represents stateof-the-art hydraulic design and is built to deliver optimum efficiency during periods of high demand. This submersible pump is renowned for its reliability, efficiency and durability. Once installed underground, it will keep going for years on end, requiring virtually no maintenance, which makes it of great value for the water works. The SP pump is one of several topics on which the Grundfos for Well Drillers advantage programme offers extensive information and training videos, helping you dig into the new business opportunity brought about by the increased focus on groundwater supply in Cape Town. Take your well drilling business to the next level with Grundfos for Well Drillers! Visit za.grundfos.com/grundfos-for-well-drillers to sign up.

www.grundfos.com

IMIESA September 2018

7


INFRASTRUCTURE NEWS

FROM AROUND THE CONTINENT

The Nyakanaz-Kigoma power transmission line project will improve supply, reliability and affordability of electricity in north-western Tanzania

Africa Growing continental investment Delivering his keynote address at the recent Africa50 General Shareholders Meeting in Nairobi, President of Kenya Uhuru Kenyatta made an urgent call for the development and funding of bankable infrastructure projects to drive Africa’s growth agenda. “The private sector must step up and help us close the infrastructure gap on the African continent. Public funding is limited, and there are competing priorities,” he said, noting that bankable projects in energy, transport, ICT, water and sanitation provide unprecedented opportunities for private sector participation. According to statistics provided by the African Development Bank (AfDB), President of Kenya Uhuru Kenyatta has called for the increased development and funding of bankable African infrastructure projects

8

IMIESA September 2018

the continent’s infrastructure funding requirements stand at close to US$170 billion (R2.47 trillion) a year, leaving a financing gap of between $68 billion and $108 billion. Africa50 is an infrastructure investment platform that contributes to the continent’s growth by developing and investing in bankable projects, catalysing public sector capital, and mobilising private sector funding, with differentiated financial returns and impact. Kenyatta announced that Kenya would double its current shareholding investment in Africa50 to $100 million. “We must have the confidence to trust and invest in our own infrastructure. Let us grow our partnership and make Africa50 a success.” Akinwumi Adesina, president of the AfDB and chairman of Africa50, said Africa requires new models of financing infrastructure. Private sector infrastructure financing in Africa remains low, averaging $6 billion per year. “Globally, there is an approximately $20 trillion pool of savings and private equity. Africa must creatively attract some of this into the continent,” he said. In response to Africa’s infrastructure finance deficit,

the AfDB has launched the Africa Investment Forum (AIF) set to take place in South Africa in November 2018. The transaction-based forum is expected to be a gathering of global pension funds, sovereign wealth funds and institutional investors, and key private sector players.

Cameroon Investing in greater electricity generation The World Bank Group has approved an investment package of US$794.5 million (R11.55 billion) for the Nachtigal Hydropower project in Cameroon. The Nachtigal project will help the country reach its goal of providing 88% access to electricity by 2022. Once completed, it will increase Cameroon’s electricity generating capacity by 30% and provide greater opportunities for the poor.

“This investment in clean energy is key to lowering the cost of electricity and ensuring that Cameroon’s economy is competitive. The Nachtigal project is one of the very few public-private partnership (PPP) hydropower projects in sub-Saharan Africa, and will accelerate Cameroon’s realisation of its development goals, including poverty reduction,” said Elisabeth Huybens, country director: Cameroon, World Bank. Over the past two decades, Cameroon has embarked on a series of sector reforms in the power sector to enhance financial viability and attract private sector investment. The project will support Cameroon’s Vision 2035 to achieve shared growth, reduce poverty, and create jobs through increased industrialisation, improved productivity, and better governance. It will also actively contribute to the WBG FY17-21 Cameroon Country Partnership Framework, which focuses on addressing multiple poverty traps in rural areas, particularly the northern regions,

$170 billion

88%

Africa’s infrastructure funding requirements are almost US$170 billion a year

Cameroon’s Nachtigal project will help the country reach its goal of 88% electrification by 2022


fostering infrastructure and private sector development, and improving governance.

Tanzania Expanding access to electricity Tanzania has received a US$123.39 million (R1.79 billion) loan to finance part of the country’s North-West Grid 400 kV Nyakanaz-Kigoma power transmission line project. Expected to be completed by 2024, the project will involve the construction of a 280 km 400 kV transmission line from Nyakanazi to Kigoma, as well as the extension of the Nyakanazi substation and construction of a new substation at Kigoma. The existing Kigoma and Kasulu 33 kV distribution networks will also be integrated with the main grid, including supply of last-mile connection materials to serve at least 10 000 new consumers in Kigoma Region. The project aims to improve the supply, reliability and affordability of electricity in Kigoma Region in north-western Tanzania by providing main grid access for the socio-economic transformation of the region in line with Tanzania

Cameroon’s Nachtigal Hydropower project will increase access to electricity to 88% by 2022

Vision 2025. It will increase electricity access from 16.2% to 20% in the region with over 483 000 households by 2024. The project will lower energy production costs by decommissioning expensive diesel-powered plants, as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions in north-western Tanzania.

Togo Filling in the gaps Togo has received a US$30 million (R436 million) International Development Association credit to help address urban development challenges and reduce service delivery gaps in some of the country’s most populated municipalities. The new Infrastructure and Urban Development Project (PIDU – Projet d’infrastructure et de développement urbain) will rehabilitate, restore and improve infrastructure facilities in the underserviced neighbourhoods of the cities of Lomé, Kara and Dapaong. It will also strengthen the institutional capacity of seven municipalities in managing sustainable urban development, through technical assistance, trainings and other capacitybuilding activities. PIDU has been designed with a phased approach in investments,

280 km

2.3 million

Tanzania aims to complete a 280 km, 400 kV transmission line in Kigoma Region by 2024

Togo’s new Infrastructure and Urban Development Project will benefit 2.3 million people

Members of the Zimborders Consortium announce the signed concession agreement

beginning with a priority investment programme. Through its lifespan, PIDU will potentially finance urban roads and public space improvements, water points, drainage and stormwater management systems, and small social and economic infrastructure such as markets, schools and health facilities. This new project will directly or indirectly benefit about 2.3 million people, and responds to the government’s request to scale up investments in urban infrastructure in Togo’s cities, following the successful implementation of Purise (Projet d’urgence pour la rehabilitation des infrastructures et services électriques), a previous infrastructure project funded by the World Bank.

Zimbabwe Improving the movement of goods and people The Zimborders Consortium has signed a concession

agreement for a US$240 million (R3.49 billion) contract for a major expansion and upgrade of the Beitbridge border post – the country’s busiest inland port of entry and one of the region’s key transit points. Once completed, the border post will be run as a publicprivate partnership between the government of Zimbabwe and the Zimborders Consortium, according to a long-term concession period. The project will include a major upgrade of roads to and from the border post; perimeter fencing and gate control infrastructure; parking areas; a commercial centre; staff accommodation; the upgrading of communications, security and lighting systems; computerisation; as well as the construction of new buildings and terminals. Additional non-core works to improve the town’s critical infrastructure will also be included, such as sewer ponds and storage dumps.

IMIESA September 2018

9


Construction on the Booysens site commenced in June 2016, and the final structure was built at a cost of over R240 million

Building social justice and communities The Independent Development Trust (IDT) is making a major difference through the implementation of strategic projects, which will help shape current and future societies that are integrated, inclusive and equipped with the skills to compete in the local and international arena.

Construction at an advanced stage on the Port Nolloth clinic

T

he rule of law is the foundation on which all democratic societies are built and, in this area, South Africa is recognised globally as one of the most progressive nations. For this reason, providing community access to legal centres is a priority. In this respect, the IDT has been rolling out a number of new magistrates’ courts that excel in terms of architectural design and provide a lasting statement that underscores government’s commitment to social justice. As of September 2018, two key projects are now ready to perform their roles, namely the Booysens Magistrates’ Court and the Plettenberg Magistrates’ Court, following completion of the planning, design and construction works on behalf of the Department of Justice and Correctional Services. Construction on the Booysens site commenced in June 2016, and the final structure was built at a cost of over R240 million.

The Booysens facility comprises 10 courtrooms – including one Civil Court, two Family Courts and one Child, Domestic Violence and Peace Order Court – administration offices, 15 magistrates’ offices, and holding cells with a provision for juvenile male and female and adult male and female cells. The work included the construction of 69 parking bays for staff, 54 parking bays for visitors, and an additional four parking bays per 100 m² of office space. The IDT is proud to have contributed at least 1 665 job opportunities throughout the project life cycle. The IDT’s comprehensive social facilitation process – a niche service offering by the IDT that ensures communities take ownership of the facilities once transferred to them – saw an agreement reached with the communities surrounding the construction site that saw 50% of the labour sourced locally. Candidates taken in without the necessary skills were trained and conferred with certificates that


Infrastructure Insight

Healthcare at Port Nolloth

The 10 courtrooms housed at the Plettenberg facility include two Sexual Offences Courts, four Criminal Courts, two Regional Courts and two Family Courts, as well as a Civil and Equality Court

a community liaison officer. Furthermore, the IDT – in consultation with the appointed contractor – facilitated a process where prospects for subcontractors not contracted to the tender process were given an opportunity to participate. Around 519 work opportunities were created, half of which were taken up by residents of Plettenberg Bay, many of whom were unemployed general and semi-skilled workers. Understanding the significance of obtaining work and the dignity Booysens Magistrates’ Court: a view of the it imparts is a life-changing atrium section experience for those who otherwise face the prospect of will help them find suitable jobs in the long-term unemployment and marignalisation construction sector. The IDT’s mandate is from society. For Pinky Rila, a single mother to ensure that 20% of the total expenditure of two who lives in New Horizons, a township on any project is allocated to women, and a outside Plettenberg Bay, finding indirect work further 15% for youth employment. on an IDT project has set her on a path to new and better opportunities. Plettenberg Magistrates’ Court Like many breadwinners in the township, The Plettenberg Magistrates’ Court was built she wakes up early to prepare the younger at a cost of around R300 million and has a of her sons for school, and cook breakfast similar set-up. The 10 courtrooms housed for the household. That in-depth experience in the building include two Sexual Offences unexpectedly translated into a business Courts, four Criminal Courts, two Regional opportunity when Rila was able to establish a Courts and two Family Courts, as well as a mobile kitchen to serve work crews employed Civil and Equality Court. on the Plettenberg court project. During the As with the Booysens development, course of the three-year construction project, the IDT embarked on a comprehensive Rila prepared food for the approximately social facilitation process, which included 320-strong labour force, and now plans to set participation and buy-in from the Bitou up a formal catering business. Her elder son Municipal Council. Intensive community was also part of the local labour employed by engagement and community meetings the contractor, GVK-Siya Zama Construction. were held in terms of upcoming work and These are practical examples of the direct subcontracting opportunities. A steering and indirect way that the construction of the committee representative was appointed Plettenberg Bay Magistrates’ Court project for each municipal ward, together with has impacted positively on many lives.

Caring for the community is multifaceted and the IDT continues to forge ahead on allied projects that include hospitals and clinics. A recent example is the commissioning of a new R150 million project in Port Nolloth. This small seaside town on the Atlantic coast is situated in one of the remotest areas in South Africa and is home to just over 6 000 people, living in 1 830 households, according to a 2011 census. Built on behalf of the Northern Cape Department of Health, this primary healthcare facility includes a trauma unit; radiology; dispensary; psychiatric, maternity and pediatric wards; and consultation rooms for reproductive health, psychology, dietetics and other services. Alongside other initiatives, the Port Nolloth clinic and the two recently completed court projects demonstrate the IDT’s commitment to being a premier implementing agent for government social infrastructure projects across every sphere of community upliftment and development.

About the IDT The IDT is an entity of the National Department of Public Works that is mandated to support all spheres of government with social infrastructure management and programme implementation. In the past five years, the IDT has supported 40 government departments, which has included building 97 new schools and 36 new health facilities, renovating hundreds more, and creating more than 360 000 work opportunities in various communities through its implementation of social infrastructure programmes and the Expanded Public Works Programme.

www.idt.org.za

IMIESA September 2018

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82ND IMESA CONFERENCE

31st October to 2nd November 2018

2018

PORT ELIZABETH

Innovative infrastructure solutions CONFERENCE SOCIAL ACTIVITIES

GOLF DAY

S p o n s o r e d b y Te c r o v e e r Found in the coastal city of Port Elizabeth, Humewood golf course is a genuine seaside links, with wide and undulating fairways, fast greens and thick coastal bush. A round is a must for any golfer visiting the ‘Friendly City’ of Port Elizabeth.

CONFERENCE VENUE BOARDWALK HOTEL PORT ELIZABETH

Date: 30 October 2018 Venue: Humewood Golf Club Time: Registration from 9:30-10:30; shotgun start @11am Cost: R480pp (Fee covers Golf only) For players account: Hiring of Golf Carts and Caddies

COMPANION TOUR

Sponsored by AECOM Explore Route 67 filled with 67 Public Art Works celebrating our cities heritage and history. Be adventurous and climb the famous Campanile that contains the largest carillon of bells in the country. Tour the marine rehabilitation and education centre and experience nature through sight, sound and touch. Dates: 31 October – 02 November 2018 Cost: R900pp (incl. entry to Opening & Thursday Social evening)

THURSDAY SOCIAL EVENING We having a BEACH Party! So come dressed for the occasion with your flip flops and something warm for the chills. Beer, wine and soft drinks will be freely available.

Conference endorsed by

Date: 01 November 2018 Venue: Happy Valley (under the bridge) Time: 18:30 for 19:00 Cost: Incl. in delegate full conference fee. Exhibitors may purchase discounted event tickets. Enquiries: conference@imesa.org.za

BOOK ONLINE NOW conference.imesa.org.za

ORGANISER

t +27 (031)266 3263 email: conference@imesa.org.za

www.imesa.org.za marketing@imesa.org.za

The Institute of Municipal Engineering of Southern Africa (IMESA)

IMESA


Municipal Focus | eThekwini

Spatial development that works

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joint venture between eThekwini Municipality and Tongaat Hulett, the Bridge City precinct-based development provides an interesting perspective on how land can be developed in South Africa’s urban areas (and particularly those areas situated within historically marginalised locations) to serve the needs of diverse local communities. This reimagining of the urban environment is leading to real spatial transformation while also challenging the idea that the value of property is determined largely by its location. The Bridge City concept plan centres on successfully melding conventional and highdensity housing, as well as commercial, retail and business facilities. The close partnership with local and regional government, meanwhile, has prioritised the development of public services including a 500-bed regional state hospital, a 150-bed private hospital, as well as a new regional magistrates’ court and other civic services.

Neighbourhood development Government has been supporting spatial development opportunities for at least the

The Bridge City mixed-use development north of Durban demonstrates how government’s vision, with the support of the private sector, can positively impact on society and the economy.

past decade through the Neighbourhood Development Partnership Grant. Since inception, this programme has fed hundreds of millions of rand to municipalities for technical assistance and capital grants for projects that facilitate transformation, integration and inclusion. One of the more recent focus areas is funding to promote precinct management initiatives. Three pilot projects are already in place in Soweto, Buffalo City and Msunduzi Municipality, Pietermaritzburg. Brian Wright, managing director, UrbanMGT, which drives the Bridge City Management Association, says the precinct concept emerged from the need to revitalise degenerated city centres through publicprivate partnerships. National Treasury, for example, has signed a memorandum of understanding with the SA Property Owners Association to create an enabling environment that supports inclusive growth and urban renewal. However, Wright says success is heavily dependent on establishing a true partnership between property owners, precinct managers and municipalities. Brian Ive, Tongaat Hulett’s development executive responsible for Bridge City, says the key lesson for developers is to establish

Types of investments in Durban 2008-2017 Sales, marketing and support Manufacturing Business services Logistics, distribution and transportation Other

31% 26% 18% 13% 12%

(Source: EDGE April 2018)

an overarching management organisation. This body would be responsible for representing the interests of the developer, investors, tenants, residents and the municipality through the coordination and alignment of facilities, services and day-today operational requirements that ultimately create an environment that can be enjoyed by all. Sharing responsibility for public realm servicing also assists the municipality to deliver services in newly developed areas. The Bridge City partners and investors recognise that its future well-being is inextricably linked to that of its neighbours

IMIESA September 2018

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Municipal Focus | eThekwini

What type of investment has Durban attracted?

and that a collaborative approach will significantly enhance the area’s overall sustainability and ultimate success.

ABOVE LEFT An affordable housing development at Bridge City

Durban inner-city renewal

ABOVE The City of eThekwini’s drive to regenerate Durban’s inner city includes rezoning selected buildings to make way for social housing initiatives

Within Durban’s inner city, there’s a pressing requirement for social housing, which dovetails with the need to rejuvenate and attract investment. So far, around eight sites have been identified, as outlined following the tabling of eThekwini’s Human Settlements and Infrastructure Committee report in July 2018. The tabled report grants authority to enter into long-term leases on specified properties for an initial period of 30 years, with an option to renew for a further 20. These properties will be appropriately rezoned to accommodate proposed development.

“We want to bring back to the inner-city investment that has moved to the northern and western suburbs. This project will bring much-needed economic growth to the city,” says Cllr Mondli Mthembu, chairperson, Human Settlements and Infrastructure Committee. According to Beryl Mphakathi, deputy city manager: Human Settlements, Engineering and Transport Cluster, there are currently 60 000 to 70 000 people living in the inner city. By 2040, this figure is expected to climb to around 450 000.

Of all investments, manufacturing investments are the most obviously beneficial to the city’s economy. While only 26% of FDI was from this sector, it accounted for 63% of all jobs created through FDI. Additionally, while only 26% of all FDI was from manufacturing, its monetary value accounted for more than half of all FDI, at 53%. Still using 10-year investment trends as an indicator, on average: • every R1 billion invested in manufacturing in the city has created 420 jobs • every R1 billion invested in sales, marketing and support firms in the city has created 150 jobs • every R1 billion invested in business services in the city has created 130 jobs • every R1 billion invested in logistics in the city has created 120 jobs. (Source: EDGE April 2018)

Specialising in: Water and sewerage reticulation, Bulk transfer pipelines, Reinforced concrete structures, Shoring of excavations, Industrial buildings, Enterprise development. P.O BOX 374, MOUNT EDGECOMBE, 4300, 67 SIPHOSETHU RD, 4302, TEL: 031 003 0000,FAX: 031 502 5433, EMAIL. ICONCON@MWEB.CO.ZA,WWW.ICONCONSTRUCTION.CO.ZA


Municipal Focus | eThekwini

Umgeni pipe delivery Construction works are progressing on Phase 5 of the eThekwini Northern Aqueduct Augmentation Bulk Water Pipeline project, which is designed to meet the city’s future water demand.

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he existing Durban Northern Aqueduct system operated by eThekwini Water and Sanitation (EWS) comprises a network of potable bulk water supply pipelines that serve the northern areas of Durban. However, the system has reached its maximum flow capacity at various sections of the trunk main system due to growth in demand from new, major commercial and residential developments and urbanisation north of the Umgeni River. Bosch Projects was appointed by eThekwini Municipality

to provide the professional services required for the preliminary planning, detail design and construction stages of the Northern Aqueduct Augmentation Project Phase 5. This entails a 12 km long 1 200 mm diameter high-pressure continuously welded steel bulk water pipeline. The areas that will benefit from this upgrade include Newlands, KwaMashu, Phoenix, Cornubia, Waterloo, uMhlanga and Durban North. The pipeline starts at the bulk connection point in Pridley Road, Reservoir Hills, then descends

into the Umgeni Valley, crosses the Umgeni River and traverses through the Newlands and Avoca Hills area, en route to Duffs Road, where it will tie in to the Phase 3 Northern Aqueduct pipeline. A new, incrementally launched concrete pipe bridge is being constructed for the Umgeni River section. The estimated value of the works is approximately R270 million, with the project being carried out by main contractor Icon Construction. Key technical challenges include constructing the pipeline through densely populated built-up areas, traversing major roads and railway lines, steep terrain, dealing with existing buried municipal services, and rehabilitating environmentally sensitive areas. The Umgeni River pipe bridge crossing is the most interesting and challenging part of the project.

River bridge design This bridge comprises a 230 m long reinforced concrete box-type cross section, which will be supported on five solid concrete piers. The bridge will cross the Umgeni River adjacent to the existing pipe bridge. The new structure will be constructed on a similar alignment to the previously collapsed steel suspension bridge, approximately 9.6 km from the river mouth. The level of the bridge deck has been based on a detailed hydrological flood assessment of the Umgeni River, which will be at a height that is above the 1:100 year flood level. The project is expected to be completed and commissioned by the end of 2019.

IMIESA September 2018

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African Infrastructure

Leveraging the

African market

AECOM continues to secure contracts in East Africa, as well as further afield in Southern Africa. The strategic focus across the board includes transportation, water and power projects.

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ne of AECOM’s major advantages is the group’s ability to leverage its international expertise and experience to secure projects. “There is not a single project delivered in Kenya, for example, that does not deploy at least three different teams,” points out Boni Chileshe, managing director: East Africa, AECOM. These include ongoing contracts for the Kenya Electricity Generating Company, which involves AECOM collaboration between Kenya, New Zealand and the US, with local support from South Africa. East Africa has an estimated population of 280 million people, less than 27% of whom have access to a reliable electricity supply, so this presents major opportunities for investment. The megaprojects involved are some of the biggest in the world, with examples including the 1 743 km long transmission line from Zambia to Kenya, where the feasibility study was carried out by AECOM. Alongside the power sector, the transportation segment is another priority. “We are collaborating to secure the commission of a 400 km, six-lane Mombasa-Nairobi motorway, in conjunction with our transport team,” says Chileshe, commenting on current initiatives. Other transport-related pursuits include the design of the Likoni Cable mass-transit system, running from Mombasa Island to the mainland. “Infrastructure such as roads, airports and railways is the one area where the bulk of the

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IMIESA September 2018

governments in East Africa are directing their capex spend. A lot of gravel roads need to be upgraded, while at least three airports a year are being developed at present. Hence, this is a significant focus area,” says Chileshe.

Chinese funding Commenting on funding models for infrastructure development in Africa, Chileshe says these have been predominantly based on aid from financial institutions such as the African Development Bank and the World Bank. However, a quarter of all funding is still derived from China, along with a mix of other international players. “The fact that such funding is often tied to sovereign guarantees and national debt means that, ultimately, it is unsustainable, as a lot of countries have now built up such a high debt burden that they cannot afford to borrow more,” Chileshe stresses. This has resulted in a shift towards alternative funding, particularly publicprivate partnerships. There is also a move towards engineering, procurement, and construction contracts. AECOM is now aligning itself with suitably qualified and experienced contractors capable of undertaking these complex and integrated projects.

Zambia In Zambia, AECOM has been appointed by the Department for International Development (DFID) to deliver its Cities and Infrastructure for Growth in Zambia (CIGZ) project.

Developing Africa’s transportation infrastructure is a critical factor in stimulating inter-country trade and socioeconomic prosperity across the continent

CIGZ will provide demand-led technical assistance to national and local government in areas such as urban planning, infrastructure service delivery and energy access. It also aims to improve the quality of projects, while promoting investment opportunities that drive economic transformation and job creation. The DFID will work closely with the Zambian government to implement its 7th National Development Plan, which looks to diversify the economy, reduce poverty, create jobs, and set Zambia on a path to becoming a middleincome country. “We are proud to be supporting the DFID in this hugely positive initiative. With an urbanisation rate of 4.2% a year, Zambia is one of the fastest urbanising economies in Africa,” comments Simone Anzboeck, associate director: International Development at AECOM. “For its cities to keep up with the pace of this change, CIGZ has come at the right time. AECOM is looking forward to supporting the Zambian government in addressing the constraints of urban infrastructure service delivery.” The project further enhances AECOM’s longterm strategic partnership with the DFID, having secured a contract last year to manage its Trade and Investment Advocacy Fund (TAF2 Plus), in collaboration with Saana Consulting.


Risk Management

Risk-taking for SMEs

It’s never too early for an SME to formalise a risk management programme. First, though, it’s impor tant to understand how risk management adds value. By Michael Ferendinos*

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isk management is traditionally viewed as a compliance issue managed through a rules-based approach. This approach works

for many risks that can significantly threaten the reputation of a company, but is not holistic enough to apply to the management of all risks.

Countless disasters have not been prevented through rules-based risk management. Worldrenowned Harvard Business School professor Robert Kaplan suggests a new categorisation of risks using alternative approaches to rules-based models. This will guide small businesses to where higher tolerances exist for risk-taking. However, we first need to clarify what is meant by risk categories before addressing the new categorisation. Companies often try to dissect their risks into categories in an attempt to cover the

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Risk Management

spectrum of risks that they face. The risk categories are usually dependent on the nature of the company and industry. These range from environmental, operational, technological, societal, and health and safety risks to those related to financial, market, political, economic and regulatory dynamics. This appears to be a good strategy on the surface, but will most likely lead to questions about the effectiveness of your risk management efforts down the road. As a small business owner, you may be left feeling overwhelmed by the risks that require immediate attention and budget allocation. The traditional approach to risk categorisation also brings about a silo mentality where the interdependency of risks is overlooked.

Preventable risks Professor Kaplan suggests that business risks should fall into three categories, namely preventable, strategy and external risks. Preventable risks are internal risks, often operational or behavioural in nature. Strategy risks are both internal and external and entail voluntar y risk-taking to generate superior returns. External risks occur outside a company’s influence or control,

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and include political, economic, regulatory and environmental uncertainties. Preventable risks are best managed through the rules-based compliance approach. These risks are controllable and should be avoided or eliminated as far as possible. Companies should have a low tolerance for these risks as they have no strategic benefit. Strategy risks cannot be managed through this approach and require a riskreduction approach focusing on decreasing both the likelihood of the risk occurring and the consequence should it materialise. Companies should have a moderate tolerance for these risks because they are not inherently undesirable. External risks require a slightly different approach, focusing on the ef fective identification of these risks and reducing their consequences. A company should have a moderate tolerance for external risks since they cannot be prevented.

Small businesses should manage preventable risks through rules and should hold constructive discussions at the correct leadership levels to manage strategy and external risks. This allows for greater risk-taking in the strategy risk space in search of higher returns. In this case, more effective risk management will give small businesses a definite competitive advantage. *Michael Ferendinos is the head: Enterprise Risk Business at Aon South Africa.

IMIESA September 2018

Are you excavating responsibly? By using cable and pipe locators before excavating, you will: Reduce safety risks by lowering the number of pipe and safety strikes. Reduce costs by lowering exposure to fines for non-complianace to regulations. Avoid penalties by preventing damage to utilities and disruptions to services.

More than 20 years in the industry!

+27 (0)31 764 3062 brad@dbequipment.co.za www.dbequipment.co.za


h c les n e r s T

The final link

ws Ne

www.sastt.org.za

Optimising your pipe assets 23

Plastic pipe trends and trenchless technology 26

Going underground to meet Cape development

HDD and pipe bursting with Ditch Witch and HammerHead 29

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Efficient Credit: Terry February

State-of-the-art tunnelling technology from Herrenknecht was applied to upgrade the sewage system in Cape Town. 2.5 km of new, sustainable tunnel infrastructure has been constructed with minimum disruption to the local community. Construction of the Cape Flats 3 Bulk Sewer – Phase 2 Client: City of Cape Town Engineer: AECOM Contractor: CSV Construction

Pioneering Underground Technologies www.herrenknecht.com

6-08-31_ID_XXXX_IMESA_210x148-5_Druck.indd 1

31.08.16 15:18


SASTT Trenchless News

The final link

Cape Flats 3 Bulk Sewer – Microtunnelling Solution The successful construction of the second phase of the Cape Flats 3 Bulk Sewer provides the final link in the City of Cape Town’s strategic Cape Flats bulk sewerage system. Microtunnelling played a big role in achieving this target.

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he City of Cape Town’s existing twin Cape Flats Bulk Sewers, constructed in the 1960s, serve an 8 000 ha area of the Cape Flats, and also provide a link for transfer of flow between two bulk wastewater catchment areas. However, they have become severely dilapidated and silted up, and can no longer adequately perform their strategic function. The completion of Phase 2 of the Cape Flats 3 Bulk Sewer (CF3-2) will provide the final link in the system, greatly increasing the system capacity to allow rehabilitation work to be undertaken on the old sewers, as well as providing sufficient capacity in the system for at least the next 50 years. AECOM’s design for the CF3-2 was undertaken between 2012 and 2015, and

included comprehensive assessments of various alignment options. CSV Construction was appointed in July 2015 and physical construction work commenced at the beginning of 2016. The CF3-2 was ultimately designed as a 1 000 mm diameter ductile iron rising main, starting at the Bridgetown Pump Station and discharging into the existing CF3 gravity sewer (Phase 1). The 5 km route traverses a densely populated area of Cape Town, where significant sections of the pipeline would need to be installed beneath busy roadways.

Microtunnelling According to Timothy Hotchkiss, engineer, AECOM, the route was broadly debated seeing as construction could have significant

Project Team Client: City of Cape Town Consulting engineer: AECOM Contractor: CSV Construction

social and environmental impacts on the built-up and densely populated areas the sewer line would run beneath. Moreover, the detailed survey showed that the preferred alignment would cross numerous existing services, resulting in further complexity to an already technically challenging project. Microtunnelling was suggested as a means to accommodate these challenges, but was originally not considered economically feasible, explains Hotchkiss. Therefore, the tender originally called for three conventional pipe jacks to be undertaken for the crossing of three major roads only. The balance of the pipeline was tendered as conventional open excavation with allowance for trench shoring. However, the microtunnelling method was reconsidered when Hannes Coetzee, director, CSV Construction, advocated the use of microtunnelling due to the number of pipe jacks under busy roads and the close proximity to other sensitive utilities. The number of traffic diversions, temporary works and dewatering that would have been required with conventional pipe jacking remained an obstacle due to the high cost and technical challenges presented. Following extensive technical and financial evaluations, it was found that microtunnelling

IMIESA September 2018

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SASTT Trenchless News

sections of the CF3-2 would indeed be feasible. One of the biggest contributing factors to making this possible was the recent introduction of a ductile iron jacking pipe to the market – a final product pressure pipe that can be jacked directly into the ground behind a microtunnel boring machine. This, therefore, offered a more cost-effective and operationally sustainable system than the conventional option of the pressure pipe being installed through a microtunnelled concrete ‘sleeve’. Anic Smit, project lead, City of Cape Town, commented that this project has ultimately proved that microtunnelling not only mitigates social and environmental impacts, but that it could also offer the City of Cape Town a financially feasible alternative at reduced risk and higher end-product quality.

The right machine for the job CSV acquired an AVN 800 XC TBM from Herrenknecht – the leading premium provider worldwide for all-round technical solutions in mechanised tunnelling – with a 1 190 mm diameter extension kit for the job. AVN machines belong to the category of closed, full-face excavation machines with a hydraulic slurry circuit. The soil to be excavated is removed using a cutter head adapted to the respective geology, be it soft soils or hard rock, making it possible to use the machines in almost all geological conditions. A coneshaped crusher inside the excavation chamber crumbles stones and other obstructions to a conveyable grain size while tunnelling and advancing; this debris is removed through the slurry line. CSV opted for a soft-ground cutter head on its AVN 800 XC because it has larger openings, allowing for faster advancement as the machines can accommodate larger volumes of material in the chamber. The cutter head, equipped with chisels, can also comfortably handle more solid materials.

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IMIESA September 2018

Technical details The 4 m long ductile iron jacking pipes were supplied by Chinese company Xinxing, at 1 170 mm OD and 1 000 mm ID, with an outside reinforced concrete sheath and a polyurethane internal lining. According to Coetzee, these pipes offer a jacking capacity of 5 080 kN, making them significantly stronger than conventional concrete jacking pipes, and significantly decreasing the likelihood of a pipe failure during the jacking operations, even for long jacking distances in excess of 200 m. These pipes had never been jacked in South Africa before. “We teamed up with Herrenknecht because it is the best supplier of this type of slurry method small-diameter

Benefits of microtunnelling Throughout the world, microtunnelling is becoming increasingly important for the installation of pipes. Microtunnelling offers numerous advantages, especially in urban city areas: • It is suitable in nearly all geologies • The method is safe with un-crewed underground operations • It causes minimal traffic disruption along the construction route • In contrast to conventional methods, it is an environment-friendly method that helps to conserve protected landscape areas (due to minimum excavation and dewatering) • Fewer stoppage periods due to weather conditions • Minimal soil quantities to be disposed of • Sub-leasing of microtunnelled pipeline sleeves makes it a popular trenchless solution, especially in congested city areas

tunnelling equipment. It has the knowledge we needed to complete this project successfully,” said Coetzee. The team typically jacked between three and five pipes per eight-hour workday. On its best day, the team was able to jack 25 m. Coetzee asserts that working an extended day with the four-man crew would enable 32 m to be installed comfortably. CSV decided on drive lengths of 150 m to circumvent the need for inter-jack stations. Coetzee explains that the team opted not to lubricate the pipes through ports in the pipes themselves, but only to lubricate from the tunnelling machine as the tunnel advanced. The machine overcut the pipe OD by 10 mm, forming a 10 mm annulus around the pipe, which was filled using a computer-controlled pressurised bentonite injection system. “This allowed very comfortable progress and comfortable jacking pressures,” he explains. At one point along the route, the jacking length was increased to 218 m because technical challenges prevented the sinking of an additional shaft. Interlocking steel sheet piles were used to construct 6 m x 4 m jacking shafts. In some areas, the sheet piles were driven using an excavator fitted with a high-frequency vibration hammer, while in other sections, Giken silent piling technology was used to prevent disturbance when sinking shafts close to houses. According to Coetzee, the machine was able to achieve an extremely high vertical accuracy of 13 mm, with zero disturbances at the surface during the project, for the 1 120 m of microtunnelling. Due to the high level of control possible in controlling the ground and groundwater pressures created and counteracted by pressures exerted by the slurry system and the rate of advancing of the MTBM, depressions (sinkholes) and heaving at ground level can be totally avoided. Although working in an area where high groundwater levels are present, no dewatering was required for the MTBM operation.

Successful completion From February to November 2016, a total of 1 200 m of pipeline was installed successfully across eight sections, ahead of schedule and within budget, using the microtunnelling method. CSV Construction’s Herrenknecht AVN 800 XC TBM is the first of its kind to be owned and operated by a Southern African company. The project team is confident that the microtunnelling technology will form a crucial role in the successful implementation of future pipeline projects located in the congested urban areas of Southern Africa.


SASTT Trenchless Technology

Optimising your pipe assets Maximising the value of an asset over its life cycle begins with the original design and ends with the decision to terminate or dispose of it. Achieving the best return on investment along the way is a scientific process.

E

ffective pipeline asset management systems assist in the correct allocation of funds for both infrastructure and service levels in a costeffective manner, resulting in a reduction of catastrophic failures. Advantages include minimal service disruptions, lower risk of human injury/death, reduced damage to the environment and surrounding properties, and improved quality of life. The right process also minimises the costs of emergency repairs and defines a logical programme for repair and replacement of capital facilities and equipment. As a leader in this field, Camjet provides a range of specialist pipeline services allowing it to partner with its clients through the complete life cycle of their assets. The primary components of any asset management programme include the identification, location and conditional assessment of assets. Conditional assessments provide the critical information needed to assess the physical condition and functionality of the system, and estimate the remaining service life plus asset value. Camjet’s CCTV pipeline


SASTT Trenchless News Camjet’s rehabilitation units allow for effectively solving all issues identified during conditional assessments

inspections enable the quick, accurate and cost-effective examination of drains, sewers and other pipelines without causing any damage to the infrastructure.

soil, weather and a range of other external factors. By analysing all related factors, it is possible to determine which assets are located in the ‘hot spot’ areas and plan priority maintenance activities.

GIS benefits Effectively integrating asset data with geographical information systems (GIS) is the key to successfully managing water and wastewater systems. Camjet’s specialist GIS Department integrates information from a range of sources – e.g. CCTV, GPS, GIS, and as-builts – into one manageable system, so that better-informed decisions can be made based on all relevant factors. For example, pipeline failure could be caused not only by age, but by material, surrounding

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Maintenance and rehabilitation Camjet’s maintenance and rehabilitation units allow the company to effectively solve all issues identified during conditional assessments. The servicing and cleaning of pipelines is expertly handled by a range of high-pressure jetting units, combination units, vacuum trucks and recycling units. These cater to a variety of pipe sizes, from small domestic pipelines to large municipal trunk lines, as well as specific conditions.

The company’s holistic approach to pipeline rehabilitation has led to it extending its services to include pipe bursting and pipe cracking. These well-established trenchless methods are widely used for the replacement of existing and deteriorated pipelines or the installation of new, factory-manufactured pipe without the need to dig up the entire pipe length. Camjet prides itself on providing the latest sustainable solutions for both standard and non-standard pipeline systems, and caters for a range of specialist services including a combination of CCTV, laser and sonar surveys. The company is an invaluable partner through the lifespan of clients’ assets. Learn more at www.camjet.co.za.

IMIESA September 2018

International Exhibition and Conference Trenchless Technology l Underground Infrastructure l Pipeline Technologies Take part in South Africa’s only specialist showcase of trenchless technology, combined with Cape Town’s host of tours – this is one not to be missed. Visit the exhibition free of charge. ISTT’s 36th Annual International No-Dig Conference and Exhibition, hosted by the Southern African Society for Trenchless Technology (SASTT)

8-9 October 2018

Cape Town International Convention Centre (CTICC), South Africa 36th International NO-DIG

Hosted by

Register online now Limited stands available – Book your space today! Contact Paul Harwood – pharwood@westrade.co.uk or telephone +44 (0)1923 723990

www.nodigsouthafrica.com Supported by

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SASTT Trenchless News

Going underground to meet Cape development A combination of microtunnelling and pipe jacking serves as a classic example of a trenchless technology approach in a highly urbanised environment.

The project is led by main contractor Exeo Khokela Civil Engineering Construction, which has extensive experience in water and sewer line installations, with CSV Construction appointed as the specialist subcontractor responsible for the microtunnelling trenchless sections. Franki Africa was appointed to install all the ‘conventional’ pipe jacking sections. All works are scheduled for completion by the end of November 2018.

he construction of a new 3.2 km pressurised bulk water pipeline along Stellenbosch Arterial Road in Belhar caters for current and future residential expansion in this fast-growing region of the Western Cape. Along the route, the pipeline crosses under the heavily trafficked R300 freeway, as well as over a section of the Kuils River via an approximately 70 m long lightframe steel bridge. Other works include a new pressure-reducing valve chamber, plus a number of scour- and air-valve chambers. A key challenge for the project team was the need to counter the area’s high water table, which, in the case of the R300 underground tunnelling phase, ruled out the use of conventional pipe jacking techniques due to the depth of the installation and the inability to establish well points. The deepest level was recorded at 13.948 m. Here, a concrete sleeve was installed using a microtunnel boring machine. In other sections where this wasn’t a factor or design requirement, however, conventional pipe jacking was employed.

HDPE instead of ductile iron

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“Initially, ductile iron pipe was specified, but was ruled out by the consultants for technical reasons,” explains Egan Treu, director, Exeo. “The option selected was to go exclusively with HDPE pipe for both the microtunnelling and pipe jacking phases. Four sections on this project

Pipe sections • 990 m of Ø 500 mm PVC-O CL500 PN16 pipes • 1 650 m of Ø 800 mm PVC-O CL500 PN16 pipes • 100 m of Ø 560 mm HDPE PE100 PN16 pipes • 450 m of Ø 900 mm HDPE PE100 PN16 pipes Main structures • 4 isolating-valve chambers • 6 air-valve chambers • 5 scour-valve chambers • 1 pressure-reducing-valve chamber • 1 flow meter chamber

CIVIL ENGINEERING CONTRACTOR

Project Team Main contractor: Exeo Khokela Civil Engineering Construction Client: Calgro M3 Developments Consulting engineer: Bigen Africa

were microtunnelled underneath existing main arterial roads that could not be pipe jacked the traditional way. The average depth, with the exception of the R300 underpass, was 3.5 m. The remaining four road crossings were pipe jacked at similar depths.” The various road crossings are situated under the R300 off- and onramps, the main R300 road embankment, and crossings to the south of Stellenbosch Arterial Road. The central portion of the pipeline section has been installed near existing houses, stormwater infrastructure and a Ø 500 mm sewer rising main. This underscores the advantages of trenchless technology in executing projects in confined spaces that would be ruled out by conventional open-cut trenching methods. The balance of the pipeline is made up of Ø 800 mm PVC-O pipes, and Ø 500 mm PVC-O pipes. The upstream end of the pipeline will be connected to an existing valve chamber located approximately 1 km east of the R300 interchange. The first portion of the pipe has been installed parallel to an existing Ø 700 mm asbestos cement/steel potable water pipeline that supplies households in the Belhar and Delft areas.

www.exeo.co.za


SASTT Trenchless News

The entry pit for pipe reaming done below power lines

Plastic pipe trends and trenchless technology Compared to open excavations, the use of trenchless technology in densely populated urban areas is a far more cost-effective and technically sound solution when it comes to new installations, as well as the rehabilitation of existing water, sanitation and related services.

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ipe material is a critical component in any trenchless installation and must meet specific requirements dependent on the particular technique employed. In this respect, the Southern African Association of Trenchless Technology (SASTT) and the Southern African Plastic Pipe Manufacturers Association (SAPPMA) have a sound working relationship, where the one association focuses on installation techniques and the other on the materials used. The long-term effective and efficient performance of infrastructure in general is determined by the quality of investigation, planning, design and specification that take place prior to construction. In urban areas, these stages need to consider the impact on the public, business community and environment during construction, particularly in the space occupied. This has an even greater

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IMIESA September 2018

impact when installing buried infrastructure, since the width of the excavation will be several times that of the pipeline services installed. Trenchless techniques, on the other hand, require a fraction of the space. Trenchless installation techniques involve the pulling, pushing or expanding of pipes or pipe components. Currently, most of the services provided are for reticulation and collector systems of up to 450 mm in diameter. These are generally installed using systems where the pipes are pulled into place. Examples include directional drilling, the rehabilitation of deteriorated pipelines using various types of slip lining, and the upsizing of existing pipelines using pipe bursting and its derivatives. Almost all of this work is done using polyethylene (PE) pipe, as it can be welded into long, continuous lengths before being pulled into place. PE has the advantage of being resistant to almost all aggressive

elements and is flexible, robust and durable, making it the ideal pipe material composite for pulling through long, underground holes.

Maintaining the standard SASTT has made a concerted effort to promote the use of these and other trenchless techniques via press releases, conducting seminars, and writing standards covering the subject. As producing the latter takes time, extensive use is made of international standards, in particular those provided by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) for the selection of pipe properties and installation techniques. SAPPMA has made significant progress with the adoption of ISO standards for setting the quality of thermoplastic (in particular PE and PVC) pipes. These have been published as SANS/ISO standards. In addition, SAPPMA audits member companies to ensure that


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In many situations, the problem with old freshwater supply or wastewater disposal pipelines is that, in addition to their structural deterioration, their capacity

ON ST

Pipe bursting applications

THE SAPPM

Pipe reaming

introduction of horizontal directional drilling (HDD) has been a boon

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QUALITY & TRUST

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With trenchless installations, it is essential that both the short-term pipe properties required during installation and the longterm properties needed when in service are taken into consideration. Depending on the application, it may be either the shortor the long-term properties that are critical. It is thus essential that these structural and durability properties are consistent over the life cycle of the installed pipeline and that the necessary quality checks to confirm this are done. Here, too, SAPPMA provides reliable technical support to the trenchless industry.

A LIFETIME OF

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Short- and long-term considerations

for service utility organisations worldwide. As a result, there has been tremendous growth in its capabilities and applications over the past two decades. With this technique, the route that the new pipeline takes can be steered so that obstacles in its path can be avoided. The longitudinal flexural properties of PE pipe ensure it can follow a route that incorporates both vertical and horizontal curves. However, in South Africa, the opportunities for using this technique, despite the obvious advantages, are far from being realised. Using trenchless techniques to rehabilitate pipelines means that the route to follow is already established and that surrounding services are not disturbed. The simplest of these techniques is slip lining, where a new pipeline (the liner) is pulled through an existing one (the host). This would appear to be an economic solution and may be so when hydraulic capacity is not a problem; however, in most situations, the hydraulic capacity of the rehabilitated pipeline is compromised. Alternatives to traditional slip lining are the close-fit lining solutions, such as swage lining, fold and form, or cured-in-place pipe (CIPP). The CIPP alternatives use thermosets rather than thermoplastics and have a slight advantage in terms of hydraulic performance.

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the quality standards specified are met and adhered to, thereby entitling them to carry the SAPPMA mark of approval. This is alongside compliance with product certification bodies such as the South African Technical Auditing Services (SATAS) or the SABS. By doing this, SAPPMA supports the industry by ensuring that contractors are supplied with piping that meets the high quality standards required for trenchless installations.


SASTT Trenchless News Marco Camarda, GM of Trenchless Technologies, explains the pipe reaming process

Butt welding of OD 800 mm HDPE pipe

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One of the features that makes PE the ideal material for all these applications is that it is delivered to site in long lengths that can be fusion welded into a continuous pipeline before

THE SAPPM

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being pulled into place, without compromising the pipe strength. The requirements to be met for these applications are covered by the standards for PE pipe, so there is generally no need to set any additional ones. The robustness, flexibility and chemical IN resistance to almost all aggressive elements means that PE has distinct advantages over other materials that could be used for the trenchless installation of new services and the rehabilitation of existing pipelines. Hence, PE is by far the most frequently used pipeline material for trenchless installations in South Africa. ST

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the confined areas in which any excavations are needed are more suited to hand than machine work. Workers are also able to develop skills that equip them for sustainable employment, which contributes to meeting the government’s demands for labour-based construction, while simultaneously helping to reduce the backlog in upgrading old services.

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no longer meets the needs of the catchment area. This is because it’s far more densely populated. None of the close-fit lining solutions provide any significant increase in hydraulic capacity. This is where online replacement techniques, such as pipe bursting, can both rehabilitate and offer significant increases in hydraulic capacity. Under certain conditions, the old pipeline can be upsized to twice its original diameter, thus providing an increase in hydraulic capacity of at least sixfold. Contrary to common belief, the on-line replacement of pipelines actually provides an opportunity for labour-based construction, as IMIESA September 2018

WINNER SASTT AWARD OF EXCELLENCE 2017 FOR WORLD-FIRST PIPE REAMING IN TSHWANE

25

YEARS

PLEASE VISIT US AT STAND Pipe Bursting • Sliplining • CIPP UV Cure • CIPP Ambient Cure Ribloc Expanda • Ribloc Ribline • Ribloc Rotoloc • Pipe Reaming Horizontal Directional Drilling • Guided Rock Drilling • Bores of 1400mm Lengths up to 1000 metres • Microtunnelling • Pipe Ramming

www.trenchless.co.za +27 (0)86 006 6344 info@trenchless.co.za

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SASTT Trenchless News

HDD and pipe bursting with Ditch Witch and HammerHead Benefits of pipe bursting • Proven replacement method that follows the existing path of the installation • Significant risk reduction regarding potential damage to adjacent services • The preferred trenchless method for increasing pipe flow and diameter • The only rehabilitation method that installs new pipe of the same or larger diameter in the same path • Major reduction in engineering and design costs

For pipe bursting applications, there are three HammerHead Hydroguide models available, which provide 3.4 t, 11 t and 20 t of pulling power, respectively, for pipes ranging from 152 mm to 762 mm in diameter

Crossing under roads, buildings and rivers to deliver services is an area where trenchless drilling techniques offer a unique advantage for new and upgraded infrastructure. This is especially the case when it comes to pipeline replacements, with pipe bursting being one of the preferred methods.

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ithin the world of trenchless technology, Ditch Witch is a household name in the construction industry and this American OEM continues to push research and development boundaries. This is underscored by the fact that seven new models in this class have been launched in the past 17 years. The range is supplied and

supported locally by Southern African dealer ELB Equipment, which, together with Ditch Witch, is focused on building the machine and allied product solutions footprint. The full trenchless

Ditch Witch line-up is available on order, with ELB currently fielding selected models. These include Ditch Witch’s smaller horizontal directional drill (HDD) rigs, such as the JT10 and JT20, which are compact yet powerful machines that perform well in tight jobsites. At the other end of the scale is the high-production JT100. Ditch Witch’s JT10 has 40 kN (9 000 lb) of thrust and 44.5 kN (10 000 lb) of pullback force, and features a heavy-duty anchor system. In turn, the JT20 delivers 75.6 kN (17 000 lb) of thrust and 89 kN (20 000 lb) of pullback force. The flagship JT100 model has

Ditch Witch’s JT10 is the second smallest model in the drilling fleet, yet it’s still very powerful. The machine is capable of 44 kN of pullback force, and features a heavy-duty anchor system

Trenchless Technology Specialist

Our range of services include: • Pipe Bursting • Horizontal Directional Drilling • Pipe Rehabilitation

• Pipe Ramming • CCTV Inspection • Dewatering

• HDPE Welding • Deep Excavation and Shoring • Underground Service Detection

• Slip Lining

• Industrial Pipe Cleaning

• Close-fit lining: COMPACT PIPE

For more information you can contact us: +27 (0)21 761 3474 F +27 (0)21 797 1151 E info@tt-innovations.co.za www.tt-innovations.co.za


SASTT Trenchless News

Alongside its trenchless drilling suite, Ditch Witch has also developed a vacuum excavation range

the power to meet large-scale pipeline projects, such as river crossings and larger-diameter installations, delivering 331 kN (70 000 lb) of thrust and 445 kN (100 000 lb) of pullback. With its infinitely variable rotary drive, the JT100 claims to be the only drill in its class that can truly match spindle speed and torque, enabling it to power through virtually any soil conditions. “A key market at present is the fibre-optic telecommunications sector,” explains Phillip McCallum, product manager: Ditch Witch at ELB Equipment and a board member of the Southern African Society for Trenchless Technology. “Alongside this, our goal is to expand our presence in the water and sewer segments, where there are major opportunities for trenchless applications.” ELB Equipment will be showcasing a range of solutions at the upcoming No-Dig South Africa 2018 international trenchless technology conference and expo, being held in Cape Town during October.

Hydroguide winch systems Complementing Ditch Witch’s drilling rigs is the HammerHead range. Contractors can choose

between lateral, pneumatic or static pipe bursting systems, all of which are available from the product distributor ELB Equipment. “Pipe bursting follows the path of the existing utilities, reducing utility strike risks and eliminating up to 85% of excavation work compared to open-cut methods,” he points out. HammerHead offers eight pneumatic bursting tool heads, ranging from 130 mm to 600 mm, capable of installing HDPE pipe from 150 mm to 762 mm. In turn, there are three HammerHead Hydroguide cable winch models available that provide 3.4 t, 11 t and 20 t of pulling power, respectively, depending on the pipe diameter and geology. The bursting head fitted to the mole tool bursts the damaged pipeline and pushes the fragments into the surrounding soil. As the tool bursts the pipe, new product of the same or larger size is pulled through by the Hydroguide unit stationed at ground level. The static system, which uses a series of interconnecting rods, is well suited for bursting and splitting the toughest of pipes, including ductile iron, and is the preferred method for the replacement of gas and water mains.

A popular option for smaller works is the HammerHead PortaBurst PB30 Gen 2 unit, designed for replacing 50 mm to 150 mm lateral pipes

Recent local projects where Ditch Witch HammerHead technology has been employed include a potable water pipeline replacement programme in Tembisa, Gauteng, where a HammerHead Hydroguide HG12 was employed. Here, a 70 m pipeline section was replaced in 38 minutes. “A key advantage of pipe bursting is that it lets you install the same or a larger-sized pipe in a fast and efficient manner, with minimal disruption,” says McCallum. A popular option for smaller works is the HammerHead PortaBurst PB30 Gen 2 unit, designed for replacing 50 mm to 160 mm lateral pipes. Equipped with 30 t of pulling force, the PB30 operates at 207 bar and the system can be powered by a backhoe, compact excavator or any other portable hydraulic power pack. The optimal distance is between 30 m and 50 m. Alongside its trenchless drilling suite, Ditch Witch has also developed a vacuum excavation range, among its other innovations, with the FX30 and FX65 included in the line-up for the Southern African market. “Vacuum excavation is a fairly new application for South Africa, which is slowly gaining traction,” explains McCallum. “It’s certainly a safer way of exposing utilities, like high-voltage cabling, in preparing for trenchless applications.”

Radar To ensure precision drilling, Ditch Witch also supplies ground-penetration radar systems via group entity Subsite Electronics. The latest offering is the 2550GR unit, which is designed to locate metallic and non-metallic pipes and cables at depths of up to 6 m, depending on soil conditions and antenna selection. Other applications include void and sinkhole detection, concrete detection, as well as the location of underground storage tanks. “In urban environments, trenchless technology is one of the best solutions for new as well as refurbishment projects in fields that include electrification, gas, fuel, water and sanitation. These are all areas where Ditch Witch machines have played a role worldwide on small- and large-scale projects. That proven track record is now opening up new business opportunities for contractors within Southern Africa as private and public clients recognise the time and cost benefits,” McCallum concludes. IMIESA September 2018

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For more information, visit www.mueller-international.com or contact Tydan Control Valve at 011 450 3080 Copyright © 2018 Mueller Co., LLC. All Rights Reserved.


Pumps, Pipes & Valves

Options for optimising pressure Pressure management is becoming a very popular topic as water utilities strive to maximise efficiencies by reducing water loss and leakage rates. A well-thought-out programme utilising pressure-reducing control valves (PRVs) is often the best approach. By Alejandro Duque*

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hen selecting a PRV, it’s important to have the highest-quality product available that also requires minimal maintenance. Not all manufacturers build valves the same way, so it is important to specify components such as: the pilot valve being the same make as the main valve supplier; 316 stainless steel seats (no bronze/brass, as this soft yellow metal will wear); stainless steel fasteners on the external portion of the valve (not plated or galvanised, since this is prone to rust); and heat-fusion epoxy coatings on both the external portions of the valve, as well as internally on all wetted surfaces (to avoid rusting).

Singer PRV

Single rolling diaphragms offer more flow range There are technologies that ensure all PRVs are stable throughout their entire stroke. Traditionally, flat diaphragms have been used in most diaphragm-operated PRVs and can be very effective when operating mid-stroke, but unstable at low flows. A single rolling diaphragm, however, supplies consistent pressure throughout the entire stroke of the valve – from shut-off to the highest flow required. This is best applied in pressure management systems during low-flow periods.

Anti-cavitation protection When there is a significant drop between inlet and outlet pressure (anything higher than a 3:1 ratio), anti-cavitation protection must be considered. The latest anti-cavitation technology for PRVs uses dual cages with engineered orifices to maximise full flow capacity. The first heavy stainless-steel sliding cage directs and contains the cavitation recovery, allowing the vapour bubbles to collapse and dissipate harmlessly, while the second cage allows further control to a level as low as atmospheric pressure downstream. The cages are individually engineered by entering the data into proprietary software, which calculates the size and placement of the orifices on both inlet and outlet cages. Extreme pressure drops – even to atmosphere and up to 21 bar – and head loss across the valve will not result in cavitation.

required conditions, but most standard PRVs have options for automation. A standard PRV with two mechanical pilots and a simple, inexpensive batteryoperated timer and solenoid can change pressures based on time. This approach can supply higher pressures in the daytime and reduce pressure at night-time or off-peak periods. Another approach is to have a special mechanical pilot system to modulate pressures. For this technology to be most effective, a minimum of 3 bar at the inlet to the valve and only one supply point into your district metering area are required. This valve mechanically changes pressure (no batteries or power required) based on flow up to 2 bar and is fully adjustable. This means the pressure will decrease at night, when the demand is low, and will increase during the day, when demand is high and the pressure is low. Full Scada control of PRVs is also possible by adding a 4 mA to 20 mA motor and pressure switches. This provides accurate flow information for remote operation that adjusts pressure based on varying flow demands. A well-thought-out pressure management solution can have a very short payback period, especially when choosing a high-quality PRV with engineered options that suit your application. *Alejandro Duque is the Singer product manager at Mueller Water Products. In South Africa, Singer products are supplied and supported by Tydan Control Valve.

Choose the necessary control options

Singer single rolling diaphragm main valve body

A standard PRV is very effective in controlling water pressure in a distribution system. It is limited to one pressure setting downstream, which can be adjusted manually to suit the Singer anti-cavitation trim PRV

IMIESA September 2018

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Pumps, Pipes & Valves

Welcome to our world

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perating since 1952, APE Pumps has seen many changes over the years due to evolving technologies in the field of pump innovation and fluid management handling. By responding to and adopting these technologies, APE Pumps and sister entity Mather+Platt have sustained their business models and continued to

provide best-in-class suppor t for their internal operations and clients. Examples include the application of the latest Autodesk software for the creation of digital product design prototypes. The group’s engineering database contains over 500 000 drawing files. This database has been developed in a way that allows the data to be IP-protected via data management encryption software, protecting the intellectual property of the group and, more importantly, the client’s information. APE Pumps and Mather+Platt have also adopted 3D additive technology (3D printing) for conceptual prototyping and visual representations of intended manufactured components. This technology suppor ts the group’s research and development

programmes while reducing the initial prototyping costs. The group’s companies are now compiling and setting up a web-based pump selection programme, which will be made available to selected clients. This will allow customers to identify suitable products for a given application and then instantly access detailed technical information, such as pump per formance curves, efficiencies, power usage and motor selection via onscreen displays. Over the past 66 years, the group’s success has been based on the principle that its solutions have to be on par and ahead of the competition. This continues to be the case and ensures that APE Pumps and Mather+Platt remain market leaders in pump supply, service, aftermarket sales and fluid management.

APE pumps

Pumps at the heart of Africa

Power Generation

APE Pumps manufacturing pumps for over

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66 Years!

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Mining

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Leaders in pump innovation

Waste Water processing

26 Nagington Road, Wadeville Germiston 1400, South Africa T: +27 11 824 4810 | F: +27 11 824 2770 PO Box 14733, Wadeville 1422, South Africa

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Manufacturers of:

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Split casing pumps End suction pumps

Petrochemicals

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Vertical industrial turbine pumps

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Multi-stage high pressure pumps Vertical sump pumps

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API 610 pumps

E: apepumps@mweb.co.za W: www.apepumps.co.za

ISO VIEW


Geotechnical Engineering

A first for polymeric reinforcement

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outh Africa’s first true bridge walls and abutments), railways, abutment using polymeric highways, airports, quarries reinforcement was recently and other industrial areas. completed at Lanseria MSE benefits International Airport, one of Johannesburg’s According to Maccaferri, the major air hubs, and represents a key MacRes MSE wall system milestone for the innovative application of outper forms traditional Maccaferri’s MacRes system. The abutment reinforced concrete structures forms the cornice for the new airport because it offers several benefits, entrance, designed to enable commuters to including high resistance to corrosion and transit to the parking area without having to increased durability of all components, giving cross the access road. a project working life up to 120 years, even The MacRes system for vertical soil in chemically aggressive soils. Additionally, reinforcement structures consists of highDRIVE SIDE VIEW C the system offers rapid deployment and performance ParaWeb polymer D geostrip installation, and does not require specialised linear reinforcement connected to large equipment or experienced labour. Combined concrete facing panels. The geostrips with its simplicity and design efficiency, as are manufactured from high-tenacity, well as the possibility of using lower-quality multifilament polyester yarns aligned and X W backfill in the reinforced zone, MacRes co-extruded with an LLDPE (linear low-density F E therefore offers considerable construction polyethylene) sheath to form polymeric Q V strips.A TheT Ugeostrips are placed between B cost savings. R For this MacRes application, Maccaferri compacted layers of structural backfill, and was responsible for the design of the walls, are intimately connected to the precast DISCHARGE SUCTION G P the supply of ParaWeb reinforcement, concrete fascia panels.O L K Q R 4 ''X'' DIA HOLES O accessories and concrete panels, as well Maccaferri’s reinforcements have been P as project management. Maccaferri also intensively tested since V 1976 and used for A-A U under took the professional indemnity theA-A (construction of mechanically stabilised 1:1 ) insurance for the MSE walls in accordance earth (MSE) retaining walls. The MacRes w with the Engineering Council of South system has been used on projects worldwide Africa’s requirements. To fine-tune the for various applications such as bridges (wing

With a maximum height of 3.5 m and a total face area of 496 m2, the wall was constructed in just two months by Engineered Interlock Solutions

best design, Maccaferri’s engineers worked closely with lead consultant DeltaBEC. With a maximum height of 3.5 m and a total face area of 496 m2, the wall was constructed in just two months by Engineered Interlock Solutions. The Lanseria Airpor t project will be presented at the 11th International Conference on Geosynthetics, taking place in Korea in September 2018. As Maccaferri points out, “The Lanseria project is a clear example of how our motto of ‘Engineering a better solution’ can lead to excellent work.” 

SHAFT VIEW

D1 SHAFT VIEW

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A strong foundation for infrastructure success

Geotechnical Engineering

Fast and effective drainage retrofit

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ROCLA is South Africa’s leading manufacturer of pre-cast concrete products. Surpassing 100 years of product excellence, including pipes, culverts, manholes, poles, retaining walls, roadside furniture, sanitation and other related products within infrastructure development and related industries.

Visit us on www.rocla.co.za for our nationwide branches

perating under licence from Sanral, Trans African Concessions manages the heavily trafficked 600 km N4 toll route linking Tshwane with Maputo. Routine maintenance is ongoing and this includes a series of recent subsoil drainage upgrades to protect the integrity of the riding surface. On one of these projects, SNA Civil and Structural Engineers recognised that the old subsoil drains were functioning below par and urgently needed replacing on a section east of Pretoria where the N4 converges with the N12 at eMalahleni. As on previous N4 refurbishments, Kaytech’s Megaflo system was selected. Megaflo is a robust, easy-to-install geocomposite panel drain system consisting of an HDPE flat-pipe core completely wrapped in Kaytech’s bidim, a continuous filament, nonwoven, needlepunched geotextile manufactured from 100% recycled plastic. In this system, bidim provides the optimum filtering performance, thus lowering the phreatic surface in the surrounding soils. Since Megaflo can be installed in much narrower trenches than conventional drains, less excavation and reinstatement is required. This makes Megaflo drains ideal for retrofitting, as very little disturbance is caused to the existing roadway. Once installed, Megaflo provides rapid response times, thereby reducing the timeframe that moisture remains in the pavement. A formed invert at the base of the Megaflo panel prevents water loss into base soils, while an open, unrestricted waterway allows for greatly increased flow rates. With a high crush resistance, Megaflo will not buckle or J during installation, while its high vertical crush strength allows for reduced cover depths even under highway applications. For this N4 project, the contractor cut a 1 m slot into the roadside using a chain trencher. A fine stone was then placed at the base of the narrow trench as a bedding layer prior to the installation of 7 000 m of Megaflo 300. After filling the trench with fine stone to approximately 80 mm from the surface, a concrete plug was then placed above to seal off the installation.

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Building systems

In addition to its aesthetic properties, clay brick provides a range of structural and construction cost benefits, as two recent projects demonstrate.

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lay brick is an integral part of the personality of the new uMkhumbane Cultural Museum at Cato Manor, Durban, which was designed by Choromanski Architects for eThekwini Municipality. This iconic five-storey museum tower will document the socio-political chapters of Cato Manor, cultural traditions and the history of the Zulu nation, as well as offering venues for educational and recreational events. Its inner skeleton is concrete while the outer skin is clay; various materials were investigated before confirming clay brick as the final cladding. Approximately 500 000 Corobrik Firelight Satin bricks shape the tower, with Silver Grey Travertine employed on ancillary spaces and constructed using a simple stretcher bond with minimal embellishment. However, as Sada Naidu from LSC Brunette Consulting Civil/Structural Engineers points out, clay bricks were not chosen purely for their aesthetic impact. “Because of its inherent strength, brick achieved higher walls utilising the method of diaphragms, thereby avoiding extra reinforced concrete beams and added cost while providing ideal thermal and environmentally sustainable properties,” Naidu explains.

Corobrik’s CoroJem Classic Blend Travertine provided the perfect finish to the Zamdela Community Residential Units in Sasolburg (Credit: Urban Dynamics)

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IMIESA September 2018

Bricks that celebrate life uMkhumbane Museum – north entrance elevation (Photo: Roy Reed)

The city’s master plan for the site envisages the future inclusion of a cultural park and public neighbourhood square, further retail spaces for trader and crafter stalls, and facilities for children.

Affordable housing Corobrik’s products continue to contribute to the built environment landscape via a broad range of building initiatives, extending from schools to commercial structures. A recent social housing example is the Zamdela Community Residential development in Sasolburg, which was constructed out of Corobrik’s CoroJem Classic Blend Travertine face bricks. The CoroJem is essentially twice the width of a standard brick and laid as a single skin, making

it 20% more affordable than the double-skin wall format. Phase 3 was completed in November 2017 and consisted of 128 subsidised two- and three-bedroom duplex units. Falling under the Metsimaholo Local Municipality, the project was funded by the Free State Department of Human Settlements. Incline Architects said these highquality bricks met the client’s requirements for a unique product that matched both the budget and the intention to design homes that created a sense of belonging. According to Musa Shangase, commercial director, Corobrik, the CoroJem was designed to meet the growing needs of the affordable housing sector, providing a sustainable building option that fuses aesthetics with quality. “Corobrik is committed to working with government in its ongoing aim to create homes where people really want to live,” explains Shangase. “These bricks are used to construct inexpensive, maintenance-free developments that have a number of associated living benefits including natural sound-proofing, thermal qualities and incombustibility.” The natural, earthy colours and textures don’t require plastering and painting, saving on future maintenance costs, and the low life-cycle energy costs make this an environmentally sound choice for construction.


Building systems

Virtual project execution Building information modelling (BIM) systems provide significant time and cost savings, as well as a high degree of confidence in the end result.

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IM opens up communication lines, enabling project teams to work collectively during the planning and execution phases. For this reason, BIM is a highly effective tool in terms of risk mitigation via simulation walk-throughs that minimise downstream cost overruns and potential rework. BIM has applications across all design stages. For formwork specialist PERI South Africa, a current focus and strategy is to educate the South African construction industry about the benefits of adopting BIM up front. “People are unsure what BIM is, with some believing it’s 3D modelling, and others thinking it’s the automation of the inspection list on-site,” comments Riaan Brits, director: Engineering, PERI. He says that a common misconception is to regard BIM as stand-alone software. Instead, it integrates all construction processes, from planning to supply, allowing the entire

team to work on a model in real time, which can be changed, adapted and managed easily. “This is not majorly different from how systems are working currently; but now, with BIM, they are integrated into a central point, where everyone is working on a live model. Therefore, for example, if an architect’s calculations change, the end supplier will be able to see this, and can adapt what needs to be supplied in accordance with the new calculations,” Brits points out.

Risk mitigation “PERI South Africa is already doing quite a lot in this regard. I think it’s important for us to focus on high-riskfactor projects where on-site safety is the ultimate goal. BIM needs to be promoted to architects and engineers, as well as end users and property owners, so they really comprehend its impact on the

entire value chain, from cost savings to constructability and safety,” he stresses. Traditionally, architects are approached to design a new structure to guidelines specified by the client. The design work is verified by an engineer, whereafter the development is put out to tender. Contractors tender according to their best cost estimates and only at this stage of the process is the formwork supplier consulted. By now, the project has been awarded and construction has commenced. “Only then do we begin to get a sense of what the architect and engineer intended – as a result, a number of issues can be overlooked, especially as some items are so expensive to construct,” Brits adds. The level of BIM integration in the South African construction industry still has a long way to go. State-owned enterprises in the EU and Australia, for example, have put processes in place where level 2 BIM adoption is becoming standard practice.

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Cement & Concrete

The all-rounders in concrete paving Slipform paving is a precise solution that achieves rapid and consistent results. IMIESA speaks to Waylon Kukard, national sales manager, Wirtgen South Africa, about the benefits of this technology for a wide range of applications that will help address the country’s infrastructure backlog and create jobs. By Alastair Currie A virtually limitless range of moulds can be used: profiles can even be poured below road level

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cross the globe, slipform paving has been part of the construction landscape for more than 50 years as a fast and effective method for producing in situ concrete structures, ranging from crash barriers to kerbs and V-drains. This technology is also commonly employed for the formation of concrete roads, pathways and runways, among other applications. Wirgen entered the slipform segment in 1989 and now fields around 25 models, starting with the SP15 and ending with the flagship ISF94i unit. Outside the EU and other key markets, like North America and Asia, India remains one of the world’s biggest slipform users, accounting for a third of all Wirtgen pavers sold annually. Slipform is also common in parts of Africa, with Nigeria being one of the largest adopters. Past examples of local slipform projects include the N12 highway outside Boksburg in Ekurhuleni, Gauteng, where the road was constructed with a concrete underlayer topped

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with an asphalt surface. Slipform technology was also used extensively during the Gillooly’s Interchange upgrade (also in Ekurhuleni) for the 2010 FIFA World Cup, and on sections of the N3 bordering Pietermaritzburg in KwaZulu-Natal. “However, the uptake has generally been slow in South Africa, mainly due to some misconceptions about slipform paving,” Kukard explains. “One area of concern is that the technology competes with traditional in situ concrete casting methodologies, as well as precast product installations that could potentially lower the labour-intensive component on job sites. However, there’s definitely a place for slipform technology within the construction mix, since labour-based and mechanical interventions do combine to form

Complex poured-in-place profiles, such as kerbs and gutters, are produced in a single operation

the final result. This viewpoint is supported by the uptake in India and Nigeria, which share similar development challenges. It’s one of the best techniques where economies of scale and high production rates are priorities.” Examples of labour interventions would include ground preparation works. Labour is also required for the final finishing stages, such as the cutting of expansion joints, as well as for the concrete curing phases. Plus, there are allied tasks like the installation of pavement furniture. “When you add technology, there’s another dimension that translates into improved time and cost efficiencies, improved health and safety, environmental impact minimisation, sustainable skills transfer, plus excellent opportunities for the establishment of SME businesses,” he asserts. Wirtgen is currently in discussions with South African national and provincial roads


Cement & Concrete

Slipform is the perfect combination of labour-intensive and technological interventions

departments with a view to rolling out a pilot project to demonstrate the advantages of slipform technology. One possibility is the construction of a rural road. “The upfront costs are slightly more expensive, but the longer-term return on investment is proven. For example, case studies have shown that concrete roads will last up to 40 years without maintenance.” To help stretch infrastructure budgets, Wirtgen is also currently investigating the viability of going the white-topping route. This entails the application of a thin concrete layer on top of a well-constructed asphalt road as a longer-term rehabilitation solution, which will significantly extend the pavement life.

Inset and offset paving Essentially, there are two approaches to slipform technology, depending on endproduct requirements – namely offset or inset paving – and Wirtgen manufactures machines for both applications. To achieve consistent offset results, such as crash barriers or narrow paths, Wirtgen builds made-to-measure paving moulds. These continuous, compact structures are cast into a homogeneous whole, with or without reinforcement. Additionally, offset moulds can be mounted to either the left or right side of the machine, to suit the site conditions and facilitate access for readymix trucks. Inset pavers are essentially road construction plants catering for working widths

ranging from 1 m to 16 m, at a standard paving thickness of up to 450 mm, with the concrete placed and formed within the machine’s track profile. Typical inset works include highways, airport runways and high-speed railway tracks, where the precise nature of this technology ensures a perfectly even finish, as well as durability and strength. In accordance with design requirements, Wirtgen texture curing machines can be fitted on inset pavers to meet skid resistance specifications on road projects. All of these machines are equipped to automatically insert dowel and/or tie bar reinforcing into the concrete during paving operations. “With both approaches, the speed of construction is remarkable. For example, in an offset application, up to 60 m of crash barrier can be formed in an hour at standard heights up to 2.2 m,” Kukard explains.

Intelligent control Operators have the choice of using a conventional string line, or selecting one of Wirtgen’s machine control systems. For example, by scanning a string line using Wirtgen sensors, highly precise level and steering parameters are created to guide the machine. “When using an external 3D system, digital topographic data is reconciled with the positioning data of the total station,” Kukard explains. “Any deviations from the

specific position are processed by the 3D control interface to generate exact level and steering corrections.” Another option is Wirtgen’s proprietary AutoPilot system, which establishes a virtual string line based on imported survey data and then automatically steers the paver. Three models have been identified for South Africa, namely the SP15, SP25 and SP64. The entry-level SP15 is a pure offset machine, while the SP25 is designed for both offset and inset tasks. As an aside, an SP25 was used by Basil Read to construct the runway at St Helena Island. The SP64, in turn, is an inset machine designed for larger road works. “Whether for new construction or maintenance, slipform has a major role to play in accelerating the roll-out of infrastructure projects, with major savings in terms of time and programme management. We’re committed to supporting this technology and are excited about future prospects. We believe it offers the industry the best of both worlds, working alongside traditional in situ and precast techniques,” Kukard concludes.

A technician uses a Field Rover prism pole to collect measuring points and perform a final inspection of a pathway constructed using the inset paving method

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Building a concrete future The Concrete Conference 2018 brought together professionals from across the concrete industry for the latest in concrete techniques and products. By Danielle Petterson

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n the agenda again this year was the consolidation of the industry bodies, which is now closer to

reality than ever. The five organisations representing the cement and concrete industry – The Concrete Institute (TCI), the Southern African Readymix Association (SARMA), Concrete Society of Southern Africa (CSSA), Concrete Manufacturers Association (CMA), and the Association of Cementitious Material Producers (ACMP) – are working together to consolidate into a single organisation that can represent the industry as a whole. According to Bryan Perrie, managing director, TCI, one of the main drivers behind consolidation is that stakeholders cannot support all five institutes. Through

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consolidation, calls for membership fees and sponsorships will come from a single institute that provides greater value to its members while unifying the sector. At this stage, it is envisaged that the five existing organisations would cease to exist and would merge under a new name. The new organisation would have four core pillars, namely technical: cement; technical: concrete; marketing; and knowledge transfer, all under single management with one administration and financial services department. This will ensure that all areas of the cement and concrete sector are catered to. Perrie, together with the other industry heads, believes that a consolidated, stronger, more sustainable organisation would provide several key benefits to members. The new institute would provide a one-stop shop for all things cement and concrete, developing and defending the market while positioning concrete as the material of choice for the built environment. It would also support the industry with research and training, and promote, support or oppose legislative or other measures or proceedings affecting the interests of the industry.

Johan van Wyk, director, SARMA, urged members of the various institutes not to feel threatened. While the institutes are exploring consolidation, it will be up to the members to make the final decision. Members are also encouraged to provide their input to guide the transition. “Watch this space. It is an ongoing process that is nowhere near finalised yet, but there is an imperative to resolve this as soon as possible. We are working as hard as we can to reach this new future that hopefully benefits all the bodies and stakeholders,” says Perrie.

Adopting new standards According to Perrie, there are also many changes ahead for concrete codes and standards. However, the SABS is currently understaffed, making it difficult to get these passed. The industry is in the process of finalising a concrete design standard to replace SANS 10100-1. This process began in 2007, when a decision was taken to adopt the EU standard EN 1992-1-1, with a set of nationally determined parameters. In 2012,


Cement & Concrete

Construction sector snapshot Delivering the keynote address at the conference, renowned economist Dr Roelof Botha pointed out that it is not all doom and gloom for the South African economy. Although the country is in a low-growth environment, Botha says South Africa is not headed for a recession. Encouragingly, there is an upward trend in the sale of building materials, as well as in the passing of building plans. The country’s leading business cycle indicator also continues to recover into 2018 and household disposable income continues to grow. “It is going to take some time to recover from Zuma, but we are on the right trajectory. I’m feeling bullish about the medium-term future,” he said. Botha also addressed the growing concern around land reform. He explained that the ANC has put forward a request to amend the Constitution to allow for land expropriation without compensation, but this still has to be deliberated on by the Constitutional Review Committee. “I think Parliament is smart enough to realise that, with land reform, as necessary as it is, we need to proceed down this path in a smarter way,” said Botha. Unfortunately, he believes that the move to towards land expropriation without compensation has caused uncertainty, resulting in job losses and a negative impact on domestic capital formation. Botha argued that government should instead reinvigorate the RDP housing programme. By increasing building activity, it would create jobs, grow the market for local products, and broaden the tax base. By handing over title deeds, government is also able to empower South Africans and partly resolve the land issue.

a draft document went to the National Annex, but there has been a delay at the SABS and Perrie hopes that the new concrete design standard will be finalised by late 2018 or early 2019. South Africa has also never had a concrete water-retaining standard, and is now in the process of putting one together, using BS8007 and EN-1992-1-3 as references. Although a draft standard was completed in 2010, this can only be finalised once the structural design code mentioned above has been approved. In addition, a new group is working on revising SANS 1083 for aggregates rather than adopting the EU aggregates specification. The intention is for the new version – to be named ‘Aggregates for construction’ – to include natural, non-natural and recycled aggregates. It is envisaged that all aggregate requirements will be included in one document with six parts, namely: 1. Aggregates for concrete 2. Aggregates mortar and plaster (to replace SANS 1090) 3. Aggregates for gabions and balusters 4. Aggregates for asphalt 5. Aggregates for layer works 6. Aggregates for surfaces. A big difference for the readymix producers is that there will no longer be a separate specification for readymix. SANS 50206 will now cover all types of concrete, including concrete mixed on-site, readymix concrete, and concrete produced in plant for precast. The standard defines readymix concrete as concrete delivered in a fresh state by a body that is not the user, and includes concrete produced off-site by the user and concrete produced on-site by someone other than the user. “There are a lot of changes coming and we need to acknowledge

the work done by the members of the various committees and the amount of time and effort it has taken to get the documents to where they are. It will still be a long way to getting them finalised,” said Perrie.

A successful event Van Wyk reports that TCC 2018 was a huge success based on feedback from visitors, exhibitors and speakers. “We achieved our goals of transferring knowledge, motivating the industry and networking, and then having a little fun. We are looking forward to TCC 2020, where we will be bringing the latest in cutting-edge concrete technology, spanning the whole concrete value chain, to the industry.”

Self-healing concrete This year’s conference brought together a range of exhibitors to showcase their offerings, including the launch of new ranges of equipment, concrete additives, adhesives and more. Most notable was Basilisk’s selfhealing concrete. The technology, developed and patented in collaboration with the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, is currently capable of repairing cracks of up to 0.8 mm, but continues to evolve. The technology is based on microorganisms that produce limestone, allowing crack formation in concrete structures to be autonomously repaired and greatly improving the durability of the concrete structure. The autonomous repair system is implemented in several products that are applicable for both new and existing structures.

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Cement & Concrete

Made to last The versatility and specification of concrete, whether cast in situ or precast, have decisive roles in ensuring the quality and longevity of infrastructural projects, says Bryan Perrie, managing director of The Concrete Institute.

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oncrete can be designed and proportioned to meet an extremely wide range of requirements, including consistencies, flows, setting times, and hardening properties. The product is flexible enough to produce varying strengths at early or late stages, different types of strengths in general, predetermined densities, as well as the required levels of abrasion resistance and shrinkage. “Concrete has an advantage over other materials in that elements such as walls, columns, beams, trusses and slabs can be constructed in situ as part of the structure being erected, or precast on-site on the ground and lifted into their final position via the tilt-up and stack-casting methods,”

Bryan Perrie, managing director, The Concrete Institute

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IMIESA September 2018

The increased control of precast concrete in the production phase ensures fewer reject products and consequent raw materials savings.”

Versatile concrete in its precast form is used for stormwater drainage, water and sewage reticulation pipes

explains Perrie. “As a hybrid of precast and in situ concrete, concrete can also be precast kilometres away in a precast yard and transported to site and placed into position there. An additional benefit is that all of these options can be combined on one project.” By producing precast concrete in a controlled environment – the so-called precast yard – it is possible to monitor and control all stages of production, including ensuring that adequate curing is carried out and the final products fully comply with strength requirements. Another benefit is that the forms used in a precast plant may be reused hundreds to thousands of times before they have to be replaced. This ensures that the cost of formwork per unit is lower than for in situ construction. Furthermore, if the structure has been appropriately designed, precast products can be removed and reused after the structure has reached the end of its life.

Design without limits There are many forms of precast concrete products, including: • stormwater drainage, water and sewage reticulation pipes, culverts, manholes, sumps and tunnels


Cement & Concrete

Concrete can be precast on-site on the ground and lifted into its final position via the tilt-up and stackcasting methods

• precast building components used architecturally as cladding, trimmings, accessories and curtain walls • structural applications that include bricks, blocks, foundations, bridge beams, floors, walls and other similar components • transportation applications, e.g. railway sleepers, sound and safety barriers. The increased control of precast in the production phase ensures fewer reject products and consequent savings in raw materials. Plus, the technology is well suited for fast-tracking megaprojects. Examples include the thousands of precast concrete tunnel and bridge segments used to form the Gautrain rapid rail link. “The social contribution of concrete cannot be overestimated. It is the second most used resource in the world after water and contributes significantly to shaping the built environment today and in the future,” Pierre concludes.

Benefits of building with concrete • Concrete can be produced on the building site using a wide variety of transport and placing mechanisms • It can be transported from batch plants to the construction site via numerous means, ranging from simple wheelbarrows to heavy engineering vehicles and equipment such as dumpers, trucks, conveyors, cranes and pumps • Self-compacting concrete offers additional flexibility in the placing of concrete and the achievement of excellent off-shutter finishes

ENDING EROSION Technicrete Armorflex erosion control system provides an alternative for a wide variety of erosion control and drainage projects. When your project calls for protection that can withstand severe applications and climatic conditions, with quick installation with no in-situ concrete or even under water, Armorflex from Technicrete is the engineered solution. Suitable for:

Specially designed:

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Rivers, Estuaries, Dams, Reservoirs Areas subject to wave action Access roads Parking areas Stormwater drift crossings

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Compressed concrete blocks (solid or vertical holes

or horizontal cable ducts)

Interlocking system Partial taper of each block Various sizes of blocks available

paving | mining | masonry | erosion protection retaining walls | drainage | kerbs | precast products www.technicrete.co.za Technicrete is a subsidiary of ISG, a leading supplier of innovative infrastructure products to the construction and mining markets in Southern Africa.

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Cement & Concrete

Game, set and match Specialty construction chemicals were key to the construction of community tennis courts located in sandy geological conditions in Cape Town.

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he municipal project to provide the Lavender Hill community with world-class tennis courts was undertaken by sports facility specialist SynSport, on behalf of main contractor Aveng. The courts had to be strong and durable enough to withstand tough environmental and high-traffic situations. The challenging project called for minimal disruption in the busy urban area and a reduction in the amount of additional aggregates traditionally required to establish a stable base foundation for such sports facilities.

A modern solution Mapei’s specialty sports facility range was chosen as the most suitable solution. The project called for the use of Mapesoil 100 ground stabilisation formulation to provide a stable foundation for a bitumen surface, with Mapecoat basecoats, Mapefill Black crack repair to fill settling cracks, as well as various finishing and line-coating systems. A dosage of 5% of Mapesoil 100 was used to a depth of 150 mm in the natural sandy soil

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to stabilise the base of the tennis courts, explains Mapei representative Carel Louw. This provided enough stability for the upper levels and negated the need for additional G5 materials. The preparation was done entirely by hand and an average of over 96% compaction was achieved without the use of heavy equipment, exceeding requirements. An additional specialty geotextile was placed on top of the Mapesoil layer, before asphalt, to prevent bonding of the two layers, which would otherwise move at different rates and lead to the formation of cracks. Thereafter, a base coat was applied to the levelled asphalt surface and cracks formed by the roller, and any impurities, high or low spots were identified and rectified. Cracks were repaired using Mapefill Black, which was injected into the cracks, levelled using a trowel and sprinkled with sand while still wet to improve adhesion of the base coat.

Low areas were identified and filled with the company’s Mapecoat TNS basecoat. A further two coats were applied to the entire surface, after which the contractor could apply the finishing touches using the Mapecoat TNS Finish 1 and 3 solutions. Once the tennis court base was completed, specially developed Mapecoat TNS line solution was applied to provide clear, non-fading lines. “The Mapei sports facility solutions not only saved the City of Cape Town time and money, but also provided the community with world-class facilities quickly and with minimal disruption, which would otherwise have been caused due to truckloads of additional aggregates and heavy equipment needed on-site. The solution will also ensure that the courts remain in good condition for many years to come,” concludes Louw.


Cement & Concrete

Quality defined in stone Disagreements over the quality of sand and stone delivered on-site may soon be a thing of the past thanks to the intervention of the Aggregate and Sand Producers Association of South Africa (Aspasa).

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spasa’s special task team is moving rapidly to formalise standards for the benefit of both producers and their customers. According to Saar tjie Duvenhage, chairperson of Aspasa’s technical committee on quality management, a number of large strides have already been made to close the gap between customer expectations and

the actual ability of producers to supply the required materials. “First and foremost, we have defined quality and what it means to everyone in the entire supply chain, from extraction to processing and delivery to the customer’s site. In our case, we define this as a product that meets a certain measure of excellence, which is free from deficiencies and significant variations,” Duvenhage explains.

Mark Hunter, GM, Sacaa (left), with Nico Pienaar, director, Aspasa. Sacaa and Aspasa have joined forces to better regulate and communicate the use of coal ash products

“To assist our members, we have introduced our own quick guide to quality management. ‘The 123 of Quality Management for Material Producers’ is designed to act as a guideline to quality management and explains the


Cement & Concrete

concept with eight steps for members to successfully implement their own systems,” she continues. The committee is also assisting with the revision of South African National Standards codes, including SANS 1083, as well as Sanral revisions of the G-materials guides. Aspasa has also appointed Barry Pearce to represent the association on a number of technical forums including SABS roads, concrete aggregates and SANS 1083 committees. “We are working towards introducing mandatory quality audit systems among our members,” adds Duvenhage.

Fly ash In terms of other developments, the South African Coal Ash Association (Sacaa) has joined forces with Aspasa to help improve Sacaa’s reach to a broader cross section of industries. For some time now, Sacaa has been working with government, environmental

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agencies and business to develop solutions to tackle growing ash dumps produced as a by-product of thermal power generation. Some of the ash is making its way into the country’s cement products, as well

as applications in agriculture and ground stabilisation, among other uses. But the combined offtake of these is below 7% of the ash produced, and this needs to be boosted considerably higher to 18% if environmental goals are to be met, according to Sacaa. Research is under way to broaden the scope, says Mark Hunter, general manager, Sacaa. For example, certain building products are being tested and reviewed for suitability in the housing market. “There are certainly more uses in civil engineering for roads and concrete structures, as well as in manufacturing, the chemical industry, and landscaping,” says Hunter, adding that in certain developed economies, as much as 80% of the ash produced is reused. From a case study perspective, South African fly ash and ash products have played a key role in the concrete mix on some of the world’s iconic structures. These include the Burj Khalifa building in Dubai, and Lesotho’s Katse Dam.

IMIESA September 2018

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Transport, Logistics, Vehicles & Equipment

Why fleet audits are essential

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number of municipal fleet depots around South Africa house old or disused, but possibly valuable, assets that are lying around and unproductively occupying space. It certainly sends out the wrong message about fleet management and is a waste of valuable resources. Although these vehicles may be standing or parked indefinitely, they could still be incurring hidden costs because they’re probably still on the municipal asset and insurance register. There is also a good chance that they have not been taken off the eNatis listing and are therefore still due for relicensing. Some fleet managers might have decided not to relicense because these vehicles are wrecks and out of service, but if they’re still on the system, they need to be officially scrapped. Otherwise, substantial arrears penalties will be incurred due to late licence disk renewals. Clearly, these problems need to be resolved.

My recommendation is for fleet managers to conduct regular inspections/audits. This will enable them to identify in- and out-of-ser vice vehicles, as well as their age, condition and mileage.

Best approach Cleaning house is the starting point for a formal system, which will ensure that fleet managers obtain the best utilisation and return on investment. The following are some recommended steps: • Star t by inspecting the fleet and recording its details. Preferably use a vehicle inspection application that enables fleet owners to photograph and record, in detail, a vehicle’s condition, including the validity of the licence, age and mileage. The details are stored online and immediately become available as par t of the fleet register. • Integrate the inspection report with the asset, fleet, insurance and eNatis

By Nigel Webb* registers and clean up the administration of these registers. • Identify those vehicles that should ideally be disposed of because of condition and age, and sell them through an auction process. • The detailed information will most certainly improve the quality of the fleet register and will facilitate future capex and opex forecasting models. Updated and accurate registers will enable fleet managers to maintain operating costs within budget and plan replacement cycles. Getting rid of the ‘scrap yard’ sends the right message that municipalities are running best-in-class fleet departments, with quality processes in place for ser vice deliver y. Depending on the fleet size, however, this can be an involved and lengthy process, which may require the ser vices of an external consultant or ser vice provider. *Nigel Webb is the owner of Latitude Fleet Services. IMIESA September 2018

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FREIGHT CARRIERS

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Transport, Logistics, Vehicles & Equipment

Portland and FAW strengthen ties

According to Nico Heyns, managing director, Portland, purchase price and quality of the backup service were important factors when purchasing vehicles for his fleet. He initially bought six FAW 28.380FTs equipped with flatdeck trailers as a trial and was impressed with the fuel consumption and affordable maintenance costs. “FAW’s warranty promise and level of service backup confirmed my decision – that’s why the entire fleet has been converted to the FAW brand exclusively,” Heyns explains.

A concrete product

FAW has strengthened its ties with Portland, a construction-related company with a fleet of 27 FAW trucks.

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ased in Cape Town, Portland is part of the Portland Group of companies, which primarily focuses on the construction industry. The company produces quality aggregates from the natural Malmesbury Hornfels deposits in its 65 ha quarry in Durbanville, and provides a range of concretes to large construction sites, shopping malls, office blocks, residential properties and lowcost housing projects.

In 2008, it expanded its operations to include manufacturing, installation and transport of precast hollow-core slabs, which it handles through its specialised Hollowcore® division. Today, the family business, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary in 2018, owns a total of 27 FAW trucks, each supplied with a full maintenance contract undertaken by FAW Cape Town. Portland recently took delivery of the first FAW 33.420FT in the city.

A long history Portland purchased its first fleet of FAW trucks some eight years ago, and is now on its third buying cycle with FAW. Apart from the quarry, Portland also runs a number of FAW 28.380FT 6x4 truck tractors with flat-deck trailers up and down the Cape Peninsula with payloads of up to 28 t, and GCM of around 63 t.

While most of Portland’s readymix vehicles do not drive long distances, the terrain in the company’s quarry is highly demanding, with steep, long inclines. The nature of the business – transporting concrete – means total vehicle breakdowns are completely out of the question. This is partly why Portland has adopted a strict truck renewal policy, which sees it trade in its trucks every three years for brand-new vehicles. This ensures maximum uptime is achieved. Truck maintenance is set at 300hour intervals, with the FAW trucks working 12 hours per day, five days a week. Apart from the full maintenance contracts, FAW Cape Town provides the company with an on-site technician to resolve minor electrical issues and other minor problems as they occur. A Chinese FAW delegation was also sent to South Africa to view Heyns’ vehicles and make technical changes as per his unique requirements. “They were able to change the wheelbase to ensure that no overloading is taking place, as per South African legislation. This is critical for us because our trucks cannot leave the quarry in an illegal or unroadworthy condition. “FAW is prepared to listen to us in order to solve our problems. We have given them input on the trucks and they have responded to this feedback positively,” says Heyns.

IMIESA September 2018

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82ND IMESA CONFERENCE

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Transport, Logistics, Vehicles & Equipment

Plant solutions for emerging contractors

S

anral and Bell Equipment Sales South Africa Limited have signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) that provides black-owned CIDB-graded contractors with a one-stop solution for finance, leasing and rental options, training and maintenance ser vices. “Our primar y objectives are to grow the construction and engineering sectors and attract new entrants, especially black contractors who can build businesses and create jobs,” says Skhumbuzo Macozoma, CEO, Sanral. To date, access to construction equipment has been identified as one of the biggest hurdles facing emerging contractors. Bell Equipment sees this as an opportunity to position itself as a road construction equipment supplier of choice. “This partnership with Sanral will enable us to grow our customer base and contribute greatly to the empowerment of emerging contractors in the industr y,” says Gar y Bell, chairman at Bell Equipment. Bell Equipment will also leverage its existing partnerships with the financial sector to give black-owned and -managed, CIDBgraded contractors access to financing.

Celebrating the MoU are Skhumbuzo Macozoma, CEO of Sanral (left), and Duncan Mashika, MD: Sales for South Africa at Bell Equipment

Macozoma says the cooperation with Bell Equipment is a “trailblazing step for the South African construction industry” and demonstrates Sanral’s resolve to use its contracting and procurement processes to facilitate the growth of emerging contractors. IMIESA September 2018

www.atlascopco.com

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Transport, Logistics, Vehicles & Equipment

Tough operator

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oosan’s latest-generation DISD SD310 wheel loader maintains its reputation for high-per formance and cost-efficient operation in the tough operating conditions typically found in the construction, quarr ying and allied industrial environments.

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IMIESA September 2018

The machine’s Tier II direct injection engine delivers 160 kW @ 2 000 rpm, with excellent fuel economy. High power and torque characteristics, coupled with efficient synchronisation of the drive train and hydraulic system, ensure optimum productivity, with engine temperature regulation provided by a high-efficiency cooling fan designed for increased air flow and reduced noise. For enhanced safety on-site, the machine’s new streamlined design has broadened the rear ward visual field by approximately 20%, while features for

Doosan’s SD310 wheel loader has an approximate operating weight of 17 300 kg and comes equipped with a 3 m³ bucket

enhanced operator control and greater comfort include a spacious, low-noise cab, with efficient air circulation and a newly designed instrument panel. Another plus is the advanced steering system, which has a 40-degree steering angle. Routine maintenance is facilitated by a 180-degree, side-opened panel, which provides a direct view for daily inspection procedures, while a full tilting engine cover enables easy access to the engine and components. For user convenience, brake discs can be replaced without disassembling the hub.


PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATES AECOM siphokuhle.dlamini@aecom.com Afri-Infra Group (Pty) Ltd banie@afri-infra.com AJ Broom Road Products ajbroom@icon.co.za ALULA (Pty) Ltd info@alulawater.co.za AQUADAM (Pty) Ltd sales@aquadam.co.za Arup SA candice.thorne@arup.com Aurecon Fani.Xaba@aurecongroup.com Aveng Manufacturing Infraset cgroenewald@infraset.com Averda claude.marais@averda.com Bigen Africa Group Holdings otto.scharfetter@bigenafrica.com BMK Group brian@bmkgroup.co.za Bosch Munitech info@boschmunitech.co.za Bosch Projects (Pty) Ltd mail@boschprojects.co.za BVI Consulting Engineers marketing@bviho.co.za Civilconsult Consulting Engineers mail@civilconsult.co.za Corrosion Institute of Southern Africa secretary@corrosioninstitute.org.za Development Bank of SA divb@dbsa.org.za DPI Plastics Farhana@dpiplastics.co.za EFG Engineers eric@efgeng.co.za Elster Kent Metering Leonardus.Basson@honeywell.com ERWAT mail@erwat.co.za Fibertex South Africa (Pty) Ltd rcl@fibertex.com GIBB yvanrooyen@gibb.co.za GIGSA secretary@gigsa.org GLS Consulting nicky@gls.co.za Gudunkomo Investments & Consulting info@gudunkomo.co.za Hatch Africa (Pty) Ltd info@hatch.co.za Henwood & Nxumalo Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd pmboffice@hn.co.za Herrenknecht schiewe.helene@herrenknecht.de Huber Technology cs@hubersa.com Hydro-comp Enterprises dan@edams.co.za I@Consulting louis_icon@mics.co.za INGEROP mravjee@ingerop.co.za Integrity Environment info@integrityafrica.co.za IQHINA Consulting Engineers & Project Managers info@iqhina.co.za iX engineers (Pty) Ltd hans.k@ixengineers.co.za JBFE Consulting (Pty) Ltd issie@jbfe.co.za JG Afrika DennyC@jgafrika.com KABE Consulting Engineers info@kabe.co.za Kago Consulting Engineers kagocon@kago.co.za Kantey & Templer (K&T) Consulting Engineers info@kanteys.co.za Kitso Botlhale Consulting Engineers zimema.jere@gmail.com Knowledge Base info@knowbase.co.za Lektratek Water general@lwt.co.za Lithon Project Consultants (Pty) Ltd info@lithon.com Makhaotse Narasimulu & Associates mmakhaotse@mna-sa.co.za Malani Padayachee & Associates (Pty) Ltd admin@mpa.co.za M & C Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd info@mcconsulting.co.za

Maragela Consulting Engineers admin@maragelaconsulting.co.za Marley Pipe Systems info@marleypipesystems.co.za Martin & East gbyron@martin-east.co.za Masithu Consulting & Project Management info@mcpm.co.za Mhiduve adminpotch@mhiduve.co.za Mogoba Maphuthi & Associates (Pty) Ltd admin@mmaholdings.co.za Moedi Wa Batho Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd info@wabatho.co.za Mott Macdonald Africa (Pty) Ltd johannesburg@mottmac.com Much Asphalt bennie.greyling@muchasphalt.com NAKO ILISO lyn.adams@nakogroup.com Nyeleti Consulting ppienaar@nyeleti.co.za Odour Engineering Systems mathewc@oes.co.za Pumptron info@pumptron.co.za Royal HaskoningDHV francisg@rhdv.com SABITA info@sabita.co.za SAFRIPOL mberry@safripol.com SALGA info@salga.org.za SAPPMA admin@sappma.co.za / willem@sappma.co.za SARF administrator@sarf.org.za.co.za SBS Water Systems mava@sbstanks.co.za Sembcorp Siza Water info-sizawater@sembcorp.com Sigodi Marah Martin Management Support lansanam@sigodimarah.co.za SiVEST SA garths@sivest.co.za Sizabantu Piping Systems (Pty) Ltd gregl@sizabantupipingsystems.com SKYV Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd kamesh@skyv.co.za SMEC capetown@smec.com SNA stolz.j@sna.co.za Sobek Engineering gen@sobek.co.za Southern African Society for Trenchless Technology director@sasst.org.za Southern Pipeline Contractors (Pty) Ltd spc@vinci-construction.com SRK Consulting jomar@srk.co.za STAR OF LIFE EMERGENCY TRADING CC admin@staroflife.co.za Syntell julia@syntell.co.za TECROVEER (Pty) Ltd info@tecroveer.co.za TPA Consulting roger@tpa.co.za Ulozolo Engineers CC admin@ulozolo.co.za UWP Consulting nonkululekos@uwp.co.za V3 Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd info@v3consulting.co.za Vetasi south-africa@vetasi.com VIP Consulting Engineers esme@vipconsulting.co.za VUKA Africa Consulting Engineers info@vukaafrica.co.za Water Institute of Southern Africa wisa@wisa.org.za WAM TECHNOLOGY CC support@wamsys.co.za Water Solutions Southern Africa ecoetzer@wssa.co.za Wilo South Africa marketingsa@wilo.co.za WRP ronniem@wrp.co.za WRNA washy@wrnyabeze.com WSP Group Africa sam.herman@wspgroup.co.za

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IMIESA September 2018

CS533E Durable vibration system - 3 000 hours maintenance intervals Dual propel pump system for excellent traction in all conditions and grade ability Comfortable operator station and intuitive controls Can be used in numerous compaction projects

ONL0Y00

R999

AT EXCL. V

CS533E

To buy yours today visit: www.barloworld-equipment.com or call 010 040 7338

BUILT FOR IT.

© 2018 Caterpillar. All Rights Reserved. CAT, CATERPILLAR, BUILT FOR IT, their respective logos, "Caterpillar Yellow", the "Power Edge" trade dress as well as corporate and product identity used herein, are trademarks of Caterpillar and may not be used without permission.


www.sizabantupipingsystems.com


IMIESA September 2018  

Critical information on infrastructure development, maintenance and service delivery. The official magazine of the Institute of Municipal En...

IMIESA September 2018  

Critical information on infrastructure development, maintenance and service delivery. The official magazine of the Institute of Municipal En...

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